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Sample records for online cone beam

  1. Online planning and delivery technique for radiotherapy of spinal metastases using cone-beam CT: Image quality and system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Letourneau, Daniel . E-mail: daniel.letourneau@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Wong, Rebecca; Moseley, Douglas; Sharpe, Michael B.; Ansell, Stephen B.Sc.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of an online strategy for palliative radiotherapy (RT) of spinal bone metastasis, which integrates imaging, planning, and treatment delivery in a single step at the treatment unit. The technical challenges of this approach include cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality for target definition, online planning, and efficient process integration. Methods and Materials: An integrated imaging, planning, and delivery system was constructed and tested with phantoms. The magnitude of CBCT image artifacts following the use of an antiscatter grid and a nonlinear scatter correction was quantified using phantom data and images of patients receiving conventional palliative RT of the spine. The efficacy of online planning was then assessed using corrected CBCT images. Testing of the complete process was performed on phantoms with assessment of timing and dosimetric accuracy. Results: The use of image corrections reduced the cupping artifact from 30% to 4.5% on CBCT images of a body phantom and improved the accuracy of CBCT numbers (water: {+-} 20 Hounsfield unit [HU], and lung and bone: to within {+-} 130 HU). Bony anatomy was clearly visible and was deemed sufficient for target definition. The mean total time (n = 5) for application of the online approach was 23.1 min. Image-guided dose placement was assessed using radiochromic film measurements with good agreement (within 5% of dose difference and 2 mm of distance to agreement). Conclusions: The technical feasibility of CBCT-guided online planning and delivery for palliative single treatment has been demonstrated. The process was performed in one session equivalent to an initial treatment slot (<30 min) with dosimetric accuracy satisfying accepted RT standards.

  2. SU-E-J-92: On-Line Cone Beam CT Based Planning for Emergency and Palliative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Held, M; Morin, O; Pouliot, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and develop the feasibility of on-line cone beam CT based planning for emergency and palliative radiotherapy treatments. Methods: Subsequent to phantom studies, a case library of 28 clinical megavoltage cone beam CT (MVCBCT) was built to assess dose-planning accuracies on MVCBCT for all anatomical sites. A simple emergency treatment plan was created on the MVCBCT and copied to its reference CT. The agreement between the dose distributions of each image pair was evaluated by the mean dose difference of the dose volume and the gamma index of the central 2D axial plane. An array of popular urgent and palliative cases was also evaluated for imaging component clearance and field-of-view. Results: The treatment cases were categorized into four groups (head and neck, thorax/spine, pelvis and extremities). Dose distributions for head and neck treatments were predicted accurately in all cases with a gamma index of >95% for 2% and 2 mm criteria. Thoracic spine treatments had a gamma index as low as 60% indicating a need for better uniformity correction and tissue density calibration. Small anatomy changes between CT and MVCBCT could contribute to local errors. Pelvis and sacral spine treatment cases had a gamma index between 90% and 98% for 3%/3 mm criteria. The limited FOV became an issue for large pelvis patients. Imaging clearance was difficult for cases where the tumor was positioned far off midline. Conclusion: The MVCBCT based dose planning and delivery approach is feasible in many treatment cases. Dose distributions for head and neck patients are unrestrictedly predictable. Some FOV restrictions apply to other treatment sites. Lung tissue is most challenging for accurate dose calculations given the current imaging filters and corrections. Additional clinical cases for extremities need to be included in the study to assess the full range of site-specific planning accuracies. This work is supported by Siemens.

  3. Dosimetric Impact of Online Correction via Cone-Beam CT-Based Image Guidance for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Galerani, Ana Paula; Grills, Inga; Hugo, Geoffrey; Kestin, Larry; Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Chao, K. Kenneth; Suen, Andrew; Martinez, Alvaro; Yan, Di

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of online cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guided correction in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty planning and 162 CBCT images from 20 patients undergoing lung SBRT were analyzed. The precorrection CBCT (CBCT after patient setup, no couch correction) was registered to planning CT using soft tissue; couch shift was applied, with a second CBCT for verification (postcorrection CBCT). Targets and normal structures were delineated on CBCTs: gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), cord, esophagus, lung, proximal bronchial tree, and aorta. Dose distributions on all organs manifested on each CBCT were compared with those planned on the CT. Results: Without CBCT guided target position correction, target dose reduced with respect to treatment plan. Mean and standard deviation of treatment dose discrepancy from the plan were -3.2% (4.9%), -2.1% (4.4%), -6.1% (10.7%), and -3.5% (7%) for GTV D{sub 99%}, GTV D{sub 95%}, CTV D{sub 99%}, and CTV D{sub 95%}, respectively. With CBCT correction, the results were -0.4% (2.6%), 0.1% (1.7%), -0.3% (4.2%), and 0.5% (3%). Mean and standard deviation of the difference in normal organ maximum dose were 2.2% (6.5%) before correction and 2.4% (5.9%) after correction for esophagus; 6.1% (14.1%) and 3.8% (8.1%) for cord; 3.1% (17.5%) and 6.2% (9.8%) for proximal bronchial tree; and 17.7% (19.5%) and 14.1% (17%) for aorta. Conclusion: Online CBCT guidance improves the accuracy of target dose delivery for lung SBRT. However, treatment dose to normal tissue can vary regardless of the correction. Normal tissues should be considered during target registration, according to target proximity.

  4. SU-E-J-47: Comparison of Online Image Registrations of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J; Shi, W; Andrews, D; Werner-Wasik, M; Yu, Y; Liu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To compare online image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam CT (CBCT) and BrainLab ExacTrac imaging systems. Methods Tests were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (Version 2.0), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (Version 6.0.5). The study was focused on comparing the online image registrations for translational shifts. A Rando head phantom was placed on treatment couch and immobilized with a BrainLab mask. The phantom was shifted by moving the couch translationally for 8 mm with a step size of 1 mm, in vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. At each location, the phantom was imaged with CBCT and ExacTrac x-ray. CBCT images were registered with TrueBeam and ExacTrac online registration algorithms, respectively. And ExacTrac x-ray image registrations were performed. Shifts calculated from different registrations were compared with nominal couch shifts. Results The averages and ranges of absolute differences between couch shifts and calculated phantom shifts obtained from ExacTrac x-ray registration, ExacTrac CBCT registration with default window, ExaxTrac CBCT registration with adjusted window (bone), Truebeam CBCT registration with bone window, and Truebeam CBCT registration with soft tissue window, were: 0.07 (0.02–0.14), 0.14 (0.01–0.35), 0.12 (0.02–0.28), 0.09 (0–0.20), and 0.06 (0–0.10) mm, in vertical direction; 0.06 (0.01–0.12), 0.27 (0.07–0.57), 0.23 (0.02–0.48), 0.04 (0–0.10), and 0.08 (0– 0.20) mm, in longitudinal direction; 0.05 (0.01–0.21), 0.35 (0.14–0.80), 0.25 (0.01–0.56), 0.19 (0–0.40), and 0.20 (0–0.40) mm, in lateral direction. Conclusion The shifts calculated from ExacTrac x-ray and TrueBeam CBCT registrations were close to each other (the differences between were less than 0.40 mm in any direction), and had better agreements with couch shifts than those from ExacTrac CBCT registrations. There were no significant differences between TrueBeam

  5. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  6. Monitoring tumor motion with on-line mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging in a cine mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Bodo; Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David S.; Miften, Moyed

    2008-02-01

    Accurate daily patient localization is becoming increasingly important in external-beam radiotherapy (RT). Mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) utilizing a therapy beam and an on-board electronic portal imager can be used to localize tumor volumes and verify the patient's position prior to treatment. MV-CBCT produces a static volumetric image and therefore can only account for inter-fractional changes. In this work, the feasibility of using the MV-CBCT raw data as a fluoroscopic series of portal images to monitor tumor changes due to e.g. respiratory motion was investigated. A method was developed to read and convert the CB raw data into a cine. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio on the MV-CB projection data, image post-processing with filtering techniques was investigated. Volumes of interest from the planning CT were projected onto the MV-cine. Because of the small exposure and the varying thickness of the patient depending on the projection angle, soft-tissue contrast was limited. Tumor visibility as a function of tumor size and projection angle was studied. The method was well suited in the upper chest, where motion of the tumor as well as of the diaphragm could be clearly seen. In the cases of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with medium or large tumor masses, we verified that the tumor mass was always located within the PTV despite respiratory motion. However for small tumors the method is less applicable, because the visibility of those targets becomes marginal. Evaluation of motion in non-superior-inferior directions might also be limited for small tumor masses. Viewing MV-CBCT data in a cine mode adds to the utility of MV-CBCT for verification of tumor motion and for deriving individualized treatment margins.

  7. Dosimetric Advantages of Four-Dimensional Adaptive Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Lung Tumors Using Online Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Harsolia, Asif; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Kestin, Larry L. Grills, Inga S.; Yan Di

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: This study compares multiple planning techniques designed to improve accuracy while allowing reduced planning target volume (PTV) margins though image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Free-breathing planning and 4D-CBCT scans were obtained in 8 patients with lung tumors. Four plans were generated for each patient: 3D-conformal, 4D-union, 4D-offline adaptive with a single correction (offline ART), and 4D-online adaptive with daily correction (online ART). For the 4D-union plan, the union of gross tumor volumes from all phases of the 4D-CBCT was created with a 5-mm expansion applied for setup uncertainty. For offline and online ART, the gross tumor volume was delineated at the mean position of tumor motion from the 4D-CBCT. The PTV margins were calculated from the random components of tumor motion and setup uncertainty. Results: Adaptive IGRT techniques provided better PTV coverage with less irradiated normal tissues. Compared with 3D plans, mean relative decreases in PTV volumes were 15%, 39%, and 44% using 4D-union, offline ART, and online ART planning techniques, respectively. This resulted in mean lung volume receiving {>=} 20Gy (V20) relative decreases of 21%, 23%, and 31% and mean lung dose relative decreases of 16%, 26%, and 31% for the 4D-union, 4D-offline ART, and 4D-online ART, respectively. Conclusions: Adaptive IGRT using CBCT is feasible for the treatment of patients with lung tumors and significantly decreases PTV volume and dose to normal tissues, allowing for the possibility of dose escalation. All analyzed 4D planning strategies resulted in improvements over 3D plans, with 4D-online ART appearing optimal.

  8. Panoramic cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Jenghwa; Zhou Lili; Wang Song; Clifford Chao, K. S.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the main imaging tool for image-guided radiotherapy but its functionality is limited by a small imaging volume and restricted image position (imaged at the central instead of the treatment position for peripheral lesions to avoid collisions). In this paper, the authors present the concept of ''panoramic CBCT,'' which can image patients at the treatment position with an imaging volume as large as practically needed. Methods: In this novel panoramic CBCT technique, the target is scanned sequentially from multiple view angles. For each view angle, a half scan (180 deg. + {theta}{sub cone} where {theta}{sub cone} is the cone angle) is performed with the imaging panel positioned in any location along the beam path. The panoramic projection images of all views for the same gantry angle are then stitched together with the direct image stitching method (i.e., according to the reported imaging position) and full-fan, half-scan CBCT reconstruction is performed using the stitched projection images. To validate this imaging technique, the authors simulated cone-beam projection images of the Mathematical Cardiac Torso (MCAT) thorax phantom for three panoramic views. Gaps, repeated/missing columns, and different exposure levels were introduced between adjacent views to simulate imperfect image stitching due to uncertainties in imaging position or output fluctuation. A modified simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (modified SART) was developed to reconstruct CBCT images directly from the stitched projection images. As a gold standard, full-fan, full-scan (360 deg. gantry rotation) CBCT reconstructions were also performed using projection images of one imaging panel large enough to encompass the target. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and geometric distortion were evaluated to quantify the quality of reconstructed images. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the effect of scattering on the image quality and

  9. Dosimetric Effect of Intrafraction Motion and Residual Setup Error for Hypofractionated Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Online Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Justus; Wu Qiuwen; Yan Di

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric effect and margins required to account for prostate intrafractional translation and residual setup error in a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Prostate position after online correction was measured during dose delivery using simultaneous kV fluoroscopy and posttreatment CBCT in 572 fractions to 30 patients. We reconstructed the dose distribution to the clinical tumor volume (CTV) using a convolution of the static dose with a probability density function (PDF) based on the kV fluoroscopy, and we calculated the minimum dose received by 99% of the CTV (D{sub 99}). We compared reconstructed doses when the convolution was performed per beam, per patient, and when the PDF was created using posttreatment CBCT. We determined the minimum axis-specific margins to limit CTV D{sub 99} reduction to 1%. Results: For 3-mm margins, D{sub 99} reduction was {<=}5% for 29/30 patients. Using post-CBCT rather than localizations at treatment delivery exaggerated dosimetric effects by {approx}47%, while there was no such bias between the dose convolved with a beam-specific and patient-specific PDF. After eight fractions, final cumulative D{sub 99} could be predicted with a root mean square error of <1%. For 90% of patients, the required margins were {<=}2, 4, and 3 mm, with 70%, 40%, and 33% of patients requiring no right-left (RL), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior margins, respectively. Conclusions: For protocols with CBCT guidance, RL, AP, and SI margins of 2, 4, and 3 mm are sufficient to account for translational errors; however, the large variation in patient-specific margins suggests that adaptive management may be beneficial.

  10. On-Line Use of Three-Dimensional Marker Trajectory Estimation From Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Projections for Precise Setup in Radiotherapy for Targets With Respiratory Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Worm, Esben S.; Hoyer, Morten; Fledelius, Walther; Nielsen, Jens E.; Larsen, Lars P.; Poulsen, Per R.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate accurate and objective on-line patient setup based on a novel semiautomatic technique in which three-dimensional marker trajectories were estimated from two-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections. Methods and Materials: Seven treatment courses of stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver tumors were delivered in 21 fractions in total to 6 patients by a linear accelerator. Each patient had two to three gold markers implanted close to the tumors. Before treatment, a CBCT scan with approximately 675 two-dimensional projections was acquired during a full gantry rotation. The marker positions were segmented in each projection. From this, the three-dimensional marker trajectories were estimated using a probability based method. The required couch shifts for patient setup were calculated from the mean marker positions along the trajectories. A motion phantom moving with known tumor trajectories was used to examine the accuracy of the method. Trajectory-based setup was retrospectively used off-line for the first five treatment courses (15 fractions) and on-line for the last two treatment courses (6 fractions). Automatic marker segmentation was compared with manual segmentation. The trajectory-based setup was compared with setup based on conventional CBCT guidance on the markers (first 15 fractions). Results: Phantom measurements showed that trajectory-based estimation of the mean marker position was accurate within 0.3 mm. The on-line trajectory-based patient setup was performed within approximately 5 minutes. The automatic marker segmentation agreed with manual segmentation within 0.36 {+-} 0.50 pixels (mean {+-} SD; pixel size, 0.26 mm in isocenter). The accuracy of conventional volumetric CBCT guidance was compromised by motion smearing ({<=}21 mm) that induced an absolute three-dimensional setup error of 1.6 {+-} 0.9 mm (maximum, 3.2) relative to trajectory-based setup. Conclusions: The first on-line clinical use of

  11. Tilted cone beam VCT reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jiang; Tang, Xiangyang

    2005-04-01

    Reconstruction algorithms for volumetric CT have been the focus of many studies. Several exact and approximate reconstruction algorithms have been proposed for step-and-shoot and helical scanning trajectories to combat cone beam related artifacts. In this paper, we present a closed form cone beam reconstruction formula for tilted gantry data acquisition. Although several algorithms were proposed to compensate for errors induced by the gantry tilt, none of the algorithms addresses the case in which the cone beam geometry is first rebinned to a set of parallel beams prior to the filtered backprojection. Because of the rebinning process, the amount of iso-center adjustment depends not only on the projection angle and tilt angle, but also on the reconstructed pixel location. The proposed algorithm has been tested extensively on both 16 and 64 slice VCT with phantoms and clinical data. The efficacy of the algorithm is clearly demonstrated by the experiments.

  12. Funnel cone for focusing intense ion beams on a target

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.

    2009-10-05

    We describe a funnel cone for concentrating an ion beam on a target. The cone utilizes the reflection characteristic of ion beams on solid walls to focus the incident beam andincrease beam intensity on target. The cone has been modeled with the TRIM code. A prototype has been tested and installed for use in the 350-keV K+ NDCX target chamber.

  13. Correction for 'artificial' electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung.

    PubMed

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Wang, An; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J

    2013-06-21

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (-1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  14. Correction for ‘artificial’ electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Wang, An; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J.

    2013-06-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (-1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  15. Comparison of Localization Performance with Implanted Fiducial Markers and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for On-line Image-Guided Radiotherapy of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Douglas J; White, Elizabeth A; Wiltshire, Kirsty L; Rosewall, Tara; Sharpe, Michael B; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles N; Jaffray, David A

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To assess the accuracy of kV cone-beam CT (CBCT) based setup corrections as compared to orthogonal MV portal image-based corrections for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy of the prostate. Method and Materials Daily cone-beam CT volumetric images were acquired after setup for patients with three intra-prostatic fiducial markers. The estimated couch shifts were compared retrospectively to patient adjustments based on two orthogonal MV portal images (the current clinical standard of care in our institution). The CBCT soft-tissue based shifts were also estimated by digitally removing the gold markers in each projection to suppress the artifacts in the reconstructed volumes. A total of 256 volumetric images for 15 patients were analyzed. Results The Pearson coefficient of correlation for the patient position shifts using fiducial markers in MV vs kV was (R2 = 0.95, 0.84, 0.81) in the L/R, A/P and S/I directions respectively. The correlation using soft-tissue matching was ((R2 = 0.90, 0.49, 0.51) in the L/R, A/P and S/I directions. A Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant trends in the data. The percentage of shifts within a +/−3mm tolerance (the clinical action level) was (99.7, 95.5, 91.3) for fiducial marker matching and (99.5, 70.3, 78.4) for soft-tissue matching. Conclusions Cone-beam CT is an accurate and precise tool for image-guidance. It provides an equivalent means of patient setup correction for prostate patients with implanted gold fiducial markers. Use of the additional information provided by the visualization of soft-tissue structures is an active area of research. PMID:17293243

  16. Comparison of localization performance with implanted fiducial markers and cone-beam computed tomography for on-line image-guided radiotherapy of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, Douglas J. . E-mail: douglas.moseley@rmp.uhn.on.ca; White, Elizabeth A.; Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Rosewall, Tara; Sharpe, Michael B.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles N.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to assess the accuracy of kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based setup corrections as compared with orthogonal megavoltage (MV) portal image-based corrections for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Daily cone-beam CT volumetric images were acquired after setup for patients with three intraprostatic fiducial markers. The estimated couch shifts were compared retrospectively to patient adjustments based on two orthogonal MV portal images (the current clinical standard of care in our institution). The CBCT soft-tissue based shifts were also estimated by digitally removing the gold markers in each projection to suppress the artifacts in the reconstructed volumes. A total of 256 volumetric images for 15 patients were analyzed. Results: The Pearson coefficient of correlation for the patient position shifts using fiducial markers in MV vs. kV was (R{sup 2} = 0.95, 0.84, 0.81) in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions, respectively. The correlation using soft-tissue matching was as follows: R{sup 2} = 0.90, 0.49, 0.51 in the LR, AP and SI directions. A Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant trends in the data. The percentage of shifts within a {+-}3-mm tolerance (the clinical action level) was 99.7%, 95.5%, 91.3% for fiducial marker matching and 99.5%, 70.3%, 78.4% for soft-tissue matching. Conclusions: Cone-beam CT is an accurate and precise tool for image guidance. It provides an equivalent means of patient setup correction for prostate patients with implanted gold fiducial markers. Use of the additional information provided by the visualization of soft-tissue structures is an active area of research.

  17. Dedicated Cone-Beam CT System for Extremity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Al Muhit, Abdullah; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Stayman, J. Webster; Packard, Nathan; Senn, Robert; Yang, Dong; Foos, David H.; Yorkston, John; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide initial assessment of image quality and dose for a cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) scanner dedicated to extremity imaging. Materials and Methods A prototype cone-beam CT scanner has been developed for imaging the extremities, including the weight-bearing lower extremities. Initial technical assessment included evaluation of radiation dose measured as a function of kilovolt peak and tube output (in milliampere seconds), contrast resolution assessed in terms of the signal difference–to-noise ratio (SDNR), spatial resolution semiquantitatively assessed by using a line-pair module from a phantom, and qualitative evaluation of cadaver images for potential diagnostic value and image artifacts by an expert CT observer (musculoskeletal radiologist). Results The dose for a nominal scan protocol (80 kVp, 108 mAs) was 9 mGy (absolute dose measured at the center of a CT dose index phantom). SDNR was maximized with the 80-kVp scan technique, and contrast resolution was sufficient for visualization of muscle, fat, ligaments and/or tendons, cartilage joint space, and bone. Spatial resolution in the axial plane exceeded 15 line pairs per centimeter. Streaks associated with x-ray scatter (in thicker regions of the patient—eg, the knee), beam hardening (about cortical bone—eg, the femoral shaft), and cone-beam artifacts (at joint space surfaces oriented along the scanning plane—eg, the interphalangeal joints) presented a slight impediment to visualization. Cadaver images (elbow, hand, knee, and foot) demonstrated excellent visibility of bone detail and good soft-tissue visibility suitable to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal indications. Conclusion A dedicated extremity cone-beam CT scanner capable of imaging upper and lower extremities (including weight-bearing examinations) provides sufficient image quality and favorable dose characteristics to warrant further evaluation for clinical use. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for

  18. Cone beam computed tomography use in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Nervina, J M

    2012-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used by orthodontists to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) images of their patients. This is of value as malocclusion results from discrepancies in three planes of space. This review tracks the use of CBCT in orthodontics, from its validation as an accurate and reliable tool, to its use in diagnosing and treatment planning, and in assessing treatment outcomes in orthodontics.

  19. Cone Beam Computed Tomography - Know its Secrets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mohan; Shanavas, Muhammad; Sidappa, Ashwin; Kiran, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an advanced imaging modality that has high clinical applications in the field of dentistry. CBCT proved to be a successful investigative modality that has been used for dental and maxillofacial imaging. Radiation exposure dose from CBCT is 10 times less than from conventional CT scans during maxillofacial exposure. Furthermore, CBCT is highly accurate and can provide a three-dimensional volumetric data in axial, sagittal and coronal planes. This article describes the basic technique, difference in CBCT from CT and main clinical applications of CBCT. PMID:25859112

  20. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillo-facial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontics. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice.

  1. Accuracy of Ultrasound-Based Image Guidance for Daily Positioning of the Upper Abdomen: An Online Comparison With Cone Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit Mennemeyer, Philipp; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Riesenacker, Nadja; Kuepper, Beate; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy can improve protection of organs at risk when large abdominal target volumes are irradiated. We estimated the daily positioning accuracy of ultrasound-based image guidance for abdominal target volumes by a direct comparison of daily imaging obtained with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Daily positioning (n = 83 positionings) of 15 patients was completed by using ultrasound guidance after an initial CBCT was obtained. Residual error after ultrasound was estimated by comparison with a second CBCT. Ultrasound image quality was visually rated using a scale of 1 to 4. Results: Of 15 patients, 7 patients had good sonographic imaging quality, 5 patients had satisfactory sonographic quality, and 3 patients were excluded because of unsatisfactory sonographic quality. When image quality was good, residual errors after ultrasound were -0.1 {+-} 3.11 mm in the x direction (left-right; group systematic error M = -0.09 mm; standard deviation [SD] of systematic error, {sigma} = 1.37 mm; SD of the random error, {sigma} = 2.99 mm), 0.93 {+-} 4.31 mm in the y direction (superior-inferior, M = 1.12 mm; {sigma} = 2.96 mm; {sigma} = 3.39 mm), and 0.71 {+-} 3.15 mm in the z direction (anteroposterior; M = 1.01 mm; {sigma} = 2.46 mm; {sigma} = 2.24 mm). For patients with satisfactory image quality, residual error after ultrasound was -0.6 {+-} 5.26 mm in the x (M = 0.07 mm; {sigma} = 5.67 mm; {sigma} = 4.86 mm), 1.76 {+-} 4.92 mm in the y (M = 3.54 mm; {sigma} = 4.1 mm; {sigma} = 5.29 mm), and 1.19 {+-} 4.75 mm in the z (M = 0.82 mm; {sigma} = 2.86 mm; {sigma} = 3.05 mm) directions. Conclusions: In patients from whom good sonographic image quality could be obtained, ultrasound improved daily positioning accuracy. In the case of satisfactory image quality, ultrasound guidance improved accuracy compared to that of skin marks only minimally. If sonographic image quality was unsatisfactory, daily CBCT

  2. Pulsar average waveforms and hollow cone beam models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of pulsar average waveforms at radio frequencies from 40 MHz to 15 GHz is presented. The analysis is based on the hypothesis that the observer sees one cut of a hollow-cone beam pattern and that stationary properties of the emission vary over the cone. The distributions of apparent cone widths for different observed forms of the average pulse profiles (single, double/unresolved, double/resolved, triple and multiple) are in modest agreement with a model of a circular hollow-cone beam with random observer-spin axis orientation, a random cone axis-spin axis alignment, and a small range of physical hollow-cone parameters for all objects.

  3. Generalized Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Jiang, Dazong; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    The cone-beam reconstruction theory has been proposed by Kirillov in 1961, Tuy in 1983, Feldkamp in 1984, Smith in 1985, Pierre Grangeat in 1990. The Fourier slice theorem is proposed by Bracewell 1956, which leads to the Fourier image reconstruction method for parallel-beam geometry. The Fourier slice theorem is extended to fan-beam geometry by Zhao in 1993 and 1995. By combining the above mentioned cone-beam image reconstruction theory and the above mentioned Fourier slice theory of fan-beam geometry, the Fourier slice theorem in cone-beam geometry is proposed by Zhao 1995 in short conference publication. This article offers the details of the derivation and implementation of this Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam geometry. Especially the problem of the reconstruction from Fourier domain has been overcome, which is that the value of in the origin of Fourier space is 0/0. The 0/0 type of limit is proper handled. As examples, the implementation results for the single circle and two perpendicular circle source orbits are shown. In the cone-beam reconstruction if a interpolation process is considered, the number of the calculations for the generalized Fourier slice theorem algorithm is O(N^4), which is close to the filtered back-projection method, here N is the image size of 1-dimension. However the interpolation process can be avoid, in that case the number of the calculations is O(N5).

  4. Pulsar average wave forms and hollow-cone beam models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulsar wave forms have been analyzed from observations conducted over a wide radio-frequency range to assess the wave-form morphologies and to measure wave-form widths. The results of the analysis compare favorably with the predictions of a model with a hollow-cone beam of fixed dimensions and with random orientation of both the observer and the cone axis with respect to the pulsar spin axis. A class of three-component wave forms is included in the model by adding a central pencil beam to the hollow-cone hypothesis. The consequences of a number of discrepancies between observations and quantitative predictions of the model are discussed.

  5. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, B. R. B.; Ding, G. X.; Kramer, R.; Kawrakow, I.

    2009-07-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12x0.12x0.12 cm{sup 3}, with 17x17x17 {mu}m{sup 3} microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens ({approx}8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only {approx}50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment.

  6. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  7. Concrescence: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Imaging Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Alluri, LeelaSubhashini Choudary; Mallela, Dhiraj

    2016-01-01

    Concrescence is a form of twinning, formed by the confluence of cementum of two teeth at the root level. The diagnosis of concrescence has largely relied on the conventional 2D imaging. The 2D imaging has inherent limitations such as distortion and superimposition. Cone-Beam CT eliminates these limitations. The aim of this article was to describe a case of dental abnormality using Cone-Beam CT imaging modality. Volumetric data demonstrated confluence of left mandibular third molar with a paramolar, a supernumerary tooth. To our knowledge, this is the second case in the dental literature reported demonstrating the use of Cone-Beam CT in the diagnosis of concrescence. PMID:27800194

  8. [Accurate 3D free-form registration between fan-beam CT and cone-beam CT].

    PubMed

    Liang, Yueqiang; Xu, Hongbing; Li, Baosheng; Li, Hongsheng; Yang, Fujun

    2012-06-01

    Because the X-ray scatters, the CT numbers in cone-beam CT cannot exactly correspond to the electron densities. This, therefore, results in registration error when the intensity-based registration algorithm is used to register planning fan-beam CT and cone-beam CT. In order to reduce the registration error, we have developed an accurate gradient-based registration algorithm. The gradient-based deformable registration problem is described as a minimization of energy functional. Through the calculus of variations and Gauss-Seidel finite difference method, we derived the iterative formula of the deformable registration. The algorithm was implemented by GPU through OpenCL framework, with which the registration time was greatly reduced. Our experimental results showed that the proposed gradient-based registration algorithm could register more accurately the clinical cone-beam CT and fan-beam CT images compared with the intensity-based algorithm. The GPU-accelerated algorithm meets the real-time requirement in the online adaptive radiotherapy.

  9. Cone-beam image reconstruction using spherical harmonics.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, K; Zeng, G L; Gullberg, G T

    2001-06-01

    Image reconstruction from cone-beam projections is required for both x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Grangeat's algorithm accurately performs cone-beam reconstruction provided that Tuy's data sufficiency condition is satisfied and projections are complete. The algorithm consists of three stages: (a) Forming weighted plane integrals by calculating the line integrals on the cone-beam detector, and obtaining the first derivative of the plane integrals (3D Radon transform) by taking the derivative of the weighted plane integrals. (b) Rebinning the data and calculating the second derivative with respect to the normal to the plane. (c) Reconstructing the image using the 3D Radon backprojection. A new method for implementing the first stage of Grangeat's algorithm was developed using spherical harmonics. The method assumes that the detector is large enough to image the whole object without truncation. Computer simulations show that if the trajectory of the cone vertex satisfies Tuy's data sufficiency condition, the proposed algorithm provides an exact reconstruction.

  10. Use of cone beam computed tomography in otolaryngologic treatments.

    PubMed

    Cakli, Hamdi; Cingi, Cemal; Ay, Yazgi; Oghan, Fatih; Ozer, Torun; Kaya, Ercan

    2012-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) allows us to evaluate 3-dimensional (3D) morphology of the maxillofacial skeleton and also used in dentomaxillofacial imaging to solve complex diagnostic and treatment planning problems such as craniofacial fractures, temporamandibular dysfunctions or sinus imaging. CBCT uses a rectangular or round 2D detector, which allows a single rotation of the gantry to generate a scan of the entire region of interest. Technological and application-specific factors such as development of compact, relatively low-cost, high-quality, large, flat-panel detector arrays; the availability of low-cost computers with processing power sufficient for cone beam image reconstruction; the fabrication of highly efficient radiograph tubes capable of multiple exposures necessary for cone beam scanning at prices lower than those currently used for fan beam CT; and limited volume scanning (e.g., head and neck) eliminating the need for subsecond gantry rotation speeds make this possible. The objective of this study is to review published evidence for CBCT having an important role in ORL treatments. We aimed to review all the available literature about the CBCT imagination in ORL treatments. Systematic literature search was performed using PubMed and Ovid. Additional literature was retrieved from reference lists in the articles. Systematic analysis of the literature from 1998 to 2010 was performed. A total of 40 abstracts were evaluated independently by two members of the project group, and 38 articles were included in the review.

  11. The frequency split method for helical cone-beam reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shechter, G; Köhler, Th; Altman, A; Proksa, R

    2004-08-01

    A new approximate method for the utilization of redundant data in helical cone-beam CT is presented. It is based on the observation that the original WEDGE method provides excellent image quality if only little more than 180 degrees data are used for back-projection, and that significant low-frequency artifacts appear if a larger amount of redundant data are used. This degradation is compensated by the frequency split method: The low-frequency part of the image is reconstructed using little more than 180 degrees of data, while the high frequency part is reconstructed using all data. The resulting algorithm shows no cone-beam artifacts in a simulation of a 64-row scanner. It is further shown that the frequency split method hardly degrades the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images and that it behaves robustly in the presence of motion.

  12. A Clinical Evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-31

    multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography in the assessment of dental implant site dimensions. Dentomaxillofac Radiol 2011;40:67-75...submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontics Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences...in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science in Oral Biology June 2013 Naval Postgraduate Dental

  13. Cone beam CT in orthodontics: the current picture.

    PubMed

    Makdissi, Jimmy

    2013-03-01

    The introduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology to dentistry and orthodontics revolutionized the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of orthodontic patients. This review article discusses the use of CBCT in diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. The steps required to install and operate a CBCT facility within the orthodontic practice as well as the challenges are highlighted. The available guidelines in relation to the clinical applications of CBCT in orthodontics are explored.

  14. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics.

  15. Cone Beam Computed Tomography for the Implant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Angelopoulos, Christos; Aghaloo, Tara

    2017-01-01

    Cone beam CT scanning has brought a new dimension to dentistry for the implant patient. In all aspects of diagnosis, treatment planning, surgical preparation and execution, follow-up, and management of complications, we now can treat our patients with increased precision and predictability. However, as with all new technology, we must consider the added cost to the overall treatment and the risks vs. benefits to each individual patient. PMID:21094723

  16. Orthogonal-rotating tetrahedral scanning for cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ivan B.; Wang, Ge

    2012-10-01

    In this article, a cone-beam CT scanning mode is designed assuming four x-ray sources and a spherical sample. The x-ray sources are mounted at the vertices of a regular tetrahedron. On the circumsphere of the tetrahedron, four detection panels are mounted opposite to each vertex. To avoid x-ray interference, the largest half angle of each x-ray cone beam is 27°22', while the radius of the largest ball fully covered by all the cone beams is 0.460, when the radius of the circumsphere is 1. Several scanning schemes are proposed which consist of two rotations about orthogonal axes, such that each quarter turn provides sufficient data for theoretically exact and stable reconstruction. This design can be used in biomedical or industrial settings, such as when a sequence of reconstructions of an object is desired. Similar scanning schemes based on other regular or irregular polyhedra and various rotation speeds are also discussed.

  17. Cone beam 3D reconstruction with double circular trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Rizo, P. CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 . Lab. d'Electronique et de Technologie de l'Informatique); Grangeat, P.; Sire, P.; Lemasson, P. . Lab. d'Electronique et de Technologie de l'Informatique); Delageniere, S. )

    1990-11-01

    In x-ray cone beam tomography the only planar source trajectory which do not produce incomplete data is the infinite line. This kind of source trajectory is not experimentally doable. To ensure a complete data acquisition with cone beam radiographs, a set of non planar trajectory has been studied. Among the trajectories proposed in the literature a simple one is the set of 2 circular trajectories with intersection of the two circular trajectories with intersection of the two trajectory axis. The angle between the two axis is related to the maximum aperture of the cone beam. We propose here an exact method to perform this reconstruction using the 3D radon transform of the object. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of this algorithm remain identical to the MTF on the central slice of reconstruction with single circular trajectory. The density relative mean square error stays within 2% for an aperture of {plus minus}30{degree}. With single circular trajectory the relative mean square error may reach 20% at the same aperture. With double circular trajectory, horizontal artifacts are almost suppressed. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  18. A One-Step Cone-Beam CT-Enabled Planning-to-Treatment Model for Palliative Radiotherapy-From Development to Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Letourneau, Daniel; Varma, Anita; Bissonnette, Jean Pierre; Fitzpatrick, David; Grabarz, Daniel; Elder, Christine; Martin, Melanie; Bezjak, Andrea; Panzarella, Tony; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Jaffray, David A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a cone-beam computed tomography (CT)-enabled one-step simulation-to-treatment process for the treatment of bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A three-phase prospective study was conducted. Patients requiring palliative radiotherapy to the spine, mediastinum, or abdomen/pelvis suitable for treatment with simple beam geometry ({<=}2 beams) were accrued. Phase A established the accuracy of cone-beam CT images for the purpose of gross tumor target volume (GTV) definition. Phase B evaluated the feasibility of implementing the cone-beam CT-enabled planning process at the treatment unit. Phase C evaluated the online cone-beam CT-enabled process for the planning and treatment of patients requiring radiotherapy for bone metastases. Results: Eighty-four patients participated in this study. Phase A (n = 9) established the adequacy of cone-beam CT images for target definition. Phase B (n = 45) established the quality of treatment plans to be adequate for clinical implementation for bone metastases. When the process was applied clinically in bone metastases (Phase C), the degree of overlap between planning computed tomography (PCT) and cone-beam CT for GTV and between PCT and cone-beam CT for treatment field was 82% {+-} 11% and 97% {+-} 4%, respectively. The oncologist's decision to accept the plan under a time-pressured environment remained of high quality, with the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivering at least 90% of the prescribed dose to 100% {+-} 0% of the cone-beam CT planning target volume (PTV). With the assumption that the PCT PTV is the gold-standard target, the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivered at least 90% and at least 95% of dose to 98% {+-} 2% and 97% {+-} 5% of the PCT PTV, respectively. The mean time for the online planning and treatment process was 32.7 {+-} 4.0 minutes. Patient satisfaction was high, with a trend for superior satisfaction with the cone-beam CT-enabled process. Conclusions: The cone-beam CT

  19. Commissioning kilovoltage cone-beam CT beams in a radiation therapy treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Alaei, Parham; Spezi, Emiliano

    2012-11-08

    The feasibility of accounting of the dose from kilovoltage cone-beam CT in treatment planning has been discussed previously for a single cone-beam CT (CBCT) beam from one manufacturer. Modeling the beams and computing the dose from the full set of beams produced by a kilovoltage cone-beam CT system requires extensive beam data collection and verification, and is the purpose of this work. The beams generated by Elekta X-ray volume imaging (XVI) kilovoltage CBCT (kV CBCT) system for various cassettes and filters have been modeled in the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) and used to compute dose to stack and anthropomorphic phantoms. The results were then compared to measurements made using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The agreement between modeled and measured depth-dose and cross profiles is within 2% at depths beyond 1 cm for depth-dose curves, and for regions within the beam (excluding penumbra) for cross profiles. The agreements between TPS-calculated doses, TLD measurements, and Monte Carlo simulations are generally within 5% in the stack phantom and 10% in the anthropomorphic phantom, with larger variations observed for some of the measurement/calculation points. Dose computation using modeled beams is reasonably accurate, except for regions that include bony anatomy. Inclusion of this dose in treatment plans can lead to more accurate dose prediction, especially when the doses to organs at risk are of importance.

  20. Comparative analysis between mandibular positions in centric relation and maximum intercuspation by cone beam computed tomography (CONE-BEAM).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Amanda de Freitas; Henriques, João César Guimarães; Almeida, Guilherme Araújo; Machado, Asbel Rodrigues; Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Fernandes Neto, Alfredo Júlio

    2009-01-01

    This research consisted of a quantitative assessment, and aimed to measure the possible discrepancies between the maxillomandibular positions for centric relation (CR) and maximum intercuspation (MI), using computed tomography volumetric cone beam (cone beam method). The sample of the study consisted of 10 asymptomatic young adult patients divided into two types of standard occlusion: normal occlusion and Angle Class I occlusion. In order to obtain the centric relation, a JIG device and mandible manipulation were used to deprogram the habitual conditions of the jaw. The evaluations were conducted in both frontal and lateral tomographic images, showing the condyle/articular fossa relation. The images were processed in the software included in the NewTom 3G device (QR NNT software version 2.00), and 8 tomographic images were obtained per patient, four laterally and four frontally exhibiting the TMA's (in CR and MI, on both sides, right and left). By means of tools included in another software, linear and angular measurements were performed and statistically analyzed by student t test. According to the methodology and the analysis performed in asymptomatic patients, it was not possible to detect statistically significant differences between the positions of centric relation and maximum intercuspation. However, the resources of cone beam tomography are of extreme relevance to the completion of further studies that use heterogeneous groups of samples in order to compare the results.

  1. Fundamentals of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist.

    PubMed

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R B

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, also referred to as C-arm computed tomography [CT], cone beam volume CT, or flat panel CT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray CT where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone.[1] CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution in images of high diagnostic quality, with short scanning times (10-70 s) and radiation dosages reportedly up to 15-100 times lower than those of conventional CT scans. Increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. The aim of this article is to sensitize the Prosthodontist to CBCT technology, provide an overview of currently available maxillofacial CBCT systems and review the specific application of various CBCT display modes to clinical Prosthodontic practice. A MEDLINE search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled.

  2. Fundamentals of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    PubMed Central

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, also referred to as C-arm computed tomography [CT], cone beam volume CT, or flat panel CT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray CT where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone.[1] CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution in images of high diagnostic quality, with short scanning times (10–70 s) and radiation dosages reportedly up to 15–100 times lower than those of conventional CT scans. Increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. The aim of this article is to sensitize the Prosthodontist to CBCT technology, provide an overview of currently available maxillofacial CBCT systems and review the specific application of various CBCT display modes to clinical Prosthodontic practice. A MEDLINE search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled. PMID:26929479

  3. Achromatic vector vortex beams from a glass cone

    PubMed Central

    Radwell, N.; Hawley, R. D.; Götte, J. B.; Franke-Arnold, S.

    2016-01-01

    The reflection of light is governed by the laws first described by Augustin-Jean Fresnel: on internal reflection, light acquires a phase shift, which depends on its polarization direction with respect to the plane of incidence. For a conical reflector, the cylindrical symmetry is echoed in an angular variation of this phase shift, allowing us to create light modes with phase and polarization singularities. Here we observe the phase and polarization profiles of light that is back reflected from a solid glass cone and, in the case of circular input light, discover that not only does the beam contain orbital angular momentum but can trivially be converted to a radially polarized beam. Importantly, the Fresnel coefficients are reasonably stable across the visible spectrum, which we demonstrate by measuring white light polarization profiles. This discovery provides a highly cost-effective technique for the generation of broadband orbital angular momentum and radially polarized beams. PMID:26861191

  4. Superior performance of cone beam tomography in detecting a calcaneus fracture.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Christian; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Regier, Marc; Heiland, Max

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography is a state-of-the-art imaging tool, initially developed for dental and maxillofacial application. With its high resolution and low radiation dose, cone beam tomography has been expanding its application fields, for example, to diagnosis of traumata and fractures in the head and neck area. In this study, we demonstrate superior and satisfactory performance of cone beam tomography for the imaging of a calcaneus fracture in comparison to conventional X-ray and computed tomography.

  5. Rapidly converging multigrid reconstruction of cone-beam tomographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Glenn R.; Kingston, Andrew M.; Latham, Shane J.; Recur, Benoit; Li, Thomas; Turner, Michael L.; Beeching, Levi; Sheppard, Adrian P.

    2016-10-01

    In the context of large-angle cone-beam tomography (CBCT), we present a practical iterative reconstruction (IR) scheme designed for rapid convergence as required for large datasets. The robustness of the reconstruction is provided by the "space-filling" source trajectory along which the experimental data is collected. The speed of convergence is achieved by leveraging the highly isotropic nature of this trajectory to design an approximate deconvolution filter that serves as a pre-conditioner in a multi-grid scheme. We demonstrate this IR scheme for CBCT and compare convergence to that of more traditional techniques.

  6. Auto calibration of a cone-beam-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Daniel; Heil, Ulrich; Schulze, Ralf; Schoemer, Elmar; Schwanecke, Ulrich

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a novel autocalibration method for cone-beam-CTs (CBCT) or flat-panel CTs, assuming a perfect rotation. The method is based on ellipse-fitting. Autocalibration refers to accurate recovery of the geometric alignment of a CBCT device from projection images alone, without any manual measurements. Methods: The authors use test objects containing small arbitrarily positioned radio-opaque markers. No information regarding the relative positions of the markers is used. In practice, the authors use three to eight metal ball bearings (diameter of 1 mm), e.g., positioned roughly in a vertical line such that their projection image curves on the detector preferably form large ellipses over the circular orbit. From this ellipse-to-curve mapping and also from its inversion the authors derive an explicit formula. Nonlinear optimization based on this mapping enables them to determine the six relevant parameters of the system up to the device rotation angle, which is sufficient to define the geometry of a CBCT-machine assuming a perfect rotational movement. These parameters also include out-of-plane rotations. The authors evaluate their method by simulation based on data used in two similar approaches [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, 'Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,' Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242-3266 (2004); K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, 'A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,' Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695-1706 (2006)]. This allows a direct comparison of accuracy. Furthermore, the authors present real-world 3D reconstructions of a dry human spine segment and an electronic device. The reconstructions were computed from projections taken with a commercial dental CBCT device having two different focus-to-detector distances that were both calibrated with their method. The authors compare their reconstruction with a reconstruction computed by the manufacturer of the CBCT device to

  7. Cone beam geometry for small objects in phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, P.; Louis, A. K.

    2013-09-01

    Phase contrast tomography has developed rapidly within the last ten years. The new method enables the reconstruction of the refraction index in addition to the attenuation coefficient and can therefore be very well applied to samples which are only weakly absorbing. First studies in phase contract tomography were done using synchrotron devices which are modeled by the so-called parallel geometry. Samples studied so far are special foams and fiber materials, see Cloetens et al (1999 App. Phys. Lett. 75 2912-4), which give almost no contrast due to absorption but provide excellent images in phase contrast. Recently tubes were successfully applied to a variety of applications. These laboratory devices no longer fulfil the requirement of a parallel geometry but need to be treated as a fan/cone beam geometry. In this paper we derive a mathematical model for cone beam geometry in phase contrast tomography in two and three dimensions for objects small compared to the two distances of object to detector and x-ray source to object. All approximations needed are analyzed and an efficient reconstruction method providing both phase and absorption in a single step is derived, based on the method by Louis and Maaß (1990 Inverse Problems 6 427-39). The reconstruction method is successfully tested using numerical examples with simulated phantom data.

  8. Incidental Findings on Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veeratrishul; Vincent, Steven D.; Hellstein, John W.; Qian, Fang; Smoker, Wendy R. K.; Ruprecht, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained widespread acceptance in dentistry for a variety of applications. Most dentists who are not radiologists/trained in radiology are generally not familiar with interpretation of anatomical structures and/or pathosis outside their area of primary interest, as often this was not within the scope of their training. Objectives. To assess that the number of incidental findings on a CBCT scan is high both within and outside of the primary area of interest, thereby emphasizing the importance of interpretation of all areas visualized on the scan. Materials and Methods. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist reviewed 1000 CBCT scans (382 males and 618 females) for findings both in- and outside the area of interest. Results. Of the 1000 subjects that were reviewed, 943 scans showed findings in the primary regions of interest and/or outside the regions of interest, and 76 different conditions were visualized in these scans both in and outside the areas of interest. Conclusion. From the wide scope of findings noted on these scans, it can be concluded that it is essential that a person trained in advanced interpretation techniques in radiology interprets cone beam computed tomography scans. PMID:23304148

  9. A unified framework for exact cone-beam reconstruction formulas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiying; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, we present concise proofs of several recently developed exact cone-beam reconstruction methods in the Tuy inversion framework, including both filtered-backprojection and backprojection-filtration formulas in the cases of standard spiral, nonstandard spiral, and more general scanning loci. While a similar proof of the Katsevich formula was previously reported, we present a new proof of the Zou and Pan backprojection-filtration formula. Our proof combines both odd and even data extensions so that only the cone-beam transform itself is utilized in the backprojection-filtration inversion. More importantly, our formulation is valid for general smooth scanning curves, in agreement with an earlier paper from our group [Ye, Zhao, Yu, and Wang, Proc. SPIE 5535, 293-300 (Aug. 6 2004)]. As a consequence of that proof, we obtain a new inversion formula, which is in a two-dimensional filtering backprojection format. A possibility for generalization of the Katsevich filtered-backprojection reconstruction method is also discussed from the viewpoint of this framework.

  10. A curve-filtered FDK (C-FDK) reconstruction algorithm for circular cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Xing, Yuxiang; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Li; Kang, Kejun

    2011-01-01

    Circular cone-beam CT is one of the most popular configurations in both medical and industrial applications. The FDK algorithm is the most popular method for circular cone-beam CT. However, with increasing cone-angle the cone-beam artifacts associated with the FDK algorithm deteriorate because the circular trajectory does not satisfy the data sufficiency condition. Along with an experimental evaluation and verification, this paper proposed a curve-filtered FDK (C-FDK) algorithm. First, cone-parallel projections are rebinned from the native cone-beam geometry in two separate directions. C-FDK rebins and filters projections along different curves from T-FDK in the centrally virtual detector plane. Then, numerical experiments are done to validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm by comparing with both FDK and T-FDK reconstruction. Without any other extra trajectories supplemental to the circular orbit, C-FDK has a visible image quality improvement.

  11. Handling data redundancy in helical cone beam reconstruction with a cone-angle-based window function and its asymptotic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiangyang; Hsieh Jiang

    2007-06-15

    A cone-angle-based window function is defined in this manuscript for image reconstruction using helical cone beam filtered backprojection (CB-FBP) algorithms. Rather than defining the window boundaries in a two-dimensional detector acquiring projection data for computed tomographic imaging, the cone-angle-based window function deals with data redundancy by selecting rays with the smallest cone angle relative to the reconstruction plane. To be computationally efficient, an asymptotic approximation of the cone-angle-based window function is also given and analyzed in this paper. The benefit of using such an asymptotic approximation also includes the avoidance of functional discontinuities that cause artifacts in reconstructed tomographic images. The cone-angle-based window function and its asymptotic approximation provide a way, equivalent to the Tam-Danielsson-window, for helical CB-FBP reconstruction algorithms to deal with data redundancy, regardless of where the helical pitch is constant or dynamically variable during a scan. By taking the cone-parallel geometry as an example, a computer simulation study is conducted to evaluate the proposed window function and its asymptotic approximation for helical CB-FBP reconstruction algorithm to handle data redundancy. The computer simulated Forbild head and thorax phantoms are utilized in the performance evaluation, showing that the proposed cone-angle-based window function and its asymptotic approximation can deal with data redundancy very well in cone beam image reconstruction from projection data acquired along helical source trajectories. Moreover, a numerical study carried out in this paper reveals that the proposed cone-angle-based window function is actually equivalent to the Tam-Danielsson-window, and rigorous mathematical proofs are being investigated.

  12. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2014-01-01

    Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis. PMID:24729729

  13. Reduction of beam hardening artifacts in cone-beam CT imaging via SMART-RECON algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    When an automatic exposure control is introduced in C-arm cone beam CT data acquisition, the spectral inconsistencies between acquired projection data are exacerbated. As a result, conventional water/bone correction schemes are not as effective as in conventional diagnostic x-ray CT acquisitions with a fixed tube potential. In this paper, a new method was proposed to reconstruct several images with different degrees of spectral consistency and thus different levels of beam hardening artifacts. The new method relies neither on prior knowledge of the x-ray beam spectrum nor on prior compositional information of the imaging object. Numerical simulations were used to validate the algorithm.

  14. Experience of direct percutaneous sac injection in type II endoleak using cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoong-Seok; Do, Young Soo; Park, Hong Suk; Park, Kwang Bo; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2015-04-01

    Cone beam CT, usually used in dental area, could easily obtain 3-dimensional images using cone beam shaped ionized radiation. Cone beam CT is very useful for direct percutaneous sac injection (DPSI) which needs very precise measurement to avoid puncture of inferior vena cava or vessel around sac or stent graft. Here we describe two cases of DPSI using cone beam CT. In case 1, a 79-year-old male had widening of preexisted type II endoleak after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). However, transarterial embolization failed due to tortuous collateral branches of lumbar arteries. In case 2, a 72-year-old female had symptomatic sac enlargement by type II endoleak after EVAR. However, there was no route to approach the lumbar arteries. Therefore, we performed DPSI assisted by cone beam CT in cases 1, 2. Six-month CT follow-up revealed no sign of sac enlargement by type II endoleak.

  15. Applications of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    PubMed Central

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R. B.

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray computed tomography where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. The increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. This article is intended to elaborate and enunciate on the various applications and benefits of CBCT, in the realm of maxillofacial prosthodontics, over and beyond its obvious benefits in the rehabilitation of patients with implants. With the onus of meticulous reconstruction of near ideal occlusion resting on the prosthodontist, CBCT provides a unique imaging option, which can be a boon in various aspects of prosthodontic practice – from imaging of the temporomandibular joint for accurate movement simulation, to template assisted maxillofacial reconstruction or even over denture therapy. CBCT could play a crucial role in lessening the burden of a hectic prosthodontic routine for the clinician and critically contribute to accurate and effective treatment for the patient. Apart from the authors’ clinical experiences shared here, a web-based search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was also conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled. PMID:27134420

  16. Applications of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist.

    PubMed

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R B

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray computed tomography where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. The increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. This article is intended to elaborate and enunciate on the various applications and benefits of CBCT, in the realm of maxillofacial prosthodontics, over and beyond its obvious benefits in the rehabilitation of patients with implants. With the onus of meticulous reconstruction of near ideal occlusion resting on the prosthodontist, CBCT provides a unique imaging option, which can be a boon in various aspects of prosthodontic practice - from imaging of the temporomandibular joint for accurate movement simulation, to template assisted maxillofacial reconstruction or even over denture therapy. CBCT could play a crucial role in lessening the burden of a hectic prosthodontic routine for the clinician and critically contribute to accurate and effective treatment for the patient. Apart from the authors' clinical experiences shared here, a web-based search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was also conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled.

  17. Quality control and patient dosimetry in dental cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, J; Stoyanov, D

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the initial experience in performing quality control and patient dose measurements in a cone beam computed tomography (CT) scanner (ILUMA Ultra, IMTEC Imaging, USA) for oral and maxillofacial radiology. The X-ray tube and the generator were tested first, including the kVp accuracy and precision, and the half-value layer (HVL). The following tests specific for panoramic dental systems were also performed: tube output, beam size and beam alignment to the detector. The tests specific for CT included measurements of noise and CT numbers in water and in air, as well as the homogeneity of CT numbers. The most appropriate dose quantity was found to be the air kerma-area product (KAP) measured with a KAP-metre installed at the tube exit. KAP values were found to vary from 110 to 185 microGy m(2) for available adult protocols and to be 54 microGy m(2) for the paediatric protocol. The effective dose calculated with the software PCXMC (STUK, Finland) was 0.05 mSv for children and 0.09-0.16 mSv for adults.

  18. Cone beam CT: a current overview of devices.

    PubMed

    Nemtoi, A; Czink, C; Haba, D; Gahleitner, A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review and compare the properties of all the available cone beam CT (CBCT) devices offered on the market, while focusing especially on Europe. In this study, we included all the different commonly used CBCT devices currently available on the European market. Information about the properties of each device was obtained from the manufacturers' official available data, which was later confirmed by their representatives in cases where it was necessary. The main features of a total of 47 CBCT devices that are currently marketed by 20 companies were presented, compared and discussed in this study. All these CBCT devices differ in specific properties according to the companies that produce them. The summarized technical data from a large number of CBCT devices currently on the market offer a wide range of imaging possibilities in the oral and maxillofacial region.

  19. Fossa navicularis magna detection on cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mupparapu, Mel

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report and discuss the detection of fossa navicularis magna, a close radiographic anatomic variant of canalis basilaris medianus of the basiocciput, as an incidental finding in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The CBCT data of the patients in question were referred for the evaluation of implant sites and to rule out pathology in the maxilla and mandible. CBCT analysis showed osseous, notch-like defects on the inferior aspect of the clivus in all four cases. The appearance of fossa navicularis magna varied among the cases. In some, it was completely within the basiocciput and mimicked a small rounded, corticated, lytic defect, whereas it appeared as a notch in others. Fossa navicularis magna is an anatomical variant that occurs on the inferior aspect of the clivus. The pertinent literature on the anatomical variations occurring in this region was reviewed. PMID:27051639

  20. Cone beam CT: a current overview of devices

    PubMed Central

    Nemtoi, A; Czink, C; Haba, D; Gahleitner, A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review and compare the properties of all the available cone beam CT (CBCT) devices offered on the market, while focusing especially on Europe. In this study, we included all the different commonly used CBCT devices currently available on the European market. Information about the properties of each device was obtained from the manufacturers’ official available data, which was later confirmed by their representatives in cases where it was necessary. The main features of a total of 47 CBCT devices that are currently marketed by 20 companies were presented, compared and discussed in this study. All these CBCT devices differ in specific properties according to the companies that produce them. The summarized technical data from a large number of CBCT devices currently on the market offer a wide range of imaging possibilities in the oral and maxillofacial region. PMID:23818529

  1. Iodine contrast cone beam CT imaging of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partain, Larry; Prionas, Stavros; Seppi, Edward; Virshup, Gary; Roos, Gerhard; Sutherland, Robert; Boone, John

    2007-03-01

    An iodine contrast agent, in conjunction with an X-ray cone beam CT imaging system, was used to clearly image three, biopsy verified, cancer lesions in two patients. The lesions were approximately in the 10 mm to 6 mm diameter range. Additional regions were also enhanced with approximate dimensions down to 1 mm or less in diameter. A flat panel detector, with 194 μm pixels in 2 x 2 binning mode, was used to obtain 500 projection images at 30 fps with an 80 kVp X-ray system operating at 112 mAs, for an 8-9 mGy dose - equivalent to two view mammography for these women. The patients were positioned prone, while the gantry rotated in the horizontal plane around the uncompressed, pendant breasts. This gantry rotated 360 degrees during the patient's 16.6 sec breath hold. A volume of 100 cc of 320 mg/ml iodine-contrast was power injected at 4 cc/sec, via catheter into the arm vein of the patient. The resulting 512 x 512 x 300 cone beam CT data set of Feldkamp reconstructed ~(0.3 mm) 3 voxels were analyzed. An interval of voxel contrast values, characteristic of the regions with iodine contrast enhancement, were used with surface rendering to clearly identify up to a total of 13 highlighted volumes. This included the three largest lesions, that were previously biopsied and confirmed to be malignant. The other ten highlighted regions, of smaller diameters, are likely areas of increased contrast trapping unrelated to cancer angiogenesis. However the technique itself is capable of resolving lesions that small.

  2. TH-A-18C-06: A Scatter Elimination Scheme for Cone Beam CT Using An Oscillating Narrow Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, H; Folkerts, M; Jia, X; Jiang, S; Xu, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: While cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used in image guided radiation therapy, its low image quality, primarily caused by scattered x-rays, hinders advanced clinical applications, e.g., CBCT based on-line adaptive re-planning. We propose in this abstract a new scheme called oscillating narrow beam CBCT (ONB-CBCT) to eliminate scatter signals. Methods: ONB-CBCT consists of two major components. 1) Oscillating narrow beam (ONB) scan and 2) partitioned flat panel containing multiple individual detector strips and their own readouts. Both the beam oscillation and detector partition are along the superior-inferior (SI) direction. During data acquisition, at a given projection, the narrow beam sweep through the detector region, and different portions of the detector acquires projection data in synchrony with the narrow beam. ONB can be generated by a rotating slit collimator design with conventional tube with single focal spot, or by directly using a new source with multiple focal spots. A proof-of-principle study via Monte Carlo simulation is conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of ONB-CBCT. Results: As the beam becomes narrower, more and more scatter signals are eliminated. For the case with a bowtie filter and using 15 ONBs, the maximum and the average intensity error due to scatter are below 20 and 10 HU, respectively. Conclusion: ONB yields a narrowed exposure field at each snapshot and hence an inherently negligible scatter effect. Meanwhile, the individualized detector units guarantee high frame rate detection and hence a same large volume coverage as that in conventional CBCT. In summary, ONB-CBCT is a promising design to achieve high-quality CBCT imaging. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01)

  3. Current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Seok; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Kwon, Ho-Beom

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to review the current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods An online PubMed search was performed to identify studies on caries research using CBCT. Results Despite its usefulness, there were inherent limitations in the detection of caries lesions through conventional radiograph mainly due to the two-dimensional (2D) representation of caries lesions. Several efforts were made to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) image of lesion, only to gain little popularity. Recently, CBCT was introduced and has been used for diagnosis of caries in several reports. Some of them maintained the superiority of CBCT systems, however it is still under controversies. Conclusion The CBCT systems are promising, however they should not be considered as a primary choice of caries diagnosis in everyday practice yet. Further studies under more standardized condition should be performed in the near future. PMID:21977474

  4. Filtered region of interest cone-beam rotational angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, Sebastian; Noeel, Peter B.; Walczak, Alan M.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam rotational angiography (CBRA) is widely used in the modern clinical settings. In a number of procedures, the area of interest is often considerably smaller than the field of view (FOV) of the detector, subjecting the patient to potentially unnecessary x-ray dose. The authors therefore propose a filter-based method to reduce the dose in the regions of low interest, while supplying high image quality in the region of interest (ROI). Methods: For such procedures, the authors propose a method of filtered region of interest (FROI)-CBRA. In the authors' approach, a gadolinium filter with a circular central opening is placed into the x-ray beam during image acquisition. The central region is imaged with high contrast, while peripheral regions are subjected to a substantial lower intensity and dose through beam filtering. The resulting images contain a high contrast/intensity ROI, as well as a low contrast/intensity peripheral region, and a transition region in between. To equalize the two regions' intensities, the first projection of the acquisition is performed with and without the filter in place. The equalization relationship, based on Beer's law, is established through linear regression using corresponding filtered and nonfiltered data. The transition region is equalized based on radial profiles. Results: Evaluations in 2D and 3D show no visible difference between conventional FROI-CBRA projection images and reconstructions in the ROI. CNR evaluations show similar image quality in the ROI, with a reduced CNR in the reconstructed peripheral region. In all filtered projection images, the scatter fraction inside the ROI was reduced. Theoretical and experimental dose evaluations show a considerable dose reduction; using a ROI half the original FOV reduces the dose by 60% for the filter thickness of 1.29 mm. Conclusions: These results indicate the potential of FROI-CBRA to reduce the dose to the patient while supplying the physician with the desired

  5. Practical patient dosimetry for partial rotation cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Podnieks, E C; Negus, I S

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This work investigates the validity of estimating effective dose for cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures from the weighted CT dose index (CTDIW) and irradiated length. Methods Measurements were made within cylindrical poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) phantoms measuring 14 cm and 28 cm in length and 32 cm in diameter for the 200° DynaCT acquisition on the Siemens Artis zee fluoroscopy unit (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). An interpolated average dose was calculated to account for the partial rotation. Organ and effective doses were estimated by modelling projections in the Monte Carlo software programme PCXMC (STUK, Helsinki, Finland). Results The CTDIW was found to closely approximate the interpolated average dose if the positions of the measured doses reflected the X-ray beam rotation. The average dose was found to increase by 8% when the phantom length was increased from 14 to 28 cm. Using the interpolated average dose and the irradiated length for effective dose calculations gave similar values to PCXMC when a double-length (28-cm) CT dose index phantom was irradiated. Simplifying the estimation of effective dose with PCXMC by modelling just 4 projections around the abdomen gave effective doses that were only 7% different to those given when 41 projections were modelled. Calculated doses to key organs within the beam varied by as much as 27%. Conclusion Estimating effective dose from the CTDIW and the irradiated length is sufficiently accurate for CBCT if the chamber positions are considered carefully. A conversion factor can be used only if a single CT dose index phantom is available. The estimation of organ doses requires a large number of modelled projections in PCXMC. PMID:21304011

  6. Is there a role for the use of volumetric cone beam computed tomography in periodontics?

    PubMed

    du Bois, A H; Kardachi, B; Bartold, P M

    2012-03-01

    Volumetric computed cone beam tomography offers a number of significant advantages over conventional intraoral and extraoral panoramic radiography, as well as computed tomography. To date, periodontal diagnosis has relied heavily on the assessment of both intraoral radiographs and extraoral panoramic radiographs. With emerging technology in radiology there has been considerable interest in the role that volumetric cone beam computed tomography might play in periodontal diagnostics. This narrative reviews the current evidence and considers whether there is a role for volumetric cone beam computed tomography in periodontics.

  7. Performance studies of four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-10-01

    Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has been proposed to characterize the breathing motion of tumors before radiotherapy treatment. However, when the acquired cone beam projection data are retrospectively gated into several respiratory phases, the available data to reconstruct each phase is under-sampled and thus causes streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images. To solve the under-sampling problem and improve image quality in 4DCBCT, various methods have been developed. This paper presents performance studies of three different 4DCBCT methods based on different reconstruction algorithms. The aims of this paper are to study (1) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the data acquisition time of a 4DCBCT scan and (2) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the number of phase bins used to sort projection data. These aims will be applied to three different 4DCBCT methods: conventional filtered backprojection reconstruction (FBP), FBP with McKinnon-Bates correction (MB) and prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) reconstruction. A hybrid phantom consisting of realistic chest anatomy and a moving elliptical object with known 3D motion trajectories was constructed by superimposing the analytical projection data of the moving object to the simulated projection data from a chest CT volume dataset. CBCT scans with gantry rotation times from 1 to 4 min were simulated, and the generated projection data were sorted into 5, 10 and 20 phase bins before different methods were used to reconstruct 4D images. The motion trajectories of the moving object were extracted using a fast free-form deformable registration algorithm. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of the extracted motion trajectories were evaluated for all simulated cases to quantitatively study the performance. The results demonstrate (1) longer acquisition times result in more accurate motion delineation

  8. Dose calculation using megavoltage cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, Olivier . E-mail: Morin@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Chen, Josephine; Aubin, Michele; Gillis, Amy; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Bose, Supratik; Chen Hong; Descovich, Martina; Xia Ping; Pouliot, Jean

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of performing dose calculation on megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) of head-and-neck patients in order to track the dosimetric errors produced by anatomic changes. Methods and Materials: A simple geometric model was developed using a head-size water cylinder to correct an observed cupping artifact occurring with MVCBCT. The uniformity-corrected MVCBCT was calibrated for physical density. Beam arrangements and weights from the initial treatment plans defined using the conventional CT were applied to the MVCBCT image, and the dose distribution was recalculated. The dosimetric inaccuracies caused by the cupping artifact were evaluated on the water phantom images. An ideal test patient with no observable anatomic changes and a patient imaged with both CT and MVCBCT before and after considerable weight loss were used to clinically validate MVCBCT for dose calculation and to determine the dosimetric impact of large anatomic changes. Results: The nonuniformity of a head-size water phantom ({approx}30%) causes a dosimetric error of less than 5%. The uniformity correction method developed greatly reduces the cupping artifact, resulting in dosimetric inaccuracies of less than 1%. For the clinical cases, the agreement between the dose distributions calculated using MVCBCT and CT was better than 3% and 3 mm where all tissue was encompassed within the MVCBCT. Dose-volume histograms from the dose calculations on CT and MVCBCT were in excellent agreement. Conclusion: MVCBCT can be used to estimate the dosimetric impact of changing anatomy on several structures in the head-and-neck region.

  9. Effective doses from cone beam CT investigation of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J; Johnson, B; Drage, NA

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the study was to calculate the effective dose delivered to the patient undergoing cone beam (CB) CT of the jaws and maxillofacial complex using the i-CAT Next Generation CBCT scanner (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA). Methods A RANDO® phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) containing thermoluminence dosemeters were scanned 10 times for each of the 6 imaging protocols. Effective doses for each protocol were calculated using the 1990 and approved 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended tissue weighting factors (E1990, E2007). Results The effective dose for E1990 and E2007, respectively, were: full field of view (FOV) of the head, 47 μSv and 78 μSv; 13 cm scan of the jaws, 44 μSv and 77 μSv; 6 cm standard mandible, 35 μSv and 58 μSv; 6 cm high resolution mandible, 69 μSv and 113 μSv; 6 cm standard maxilla, 18 μSv and 32 μSv; and 6 cm high resolution maxilla, 35 μSv and 60 μSv. Conclusions Using the new generation of CBCT scanner, the effective dose is lower than the original generation machine for a similar FOV using the ICRP 2007 tissue weighting factors. PMID:22184626

  10. Forensic imaging of projectiles using cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    von See, Constantin; Bormann, Kai-Hendrik; Schumann, Paul; Goetz, Friedrich; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Rücker, Martin

    2009-09-10

    In patients with gunshot injuries, it is easy to detect a projectile within the body due to the high-density of the object, but artefacts make it difficult to obtain information about the deformation and the exact location of the projectile in surrounding tissues. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new radiological imaging modality that allows radio-opaque objects to be localised and assessed in three dimensions. The full potential of the use of CBCT in forensic medicine has not yet been explored. In this study, three different modern projectiles were fired into the heads of pig cadavers (n=6) under standardised conditions. Tissue destruction and the location of the projectiles were analysed separately using CBCT and multi-slice computed tomography (MDCT). The projectiles had the same kinetic energy but showed considerable differences in deformation behaviour. Within the study groups, tissue destruction was reproducible. CBCT is less severely affected by metallic artefacts than MDCT. Therefore CBCT is superior in visualising bone destruction in the immediate vicinity of the projectile and projectile deformation, whereas MDCT allows soft tissue to be evaluated in more detail. CBCT is an improved diagnostic tool for the evaluation of gunshot injuries. In particular, it is superior to MDCT in detecting structural hard-tissue damage in the immediate vicinity of high-density metal projectiles and in identifying the precise location of a projectile in the body.

  11. Use of cone beam computed tomography in periodontology.

    PubMed

    Acar, Buket; Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç

    2014-05-28

    Diagnosis of periodontal disease mainly depends on clinical signs and symptoms. However, in the case of bone destruction, radiographs are valuable diagnostic tools as an adjunct to the clinical examination. Two dimensional periapical and panoramic radiographs are routinely used for diagnosing periodontal bone levels. In two dimensional imaging, evaluation of bone craters, lamina dura and periodontal bone level is limited by projection geometry and superpositions of adjacent anatomical structures. Those limitations of 2D radiographs can be eliminated by three-dimensional imaging techniques such as computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) generates 3D volumetric images and is also commonly used in dentistry. All CBCT units provide axial, coronal and sagittal multi-planar reconstructed images without magnification. Also, panoramic images without distortion and magnification can be generated with curved planar reformation. CBCT displays 3D images that are necessary for the diagnosis of intra bony defects, furcation involvements and buccal/lingual bone destructions. CBCT applications provide obvious benefits in periodontics, however; it should be used only in correct indications considering the necessity and the potential hazards of the examination.

  12. Cone beam CT tumor vasculature dynamic study (Murine model)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Ricardo, Betancourt; Liu, Shaohua

    2008-03-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is the process by which new blood vessels are formed from the existing vessels in a tumor to promote tumor growth. Tumor angiogenesis has important implications in the diagnosis and treatment of various solid tumors. Flat panel detector based cone beam CT opens up a new way for detection of tumors, and tumor angiogenesis associated with functional CBCT has the potential to provide more information than traditional functional CT due to more overall coverage during the same scanning period and the reconstruction being isotropic resulting in a more accurate 3D volume intensity measurement. A functional study was conducted by using CBCT to determine the degree of the enhancement within the tumor after injecting the contrast agent intravenously. For typical doses of contrast material, the amount of enhancement is proportional to the concentration of this material within the region of interest. A series of images obtained at one location over time allows generation of time-attenuation data from which a number of semi-quantitative parameters, such as enhancement rate, can be determined. An in vivo mice study with and without mammo tumor was conducted on our prototype CBCT system, and half scan scheme is used to determine the time-intensity curve within the VOI of the mouse. The CBCT has an x-ray tube, a gantry with slip ring technology, and a 40×30 cm Varian Paxscan 4030CB real time FPD.

  13. Image quality of flat-panel cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Georg; Wiegert, Jens; Schaefer, Dirk; Fiedler, Klaus; Conrads, Norbert; Timmer, Jan; Rasche, Volker; Noordhoek, Niels; Klotz, Erhard; Koppe, Reiner

    2003-06-01

    We present results on 3D image quality in terms of spatial resolution (MTF) and low contrast detectability, obtained on a flat dynamic X-ray detector (FD) based cone-beam CT (CB-CT) setup. Experiments have been performed on a high precision bench-top system with rotating object table, fixed X-ray tube and 176 x 176 mm2 active detector area (Trixell Pixium 4800). Several objects, including CT performance-, MTF- and pelvis phantoms, have been scanned under various conditions, including a high dose setup in order to explore the 3D performance limits. Under these optimal conditions, the system is capable of resolving less than 1% (~10 HU) contrast in a water background. Within a pelvis phantom, even inserts of muscle and fat equivalent are clearly distinguishable. This also holds for fast acquisitions of up to 40 fps. Focusing on the spatial resolution, we obtain an almost isotropic three-dimensional resolution of up to 30 lp/cm at 10% modulation.

  14. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Bifid Mandibular Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Khojastepour, Leila; Kolahi, Shirin; Panahi, Nazi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Differential diagnosis of bifid mandibular condyle (BMC) is important, since it may play a role in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunctions and joint symptoms. In addition, radiographic appearance of BMC may mimic tumors and/or fractures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and orientation of BMC based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on CBCT scans of paranasal sinuses of 425 patients. In a designated NNT station, all CBCT scans were evaluated in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes to find the frequency of BMC. The condylar head horizontal angulations were also determined in the transverse plane. T-test was used to compare the frequency of BMC between the left and right sides and between males and females. Results: Totally, 309 patients with acceptable visibility of condyles on CBCT scans were entered in the study consisting of 170 (55%) females and 139 (45%) males with a mean age of 39.43±9.7 years. The BMC was detected in 14 cases (4.53%). Differences between males and females, sides and horizontal angulations of condyle of normal and BMC cases were not significant. Conclusion: The prevalence of BMC in the studied population was 4.53%. No significant difference was observed between males and females, sides or horizontal angulations of the involved and uninvolved condyles. PMID:27559345

  15. Use of dentomaxillofacial cone beam computed tomography in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was developed and introduced specifically for dento-maxillofacial imaging. CBCT possesses a number of advantages over medical CT in clinical practice, such as lower effective radiation doses, lower costs, fewer space requirements, easier image acquisition, and interactive display modes such as mutiplanar reconstruction that are applicable to maxillofacial imaging. However, the disadvantages of CBCT include higher doses than two-dimensional imaging; the inability to accurately represent the internal structure of soft tissues and soft-tissue lesions; a limited correlation with Hounsfield Units for standardized quantification of bone density; and the presence of various types of image artifacts, mainly those produced by metal restorations. CBCT is now commonly used for a variety of purposes in oral implantology, dento-maxillofacial surgery, image-guided surgical procedures, endodontics, periodontics and orthodontics. CBCT applications provide obvious benefits in the assessment of dentomaxillofacial region, however; it should be used only in correct indications considering the necessity and the potential hazards of the examination. PMID:26120381

  16. Cone beam CT for dental and maxillofacial imaging: dose matters.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ruben

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in dentistry has led to increasing concern regarding justification and optimisation of CBCT exposures. When used as a substitute to multidetector CT (MDCT), CBCT can lead to significant dose reduction; however, low-dose protocols of current-generation MDCTs show that there is an overlap between CBCT and MDCT doses. More importantly, although the 3D information provided by CBCT can often lead to improved diagnosis and treatment compared with 2D radiographs, a routine or excessive use of CBCT would lead to a substantial increase of the collective patient dose. The potential use of CBCT for paediatric patients (e.g. developmental disorders, trauma and orthodontic treatment planning) further increases concern regarding its proper application. This paper provides an overview of justification and optimisation issues in dental and maxillofacial CBCT. The radiation dose in CBCT will be briefly reviewed. The European Commission's Evidence Based Guidelines prepared by the SEDENTEXCT Project Consortium will be summarised, and (in)appropriate use of CBCT will be illustrated for various dental applications.

  17. Streak artifact reduction in cardiac cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shechter, Gilad; Naveh, Galit; Lessick, Jonathan; Altman, Ami

    2005-04-01

    Cone beam reconstructed cardiac CT images suffer from characteristic streak artifacts that affect the quality of coronary artery imaging. These artifacts arise from inhomogeneous distribution of noise. While in non-tagged reconstruction inhomogeneity of noise distribution is mainly due to anisotropy of the attenuation of the scanned object (e.g. shoulders), in cardiac imaging it is largely influenced by the non-uniform distribution of the acquired data used for reconstructing the heart at a given phase. We use a cardiac adaptive filter to reduce these streaks. In difference to previous methods of adaptive filtering that locally smooth data points on the basis of their attenuation values, our filter is applied as a function of the noise distribution of the data as it is used in the phase selective reconstruction. We have reconstructed trans-axial images without adaptive filtering, with a regular adaptive filter and with the cardiac adaptive filter. With the cardiac adaptive filter significant reduction of streaks is achieved, and thus image quality is improved. The coronary vessel is much more pronounced in the cardiac adaptive filtered images, in slab MIP the main coronary artery branches are more visible, and non-calcified plaque is better differentiated from vessel wall. This improvement is accomplished without altering significantly the border definition of calcified plaques.

  18. FFT and cone-beam CT reconstruction on graphics hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Després, Philippe; Sun, Mingshan; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Prevrhal, Sven

    2007-03-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) are increasingly used for general purpose calculations. Their pipelined architecture can be exploited to accelerate various parallelizable algorithms. Medical imaging applications are inherently well suited to benefit from the development of GPU-based computational platforms. We evaluate in this work the potential of GPUs to improve the execution speed of two common medical imaging tasks, namely Fourier transforms and tomographic reconstructions. A two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm was GPU-implemented and compared, in terms of execution speed, to two popular CPU-based FFT routines. Similarly, the Feldkamp, David and Kress (FDK) algorithm for cone-beam tomographic reconstruction was implemented on the GPU and its performance compared to a CPU version. Different reconstruction strategies were employed to assess the performance of various GPU memory layouts. For the specific hardware used, GPU implementations of the FFT were up to 20 times faster than their CPU counterparts, but slower than highly optimized CPU versions of the algorithm. Tomographic reconstructions were faster on the GPU by a factor up to 30, allowing 256 3 voxel reconstructions of 256 projections in about 20 seconds. Overall, GPUs are an attractive alternative to other imaging-dedicated computing hardware like application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) in terms of cost, simplicity and versatility. With the development of simpler language extensions and programming interfaces, GPUs are likely to become essential tools in medical imaging.

  19. Intracranial physiological calcifications evaluated with cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Sedghizadeh, P P; Nguyen, M; Enciso, R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate cone beam CT (CBCT) scans for the presence of physiological and pathological intracranial calcifications. Methods CBCT scans from male and female patients that met our ascertainment criteria were evaluated retrospectively (n = 500) for the presence of either physiological or pathological intracranial calcifications. Results Out of the 500 patients evaluated, 176 had evidence of intracranial physiological calcification (35.2% prevalence), and none had evidence of pathological calcification. There was a 3:2 male-to-female ratio and no ethnic predilection; the ages of affected patients ranged from 13 years to 82 years with a mean age of 52 years. The majority of calcifications appeared in the pineal/habenular region (80%), with some also appearing in the choroid plexus region bilaterally (12%), and a smaller subset appearing in the petroclinoid ligament region bilaterally (8%). Conclusions Intracranial physiological calcifications can be a common finding on CBCT scans, whereas pathological intracranial calcifications are rare. PMID:22842632

  20. Noise suppression in scatter correction for cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Wang, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Scatter correction is crucial to the quality of reconstructed images in x-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Most of existing scatter correction methods assume smooth scatter distributions. The high-frequency scatter noise remains in the projection images even after a perfect scatter correction. In this paper, using a clinical CBCT system and a measurement-based scatter correction, the authors show that a scatter correction alone does not provide satisfactory image quality and the loss of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the scatter corrected image may overwrite the benefit of scatter removal. To circumvent the problem and truly gain from scatter correction, an effective scatter noise suppression method must be in place. They analyze the noise properties in the projections after scatter correction and propose to use a penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) algorithm to reduce the noise in the reconstructed images. Experimental results on an evaluation phantom (Catphan©600) show that the proposed algorithm further reduces the reconstruction error in a scatter corrected image from 10.6% to 1.7% and increases the CNR by a factor of 3.6. Significant image quality improvement is also shown in the results on an anthropomorphic phantom, in which the global noise level is reduced and the local streaking artifacts around bones are suppressed. PMID:19378735

  1. A ray-tracing backprojection algorithm for cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Pan, Tinsu

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a ray-tracing backprojection (RTB) to back-project all the detector pixels into the image domain of cone beam CT (CBCT). The underlying mathematic framework is the FDK reconstruction. In this method, every ray recorded by the flat panel detector is traced back into the image space. In each voxel of the imaging domain, all the rays contributing to the formation of the CT image are summed together weighted by each rays' intersection length with the voxel. The RTB is similar to a reverse process of x-ray transmission imaging, as opposed to the conventional voxel-driven backprojection (VDB). In the RTB, we avoided interpolation and pixel binning approximations, achieved better spatial resolution and eliminated some image artifacts. We have successfully applied the RTB in phantom studies on the Varian On Board Imager CBCT. The images of the Catphan CTP404 module show more accurate representation of the oblique ramps in the measurement of slice thickness, and more accurate determination of slice thickness with the RTB than with VDB. The RTB also shows higher spatial resolution than the VDB in the studies of a high contrast resolution phantom.

  2. Can Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Assess Bone Mineral Density?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mineral density distribution of bone tissue is altered by active bone modeling and remodeling due to bone complications including bone disease and implantation surgery. Clinical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been examined whether it can assess oral bone mineral density (BMD) in patient. It has been indicated that CBCT has disadvantages of higher noise and lower contrast than conventional medical computed tomography (CT) systems. On the other hand, it has advantages of a relatively lower cost and radiation dose but higher spatial resolution. However, the reliability of CBCT based mineral density measurement has not yet been fully validated. Thus, the objectives of this review are to discuss 1) why assessment of BMD distribution is important and 2) whether the clinical CBCT can be used as a potential tool to measure the BMD. Brief descriptions of image artefacts associated with assessment of gray value, which has been used to account for mineral density, in CBCT images are provided. Techniques to correct local and conversion errors in obtaining the gray values in CBCT images are also introduced. This review can be used as a quick reference for users who may encounter these errors during analysis of CBCT images. PMID:25006568

  3. Use of cone beam computed tomography in identifying postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, C B; Chalub, L L F H; Abreu, M H N G; Barreiros, I D; Amaral, T M P; Kakehasi, A M; Mesquita, R A

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to correlate radiometric indices from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women. Quantitative CBCT indices can be used to screen for women with low BMD.

  4. [Role of cone-beam computed tomography in diagnostic otorhinolaryngological imaging].

    PubMed

    Perényi, Ádám; Bella, Zsolt; Baráth, Zoltán; Magyar, Péter; Nagy, Katalin; Rovó, László

    2016-01-10

    Accurate diagnosis and preoperative planning in modern otorhinolaryngology is strongly supported by imaging with enhanced visualization. Computed tomography is often used to examine structures within bone frameworks. Given the hazards of ionizing radiation, repetitive imaging studies exponentially increase the risk of damages to radiosensitive tissues. The authors compare multislice and cone-beam computed tomography and determine the role, advantages and disadvantages of cone-beam computed tomography in otorhinolaryngological imaging. They summarize the knowledge from the international literature and their individual imaging studies. They conclude that cone-beam computed tomography enables high-resolution imaging and reconstruction in any optional plane and in space with considerably lower effective radiation dose. Cone-beam computed tomography with appropriate indications proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool in otorhinolaryngological imaging. It makes an alternative to multislice computed tomography and it is an effective tool in perioperative and postoperative follow-up, especially in those cases which necessitate repetitive imaging with computed tomography.

  5. Comparison of full-scan and half-scan for cone beam breast CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingyun; Shaw, Chris C.; Lai, Chao-jen; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Tu, Shu-ju; Liu, Xinming

    2006-03-01

    The half-scan cone beam technique, requiring a scan for 180° plus detector width only, can help achieve both shorter scan time as well as higher exposure in each individual projection image. This purpose of this paper is to investigate whether half-scan cone beam CT technique can provide acceptable images for clinical application. The half-scan cone beam reconstruction algorithm uses modified Parker's weighting function and reconstructs from slightly more than half of the projection views for full-scan, giving out promising results. A rotation phantom, stationary gantry bench top system was built to conduct experiments to evaluate half-scan cone beam breast CT technique. A post-mastectomy breast specimen, a stack of lunch meat slices embedded with various sizes of calcifications and a polycarbonate phantom inserted with glandular and adipose tissue equivalents are imaged and reconstructed for comparison study. A subset of full-scan projection images of a mastectomy specimen were extracted and used as the half-scan projection data for reconstruction. The results show half-scan reconstruction algorithm for cone beam breast CT images does not significantly degrade image quality when compared with the images of same or even half the radiation dose level. Our results are encouraging, emphasizing the potential advantages in the use of half-scan technique for cone beam breast imaging.

  6. Dental cone beam computed tomography: justification for use in planning oral implant placement.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Reinhilde; Quirynen, Marc

    2014-10-01

    Intra-oral and panoramic radiographs are most frequently used in oral health care. Yet, the inherent nature of jaws and teeth renders three-dimensional diagnosis essential, especially in relation to oral surgery. Nowadays, this can be accomplished by dental cone beam computed tomography, which provides high-quality images at low radiation doses and low costs. Nonetheless, the effective dose ranges of cone beam computed tomography machines may easily vary from 10 to 1000 μSv, this being equivalent to two to 200 panoramic radiographs, even for similar presurgical indications. Moreover, the diagnostic image quality varies massively among available machines and parameter settings. Apart from the radiodiagnostic possibilities, dental cone beam computed tomography may offer a vast therapeutic potential, including opportunities for surgical guidance and further prosthetic rehabilitation via computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing solutions. These additional options may definitely explain part of the success of cone beam computed tomography for oral implant placement. In conclusion, dental cone beam computed tomography imaging could be justified for oral implant-related diagnosis, planning and transfer to surgical and further prosthetic treatment, but guidelines for justification and cone beam computed tomography optimization remain mandatory.

  7. Full data consistency conditions for cone-beam projections with sources on a plane.

    PubMed

    Clackdoyle, Rolf; Desbat, Laurent

    2013-12-07

    Cone-beam consistency conditions (also known as range conditions) are mathematical relationships between different cone-beam projections, and they therefore describe the redundancy or overlap of information between projections. These redundancies have often been exploited for applications in image reconstruction. In this work we describe new consistency conditions for cone-beam projections whose source positions lie on a plane. A further restriction is that the target object must not intersect this plane. The conditions require that moments of the cone-beam projections be polynomial functions of the source positions, with some additional constraints on the coefficients of the polynomials. A precise description of the consistency conditions is that the four parameters of the cone-beam projections (two for the detector, two for the source position) can be expressed with just three variables, using a certain formulation involving homogeneous polynomials. The main contribution of this work is our demonstration that these conditions are not only necessary, but also sufficient. Thus the consistency conditions completely characterize all redundancies, so no other independent conditions are possible and in this sense the conditions are full. The idea of the proof is to use the known consistency conditions for 3D parallel projections, and to then apply a 1996 theorem of Edholm and Danielsson that links parallel to cone-beam projections. The consistency conditions are illustrated with a simulation example.

  8. Dynamic bowtie filter for cone-beam/multi-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenglin; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    A pre-patient attenuator ("bowtie filter" or "bowtie") is used to modulate an incoming x-ray beam as a function of the angle of the x-ray with respect to a patient to balance the photon flux on a detector array. While the current dynamic bowtie design is focused on fan-beam geometry, in this study we propose a methodology for dynamic bowtie design in multi-slice/cone-beam geometry. The proposed 3D dynamic bowtie is an extension of the 2D prior art. The 3D bowtie consists of a highly attenuating bowtie (HB) filled in with heavy liquid and a weakly attenuating bowtie (WB) immersed in the liquid of the HB. The HB targets a balanced flux distribution on a detector array when no object is in the field of view (FOV). The WB compensates for an object in the FOV, and hence is a scaled-down version of the object. The WB is rotated and translated in synchrony with the source rotation and patient translation so that the overall flux balance is maintained on the detector array. First, the mathematical models of different scanning modes are established for an elliptical water phantom. Then, a numerical simulation study is performed to compare the performance of the scanning modes in the cases of the water phantom and a patient cross-section without any bowtie and with a dynamic bowtie. The dynamic bowtie can equalize the numbers of detected photons in the case of the water phantom. In practical cases, the dynamic bowtie can effectively reduce the dynamic range of detected signals inside the FOV. Furthermore, the WB can be individualized using a 3D printing technique as the gold standard. We have extended the dynamic bowtie concept from 2D to 3D by using highly attenuating liquid and moving a scale-reduced negative copy of an object being scanned. Our methodology can be applied to reduce radiation dose and facilitate photon-counting detection.

  9. Dynamic Bowtie Filter for Cone-Beam/Multi-Slice CT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fenglin; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    A pre-patient attenuator (“bowtie filter” or “bowtie”) is used to modulate an incoming x-ray beam as a function of the angle of the x-ray with respect to a patient to balance the photon flux on a detector array. While the current dynamic bowtie design is focused on fan-beam geometry, in this study we propose a methodology for dynamic bowtie design in multi-slice/cone-beam geometry. The proposed 3D dynamic bowtie is an extension of the 2D prior art. The 3D bowtie consists of a highly attenuating bowtie (HB) filled in with heavy liquid and a weakly attenuating bowtie (WB) immersed in the liquid of the HB. The HB targets a balanced flux distribution on a detector array when no object is in the field of view (FOV). The WB compensates for an object in the FOV, and hence is a scaled-down version of the object. The WB is rotated and translated in synchrony with the source rotation and patient translation so that the overall flux balance is maintained on the detector array. First, the mathematical models of different scanning modes are established for an elliptical water phantom. Then, a numerical simulation study is performed to compare the performance of the scanning modes in the cases of the water phantom and a patient cross-section without any bowtie and with a dynamic bowtie. The dynamic bowtie can equalize the numbers of detected photons in the case of the water phantom. In practical cases, the dynamic bowtie can effectively reduce the dynamic range of detected signals inside the FOV. Furthermore, the WB can be individualized using a 3D printing technique as the gold standard. We have extended the dynamic bowtie concept from 2D to 3D by using highly attenuating liquid and moving a scale-reduced negative copy of an object being scanned. Our methodology can be applied to reduce radiation dose and facilitate photon-counting detection. PMID:25051067

  10. Adjustable hollow-cone output x-ray beam from an ellipsoidal monocapillary with a pinhole and a beam stop.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue-Peng; Liu, Zhi-Gou; Yi, Long-Tao; Sun, Wei-Yun; Li, Fang-Zou; Jiang, Bo-Wen; Ma, Yong-Zhong; Sun, Tian-Xi

    2015-12-10

    A combined shading system (CSS) consisting of a beam stop and a pinhole is proposed to be used between an ellipsoidal monocapillary (EM) and a conventional laboratory x-ray source to obtain an adjustable hollow-cone output beam for different experiments with no need for changing the EM. The CSS can change the incident x-ray beam on the EM by adjusting the position of the beam stop and the pinhole, with the corresponding change of the output beam of the EM. In this study, the adjustable hollow-cone output x-ray beam of an 80-mm-long EM with a CSS was studied in detail with a laboratory Cu x-ray generator with a focal spot diameter of 50 μm. The adjustable range of the focal spot size of the EM was from 8.6 to 58.7 μm. The adjustable range of the gain of the focal spot of the EM was from 0 to 1350. The beam divergence of the hollow-cone output beam of the EM ranged from 6 to 16.75 mrad. The illumination angle of the hollow-cone output beam of the EM ranged from 0 to 5.95 mrad. In addition, the potential application of the proposed adjusting method in testing the performance of the EM is briefly discussed.

  11. A reconstruction method for cone-beam differential x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Velroyen, Astrid; Tan, Renbo; Zhang, Junwei; Chen, Liyuan; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-09-10

    Most existing differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) approaches are based on three kinds of scanning geometries, described by parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam. Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution, cone-beam DPC-CT has attracted significant interest. In this paper, we report a reconstruction method based on a back-projection filtration (BPF) algorithm for cone-beam DPC-CT. Due to the differential nature of phase contrast projections, the algorithm restrains from differentiation of the projection data prior to back-projection, unlike BPF algorithms commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a micro-focus x-ray tube source. Moreover, the numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can deal with several classes of truncated cone-beam datasets. We believe that this feature is of particular interest for future medical cone-beam phase-contrast CT imaging applications.

  12. Task-driven imaging in cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gang, G. J.; Stayman, J. W.; Ouadah, S.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Conventional workflow in interventional imaging often ignores a wealth of prior information of the patient anatomy and the imaging task. This work introduces a task-driven imaging framework that utilizes such information to prospectively design acquisition and reconstruction techniques for cone-beam CT (CBCT) in a manner that maximizes task-based performance in subsequent imaging procedures. Methods The framework is employed in jointly optimizing tube current modulation, orbital tilt, and reconstruction parameters in filtered backprojection reconstruction for interventional imaging. Theoretical predictors of noise and resolution relates acquisition and reconstruction parameters to task-based detectability. Given a patient-specific prior image and specification of the imaging task, an optimization algorithm prospectively identifies the combination of imaging parameters that maximizes task-based detectability. Initial investigations were performed for a variety of imaging tasks in an elliptical phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Results Optimization of tube current modulation and view-dependent reconstruction kernel was shown to have greatest benefits for a directional task (e.g., identification of device or tissue orientation). The task-driven approach yielded techniques in which the dose and sharp kernels were concentrated in views contributing the most to the signal power associated with the imaging task. For example, detectability of a line pair detection task was improved by at least three fold compared to conventional approaches. For radially symmetric tasks, the task-driven strategy yielded results similar to a minimum variance strategy in the absence of kernel modulation. Optimization of the orbital tilt successfully avoided highly attenuating structures that can confound the imaging task by introducing noise correlations masquerading at spatial frequencies of interest. Conclusions This work demonstrated the potential of a task

  13. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    SciTech Connect

    Moehlenbruch, Markus; Nelles, Michael; Thomas, Daniel; Willinek, Winfried; Gerstner, Andreas; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently, gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.

  14. CT thermometry for cone-beam CT guided ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, Zachary; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Li, Ming; Wood, Bradford J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring temperature during a cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided ablation procedure is important for prevention of over-treatment and under-treatment. In order to accomplish ideal temperature monitoring, a thermometry map must be generated. Previously, this was attempted using CBCT scans of a pig shoulder undergoing ablation.1 We are extending this work by using CBCT scans of real patients and incorporating more processing steps. We register the scans before comparing them due to the movement and deformation of organs. We then automatically locate the needle tip and the ablation zone. We employ a robust change metric due to image noise and artifacts. This change metric takes windows around each pixel and uses an equation inspired by Time Delay Analysis to calculate the error between windows with the assumption that there is an ideal spatial offset. Once the change map is generated, we correlate change data with measured temperature data at the key points in the region. This allows us to transform our change map into a thermal map. This thermal map is then able to provide an estimate as to the size and temperature of the ablation zone. We evaluated our procedure on a data set of 12 patients who had a total of 24 ablation procedures performed. We were able to generate reasonable thermal maps with varying degrees of accuracy. The average error ranged from 2.7 to 16.2 degrees Celsius. In addition to providing estimates of the size of the ablation zone for surgical guidance, 3D visualizations of the ablation zone and needle are also produced.

  15. Dimensional stability in composite cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kopp, S; Ottl, P

    2010-12-01

    An automated increase in the field of view (FOV) for multipurpose cone beam CT (CBCT) by "stitching" (joining) up to three component volumes to yield a larger composite volume must still ensure dimensional stability, especially if the image is to form the basis for a surgical splint. Dimensional stability, image discrepancies and the influence of movement artefacts between exposures were evaluated. The first consumer installation of the Kodak 9000 three-dimensional (3D) extraoral imaging system with stitching software was used for the evaluation of a human mandible with three endodontic instruments as markers. The distances between several reproducible points were measured directly and the results compared with the values measured on screen. Displacements of the mandible along all axes between exposures as well as angular displacements were conducted to test the capability of the system. The standard deviations (SD) of the results for the vertical distances varied between 0.212 mm and 0.409 mm (approximately 1-2 voxels; range, 0.6-1.3 mm) and may be considered the systematic error. The SD of the results for the horizontal and diagonal distances varied between 0.195 mm and 0.571 mm (approximately 1-3 voxels; range, 0.6-1.7 mm) if the group with overall horizontal angulations of 10° and a central rotation of 20° was omitted. In conclusion, the evaluated stitching software is a useful tool to expand the options of combined CBCT with an initial small FOV by allowing a merger of up to three component volumes to yield a larger FOV of about 80 × 80 × 37 mm. The dimensional stability was acceptable when seen in relation to the induced disturbance. Further evaluation of this composite CBCT/digital imaging and communications in medicine system for subsequent splint fabrication may yield promising results.

  16. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, Anna M.; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Wildberger, Joachim E. Graaf, Rick de Zwam, Willem H. van Haan, Michiel W. de Kemerink, Gerrit J. Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCT dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight.

  17. Task-driven imaging in cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, G. J.; Stayman, J. W.; Ouadah, S.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Conventional workflow in interventional imaging often ignores a wealth of prior information of the patient anatomy and the imaging task. This work introduces a task-driven imaging framework that utilizes such information to prospectively design acquisition and reconstruction techniques for cone-beam CT (CBCT) in a manner that maximizes task-based performance in subsequent imaging procedures. Methods: The framework is employed in jointly optimizing tube current modulation, orbital tilt, and reconstruction parameters in filtered back-projection reconstruction for interventional imaging. Theoretical predictors of noise and resolution relates acquisition and reconstruction parameters to task-based detectability. Given a patient-specific prior image and specification of the imaging task, an optimization algorithm prospectively identifies the combination of imaging parameters that maximizes task-based detectability. Initial investigations were performed for a variety of imaging tasks in an elliptical phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Results: Optimization of tube current modulation and view-dependent reconstruction kernel was shown to have greatest benefits for a directional task (e.g., identification of device or tissue orientation). The task-driven approach yielded techniques in which the dose and sharp kernels were concentrated in views contributing the most to the signal power associated with the imaging task. For example, detectability of a line pair detection task was improved by at least three fold compared to conventional approaches. For radially symmetric tasks, the task-driven strategy yielded results similar to a minimum variance strategy in the absence of kernel modulation. Optimization of the orbital tilt successfully avoided highly attenuating structures that can confound the imaging task by introducing noise correlations masquerading at spatial frequencies of interest. Conclusions: This work demonstrated the potential of a task

  18. Cone-beam artifact evaluation of the factorization method

    SciTech Connect

    Dennerlein, Frank; Noo, Frederic

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: The authors investigate the CB artifact behavior of the factorization approach recently suggested for image reconstruction in circular cone-beam computed tomography. This investigation is carried out in a typical C-arm geometry and involves simulated data and for the first time also phantom and clinical CB data acquired with a commercially available angiographic system. Methods: The CB artifact level is first measured using quantitative figures-of-merit that are computed from the reconstructions of the mathematical FORBILD head phantom and of a modified disk phantom. The authors then show reconstructions from a physical thorax phantom and clinical head data sets for a visual assessment of image quality. The performance of the factorization method is primarily compared to that of short-scan FDK, but the authors also show the results obtained with the full-scan FDK and the virtual PI-line BPF method for the simulation studies, as a benchmark. Results: Quantitatively, the FORBILD head phantom reconstructions of both FDK methods show a spatially averaged bias of up to 1.2% in the axial slices about 9 cm away from the plane of the scan, which is placed 4 cm below the central slice through the phantom. The artifact level for the short-scan FDK method and the virtual PI-line BPF method noticeably depends on the scan orientation. The factorization approach can significantly reduce both, this dependency as well as the reconstruction bias. It also shows visually an improved quality of the clinical images compared to short-scan FDK, particularly close to the spine and in the subcranial regions of the clinical data sets. Conclusions: The factorization approach comes with noticeably lower reconstruction bias than the FDK methods and is least sensitive to the scan orientation among all considered short-scan methods. The data inconsistencies contained in the real data sets, such as scatter, beam hardening, or data truncation, show only little impact on the factorization

  19. Scatter correction for cone-beam CT in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Xie, Yaoqin; Wang, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is being increasingly used in modern radiation therapy for patient setup and adaptive replanning. However, due to the large volume of x-ray illumination, scatter becomes a rather serious problem and is considered as one of the fundamental limitations of CBCT image quality. Many scatter correction algorithms have been proposed in literature, while a standard practical solution still remains elusive. In radiation therapy, the same patient is scanned repetitively during a course of treatment, a natural question to ask is whether one can obtain the scatter distribution on the first day of treatment and then use the data for scatter correction in the subsequent scans on different days. To realize this scatter removal scheme, two technical pieces must be in place: (i) A strategy to obtain the scatter distribution in on-board CBCT imaging and (ii) a method to spatially match a prior scatter distribution with the on-treatment CBCT projection data for scatter subtraction. In this work, simple solutions to the two problems are provided. A partially blocked CBCT is used to extract the scatter distribution. The x-ray beam blocker has a strip pattern, such that partial volume can still be accurately reconstructed and the whole-field scatter distribution can be estimated from the detected signals in the shadow regions using interpolation∕extrapolation. In the subsequent scans, the patient transformation is determined using a rigid registration of the conventional CBCT and the prior partial CBCT. From the derived patient transformation, the measured scatter is then modified to adapt the new on-treatment patient geometry for scatter correction. The proposed method is evaluated using physical experiments on a clinical CBCT system. On the Catphan©600 phantom, the errors in Hounsfield unit (HU) in the selected regions of interest are reduced from about 350 to below 50 HU; on an anthropomorphic phantom, the error is reduced from 15.7% to 5.4%. The proposed

  20. Scatter correction for cone-beam CT in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lei; Xie Yaoqin; Wang Jing; Xing Lei

    2009-06-15

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is being increasingly used in modern radiation therapy for patient setup and adaptive replanning. However, due to the large volume of x-ray illumination, scatter becomes a rather serious problem and is considered as one of the fundamental limitations of CBCT image quality. Many scatter correction algorithms have been proposed in literature, while a standard practical solution still remains elusive. In radiation therapy, the same patient is scanned repetitively during a course of treatment, a natural question to ask is whether one can obtain the scatter distribution on the first day of treatment and then use the data for scatter correction in the subsequent scans on different days. To realize this scatter removal scheme, two technical pieces must be in place: (i) A strategy to obtain the scatter distribution in on-board CBCT imaging and (ii) a method to spatially match a prior scatter distribution with the on-treatment CBCT projection data for scatter subtraction. In this work, simple solutions to the two problems are provided. A partially blocked CBCT is used to extract the scatter distribution. The x-ray beam blocker has a strip pattern, such that partial volume can still be accurately reconstructed and the whole-field scatter distribution can be estimated from the detected signals in the shadow regions using interpolation/extrapolation. In the subsequent scans, the patient transformation is determined using a rigid registration of the conventional CBCT and the prior partial CBCT. From the derived patient transformation, the measured scatter is then modified to adapt the new on-treatment patient geometry for scatter correction. The proposed method is evaluated using physical experiments on a clinical CBCT system. On the Catphan(c)600 phantom, the errors in Hounsfield unit (HU) in the selected regions of interest are reduced from about 350 to below 50 HU; on an anthropomorphic phantom, the error is reduced from 15.7% to 5.4%. The proposed method

  1. Exact cone beam reconstruction formulae for functions and their gradients for spherical and flat detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Alfred K.

    2016-11-01

    We derive unified inversion formulae for the cone beam transform similar to the Radon transform. Reinterpreting Grangeat’s formula we find a relation between the Radon transform of the gradient of the searched-for function and a quantity computable from cone beam data. This gives a uniqueness result for the cone beam transform of compactly supported functions under much weaker assumptions than the Tuy-Kirillov condition. Furthermore this relation leads to an exact formula for the direct calculation of derivatives of the density distribution; but here, similar to the classical Radon transform, complete Radon data are needed, hence the Tuy-Kirillov condition has to be imposed. Numerical experiments reported in Hahn B N et al (2013 Meas. Sci. Technol. 24 125601) indicate that these calculations are less corrupted by beam-hardening noise. Finally, we present flat detector versions for these results, which are mathematically less attractive but important for applications.

  2. Rotational artifacts in on-board cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ali, E S M; Webb, R; Nyiri, B J

    2015-02-21

    Rotational artifacts in image guidance systems lead to registration errors that affect non-isocentric treatments and dose to off-axis organs-at-risk. This study investigates a rotational artifact in the images acquired with the on-board cone beam computed tomography system XVI (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden). The goals of the study are to identify the cause of the artifact, to characterize its dependence on other quantities, and to investigate possible solutions. A 30 cm diameter cylindrical phantom is used to acquire clockwise and counterclockwise scans at five speeds (120 to 360 deg min(-1)) on six Elekta linear accelerators from three generations (MLCi, MLCi2 and Agility). Additional scans are acquired with different pulse widths and focal spot sizes for the same mAs. Image quality is evaluated using a common phantom with an in-house three dimensional contrast transfer function attachment. A robust, operator-independent analysis is developed which quantifies rotational artifacts with 0.02° accuracy and imaging system delays with 3 ms accuracy. Results show that the artifact is caused by mislabelling of the projections with a lagging angle due to various imaging system delays. For the most clinically used scan speed (360 deg min(-1)), the artifact is ∼0.5°, which corresponds to ∼0.25° error per scan direction with the standard Elekta procedure for angle calibration. This leads to a 0.5 mm registration error at 11 cm off-center. The artifact increases linearly with scan speed, indicating that the system delay is independent of scan speed. For the most commonly used pulse width of 40 ms, this delay is 34 ± 1 ms, part of which is half the pulse width. Results are consistent among the three linac generations. A software solution that corrects the angles of individual projections is shown to eliminate the rotational error for all scan speeds and directions. Until such a solution is available from the manufacturer, three clinical solutions are presented, which

  3. Rotational artifacts in on-board cone beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, E. S. M.; Webb, R.; Nyiri, B. J.

    2015-02-01

    Rotational artifacts in image guidance systems lead to registration errors that affect non-isocentric treatments and dose to off-axis organs-at-risk. This study investigates a rotational artifact in the images acquired with the on-board cone beam computed tomography system XVI (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden). The goals of the study are to identify the cause of the artifact, to characterize its dependence on other quantities, and to investigate possible solutions. A 30 cm diameter cylindrical phantom is used to acquire clockwise and counterclockwise scans at five speeds (120 to 360 deg min-1) on six Elekta linear accelerators from three generations (MLCi, MLCi2 and Agility). Additional scans are acquired with different pulse widths and focal spot sizes for the same mAs. Image quality is evaluated using a common phantom with an in-house three dimensional contrast transfer function attachment. A robust, operator-independent analysis is developed which quantifies rotational artifacts with 0.02° accuracy and imaging system delays with 3 ms accuracy. Results show that the artifact is caused by mislabelling of the projections with a lagging angle due to various imaging system delays. For the most clinically used scan speed (360 deg min-1), the artifact is ˜0.5°, which corresponds to ˜0.25° error per scan direction with the standard Elekta procedure for angle calibration. This leads to a 0.5 mm registration error at 11 cm off-center. The artifact increases linearly with scan speed, indicating that the system delay is independent of scan speed. For the most commonly used pulse width of 40 ms, this delay is 34 ± 1 ms, part of which is half the pulse width. Results are consistent among the three linac generations. A software solution that corrects the angles of individual projections is shown to eliminate the rotational error for all scan speeds and directions. Until such a solution is available from the manufacturer, three clinical solutions are presented, which reduce the

  4. Actively triggered 4d cone-beam CT acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Martin F.; Wisotzky, Eric; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: 4d cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are usually reconstructed by extracting the motion information from the 2d projections or an external surrogate signal, and binning the individual projections into multiple respiratory phases. In this “after-the-fact” binning approach, however, projections are unevenly distributed over respiratory phases resulting in inefficient utilization of imaging dose. To avoid excess dose in certain respiratory phases, and poor image quality due to a lack of projections in others, the authors have developed a novel 4d CBCT acquisition framework which actively triggers 2d projections based on the forward-predicted position of the tumor.Methods: The forward-prediction of the tumor position was independently established using either (i) an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system based on implanted EM-transponders which act as a surrogate for the tumor position, or (ii) an external motion sensor measuring the chest-wall displacement and correlating this external motion to the phase-shifted diaphragm motion derived from the acquired images. In order to avoid EM-induced artifacts in the imaging detector, the authors devised a simple but effective “Faraday” shielding cage. The authors demonstrated the feasibility of their acquisition strategy by scanning an anthropomorphic lung phantom moving on 1d or 2d sinusoidal trajectories.Results: With both tumor position devices, the authors were able to acquire 4d CBCTs free of motion blurring. For scans based on the EM tracking system, reconstruction artifacts stemming from the presence of the EM-array and the EM-transponders were greatly reduced using newly developed correction algorithms. By tuning the imaging frequency independently for each respiratory phase prior to acquisition, it was possible to harmonize the number of projections over respiratory phases. Depending on the breathing period (3.5 or 5 s) and the gantry rotation time (4 or 5 min), between ∼90 and 145

  5. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Cone-Beam CT in Conjunction with DSA for Identifying Prostatic Arterial Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao Qiang; Duan, Feng; Yuan, Kai; Zhang, Guo Dong; Yan, Jieyu; Wang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To describe findings in prostatic arteries (PAs) at digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and cone-beam computed tomography (CT) that allow identification of benign prostatic hyperplasia and to determine the value added with the use of cone-beam CT. Materials and Methods This retrospective single-institution study was approved by the institutional review board, and the requirement for written informed consent was waived. From February 2009 to December 2014, a total of 148 patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 70.5 years ± 14.5) underwent DSA of the internal iliac arteries and cone-beam CT with a flat-detector angiographic system before they underwent prostate artery embolization. Both the DSA and cone-beam CT images were evaluated by two interventional radiologists to determine the number of independent PAs and their origins and anastomoses with adjacent arteries. The exact McNemar test was used to compare the detection rate of the PAs and the anastomoses with DSA and with cone-beam CT. Results The PA anatomy was evaluated successfully by means of cone-beam CT in conjunction with DSA in all patients. Of the 296 pelvic sides, 274 (92.6%) had only one PA. The most frequent PA origin was the common gluteal-pudendal trunk with the superior vesicular artery in 118 (37.1%), followed by the anterior division of the internal iliac artery in 99 (31.1%), and the internal pudendal artery in 77 (24.2%) pelvic sides. In 67 (22.6%) pelvic sides, anastomoses to adjacent arteries were documented. The numbers of PA origins and anastomoses, respectively, that could be identified were significantly higher with cone-beam CT (301 of 318 [94.7%] and 65 of 67 [97.0%]) than with DSA (237 [74.5%] and 39 [58.2%], P < .05). Cone-beam CT provided essential information that was not available with DSA in 90 of 148 (60.8%) patients. Conclusion Cone-beam CT is a useful adjunctive technique to DSA for identification of the PA anatomy and provides information to help treatment planning

  6. Design of metallic electron beam cones for an intraoperative therapy linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, K R; Boyer, A L; Shiu, A S; Ochran, T G; Kirsner, S M; Krispel, F; Rich, T

    1990-05-01

    A set of circular collimators and treatment cones from 5 to 12 cm diameter has been designed for an intraoperative accelerator (6-18 MeV) that has an optical docking system. Electron beam scattering theory has been used to minimize their weight while minimizing leakage radiation. Both acrylic and brass were evaluated as possible materials; however, because of substantial electron leakage through the lateral cone wall for acrylic, we have concluded that 2 mm thick brass walls are more desirable than acrylic walls. At 18 MeV, isodose measurements beneath the cones showed hot spots as great as 120% for both materials. The placement and dimension of an internal trimmer ring inside the brass cone was studied as a method for reducing the hot spots, and it was found this could only be accomplished at the expense of decreasing coverage of the 90% isodose surface. The effects of 1 degree cone misalignment on the dose distribution has been studied and found to generate changes of less than 5% in the dose and 3 mm in position of the 90% isodose surface. In a study of the contribution of the cone and its matching collimator assembly to x-ray room leakage, it was noted that although the treatment cone had a negligible contribution, the upper annuli of the upper collimator assembly contributed as much as 80% of the leakage at 16 MeV for the 5-cm cone.

  7. Tetrahedron-based orthogonal simultaneous scan for cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ivan B; Wang, Ge

    2012-08-06

    In this article, a cone-beam computed tomography scanning mode is designed using four x-ray sources and a spherical sample. The x-ray sources are mounted at the vertices of a regular tetrahedron. On the circumsphere of the tetrahedron, four detection panels are mounted opposite of each vertex. To avoid x-ray interference, the largest half angle of each x-ray cone beam is 27°22', while the radius of the largest ball fully covered by all the cone beams is 0.460, when the radius of the circumsphere is 1. A proposed scanning scheme consists of two rotations about orthogonal axes, such that, each quarter turn provides sufficient data for theoretically exact and stable reconstruction. This design can be used in biomedical or industrial settings, such as when a sequence of reconstructions of an object is desired.

  8. Square wave cone beam scanning trajectory for data completeness in three-dimensional computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, J.W.; Hedengren, K.H.V.

    1991-12-17

    This paper describes a scanning and data acquisition method for three-dimensional computerized tomography (CT) imaging of a field of view containing at least a portion of an object illuminated by a cone beam source. It comprises: defining a source scanning trajectory as a path traversed by the source; employing the cone beam source fixed with reference to a two-dimensional array detector with both source and detector movably positioned relative to the object in order to scan about the object; specifying the source scanning trajectory as a square wave on a cylindrical surface surrounding the field of view such that each plane passing through the field of view intersects the scanning trajectory in at lease one point; and scanning at a plurality of positions along the source scanning trajectory to obtain cone beam projection data.

  9. Cone beam CT findings of retromolar canals: Report of cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Sun

    2013-01-01

    A retromolar canal is an anatomical variation in the mandible. As it includes the neurovascular bundle, local anesthetic insufficiency can occur, and an injury of the retromolar canal during dental surgery in the mandible may result in excessive bleeding, paresthesia, and traumatic neuroma. Using imaging analysis software, we evaluated the cone-beam computed tomography (CT) images of two Korean patients who presented with retromolar canals. Retromolar canals were detectable on the sagittal and cross-sectional images of cone-beam CT, but not on the panoramic radiographs of the patients. Therefore, the clinician should pay particular attention to the identification of retromolar canals by preoperative radiographic examination, and additional cone beam CT scanning would be recommended. PMID:24380072

  10. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  11. Prior image constrained scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography image-guided radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Stephen; Nett, Brian E; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-01-01

    X-ray scatter is a significant problem in cone-beam computed tomography when thicker objects and larger cone angles are used, as scattered radiation can lead to reduced contrast and CT number inaccuracy. Advances have been made in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by incorporating a high quality prior image into the image reconstruction process. In this paper, we extend this idea to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT image-guided radiation therapy. Specifically, this paper presents a new scatter correction algorithm which uses a prior image with low scatter artifacts to reduce shading artifacts in cone-beam CT images acquired under conditions of high scatter. The proposed correction algorithm begins with an empirical hypothesis that the target image can be written as a weighted summation of a series of basis images that are generated by raising the raw cone-beam projection data to different powers, and then, reconstructing using the standard filtered backprojection algorithm. The weight for each basis image is calculated by minimizing the difference between the target image and the prior image. The performance of the scatter correction algorithm is qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated through phantom studies using a Varian 2100 EX System with an on-board imager. Results show that the proposed scatter correction algorithm using a prior image with low scatter artifacts can substantially mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in both full-fan and half-fan modes. PMID:21258140

  12. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  13. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    PubMed

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  14. Cone beam CT assisted re-treatment of class 3 invasive cervical resorption

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Unni; Moule, Alex J; Alawadhi, Abdulwahab

    2015-01-01

    Invasive cervical root resorption is an uncommon external root resorption which initiates at the cervical aspect of the tooth. This case report involves a case of cervical root resorption which was initially misdiagnosed and managed as cervical root caries. It was later diagnosed with cone beam CT and the lesion microsurgically removed and restored with resin modified glass ionomer cement. The importance of increasing awareness of this uncommon pathology and the role of cone beam CT in mapping the extent of the lesion is emphasised. PMID:25795743

  15. How I Do It: Cone-Beam CT during Transarterial Chemoembolization for Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tacher, Vania; Radaelli, Alessandro; Lin, MingDe

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging technique that provides computed tomographic (CT) images from a rotational scan acquired with a C-arm equipped with a flat panel detector. Utilizing CBCT images during interventional procedures bridges the gap between the world of diagnostic imaging (typically three-dimensional imaging but performed separately from the procedure) and that of interventional radiology (typically two-dimensional imaging). CBCT is capable of providing more information than standard two-dimensional angiography in localizing and/or visualizing liver tumors (“seeing” the tumor) and targeting tumors though precise microcatheter placement in close proximity to the tumors (“reaching” the tumor). It can also be useful in evaluating treatment success at the time of procedure (“assessing” treatment success). CBCT technology is rapidly evolving along with the development of various contrast material injection protocols and multiphasic CBCT techniques. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the principles of CBCT imaging, including purpose and clinical evidence of the different techniques, and to introduce a decision-making algorithm as a guide for the routine utilization of CBCT during transarterial chemoembolization of liver cancer. © RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25625741

  16. Single-slice reconstruction method for helical cone-beam differential phase-contrast CT.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Chen, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) can provide the internal structure information of biomedical specimens with high-quality cross-section images and has become an invaluable analysis tool. Here a simple and fast reconstruction algorithm is reported for helical cone-beam differential PC-CT (DPC-CT), which is called the DPC-CB-SSRB algorithm. It combines the existing CB-SSRB method of helical cone-beam absorption-contrast CT with the differential nature of DPC imaging. The reconstruction can be performed using 2D fan-beam filtered back projection algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter. The quality of the results for large helical pitches is surprisingly good. In particular, with this algorithm comparable quality is obtained using helical cone-beam DPC-CT data with a normalized pitch of 10 to that obtained using the traditional inter-row interpolation reconstruction with a normalized pitch of 2. This method will push the future medical helical cone-beam DPC-CT imaging applications.

  17. 3D algebraic iterative reconstruction for cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications.

  18. Micro-cone targets for producing high energy and low divergence particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Le Galloudec, Nathalie

    2013-09-10

    The present invention relates to micro-cone targets for producing high energy and low divergence particle beams. In one embodiment, the micro-cone target includes a substantially cone-shaped body including an outer surface, an inner surface, a generally flat and round, open-ended base, and a tip defining an apex. The cone-shaped body tapers along its length from the generally flat and round, open-ended base to the tip defining the apex. In addition, the outer surface and the inner surface connect the base to the tip, and the tip curves inwardly to define an outer surface that is concave, which is bounded by a rim formed at a juncture where the outer surface meets the tip.

  19. Breath-Hold Target Localization With Simultaneous Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Fast Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Blessing, Manuel; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Arns, Anna; Lohr, Frank; Hesser, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated high-dose radiotherapy for small lung tumors has typically been based on stereotaxy. Cone-beam computed tomography and breath-hold techniques have provided a noninvasive basis for precise cranial and extracranial patient positioning. The cone-beam computed tomography acquisition time of 60 s, however, is beyond the breath-hold capacity of patients, resulting in respiratory motion artifacts. By combining megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) photon sources (mounted perpendicularly on the linear accelerator) and accelerating the gantry rotation to the allowed limit, the data acquisition time could be reduced to 15 s. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Synergy 6-MV linear accelerator, with iViewGT as the MV- and XVI as the kV-imaging device, was used with a Catphan phantom and an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Both image sources performed continuous image acquisition, passing an angle interval of 90{sup o} within 15 s. For reconstruction, filtered back projection on a graphics processor unit was used. It reconstructed 100 projections acquired to a 512 x 512 x 512 volume within 6 s. Results: The resolution in the Catphan phantom (CTP528 high-resolution module) was 3 lines/cm. The spatial accuracy was within 2-3 mm. The diameters of different tumor shapes in the thorax phantom were determined within an accuracy of 1.6 mm. The signal-to-noise ratio was 68% less than that with a 180{sup o}-kV scan. The dose generated to acquire the MV frames accumulated to 82.5 mGy, and the kV contribution was <6 mGy. Conclusion: The present results have shown that fast breath-hold, on-line volume imaging with a linear accelerator using simultaneous kV-MV cone-beam computed tomography is promising and can potentially be used for image-guided radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in the near future.

  20. Computed tomography dose assessment for a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Geleijns, J; Salvadó Artells, M; de Bruin, P W; Matter, R; Muramatsu, Y; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2009-05-21

    Computed tomography (CT) dosimetry should be adapted to the rapid developments in CT technology. Recently a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner that challenges the existing Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) dosimetry paradigm was introduced. The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric characteristics of this cone beam scanner, to study the appropriateness of existing CT dose metrics and to suggest a pragmatic approach for CT dosimetry for cone beam scanners. Dose measurements with a small Farmer-type ionization chamber and with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers were performed free in air to characterize the cone beam. According to the most common dose metric in CT, namely CTDI, measurements were also performed in 150 mm and 350 mm long CT head and CT body dose phantoms with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers, respectively. To explore effects that cannot be measured with ionization chambers, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the dose distribution in 150 mm, 350 mm and 700 mm long CT head and CT body phantoms were performed. To overcome inconsistencies in the definition of CTDI100 for the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner, doses were also expressed as the average absorbed dose within the pencil chamber (D100). Measurements free in air revealed excellent correspondence between CTDI300air and D100air, while CTDI100air substantially underestimates CTDI300air. Results of measurements in CT dose phantoms and corresponding MC simulations at centre and peripheral positions were weighted and revealed good agreement between CTDI300w, D100w and CTDI600w, while CTDI100w substantially underestimates CTDI300w. D100w provides a pragmatic metric for characterizing the dose of the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner. This quantity can be measured with the widely available 100 mm pencil ionization chamber within 150 mm long CT dose phantoms. CTDI300w measured in 350 mm long CT dose phantoms serves as an appropriate standard of

  1. Simulation of mammograms and tomosynthesis imaging with cone beam breast CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Shaw, Chris C.; Chen, Lingyun; Lai, Chao-jen; Liu, Xinming; Wang, Tianpeng

    2008-03-01

    The use of mammography techniques for the screening and diagnosis of breast cancers has been limited by the overlapping of cancer symptoms with normal tissue structures. To overcome this problem, two methods have been developed and actively investigated recently: digital tomosynthesis mammography and cone beam breast CT. Comparison study with these three techniques will be helpful to understand their difference and further might be supervise the direction of breast imaging. This paper describes and discusses about a technique using a general-purpose PC cluster to develop a parallel computer simulation model to simulate mammograms and tomosynthesis imaging with cone beam CT images of a mastectomy breast specimen. The breast model used in simulating mammography and tomosynthesis was developed by re-scaling the CT numbers of cone beam CT images from 80kVp to 20 kev. The compression of breast was simulated by deformation of the breast model. Re-projection software with parallel computation was developed and used to compute projection images of this simulated compressed breast for a stationary detector and a linearly shifted x-ray source. The resulting images were then used to reconstruct tomosynthesis mammograms using shift-and-add algorithms. It was found that MCs in cone beam CT images were not visible in regular mammograms but faintly visible in tomosynthesis images. The scatter signal and noise property needs to be simulated and incorporated in the future.

  2. Cone Beam Computed Tomography-Dawn of A New Imaging Modality in Orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Mamatha, J; Chaitra, K R; Paul, Renji K; George, Merin; Anitha, J; Khanna, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Today, we are in a world of innovations, and there are various diagnostics aids that help to take a decision regarding treatment in a well-planned way. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been a vital tool for imaging diagnostic tool in orthodontics. This article reviews case reports during orthodontic treatment and importance of CBCT during the treatment evaluation.

  3. The application of cone-beam CT in the aging of bone calluses: a new perspective?

    PubMed

    Cappella, A; Amadasi, A; Gaudio, D; Gibelli, D; Borgonovo, S; Di Giancamillo, M; Cattaneo, C

    2013-11-01

    In the forensic and anthropological fields, the assessment of the age of a bone callus can be crucial for a correct analysis of injuries in the skeleton. To our knowledge, the studies which have focused on this topic are mainly clinical and still leave much to be desired for forensic purposes, particularly in looking for better methods for aging calluses in view of criminalistic applications. This study aims at evaluating the aid cone-beam CT can give in the investigation of the inner structure of fractures and calluses, thus acquiring a better knowledge of the process of bone remodeling. A total of 13 fractures (three without callus formation and ten with visible callus) of known age from cadavers were subjected to radiological investigations with digital radiography (DR) (conventional radiography) and cone-beam CT with the major aim of investigating the differences between DR and tomographic images when studying the inner and outer structures of bone healing. Results showed how with cone-beam CT the structure of the callus is clearly visible with higher specificity and definition and much more information on mineralization in different sections and planes. These results could lay the foundation for new perspectives on bone callus evaluation and aging with cone-beam CT, a user-friendly and skillful technique which in some instances can also be used extensively on the living (e.g., in cases of child abuse) with reduced exposition to radiation.

  4. Cone Beam Computed Tomography-Dawn of A New Imaging Modality in Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mamatha, J; Chaitra, K R; Paul, Renji K; George, Merin; Anitha, J; Khanna, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Today, we are in a world of innovations, and there are various diagnostics aids that help to take a decision regarding treatment in a well-planned way. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been a vital tool for imaging diagnostic tool in orthodontics. This article reviews case reports during orthodontic treatment and importance of CBCT during the treatment evaluation. PMID:26225116

  5. Point spread function modeling and image restoration for cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Huang, Kui-Dong; Shi, Yi-Kai; Xu, Zhe

    2015-03-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has such notable features as high efficiency and precision, and is widely used in the fields of medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the inherent imaging degradation reduces the quality of CT images. Aimed at the problems of projection image degradation and restoration in cone-beam CT, a point spread function (PSF) modeling method is proposed first. The general PSF model of cone-beam CT is established, and based on it, the PSF under arbitrary scanning conditions can be calculated directly for projection image restoration without the additional measurement, which greatly improved the application convenience of cone-beam CT. Secondly, a projection image restoration algorithm based on pre-filtering and pre-segmentation is proposed, which can make the edge contours in projection images and slice images clearer after restoration, and control the noise in the equivalent level to the original images. Finally, the experiments verified the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods. Supported by National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology of China (2012ZX04007021), Young Scientists Fund of National Natural Science Foundation of China (51105315), Natural Science Basic Research Program of Shaanxi Province of China (2013JM7003) and Northwestern Polytechnical University Foundation for Fundamental Research (JC20120226, 3102014KYJD022)

  6. AAE and AAOMR Joint Position Statement: Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics 2015 Update.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    The following statement was prepared by the Special Committee to Revise the Joint American Association of Endodontists/American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Position on Cone Beam Computed Tomography, and approved by the AAE Board of Directors and AAOMR Executive Council in May 2015. AAE members may reprint this position statement for distribution to patients or referring dentists.

  7. Contours identification of elements in a cone beam computed tomography for investigating maxillary cysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chioran, Doina; Nicoarǎ, Adrian; Roşu, Şerban; Cǎrligeriu, Virgil; Ianeş, Emilia

    2013-10-01

    Digital processing of two-dimensional cone beam computer tomography slicesstarts by identification of the contour of elements within. This paper deals with the collective work of specialists in medicine and applied mathematics in computer science on elaborating and implementation of algorithms in dental 2D imagery.

  8. Cone-beam computed tomography: An inevitable investigation in cleidocranial dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nandita S.; Gogri, Ajas A.; Kajale, Manasi M.; Kadam, Sonali G.

    2015-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia is a heritable skeletal dysplasia and one of the most common features of this syndrome is multiple impacted supernumerary teeth. Cone-beam computed tomography, the most recent advancement in maxillofacial imaging, provides the clinician to view the morphology of the skull and the dentition in all three dimensions and help in treatment planning for the patient. PMID:26097368

  9. Evaluation of the OSC-TV iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam optical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Matenine, Dmitri Mascolo-Fortin, Julia; Goussard, Yves

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The present work evaluates an iterative reconstruction approach, namely, the ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm with regularization via total variation (TV) minimization in the field of cone-beam optical computed tomography (optical CT). One of the uses of optical CT is gel-based 3D dosimetry for radiation therapy, where it is employed to map dose distributions in radiosensitive gels. Model-based iterative reconstruction may improve optical CT image quality and contribute to a wider use of optical CT in clinical gel dosimetry. Methods: This algorithm was evaluated using experimental data acquired by a cone-beam optical CT system, as well as complementary numerical simulations. A fast GPU implementation of OSC-TV was used to achieve reconstruction times comparable to those of conventional filtered backprojection. Images obtained via OSC-TV were compared with the corresponding filtered backprojections. Spatial resolution and uniformity phantoms were scanned and respective reconstructions were subject to evaluation of the modulation transfer function, image uniformity, and accuracy. The artifacts due to refraction and total signal loss from opaque objects were also studied. Results: The cone-beam optical CT data reconstructions showed that OSC-TV outperforms filtered backprojection in terms of image quality, thanks to a model-based simulation of the photon attenuation process. It was shown to significantly improve the image spatial resolution and reduce image noise. The accuracy of the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients remained similar to that obtained via filtered backprojection. Certain image artifacts due to opaque objects were reduced. Nevertheless, the common artifact due to the gel container walls could not be eliminated. Conclusions: The use of iterative reconstruction improves cone-beam optical CT image quality in many ways. The comparisons between OSC-TV and filtered backprojection presented in this paper demonstrate that OSC-TV can

  10. Region-of-interest image reconstruction in circular cone-beam microCT

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seungryong; Bian, Junguo; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Chen, C.-T.; He, T.-C.; Pan Xiaochuan

    2007-12-15

    Cone-beam microcomputed tomography (microCT) is one of the most popular choices for small animal imaging which is becoming an important tool for studying animal models with transplanted diseases. Region-of-interest (ROI) imaging techniques in CT, which can reconstruct an ROI image from the projection data set of the ROI, can be used not only for reducing imaging-radiation exposure to the subject and scatters to the detector but also for potentially increasing spatial resolution of the reconstructed images. Increasing spatial resolution in microCT images can facilitate improved accuracy in many assessment tasks. A method proposed previously for increasing CT image spatial resolution entails the exploitation of the geometric magnification in cone-beam CT. Due to finite detector size, however, this method can lead to data truncation for a large geometric magnification. The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm yields images with artifacts when truncated data are used, whereas the recently developed backprojection filtration (BPF) algorithm is capable of reconstructing ROI images without truncation artifacts from truncated cone-beam data. We apply the BPF algorithm to reconstructing ROI images from truncated data of three different objects acquired by our circular cone-beam microCT system. Reconstructed images by use of the FDK and BPF algorithms from both truncated and nontruncated cone-beam data are compared. The results of the experimental studies demonstrate that, from certain truncated data, the BPF algorithm can reconstruct ROI images with quality comparable to that reconstructed from nontruncated data. In contrast, the FDK algorithm yields ROI images with truncation artifacts. Therefore, an implication of the studies is that, when truncated data are acquired with a configuration of a large geometric magnification, the BPF algorithm can be used for effective enhancement of the spatial resolution of a ROI image.

  11. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: II. Reduction using a convergent light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Kurtis H.; Battista, Jerry J.; Jordan, Kevin J.

    2016-04-01

    Optical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using a broad beam and CCD camera is a fast method for densitometry of 3D optical gel dosimeters. However, diffuse light sources introduce considerable stray light into the imaging system, leading to underestimation of attenuation coefficients and non-uniformities in CT images unless corrections are applied to each projection image. In this study, the light source of a commercial optical CT scanner is replaced with a convergent cone beam source consisting of almost exclusively image forming primary rays. The convergent source is achieved using a small isotropic source and a Fresnel lens. To characterize stray light effects, full-field cone beam CT imaging is compared to fan beam CT (FBCT) using a 1 cm high fan beam aperture centered on the optic axis of the system. Attenuating liquids are scanned within a large 96 mm diameter uniform phantom and in a small 13.5 mm diameter finger phantom. For the uniform phantom, cone and fan beam CT attenuation coefficients agree within a maximum deviation of (1  ±  2)% between mean values over a wide range from 0.036 to 0.43 cm-1. For the finger phantom, agreement is found with a maximum deviation of (4  ±  2)% between mean values over a range of 0.1-0.47 cm-1. With the convergent source, artifacts associated with refractive index mismatch and vessel optical features are more pronounced. Further optimization of the source size to achieve a balance between quantitative accuracy and artifact reduction should enable practical, accurate 3D dosimetry, avoiding time consuming 3D scatter measurements.

  12. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: II. Reduction using a convergent light source.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Kurtis H; Battista, Jerry J; Jordan, Kevin J

    2016-04-07

    Optical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using a broad beam and CCD camera is a fast method for densitometry of 3D optical gel dosimeters. However, diffuse light sources introduce considerable stray light into the imaging system, leading to underestimation of attenuation coefficients and non-uniformities in CT images unless corrections are applied to each projection image. In this study, the light source of a commercial optical CT scanner is replaced with a convergent cone beam source consisting of almost exclusively image forming primary rays. The convergent source is achieved using a small isotropic source and a Fresnel lens. To characterize stray light effects, full-field cone beam CT imaging is compared to fan beam CT (FBCT) using a 1 cm high fan beam aperture centered on the optic axis of the system. Attenuating liquids are scanned within a large 96 mm diameter uniform phantom and in a small 13.5 mm diameter finger phantom. For the uniform phantom, cone and fan beam CT attenuation coefficients agree within a maximum deviation of (1  ±  2)% between mean values over a wide range from 0.036 to 0.43 cm(-1). For the finger phantom, agreement is found with a maximum deviation of (4  ±  2)% between mean values over a range of 0.1-0.47 cm(-1). With the convergent source, artifacts associated with refractive index mismatch and vessel optical features are more pronounced. Further optimization of the source size to achieve a balance between quantitative accuracy and artifact reduction should enable practical, accurate 3D dosimetry, avoiding time consuming 3D scatter measurements.

  13. An intracavitary cone system for electron beam therapy using a Therac 20 linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D L; Sharma, S C; Jose, B

    1986-06-01

    The Therac 20 is an AECL medical linear accelerator that produces electron and photon beams. Electron fields are produced by a scanned beam; collimation is provided by two sets of primary collimators and further collimated by external electron trimmers located 11 cm above the plane of isocenter (100 cm). These collimators are not suitable for intracavitary treatment. To overcome this limitation, we have designed an intracavitary cone system that attaches to the electron trimmers. Since the trimmers do not have to be removed while this system is in use, there is no need to bypass the associated interlock system. The apparatus consists of a platform which slides onto the lower set of trimmers, onto which a lead insert is attached. Dosimetry measurements for 9, 13, and 17 MeV electron beams are reported for three different treatment cones.

  14. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: Imaging Dose during CBCT Scan Acquisition and Accuracy of CBCT Based Dose Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, David Matthew

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a recent development in radiotherapy for use in image guidance. Image guided radiotherapy using CBCT allows visualization of soft tissue targets and critical structures prior to treatment. Dose escalation is made possible by accurately localizing the target volume while reducing normal tissue toxicity. The kilovoltage x-rays of the cone beam imaging system contribute additional dose to the patient. In this study a 2D reference radiochromic film dosimetry method employing GAFCHROMIC(TM) model XR-QA film is used to measure point skin doses and dose profiles from the Elekta XVI CBCT system integrated onto the Synergy linac. The soft tissue contrast of the daily CBCT images makes adaptive radiotherapy possible in the clinic. In order to track dose to the patient or utilize on-line replanning for adaptive radiotherapy the CBCT images must be used to calculate dose. A Hounsfield unit calibration method for scatter correction is investigated for heterogeneity corrected dose calculation in CBCT images. Three Hounsfield unit to density calibration tables are used for each of four cases including patients and an anthropomorphic phantom, and the calculated dose from each is compared to results from the clinical standard fan beam CT. The dose from the scan acquisition is reported and the effect of scan geometry and total output of the x-ray tube on dose magnitude and distribution is shown. The ability to calculate dose with CBCT is shown to improve with the use of patient specific density tables for scatter correction, and for high beam energies the calculated dose agreement is within 1%.

  15. Tilted cone-beam reconstruction with row-wise fan-to-parallel rebinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jiang; Tang, Xiangyang

    2006-10-01

    Reconstruction algorithms for cone-beam CT have been the focus of many studies. Several exact and approximate reconstruction algorithms were proposed for step-and-shoot and helical scanning trajectories to combat cone-beam related artefacts. In this paper, we present a new closed-form cone-beam reconstruction formula for tilted gantry data acquisition. Although several algorithms were proposed in the past to combat errors induced by the gantry tilt, none of the algorithms addresses the scenario in which the cone-beam geometry is first rebinned to a set of parallel beams prior to the filtered backprojection. We show that the image quality advantages of the rebinned parallel-beam reconstruction are significant, which makes the development of such an algorithm necessary. Because of the rebinning process, the reconstruction algorithm becomes more complex and the amount of iso-centre adjustment depends not only on the projection and tilt angles, but also on the reconstructed pixel location. In this paper, we first demonstrate the advantages of the row-wise fan-to-parallel rebinning and derive a closed-form solution for the reconstruction algorithm for the step-and-shoot and constant-pitch helical scans. The proposed algorithm requires the 'warping' of the reconstruction matrix on a view-by-view basis prior to the backprojection step. We further extend the algorithm to the variable-pitch helical scans in which the patient table travels at non-constant speeds. The algorithm was tested extensively on both the 16- and 64-slice CT scanners. The efficacy of the algorithm is clearly demonstrated by multiple experiments.

  16. A theoretically exact reconstruction algorithm for helical cone-beam differential phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Sun, Yi; Zhu, Peiping

    2013-08-21

    Differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) reconstruction problems are usually solved by using parallel-, fan- or cone-beam algorithms. For rod-shaped objects, the x-ray beams cannot recover all the slices of the sample at the same time. Thus, if a rod-shaped sample is required to be reconstructed by the above algorithms, one should alternately perform translation and rotation on this sample, which leads to lower efficiency. The helical cone-beam CT may significantly improve scanning efficiency for rod-shaped objects over other algorithms. In this paper, we propose a theoretically exact filter-backprojection algorithm for helical cone-beam DPC-CT, which can be applied to reconstruct the refractive index decrement distribution of the samples directly from two-dimensional differential phase-contrast images. Numerical simulations are conducted to verify the proposed algorithm. Our work provides a potential solution for inspecting the rod-shaped samples using DPC-CT, which may be applicable with the evolution of DPC-CT equipments.

  17. Cone Beam X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography Based on Bayesian Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanglei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jie; Luo, Jianwen; Xie, Yaoqin; Bai, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), which aims to achieve molecular and functional imaging by X-rays, has recently been proposed as a new imaging modality. Combining the principles of X-ray excitation of luminescence-based probes and optical signal detection, XLCT naturally fuses functional and anatomical images and provides complementary information for a wide range of applications in biomedical research. In order to improve the data acquisition efficiency of previously developed narrow-beam XLCT, a cone beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) mode is adopted here to take advantage of the useful geometric features of cone beam excitation. Practically, a major hurdle in using cone beam X-ray for XLCT is that the inverse problem here is seriously ill-conditioned, hindering us to achieve good image quality. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian method to tackle the bottleneck in CB-XLCT reconstruction. The method utilizes a local regularization strategy based on Gaussian Markov random field to mitigate the ill-conditioness of CB-XLCT. An alternating optimization scheme is then used to automatically calculate all the unknown hyperparameters while an iterative coordinate descent algorithm is adopted to reconstruct the image with a voxel-based closed-form solution. Results of numerical simulations and mouse experiments show that the self-adaptive Bayesian method significantly improves the CB-XLCT image quality as compared with conventional methods.

  18. Cone Beam X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography Based on Bayesian Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanglei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jie; Luo, Jianwen; Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei

    2016-08-26

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), which aims to achieve molecular and functional imaging by X-rays, has recently been proposed as a new imaging modality. Combining the principles of X-ray excitation of luminescence-based probes and optical signal detection, XLCT naturally fuses functional and anatomical images and provides complementary information for a wide range of applications in biomedical research. In order to improve the data acquisition efficiency of previously developed narrow-beam XLCT, a cone beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) mode is adopted here to take advantage of the useful geometric features of cone beam excitation. Practically, a major hurdle in using cone beam X-ray for XLCT is that the inverse problem here is seriously ill-conditioned, hindering us to achieve good image quality. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian method to tackle the bottleneck in CB-XLCT reconstruction. The method utilizes a local regularization strategy based on Gaussian Markov random field to mitigate the ill-conditioness of CB-XLCT. An alternating optimization scheme is then used to automatically calculate all the unknown hyperparameters while an iterative coordinate descent algorithm is adopted to reconstruct the image with a voxel-based closed-form solution. Results of numerical simulations and mouse experiments show that the self-adaptive Bayesian method significantly improves the CB-XLCT image quality as compared with conventional methods.

  19. Measurement of breast tissue composition with dual energy cone-beam computed tomography: A postmortem study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a three-material compositional measurement of water, lipid, and protein content of breast tissue with dual kVp cone-beam computed tomography (CT) for diagnostic purposes. Methods: Simulations were performed on a flat panel-based computed tomography system with a dual kVp technique in order to guide the selection of experimental acquisition parameters. The expected errors induced by using the proposed calibration materials were also estimated by simulation. Twenty pairs of postmortem breast samples were imaged with a flat-panel based dual kVp cone-beam CT system, followed by image-based material decomposition using calibration data obtained from a three-material phantom consisting of water, vegetable oil, and polyoxymethylene plastic. The tissue samples were then chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein contents after imaging to allow direct comparison with data from dual energy decomposition. Results: Guided by results from simulation, the beam energies for the dual kVp cone-beam CT system were selected to be 50 and 120 kVp with the mean glandular dose divided equally between each exposure. The simulation also suggested that the use of polyoxymethylene as the calibration material for the measurement of pure protein may introduce an error of −11.0%. However, the tissue decomposition experiments, which employed a calibration phantom made out of water, oil, and polyoxymethylene, exhibited strong correlation with data from the chemical analysis. The average root-mean-square percentage error for water, lipid, and protein contents was 3.58% as compared with chemical analysis. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the water, lipid, and protein contents can be accurately measured using dual kVp cone-beam CT. The tissue compositional information may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:23718593

  20. Measurement of breast tissue composition with dual energy cone-beam computed tomography: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Huanjun; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a three-material compositional measurement of water, lipid, and protein content of breast tissue with dual kVp cone-beam computed tomography (CT) for diagnostic purposes. Methods: Simulations were performed on a flat panel-based computed tomography system with a dual kVp technique in order to guide the selection of experimental acquisition parameters. The expected errors induced by using the proposed calibration materials were also estimated by simulation. Twenty pairs of postmortem breast samples were imaged with a flat-panel based dual kVp cone-beam CT system, followed by image-based material decomposition using calibration data obtained from a three-material phantom consisting of water, vegetable oil, and polyoxymethylene plastic. The tissue samples were then chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein contents after imaging to allow direct comparison with data from dual energy decomposition. Results: Guided by results from simulation, the beam energies for the dual kVp cone-beam CT system were selected to be 50 and 120 kVp with the mean glandular dose divided equally between each exposure. The simulation also suggested that the use of polyoxymethylene as the calibration material for the measurement of pure protein may introduce an error of -11.0%. However, the tissue decomposition experiments, which employed a calibration phantom made out of water, oil, and polyoxymethylene, exhibited strong correlation with data from the chemical analysis. The average root-mean-square percentage error for water, lipid, and protein contents was 3.58% as compared with chemical analysis. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the water, lipid, and protein contents can be accurately measured using dual kVp cone-beam CT. The tissue compositional information may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer diagnosis.

  1. Optimizing 4D cone-beam CT acquisition protocol for external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Tianfang; Xing Lei . E-mail: lei@reyes.stanford.edu

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) imaging is sensitive to parameters such as gantry rotation speed, number of gantry rotations, X-ray pulse rate, and tube current, as well as a patient's breathing pattern. The aim of this study is to optimize the image acquisition on a patient-specific basis while minimizing the scan time and the radiation dose. Methods and Materials: More than 60 sets of 4D-CBCT images, each with a temporal resolution of 10 phases, were acquired using multiple-gantry rotation and slow-gantry rotation techniques. The image quality was quantified with a relative root mean-square error (RE) and correlated with various acquisition settings; specifically, varying gantry rotation speed, varying both the rotation speed and the number of rotations, and varying both the rotation speed and tube current to keep the radiation exposure constant. These experiments were repeated for three different respiratory periods. Results: With similar radiation dose, 4D-CBCT images acquired with low current and low rotation speed have better quality over images obtained with high current and high rotation speed. In general, a one-rotation low-speed scan is superior to a two-rotation double-speed scan, even though they provide the same number of projections. Furthermore, it is found that the image quality behaves monotonically with the relative speed as defined by the gantry rotation speed and the patient respiratory period. Conclusions: The RE curves established in this work can be used to predict the 4D-CBCT image quality before a scan. This allows the acquisition protocol to be optimized individually to balance the desired quality with the associated scanning time and patient radiation dose.

  2. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    PubMed

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  3. Iterative image reconstruction for limited-angle inverse helical cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Zeng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Helical trajectory satisfying the condition of exact reconstruction, has been widely utilized in the commercial computed tomography (CT). While limited by the scanning environment in some practical applications, the conventional helical cone-beam CT imaging is hard to complete, thus, developing an imaging system suited for long-object may be valuable. Three-dimensional C-arm CT is an innovative imaging technique which has been greatly concerned. Since there is a high degree of freedom of C-arm, more flexible image acquisition trajectories for 3D imaging can be achieved. In this work, a fast iterative reconstruction algorithm based on total variation minimization is developed for a trajectory of limited-angle inverse helical cone-beam CT, which can be applied to detect long-object without slip-ring technology. The experimental results show that the developed algorithm can yield reconstructed images of low noise level and high image quality.

  4. MR cone-beam CT fusion image overlay for fluoroscopically guided percutaneous biopsies in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Patel, Premal A; Gu, Richard; Rea, Vanessa; Amaral, Joao; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2016-03-01

    Lesions only visible on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging cannot easily be targeted for image-guided biopsy using ultrasound or X-rays but instead require MR guidance with MR-compatible needles and long procedure times (acquisition of multiple MR sequences). We developed an alternative method for performing these difficult biopsies in a standard interventional suite, by fusing MR with cone-beam CT images. The MR cone-beam CT fusion image is then used as an overlay to guide a biopsy needle to the target area under live fluoroscopic guidance. Advantages of this technique include (i) the ability for it to be performed in a conventional interventional suite, (ii) three-dimensional planning of the needle trajectory using cross-sectional imaging, (iii) real-time fluoroscopic guidance for needle trajectory correction and (iv) targeting within heterogeneous lesions based on MR signal characteristics to maximize the potential biopsy yield.

  5. Comparative study of mandibular linear measurements obtained by cone beam computed tomography and digital calipers

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Álvarez, Pablo; Romero-Millán, Javier; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Fuster-Torres, María Á.; Tarazona, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an innovative dental of imaging system characterized by rapid volumetric imaging with patient exposure to a single dose of radiation. The present study was carried out to compare the linear measurements obtained with CBCT and digital caliper in 20 mandibles from human cadavers. Study design: A total of 4800 linear measurements were measured between different mandibular anatomical points with CBCT and digital caliper. The real measurements were defined as those obtained with the digital caliper. Posteriorly, the mandibles were scanned to obtain the CBCT images, with software-based measurements of the distances. Results: The measurements obtained with the digital caliper were greater. The CBCT technique underestimated distances greater than 100 mm. Conclusions: CBCT allows to obtain linear mandibular anatomical measurements equivalent to those obtained with digital caliper. The differences existing between both methods were clinically acceptable. Key words:Computed tomography, cone beam CT, accuracy, reliability, digital caliper. PMID:25136429

  6. 3D Multislice and Cone-beam Computed Tomography Systems for Dental Identification.

    PubMed

    Eliášová, Hana; Dostálová, Taťjana

    2017-01-01

    3D Multislice and Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in forensic odontology has been shown to be useful not only in terms of one or a few of dead bodies but also in multiple fatality incidents. 3D Multislice and Cone-beam computed tomography and digital radiography were demonstrated in a forensic examination form. 3D images of the skull and teeth were analysed and validated for long ante mortem/post mortem intervals. The image acquisition was instantaneous; the images were able to be optically enlarged, measured, superimposed and compared prima vista or using special software and exported as a file. Digital radiology and computer tomography has been shown to be important both in common criminalistics practices and in multiple fatality incidents. Our study demonstrated that CBCT imaging offers less image artifacts, low image reconstruction times, mobility of the unit and considerably lower equipment cost.

  7. [Upper airway's 3D analysis of patients with obstructive sleep apnea using tomographic cone beam].

    PubMed

    Bruwier, A; Poirrier, A L; Limme, M; Poirrier, R

    2014-12-01

    The progress of medical imaging over the last decades has led to a better understanding of the upper airway structure in sleep-disordered patients. The Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSA) is attributed to a functional narrowing of the upper airway, particularly of the oropharynx, during sleep. This narrowing is multifactorial. We have shown that in 60% cases, the maxilla (nasal pyramid) seems too narrow. A mandible retroposition may also play a dominant role in 30% of the cases. Both scenarios can be combined. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a new medical imaging technique that permits to visualize the upper airway with less ionizing radiation than the conventional scanner. To date, only five authors have performed an upper airway's 3D analysis of sleep apnea patients with cone beam. A better understanding of the affected segment of the upper airway should help refine treatment options.

  8. Cracked Tooth: A Report of Two Cases and Role of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kalyan Chakravarthy, Pishipati Vinayak; Telang, Lahari Ajay; Nerali, Jayashri; Telang, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Cracked tooth is a distinct type of longitudinal tooth fracture which occurs very commonly and its diagnosis can be challenging. This type of fracture tends to grow and change over time. Clinical diagnosis is difficult because the signs and symptoms are variable or nonspecific and may even resemble post-treatment disease following root canal treatment or periodontal disease. This variety and unpredictability make the cracked tooth a challenging diagnostic entity. The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in diagnosis of complex endodontic cases has been well documented in the literature. In this paper we present two cases of cracked tooth and emphasise on the timely use of cone beam computed tomography as an aid in diagnosis and as a prognostic determinant. PMID:23198164

  9. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of Mental Foramen Variations: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Karbasi Kheir, Mitra; Hekmatian, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mental foramen is important in surgical operations of premolars because it transfers the mental nerves and vessels. This study evaluated the variations of mental foramen by cone-beam computed tomography among a selected Iranian population. Materials and Methods. A total number of 180 cone-beam computed tomography projections were analyzed in terms of shape, size, direction, and horizontal and vertical positions of mental foramen in the right and left sides. Results. The most common shape was oval, opening direction was posterior-superior, horizontal position was in line with second premolar, and vertical position was apical to the adjacent dental root. The mean of foremen diameter was 3.59 mm. Conclusion. In addition to the most common types of mental foramen, other variations exist, too. Hence, it reflects the significance of preoperative radiographic examinations, especially 3-dimensional images to prevent nerve damage. PMID:26609432

  10. Can cone-beam computed tomography superimposition help orthodontists better understand relapse in surgical patients?

    PubMed

    Porciúncula, Guilherme Machado; Koerich, Leonardo; Eidson, Lindsey; Gandini Junior, Luiz Gonzaga; Gonçalves, João Roberto

    2014-11-01

    This case report describes the interdisciplinary treatment of a 19-year-old Brazilian man with a Class I malocclusion, a hyperdivergent profile, an anterior open bite, and signs of temporomandibular joint internal derangement. The treatment plan included evaluation with a temporomandibular joint specialist and a rheumatologist, orthodontic appliances, and maxillomandibular surgical advancement with counterclockwise rotation. Cone-beam computed tomography images were taken before and after surgery at different times and superimposed at the cranial base to assess the changes after orthognathic surgery and to monitor quantitatively the internal derangement of the temporomandibular joints and surgical relapse. Our protocol can improve the orthodontist's understanding of surgical instability, demonstrate the clinical value of cone-beam computed tomography analysis beyond the multiplanar reconstruction, and guide patient management for the best outcome possible.

  11. The Applications of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kiarudi, Amir Hosein; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Safi, Yaser; Aghdasi, Mohammad Mehdi; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2015-01-01

    By producing undistorted three-dimensional images of the area under examination, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems have met many of the limitations of conventional radiography. These systems produce images with small field of view at low radiation doses with adequate spatial resolution that are suitable for many applications in endodontics from diagnosis to treatment and follow-up. This review article comprehensively assembles all the data from literature regarding the potential applications of CBCT in endodontics. PMID:25598804

  12. Dental cone beam CT image quality possibly reduced by patient movement.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, K; O'Connor, S; Heath, N

    2013-01-01

    Patient artefacts in dental cone beam CT scans can happen for various reasons. These range from artefacts from metal restorations to movement. An audit was carried out in the Glasgow Dental Hospital analysing how many scans showed signs of "motion artefact", and then to assess if there was any correlation between patient age and movement artefacts. Specific age demographics were then analysed to see if these cohorts were at a higher risk of "movement artefacts".

  13. History of imaging in orthodontics from Broadbent to cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hans, Mark G; Palomo, J Martin; Valiathan, Manish

    2015-12-01

    The history of imaging and orthodontics is a story of technology informing biology. Advances in imaging changed our thinking as our understanding of craniofacial growth and the impact of orthodontic treatment deepened. This article traces the history of imaging in orthodontics from the invention of the cephalometer by B. Holly Broadbent in 1930 to the introduction of low-cost, low-radiation-dose cone-beam computed tomography imaging in 2015.

  14. Reduced exposure using asymmetric cone beam processing for wide area detector cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Bedayat, Arash; Rybicki, Frank J; Kumamaru, Kanako; Powers, Sara L; Signorelli, Jason; Steigner, Michael L; Steveson, Chloe; Soga, Shigeyoshi; Adams, Kimberly; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Clouse, Melvin; Mather, Richard T

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate dose reduction after implementation of asymmetrical cone beam processing using exposure differences measured in a water phantom and a small cohort of clinical coronary CTA patients. Two separate 320 × 0.5 mm detector row scans of a water phantom used identical cardiac acquisition parameters before and after software modifications from symmetric to asymmetric cone beam acquisition and processing. Exposure was measured at the phantom surface with Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimeters at 12 equally spaced angular locations. Mean HU and standard deviation (SD) for both approaches were compared using ROI measurements obtained at the center plus four peripheral locations in the water phantom. To assess image quality, mean HU and standard deviation (SD) for both approaches were compared using ROI measurements obtained at five points within the water phantom. Retrospective evaluation of 64 patients (37 symmetric; 27 asymmetric acquisition) included clinical data, scanning parameters, quantitative plus qualitative image assessment, and estimated radiation dose. In the water phantom, the asymmetric cone beam processing reduces exposure by approximately 20% with no change in image quality. The clinical coronary CTA patient groups had comparable demographics. The estimated dose reduction after implementation of the asymmetric approach was roughly 24% with no significant difference between the symmetric and asymmetric approach with respect to objective measures of image quality or subjective assessment using a four point scale. When compared to a symmetric approach, the decreased exposure, subsequent lower patient radiation dose, and similar image quality from asymmetric cone beam processing supports its routine clinical use.

  15. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  16. C-arm cone-beam computed tomography in interventional oncology: technical aspects and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Floridi, Chiara; Radaelli, Alessandro; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Grass, Micheal; Lin, Ming De; Chiaradia, Melanie; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Kobeiter, Hishman; Squillaci, Ettore; Maleux, Geert; Giovagnoni, Andrea; Brunese, Luca; Wood, Bradford; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new imaging technology integrated in modern angiographic systems. Due to its ability to obtain cross-sectional imaging and the possibility to use dedicated planning and navigation software, it provides an informed platform for interventional oncology procedures. In this paper, we highlight the technical aspects and clinical applications of CBCT imaging and navigation in the most common loco-regional oncological treatments. PMID:25012472

  17. SU-E-J-99: Reconstruction of Cone Beam CT Image Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Exit Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, K; Goddard, L; Savacool, M; Mynampati, D; Godoy Scripes, P; Tome', W; Kuo, H; Basavatia, A; Hong, L; Yaparpalvi, R; Kalnicki, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To test the possibility of obtaining an image of the treated volume during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with exit beams. Method: Using a Varian Clinac 21EX and MVCT detector the following three sets of detector projection data were obtained for cone beam CT reconstruction with and without a Catphan 504 phantom. 1) 72 projection images from 20 × 16 cm{sup 2} open beam with 3 MUs, 2) 72 projection images from 20 × 16 cm{sup 2} MLC closed beam with 14 MUs. 3) 137 projection images from a test RapicArc QA plan. All projection images were obtained in ‘integrated image’ mode. We used OSCaR code to reconstruct the cone beam CT images. No attempts were made to reduce scatter or artifacts. Results: With projection set 1) we obtained a good quality MV CBCT image by optimizing the reconstruction parameters. Using projection set 2) we were not able to obtain a CBCT image of the phantom, which was determined to be due to the variation of interleaf leakage with gantry angle. From projection set 3), we were able to obtain a weak but meaningful signal in the image, especially in the target area where open beam signals were dominant. This finding suggests that one might be able to acquire CBCT images with rough body shape and some details inside the irradiated target area. Conclusion: Obtaining patient images using the VMAT exit beam is challenging but possible. We were able to determine sources of image degradation such as gantry angle dependent interleaf leakage and beams with a large scatter component. We are actively working on improving image quality.

  18. The adaptation of megavoltage cone beam CT for use in standard radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T Hannah Mary; Devakumar, D; Purnima, S; Ravindran, B Paul

    2009-04-07

    Potential areas where megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) could be used are second- and third-phase treatment planning in 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, adaptive radiation therapy, single fraction palliative treatment and for the treatment of patients with metal prostheses. A feasibility study was done on using MV cone beam CT (CBCT) images generated by proprietary 3D reconstruction software based on the FDK algorithm for megavoltage treatment planning. The reconstructed images were converted to a DICOM file set. The pixel values of megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) were rescaled to those of kV CT for use with a treatment planning system. A calibration phantom was designed and developed for verification of geometric accuracy and CT number calibration. The distance measured between two marker points on the CBCT image and the physical dimension on the phantom were in good agreement. Point dose verification for a 10 cm x 10 cm beam at a gantry angle of 0 degrees and SAD of 100 cm were performed for a 6 MV beam for both kV and MV CBCT images. The point doses were found to vary between +/-6.1% of the dose calculated from the kV CT image. The isodose curves for 6 MV for both kV CT and MV CBCT images were within 2% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement. A plan with three beams was performed on MV CBCT, simulating a treatment plan for cancer of the pituitary. The distribution obtained was compared with those corresponding to that obtained using the kV CT. This study has shown that treatment planning with MV cone beam CT images is feasible.

  19. The adaptation of megavoltage cone beam CT for use in standard radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T. Hannah Mary; Devakumar, D.; Purnima, S.; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2009-04-01

    Potential areas where megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) could be used are second- and third-phase treatment planning in 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, adaptive radiation therapy, single fraction palliative treatment and for the treatment of patients with metal prostheses. A feasibility study was done on using MV cone beam CT (CBCT) images generated by proprietary 3D reconstruction software based on the FDK algorithm for megavoltage treatment planning. The reconstructed images were converted to a DICOM file set. The pixel values of megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) were rescaled to those of kV CT for use with a treatment planning system. A calibration phantom was designed and developed for verification of geometric accuracy and CT number calibration. The distance measured between two marker points on the CBCT image and the physical dimension on the phantom were in good agreement. Point dose verification for a 10 cm × 10 cm beam at a gantry angle of 0° and SAD of 100 cm were performed for a 6 MV beam for both kV and MV CBCT images. The point doses were found to vary between ±6.1% of the dose calculated from the kV CT image. The isodose curves for 6 MV for both kV CT and MV CBCT images were within 2% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement. A plan with three beams was performed on MV CBCT, simulating a treatment plan for cancer of the pituitary. The distribution obtained was compared with those corresponding to that obtained using the kV CT. This study has shown that treatment planning with MV cone beam CT images is feasible.

  20. A Monte Carlo investigation of dual-planar circular-orbit cone-beam SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalush, David S.; Di Meo, Andrew J.

    2002-12-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the imaging properties of a design for a dual-planar cone-beam (DPCB) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system. A dual-planar system uses a dual-camera SPECT system and two cone-beam collimators with foci in different axial planes to increase the effective axial field of view (FOV). We simulated nearly noise-free projection data from a computerized brain phantom and a phantom consisting of a series of points. Four configurations were simulated: parallel-beam low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) as a standard for comparison and DPCB at three radii of rotation (ROR) corresponding to the smallest, average and largest ROR required to clear patients' shoulders based on ergonomic data. We compared global measures of average resolution and total acquired counts for the four configurations. We also estimated local spatial frequency response for reconstructions of point sources. Finally, we estimated a local noise power spectrum by simulating 1000 noise realizations of the brain phantom and estimating a local noise covariance at selected points. The noise power spectra were used to estimate spectral signal to noise ratio (SNR) for each configuration. The resolution in the reconstructed image space ranges from 7.2 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) at the minimum ROR to 9.4 mm FWHM at the maximum ROR. The efficiency is inversely related, ranging from 1.5 times that of parallel LEHR at minimum ROR to 2.5 times that of LEHR at maximum ROR. Estimates of system frequency response roughly correspond to the global resolution estimates, but the cone-beam techniques exhibit an unusual secondary peak in the axial-direction response. Estimates of spectral SNR show that the cone-beam configurations almost always result in higher SNR at all spatial frequencies regardless of ROR. The very largest ROR may be an exception. A larger ROR results in significantly higher SNR for low spatial frequencies with small reductions in SNR for mid

  1. [Change in condylar and mandibular morphology in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: cone beam volumetric imaging].

    PubMed

    Garagiola, Umberto; Mercatali, Lorenzo; Bellintani, Claudio; Fodor, Attila; Farronato, Giampietro; Lőrincz, Adám

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to show the importance of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography to volumetrically quantify TMJ damage in patients with JIA, measuring condylar and mandibular real volumes. 34 children with temporomandibular involvement by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis were observed by Cone Beam Computerized Tomography. 4 were excluded because of several imaging noises. The mandible was isolated from others craniofacial structures; the whole mandibular volume and its components' volumes (condyle, ramus, hemibody, hemisymphysis on right side and on left side) has been calculated by a 3D volume rendering technique. The results show a highly significant statistical difference between affected side volumetric values versus normal side volumetric values above all on condyle region (P < 0.01), while they don't show any statistical differences between right side versus left side. The Cone Beam Computerized Tomography represents a huge improvement in understanding of the condyle and mandibular morphological changes, even in the early stages of the Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. The JIA can lead in children to temporomandibular joint damage with facial development and growth alterations.

  2. SPECT reconstruction of combined cone beam and parallel hole collimation with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianying; Jaszczak, Ronald J.; Turkington, Timothy G.; Greer, Kim L.; Coleman, R. Edward

    1993-06-01

    We have developed three methods to combine parallel and cone beam (P & CB) SPECT data using modified Maximum Likelihood-Expectation Maximization (ML-EM) algorithms. The first combination method applies both parallel and cone beam data sets to reconstruct a single intermediate image after each iteration using the ML-EL algorithm. The other two iterative methods combine the intermediate beam (PB) and cone (CB) source estimates to enhance the uniformity of images. These two methods are ad hoc methods. In earlier studies using computer Monte Carlo simulation, we suggested that improved images might be obtained by reconstructing combined P & CB SPECT data. These combined collimation methods are qualitatively evaluated using experimental data. An attenuation compensation is performed by including the effects of attenuation in the transition matrix as a multiplicative factor. The combined P&CB images are compared with CB-only images and the results indicate that the combined P&CB approaches suppress artifacts caused by truncated projections and correct for the distortions of the CB-only images.

  3. GPU-Based 3D Cone-Beam CT Image Reconstruction for Large Data Volume

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xing; Hu, Jing-jing; Zhang, Peng

    2009-01-01

    Currently, 3D cone-beam CT image reconstruction speed is still a severe limitation for clinical application. The computational power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) has been harnessed to provide impressive acceleration of 3D volume image reconstruction. For extra large data volume exceeding the physical graphic memory of GPU, a straightforward compromise is to divide data volume into blocks. Different from the conventional Octree partition method, a new partition scheme is proposed in this paper. This method divides both projection data and reconstructed image volume into subsets according to geometric symmetries in circular cone-beam projection layout, and a fast reconstruction for large data volume can be implemented by packing the subsets of projection data into the RGBA channels of GPU, performing the reconstruction chunk by chunk and combining the individual results in the end. The method is evaluated by reconstructing 3D images from computer-simulation data and real micro-CT data. Our results indicate that the GPU implementation can maintain original precision and speed up the reconstruction process by 110–120 times for circular cone-beam scan, as compared to traditional CPU implementation. PMID:19730744

  4. Region-of-interest reconstruction for a cone-beam dental CT with a circular trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhanli; Zou, Jing; Gui, Jianbao; Zheng, Hairong; Xia, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Dental CT is the most appropriate and accurate device for preoperative evaluation of dental implantation. It can demonstrate the quantity of bone in three dimensions (3D), the location of important adjacent anatomic structures and the quality of available bone with minimal geometric distortion. Nevertheless, with the rapid increase of dental CT examinations, we are facing the problem of dose reduction without loss of image quality. In this work, backprojection-filtration (BPF) and Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct the 3D full image and region-of-interest (ROI) image from complete and truncated circular cone-beam data respectively by computer-simulation. In addition, the BPF algorithm was evaluated based on the 3D ROI-image reconstruction from real data, which was acquired from our developed circular cone-beam prototype dental CT system. The results demonstrated that the ROI-image quality reconstructed from truncated data using the BPF algorithm was comparable to that reconstructed from complete data. The FDK algorithm, however, created artifacts while reconstructing ROI-image. Thus it can be seen, for circular cone-beam dental CT, reducing scanning angular range of the BPF algorithm used for ROI-image reconstruction are helpful for reducing the radiation dose and scanning time. Finally, an analytical method was developed for estimation of the ROI projection area on the detector before CT scanning, which would help doctors to roughly estimate the total radiation dose before the CT examination.

  5. Image reconstruction in circular cone-beam computed tomography by constrained, total-variation minimization

    PubMed Central

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2009-01-01

    An iterative algorithm, based on recent work in compressive sensing, is developed for volume image reconstruction from a circular cone-beam scan. The algorithm minimizes the total-variation (TV) of the image subject to the constraint that the estimated projection data is within a specified tolerance of the available data and that the values of the volume image are non-negative. The constraints are enforced by use of projection onto convex sets (POCS) and the TV objective is minimized by steepest descent with an adaptive step-size. The algorithm is referred to as adaptive-steepest-descent-POCS (ASD-POCS). It appears to be robust against cone-beam artifacts, and may be particularly useful when the angular range is limited or when the angular sampling rate is low. The ASD-POCS algorithm is tested with the Defrise disk and jaw computerized phantoms. Some comparisons are performed with the POCS and expectation-maximization (EM) algorithms. Although the algorithm is presented in the context of circular cone-beam image reconstruction, it can also be applied to scanning geometries involving other x-ray source trajectories. PMID:18701771

  6. Current role of hybrid CT/angiography system compared with C-arm cone beam CT for interventional oncology

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Y; Inaba, Y; Inoue, M; Nishiofuku, H; Anai, H; Hori, S; Sakaguchi, H; Kichikawa, K

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid CT/angiography (angiography) system and C-arm cone beam CT provide cross-sectional imaging as an adjunct to angiography. Current interventional oncological procedures can be conducted precisely using these two technologies. In this article, several cases using a hybrid CT/angiography system are shown first, and then the advantages and disadvantages of the hybrid CT/angiography and C-arm cone beam CT are discussed with literature reviews. PMID:24968749

  7. Current role of hybrid CT/angiography system compared with C-arm cone beam CT for interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Arai, Y; Inaba, Y; Inoue, M; Nishiofuku, H; Anai, H; Hori, S; Sakaguchi, H; Kichikawa, K

    2014-09-01

    Hybrid CT/angiography (angiography) system and C-arm cone beam CT provide cross-sectional imaging as an adjunct to angiography. Current interventional oncological procedures can be conducted precisely using these two technologies. In this article, several cases using a hybrid CT/angiography system are shown first, and then the advantages and disadvantages of the hybrid CT/angiography and C-arm cone beam CT are discussed with literature reviews.

  8. PI-line-based image reconstruction in helical cone-beam computed tomography with a variable pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Yu; Pan Xiaochuan; Xia Dan; Wang Ge

    2005-08-15

    Current applications of helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT) involve primarily a constant pitch where the translating speed of the table and the rotation speed of the source-detector remain constant. However, situations do exist where it may be more desirable to use a helical scan with a variable translating speed of the table, leading a variable pitch. One of such applications could arise in helical cone-beam CT fluoroscopy for the determination of vascular structures through real-time imaging of contrast bolus arrival. Most of the existing reconstruction algorithms have been developed only for helical cone-beam CT with constant pitch, including the backprojection-filtration (BPF) and filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithms that we proposed previously. It is possible to generalize some of these algorithms to reconstruct images exactly for helical cone-beam CT with a variable pitch. In this work, we generalize our BPF and FBP algorithms to reconstruct images directly from data acquired in helical cone-beam CT with a variable pitch. We have also performed a preliminary numerical study to demonstrate and verify the generalization of the two algorithms. The results of the study confirm that our generalized BPF and FBP algorithms can yield exact reconstruction in helical cone-beam CT with a variable pitch. It should be pointed out that our generalized BPF algorithm is the only algorithm that is capable of reconstructing exactly region-of-interest image from data containing transverse truncations.

  9. Use of cone beam computed tomography in implant dentistry: current concepts, indications and limitations for clinical practice and research.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Michael M; Horner, Keith; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2017-02-01

    Diagnostic radiology is an essential component of treatment planning in the field of implant dentistry. This narrative review will present current concepts for the use of cone beam computed tomography imaging, before and after implant placement, in daily clinical practice and research. Guidelines for the selection of three-dimensional imaging will be discussed, and limitations will be highlighted. Current concepts of radiation dose optimization, including novel imaging modalities using low-dose protocols, will be presented. For preoperative cross-sectional imaging, data are still not available which demonstrate that cone beam computed tomography results in fewer intraoperative complications such as nerve damage or bleeding incidents, or that implants inserted using preoperative cone beam computed tomography data sets for planning purposes will exhibit higher survival or success rates. The use of cone beam computed tomography following the insertion of dental implants should be restricted to specific postoperative complications, such as damage of neurovascular structures or postoperative infections in relation to the maxillary sinus. Regarding peri-implantitis, the diagnosis and severity of the disease should be evaluated primarily based on clinical parameters and on radiological findings based on periapical radiographs (two dimensional). The use of cone beam computed tomography scans in clinical research might not yield any evident beneficial effect for the patient included. As many of the cone beam computed tomography scans performed for research have no direct therapeutic consequence, dose optimization measures should be implemented by using appropriate exposure parameters and by reducing the field of view to the actual region of interest.

  10. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, Georg A.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities—fan beam and cone beam—was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient. PMID:27752404

  11. An index of beam hardening artifact for two-dimensional cone-beam CT tomographic images: establishment and preliminary evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Yang, Huifang; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yuchun

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Based on the pixel gray value measurements, establish a beam-hardening artifacts index of the cone-beam CT tomographic image, and preliminarily evaluate its applicability. Methods: The 5mm-diameter metal ball and resin ball were fixed on the light-cured resin base plate respectively, while four vitro molars were fixed above and below the ball, on the left and right respectively, which have 10mm distance with the metal ball. Then, cone beam CT was used to scan the fixed base plate twice. The same layer tomographic images were selected from the two data and imported into the Photoshop software. The circle boundary was built through the determination of the center and radius of the circle, according to the artifact-free images section. Grayscale measurement tools were used to measure the internal boundary gray value G0, gray value G1 and G2 of 1mm and 20mm artifacts outside the circular boundary, the length L1 of the arc with artifacts in the circular boundary, the circumference L2. Hardening artifacts index was set A = (G1 / G0) * 0.5 + (G2 / G1) * 0.4 + (L2 / L1) * 0.1. Then, the A values of metal and resin materials were calculated respectively. Results: The A value of cobalt-chromium alloy material is 1, and resin material is 0. Conclusion: The A value reflects comprehensively the three factors of hardening artifacts influencing normal oral tissue image sharpness of cone beam CT. The three factors include relative gray value, the decay rate and range of artifacts.

  12. Effects of the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams on the implosion of a cone-guided target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagawa, T.; Sakagami, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Sunahara, A.

    2016-03-01

    In direct drive laser fusion, the non-uniformity of the laser absorption on the target surface caused by the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams is a sever problem. GekkoXII laser at Osaka University has twelve laser beams and is irradiated to the target with a dodecahedron orientation, in which the distribution of the laser absorption on the target surface becomes non-uniform. Furthermore, in the case of a cone-guided target, the laser irradiation orientation is more limited. In this paper, we conducted implosion simulations of the cone- guided target based on GekkoXII irradiation orientation and compared the case of using the twelve beams and nine beams where the three beams irradiating the cone region are cut. The implosion simulations were conducted by a three-dimensional pure hydro code.

  13. Fast kilovoltage/megavoltage (kVMV) breathhold cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, Hansjoerg; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Blessing, Manuel; Rossi, Michael; Knox, Chris; Brown, Kevin; Gros, Uwe; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Walter, Cornelia; Hesser, Juergen; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-08-01

    Long image acquisition times of 60-120 s for cone-beam CT (CBCT) limit the number of patients with lung cancer who can undergo volume image guidance under breathhold. We developed a low-dose dual-energy kilovoltage-megavoltage-cone-beam CT (kVMV-CBCT) based on a clinical treatment unit reducing imaging time to <=15 s. Simultaneous kVMV-imaging was achieved by dedicated synchronization hardware controlling the output of the linear accelerator (linac) based on detector panel readout signals, preventing imaging artifacts from interference of the linac's MV-irradiation and panel readouts. Optimization was performed to minimize the imaging dose. Single MV-projections, reconstructed MV-CBCT images and images of simultaneous 90° kV- and 90° MV-CBCT (180° kVMV-CBCT) were acquired with different parameters. Image quality and imaging dose were evaluated and compared to kV-imaging. Hardware-based kVMV synchronization resulted in artifact-free projections. A combined 180° kVMV-CBCT scan with a total MV-dose of 5 monitor units was acquired in 15 s and with sufficient image quality. The resolution was 5-6 line pairs cm-1 (Catphan phantom). The combined kVMV-scan dose was equivalent to a kV-radiation scan dose of ~33 mGy. kVMV-CBCT based on a standard linac is promising and can provide ultra-fast online volume image guidance with low imaging dose and sufficient image quality for fast and accurate patient positioning for patients with lung cancer under breathhold.

  14. Characteristics of kilovoltage x-ray beams used for cone-beam computed tomography in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, George X; Duggan, Dennis M; Coffey, Charles W

    2007-03-21

    The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the beams produced by a kilovoltage (kV) imager integrated into a linear accelerator (Varian on-board imager integrated into the Trilogy accelerator) for acquiring high resolution volumetric cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of the patient on the treatment table. The x-ray tube is capable of generating photon spectra with kVp values between 40 and 125 kV. The Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the characteristics of kV beams and the properties of imaged target scatters. The Monte Carlo results were benchmarked against measurements, and excellent agreements were obtained. We also studied the effect of including the electron impact ionization (EII), and the simulation showed that the characteristic radiation is increased significantly in the energy spectra when EII is included. Although only slight beam hardening is observed in the spectra of all photons after passing through the phantom target, there is a significant difference in the spectra and angular distributions between scattered and primary photons. The results also show that the photon fluence distributions are significantly altered by adding bow tie filters. The results indicate that a combination of large cone-beam field size and large imaged target significantly increases scatter-to-primary ratios for photons that reach the detector panel. For phantoms 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm thick of water placed at the isocentre, the scatter-to-primary ratios are 0.94, 3.0 and 7.6 respectively for an open 125 kVp CBCT beam. The Monte Carlo simulations show that the increase of the scatter is proportional to the increase of the imaged volume, and this also applies to scatter-to-primary ratios. This study shows both the magnitude and the characteristics of scattered x-rays. The knowledge obtained from this investigation may be useful in the future design of the image detector to improve the image quality.

  15. Characteristics of kilovoltage x-ray beams used for cone-beam computed tomography in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, George X.; Duggan, Dennis M.; Coffey, Charles W.

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the beams produced by a kilovoltage (kV) imager integrated into a linear accelerator (Varian on-board imager integrated into the Trilogy accelerator) for acquiring high resolution volumetric cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of the patient on the treatment table. The x-ray tube is capable of generating photon spectra with kVp values between 40 and 125 kV. The Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the characteristics of kV beams and the properties of imaged target scatters. The Monte Carlo results were benchmarked against measurements, and excellent agreements were obtained. We also studied the effect of including the electron impact ionization (EII), and the simulation showed that the characteristic radiation is increased significantly in the energy spectra when EII is included. Although only slight beam hardening is observed in the spectra of all photons after passing through the phantom target, there is a significant difference in the spectra and angular distributions between scattered and primary photons. The results also show that the photon fluence distributions are significantly altered by adding bow tie filters. The results indicate that a combination of large cone-beam field size and large imaged target significantly increases scatter-to-primary ratios for photons that reach the detector panel. For phantoms 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm thick of water placed at the isocentre, the scatter-to-primary ratios are 0.94, 3.0 and 7.6 respectively for an open 125 kVp CBCT beam. The Monte Carlo simulations show that the increase of the scatter is proportional to the increase of the imaged volume, and this also applies to scatter-to-primary ratios. This study shows both the magnitude and the characteristics of scattered x-rays. The knowledge obtained from this investigation may be useful in the future design of the image detector to improve the image quality.

  16. MODELING THE FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF RADIO BEAMS FOR CONE-DOMINANT PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P. F.; Han, J. L.; Wang, C. E-mail: hjl@nao.cas.cn

    2013-05-10

    Beam radii for cone-dominant pulsars follow a power-law relation with frequency, thetav = ({nu}/{nu}{sub 0}) {sup k} + thetav{sub 0}, which has not been well explained in previous works. We study this frequency dependence of beam radius (FDB) for cone-dominant pulsars by using the curvature radiation mechanism. Considering various density and energy distributions of particles in the pulsar open field-line region, we numerically simulate the emission intensity distribution across emission height and rotation phase, get integrated profiles at different frequencies, and obtain the FDB curves. For the density model of a conal-like distribution, the simulated profiles always shrink to one component at high frequencies. In the density model with two separated density patches, the profiles generally have two distinct components, and the power-law indices k are found to be in the range from -0.1 to -2.5, consistent with observational results. Energy distributions of streaming particles have significant influence on the frequency-dependence behavior. Radial energy decay of particles is desired to get proper thetav{sub 0} in models. We conclude that by using the curvature radiation mechanism, the observed FDB for the cone-dominant pulsars can only be explained by the emission model of particles in two density patches with a Gaussian energy distribution and a radial energy loss.

  17. 3D In Vivo Dosimetry Using Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT and EPID Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Elmpt, Wouter van Nijsten, Sebastiaan; Petit, Steven; Mijnheer, Ben; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To develop a method that reconstructs, independently of previous (planning) information, the dose delivered to patients by combining in-room imaging with transit dose measurements during treatment. Methods and Materials: A megavoltage cone-beam CT scan of the patient anatomy was acquired with the patient in treatment position. During treatment, delivered fields were measured behind the patient with an electronic portal imaging device. The dose information in these images was back-projected through the cone-beam CT scan and used for Monte Carlo simulation of the dose distribution inside the cone-beam CT scan. Validation was performed using various phantoms for conformal and IMRT plans. Clinical applicability is shown for a head-and-neck cancer patient treated with IMRT. Results: For single IMRT beams and a seven-field IMRT step-and-shoot plan, the dose distribution was reconstructed within 3%/3mm compared with the measured or planned dose. A three-dimensional conformal plan, verified using eight point-dose measurements, resulted in a difference of 1.3 {+-} 3.3% (1 SD) compared with the reconstructed dose. For the patient case, planned and reconstructed dose distribution was within 3%/3mm for about 95% of the points within the 20% isodose line. Reconstructed mean dose values, obtained from dose-volume histograms, were within 3% of prescribed values for target volumes and normal tissues. Conclusions: We present a new method that verifies the dose delivered to a patient by combining in-room imaging with the transit dose measured during treatment. This verification procedure opens possibilities for offline adaptive radiotherapy and dose-guided radiotherapy strategies taking into account the dose distribution delivered during treatment sessions.

  18. Maxillary first molar with 7 root canals diagnosed using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Evaldo; Braitt, Antônio Henrique; Galvão, Bruno Ferraz

    2017-01-01

    Root canal anatomy is complex, and the recognition of anatomic variations could be a challenge for clinicians. This case report describes the importance of cone beam computed tomographyic (CBCT) imaging during endodontic treatment. A 23 year old woman was referred by her general dental practitioner with the chief complaint of spontaneous pain in her right posterior maxilla. From the clinical and radiographic findings, a diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis was made and endodontic treatment was suggested to the patient. The patient underwent CBCT examination, and CBCT scan slices revealed seven canals: three mesiobuccal (MB1, MB2, and MB3), two distobuccal (DB1 and DB2), and two palatal (P1 and P2). Canals were successfully treated with reciprocating files and filled using single-cone filling technique. Precise knowledge of root canal morphology and its variation is important during root canal treatment. CBCT examination is an excellent tool for identifying and managing these complex root canal systems. PMID:28194366

  19. Experimental Scatter Correction Methods in Industrial X-Ray Cone-Beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schörner, K.; Goldammer, M.; Stephan, J.

    2011-06-01

    Scattered radiation presents a major source of image degradation in industrial cone-beam computed tomography systems. Scatter artifacts introduce streaks, cupping and a loss of contrast in the reconstructed CT-volumes. In order to overcome scatter artifacts, we present two complementary experimental correction methods: the beam-stop array (BSA) and an inverse technique we call beam-hole array (BHA). Both correction methods are examined in comparative measurements where it is shown that the aperture-based BHA technique has practical and scatter-reducing advantages over the BSA. The proposed BHA correction method is successfully applied to a large-scale industrial specimen whereby scatter artifacts are reduced and contrast is enhanced significantly.

  20. Modulation transfer function determination using the edge technique for cone-beam micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Junyan; Liu, Wenlei; Gao, Peng; Liao, Qimei; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    Evaluating spatial resolution is an essential work for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) manufacturers, prototype designers or equipment users. To investigate the cross-sectional spatial resolution for different transaxial slices with CBCT, the slanted edge technique with a 3D slanted edge phantom are proposed and implemented on a prototype cone-beam micro-CT. Three transaxial slices with different cone angles are under investigation. An over-sampled edge response function (ERF) is firstly generated from the intensity of the slightly tiled air to plastic edge in each row of the transaxial reconstruction image. Then the oversampled ESF is binned and smoothed. The derivative of the binned and smoothed ERF gives the line spread function (LSF). At last the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) is calculated by taking the modulus of the Fourier transform of the LSF. The spatial resolution is quantified with the spatial frequencies at 10% MTF level and full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) value. The spatial frequencies at 10% of MTFs are 3.1+/-0.08mm-1, 3.0+/-0.05mm-1, and 3.2+/-0.04mm-1 for the three transaxial slices at cone angles of 3.8°, 0°, and -3.8° respectively. The corresponding FWHMs are 252.8μm, 261.7μm and 253.6μm. Results indicate that cross-sectional spatial resolution has no much differences when transaxial slices being 3.8° away from z=0 plane for the prototype conebeam micro-CT.

  1. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction from Cone-Beam Projections for Flat and Curved Detectors: Reconstruction Method Development.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui

    This dissertation is principally concerned with improving the performance of a prototype image-intensifier -based cone-beam volume computed tomography system by removing or partially removing two of its restricting factors, namely, the inaccuracy of current cone-beam reconstruction algorithm and the image distortion associated with the curved detecting surface of the image intensifier. To improve the accuracy of cone-beam reconstruction, first, the currently most accurate and computationally efficient cone-beam reconstruction method, the Feldkamp algorithm, is investigated by studying the relation of an original unknown function with its Feldkamp estimate. From this study, a partial knowledge on the unknown function can be derived in the Fourier domain from its Feldkamp estimate. Then, based on the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm, a modified iterative algorithm efficiently incorporating the Fourier knowledge as well as the a priori spatial knowledge on the unknown function is devised and tested to improve the cone-beam reconstruction accuracy by postprocessing the Feldkamp estimate. Two methods are developed to remove the distortion associated with the curved surface of image intensifier. A calibrating method based on a rubber-sheet remapping is designed and implemented. As an alternative, the curvature can be considered in the reconstruction algorithm. As an initial effort along this direction, a generalized convolution -backprojection reconstruction algorithm for fan-beam and any circular detector arrays is derived and studied.

  2. Cone Beam X-Ray Luminescence Tomography Imaging Based on KA-FEM Method for Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Fanzhen; Zhao, Fengjun

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography can realize fast X-ray luminescence tomography imaging with relatively low scanning time compared with narrow beam X-ray luminescence tomography. However, cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography suffers from an ill-posed reconstruction problem. First, the feasibility of experiments with different penetration and multispectra in small animal has been tested using nanophosphor material. Then, the hybrid reconstruction algorithm with KA-FEM method has been applied in cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography for small animals to overcome the ill-posed reconstruction problem, whose advantage and property have been demonstrated in fluorescence tomography imaging. The in vivo mouse experiment proved the feasibility of the proposed method. PMID:27868068

  3. Motion correction for improved target localization with on-board cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Schreibmann, E; Yang, Y; Xing, L

    2006-01-21

    On-board imager (OBI) based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has become available in radiotherapy clinics to accurately identify the target in the treatment position. However, due to the relatively slow gantry rotation (typically about 60 s for a full 360 degrees scan) in acquiring the CBCT projection data, the patient's respiratory motion causes serious problems such as blurring, doubling, streaking and distortion in the reconstructed images, which heavily degrade the image quality and the target localization. In this work, we present a motion compensation method for slow-rotating CBCT scans by incorporating into image reconstruction a patient-specific motion model, which is derived from previously obtained four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning CT images of the same patient via deformable registration. The registration of the 4D CT phases results in transformations representing a temporal sequence of three-dimensional (3D) deformation fields, or in other words, a 4D model of organ motion. The algorithm was developed heuristically in two-dimensional (2D) parallel-beam geometry and extended to 3D cone-beam geometry. By simulations with digital phantoms capable of translational motion and other complex motion, we demonstrated that the algorithm can reduce the motion artefacts locally, and restore the tumour size and shape, which may thereby improve the accuracy of target localization and patient positioning when CBCT is used as the treatment guidance.

  4. Comparative study of a low-Z cone-beam computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. A.; Hansen, V. N.; Thompson, M. G.; Poludniowski, G.; Niven, A.; Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography images have been acquired using an experimental (low atomic number (Z) insert) megavoltage cone-beam imaging system. These images have been compared with standard megavoltage and kilovoltage imaging systems. The experimental system requires a simple modification to the 4 MeV electron beam from an Elekta Precise linac. Low-energy photons are produced in the standard medium-Z electron window and a low-Z carbon electron absorber located after the window. The carbon electron absorber produces photons as well as ensuring that all remaining electrons from the source are removed. A detector sensitive to diagnostic x-ray energies is also employed. Quantitative assessment of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) contrast shows that the low-Z imaging system is an order of magnitude or more superior to a standard 6 MV imaging system. CBCT data with the same contrast-to-noise ratio as a kilovoltage imaging system (0.15 cGy) can be obtained in doses of 11 and 244 cGy for the experimental and standard 6 MV systems, respectively. Whilst these doses are high for everyday imaging, qualitative images indicate that kilovoltage like images suitable for patient positioning can be acquired in radiation doses of 1-8 cGy with the experimental low-Z system.

  5. Minimal residual cone-beam reconstruction with attenuation correction in SPECT.

    PubMed

    La, V; Grangeat, P

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents an iterative method based on the minimal residual algorithm for tomographic attenuation compensated reconstruction from attenuated cone-beam projections given the attenuation distribution. Unlike conjugate-gradient based reconstruction techniques, the proposed minimal residual based algorithm solves directly a quasisymmetric linear system, which is a preconditioned system. Thus it avoids the use of normal equations, which improves the convergence rate. Two main contributions are introduced. First, a regularization method is derived for quasisymmetric problems, based on a Tikhonov-Phillips regularization applied to the factorization of the symmetric part of the system matrix. This regularization is made spatially adaptive to avoid smoothing the region of interest. Second, our existing reconstruction algorithm for attenuation correction in parallel-beam geometry is extended to cone-beam geometry. A circular orbit is considered. Two preconditioning operators are proposed: the first one is Grangeat's inversion formula and the second one is Feldkamp's inversion formula. Experimental results obtained on simulated data are presented and the shadow zone effect on attenuated data is illustrated.

  6. Minimal residual cone-beam reconstruction with attenuation correction in SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Valérie; Grangeat, Pierre

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents an iterative method based on the minimal residual algorithm for tomographic attenuation compensated reconstruction from attenuated cone-beam projections given the attenuation distribution. Unlike conjugate-gradient based reconstruction techniques, the proposed minimal residual based algorithm solves directly a quasisymmetric linear system, which is a preconditioned system. Thus it avoids the use of normal equations, which improves the convergence rate. Two main contributions are introduced. First, a regularization method is derived for quasisymmetric problems, based on a Tikhonov-Phillips regularization applied to the factorization of the symmetric part of the system matrix. This regularization is made spatially adaptive to avoid smoothing the region of interest. Second, our existing reconstruction algorithm for attenuation correction in parallel-beam geometry is extended to cone-beam geometry. A circular orbit is considered. Two preconditioning operators are proposed: the first one is Grangeat's inversion formula and the second one is Feldkamp's inversion formula. Experimental results obtained on simulated data are presented and the shadow zone effect on attenuated data is illustrated.

  7. GPU-accelerated regularized iterative reconstruction for few-view cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Matenine, Dmitri; Goussard, Yves

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The present work proposes an iterative reconstruction technique designed for x-ray transmission computed tomography (CT). The main objective is to provide a model-based solution to the cone-beam CT reconstruction problem, yielding accurate low-dose images via few-views acquisitions in clinically acceptable time frames. Methods: The proposed technique combines a modified ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm and the total variation minimization (TV) regularization technique and is called OSC-TV. The number of subsets of each OSC iteration follows a reduction pattern in order to ensure the best performance of the regularization method. Considering the high computational cost of the algorithm, it is implemented on a graphics processing unit, using parallelization to accelerate computations. Results: The reconstructions were performed on computer-simulated as well as human pelvic cone-beam CT projection data and image quality was assessed. In terms of convergence and image quality, OSC-TV performs well in reconstruction of low-dose cone-beam CT data obtained via a few-view acquisition protocol. It compares favorably to the few-view TV-regularized projections onto convex sets (POCS-TV) algorithm. It also appears to be a viable alternative to full-dataset filtered backprojection. Execution times are of 1–2 min and are compatible with the typical clinical workflow for nonreal-time applications. Conclusions: Considering the image quality and execution times, this method may be useful for reconstruction of low-dose clinical acquisitions. It may be of particular benefit to patients who undergo multiple acquisitions by reducing the overall imaging radiation dose and associated risks.

  8. Phantom dosimetry and image quality of i-CAT FLX cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, John B.; Walker, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Increasing use of cone-beam computed tomography in orthodontics has been coupled with heightened concern with the long-term risks of x-ray exposure in orthodontic populations. An industry response to this has been to offer low-exposure alternative scanning options in newer cone-beam computed tomography models. Methods Effective doses resulting from various combinations of field size, and field location comparing child and adult anthropomorphic phantoms using the recently introduced i-CAT FLX cone-beam computed tomography unit were measured with Optical Stimulated Dosimetry using previously validated protocols. Scan protocols included High Resolution (360° rotation, 600 image frames, 120 kVp, 5 mA, 7.4 sec), Standard (360°, 300 frames, 120 kVp, 5 mA, 3.7 sec), QuickScan (180°, 160 frames, 120 kVp, 5 mA, 2 sec) and QuickScan+ (180°, 160 frames, 90 kVp, 3 mA, 2 sec). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated as a quantitative measure of image quality for the various exposure options using the QUART DVT phantom. Results Child phantom doses were on average 36% greater than Adult phantom doses. QuickScan+ protocols resulted in significantly lower doses than Standard protocols for child (p=0.0167) and adult (p=0.0055) phantoms. 13×16 cm cephalometric fields of view ranged from 11–85 μSv in the adult phantom and 18–120 μSv in the child for QuickScan+ and Standard protocols respectively. CNR was reduced by approximately 2/3rds comparing QuickScan+ to Standard exposure parameters. Conclusions QuickScan+ effective doses are comparable to conventional panoramic examinations. Significant dose reductions are accompanied by significant reductions in image quality. However, this trade-off may be acceptable for certain diagnostic tasks such as interim assessment of treatment results. PMID:24286904

  9. WE-G-18A-06: Sinogram Restoration in Helical Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Little, K; Riviere, P La

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To extend CT sinogram restoration, which has been shown in 2D to reduce noise and to correct for geometric effects and other degradations at a low computational cost, from 2D to a 3D helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: A method for calculating sinogram degradation coefficients for a helical cone-beam geometry was proposed. These values were used to perform penalized-likelihood sinogram restoration on simulated data that were generated from the FORBILD thorax phantom. Sinogram restorations were performed using both a quadratic penalty and the edge-preserving Huber penalty. After sinogram restoration, Fourier-based analytical methods were used to obtain reconstructions. Resolution-variance trade-offs were investigated for several locations within the reconstructions for the purpose of comparing sinogram restoration to no restoration. In order to compare potential differences, reconstructions were performed using different groups of neighbors in the penalty, two analytical reconstruction methods (Katsevich and single-slice rebinning), and differing helical pitches. Results: The resolution-variance properties of reconstructions restored using sinogram restoration with a Huber penalty outperformed those of reconstructions with no restoration. However, the use of a quadratic sinogram restoration penalty did not lead to an improvement over performing no restoration at the outer regions of the phantom. Application of the Huber penalty to neighbors both within a view and across views did not perform as well as only applying the penalty to neighbors within a view. General improvements in resolution-variance properties using sinogram restoration with the Huber penalty were not dependent on the reconstruction method used or the magnitude of the helical pitch. Conclusion: Sinogram restoration for noise and degradation effects for helical cone-beam CT is feasible and should be able to be applied to clinical data. When applied with the edge-preserving Huber penalty

  10. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: A rare case report evaluated with cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Eren; Bağlar, Serdar; Ciftci, Mehmet Ertugrul; Ozcan, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old systemically healthy female patient presented to our department. Cone-beam computed tomographic images showed multiple well-defined sclerotic masses with radiolucent border in both right and left molar regions of the mandible. These sclerotic masses were surrounded by a thin radiolucent border. We diagnosed the present pathology as florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and decided to follow the patient without taking biopsy. For the patient, who did not have any clinical complaints, radiographic followupis recommended twice a year. The responsibility of the dentist is to ensure the follow-up of the diagnosed patients and take necessary measures for preventing the infections. PMID:27601835

  11. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Guidance System for a Dedicated Intracranial Radiosurgery Treatment Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Ruschin, Mark; Komljenovic, Philip T.; Ansell, Steve; Menard, Cynthia; Bootsma, Gregory; Cho, Young-Bin; Chung, Caroline; Jaffray, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Image guidance has improved the precision of fractionated radiation treatment delivery on linear accelerators. Precise radiation delivery is particularly critical when high doses are delivered to complex shapes with steep dose gradients near critical structures, as is the case for intracranial radiosurgery. To reduce potential geometric uncertainties, a cone beam computed tomography (CT) image guidance system was developed in-house to generate high-resolution images of the head at the time of treatment, using a dedicated radiosurgery unit. The performance and initial clinical use of this imaging system are described. Methods and Materials: A kilovoltage cone beam CT system was integrated with a Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery unit. The X-ray tube and flat-panel detector are mounted on a translational arm, which is parked above the treatment unit when not in use. Upon descent, a rotational axis provides 210 Degree-Sign of rotation for cone beam CT scans. Mechanical integrity of the system was evaluated over a 6-month period. Subsequent clinical commissioning included end-to-end testing of targeting performance and subjective image quality performance in phantoms. The system has been used to image 2 patients, 1 of whom received single-fraction radiosurgery and 1 who received 3 fractions, using a relocatable head frame. Results: Images of phantoms demonstrated soft tissue contrast visibility and submillimeter spatial resolution. A contrast difference of 35 HU was easily detected at a calibration dose of 1.2 cGy (center of head phantom). The shape of the mechanical flex vs scan angle was highly reproducible and exhibited <0.2 mm peak-to-peak variation. With a 0.5-mm voxel pitch, the maximum targeting error was 0.4 mm. Images of 2 patients were analyzed offline and submillimeter agreement was confirmed with conventional frame. Conclusions: A cone beam CT image guidance system was successfully adapted to a radiosurgery unit. The system is capable of

  12. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  13. A multiscale filter for noise reduction of low-dose cone beam projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Weiguang; Farr, Jonathan B.

    2015-08-01

    The Poisson or compound Poisson process governs the randomness of photon fluence in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging systems. The probability density function depends on the mean (noiseless) of the fluence at a certain detector. This dependence indicates the natural requirement of multiscale filters to smooth noise while preserving structures of the imaged object on the low-dose cone beam projection. In this work, we used a Gaussian filter, \\text{exp}≤ft(-{{x}2}/2σ f2\\right) as the multiscale filter to de-noise the low-dose cone beam projections. We analytically obtained the expression of {σf} , which represents the scale of the filter, by minimizing local noise-to-signal ratio. We analytically derived the variance of residual noise from the Poisson or compound Poisson processes after Gaussian filtering. From the derived analytical form of the variance of residual noise, optimal σ f2 is proved to be proportional to the noiseless fluence and modulated by local structure strength expressed as the linear fitting error of the structure. A strategy was used to obtain the reliable linear fitting error: smoothing the projection along the longitudinal direction to calculate the linear fitting error along the lateral direction and vice versa. The performance of our multiscale filter was examined on low-dose cone beam projections of a Catphan phantom and a head-and-neck patient. After performing the filter on the Catphan phantom projections scanned with pulse time 4 ms, the number of visible line pairs was similar to that scanned with 16 ms, and the contrast-to-noise ratio of the inserts was higher than that scanned with 16 ms about 64% in average. For the simulated head-and-neck patient projections with pulse time 4 ms, the visibility of soft tissue structures in the patient was comparable to that scanned with 20 ms. The image processing took less than 0.5 s per projection with 1024   ×   768 pixels.

  14. [Radiographic evaluation of cone-beam computed tomography for oral implants: maxillary sinus].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu

    2015-08-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has an important function in understanding implant operations. CBCT can be used to evaluate the basic condition of implant site before implant operation and decide whether it is suitable for implanting. CBCT also ensures whether the direction of implant and the operation method are satisfactory. CBCT can be used pre- or post-operation as long as the case involves the maxillary sinus. Clinical implant cases using CBCT were introduced to evaluate the maxillary sinus pre- or post-operation.

  15. Clinical applications of cone beam computed tomography in endodontics: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Cohenca, Nestor; Shemesh, Hagay

    2015-06-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new technology that produces three-dimensional (3D) digital imaging at reduced cost and less radiation for the patient than traditional CT scans. It also delivers faster and easier image acquisition. By providing a 3D representation of the maxillofacial tissues in a cost- and dose-efficient manner, a better preoperative assessment can be obtained for diagnosis and treatment. This comprehensive review presents current applications of CBCT in endodontics. Specific case examples illustrate the difference in treatment planning with traditional periapical radiography versus CBCT technology.

  16. Clinical applications of cone beam computed tomography in endodontics: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Cohenca, Nestor; Shemesh, Hagay

    2015-09-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics has been extensively reported in the literature. Compared with the traditional spiral computed tomography, limited field of view (FOV) CBCT results in a fraction of the effective absorbed dose of radiation. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the application and advantages associated with advanced endodontic problems and complications, while reducing radiation exposure during complex endodontic procedures. The benefits of the added diagnostic information provided by intraoperative CBCT images in select cases justify the risk associated with the limited level of radiation exposure.

  17. A method for determining the gantry angle for megavoltage cone beam imaging.

    PubMed

    Sillanpaa, J; Chang, J; Amols, H; Mageras, G

    2005-02-01

    Accurate knowledge of gantry angle is essential in megavoltage cone beam imaging (MVCBI) with an electronic portal imager. We present a method for determining the gantry angle by detecting multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions in projection images. During image acquisition the gantry moves continuously and the MLC operates in dynamic arc mode. Our algorithm detects the leaf positions in the images and compares them with a stationary reference leaf. Comparison of the algorithm against angles determined from the locations of fiducial markers shows the accuracy (0.26 degrees rms error) to be sufficient for MVCBI.

  18. Cone beam computed tomography aided diagnosis and treatment of endodontic cases: Critical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Funda; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç; Yeta, Naz Yakar; Öztan, Meltem Dartar

    2016-01-01

    Although intraoral radiographs still remain the imaging method of choice for the evaluation of endodontic patients, in recent years, the utilization of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics showed a significant jump. This case series presentation shows the importance of CBCT aided diagnosis and treatment of complex endodontic cases such as; root resorption, missed extra canal, fusion, oblique root fracture, non-diagnosed periapical pathology and horizontal root fracture. CBCT may be a useful diagnostic method in several endodontic cases where intraoral radiography and clinical examination alone are unable to provide sufficient information. PMID:27551342

  19. A multiscale filter for noise reduction of low-dose cone beam projections.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weiguang; Farr, Jonathan B

    2015-08-21

    The Poisson or compound Poisson process governs the randomness of photon fluence in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging systems. The probability density function depends on the mean (noiseless) of the fluence at a certain detector. This dependence indicates the natural requirement of multiscale filters to smooth noise while preserving structures of the imaged object on the low-dose cone beam projection. In this work, we used a Gaussian filter, exp(-x2/2σ(2)(f)) as the multiscale filter to de-noise the low-dose cone beam projections. We analytically obtained the expression of σ(f), which represents the scale of the filter, by minimizing local noise-to-signal ratio. We analytically derived the variance of residual noise from the Poisson or compound Poisson processes after Gaussian filtering. From the derived analytical form of the variance of residual noise, optimal σ(2)(f)) is proved to be proportional to the noiseless fluence and modulated by local structure strength expressed as the linear fitting error of the structure. A strategy was used to obtain the reliable linear fitting error: smoothing the projection along the longitudinal direction to calculate the linear fitting error along the lateral direction and vice versa. The performance of our multiscale filter was examined on low-dose cone beam projections of a Catphan phantom and a head-and-neck patient. After performing the filter on the Catphan phantom projections scanned with pulse time 4 ms, the number of visible line pairs was similar to that scanned with 16 ms, and the contrast-to-noise ratio of the inserts was higher than that scanned with 16 ms about 64% in average. For the simulated head-and-neck patient projections with pulse time 4 ms, the visibility of soft tissue structures in the patient was comparable to that scanned with 20 ms. The image processing took less than 0.5 s per projection with 1024   ×   768 pixels.

  20. Stafne bone cavity and cone-beam computed tomography: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Elluru

    2015-06-01

    In 1942 Stafne reported 35 asymptomatic, radiolucent cavities that were unilaterally located in the posterior region of the mandible between the mandibular angle and the third molar, and below the mandibular canal. The term Stafne bone cavity (SBC) is now used for such asymptomatic lingual bone depressions of the lower jaw. Since then there have been many reports of SBCs but very fews tudies have used cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for their diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical and radiological characteristics of two cases of SBCs and the importance of limited CBCT in confirming the diagnosis.

  1. Enhancement of breast calcification visualization and detection using a modified PG method in Cone Beam Breast CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangkun; Ning, Ruola; Cai, Weixing; Benitez, Ricardo Betancourt

    2012-01-01

    Cone Beam Breast CT is a promising diagnostic modality in breast imaging. Its isotropic 3D spatial resolution enhances the characterization of micro-calcifications in breasts that might not be easily distinguishable in mammography. However, due to dose level considerations, it is beneficial to further enhance the visualization of calcifications in Cone Beam Breast CT images that might be masked by noise. In this work, the Papoulis-Gerchberg method was modified and implemented in Cone Beam Breast CT images to improve the visualization and detectability of calcifications. First, the PG method was modified and applied to the projections acquired during the scanning process; its effects on the reconstructed images were analyzed by measuring the Modulation Transfer Function and the Noise Power Spectrum. Second, Cone Beam Breast CT images acquired at different dose levels were pre-processed using this technique to enhance the visualization of calcification. Finally, a computer-aided diagnostic algorithm was utilized to evaluate the efficacy of this method to improve calcification detectability. The results demonstrated that this technique can effectively improve image quality by improving the Modulation Transfer Function with a minor increase in noise level. Consequently, the visualization and detectability of calcifications were improved in Cone Beam Breast CT images. This technique was also proved to be useful in reducing the x-ray dose without degrading visualization and detectability of calcifications.

  2. Enhancement of Breast Calcification Visualization and Detection Using a Modified PG Method in Cone Beam Breast CT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangkun; Cai, Weixing; Benitez, Ricardo Betancourt

    2012-01-01

    Cone Beam Breast CT is a promising diagnostic modality in breast imaging. Its isotropic 3D spatial resolution enhances the characterization of micro-calcifications in breasts that might not be easily distinguishable in mammography. However, due to dose level considerations, it is beneficial to further enhance the visualization of calcifications in Cone Beam Breast CT images that might be masked by noise. In this work, the Papoulis-Gerchberg method was modified and implemented in Cone Beam Breast CT images to improve the visualization and detectability of calcifications. First, the PG method was modified and applied to the projections acquired during the scanning process; its effects on the reconstructed images were analyzed by measuring the Modulation Transfer Function and the Noise Power Spectrum. Second, Cone Beam Breast CT images acquired at different dose levels were pre-processed using this technique to enhance the visualization of calcification. Finally, a computer-aided diagnostic algorithm was utilized to evaluate the efficacy of this method to improve calcification detectability. The results demonstrated that this technique can effectively improve image quality by improving the Modulation Transfer Function with a minor increase in noise level. Consequently, the visualization and detectability of calcifications were improved in Cone Beam Breast CT images. This technique was also proved to be useful in reducing the x-ray dose without degrading visualization and detectability of calcifications. PMID:22398591

  3. Iterative reconstruction optimisations for high angle cone-beam micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recur, B.; Fauconneau, M.; Kingston, A.; Myers, G.; Sheppard, A.

    2014-09-01

    We address several acquisition questions that have arisen for the high cone-angle helical-scanning micro-CT facility developed at the Australian National University. These challenges are generally known in medical and industrial cone-beam scanners but can be neglected in these systems. For our large datasets, with more than 20483 voxels, minimising the number of operations (or iterations) is crucial. Large cone-angles enable high signal-to-noise ratio imaging and a large helical pitch to be used. This introduces two challenges: (i) non-uniform resolution throughout the reconstruction, (ii) over-scan beyond the region-of-interest significantly increases re- quired reconstructed volume size. Challenge (i) can be addressed by using a double-helix or lower pitch helix but both solutions slow down iterations. Challenge (ii) can also be improved by using a lower pitch helix but results in more projections slowing down iterations. This may be overcome using less projections per revolution but leads to more iterations required. Here we assume a given total time for acquisition and a given reconstruction technique (SART) and seek to identify the optimal trajectory and number of projections per revolution in order to produce the best tomogram, minimise reconstruction time required, and minimise memory requirements.

  4. Radiobiologically optimized couch shift: A new localization paradigm using cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yimei Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Gordon, James; Brown, Stephen; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To present a novel positioning strategy which optimizes radiation delivery by utilizing radiobiological response knowledge and evaluate its use during prostate external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Five patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer were evaluated retrospectively in this IRB-approved study. For each patient, a VMAT plan with one 358° arc was generated on the planning CT (PCT) to deliver 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Five representative pretreatment cone beam CTs (CBCT) were selected for each patient. The CBCT images were registered to PCT by a human observer, which consisted of an initial automated registration with three degrees-of-freedom, followed by manual adjustment for agreement at the prostate/rectal wall interface. To determine the optimal treatment position for each CBCT, a search was performed centering on the observer-matched position (OM-position) utilizing a score function based on radiobiological and dosimetric indices (EUD{sub prostate}, D99{sub prostate}, NTCP{sub rectum}, and NTCP{sub bladder}) for the prostate, rectum, and bladder. We termed the optimal treatment position the radiobiologically optimized couch shift position (ROCS-position). Results: The dosimetric indices, averaged over the five patients’ treatment plans, were (mean ± SD) 79.5 ± 0.3 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 78.2 ± 0.4 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 11.1% ± 2.7% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 7.6% (NTCP{sub bladder}). The corresponding values from CBCT at the OM-positions were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.8 ± 0.7 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 12.1% ± 5.6% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 51.6% ± 15.2% (NTCP{sub bladder}), respectively. In comparison, from CBCT at the ROCS-positions, the dosimetric indices were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.3 ± 0.6 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 8.0% ± 3.3% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 15.7% (NTCP{sub bladder}). Excessive NTCP{sub rectum} was observed on Patient 5 (19.5% ± 6.6%) corresponding to localization at OM

  5. Reconstruction-plane-dependent weighted FDK algorithm for cone beam volumetric CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Hsieh, Jiang

    2005-04-01

    The original FDK algorithm has been extensively employed in medical and industrial imaging applications. With an increased cone angle, cone beam (CB) artifacts in images reconstructed by the original FDK algorithm deteriorate, since the circular trajectory does not satisfy the so-called data sufficiency condition (DSC). A few "circular plus" trajectories have been proposed in the past to reduce CB artifacts by meeting the DSC. However, the circular trajectory has distinct advantages over other scanning trajectories in practical CT imaging, such as cardiac, vascular and perfusion applications. In addition to looking into the DSC, another insight into the CB artifacts of the original FDK algorithm is the inconsistency between conjugate rays that are 180° apart in view angle. The inconsistence between conjugate rays is pixel dependent, i.e., it varies dramatically over pixels within the image plane to be reconstructed. However, the original FDK algorithm treats all conjugate rays equally, resulting in CB artifacts that can be avoided if appropriate view weighting strategy is exercised. In this paper, a modified FDK algorithm is proposed, along with an experimental evaluation and verification, in which the helical body phantom and a humanoid head phantom scanned by a volumetric CT (64 x 0.625 mm) are utilized. Without extra trajectories supplemental to the circular trajectory, the modified FDK algorithm applies reconstruction-plane-dependent view weighting on projection data before 3D backprojection, which reduces the inconsistency between conjugate rays by suppressing the contribution of one of the conjugate rays with a larger cone angle. Both computer-simulated and real phantom studies show that, up to a moderate cone angle, the CB artifacts can be substantially suppressed by the modified FDK algorithm, while advantages of the original FDK algorithm, such as the filtered backprojection algorithm structure, 1D ramp filtering, and data manipulation efficiency, can be

  6. Characterization and correction of cupping effect artefacts in cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, AK; McDavid, WD

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to demonstrate and correct the cupping effect artefact that occurs owing to the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation during image acquisition in cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods A uniform aluminium cylinder (6061) was used to demonstrate the cupping effect artefact on the Planmeca Promax 3D CBCT unit (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland). The cupping effect was studied using a line profile plot of the grey level values using ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). A hardware-based correction method using copper pre-filtration was used to address this artefact caused by beam hardening and a software-based subtraction algorithm was used to address scatter contamination. Results The hardware-based correction used to address the effects of beam hardening suppressed the cupping effect artefact but did not eliminate it. The software-based correction used to address the effects of scatter resulted in elimination of the cupping effect artefact. Conclusion Compensating for the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation improves grey level uniformity in CBCT. PMID:22378754

  7. Augmented reality and cone beam CT guidance for transoral robotic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Richmon, Jeremy D.; Sorger, Jonathan M.; Azizian, Mahdi; Taylor, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    In transoral robotic surgery preoperative image data do not reflect large deformations of the operative workspace from perioperative setup. To address this challenge, in this study we explore image guidance with cone beam computed tomographic angiography to guide the dissection of critical vascular landmarks and resection of base-of-tongue neoplasms with adequate margins for transoral robotic surgery. We identify critical vascular landmarks from perioperative c-arm imaging to augment the stereoscopic view of a da Vinci si robot in addition to incorporating visual feedback from relative tool positions. Experiments resecting base-of-tongue mock tumors were conducted on a series of ex vivo and in vivo animal models comparing the proposed workflow for video augmentation to standard non-augmented practice and alternative, fluoroscopy-based image guidance. Accurate identification of registered augmented critical anatomy during controlled arterial dissection and en bloc mock tumor resection was possible with the augmented reality system. The proposed image-guided robotic system also achieved improved resection ratios of mock tumor margins (1.00) when compared to control scenarios (0.0) and alternative methods of image guidance (0.58). The experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed workflow and advantages of cone beam computed tomography image guidance through video augmentation of the primary stereo endoscopy as compared to control and alternative navigation methods. PMID:26531203

  8. A denoising algorithm for projection measurements in cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Davood; Ward, Rabab

    2016-02-01

    The ability to reduce the radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) is limited by the excessive quantum noise present in the projection measurements. Sinogram denoising is, therefore, an essential step towards reconstructing high-quality images, especially in low-dose CT. Effective denoising requires accurate modeling of the photon statistics and of the prior knowledge about the characteristics of the projection measurements. This paper proposes an algorithm for denoising low-dose sinograms in cone-beam CT. The proposed algorithm is based on minimizing a cost function that includes a measurement consistency term and two regularizations in terms of the gradient and the Hessian of the sinogram. This choice of the regularization is motivated by the nature of CT projections. We use a split Bregman algorithm to minimize the proposed cost function. We apply the algorithm on simulated and real cone-beam projections and compare the results with another algorithm based on bilateral filtering. Our experiments with simulated and real data demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Denoising of the projections with the proposed algorithm leads to a significant reduction of the noise in the reconstructed images without oversmoothing the edges or introducing artifacts.

  9. Differences between panoramic and Cone Beam-CT in the surgical evaluation of lower third molars

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez y Baena, Ruggero; Beltrami, Riccardo; Tagliabo, Angelo; Rizzo, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to identify the contiguity between the root of the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal (MC) in panoramic radiographs compared with Cone Beam-CT. Material and Methods Panoramic radiographs of 326 third molars and CBCT radiographs of 86 cases indicated for surgery and considered at risk were evaluated. The following signs were assessed in panoramic radiographs as risk factors: radiolucent band, loss of MC border, change in MC direction, MC narrowing, root narrowing, root deviation, bifid apex, superimposition, and contact between the root third molar and the MC. Results Radiographic signs associated with absence of MC cortical bone are: radiolucent band, loss of MC border, change in MC direction, and superimposition. The number of risk factors was significantly increased with an increasing depth of inclusion. CBCT revealed a significant association between the absence of MC cortical bone and a lingual or interradicular position of the MC. Conclusions In cases in which panoramic radiographs do not exclude contiguity between the MC and tooth, careful assessment the signs and risks on CBCT radiographs is indicated for proper identification of the relationships between anatomic structures. Key words:Panoramic radiography, Cone-Beam computed tomography, third molar, mandibular nerve. PMID:28210446

  10. Superimposition of 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography models of growing patients

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. C.; Heymann, Gavin; Cornelis, Marie A.; DeClerck, Hugo J.; Tulloch, J. F. Camilla

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to evaluate a new method for superimposition of 3-dimensional (3D) models of growing subjects. Methods Cone-beam computed tomography scans were taken before and after Class III malocclusion orthopedic treatment with miniplates. Three observers independently constructed 18 3D virtual surface models from cone-beam computed tomography scans of 3 patients. Separate 3D models were constructed for soft-tissue, cranial base, maxillary, and mandibular surfaces. The anterior cranial fossa was used to register the 3D models of before and after treatment (about 1 year of follow-up). Results Three-dimensional overlays of superimposed models and 3D color-coded displacement maps allowed visual and quantitative assessment of growth and treatment changes. The range of interobserver errors for each anatomic region was 0.4 mm for the zygomatic process of maxilla, chin, condyles, posterior border of the rami, and lower border of the mandible, and 0.5 mm for the anterior maxilla soft-tissue upper lip. Conclusions Our results suggest that this method is a valid and reproducible assessment of treatment outcomes for growing subjects. This technique can be used to identify maxillary and mandibular positional changes and bone remodeling relative to the anterior cranial fossa. PMID:19577154

  11. Characteristics of anatomical landmarks in the mandibular interforaminal region: A cone-beam computed tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Parnia, Fereidoun; Hafezeqoran, Ali; Mahboub, Farhang; Mojaver-Kahnamoui, Haniye

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to assess appearance, visibility, location and course of anatomical landmarks in mandibular interforaminal region using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Study design: A total of 96 CBCT examinations was re-evaluated to exploit anatomical landmarks. The examinations used the Promax 3D CBCT unit. A sole examiner carried out all the measurements. Visibilities of the anatomical landmarks were scored using a four-point rating scale. Results: The mandibular foramen, anterior loop, incisive canal and lingual foramen were observed in 100,84,83,49 % of the images, respectively. The mean size, diameter and width of anterior loop, incisive canal and lingual foramen were obtained 3.54± 1.41, 1.47±0.50 and 0.8 ± 0.09mm, respectively. Conclusion: It is not safe to recommend any definite distance mesially from the mental foramen. The diameter of the canals and foramens should be determined on a case-by-case basis to exploit the appropriate location for each individual. Key words:Anatomical landmarks, cone-beam computed tomography, implant surgery, radiographic evaluation, surgical complications. PMID:22143718

  12. Does cone beam CT actually ameliorate stab wound analysis in bone?

    PubMed

    Gaudio, D; Di Giancamillo, M; Gibelli, D; Galassi, A; Cerutti, E; Cattaneo, C

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at verifying the potential of a recent radiological technology, cone beam CT (CBCT), for the reproduction of digital 3D models which may allow the user to verify the inner morphology of sharp force wounds within the bone tissue. Several sharp force wounds were produced by both single and double cutting edge weapons on cancellous and cortical bone, and then acquired by cone beam CT scan. The lesions were analysed by different software (a DICOM file viewer and reverse engineering software). Results verified the limited performances of such technology for lesions made on cortical bone, whereas on cancellous bone reliable models were obtained, and the precise morphology within the bone tissues was visible. On the basis of such results, a method for differential diagnosis between cutmarks by sharp tools with a single and two cutting edges can be proposed. On the other hand, the metrical computerised analysis of lesions highlights a clear increase of error range for measurements under 3 mm. Metric data taken by different operators shows a strong dispersion (% relative standard deviation). This pilot study shows that the use of CBCT technology can improve the investigation of morphological stab wounds on cancellous bone. Conversely metric analysis of the lesions as well as morphological analysis of wound dimension under 3 mm do not seem to be reliable.

  13. Dry skull positioning device for extra-oral radiology and cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Beaini, Thiago Leite; Dias, Paulo Eduardo Miamoto; Melani, Rodolfo Francisco Haltenhoff

    2014-01-01

    Extra-oral radiographs of dry skulls on scientific or forensic context have head position as a critical procedure. The aims of this article are to present a multi-purposed head-positioning device, and to describe the new method of image acquirement using the device to adequately keep the head in a correct and safe position during radiological or tomographic exam. The design was created from an average-sized skull and then tested in 20 others with different morphologies, sizes, weights, and structural state of preservation. A series of digital and analog orthopantomographies followed by a cone-beam computer tomography were obtained to assure that the correct positioning standards and anatomical visualization were achievable. The developed device properly kept adult skulls in position for all extra-oral radiographic exams, providing to operators a secure and facilitated way to achieve the proper position standards. The device did not impair the visualization of the anatomical structures neither on radiographs nor in cone-beam computer tomography.

  14. Initial Experience with a Cone-beam Breast Computed Tomography-guided Biopsy System

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Posy J; Morgan, Renee C; Conover, David L; Arieno, Andrea L

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate our initial experience with a cone-beam breast computed tomography (BCT)-guided breast biopsy system for lesion retrieval in phantom studies for use with a cone-beam BCT imaging system. Materials and Methods: Under the Institutional Review Board approval, a phantom biopsy study was performed using a dedicated BCT-guided biopsy system. Fifteen biopsies were performed on each of the small, medium, and large anthropomorphic breast phantoms with both BCT and stereotactic guidance for comparison. Each set of the 45 phantoms contained masses and calcification clusters of varying sizes. Data included mass/calcium retrieval rate and dose and length of procedure time for phantom studies. Results: Phantom mass and calcium retrieval rate were 100% for BCT and stereotactic biopsy. BCT dose for small and medium breast phantoms was found to be equivalent to or less than the corresponding stereotactic approach. Stereotactic-guided biopsy dose was 34.2 and 62.5 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. BCT-guided biopsy dose was 15.4 and 30.0 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. Both computed tomography biopsy and stereotactic biopsy study time ranged from 10 to 20 min. Conclusion: Initial experience with a BCT-guided biopsy system has shown to be comparable to stereotactic biopsy in phantom studies with equivalent or decreased dose. PMID:28217404

  15. Augmented reality and cone beam CT guidance for transoral robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen P; Richmon, Jeremy D; Sorger, Jonathan M; Azizian, Mahdi; Taylor, Russell H

    2015-09-01

    In transoral robotic surgery preoperative image data do not reflect large deformations of the operative workspace from perioperative setup. To address this challenge, in this study we explore image guidance with cone beam computed tomographic angiography to guide the dissection of critical vascular landmarks and resection of base-of-tongue neoplasms with adequate margins for transoral robotic surgery. We identify critical vascular landmarks from perioperative c-arm imaging to augment the stereoscopic view of a da Vinci si robot in addition to incorporating visual feedback from relative tool positions. Experiments resecting base-of-tongue mock tumors were conducted on a series of ex vivo and in vivo animal models comparing the proposed workflow for video augmentation to standard non-augmented practice and alternative, fluoroscopy-based image guidance. Accurate identification of registered augmented critical anatomy during controlled arterial dissection and en bloc mock tumor resection was possible with the augmented reality system. The proposed image-guided robotic system also achieved improved resection ratios of mock tumor margins (1.00) when compared to control scenarios (0.0) and alternative methods of image guidance (0.58). The experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed workflow and advantages of cone beam computed tomography image guidance through video augmentation of the primary stereo endoscopy as compared to control and alternative navigation methods.

  16. Planar cone-beam computed tomography with a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. W.; Youn, H.; Kim, D.; Kam, S.; Jeon, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    For a dedicated x-ray inspection of printed-circuit boards (PCBs), a bench-top planar cone-beam computed tomography (pCT) system with a flat-panel detector has been built in the laboratory. The system adopts the tomosynthesis technique that can produce cross-sectional images parallel to the axis of rotation for a limited angular range. For the optimal operation of the system and further improvement in the next design, we have evaluated imaging performances, such as modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, and noise-equivalent number of quanta. The performances are comparatively evaluated with the coventional cone-beam CT (CBCT) acquisition for various scanning angular ranges, applied tube voltages, and geometrical magnification factors. The pCT scan shows a poorer noise performance than the conventional CBCT scan because of less number of projection views used for reconstruction. However, the pCT shows a better spatial-resolution performance than the CBCT. Because the image noise can be compensated by an elevated exposure level during scanning, the pCT can be a useful modality for the PCB inspection that requires higher spatial-resolution performance.

  17. Supergridded cone-beam reconstruction and its application to point-spread function calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zikuan; Ning, Ruola

    2005-08-01

    In cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), the volumetric reconstruction may in principle assume an arbitrarily fine grid. The supergridded cone-beam reconstruction refers to reconstructing the object domain or a subvolume thereof with a grid that is finer than the proper computed tomography sampling grid (as determined by gantry geometry and detector discreteness). This technique can naturally reduce the voxelization effect, thereby retaining more details for object reproduction. The grid refinement is usually limited to two or three refinement levels because the detail pursuit is eventually limited by the detector discreteness. The volume reconstruction is usually targeted to a local volume of interest due to the cubic growth in a three-dimensional (3D) array size. As an application, we used this technique for 3D point-spread function (PSF) measurement of a CBCT system by reconstructing edge spread profiles in a refined grid. Through an experiment with a Teflon ball on a CBCT system, we demonstrated the supergridded volume reconstruction (based on a Feldcamp algorithm) and the CBCT PSF measurement (based on an edge-blurring technique). In comparison with a postreconstruction image refinement technique (upsampling and interpolation), the supergridded reconstruction could produce better PSFs (in terms of a smaller FWHM and PSF fitting error).

  18. Composite modulation transfer function evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography breast imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt-Benítez, Ricardo; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Shaohua

    2009-11-01

    Several factors during the scanning process, image reconstruction and geometry of an imaging system, influence the spatial resolution of a computed tomography imaging system. In this work, the spatial resolution of a state of the art flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography breast imaging system is evaluated. First, scattering, exposure level, voltage, voxel size, pixel size, back-projection filter, reconstruction algorithm, and number of projections are varied to evaluate their effect on spatial resolution. Second, its uniformity throughout the whole field of view is evaluated as a function of radius along the x-y plane and as a function of z at the center of rotation. The results of the study suggest that the modulation transfer function is mainly influenced by the pixel, back-projection filter, and number of projections used. The evaluation of spatial resolution throughout the field of view also suggests that this imaging system does have a 3-D quasi-isotropic spatial resolution in a cylindrical region of radius equal to 40 mm centered at the axis of rotation. Overall, this study provides a useful tool to determine the optimal parameters for the best possible use of this cone beam computed tomography breast imaging system.

  19. Guiding and focusing of fast electron beams produced by ultra-intense laser pulse using a double cone funnel target

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen-shuai; Cai, Hong-bo; Zhu, Shao-ping

    2015-10-15

    A novel double cone funnel target design aiming at efficiently guiding and focusing fast electron beams produced in high intensity (>10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions is investigated via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The forward-going fast electron beams are shown to be directed and focused to a smaller size in comparison with the incident laser spot size. This plasma funnel attached on the cone target guides and focuses electrons in a manner akin to the control of liquid by a plastic funnel. Such device has the potential to add substantial design flexibility and prevent inefficiencies for important applications such as fast ignition. Two reasons account for the collimation of fast electron beams. First, the sheath electric fields and quasistatic magnetic fields inside the vacuum gap of the double cone provide confinement of the fast electrons in the laser-plasma interaction region. Second, the interface magnetic fields inside the beam collimator further guide and focus the fast electrons during the transport. The application of this technique to cone-guided fast ignition is considered, and it is shown that it can enhance the laser energy deposition in the compressed fuel plasma by a factor of 2 in comparison with the single cone target case.

  20. Low dose megavoltage cone beam computed tomography with an unflattened 4 MV beam from a carbon target.

    PubMed

    Faddegon, Bruce A; Wu, Vincent; Pouliot, Jean; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bani-Hashemi, Ali

    2008-12-01

    Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) is routinely used for visualizing anatomical structures and implanted fiducials for patient positioning in radiotherapy. MVCBCT using a 6 MV treatment beam with high atomic number (Z) target and flattening filter in the beamline, as done conventionally, has lower image quality than can be achieved with a MV beam due to heavy filtration of the low-energy bremsstrahlung. The unflattened beam of a low Z target has an abundance of diagnostic energy photons, detected with modern flat panel detectors with much higher efficiency given the same dose to the patient. This principle guided the development of a new megavoltage imaging beamline (IBL) for a commercial radiotherapy linear accelerator. A carbon target was placed in one of the electron primary scattering foil slots on the target-foil slide. A PROM on a function controller board was programed to put the carbon target in place for MVCBCT. A low accelerating potential of 4.2 MV was used for the IBL to restrict leakage of primary electrons through the target such that dose from x rays dominated the signal in the monitor chamber and the patient surface dose. Results from phantom and cadaver images demonstrated that the IBL had much improved image quality over the treatment beam. For similar imaging dose, the IBL improved the contrast-to-noise ratio by as much as a factor of 3 in soft tissue over that of the treatment beam. The IBL increased the spatial resolution by about a factor of 2, allowing the visualization of finer anatomical details. Images of the cadaver contained useful information with doses as low as 1 cGy. The IBL may be installed on certain models of linear accelerators without mechanical modification and results in significant improvement in the image quality with the same dose, or images of the same quality with less than one-third of the dose.

  1. Algorithm for x-ray beam hardening and scatter correction in low-dose cone-beam CT: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenlei; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Liao, Qimei; Lu, HongBing

    2016-03-01

    X-ray scatter poses a significant limitation to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT), as well as beam hardening, resulting in image artifacts, contrast reduction, and lack of CT number accuracy. Meanwhile the x-ray radiation dose is also non-ignorable. Considerable scatter or beam hardening correction methods have been developed, independently, and rarely combined with low-dose CT reconstruction. In this paper, we combine scatter suppression with beam hardening correction for sparse-view CT reconstruction to improve CT image quality and reduce CT radiation. Firstly, scatter was measured, estimated, and removed using measurement-based methods, assuming that signal in the lead blocker shadow is only attributable to x-ray scatter. Secondly, beam hardening was modeled by estimating an equivalent attenuation coefficient at the effective energy, which was integrated into the forward projector of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). Finally, the compressed sensing (CS) iterative reconstruction is carried out for sparse-view CT reconstruction to reduce the CT radiation. Preliminary Monte Carlo simulated experiments indicate that with only about 25% of conventional dose, our method reduces the magnitude of cupping artifact by a factor of 6.1, increases the contrast by a factor of 1.4 and the CNR by a factor of 15. The proposed method could provide good reconstructed image from a few view projections, with effective suppression of artifacts caused by scatter and beam hardening, as well as reducing the radiation dose. With this proposed framework and modeling, it may provide a new way for low-dose CT imaging.

  2. Value of cone-beam computed tomography in the process of diagnosis and management of disorders of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    de Boer, E W J; Dijkstra, P U; Stegenga, B; de Bont, L G M; Spijkervet, F K L

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the value of cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) images in the primary diagnosis and management of 128 outpatients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Before a diagnosis was made and treatment planned, the history was taken, physical examination made, and the orthopantomogram studied. After assessment of the cone-beam CT, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon (specialist or resident) was allowed to revise the provisional primary diagnosis and management. The degree of certainty was rated by the clinician before and after the cone-beam CT had been assessed. The primary diagnosis was changed in 32 patients (25%), additional diagnostic procedures were changed in 57 (45%), and the treatment was changed in 15 (12%) (in 4 the treatment was changed to a (minimally) invasive procedure). A total of 74 patients (58%) had their diagnosis and management changed after the cone-beam CT had been assessed. Changes in diagnosis and management were clinically relevant in 9/32 and 9/61 patients, respectively. The clinician's certainty about the primary diagnosis increased after the cone-beam CT had been assessed in 57 patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds in favour of changes in primary diagnosis and management increased when limited mandibular function was a primary symptom, the patient was taking medication for pain, and the articular eminence could not be assessed on OPT. Assessment of cone-beam CT led to changes in primary diagnosis and management in more than half the patients with disorders of the TMJ.

  3. [The potential of cone beam computed tomography of the temporal bones in the patients presenting with otosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Karpishchenko, S A; Zubareva, A A; Filimonov, V N; Shavgulidze, M A; Azovtseva, E A

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the potential of cone beam computed tomography of the temporal bones in the patients presenting with otosclerosis for the detection of surgically significant specific structural features of the labyrinth wall of the tympanic cavity. More than 400 tomograms of the temporal bones were obtained with the use of a cone beam tomographwere available for the investigation during the period from 2012 till 2016. The study was carried out in several steps, viz. the search for the optimal (for the given instrument) position of the patient, the experimental stage, the retrospective analysis of the tomograms and the comparison of the temporal bones of different types (pneumatic, mixed, and sclerotic) in individual patients, the comparison of the results of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with the intraoperative observations, and the modification of the algorithm for the analysis of temporal bone cone beam tomograms. The study included a total of 16 patients (15 women at the age from 32 to 56 years and one managed 58 years) presenting with the clinical diagnosis of otosclerosis. The results of the study were used to elaborate the algorithm for the analysis of cone beam tomograms of the temporal bones to be performed inthe stage by stage manner including the qualitative analysis of tomograms, evaluation of their quantitative parameters and additional characteristics to be taken into consideration when planning the surgical interventions on the labyrinth wall and the tympanic cavity as a preparation for the stapedoplastic treatment. The results of CBCT obtained in the present study were compared with the surgical observations. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the method were estimated to be 100% and 83% respectively. It is concluded that cone beam computed tomography can be employed as a component of the diagnostic algorithm prior to the planning of surgical interventions onthe medial wall of the tympanic cavity

  4. The value of cone beam CT in assessing and managing a dilated odontome of a maxillary canine.

    PubMed

    Wall, Aoibheann; Ng, Suk; Djemal, Serpil

    2015-03-01

    A case of an unusual anomaly in a maxillary canine is described. A deep enamel invagination resulted in pulpal necrosis, longstanding infection and development of an associated radicular cyst. Diagnostic X-ray imaging was invaluable in demonstrating the complex root anatomy of the dilated odontome. In particular, a cone beam CT scan helped in the formulation of an appropriate treatment plan. Clinical Relevance: Three-dimensional imaging using cone beam CT was valuable in this case to demonstrate the complicated anatomy of a rare dental anomaly, and to help plan treatment.

  5. Does cone-beam CT alter treatment plans? Comparison of preoperative implant planning using panoramic versus cone-beam CT images

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Noriega, Jorge; Castro, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The present study was performed to compare the planning of implant placement based on panoramic radiography (PAN) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, and to study the impact of the image dataset on the treatment planning. Materials and Methods One hundred five partially edentulous patients (77 males, 28 females, mean age: 46 years, range: 26-67 years) seeking oral implant rehabilitation were referred for presurgical imaging. Imaging consisted of PAN and CBCT imaging. Four observers planned implant treatment based on the two-dimensional (2D) image datasets and at least one month later on the three-dimensional (3D) image dataset. Apart from presurgical diagnostic and dimensional measurement tasks, the observers needed to indicate the surgical confidence levels and assess the image quality in relation to the presurgical needs. Results All observers confirmed that both imaging modalities (PAN and CBCT) gave similar values when planning implant diameter. Also, the results showed no differences between both imaging modalities for the length of implants with an anterior location. However, significant differences were found in the length of implants with a posterior location. For implant dimensions, longer lengths of the implants were planned with PAN, as confirmed by two observers. CBCT provided images with improved scores for subjective image quality and surgical confidence levels. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, there was a trend toward PAN-based preoperative planning of implant placement leading towards the use of longer implants within the posterior jaw bone. PMID:24944961

  6. Data consistency-driven scatter kernel optimization for x-ray cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changhwan; Park, Miran; Sung, Younghun; Lee, Jaehak; Choi, Jiyoung; Cho, Seungryong

    2015-08-01

    Accurate and efficient scatter correction is essential for acquisition of high-quality x-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) images for various applications. This study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using the data consistency condition (DCC) as a criterion for scatter kernel optimization in scatter deconvolution methods in CBCT. As in CBCT, data consistency in the mid-plane is primarily challenged by scatter, we utilized data consistency to confirm the degree of scatter correction and to steer the update in iterative kernel optimization. By means of the parallel-beam DCC via fan-parallel rebinning, we iteratively optimized the scatter kernel parameters, using a particle swarm optimization algorithm for its computational efficiency and excellent convergence. The proposed method was validated by a simulation study using the XCAT numerical phantom and also by experimental studies using the ACS head phantom and the pelvic part of the Rando phantom. The results showed that the proposed method can effectively improve the accuracy of deconvolution-based scatter correction. Quantitative assessments of image quality parameters such as contrast and structure similarity (SSIM) revealed that the optimally selected scatter kernel improves the contrast of scatter-free images by up to 99.5%, 94.4%, and 84.4%, and of the SSIM in an XCAT study, an ACS head phantom study, and a pelvis phantom study by up to 96.7%, 90.5%, and 87.8%, respectively. The proposed method can achieve accurate and efficient scatter correction from a single cone-beam scan without need of any auxiliary hardware or additional experimentation.

  7. Anti-aliased three-dimensional cone-beam reconstruction of low-contrast objects with algebraic methods.

    PubMed

    Mueller, K; Yagel, R; Wheller, J J

    1999-06-01

    This paper examines the use of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and related techniques to reconstruct 3-D objects from a relatively sparse set of cone-beam projections. Although ART has been widely used for cone-beam reconstruction of high-contrast objects, e.g., in computed angiography, the work presented here explores the more challenging low-contrast case which represents a little-investigated scenario for ART. Preliminary experiments indicate that for cone angles greater than 20 degrees, traditional ART produces reconstructions with strong aliasing artifacts. These artifacts are in addition to the usual off-midplane inaccuracies of cone-beam tomography with planar orbits. We find that the source of these artifacts is the nonuniform reconstruction grid sampling and correction by the cone-beam rays during the ART projection-backprojection procedure. A new method to compute the weights of the reconstruction matrix is devised, which replaces the usual constant-size interpolation filter by one whose size and amplitude is dependent on the source-voxel distance. This enables the generation of reconstructions free of cone-beam aliasing artifacts, at only little extra cost. An alternative analysis reveals that simultaneous ART (SART) also produces reconstructions without aliasing artifacts, however, at greater computational cost. Finally, we thoroughly investigate the influence of various ART parameters, such as volume initialization, relaxation coefficient lambda, correction scheme, number of iterations, and noise in the projection data on reconstruction quality. We find that ART typically requires only three iterations to render satisfactory reconstruction results.

  8. Accurate patient dosimetry of kilovoltage cone-beam CT in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X.; Duggan, Dennis M.; Coffey, Charles W.

    2008-03-15

    The increased utilization of x-ray imaging in image-guided radiotherapy has dramatically improved the radiation treatment and the lives of cancer patients. Daily imaging procedures, such as cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), for patient setup may significantly increase the dose to the patient's normal tissues. This study investigates the dosimetry from a kilovoltage (kV) CBCT for real patient geometries. Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the kV beams from a Varian on-board imager integrated into the Trilogy accelerator. The Monte Carlo calculated results were benchmarked against measurements and good agreement was obtained. The authors developed a novel method to calibrate Monte Carlo simulated beams with measurements using an ionization chamber in which the air-kerma calibration factors are obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory. The authors have introduced a new Monte Carlo calibration factor, f{sub MCcal}, which is determined from the calibration procedure. The accuracy of the new method was validated by experiment. When a Monte Carlo simulated beam has been calibrated, the simulated beam can be used to accurately predict absolute dose distributions in the irradiated media. Using this method the authors calculated dose distributions to patient anatomies from a typical CBCT acquisition for different treatment sites, such as head and neck, lung, and pelvis. Their results have shown that, from a typical head and neck CBCT, doses to soft tissues, such as eye, spinal cord, and brain can be up to 8, 6, and 5 cGy, respectively. The dose to the bone, due to the photoelectric effect, can be as much as 25 cGy, about three times the dose to the soft tissue. The study provides detailed information on the additional doses to the normal tissues of a patient from a typical kV CBCT acquisition. The methodology of the Monte Carlo beam calibration developed and introduced in this study allows the user to calculate both relative and absolute

  9. Development of Kilovoltage X-ray Dosimetry Methods and Their Application to Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawless, Michael J.

    The increase in popularity of pre-treatment imaging procedures in radiation therapy, such as kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), has been accompanied by an increase in the dose delivered to the patient from these imaging procedures. The measurement of dose from CBCT scans is complicated, as currently available kilovoltage dosimetry protocols are based on air-kerma standards and radiation detectors exhibit large energy responses at the low photon energies used in the imaging procedures. This work aims to provide the tools and methodology needed to measure the dose from these scans more accurately and precisely. Through the use of a validated Monte Carlo (MC) model of the moderately filtered (M-series) x-ray beams at the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory, dose-to-water rates were obtained in a water phantom for the M-series x-ray beams with tube potentials from 40-250 kVp. The resulting dose-to-water rates were consistent with previously established methods, but had significantly reduced uncertainties. While detectors are commonly used to measure dose in phantom, previous investigations of the energy response of common detectors in the kilovoltage energy range have been limited to in-air geometries. The newly determined dose-to-water rates were used to characterize the in-phantom energy and depth response of thermoluminescent dosimeters and ionization chambers. When compared to previous investigations of the in-air detector response, the impact of scatter and absorption of the photon beam by the water medium was found to have a significant impact on the response of certain detectors. The dose to water in the NIST-traceable M-series x-ray beams was transferred to clinical CBCT beams and the resulting doses agreed with other dose-to-water measurement techniques. The dose to water in the CBCT beams was used to characterize the energy and depth responses of a number of detectors. The energy response in the CBCT beams agreed

  10. Dynamics of high-energy proton beam acceleration and focusing from hemisphere-cone targets by high-intensity lasers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Foord, M E; Wei, M S; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; McLean, H; Patel, P K; Beg, F N

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration and focusing of high-energy proton beams from fast-ignition (FI) -related hemisphere-cone assembled targets have been numerically studied by hybrid particle-in-cell simulations and compared with those from planar-foil and open-hemisphere targets. The whole physical process including the laser-plasma interaction has been self-consistently modeled for 15 ps, at which time the protons reach asymptotic motion. It is found that the achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradients in the co-moving hot electrons, which induce a transverse defocusing electric field that bends proton trajectories near the axis. For the advanced hemisphere-cone target, the flow of hot electrons along the cone wall induces a local transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement in proton focusing; however, it leads to a significant loss of longitudinal sheath potential, reducing the total conversion efficiency from laser to protons.

  11. Laser cone beam computed tomography scanner geometry for large volume 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K. J.; Turnbull, D.; Batista, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    A new scanner geometry for fast optical cone-beam computed tomography is reported. The system consists of a low power laser beam, raster scanned, under computer control, through a transparent object in a refractive index matching aquarium. The transmitted beam is scattered from a diffuser screen and detected by a photomultiplier tube. Modest stray light is present in the projection images since only a single ray is present in the object during measurement and there is no imaging optics to introduce further stray light in the form of glare. A scan time of 30 minutes was required for 512 projections with a field of view of 12 × 18 cm. Initial performance from scanning a 15 cm diameter jar with black solutions is presented. Averaged reconstruction coefficients are within 2% along the height of the jar and within the central 85% of diameter, due to the index mismatch of the jar. Agreement with spectrometer measurements was better than 0.5% for a minimum transmission of 4% and within 4% for a dark, 0.1% transmission sample. This geometry's advantages include high dynamic range and low cost of scaling to larger (>15 cm) fields of view.

  12. Influence of lead apron shielding on absorbed doses from cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Rottke, Dennis; Andersson, Jonas; Ejima, Ken-Ichiro; Sawada, Kunihiko; Schulze, Dirk

    2016-09-24

    The aim of the present work was to investigate absorbed and to calculate effective doses (EDs) in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The study was conducted using examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. A full-body male RANDO(®) phantom was loaded with 110 GR200A thermoluminescence dosemeter chips at 55 different sites and set up in two different CBCT systems (CS 9500(®), ProMax(®) 3D). Two different protocols were performed: the phantom was set up (1) with and (2) without a lead apron. No statistically significant differences in organ and absorbed doses from regions outside the primary beam could be found when comparing results from exposures with and without lead apron shielding. Consequently, calculating the ED showed no significant differences between the examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. For the ProMax(®) 3D with shielding, the ED was 149 µSv, and for the examination protocol without shielding 148 µSv (SD = 0.31 µSv). For the CS 9500(®), the ED was 88 and 86 µSv (SD = 0.95 µSv), respectively, with and without lead apron shielding. The results revealed no statistically significant differences in the absorbed doses between examination with and without lead apron shielding, especially in organs outside the primary beam.

  13. TU-F-BRE-08: Significant Variations in Measured Small Cone Output Factor for FFF Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhyadhom, A; Ma, L; Kirby, N

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the measurement accuracy of several dosimeters for small cone output factors in two SRS/SBRT dedicated systems with Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beams: a Varian TrueBeam STx (TB) and an Accuray CyberKnife VSI (CK). Output factors (OFs) were measured for both machines and for CK, compared against a Monte Carlo model. Methods: Dose measurements were taken using three different FFF beams (TB 6XFFF, TB 10XFFF, and CK 6XFFF). Three commonly used types of dosimeters were examined in this work: a micro-ion chamber (Exradin A16), two shielded diodes (PTW TN60008 and PTW TN60017), and radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT2). Measured OFs from these dosimeters were compared with each other and OFs measured with an Exradin W1 scintillator. Monte Carlo determined correction factors for the CK beam for the micro-ion chamber and diodes were applied to the respective OF measurements and compared against scintillator measured OFs corrected for volume averaging. Results: OFs measured for the smallest fields using the micro-ion chamber, diodes, scintillator, and film varied substantially (with up to a 16% difference between dosimeters). Micro-ion chamber and film OF measurements were up to 9% and 10%, respectively, lower than scintillator measurements for the smallest fields. OF measurements by diode were up to 6% greater than scintillator measurements for the smallest fields. With correction factors, the micro-ion chamber and diode measured OFs showed good agreement with scintillator measured OFs for the CK 6XFFF beam (within 3% and 1.5%, respectively). Conclusion: Uncorrected small field OFs vary significantly with dosimeter. The accuracy of scintillator measurements for small field OFs may be greater than the other dosimeters studied in this work (when uncorrected). Measurements involving EBT2 film may Result in lower accuracy for smaller fields (less than 10mm). Care should be taken in the choice of the dosimeter used for small field OF measurements.

  14. Single-scan scatter correction for cone-beam CT using a stationary beam blocker: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei

    2011-03-01

    The performance of cone-beam CT (CBCT) is greatly limited by scatter artifacts. The existing measurement-based methods have promising advantages as a standard scatter correction solution, except that they currently require multiple scans or moving the beam blocker during data acquisition to compensate for the missing primary data. These approaches are therefore unpractical in clinical applications. In this work, we propose a new measurement-based scatter correction method to achieve accurate reconstruction with one single scan and a stationary beam blocker, two seemingly incompatible features which enable simple and effective scatter correction without increase of scan time or patient dose. Based on CT reconstruction theory, we distribute the blocked areas over one projection where primary signals are considered to be redundant in a full scan. The CT image quality is not degraded even with primary loss. Scatter is accurately estimated by interpolation and scatter-corrected CT images are obtained using an FDK-based reconstruction. In a Monte Carlo simulation study, we first optimize the beam blocker geometry using projections on the Shepp-Logan phantom and then carry out a complete simulation of a CBCT scan on a water phantom. With the scatter-to-primary ratio around 1.0, our method reduces the CT number error from 293 to 2.9 Hounsfield unit (HU) around the phantom center. The proposed approach is further evaluated on a CBCT tabletop system. On the Catphan©600 phantom, the reconstruction error is reduced from 202 to 10 HU in the selected region of interest after the proposed correction.

  15. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Evaluation and Diagnosis of Mandibular First Molar with 6 Canals

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Shiraz; Chaitanya, Bathula Vimala; Somisetty, Kusum Valli

    2016-01-01

    Root canal treatment of tooth with aberrant root canal morphology is very challenging. So thorough knowledge of both the external and internal anatomy of teeth is an important aspect of root canal treatment. With the advancement in technology it is imperative to use modern diagnostic tools such as magnification devices, CBCT, microscopes, and RVG to confirm the presence of these aberrant configurations. However, in everyday endodontic practice, clinicians have to treat teeth with atypical configurations for root canal treatment to be successful. This case report presents the management of a mandibular first molar with six root canals, four in mesial and two in distal root, and also emphasizes the use and importance of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) as a diagnostic tool in endodontics. PMID:26904310

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of a Type III Dens Invagination Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bahmani, Mohsen; Adl, Alireza; Javanmardi, Samane; Naghizadeh, Sina

    2016-01-01

    A 20-year-old man presented with the history of pain and swelling in the anterior maxillary segment. The periapical radiography was indicative of a dental anomaly in right maxillary lateral incisor. Due to the insufficient information from conventional radiography, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was ordered. CBCT showed apical root resorption, large apical lucency and two separate canals with distinct apical foramen (Oehlers type III dens invagination). The CBCT image was used as a guide for dentine removal with an ultrasonic tip. Conventional root canal therapy was done using lateral compaction technique. One-and two-year follow-up radiographies revealed periapical repair and absence of symptoms. PMID:27790268

  17. Scattered radiation in flat-detector based cone-beam CT: analysis of voxelized patient simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Jens; Bertram, Matthias

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a systematic assessment of scattered radiation in flat-detector based cone-beam CT. The analysis is based on simulated scatter projections of voxelized CT images of different body regions allowing to accurately quantify scattered radiation of realistic and clinically relevant patient geometries. Using analytically computed primary projection data of high spatial resolution in combination with Monte-Carlo simulated scattered radiation, practically noise-free reference data sets are computed with and without inclusion of scatter. The impact of scatter is studied both in the projection data and in the reconstructed volume for the head, thorax, and pelvis regions. Currently available anti-scatter grid geometries do not sufficiently compensate scatter induced cupping and streak artifacts, requiring additional software-based scatter correction. The required accuracy of scatter compensation approaches increases with increasing patient size.

  18. Limited-angle reverse helical cone-beam CT for pipeline with low rank decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dong; Zeng, Li

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, tomographic imaging of pipeline in service by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is studied. With the developed scanning strategy and image model, the quality of reconstructed image is improved. First, a limited-angle reverse helical scanning strategy based on C-arm computed tomography (C-arm CT) is developed for the projection data acquisition of pipeline in service. Then, an image model which considering the resemblance among slices of pipeline is developed. Finally, split Bregman method based algorithm is implemented in solving the model aforementioned. Preliminary results of simulation experiments show that the projection data acquisition strategy and reconstruction method are efficient and feasible, and our method is superior to Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART).

  19. Evaluation of Dose Homogeneity in Cone-Beam Breast Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Mettivier, Giovanni; Costa, Matilde; Lanconelli, Nico; Ianiro, Anna; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; Quarto, Maria; Russo, Paolo

    2017-01-10

    The aim of this study is to determine, via measurements on phantoms and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, the dose distribution of absorbed dose in a cone-beam breast computed tomography scan. The absorbed dose volume distribution was measured inside a polyethylene cylindrical phantom, simulating adipose breast tissue, using LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosimeters. A reasonable agreement (between 2 and 8%) between the simulated and measured data was observed. The 3D distribution of absorbed dose was evaluated at 40, 60 and 80 kV in a phantom simulating a pendant breast. MC simulations indicate a significantly lower spread of volume dose than in mammography. The dose variation along the radial distance in the simulated phantoms was in the range of 4‒14%. These findings might be useful when devising models for breast imaging dose assessment that take into account the uneven distribution of the glandular mass in the breast volume.

  20. Cone Beam CT in Diagnosis and Surgical Planning of Dentigerous Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Deana, Naira Figueiredo

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis and preoperative planning are critical in the execution of any surgical procedure. Panoramic radiography is a routine method used in dentistry to assist clinical diagnosis; however, with this technique 3D anatomical structures are compressed into 2D images, resulting in overlapping of structures which are of interest in the diagnosis. In this study we report the case of a patient who presented with a dentigerous cyst of expressive dimensions in the body of the mandible region. The surgery was planned and executed after observing the margins of the lesion by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). We conclude that CBCT is a precise method to help diagnosis; it provides greater accuracy in surgical treatment planning through 3D image display, allowing more effective results. PMID:28293442

  1. Developmental salivary gland depression in the ascending mandibular ramus: A cone-beam computed tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Christine A.; Ahn, Yoonhee; Odell, Scott; Graham, David Mattew

    2016-01-01

    A static, unilateral, and focal bone depression located lingually within the ascending ramus, identical to the Stafne's bone cavity of the angle of the mandible, is being reported. During development of the mandible, submandibular gland inclusion may lead to the formation of a lingual concavity, which could contain fatty tissue, blood vessels, or soft tissue. However, similar occurrences in the ascending ramus at the level of the parotid gland are extremely rare. Similar cases were previously reported in dry, excavated mandibles, and 3 cases were reported in living patients. A 52-year-old African American male patient was seen for pain in the mandibular teeth. Panoramic radiography showed an unusual concavity within the left ascending ramus. Cone-beam computed tomography confirmed this incidental finding. The patient was cleared for the extraction of non-restorable teeth and scheduled for annual follow-up. PMID:27672619

  2. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a slight swelling in the left mandible. Surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. In the CBCT sections, we observed perforation of the cortical plate and radiopaque line that extended from the periosteum, resembling "sunray" appearance—a rare feature of OM—which could not be assessed by panoramic radiography. PMID:27092217

  3. Reproducibility of facial soft tissue thicknesses for craniofacial reconstruction using cone-beam CT images.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyeon-Shik; Kim, Kyul; Moon, Da-Nal; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Wilkinson, Caroline

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of the soft tissue (ST) thicknesses at 31 landmarks using the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images obtained from 20 adult subjects. Four observers carried out ST thickness measurements using Skull Measure software, and the inter- and intra-observer error rates were evaluated. Only five of 31 landmarks showed significant differences in recorded ST thickness between the observers. When excluding inexperienced observers, only one landmark showed a significant difference between the observers. Regarding the intra-observer reproducibility, the ST thickness measurements at three landmarks showed low correlation coefficients. The results of this study indicate that CBCT images can be used to measure ST thickness with high reproducibility. However, some landmarks need to be redefined to reliably measure ST thickness on CBCT images.

  4. Endodontic management of mandibular first molar with seven canals using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Banode, Ankur Mahesh; Gade, Vandana; Patil, Sanjay; Gade, Jaykumar

    2016-01-01

    The endodontic treatment of a mandibular molar with aberrant canal configuration can be diagnostically and clinically challenging. Successful endodontic therapy thus depends on the clinician's ability to anticipate and look for these aberrant variations. A mandibular first molar with seven canals represents a rare anatomical variant, particularly when four canals are found in distal root. Based on in vitro studies, its incidence is reported to be between 0.2% and 3%. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) as an adjunctive diagnostic aid, the determination of root canal anatomy in teeth with complex canal configurations has become more precise. The present case report discusses successful nonsurgical management of radix entomolaris along with middle mesial canal and middle distal canal in mandibular first molar with seven canals (four canals in distal and three in mesial) employing CBCT as an adjunctive diagnostic aid to conventional radiography. PMID:27307680

  5. Artefacts in Cone Beam CT Mimicking an Extrapalatal Canal of Root-Filled Maxillary Molar.

    PubMed

    Camilo, Carla Cristina; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Quintino, Alex Carvalho; de Paula, Adrianne Freire; Cruz-Filho, Antônio Miranda; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2013-01-01

    Despite the advantages of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), the images provided by this diagnostic tool can produce artifacts and compromise accurate diagnostic assessment. This paper describes an endodontic treatment of a maxillary molar where CBCT images suggested the presence of a nonexistent third root canal in the palatal root. An endodontic treatment was performed in a first maxillary molar with palatal canals, and the tooth was restored with a cast metal crown. The patient returned four years later presenting with a discomfort in chewing, which was reduced after occlusal adjustment. CBCT was prescribed to verify additional diagnostic information. Axial scans on coronal, middle, and apical palatal root sections showed images similar to a third root canal. However, sagittal scans demonstrated that these images were artifacts caused by root canal fillings. A careful interpretation of CBCT images in root-filled teeth must be done to avoid mistakes in treatment.

  6. [Periinterventional cone-beam-CT: application at transarterial chemoembolization of liver tumors].

    PubMed

    Adamus, R; Uder, M; Wilhelm, M; Loose, R W

    2011-07-01

    Periinterventional Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) today is a valuable tool in complex radiological interventions. Only little experience exists about CBCT in transarterial chemoembolisations (TACE) of liver tumors. 25 patients underwent periinterventional CBCT. We used a C-arc DSA with 30 × 40 cm flat panel detector. Image data with axial, coronal and 3D-reconstruction were acquired by 217° rotation in 8 seconds. In all 25 cases CBCT had an influence on the TACE regarding the decision which vessels to catheterize, the amount of retention of the embolisation agent or an abort because of insufficient vascularisation. In comparison with DSA alone, CBCT allows a better visualisation of tumour vessels, simplifies selective catheterisation, the decision whether an embolisation is possible and enables a good visualisation of Lipiodol retention. Hence, CBCT is a helpful periinterventional tool but cannot substitute CT and MRI in follow up.

  7. A Diagnosis of Maxillary Sinus Fracture with Cone-Beam CT: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Selmi Yardimci; Misirlioglu, Melda; Adisen, Mehmet Zahit

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the case of maxillofacial trauma patient with maxillary sinus fracture diagnosed with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to explore the applications of this technique in evaluating the maxillofacial region. A 23-year-old male patient attempted to our clinic who had an injury at midface with complaints of swelling, numbness. The patient was examined before in emergency center but any diagnosis was made about the maxillofacial trauma. The patient re-examined clinically and radiographically. A fracture on the frontal wall of maxillary sinus is determined with the aid of CBCT. The patient consulted with the department of maxillofacial surgery and it is decided that any surgical treatment was not necessary. The emerging technique CBCT would not be the primary choice of imaging maxillofacial trauma. Nevertheless, when advantages considered this imaging procedure could be the modality of choice according to the case. PMID:25045417

  8. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Findings in Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor Associated with Odontome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Phulambrikar, Tushar; Vilas Kant, Sanchita; Kode, Manasi; Magar, Shaliputra

    2015-01-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is a rare cystic odontogenic neoplasm frequently found in association with odontome. This report documents a case of CCOT associated with an odontome arising in the anterior maxilla in a 28-year-old man. Conventional radiographs showed internal calcification within the lesion but were unable to visualize its relation with the adjacent structures and its accurate extent. In this case cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could accurately reveal the extent and the internal structure of the lesion which aided the presumptive diagnosis of the lesion as CCOT. This advanced imaging technique proved to be extremely useful in the radiographic assessment and management of this neoplasm of the maxilla. PMID:26636128

  9. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography contrast validation of an artificial periodontal phantom for use in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Michetti, Jerome; Basarab, Adrian; Tran, Michel; Diemer, Franck; Kouame, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Validation of image processing techniques such as endodontic segmentations in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a challenging issue because of the lack of ground truth in in vivo experiments. The purpose of our study was to design an artificial surrounding tissues phantom able to provide CBCT image quality of real extracted teeth, similar to in vivo conditions. Note that these extracted teeth could be previously scanned using micro computed tomography (μCT) to access true quantitative measurements of the root canal anatomy. Different design settings are assessed in our study by comparison to in vivo images, in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) obtained between different anatomical structures. Concerning the root canal and the dentine, the best design setup allowed our phantom to provide a CNR difference of only 3% compared to clinical cases.

  10. Cone-beam computed tomography in endodontics: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Nesari, Royeen; Rossman, Louis E; Kratchman, Samuel I

    2009-01-01

    From digital radiography units to office computer systems, there are several pieces of equipment that make up today's high-tech dental office. Recently, advances in dental imaging have allowed cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), which is a form of 3-dimensional radiography, to gain increasing popularity as another major office component. In consideration of the current economic conditions, cost has become a definite obstacle for many practitioners. With several brands available, this technology has nonetheless generated considerable attention for use in presurgical treatment planning and diagnosis. However, is there enough evidence for its use in endodontics? This article aims to bring to light the many exciting features of CBCT, including its operation, impact, and feasibility in endodontics.

  11. Implant planning and placement using optical scanning and cone beam CT technology.

    PubMed

    van der Zel, Jef M

    2008-08-01

    There is a growing interest in minimally invasive implant therapy as a standard prosthodontic treatment, providing complete restoration of occlusal function. A new treatment method (CADDIMA), which combines both computerized tomographic (CT) and optical laser-scan data for planning and design of surgical guides, implant abutments, and prosthetic devices, is described. Imaging using a "NewTom 3G" cone beam CT scanner and a modified laser triangulation scanner "D200c" is discussed, as are impression and surgical guide fabrication, which allow for flapless, precise implant placement and an accurate provisional prosthesis. The new approach gives the operator full control over the design of the implant prosthesis for planning of proper occlusal relations and shows promise for further evaluation.

  12. Artefacts in Cone Beam CT Mimicking an Extrapalatal Canal of Root-Filled Maxillary Molar

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Carla Cristina; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Quintino, Alex Carvalho; de Paula, Adrianne Freire; Cruz-Filho, Antônio Miranda; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2013-01-01

    Despite the advantages of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), the images provided by this diagnostic tool can produce artifacts and compromise accurate diagnostic assessment. This paper describes an endodontic treatment of a maxillary molar where CBCT images suggested the presence of a nonexistent third root canal in the palatal root. An endodontic treatment was performed in a first maxillary molar with palatal canals, and the tooth was restored with a cast metal crown. The patient returned four years later presenting with a discomfort in chewing, which was reduced after occlusal adjustment. CBCT was prescribed to verify additional diagnostic information. Axial scans on coronal, middle, and apical palatal root sections showed images similar to a third root canal. However, sagittal scans demonstrated that these images were artifacts caused by root canal fillings. A careful interpretation of CBCT images in root-filled teeth must be done to avoid mistakes in treatment. PMID:23606995

  13. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in the Field of Interventional Oncology of the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Bapst, Blanche Lagadec, Matthieu; Breguet, Romain; Vilgrain, Valérie Ronot, Maxime

    2016-01-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging modality that provides computed tomographic images using a rotational C-arm equipped with a flat panel detector as part of the Angiography suite. The aim of this technique is to provide additional information to conventional 2D imaging to improve the performance of interventional liver oncology procedures (intraarterial treatments such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy, and percutaneous tumor ablation). CBCT provides accurate tumor detection and targeting, periprocedural guidance, and post-procedural evaluation of treatment success. This technique can be performed during intraarterial or intravenous contrast agent administration with various acquisition protocols to highlight liver tumors, liver vessels, or the liver parenchyma. The purpose of this review is to present an extensive overview of published data on CBCT in interventional oncology of the liver, for both percutaneous ablation and intraarterial procedures.

  14. Comparison of in vivo cone-beam and multidetector computed tomographic scans by three-dimensional merging software.

    PubMed

    Rostetter, Claudio; Metzler, Philipp; Schenkel, Jan S; Seifert, Burkhardt; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo

    2015-12-01

    In dentomaxillofacial radiology, cone-beam computed tomography (CT) is used to give fast and high-resolution 3-dimensional images of bone with a low dose of radiation. However, its use for quantitative measurement of bone density based on absolute values (Hounsfield units, HU) as in multidetector CT is still controversial. We know of no in vivo study of 3-dimensional merging software that will reliably match identical bone areas of cone-beam and multidetector CT datasets. We studied 19 multidetector, and 19 cone-beam, CT scans of the skull. The two datasets were fused, corresponding points were identified for measurement, and we compared mean density. We used linear regression to analyse the relation between the two different scanning methods, and studied a total of 4180 measurements. The mean time interval between scans was 5.2 (4.7) months. Mean R(2) over all measurements was 0.63 (range 0.22 - 0.79) with a mean internal consistency (Cronbach's α) of 0.86 (range 0.61 - 0.93). The strongest linearity, seen at the left mastoid, was R(2)=0.79 with high internal consistency (Cronbach's α 0.89), and the weakest was at the left zygomatic bone with R(2)=0.22 and Cronbach's α=0.61. Measurements of bone density based on cone-beam and multidetector CT scans generated in vivo showed high and reproducible internal consistency but poor linearity.

  15. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Needle Path Overlay for Fluoroscopic-Guided Placement of Translumbar Central Venous Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Alda; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Rohm, Esther; Wallace, Michael J.

    2009-07-15

    C-arm cone beam computed tomography is an advanced 3D imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat-panel-based angiography systems. The overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real-time fluoroscopy. This overlay technology was used to guide the placement of three percutaneous translumbar inferior vena cava catheters.

  16. Radiologic evaluation of an unusually sized complex odontoma involving the maxillary sinus by cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Isler, Sabri Cemil; Demircan, Sabit; Soluk, Merva; Cebi, Zerrin

    2009-01-01

    As a group, odontomas are the most common odontogenic neoplasms. This case report illustrates the benefits of cone beam computed tomography, in terms of treatment planning and surgical technique, to localize a large maxillary odontoma and accurately establish its relationship with the maxillary sinus and molar.

  17. In-treatment 4D cone-beam CT with image-based respiratory phase recognition.

    PubMed

    Kida, Satoshi; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hideomi; Imae, Toshikazu; Matsuura, Taeko; Saotome, Naoya; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Haga, Akihiro

    2012-07-01

    The use of respiration-correlated cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) appears to be crucial for implementing precise radiation therapy of lung cancer patients. The reconstruction of 4D-CBCT images requires a respiratory phase. In this paper, we propose a novel method based on an image-based phase recognition technique using normalized cross correlation (NCC). We constructed the respiratory phase by searching for a region in an adjacent projection that achieves the maximum correlation with a region in a reference projection along the cranio-caudal direction. The data on 12 lung cancer patients acquired just prior to treatment and on 3 lung cancer patients acquired during volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment were analyzed in the search for the effective area of cone-beam projection images for performing NCC with 12 combinations of registration area and segment size. The evaluation was done by a "recognition rate" defined as the ratio of the number of peak inhales detected with our method to that detected by eye (manual tracking). The average recognition rate of peak inhale with the most efficient area in the present method was 96.4%. The present method was feasible even when the diaphragm was outside the field of view. With the most efficient area, we reconstructed in-treatment 4D-CBCT by dividing the breathing signal into four phase bins; peak exhale, peak inhale, and two intermediate phases. With in-treatment 4D-CBCT images, it was possible to identify the tumor position and the tumor size in moments of inspiration and expiration, in contrast to in-treatment CBCT reconstructed with all projections.

  18. Automatic tracking of implanted fiducial markers in cone beam CT projection images

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, T. E.; Skalski, A.; Matuszewski, B. J.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: This paper describes a novel method for simultaneous intrafraction tracking of multiple fiducial markers. Although the proposed method is generic and can be adopted for a number of applications including fluoroscopy based patient position monitoring and gated radiotherapy, the tracking results presented in this paper are specific to tracking fiducial markers in a sequence of cone beam CT projection images. Methods: The proposed method is accurate and robust thanks to utilizing the mean shift and random sampling principles, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods, using data from two pancreatic and one prostate cancer patients and a moving phantom. The ground truth, for quantitative evaluation, was calculated based on manual tracking preformed by three observers. Results: The average dispersion of marker position error calculated from the tracking results for pancreas data (six markers tracked over 640 frames, 3840 marker identifications) was 0.25 mm (at iscoenter), compared with an average dispersion for the manual ground truth estimated at 0.22 mm. For prostate data (three markers tracked over 366 frames, 1098 marker identifications), the average error was 0.34 mm. The estimated tracking error in the pancreas data was < 1 mm (2 pixels) in 97.6% of cases where nearby image clutter was detected and in 100.0% of cases with no nearby image clutter. Conclusions: The proposed method has accuracy comparable to that of manual tracking and, in combination with the proposed batch postprocessing, superior robustness. Marker tracking in cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is useful for a variety of purposes, such as providing data for assessment of intrafraction motion, target tracking during rotational treatment delivery, motion correction of CBCT, and phase sorting for 4D CBCT.

  19. Accuracy and reliability of facial soft tissue depth measurements using cone beam computer tomography.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Peter O; Ren, Yijin

    2010-06-15

    It is important to have accurate and reliable measurements of soft tissue thickness for specific landmarks of the face and scalp when producing a facial reconstruction. In the past several methods have been created to measure facial soft tissue thickness (FSTT) in cadavers and in the living. The conventional spiral CT is mostly used to determine the FSTT but is associated with high radiation doses. The cone beam CT (CBCT) is a relatively new computer tomography system that focuses on head and neck regions and has much lower radiation doses. The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy and reliability of CBCT scans to measure the soft tissue thicknesses of the face. Seven cadaver heads were used. Eleven soft tissue landmarks were identified on each head and a punch hole was made on each landmark using a dermal biopsy punch. The seven cadaver heads were scanned in the CBCT with 0.3 and 0.4mm resolution. The FSTT at the 11 different sites (soft tissue landmarks) were measured using SimPlant-ortho volumetric software. These measurements were compared to the physical measurements. Statistical analysis for the reliability was done by means of the interclass coefficient (ICC) and the accuracy by means of the absolute error (AE) and absolute percentage error (APE). The intra-observer (0.976-0.999) and inter-observer (0.982-0.997) correlations of the CBCT and physical measurements were very high. There was no clinical significant difference between the measurements made on the CBCT images and the physical measurements. Increasing the voxel size from 0.4 to 0.3mm resulted in a slight increase of accuracy. Cone beam CT images of the face using routine scanning protocols are reliable for measuring soft tissue thickness in the facial region and give a good representation of the facial soft tissues. For more accurate data collection the 0.3mm voxel size should be considered.

  20. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector

    PubMed Central

    Jain, A; Takemoto, H; Silver, M D; Nagesh, S V S; Ionita, C N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm × 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested. PMID:26877577

  1. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Takemoto, H.; Silver, M. D.; Nagesh, S. V. S.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm x 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested.

  2. Enlarged longitudinal dose profiles in cone-beam CT and the need for modified dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Tsunoo, Takanori; Aoyama, Takahiko; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya

    2005-04-01

    In order to examine phantom length necessary to assess radiation dose delivered to patients in cone-beam CT with an enlarged beamwidth, we measured dose profiles in cylindrical phantoms of sufficient length using a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner developed at our institute. Dose profiles parallel to the rotation axis were measured at the central and peripheral positions in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) phantoms of 160 or 320 mm diameter and 900 mm length. For practical application, we joined unit cylinders (150 mm long) together to provide phantoms of 900 mm length. Dose profiles were measured with a pin photodiode sensor having a sensitive region of approximately 2.8x2.8 mm{sup 2} and 2.7 mm thickness. Beamwidths of the scanner were varied from 20 to 138 mm. Dose profile integrals (DPI) were calculated using the measured dose profiles for various beamwidths and integration ranges. For the body phantom (320-mm-diam phantom), 76% of the DPI was represented for a 20 mm beamwidth and 60% was represented for a 138 mm beamwidth if dose profiles were integrated over a 100 mm range, while more than 90% of the DPI was represented for beamwidths between 20 and 138 mm if integration was carried out over a 300 mm range. The phantom length and integration range for dosimetry of cone-beam CT needed to be more than 300 mm to represent more than 90% of the DPI for the body phantom with the beamwidth of more than 20 mm. Although we reached this conclusion using the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner, it may be applied to other multislice CT-scanners as well.

  3. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector.

    PubMed

    Jain, A; Takemoto, H; Silver, M D; Nagesh, S V S; Ionita, C N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm × 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested.

  4. A system to track skin dose for neuro-interventional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Xiong, Zhenyu; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The skin-dose tracking system (DTS) provides a color-coded illustration of the cumulative skin-dose distribution on a closely-matching 3D graphic of the patient during fluoroscopic interventions in real-time for immediate feedback to the interventionist. The skin-dose tracking utility of DTS has been extended to include cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) of neurointerventions. While the DTS was developed to track the entrance skin dose including backscatter, a significant part of the dose in CBCT is contributed by exit primary radiation and scatter due to the many overlapping projections during the rotational scan. The variation of backscatter inside and outside the collimated beam was measured with radiochromic film and a curve was fit to obtain a scatter spread function that could be applied in the DTS. Likewise, the exit dose distribution was measured with radiochromic film for a single projection and a correction factor was determined as a function of path length through the head. Both of these sources of skin dose are added for every projection in the CBCT scan to obtain a total dose mapping over the patient graphic. Results show the backscatter to follow a sigmoidal falloff near the edge of the beam, extending outside the beam as far as 8 cm. The exit dose measured for a cylindrical CTDI phantom was nearly 10 % of the entrance peak skin dose for the central ray. The dose mapping performed by the DTS for a CBCT scan was compared to that measured with radiochromic film and a CTDI-head phantom with good agreement.

  5. SU-E-J-69: Evaluation of the Lens Dose On the Cone Beam IGRT Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Palomo-Llinares, R; Gimeno-Olmos, J; Carmona Meseguer, V; Lliso-Valverde, F; Candela-Juan, C; Perez-Calatayud, J; Pujades, M; Ballester, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: With the establishment of the IGRT as a standard technique, the extra dose that is given to the patients should be taken into account. Furthermore, it has been a recent decrease of the dose threshold in the lens, reduced to 0.5 Gy (ICRP ref 4825-3093-1464 on 21st April, 2011).The purpose of this work was to evaluate the extra dose that the lens is receive due to the Cone-Beam (CBCT) location systems in Head-and-Neck treatments. Methods: The On-Board Imaging (OBI) v 1.5 of the two Varian accelerators, one Clinac iX and one True Beam, were used to obtain the dose that this OBI version give to the lens in the Head-and-Neck location treatments. All CBCT scans were acquired with the Standard Dose Head protocol (100 kVp, 80 mA, 8 ms and 200 degree of rotation).The measurements were taken with thermoluminescence (TLD) EXTRAD (Harshaw) dosimeters placed in an anthropomorphic phantom over the eye and under 3 mm of bolus material to mimic the lens position. The center of the head was placed at the isocenter. To reduce TLD energy dependence, they were calibrated at the used beam quality. Results: The average lens dose at the lens in the OBI v 1.5 systems of the Clinac iX and the True Beam is 0.071 and 0.076 cGy/CBCT, respectively. Conclusions: The extra absorbed doses that receive the eye lenses due to one CBCT acquisition with the studied protocol is far below the new ICRP recommended threshold for the lens. However, the addition effect of several CBCT acquisition during the whole treatment should be taken into account.

  6. Low-dose 2.5 MV cone-beam computed tomography with thick CsI flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    Tang, Grace; Moussot, Christopher; Morf, Daniel; Seppi, Edward; Amols, Howard

    2016-07-08

    Most of the treatment units, both new and old models, are equipped with a megavoltage portal imager but its use for volumetric imaging is limited. This is mainly due to the poor image quality produced by the high-energy treatment beam (> 6MV). A linac at our center is equipped with a prototype 2.5 MV imaging beam. This study evaluates the feasibility of low-dose megavoltage cone-beam imaging with the 2.5MV beam and a thick cesium iodide detector, which is a high-efficiency imager. Basic imaging properties such as spatial resolution and modulation transfer function were assessed for the 2.5 MV prototype imaging system. For image quality and imaging dose, a series of megavoltage cone-beam scans were acquired for the head, thorax, and pelvis of an anthropomorphic phantom and were compared to kilovoltage cone-beam and 6X megavoltage cone-beam images. To demonstrate the advantage of MV imaging, a phantom with metallic inserts was scanned and the image quality was compared to CT and kilovoltage cone-beam scans. With a lower energy beam and higher detector efficiency, the 2.5 MV imaging system generally yields better image quality than does the 6 MV imaging system with the conventional MV imager. In particular, with the anthropomorphic phantom studies, the contrast to noise of bone to tissue is generally improved in the 2.5 MV images compared to 6 MV. With an image quality sufficient for bony alignment, the imaging dose for 2.5 MV cone-beam images is 2.4-3.4 MU compared to 26 MU in 6 MV cone-beam scans for the head, thorax, and pelvis regions of the phantom. Unlike kilovoltage cone-beam, the 2.5 MV imaging system does not suffer from high-Z image artifacts. This can be very useful for treatment planning in cases where high-Z prostheses are present.

  7. The use of cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ghoneima, Ahmed; Sachdeva, Kanwar; Hartsfield, James; Weaver, David; Kula, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type I is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by cone-shaped epiphysis, sparse fine hair, pear-shaped nose and variable growth retardation. The typical craniofacial features include thin upper lip, elongated philtrum, large outstanding ears, shortened posterior facial height associated with short mandibular ramus and reduced and superiorly deflected posterior cranial base. This report describes a 17-year-old male patient with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type I and a detailed description of the craniofacial radiographic findings, including the use of cone beam computed tomography images for determination of the airway and temporomandibular joint discrepancies. PMID:23524547

  8. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT.

    PubMed

    Aootaphao, Sorapong; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak S; Rajruangrabin, Jartuwat; Thanasupsombat, Chalinee; Srivongsa, Tanapon; Thajchayapong, Pairash

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter correction scheme to estimate X-ray scatter signals is based on the deconvolution technique using the maximum likelihood estimation maximization (MLEM) method. The scatter kernels are obtained by simulating the PMMA sheet on the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) software. In the experiment, we used the QRM phantom to quantitatively compare with fan-beam CT (FBCT) data in terms of CT number values, contrast to noise ratio, cupping artifacts, and low contrast detectability. Moreover, the PH3 angiography phantom was also used to mimic human soft tissues in the brain. The reconstructed images with our proposed scatter correction show significant improvement on image quality. Thus the proposed scatter correction technique has high potential to detect soft tissues in the brain.

  9. Fractionated changes in prostate cancer radiotherapy using cone-beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tzung-Chi; Chou, Kuei-Ting; Yang, Shih-Neng; Chang, Chih-Kai; Liang, Ji-An; Zhang, Geoffrey

    2015-10-01

    The high mobility of the bladder and the rectum causes uncertainty in radiation doses prescribed to patients with prostate cancer who undergo radiotherapy (RT) multifraction treatments. The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose received by the bladder, rectum, and prostate from multifraction treatments using daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Overall, 28 patients with prostate cancer who planned to receive radiation treatments were enrolled in the study. The acquired CBCT before the treatment delivery was registered with the planning CT to map the dose distribution used in the treatment plan for estimating the received dose during clinical treatment. For all 28 patients with 112 data sets, the mean percentage differences (± standard deviation) in the volume and radiation dose were 44% (± 41) and 18% (± 17) for the bladder, 20% (± 21) and 2% (± 2) for the prostate, and 36% (± 29) and 22% (± 15) for the rectum, respectively. Substantial differences between the volumes and radiation dose and those specified in treatment plans were observed. Besides the use of image-guided RT to improve patient setup accuracy, further consideration of large changes in bladder and rectum volumes is strongly suggested when using external beam radiation for prostate cancer.

  10. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Aootaphao, Sorapong; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak S.; Rajruangrabin, Jartuwat; Thanasupsombat, Chalinee; Srivongsa, Tanapon; Thajchayapong, Pairash

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter correction scheme to estimate X-ray scatter signals is based on the deconvolution technique using the maximum likelihood estimation maximization (MLEM) method. The scatter kernels are obtained by simulating the PMMA sheet on the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) software. In the experiment, we used the QRM phantom to quantitatively compare with fan-beam CT (FBCT) data in terms of CT number values, contrast to noise ratio, cupping artifacts, and low contrast detectability. Moreover, the PH3 angiography phantom was also used to mimic human soft tissues in the brain. The reconstructed images with our proposed scatter correction show significant improvement on image quality. Thus the proposed scatter correction technique has high potential to detect soft tissues in the brain. PMID:27022608

  11. A Method to Improve Electron Density Measurement of Cone-Beam CT Using Dual Energy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Men, Kuo; Dai, Jian-Rong; Li, Ming-Hui; Chen, Xin-Yuan; Zhang, Ke; Tian, Yuan; Huang, Peng; Xu, Ying-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a dual energy imaging method to improve the accuracy of electron density measurement with a cone-beam CT (CBCT) device. Materials and Methods. The imaging system is the XVI CBCT system on Elekta Synergy linac. Projection data were acquired with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively, to set up a basis material decomposition model. Virtual phantom simulation and phantoms experiments were carried out for quantitative evaluation of the method. Phantoms were also scanned twice with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively. The data were decomposed into projections of the two basis material coefficients according to the model set up earlier. The two sets of decomposed projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images of the basis material coefficients. Then, the images of electron densities were calculated with these CBCT images. Results. The difference between the calculated and theoretical values was within 2% and the correlation coefficient of them was about 1.0. The dual energy imaging method obtained more accurate electron density values and reduced the beam hardening artifacts obviously. Conclusion. A novel dual energy CBCT imaging method to calculate the electron densities was developed. It can acquire more accurate values and provide a platform potentially for dose calculation. PMID:26346510

  12. Interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saedjalil, N.; Mehrangiz, M.; Jafari, S.; Ghasemizad, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme has been presented. We propose here to merge a plasma-loaded cone with the precompressed DT target in order to strongly focus the incident laser beam on the core to improve the fusion gain. The WKB approximation is used to derive a differential equation that governs the evolution of beamwidth of the incident laser beam with the distance of propagation in the plasma medium. The effects of initial plasma and laser parameters, such as initial plasma electron temperature, initial radius of the laser beam, initial laser beam intensity and plasma density, on self-focusing and defocusing of the Gaussian laser beam have been studied. Numerical results indicate that with increasing the plasma frequency (or plasma density) in the cone, the laser beam will be self-focused noticeably, while for a thinner laser beam (with small radius), it will diverge as propagate in the cone. By evaluating the energy deposition of the relativistic electron ignitors in the fuel, the importance of electron transportation in the cone-attached shell was demonstrated. Moreover, by lessening the least energy needed for ignition, the electrons coupling with the pellet enhances. Therefore, it increases the fusion efficiency. In this scheme, with employing a plasma-loaded cone, the fusion process improves without needing an ultrahigh-intensity laser beam in a conventional ICF.

  13. Flat panel detector-based cone-beam volume CT angiography imaging: system evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ning, R; Chen, B; Yu, R; Conover, D; Tang, X; Ning, Y

    2000-09-01

    Preliminary evaluation of recently developed large-area flat panel detectors (FPDs) indicates that FPDs have some potential advantages: compactness, absence of geometric distortion and veiling glare with the benefits of high resolution, high detective quantum efficiency (DQE), high frame rate and high dynamic range, small image lag (< 1%), and excellent linearity (approximately 1%). The advantages of the new FPD make it a promising candidate for cone-beam volume computed tomography (CT) angiography (CBVCTA) imaging. The purpose of this study is to characterize a prototype FPD-based imaging system for CBVCTA applications. A prototype FPD-based CBVCTA imaging system has been designed and constructed around a modified GE 8800 CT scanner. This system is evaluated for a CBVCTA imaging task in the head and neck using four phantoms and a frozen rat. The system is first characterized in terms of linearity and dynamic range of the detector. Then, the optimal selection of kVps for CBVCTA is determined and the effect of image lag and scatter on the image quality of the CBVCTA system is evaluated. Next, low-contrast resolution and high-contrast spatial resolution are measured. Finally, the example reconstruction images of a frozen rat are presented. The results indicate that the FPD-based CBVCT can achieve 2.75-lp/mm spatial resolution at 0% modulation transfer function (MTF) and provide more than enough low-contrast resolution for intravenous CBVCTA imaging in the head and neck with clinically acceptable entrance exposure level. The results also suggest that to use an FPD for large cone-angle applications, such as body angiography, further investigations are required.

  14. Direct cone-beam cardiac reconstruction algorithm with cardiac banding artifact correction

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Chiang, Beshan S.; Hein, Ilmar A.

    2006-02-15

    Multislice helical computed tomography (CT) is a promising noninvasive technique for coronary artery imaging. Various factors can cause inconsistencies in cardiac CT data, which can result in degraded image quality. These inconsistencies may be the result of the patient physiology (e.g., heart rate variations), the nature of the data (e.g., cone-angle), or the reconstruction algorithm itself. An algorithm which provides the best temporal resolution for each slice, for example, often provides suboptimal image quality for the entire volume since the cardiac temporal resolution (TRc) changes from slice to slice. Such variations in TRc can generate strong banding artifacts in multi-planar reconstruction images or three-dimensional images. Discontinuous heart walls and coronary arteries may compromise the accuracy of the diagnosis. A {beta}-blocker is often used to reduce and stabilize patients' heart rate but cannot eliminate the variation. In order to obtain robust and optimal image quality, a software solution that increases the temporal resolution and decreases the effect of heart rate is highly desirable. This paper proposes an ECG-correlated direct cone-beam reconstruction algorithm (TCOT-EGR) with cardiac banding artifact correction (CBC) and disconnected projections redundancy compensation technique (DIRECT). First the theory and analytical model of the cardiac temporal resolution is outlined. Next, the performance of the proposed algorithms is evaluated by using computer simulations as well as patient data. It will be shown that the proposed algorithms enhance the robustness of the image quality against inconsistencies by guaranteeing smooth transition of heart cycles used in reconstruction.

  15. Evaluating the image quality of cone beam CT acquired during rotational delivery

    PubMed Central

    Maria Das, K J; Maria Midunvaleja, K; Gowtham Raj, D; Agarwal, Arpita; Velmurugan, J; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this work was to evaluate the quality of kilovoltage (kV) cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired during arc delivery. Methods: Arc plans were delivered on a Catphan® 600 phantom (The Phantom Laboratory Inc., Salem, NY), and kV CBCT images were acquired during the treatment. The megavoltage (MV) scatter effect on kV CBCT image quality was evaluated using parameters such as Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy, spatial resolution, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial non-uniformity (SNU). These CBCT images were compared with reference scans acquired with the same acquisition parameters without MV “beam on”. This evaluation was carried out for different photon beams (6 and 15 MV), arc types (half vs full arc), static field sizes (10 × 10 and 25 × 25 cm2) and source-to-imager distances (SID) (150 and 170 cm). Results and Conclusion: HU accuracy, CNR and SNU were considerably affected by MV scatter, and this effect was increased with increasing field size and decreasing photon energy, whereas the spatial resolution was almost unchanged. The MV scatter effect was observed to be more for full-rotation arc delivery than for half-arc delivery. In addition, increasing the SID resulted in decreased MV scatter effect and improved the image quality. Advances in knowledge: Nowadays, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is increasingly used in clinics, and this arc therapy enables us to acquire CBCT imaging simultaneously. But, the main issue of concurrent imaging is the “MV scatter” effect on CBCT imaging. This study aims to experimentally quantify the effect of MV scatter on CBCT image quality. PMID:26226396

  16. Comparison measurements of DQE for two flat panel detectors: fluoroscopic detector vs. cone beam CT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Benítez, Ricardo; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David

    2006-03-01

    The physical performance of two flat panel detectors (FPD) has been evaluated using a standard x-ray beam quality set by IEC, namely RQA5. The FPDs evaluated in this study are based on an amorphous silicon photodiode array that is coupled to a thallium-doped Cesium Iodide scintillator and to a thin film transistor (TFT) array. One detector is the PaxScan 2520 that is designed for fluoro imaging, and has a small dynamic range and a large image lag. The other detector is the PaxScan 4030CB that is designed for cone beam CT, and has a large dynamic range (>16-bit), a reduced image lag and many imaging modes. Varian Medical Systems manufactured both detectors. The linearity of the FPDs was investigated by using an ionization chamber and aluminum filtration in order to obtain the beam quality. Since the FPDs are used in fluoroscopic mode, image lag of the FPD was measured in order to investigate its effect on this study, especially its effect on DQE. The spatial resolution of the FPDs was determined by obtaining the pre-sampling modulation transfer function for each detector. A sharp edge was used in accordance to IEC 62220-1. Next, the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) was calculated for various exposures levels at RQA5 radiation quality. Finally, the DQE of each FPD was obtained with a modified version of the international standard set by IEC 62220-1. The results show that the physical performance in DQE and MTF of the PaxScan 4030CB is superior to that of PaxScan2520.

  17. Algorithm for X-ray scatter, beam-hardening, and beam profile correction in diagnostic (kilovoltage) and treatment (megavoltage) cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bose, Supratik; Hristov, Dimitre H; Faddegon, Bruce A; Paidi, Ajay; Bani-Hashemi, Ali R

    2008-12-01

    Quantitative reconstruction of cone beam X-ray computed tomography (CT) datasets requires accurate modeling of scatter, beam-hardening, beam profile, and detector response. Typically, commercial imaging systems use fast empirical corrections that are designed to reduce visible artifacts due to incomplete modeling of the image formation process. In contrast, Monte Carlo (MC) methods are much more accurate but are relatively slow. Scatter kernel superposition (SKS) methods offer a balance between accuracy and computational practicality. We show how a single SKS algorithm can be employed to correct both kilovoltage (kV) energy (diagnostic) and megavoltage (MV) energy (treatment) X-ray images. Using MC models of kV and MV imaging systems, we map intensities recorded on an amorphous silicon flat panel detector to water-equivalent thicknesses (WETs). Scattergrams are derived from acquired projection images using scatter kernels indexed by the local WET values and are then iteratively refined using a scatter magnitude bounding scheme that allows the algorithm to accommodate the very high scatter-to-primary ratios encountered in kV imaging. The algorithm recovers radiological thicknesses to within 9% of the true value at both kV and megavolt energies. Nonuniformity in CT reconstructions of homogeneous phantoms is reduced by an average of 76% over a wide range of beam energies and phantom geometries.

  18. Lipiodol: A Potential Direct Surrogate for Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Image Guidance in Radiotherapy of Liver Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Jinbo; Sun Xindong; Cai Jing; Yin Fangfang; Yin Yong; Zhu Jian; Lu Jie; Liu Tonghai; Yu Jinming; Shi Xuetao; Song Jinlong

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using lipiodol as a direct surrogate for target localization using cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance in radiotherapy (RT) of patients with unresectable liver tumors after transarterial chemoembolization. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with an unresectable solitary liver tumor were enrolled for RT using active breathing control (ABC) and CBCT image guidance after transarterial chemoembolization. Each patient had pre- and posttreatment CBCT in the first 10 fractions of treatment. Lipiodol retention was evaluated using daily CBCT scans, and volume of lipiodol retention in the liver was calculated and compared between planning CT and post-RT CT. Influence of lipiodol on dosimetry was evaluated by measuring doses using an ion chamber with and without the presence of lipiodol. Margin analysis was performed on the basis of both inter- and intrafractional target localization errors. Results: Twenty-eight patients successfully completed the study. The shape and size of lipiodol retention did not vary substantially during the course of treatment. The mean Dice similarity coefficient for the lipiodol volume in pretreatment CT and that in posttreatment CT was 0.836 (range, 0.817-0.885). The maximum change (ratio of the lipiodol volume in pretreatment CT to that in posttreatment CT) was 1.045. The mean dose changes with the presence of <10 mL lipiodol were -1.44% and 0.13% for 6 MV and 15 MV, respectively. With ABC and online CBCT image guidance, clinical target volume-planning target volume margins were determined to be 2.5 mm in the mediolateral direction, 2.9 mm in the anteroposterior direction, and 4.0 mm in the craniocaudal direction. Conclusions: Lipiodol could be used as a direct surrogate for CBCT image guidance to improve the localization accuracy for RT of liver tumors. Combination of ABC and CBCT image guidance with lipiodol can potentially reduce the clinical target volume-planning target volume margin.

  19. Comparative evaluation of a novel 3D segmentation algorithm on in-treatment radiotherapy cone beam CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gareth; Moore, Chris

    2007-03-01

    Image segmentation and delineation is at the heart of modern radiotherapy, where the aim is to deliver as high a radiation dose as possible to a cancerous target whilst sparing the surrounding healthy tissues. This, of course, requires that a radiation oncologist dictates both where the tumour and any nearby critical organs are located. As well as in treatment planning, delineation is of vital importance in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT): organ motion studies demand that features across image databases are accurately segmented, whilst if on-line adaptive IGRT is to become a reality, speedy and correct target identification is a necessity. Recently, much work has been put into the development of automatic and semi-automatic segmentation tools, often using prior knowledge to constrain some grey level, or derivative thereof, interrogation algorithm. It is hoped that such techniques can be applied to organ at risk and tumour segmentation in radiotherapy. In this work, however, we make the assumption that grey levels do not necessarily determine a tumour's extent, especially in CT where the attenuation coefficient can often vary little between cancerous and normal tissue. In this context we present an algorithm that generates a discontinuity free delineation surface driven by user placed, evidence based support points. In regions of sparse user supplied information, prior knowledge, in the form of a statistical shape model, provides guidance. A small case study is used to illustrate the method. Multiple observers (between 3 and 7) used both the presented tool and a commercial manual contouring package to delineate the bladder on a serially imaged (10 cone beam CT volumes ) prostate patient. A previously presented shape analysis technique is used to quantitatively compare the observer variability.

  20. Cone-beam CT breast imaging with a flat panel detector: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingyun; Shaw, Chris C.; Tu, Shu-Ju; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Liu, Xinming; Kappadath, S. C.

    2005-04-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using a flat panel based cone-beam computer tomography (CT) system for 3-D breast imaging with computer simulation and imaging experiments. In our simulation study, 3-D phantoms were analytically modeled to simulate a breast loosely compressed into cylindrical shape with embedded soft tissue masses and calcifications. Attenuation coefficients were estimated to represent various types of breast tissue, soft tissue masses and calcifications to generate realistic image signal and contrast. Projection images were computed to incorporate x-ray attenuation, geometric magnification, x-ray detection, detector blurring, image pixelization and digitization. Based on the two-views mammography comparable dose level on the central axis of the phantom (also the rotation axis), x-ray kVp/filtration, transmittance through the phantom, detected quantum efficiency (DQE), exposure level, and imaging geometry, the photon fluence was estimated and used to estimate the phantom noise level on a pixel-by-pixel basis. This estimated noise level was then used with the random number generator to produce and add a fluctuation component to the noiseless transmitted image signal. The noise carrying projection images were then convolved with a Gaussian-like kernel, computed from measured 1-D line spread function (LSF) to simulated detector blurring. Additional 2-D Gaussian-like kernel is designed to suppress the noise fluctuation that inherently originates from projection images so that the reconstructed image detectability of low contrast masses phantom can be improved. Image reconstruction was performed using the Feldkamp algorithm. All simulations were performed on a 24 PC (2.4 GHz Dual-Xeon CPU) cluster with MPI parallel programming. With 600 mrads mean glandular dose (MGD) at the phantom center, soft tissue masses as small as 1 mm in diameter can be detected in a 10 cm diameter 50% glandular 50% adipose or fatter breast tissue, and 2 mm or larger

  1. Directional sinogram interpolation for motion weighted 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Kruis, Matthijs; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2017-03-01

    The image quality of respiratory sorted four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam (CB) computed tomography (CT) is often limited by streak artifacts due to insufficient projections. A motion weighted reconstruction (MWR) method is proposed to decrease streak artifacts and improve image quality. Firstly, respiratory correlated CBCT projections were interpolated by directional sinogram interpolation (DSI) to generate additional CB projections for each phase and subsequently reconstructed. Secondly, local motion was estimated by deformable image registration of the interpolated 4D CBCT. Thirdly, a regular 3D FDK CBCT was reconstructed from the non-interpolated projections. Finally, weights were assigned to each voxel, based on the local motion, and then were used to combine the 3D FDK CBCT and interpolated 4D CBCT to generate the final 4D image. MWR method was compared with regular 4D CBCT scans as well as McKinnon and Bates (MKB) based reconstructions. Comparisons were made in terms of (1) comparing the steepness of an extracted profile from the boundary of the region-of-interest (ROI), (2) contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) inside certain ROIs, and (3) the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) between the planning CT and CBCT inside a homogeneous moving region. Comparisons were made for both a phantom and four patient scans. In a 4D phantom, RMSE were reduced by 24.7% and 38.7% for MKB and MWR respectively, compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Meanwhile, interpolation induced blur was minimal in static regions for MWR based reconstructions. In regions with considerable respiratory motion, image blur using MWR is less than the MKB and 3D Feldkamp (FDK) methods. In the lung cancer patients, average CNRs of MKB, DSI and MWR improved by a factor 1.7, 2.8 and 3.5 respectively relative to 4D FDK. MWR effectively reduces RMSE in 4D cone-beam CT and improves the image quality in both the static and respiratory moving regions compared to 4D FDK and MKB methods.

  2. Imaging doses in radiation therapy from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyer, Daniel Ellis

    Advances in radiation treatment delivery, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), have made it possible to deliver large doses of radiation with a high degree of conformity. While highly conformal treatments offers the advantage of sparing surrounding normal tissue, this benefit can only be realized if the patient is accurately positioned during each treatment fraction. The need to accurately position the patient has led to the development and use of gantry mounted kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) systems. These systems are used to acquire high resolution volumetric images of the patient which are then digitally registered with the planning CT dataset to confirm alignment of the patient on the treatment table. While kV-CBCT is a very useful tool for aligning the patient prior to treatment, daily use in a high fraction therapy regimen results in a substantial radiation dose. In order to quantify the radiation dose associated with CBCT imaging, an anthropomorphic phantom representing a 50th percentile adult male and a fiber-optic coupled (FOC) dosimetry system were both constructed as part of this dissertation. These tools were then used to directly measure organ doses incurred during clinical protocols for the head, chest, and pelvis. For completeness, the dose delivered from both the X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI, Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) and the On-Board Imager (OBI, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were investigated. While this study provided a direct measure of organ doses for estimating risk to the patient, a practical method for estimating organ doses that could be performed with phantoms and dosimeters currently available at most clinics was also desired. To accomplish this goal, a 100 mm pencil ion chamber was used to measure the "cone beam dose index" (CBDI) inside standard CT dose index (CTDI) acrylic phantoms. A weighted CBDI (CBDIw), similar to the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw), was then calculated to

  3. Imaging doses from the Elekta Synergy X-ray cone beam CT system.

    PubMed

    Amer, A; Marchant, T; Sykes, J; Czajka, J; Moore, C

    2007-06-01

    The Elekta Synergy is a radiotherapy treatment machine with integrated kilovoltage (kV) X-ray imaging system capable of producing cone beam CT (CBCT) images of the patient in the treatment position. The aim of this study is to assess the additional imaging dose. Cone beam CT dose index (CBDI) is introduced and measured inside standard CTDI phantoms for several sites (head: 100 kV, 38 mAs, lung: 120 kV, 152 mAs and pelvis: 130 kV, 456 mAs). The measured weighted doses were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements at various locations in a Rando phantom and at patients' surfaces. The measured CBDIs in-air at the isocentre were 9.2 mGy 100 mAs(-1), 7.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) and 5.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) for 130 kV, 120 kV and 100 kV, respectively. The body phantom weighted CBDI were 5.5 mGy 100 mAs(-1) and 3.8 mGy 100 mAs(-1 )for 130 kV and 120 kV. The head phantom weighted CBDI was 4.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) for 100 kV. The weighted doses for the Christie Hospital CBCT imaging techniques were 1.6 mGy, 6 mGy and 22 mGy for the head, lung and pelvis. The measured CBDIs were used to estimate the total effective dose for the Synergy system using the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator. Measured CBCT doses using the Christie Hospital protocols are low for head and lung scans whether compared with electronic portal imaging (EPI), commonly used for treatment verification, or single and multiple slice CT. For the pelvis, doses are similar to EPI but higher than CT. Repeated use of CBCT for treatment verification is likely and hence the total patient dose needs to be carefully considered. It is important to consider further development of low dose CBCT techniques to keep additional doses as low as reasonably practicable.

  4. Quantification of dental prostheses on cone-beam CT images by the Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Rong-Fu; Fang, Kwang-Ming; Ty, Wong; Hu, Chia Yu

    2016-01-08

    The gray values accuracy of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is affected by dental metal prostheses. The distortion of dental CBCT gray values could lead to inaccuracies of orthodontic and implant treatment. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of scanning parameters and dental metal prostheses on the accuracy of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) gray values using the Taguchi method. Eight dental model casts of an upper jaw including prostheses, and a ninth prosthesis-free dental model cast, were scanned by two dental CBCT devices. The mean gray value of the selected circular regions of interest (ROIs) were measured using dental CBCT images of eight dental model casts and were compared with those measured from CBCT images of the prosthesis-free dental model cast. For each image set, four consecutive slices of gingiva were selected. The seven factors (CBCTs, occlusal plane canting, implant connection, prosthesis position, coping material, coping thickness, and types of dental restoration) were used to evaluate scanning parameter and dental prostheses effects. Statistical methods of signal to noise ratio (S/N) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95% confidence were applied to quantify the effects of scanning parameters and dental prostheses on dental CBCT gray values accuracy. For ROIs surrounding dental prostheses, the accuracy of CBCT gray values were affected primarily by implant connection (42%), followed by type of restoration (29%), prostheses position (19%), coping material (4%), and coping thickness (4%). For a single crown prosthesis (without support of implants) placed in dental model casts, gray value differences for ROIs 1-9 were below 12% and gray value differences for ROIs 13-18 away from pros-theses were below 10%. We found the gray value differences set to be between 7% and 8% for regions next to a single implant-supported titanium prosthesis, and between 46% and 59% for regions between double implant

  5. Task-driven image acquisition and reconstruction in cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Gang, Grace J; Stayman, J Webster; Ehtiati, Tina; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2015-04-21

    This work introduces a task-driven imaging framework that incorporates a mathematical definition of the imaging task, a model of the imaging system, and a patient-specific anatomical model to prospectively design image acquisition and reconstruction techniques to optimize task performance. The framework is applied to joint optimization of tube current modulation, view-dependent reconstruction kernel, and orbital tilt in cone-beam CT. The system model considers a cone-beam CT system incorporating a flat-panel detector and 3D filtered backprojection and accurately describes the spatially varying noise and resolution over a wide range of imaging parameters in the presence of a realistic anatomical model. Task-based detectability index (d') is incorporated as the objective function in a task-driven optimization of image acquisition and reconstruction techniques. The orbital tilt was optimized through an exhaustive search across tilt angles ranging ± 30°. For each tilt angle, the view-dependent tube current and reconstruction kernel (i.e. the modulation profiles) that maximized detectability were identified via an alternating optimization. The task-driven approach was compared with conventional unmodulated and automatic exposure control (AEC) strategies for a variety of imaging tasks and anthropomorphic phantoms. The task-driven strategy outperformed the unmodulated and AEC cases for all tasks. For example, d' for a sphere detection task in a head phantom was improved by 30% compared to the unmodulated case by using smoother kernels for noisy views and distributing mAs across less noisy views (at fixed total mAs) in a manner that was beneficial to task performance. Similarly for detection of a line-pair pattern, the task-driven approach increased d' by 80% compared to no modulation by means of view-dependent mA and kernel selection that yields modulation transfer function and noise-power spectrum optimal to the task. Optimization of orbital tilt identified the tilt

  6. Task-driven image acquisition and reconstruction in cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Gang, Grace J.; Stayman, J. Webster; Ehtiati, Tina; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces a task-driven imaging framework that incorporates a mathematical definition of the imaging task, a model of the imaging system, and a patient-specific anatomical model to prospectively design image acquisition and reconstruction techniques to optimize task performance. The framework is applied to joint optimization of tube current modulation, view-dependent reconstruction kernel, and orbital tilt in cone-beam CT. The system model considers a cone-beam CT system incorporating a flat-panel detector and 3D filtered backprojection and accurately describes the spatially varying noise and resolution over a wide range of imaging parameters and in the presence of a realistic anatomical model. Task-based detectability index (d') is incorporated as the objective function in a task-driven optimization of image acquisition and reconstruction techniques. The orbital tilt was optimized through an exhaustive search across tilt angles ranging ±30°. For each tilt angle, the view-dependent tube current and reconstruction kernel (i.e., the modulation profiles) that maximized detectability were identified via an alternating optimization. The task-driven approach was compared with conventional unmodulated and automatic exposure control (AEC) strategies for a variety of imaging tasks and anthropomorphic phantoms. The task-driven strategy outperformed the unmodulated and AEC cases for all tasks. For example, d' for a sphere detection task in a head phantom was improved by 30% compared to the unmodulated case by using smoother kernels for noisy views and distributing mAs across less noisy views (at fixed total mAs) in a manner that was beneficial to task performance. Similarly for detection of a line-pair pattern, the task-driven approach increased d' by 80% compared to no modulation by means of view-dependent mA and kernel selection that yields modulation transfer function and noise-power spectrum optimal to the task. Optimization of orbital tilt identified the

  7. Task-driven image acquisition and reconstruction in cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Grace J.; Webster Stayman, J.; Ehtiati, Tina; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-04-01

    This work introduces a task-driven imaging framework that incorporates a mathematical definition of the imaging task, a model of the imaging system, and a patient-specific anatomical model to prospectively design image acquisition and reconstruction techniques to optimize task performance. The framework is applied to joint optimization of tube current modulation, view-dependent reconstruction kernel, and orbital tilt in cone-beam CT. The system model considers a cone-beam CT system incorporating a flat-panel detector and 3D filtered backprojection and accurately describes the spatially varying noise and resolution over a wide range of imaging parameters in the presence of a realistic anatomical model. Task-based detectability index (d‧) is incorporated as the objective function in a task-driven optimization of image acquisition and reconstruction techniques. The orbital tilt was optimized through an exhaustive search across tilt angles ranging ±30°. For each tilt angle, the view-dependent tube current and reconstruction kernel (i.e. the modulation profiles) that maximized detectability were identified via an alternating optimization. The task-driven approach was compared with conventional unmodulated and automatic exposure control (AEC) strategies for a variety of imaging tasks and anthropomorphic phantoms. The task-driven strategy outperformed the unmodulated and AEC cases for all tasks. For example, d‧ for a sphere detection task in a head phantom was improved by 30% compared to the unmodulated case by using smoother kernels for noisy views and distributing mAs across less noisy views (at fixed total mAs) in a manner that was beneficial to task performance. Similarly for detection of a line-pair pattern, the task-driven approach increased d‧ by 80% compared to no modulation by means of view-dependent mA and kernel selection that yields modulation transfer function and noise-power spectrum optimal to the task. Optimization of orbital tilt identified the

  8. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  9. Respiratory motion guided four dimensional cone beam computed tomography: encompassing irregular breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Ricky T.; Cooper, Benjamin J.; Kipritidis, John; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-02-01

    Four dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) images suffer from angular under sampling and bunching of projections due to a lack of feedback between the respiratory signal and the acquisition system. To address this problem, respiratory motion guided 4DCBCT (RMG-4DCBCT) regulates the gantry velocity and projection time interval, in response to the patient’s respiratory signal, with the aim of acquiring evenly spaced projections in a number of phase or displacement bins during the respiratory cycle. Our previous study of RMG-4DCBCT was limited to sinusoidal breathing traces. Here we expand on that work to provide a practical algorithm for the case of real patient breathing data. We give a complete description of RMG-4DCBCT including full details on how to implement the algorithms to determine when to move the gantry and when to acquire projections in response to the patient’s respiratory signal. We simulate a realistic working RMG-4DCBCT system using 112 breathing traces from 24 lung cancer patients. Acquisition used phase-based binning and parameter settings typically used on commercial 4DCBCT systems (4 min acquisition time, 1200 projections across 10 respiratory bins), with the acceleration and velocity constraints of current generation linear accelerators. We quantified streaking artefacts and image noise for conventional and RMG-4DCBCT methods by reconstructing projection data selected from an oversampled set of Catphan phantom projections. RMG-4DCBCT allows us to optimally trade-off image quality, acquisition time and image dose. For example, for the same image quality and acquisition time as conventional 4DCBCT approximately half the imaging dose is needed. Alternatively, for the same imaging dose, the image quality as measured by the signal to noise ratio, is improved by 63% on average. C-arm cone beam computed tomography systems, with an acceleration up to 200°/s2, a velocity up to 100°/s and the acquisition of 80 projections per second

  10. Radiation doses in cone-beam breast computed tomography: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Ying; Lai, Chao-Jen; Han Tao; Zhong Yuncheng; Shen Youtao; Liu Xinming; Ge Shuaiping; You Zhicheng; Wang Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: In this article, we describe a method to estimate the spatial dose variation, average dose and mean glandular dose (MGD) for a real breast using Monte Carlo simulation based on cone beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT) images. We present and discuss the dose estimation results for 19 mastectomy breast specimens, 4 homogeneous breast models, 6 ellipsoidal phantoms, and 6 cylindrical phantoms. Methods: To validate the Monte Carlo method for dose estimation in CBBCT, we compared the Monte Carlo dose estimates with the thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements at various radial positions in two polycarbonate cylinders (11- and 15-cm in diameter). Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 19 mastectomy breast specimens, obtained with a bench-top experimental scanner, were segmented and used to construct 19 structured breast models. Monte Carlo simulation of CBBCT with these models was performed and used to estimate the point doses, average doses, and mean glandular doses for unit open air exposure at the iso-center. Mass based glandularity values were computed and used to investigate their effects on the average doses as well as the mean glandular doses. Average doses for 4 homogeneous breast models were estimated and compared to those of the corresponding structured breast models to investigate the effect of tissue structures. Average doses for ellipsoidal and cylindrical digital phantoms of identical diameter and height were also estimated for various glandularity values and compared with those for the structured breast models. Results: The absorbed dose maps for structured breast models show that doses in the glandular tissue were higher than those in the nearby adipose tissue. Estimated average doses for the homogeneous breast models were almost identical to those for the structured breast models (p=1). Normalized average doses estimated for the ellipsoidal phantoms were similar to those for the structured breast models (root mean square (rms

  11. Impacted lower third molar fused with a supernumerary tooth--diagnosis and treatment planning using cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Junior, Osny; de Avila, Luciana Dorigatti; Sampieri, Marcelo Bonifácio da Silva; Dias-Ribeiro, Eduardo; Chen, Wei-liang; Fan, Song

    2009-12-01

    This paper reported a case of fusion between an impacted third molar and a supernumerary tooth, in which a surgical intervention was carried out, with the objective of removing the dental elements. The panoramic radiography was complemented by the Donovan's radiographic technique; but because of the proximity of the dental element to the mandibular ramus, it was not possible to have a final fusion diagnosis. Hence, the Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-which provides precise three-dimensional information-was used to determinate the fusion diagnosis and also to help in the surgical planning. In this case report we observed that the periapical, occlusal and panoramic were not able to show details which could only be examined through the cone-beam computed tomography.

  12. Applications of linac-mounted kilovoltage Cone-beam Computed Tomography in modern radiation therapy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Kavitha; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Shepherd, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Summary The use of Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in radiotherapy is increasing due to the widespread implementation of kilovoltage systems on the currently available linear accelerators. Cone beam CT acts as an effective Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) tool for the verification of patient position. It also opens up the possibility of real-time re-optimization of treatment plans for Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART). This paper reviews the most prominent applications of CBCT (linac-mounted) in radiation therapy, focusing on CBCT-based planning and dose calculation studies. This is followed by a concise review of the main issues associated with CBCT, such as imaging artifacts, dose and image quality. It explores how medical physicists and oncologists can best apply CBCT for therapeutic applications. PMID:25006356

  13. Small peripheral developing odontoma of the maxilla in a 3-year-old patient depicted on cone-beam tomograms.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Fuhrmann, Andreas; Scheuer, Hanna A; Zustin, Jozef

    2010-01-01

    A 3-year-old male patient was referred to the Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic due to a painless swelling of the right palatal region. Conventional radiographs revealed no alteration of the dentition and did not delineate a lesion in the region of interest. Cone-beam tomography depicted small radiopaque, extraosseous deposits inside the palatal space. Histological examination revealed a minute mixed epithelial-mesenchymal lesion of odontogenic origin. We made the diagnosis of a peripheral developing odontoma, taking into consideration the components and arrangements of structures of the lesion. Early intervention is advisable to prevent these odontogenic lesions from eventually deforming the jaw and displacing adjacent teeth. Cone-beam tomography was a valuable pre-operative diagnostic tool to assess the lesion as being composed in part of hard tissue.

  14. Clinical introduction of image lag correction for a cone beam CT system

    SciTech Connect

    Stankovic, Uros; Ploeger, Lennert S.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob Herk, Marcel van

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Image lag in the flat-panel detector used for Linac integrated cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has a degrading effect on CBCT image quality. The most prominent visible artifact is the presence of bright semicircular structure in the transverse view of the scans, known also as radar artifact. Several correction strategies have been proposed, but until now the clinical introduction of such corrections remains unreported. In November 2013, the authors have clinically implemented a previously proposed image lag correction on all of their machines at their main site in Amsterdam. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the effect of the correction on the quality of CBCT images and evaluate the required calibration frequency. Methods: Image lag was measured in five clinical CBCT systems (Elekta Synergy 4.6) using an in-house developed beam interrupting device that stops the x-ray beam midway through the data acquisition of an unattenuated beam for calibration. A triple exponential falling edge response was fitted to the measured data and used to correct image lag from projection images with an infinite response. This filter, including an extrapolation for saturated pixels, was incorporated in the authors’ in-house developed clinical CBCT reconstruction software. To investigate the short-term stability of the lag and associated parameters, a series of five image lag measurement over a period of three months was performed. For quantitative analysis, the authors have retrospectively selected ten patients treated in the pelvic region. The apparent contrast was quantified in polar coordinates for scans reconstructed using the parameters obtained from different dates with and without saturation handling. Results: Visually, the radar artifact was minimal in scans reconstructed using image lag correction especially when saturation handling was used. In patient imaging, there was a significant reduction of the apparent contrast from 43 ± 16.7 to

  15. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Kang-Hsin Wang, Ken; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  16. The influence of bowtie filtration on x-ray photons distribution in cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanghai; Feng, Peng; Wei, Biao; He, Peng; Deng, Luzhen; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Bowtie filters are used to modulate an incoming x-ray beam as a function of the angle of the x-ray to balance the photon flux on a detector array. Because of their key roles in radiation dose reduction and multi-energy imaging, bowtie filters have attracted a major attention in modern X-ray computed tomography (CT). However, few researches are concerned on the effects of the structure and materials for the bowtie filter in the Cone Beam CT (CBCT). In this study, the influence of bowtie filters' structure and materials on X-ray photons distribution are analyzed using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations by MCNP5 code. In the current model, the phantom was radiated by virtual X-ray source (its' energy spectrum calculated by SpekCalc program) filtered using bowtie, then all photons were collected through array photoncounting detectors. In the process above, two bowtie filters' parameters which include center thickness (B), edge thickness (controlled by A), changed respectively. Two kinds of situation are simulated: 1) A=0.036, B=1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6mm and the material is aluminum; 2) A=0.016, 0.036, 0.056, 0.076, 0.096, B=2mm and the material is aluminum. All the X-ray photons' distribution are measured through MCNP. The results show that reduction in center thickness and edge thickness can reduce the number of background photons in CBCT. Our preliminary research shows that structure parameters of bowtie filter can influence X-ray photons, furthermore, radiation dose distribution, which provide some evidences in design of bowtie filter for reducing radiation dose in CBCT.

  17. Evaluation of a Cone Beam Computed Tomography Geometry for Image Guided Small Animal Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (“tubular” geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (“pancake” geometry). The small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Notwithstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e., pancake and tubular geometry

  18. Four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography using an on-board imager.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianfang; Xing, Lei; Munro, Peter; McGuinness, Christopher; Chao, Ming; Yang, Yong; Loo, Bill; Koong, Albert

    2006-10-01

    On-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has recently become available to provide volumetric information of a patient in the treatment position, and holds promises for improved target localization and irradiation dose verification. The design of currently available on-board CBCT, however, is far from optimal. Its quality is adversely influenced by many factors, such as scatter, beam hardening, and intra-scanning organ motion. In this work we quantitatively study the influence of organ motion on CBCT imaging and investigate a strategy to acquire high quality phase-resolved [four-dimensional (4D)] CBCT images based on phase binning of the CBCT projection data. An efficient and robust method for binning CBCT data according to the patient's respiratory phase derived in the projection space was developed. The phase-binned projections were reconstructed using the conventional Feldkamp algorithm to yield 4D CBCT images. Both phantom and patient studies were carried out to validate the technique and to optimize the 4D CBCT data acquisition protocol. Several factors that are important to the clinical implementation of the technique, such as the image quality, scanning time, number of projections, and radiation dose, were analyzed for various scanning schemes. The general references drawn from this study are: (i) reliable phase binning of CBCT projections is accomplishable with the aid of external or internal marker and simple analysis of its trace in the projection space, and (ii) artifact-free 4D CBCT images can be obtained without increasing the patient radiation dose as compared to the current 3D CBCT scan.

  19. Radiation Dose From Kilovoltage Cone Beam Computed Tomography in an Image-Guided Radiotherapy Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X. Coffey, Charles W.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy has emerged as the new paradigm in radiotherapy. This work is to provide detailed information concerning the additional imaging doses to patients' radiosensitive organs from a kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT) scan procedure. Methods and Materials: The Vanderbilt-Monte-Carlo-Beam-Calibration (VMCBC; Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN) algorithm was used to calculate radiation dose to organs resulting from a kV CBCT imaging guidance procedure. Eight patients, including 3 pediatric and 5 adult patients, were investigated. The CBCT scans in both full- and half-fan modes were studied. Results: For a head-and-neck scan in half-fan mode, dose-volume histogram analyses show mean doses of 7 and 8 cGy to the eyes, 5 and 6 cGy to the spinal cord, 5 and 6 cGy to the brain, and 18 and 23 cGy to the cervical vertebrae for an adult and a 29-month-old child, respectively. The dose from a scan in full-fan mode is 10-20% lower than that in half-fan mode. For an abdominal scan, mean doses are 3 and 7 cGy to prostate and 7 and 17 cGy to femoral heads for a large adult patient and a 31-month-old pediatric patient, respectively. Conclusions: Doses to radiosensitive organs can total 300 cGy accrued over an entire treatment course if kV CBCT scans are acquired daily. These findings provide needed data for clinicians to make informed decisions concerning additional imaging doses. The dose to bone is two to four times greater than dose to soft tissue for kV x-rays, which should be considered, especially for pediatric patients.

  20. An investigation into factors affecting electron density calibration for a megavoltage cone-beam CT system.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jessica; Holloway, Lois C; Quinn, Alexandra; Fielding, Andrew

    2012-09-06

    There is a growing interest in the use of megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) data for radiotherapy treatment planning. To calculate accurate dose distributions, knowledge of the electron density (ED) of the tissues being irradiated is required. In the case of MV CBCT, it is necessary to determine a calibration-relating CT number to ED, utilizing the photon beam produced for MV CBCT. A number of different parameters can affect this calibration. This study was undertaken on the Siemens MV CBCT system, MVision, to evaluate the effect of the following parameters on the reconstructed CT pixel value to ED calibration: the number of monitor units (MUs) used (5, 8, 15 and 60 MUs), the image reconstruction filter (head and neck, and pelvis), reconstruction matrix size (256 by 256 and 512 by 512), and the addition of extra solid water surrounding the ED phantom. A Gammex electron density CT phantom containing EDs from 0.292 to 1.707 was imaged under each of these conditions. The linear relationship between MV CBCT pixel value and ED was demonstrated for all MU settings and over the range of EDs. Changes in MU number did not dramatically alter the MV CBCT ED calibration. The use of different reconstruction filters was found to affect the MV CBCT ED calibration, as was the addition of solid water surrounding the phantom. Dose distributions from treatment plans calculated with simulated image data from a 15 MU head and neck reconstruction filter MV CBCT image and a MV CBCT ED calibration curve from the image data parameters and a 15 MU pelvis reconstruction filter showed small and clinically insignificant differences. Thus, the use of a single MV CBCT ED calibration curve is unlikely to result in any clinical differences. However, to ensure minimal uncertainties in dose reporting, MV CBCT ED calibration measurements could be carried out using parameter-specific calibration measurements.

  1. Characterization of Scattered X-Ray Photons in Dental Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Scatter is a very important artifact causing factor in dental cone-beam CT (CBCT), which has a major influence on the detectability of details within images. This work aimed to improve the image quality of dental CBCT through scatter correction. Methods Scatter was estimated in the projection domain from the low frequency component of the difference between the raw CBCT projection and the projection obtained by extrapolating the model fitted to the raw projections acquired with 2 different sizes of axial field-of-view (FOV). The function for curve fitting was optimized by using Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the proposed method, an anthropomorphic phantom and a water-filled cylindrical phantom with rod inserts simulating different tissue materials were scanned using 120 kVp, 5 mA and 9-second scanning time covering an axial FOV of 4 cm and 13 cm. The detectability of the CT image was evaluated by calculating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Results Beam hardening and cupping artifacts were observed in CBCT images without scatter correction, especially in those acquired with 13 cm FOV. These artifacts were reduced in CBCT images corrected by the proposed method, demonstrating its efficacy on scatter correction. After scatter correction, the image quality of CBCT was improved in terms of target detectability which was quantified as the CNR for rod inserts in the cylindrical phantom. Conclusions Hopefully the calculations performed in this work can provide a route to reach a high level of diagnostic image quality for CBCT imaging used in oral and maxillofacial structures whilst ensuring patient dose as low as reasonably achievable, which may ultimately make CBCT scan a reliable and safe tool in clinical practice. PMID:26950435

  2. Radiation Dose From Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Monica W.K. Leung, Lucullus H.T.; Wong, Wicger; Lam, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive study on organ absorbed doses and effective doses from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for three different treatment sites. Methods and Materials: An extensive set of dosimetric measurements were performed using a widely used CBCT system, the On-Board Imager (OBI). Measurements were performed using a female anthropomorphic phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The effective doses to the body and the absorbed doses to 26 organs were reported using two different technical settings, namely, the standard mode and the low-dose mode. The measurements were repeated for three different scan sites: head and neck, chest, and pelvis. Comparisons of patient doses as well as image quality were performed among the standard mode CBCT, low-dose mode CBCT, and fan beam CT. Results: The mean skin doses from standard mode CBCT to head and neck, chest and pelvis were 6.7, 6.4, and 5.4 cGy per scan, respectively. The effective doses to the body from standard mode CBCT for imaging of head and neck, chest, and pelvis were 10.3, 23.7, and 22.7 mSv per scan, respectively. Patient doses from low-dose mode CBCT were approximately one fifth of those from standard mode CBCT. Conclusions: Patient position verification by standard mode CBCT acquired by OBI on a daily basis could increase the secondary cancer risk by up to 2% to 4%. Therefore lower mAs settings for daily CBCT should be considered, especially when bony anatomy is the main interest.

  3. Robust primary modulation-based scatter estimation for cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschl, Ludwig; Fahrig, Rebecca; Knaup, Michael; Maier, Joscha; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Scattered radiation is one of the major problems facing image quality in flat detector cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Previously, a new scatter estimation and correction method using primary beam modulation has been proposed. The original image processing technique used a frequency-domain-based analysis, which proved to be sensitive to the accuracy of the modulator pattern both spatially and in amplitude as well as to the frequency of the modulation pattern. In addition, it cannot account for penumbra effects that occur, for example, due to the finite focal spot size and the scatter estimate can be degraded by high-frequency components of the primary image. Methods: In this paper, the authors present a new way to estimate the scatter using primary modulation. It is less sensitive to modulator nonidealities and most importantly can handle arbitrary modulator shapes and changes in modulator attenuation. The main idea is that the scatter estimation can be expressed as an optimization problem, which yields a separation of the scatter and the primary image. The method is evaluated using simulated and experimental CBCT data. The scattering properties of the modulator itself are analyzed using a Monte Carlo simulation. Results: All reconstructions show strong improvements of image quality. To quantify the results, all images are compared to reference images (ideal simulations and collimated scans). Conclusions: The proposed modulator-based scatter reduction algorithm may open the field of flat detector-based imaging to become a quantitative modality. This may have significant impact on C-arm imaging and on image-guided radiation therapy.

  4. A quality assurance program for image quality of cone-beam CT guidance in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Moseley, Douglas J.; Jaffray, David A.

    2008-05-15

    The clinical introduction of volumetric x-ray image-guided radiotherapy systems necessitates formal commissioning of the hardware and image-guided processes to be used and drafts quality assurance (QA) for both hardware and processes. Satisfying both requirements provides confidence on the system's ability to manage geometric variations in patient setup and internal organ motion. As these systems become a routine clinical modality, the authors present data from their QA program tracking the image quality performance of ten volumetric systems over a period of 3 years. These data are subsequently used to establish evidence-based tolerances for a QA program. The volumetric imaging systems used in this work combines a linear accelerator with conventional x-ray tube and an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector mounted orthogonally from the accelerator central beam axis, in a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) configuration. In the spirit of the AAPM Report No. 74, the present work presents the image quality portion of their QA program; the aspects of the QA protocol addressing imaging geometry have been presented elsewhere. Specifically, the authors are presenting data demonstrating the high linearity of CT numbers, the uniformity of axial reconstructions, and the high contrast spatial resolution of ten CBCT systems (1-2 mm) from two commercial vendors. They are also presenting data accumulated over the period of several months demonstrating the long-term stability of the flat-panel detector and of the distances measured on reconstructed volumetric images. Their tests demonstrate that each specific CBCT system has unique performance. In addition, scattered x rays are shown to influence the imaging performance in terms of spatial resolution, axial reconstruction uniformity, and the linearity of CT numbers.

  5. Noise suppression in reconstruction of low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jing; Robar, James; Guan Huaiqun

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To improve the image contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratio for low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) using a statistical projection noise suppression algorithm based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion. Methods: Projection images of a contrast phantom, a CatPhan{sup Registered-Sign} 600 phantom and a head phantom were acquired by a Varian 2100EX LINAC with a low-Z (Al) target and low energy x-ray beam (2.5 MeV) at a low-dose level and at a high-dose level. The projections were then processed by minimizing the PWLS objective function. The weighted least square (WLS) term models the noise of measured projection and the penalty term enforces the smoothing constraints of the projection image. The variance of projection data was chosen as the weight for the PWLS objective function and it determined the contribution of each measurement. An anisotropic quadratic form penalty that incorporates the gradient information of projection image was used to preserve edges during noise reduction. Low-Z target MV CBCT images were reconstructed by the FDK algorithm after each projection was processed by the PWLS smoothing. Results: Noise in low-Z target MV CBCT images were greatly suppressed after the PWLS projection smoothing, without noticeable sacrifice of the spatial resolution. Depending on the choice of smoothing parameter, the CNR of selected regions of interest in the PWLS processed low-dose low-Z target MV CBCT image can be higher than the corresponding high-dose image.Conclusion: The CNR of low-Z target MV CBCT images was substantially improved by using PWLS projection smoothing. The PWLS projection smoothing algorithm allows the reconstruction of high contrast low-Z target MV CBCT image with a total dose of as low as 2.3 cGy.

  6. Bone mineral density in cone beam computed tomography: Only a few shades of gray

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Marcio José da Silva; de Souza, Thainara Salgueiro; Mota Júnior, Sergio Luiz; Fraga, Marcelo Reis; Vitral, Robert Willer Farinazzo

    2014-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has often been used to determine the quality of craniofacial bone structures through the determination of mineral density, which is based on gray scales of the images obtained. However, there is no consensus regarding the accuracy of the determination of the gray scales in these exams. This study aims to provide a literature review concerning the reliability of CBCT to determine bone mineral density. The gray values obtained with CBCT show a linear relationship with the attenuation coefficients of the materials, Hounsfield Units values obtained with medical computed tomography, and density values from dual energy X-ray absorciometry. However, errors are expected when CBCT images are used to define the quality of the scanned structures because these images show inconsistencies and arbitrariness in the gray values, particularly when related to abrupt change in the density of the object, X-ray beam hardening effect, scattered radiation, projection data discontinuity-related effect, differences between CBCT devices, changes in the volume of the field of view (FOV), and changes in the relationships of size and position between the FOV and the object evaluated. A few methods of mathematical correction of the gray scales in CBCT have been proposed; however, they do not generate consistent values that are independent of the devices and their configurations or of the scanned objects. Thus, CBCT should not be considered the examination of choice for the determination of bone and soft tissue mineral density at the current stage, particularly when values obtained are to be compared to predetermined standard values. Comparisons between symmetrically positioned structures inside the FOV and in relation to the exomass of the object, as it occurs with the right and left sides of the skull, seem to be viable because the effects on the gray scale in the regions of interest are the same. PMID:25170398

  7. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-07

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  8. Long term three dimensional tracking of orthodontic patients using registered cone beam CT and photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Pierre; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Ramirez, Juan F; Mesa, Elizabeth; Branch, John W

    2009-01-01

    The measurements from registered images obtained from Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and a photogrammetric sensor are used to track three-dimensional shape variations of orthodontic patients before and after their treatments. The methodology consists of five main steps: (1) the patient's bone and skin shapes are measured in 3D using the fusion of images from a CBCT and a photogrammetric sensor. (2) The bone shape is extracted from the CBCT data using a standard marching cube algorithm. (3) The bone and skin shape measurements are registered using titanium targets located on the head of the patient. (4) Using a manual segmentation technique the head and lower jaw geometry are extracted separately to deal with jaw motion at the different record visits. (5) Using natural features of the upper head the two datasets are then registered with each other and then compared to evaluate bone, teeth, and skin displacements before and after treatments. This procedure is now used at the University of Alberta orthodontic clinic.

  9. Clinical Implementation Of Megavoltage Cone Beam CT As Part Of An IGRT Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Albin; Bauer, Lisa; Kinney, Vicki; Crooks, Cheryl

    2008-03-01

    Knowing where the tumor is at all times during treatment is the next challenge in the field of radiation therapy. This issue has become more important because with treatments such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), healthy tissue is spared by using very tight margins around the tumor. These tight margins leave very small room for patient setup errors. The use of an imaging modality in the treatment room as a way to localize the tumor for patient set up is generally known as "Image Guided Radiation Therapy" or IGRT. This article deals with a form of IGRT known as Megavoltage Cone Beam Computed Tomography (MCBCT) using a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator currently in use at Firelands Regional Medical Center. With MCBCT, we are capable of acquiring CT images right before the treatment of the patient and then use this information to position the patient tumor according to the treatment plan. This article presents the steps followed in order to clinically implement this system, as well as some of the quality assurance tests suggested by the manufacturer and some tests developed in house

  10. Cone beam computed tomography of plastinated hearts for instruction of radiological anatomy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Atkinson, Gregory; Gandhi, Niket; Farrell, Michael L; Labrash, Steven; Smith, Alice B; Norton, Neil S; Matsui, Takashi; Lozanoff, Scott

    2016-09-01

    Radiological anatomy education is an important aspect of the medical curriculum. The purpose of this study was to establish and demonstrate the use of plastinated anatomical specimens, specifically human hearts, for use in radiological anatomy education. Four human hearts were processed with routine plastination procedures at room temperature. Specimens were subjected to cone beam computed tomography and a graphics program (ER3D) was applied to generate 3D cardiac models. A comparison was conducted between plastinated hearts and their corresponding computer models based on a list of morphological cardiac features commonly studied in the gross anatomy laboratory. Results showed significant correspondence between plastinations and CBCT-generated 3D models (98 %; p < .01) for external structures and 100 % for internal cardiac features, while 85 % correspondence was achieved between plastinations and 2D CBCT slices. Complete correspondence (100 %) was achieved between key observations on the plastinations and internal radiological findings typically required of medical student. All pathologic features seen on the plastinated hearts were also visualized internally with the CBCT-generated models and 2D slices. These results suggest that CBCT-derived slices and models can be successfully generated from plastinated material and provide accurate representations for radiological anatomy education.

  11. Iterative reconstruction of cone-beam CT data on a cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Thomas M.; Gregor, Jens

    2007-02-01

    Three-dimensional iterative reconstruction of large CT data sets poses several challenges in terms of the associated computational and memory requirements. In this paper, we present results obtained by implementing a computational framework for reconstructing axial cone-beam CT data using a cluster of inexpensive dualprocessor PCs. In particular, we discuss our parallelization approach, which uses POSIX threads and message passing (MPI) for local and remote load distribution, as well as the interaction of that load distribution with the implementation of ordered subset based algorithms. We also consider a heuristic data-driven 3D focus of attention algorithm that reduces the amount of data that must be considered for many data sets. Furthermore, we present a modification to the SIRT algorithm that reduces the amount of data that must be communicated between processes. Finally, we introduce a method of separating the work in such a way that some computation can be overlapped with the MPI communication thus further reducing the overall run-time. We summarize the performance results using reconstructions of experimental data.

  12. Three-dimensional focus of attention for iterative cone-beam micro-CT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, T. M.; Gregor, J.

    2006-09-01

    Three-dimensional iterative reconstruction of high-resolution, circular orbit cone-beam x-ray CT data is often considered impractical due to the demand for vast amounts of computer cycles and associated memory. In this paper, we show that the computational burden can be reduced by limiting the reconstruction to a small, well-defined portion of the image volume. We first discuss using the support region defined by the set of voxels covered by all of the projection views. We then present a data-driven preprocessing technique called focus of attention that heuristically separates both image and projection data into object and background before reconstruction, thereby further reducing the reconstruction region of interest. We present experimental results for both methods based on mouse data and a parallelized implementation of the SIRT algorithm. The computational savings associated with the support region are substantial. However, the results for focus of attention are even more impressive in that only about one quarter of the computer cycles and memory are needed compared with reconstruction of the entire image volume. The image quality is not compromised by either method.

  13. Motion artefacts in cone beam CT: an in vitro study about the effects on the images

    PubMed Central

    Molteni, Roberto; Lorini, Chiara; Taliani, Gian G; Matteuzzi, Benedetta; Mazzoni, Elisa; Colagrande, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In cone beam CT (CBCT), imperfect patient immobility, caused by involuntary movements, is one of the most important causes of artefacts and image quality degradation. Various works in literature address this topic, but seldom is the nature of the movement correlated with the type of artefact and the image degradation in a systematic manner, and the correlation analyzed and explained. Methods: All three types of movements that can occur during a scan—nodding, tilting and rolling—were applied to a dry skull, in various manners from abrupt to gradual through the entire scan, at different times and angles, over a wide range of displacements. 84 scans were performed, with different skull movements, and the resulting images examined by two skilled radiologists, rated in a four-point scale and statistically analyzed. A commercial CBCT machine was used, featuring supine patient positioning. Results: Different types of movements induce different artefacts, in different parts of the anatomy. In general, movement of short duration may lead to double contours (bilateral or monolateral depending upon the angle of the scan at which they occur), whereas gradual movements result into blurring. Conclusion: Not all movements cause motion artefacts that equally jeopardize the image. Rolling is the type of movement that most severely affects the image diagnostic value. Advances in knowledge: These findings may help practitioners to identify the causes of motion artefacts and the resulting image degradation, and remediate them, and manufacturers to improve the patient-positioning devices. PMID:26577438

  14. Breast density measurement: 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images versus 2D digital mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer. However, breast density is currently estimated using mammograms which are intrinsically 2D in nature and cannot accurately represent the real breast anatomy. In this study, a novel technique for measuring breast density based on the segmentation of 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) images was developed and the results were compared to those obtained from 2D digital mammograms. 16 mastectomy breast specimens were imaged with a bench top flat-panel based CBCT system. The reconstructed 3D CT images were corrected for the cupping artifacts and then filtered to reduce the noise level, followed by using threshold-based segmentation to separate the dense tissue from the adipose tissue. For each breast specimen, volumes of the dense tissue structures and the entire breast were computed and used to calculate the volumetric breast density. BI-RADS categories were derived from the measured breast densities and compared with those estimated from conventional digital mammograms. The results show that in 10 of 16 cases the BI-RADS categories derived from the CBCT images were lower than those derived from the mammograms by one category. Thus, breasts considered as dense in mammographic examinations may not be considered as dense with the CBCT images. This result indicates that the relation between breast cancer risk and true (volumetric) breast density needs to be further investigated.

  15. Prevalence of apical periodontitis detected in cone beam CT images of a Brazilian subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Paes da Silva Ramos Fernandes, LM; Ordinola-Zapata, R; Húngaro Duarte, MA; Alvares Capelozza, AL

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of apical periodontitis (AP) detected in cone beam CT (CBCT) images from a database. Methods CBCT images of 300 Brazilian patients were assessed. AP images were measured in three dimensions. Age, gender, number and location of total teeth in each patient were considered. AP location was considered according to tooth groups. The extent of AP was determined by the largest diameter in any of the three dimensions. Percentages and the χ2 test were used for statistical analysis. Results AP was found in 51.4% of the patients and in 3.4% of the teeth. Higher prevalence of AP was found in 60- to 69-year-olds (73.1%) and in mandibular molars (5.9%) (p < 0.05). Inadequate endodontic treatment presented higher prevalence of AP (78.1%). Conclusions AP can be frequently found in CBCT examinations. The presence of AP has a significant association with patients' age, and tooth type and condition. CBCT databases are useful for cross-sectional studies about AP prevalence in a population. PMID:22752318

  16. Cone beam computed tomography study of apical root resorption induced by Herbst appliance

    PubMed Central

    SCHWARTZ, João Paulo; RAVELI, Taísa Boamorte; ALMEIDA, Kélei Cristina de Mathias; SCHWARTZ-FILHO, Humberto Osvaldo; RAVELI, Dirceu Barnabé

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the frequency of root resorption during the orthodontic treatment with Herbst appliance by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods The sample comprised 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean ages 15.76±1.75 years) with Class II division 1 malocclusion, treated with Herbst appliance. CBCT was obtained before treatment (T0) and after Herbst treatment (T1). All the dental roots, except third molars, were evaluated, and apical root resorption was determined using the axial guided navigation method. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon T Test were used to compare the dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Chi-Square Test with Yates’ correction was used to evaluate the relationship between apical root resorption and gender. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%. Results Apical resorption was detected by CBCT in 57.96% of 980 roots that underwent Herbst appliance treatment. All patients had minimal resorption and there was no statistical significance between the genders. Conclusion CBCT three-dimensional evaluation showed association between Herbst appliance and minimal apical root resorption, mostly in the anchoring teeth, without clinical significance. PMID:26537718

  17. One-year assessment of surgical outcomes in Class III patients using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, L.K.; de Oliveira Ruellas, A.C.; Paniagua, B.; Styner, M.; Turvey, T.; Zhu, H.; Wang, J.; Cevidanes, L.H.S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply a novel method to evaluate surgical outcomes at 1 year after orthognathic surgery for Class III patients undergoing two different surgical protocols. Fifty patients divided equally into two groups (maxillary advancement only and combined with mandibular setback) had cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans taken pre-surgery, at splint removal, and at 1-year post-surgery. An automatic cranial base superimposition method was used to register, and shape correspondence was applied to assess, the overall changes between pre-surgery and splint removal (surgical changes) and between splint removal and 1-year post-surgery at the end of orthodontic treatment (post-surgical adaptations). Post-surgical maxillary adaptations were exactly the same for both groups, with 52% of the patients having changes >2 mm. Approximately half of the post-surgical changes in the maxilla for both groups were vertical. The two-jaw group showed significantly greater surgical and post-surgical changes in the ramus, chin, and most of the condylar surfaces (P < 0.05). Post-surgical adaptation on the anterior part of the chin was also more significant in the two-jaw group (P < 0.05). Regardless of the type of surgery, marked post-surgical adaptations were observed in the regions evaluated, which explain the adequate maxillary–mandibular relationship at 1-year post-surgery on average, with individual variability. PMID:23403336

  18. Pharyngeal airway volume and shape from cone-beam computed tomography: Relationship to facial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Grauer, Dan; Cevidanes, Lucia S. H.; Styner, Martin A.; Ackerman, James L.; Proffit, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the differences in airway shape and volume among subjects with various facial patterns. Methods Cone-beam computed tomography records of 62 nongrowing patients were used to evaluate the pharyngeal airway volume (superior and inferior compartments) and shape. This was done by using 3-dimensional virtual surface models to calculate airway volumes instead of estimates based on linear measurements. Subgroups of the sample were determined by anteroposterior jaw relationships and vertical proportions. Results There was a statistically significant relationship between the volume of the inferior component of the airway and the anteroposterior jaw relationship (P = 0.02), and between airway volume and both size of the face and sex (P = 0.02, P = 0.01). No differences in airway volumes related to vertical facial proportions were found. Skeletal Class II patients often had forward inclination of the airway (P <0.001), whereas skeletal Class III patients had a more vertically oriented airway (P = 0.002). Conclusions Airway volume and shape vary among patients with different anteroposterior jaw relationships; airway shape but not volume differs with various vertical jaw relationships. The methods developed in this study make it possible to determine the relationship of 3-dimensional pharyngeal airway surface models to facial morphology, while controlling for variability in facial size. PMID:19962603

  19. Image analysis and superimposition of 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography models

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Styner, Martin A.; Proffit, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques can provide valuable information to clinicians and researchers. But as we move from traditional 2-dimensional (2D) cephalometric analysis to new 3D techniques, it is often necessary to compare 2D with 3D data. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides simulation tools that can help bridge the gap between image types. CBCT acquisitions can be made to simulate panoramic, lateral, and posteroanterior cephalometric radioagraphs so that they can be compared with preexisting cephalometric databases. Applications of 3D imaging in orthodontics include initial diagnosis and superimpositions for assessing growth, treatment changes, and stability. Three-dimensional CBCT images show dental root inclination and torque, impacted and supernumerary tooth positions, thickness and morphology of bone at sites of mini-implants for anchorage, and osteotomy sites in surgical planning. Findings such as resorption, hyperplasic growth, displacement, shape anomalies of mandibular condyles, and morphological differences between the right and left sides emphasize the diagnostic value of computed tomography acquisitions. Furthermore, relationships of soft tissues and the airway can be assessed in 3 dimensions. PMID:16679201

  20. Precision of cephalometric landmark identification: Cone-beam computed tomography vs conventional cephalometric views

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, John B.; Gubler, Maritzabel; Cevidanes, Lucia; Mol, André

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we compared the precision of landmark identification using displays of multi-planar cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) volumes and conventional lateral cephalograms (Ceph). Methods Twenty presurgical orthodontic patients were radiographed with conventional Ceph and CBCT techniques. Five observers plotted 24 landmarks using computer displays of multi-planer reconstruction (MPR) CBCT and Ceph views during separate sessions. Absolute differences between each observer’s plot and the mean of all observers were averaged as 1 measure of variability (ODM). The absolute difference of each observer from any other observer was averaged as a second measure of variability (DEO). ANOVA and paired t tests were used to analyze variability differences. Results Radiographic modality and landmark were significant at P <0.0001 for DEO and ODM calculations. DEO calculations of observer variability were consistently greater than ODM. The overall correlation of 1920 paired ODM and DEO measurements was excellent at 0.972. All bilateral landmarks had increased precision when identified in the MPR views. Mediolateral variability was statistically greater than anteroposterior or caudal-cranial variability for 5 landmarks in the MPR views. Conclusions The MPR displays of CBCT volume images provide generally more precise identification of traditional cephalometric landmarks. More precise location of condylion, gonion, and orbitale overcomes the problem of superimposition of these bilateral landmarks seen in Ceph. Greater variability of certain landmarks in the mediolateral direction is probably related to inadequate definition of the landmarks in the third dimension. PMID:19732656

  1. Localization of impacted maxillary canines using cone beam computed tomography. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Giulia; Cavallini, Costanza; Cassetta, Michele; Galluccio, Gabriella; Barbato, Ersilia

    2012-01-01

    Summary This review analyzed the literature focused on Cone- Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) diagnostic accuracy and efficacy in detecting impacted maxillary canines, and evaluated the possible advantages in using CBCT technique compared with traditional radiographs. PubMed and Embase searches were performed selecting papers since 1998 up to September 2011, moreover reference lists were hand searched. Two reviewers selected relevant publications on the basis of predetermined inclusion criteria. The literature search yielded 94 titles, of which 5 were included in the review. Three studies used CBCT technique to 3D localize maxillary impacted canines and assess root resorption of adjacent teeth. Other two publications compared traditional radiographs with CBCT images in the diagnosis of maxillary impacted canines. Only three studies presented the results using statistical analysis. The present review highlighted that the use of CBCT has a potential diagnostic effect and may influence the outcome of treatment when compared with traditional panoramic radiography for the assessment of impacted maxillary canines. Furthermore it underlines the need of future studies performed according with high level methodological standards, investigating diagnostic accuracy and effectiveness of CBCT in the diagnosis of maxillary impacted teeth. PMID:22783450

  2. Cone-Beam CT Localization of Internal Target Volumes for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Lung Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhiheng Wu, Q. Jackie; Marks, Lawrence B.; Larrier, Nicole; Yin Fangfang

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: In this study, we investigate a technique of matching internal target volumes (ITVs) in four-dimensional (4D) simulation computed tomography (CT) to the composite target volume in free-breathing on-board cone-beam (CB) CT. The technique is illustrated by using both phantom and patient cases. Methods and Materials: A dynamic phantom with a target ball simulating respiratory motion with various amplitude and cycle times was used to verify localization accuracy. The dynamic phantom was scanned using simulation CT with a phase-based retrospective sorting technique. The ITV was then determined based on 10 sets of sorted images. The size and epicenter of the ITV identified from 4D simulation CT images and the composite target volume identified from on-board CBCT images were compared to assess localization accuracy. Similarly, for two clinical cases of patients with lung cancer, ITVs defined from 4D simulation CT images and CBCT images were compared. Results: For the phantom, localization accuracy between the ITV in 4D simulation CT and the composite target volume in CBCT was within 1 mm, and ITV was within 8.7%. For patient cases, ITVs on simulation CT and CBCT were within 8.0%. Conclusion: This study shows that CBCT is a useful tool to localize ITV for targets affected by respiratory motion. Verification of the ITV from 4D simulation CT using on-board free-breathing CBCT is feasible for the target localization of lung tumors.

  3. Cone-beam micro-CT system based on LabVIEW software.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Hoffmann, Keneth R; Bednarek, Daniel R; Chityala, Ravishankar; Rudin, Stephen

    2008-09-01

    Construction of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system for laboratory research usually requires integration of different software and hardware components. As a result, building and operating such a complex system require the expertise of researchers with significantly different backgrounds. Additionally, writing flexible code to control the hardware components of a CBCT system combined with designing a friendly graphical user interface (GUI) can be cumbersome and time consuming. An intuitive and flexible program structure, as well as the program GUI for CBCT acquisition, is presented in this note. The program was developed in National Instrument's Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) graphical language and is designed to control a custom-built CBCT system but has been also used in a standard angiographic suite. The hardware components are commercially available to researchers and are in general provided with software drivers which are LabVIEW compatible. The program structure was designed as a sequential chain. Each step in the chain takes care of one or two hardware commands at a time; the execution of the sequence can be modified according to the CBCT system design. We have scanned and reconstructed over 200 specimens using this interface and present three examples which cover different areas of interest encountered in laboratory research. The resulting 3D data are rendered using a commercial workstation. The program described in this paper is available for use or improvement by other researchers.

  4. Pseudo super-resolution for improved calcification characterization for cone beam breast CT (CBBCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiangkun; Ning, Ruola; Cai, Weixing

    2010-04-01

    Cone Beam Breast CT imaging (CBBCT) is a promising tool for diagnosis of breast tumors and calcifications. However, as the sizes of calcifications in early stages are very small, it is not easy to distinguish them from background tissues because of the relatively high noise level. Therefore, it is necessary to enhance the visualization of calcifications for accurate detection. In this work, the Papoulis-Gerchberg (PG) method was introduced and modified to improve calcification characterization. PG method is an iterative algorithm of signal extrapolation and has been demonstrated to be very effective in image restoration like super-resolution (SR) and inpainting. The projection images were zoomed by bicubic interpolation method, then the modified PG method were applied to improve the image quality. The reconstruction from processed projection images showed that this approach can effectively improve the image quality by improving the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) with a limited increase in noise level. As a result, the detectability of calcifications was improved in CBBCT images.

  5. SADMFR guidelines for the use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography/ Digital Volume Tomography.

    PubMed

    Dula, Karl; Bornstein, Michael M; Buser, Daniel; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Ettlin, Dominik A; Filippi, Andreas; Gabioud, François; Katsaros, Christos; Krastl, Gabriel; Lambrecht, J Thomas; Lauber, Roland; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Pazera, Pawel; Türp, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) has been introduced in 1998. This radiological imaging procedure has been provided for dentistry and is comparable to computed tomography (CT) in medicine. It is expected that CBCT will have the same success in dental diagnostic imaging as computed tomography had in medicine. Just as CT is responsible for a significant rise in radiation dose to the population from medical X-ray diagnostics, CBCT studies will be accompanied by a significant increase of the dose to our patients by dentistry. Because of the growing concern for an uncritical and consequently rapidly increasing use of CBCT the Swiss Society of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology convened a first consensus conference in 2011 to formulate indications for CBCT, which can be used as guidelines. In this meeting, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics and temporomandibular joint disorders and diseases were treated and the most important and most experienced users of DVT in these areas were asked to participate. In general, a highly restrictive use of CBCT is required. Justifying main criterion for CBCT application is that additional, therapy-relevant information is expected that should lead to a significant benefit in patient care. All users of CBCT should have completed a structured, high-level training, just like that offered by the Swiss Society of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology.

  6. Digital orthodontic radiographic set versus cone-beam computed tomography: an evaluation of the effective dose

    PubMed Central

    Chinem, Lillian Atsumi Simabuguro; Vilella, Beatriz de Souza; Maurício, Cláudia Lúcia de Pinho; Canevaro, Lucia Viviana; Deluiz, Luiz Fernando; Vilella, Oswaldo de Vasconcellos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the equivalent and effective doses of different digital radiographic methods (panoramic, lateral cephalometric and periapical) with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: Precalibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed at 24 locations in an anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson Rando Phantom, Alderson Research Laboratories, New York, NY, USA), representing a medium sized adult. The following devices were tested: Heliodent Plus (Sirona Dental Systems, Bernsheim, Germany), Orthophos XG 5 (Sirona Dental Systems, Bernsheim, Germany) and i-CAT (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA, USA). The equivalent doses and effective doses were calculated considering the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued in 1990 and 2007. Results: Although the effective dose of the radiographic set corresponded to 17.5% (ICRP 1990) and 47.2% (ICRP 2007) of the CBCT dose, the equivalent doses of skin, bone surface and muscle obtained by the radiographic set were higher when compared to CBCT. However, in some areas, the radiation produced by the orthodontic set was higher due to the complete periapical examination. Conclusion: Considering the optimization principle of radiation protection, i-CAT tomography should be used only in specific and justified circumstances. Additionally, following the ALARA principle, single periapical radiographies covering restricted areas are more suitable than the complete periapical examination. PMID:27653266

  7. Reliability of frontal sinus by cone beam-computed tomography (CBCT) for individual identification.

    PubMed

    Cossellu, Gianguido; De Luca, Stefano; Biagi, Roberto; Farronato, Giampietro; Cingolani, Mariano; Ferrante, Luigi; Cameriere, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the frontal sinus is an important tool in personal identification. Cone beam-computed tomography (CBCT) is also progressively replacing conventional radiography and multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) in human identification. The aim of this study is to develop a reproducible technique and measurements from 3D reconstructions obtained with CBCT, for use in human identification. CBCT from 150 patients (91 female, 59 male), aged between 15 and 78 years, was analysed with the specific software program MIMICS 11.11 (Materialise N.V., Leuven, Belgium). Corresponding 3D volumes were generated and maximal dimensions along 3 directions (x, y, z), X M, Y M, Z M (in mm), total volume area (in mm(3)), V t, and total surface (in mm(2)), S t, were calculated. Correlation analysis showed that sinus surfaces were strongly correlated with their volume (r = 0.976). Frontal sinuses were separate in 21 subjects (14 %), fused in 67 (44.6 %) and found on only one side (unilateral) in 9 (6 %). A Prominent Middle of Fused Sinus (PMS) was found in 53 subjects (35.3 %). The intra- (0.963-0.999) and inter-observer variability (0.973-0.999) showed a great agreement and a substantial homogeneity of evaluation.

  8. Robust scatter correction method for cone-beam CT using an interlacing-slit plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kui-Dong; Xu, Zhe; Zhang, Ding-Hua; Zhang, Hua; Shi, Wen-Long

    2016-06-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in medical imaging and industrial nondestructive testing, but the presence of scattered radiation will cause significant reduction of image quality. In this article, a robust scatter correction method for CBCT using an interlacing-slit plate (ISP) is carried out for convenient practice. Firstly, a Gaussian filtering method is proposed to compensate the missing data of the inner scatter image, and simultaneously avoid too-large values of calculated inner scatter and smooth the inner scatter field. Secondly, an interlacing-slit scan without detector gain correction is carried out to enhance the practicality and convenience of the scatter correction method. Finally, a denoising step for scatter-corrected projection images is added in the process flow to control the noise amplification The experimental results show that the improved method can not only make the scatter correction more robust and convenient, but also achieve a good quality of scatter-corrected slice images. Supported by National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology of China (2012ZX04007021), Aeronautical Science Fund of China (2014ZE53059), and Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities of China (3102014KYJD022)

  9. Evaluation of flat panel detector cone beam CT breast imaging with different sizes of breast phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Lu, Xianghua; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Yong; Schiffhauer, Linda; Cullinan, Jeanne

    2005-04-01

    The sensitivity to detect small breast cancers and the specificity of conventional mammography (CM) remain limited owing to an overlap in the appearances of lesions and surrounding structure. We propose to address the limitations accompanying CM using flat panel detector (FPD)-based cone beam CT breast imaging (CBCTBI). The purpose of the study is to determine optimal x-ray operation ranges for different sizes of normal breasts and corresponding glandular dose levels. The current CBCT prototype consists of a modified GE HighSpeed Advantage CT gantry, an x-ray tube, a Varian PaxScan 4030CB FPD, a CT table and a PC. Two uncompressed breast phantoms, with the diameters of 10.8 and 13.8 cm, consist of three inserts: a layer of silicone jell simulating a background structure, a lucite plate on which five simulated carcinomas are mounted, and a plate on which six calcifications are attached. With a single scan, 300 projections were acquired for all phantom scans. The optimal x-ray techniques for different phantom sizes were determined. The total mean glandular doses for different size phantoms were measured using a CT pencil ionization chamber. With the optimal x-ray techniques that result in the maximal dose efficiency for the different tissue thickness, the image quality with two different phantoms was evaluated. The results demonstrate that the CBCTBI can detect a few millimeter-size simulated carcinoma and ~ 0.2 mm calcification with clinically acceptable mean glandular doses for different size breasts.

  10. A motion-compensated cone-beam CT using electrical impedance tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Pengpan, T; Smith, N D; Qiu, W; Yao, A; Mitchell, C N; Soleimani, M

    2011-01-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is an imaging technique used in conjunction with radiation therapy. For example CBCT is used to verify the position of lung cancer tumours just prior to radiation treatment. The accuracy of the radiation treatment of thoracic and upper abdominal structures is heavily affected by respiratory movement. Such movement typically blurs the CBCT reconstruction and ideally should be removed. Hence motion-compensated CBCT has recently been researched for correcting image artefacts due to breathing motion. This paper presents a new dual-modality approach where CBCT is aided by using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for motion compensation. EIT can generate images of contrasts in electrical properties. The main advantage of using EIT is its high temporal resolution. In this paper motion information is extracted from EIT images and incorporated directly in the CBCT reconstruction. In this study synthetic moving data are generated using simulated and experimental phantoms. The paper demonstrates that image blur, created as a result of motion, can be reduced through motion compensation with EIT.

  11. A level set method for cupping artifact correction in cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shipeng; Li, Haibo; Ge, Qi; Li, Chunming

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To reduce cupping artifacts and improve the contrast-to-noise ratio in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: A level set method is proposed to reduce cupping artifacts in the reconstructed image of CBCT. The authors derive a local intensity clustering property of the CBCT image and define a local clustering criterion function of the image intensities in a neighborhood of each point. This criterion function defines an energy in terms of the level set functions, which represent a segmentation result and the cupping artifacts. The cupping artifacts are estimated as a result of minimizing this energy. Results: The cupping artifacts in CBCT are reduced by an average of 90%. The results indicate that the level set-based algorithm is practical and effective for reducing the cupping artifacts and preserving the quality of the reconstructed image. Conclusions: The proposed method focuses on the reconstructed image without requiring any additional physical equipment, is easily implemented, and provides cupping correction through a single-scan acquisition. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method successfully reduces the cupping artifacts.

  12. Flat panel detector-based cone beam CT for dynamic imaging: system evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Cai, Weixing; Yang, Dong; Lu, Xianghua

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize a newly built flat panel detector (FPD)-based cone beam CT (CBCT) prototype for dynamic imaging. A CBCT prototype has been designed and constructed by completely modifying a GE HiSpeed Advantage (HSA) CT gantry, incorporating a newly acquired large size real-time FPD (Varian PaxScan 4030CB), a new x-ray generator and a dual focal spot angiography x-ray tube that allows the full coverage of the detector. During data acquisition, the x-ray tube and the FPD can be rotated on the gantry over Nx360 degrees due to integrated slip ring technology with the rotation speed of one second/revolution. With a single scan time of up to 40 seconds , multiple sets of reconstructions can be performed for dynamic studies. The upgrade of this system has been completed. The prototype was used for a series of preliminary phantom studies: different sizes of breast phantoms, a Humanoid chest phantom and scatter correction studies. The results of the phantom studies demonstrate that good image quality can be achieved with this newly built prototype.

  13. Flat-panel detector-based cone beam volume CT breast imaging: detector evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong; Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola

    2003-06-01

    Preliminary evaluation of large-area flat panel detectors (FPDs) indicates that FPDs have some potential advantages over film-screen and CCD-based imagers: compactness, high resolution, high frame rate, large dynamic range, small image lag (<1%), and excellent linearity (~1%). A real time large-area flat panel detector (FPD) Varian PaxScan 2520 was evaluated for cone-beam volume breast imaging (CBVCTBI) in terms of dynamic range, linearity, image lag, and spatial as well as low contrast resolution. In addition, specially made breast phantoms were imaged with our prototyped CBVCTBI system to provide real outcomes to evaluate the detector under full imaging system conditions including the x-ray source, gantry geometry, x-ray technique selection, data acquisition system and reconstruction algorithms. We have concentrated on the low kVp range (30 to 80 kVp) in the context of the breast-imaging task. For ~288 images/scan the exposure required was ~2.5mR/projection. This is equivalent to that of a conventional mammography screening exam. The results indicate that the FPD-based CBVCTBI system can achieve sufficient high- and low-contrast resolution for diagnostic CBVCT breast imaging with a clinically acceptable exposure level. The advantages of the new FPD make it a promising candidate for CBVCTBI.

  14. A novel method for 4D cone-beam computer-tomography reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Park, Justin C.; Chen, Yunmei; Lan, Guanghui; Lu, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Image quality of Four Dimensional Cone-Beam Computer-Tomography (4DCBCT) is severely impaired by highly insufficient amount of projection data available for each phase. Therefore, making good use of limited projection data is crucial to solve this problem. Noticing that usually only a portion of the images is affected by motion, we separate the moving part (different between phases) of the images from the static part (identical among all phases) with the help of prior image reconstructed using all projection data. Then we update the moving part and the static part of images alternatively through solving minimization problems based on a global (use full projection data) and several local (use projection data for respective phase) linear systems. In the other word, we rebuild a large over-determined linear system for static part from the original under-determined systems and we reduce the number of unknowns in the original system for each phase as well. As a result, image quality for both static part and moving part are greatly improved and reliable 4D CBCT images are then reconstructed.

  15. 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction using multi-organ meshes for sliding motion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zichun; Gu, Xuejun; Mao, Weihua; Wang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) strategy was proposed for 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) reconstruction and showed excellent results in both phantom and lung cancer patient studies. In the original SMEIR algorithm, the deformation vector field (DVF) was defined on voxel grid and estimated by enforcing a global smoothness regularization term on the motion fields. The objective of this work is to improve the computation efficiency and motion estimation accuracy of SMEIR for 4D-CBCT through developing a multi-organ meshing model. Feature-based adaptive meshes were generated to reduce the number of unknowns in the DVF estimation and accurately capture the organ shapes and motion. Additionally, the discontinuity in the motion fields between different organs during respiration was explicitly considered in the multi-organ mesh model. This will help with the accurate visualization and motion estimation of the tumor on the organ boundaries in 4D-CBCT. To further improve the computational efficiency, a GPU-based parallel implementation was designed. The performance of the proposed algorithm was evaluated on a synthetic sliding motion phantom, a 4D NCAT phantom, and four lung cancer patients. The proposed multi-organ mesh based strategy outperformed the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, iterative total variation minimization, original SMEIR and single meshing method based on both qualitative and quantitative evaluations.

  16. View-dependent geometric calibration for offset flat-panel cone beam computed tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang

    2016-04-01

    Geometric parameters that define the geometry of imaging systems are crucial for image reconstruction and image quality in x-ray computed tomography (CT). The problem of determining geometric parameters for an offset flat-panel cone beam CT (CBCT) system, a recently introduced modality with a large field of view, with the assumption of an unstable mechanism and geometric parameters that vary in each view, is considered. To accurately and rapidly find the geometric parameters for each projection view, we use the projection matrix method and design a dedicated phantom that is partially visible in all projection views. The phantom consists of balls distributed symmetrically in a cylinder to ensure the inclusion of the phantom in all views, and a large portion of the phantom is covered in the projection image. To efficiently use calibrated geometric information in the reconstruction process and get rid of approximation errors, instead of decomposing the projection matrix into actual geometric parameters that are manually corrected before being used in reconstruction, as in conventional methods, we directly use the projection matrix and its pseudo-inverse in projection and backprojection operations of reconstruction algorithms. The experiments illustrate the efficacy of the proposed method with a real offset flat-panel CBCT system in dental imaging.

  17. Usefulness of cone beam computed tomography in temporomandibular joints with soft tissue pathology

    PubMed Central

    Alkhader, M; Kuribayashi, A; Ohbayashi, N; Nakamura, S; Kurabayashi, T

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of cone beam CT (CBCT) in temporomandibular joints (TMJs) with soft tissue pathology. Methods 106 TMJs of 55 patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were examined by MRI and CBCT. MR images were used for the evaluation of disc displacement, disc deformity, joint effusion and obscurity of temporal posterior attachment (TPA). CBCT images were evaluated for the presence or absence of osseous abnormalities. The χ2 test was used to analyse the association between MRI and CBCT findings. Results MRI of 106 TMJs revealed disc displacement, disc deformity, joint effusion and obscurity of the TPA in 68, 73, 28 and 27 joints, respectively. Of the 68 TMJs with disc displacement, anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR) was seen most frequently (47/68). CBCT imaging found 65 TMJs were characterized by the presence of osseous abnormalities and were significantly associated with disc deformity and ADDWR (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant association between the presence of joint effusion and obscurity of TPA and TMJ osseous abnormalities. Conclusions TMD patients with confirmed ADDWR or disc deformity on MRI are at risk of having osseous abnormalities in the TMJ and further examination with CBCT is recommended. PMID:20729183

  18. Modulation transfer function evaluation of cone beam computed tomography for dental use with the oversampling method

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, H; Honda, E; Kurabayashi, T

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to investigate the possibility of evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF) of cone beam CT (CBCT) for dental use using the oversampling method. Methods The CBCT apparatus (3D Accuitomo) with an image intensifier was used with a 100 μm tungsten wire placed inside the scanner at a slight angle to the plane perpendicular to the plane of interest and scanned. 200 contiguous reconstructed images were used to obtain the oversampling line-spread function (LSF). The MTF curve was obtained by computing the Fourier transformation from the oversampled LSF. Line pair tests were also performed using Catphan®. Results The oversampling method provided smooth and reproducible MTF curves. The MTF curves revealed that the spatial resolution in the z-axis direction was significantly higher than that in the axial direction. This result was also confirmed by the line pair test. Conclusions MTF analysis was performed successfully using the oversampling method. In addition, this study clarified that the 3D Accuitomo had high spatial resolution, especially in the z-axis direction. PMID:20089741

  19. Comparing the Coronal Flaring Efficacy of Five Different Instruments Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Homayoon, Amin; Hamidi, Mahmood Reza; Haddadi, Azam; Madani, Zahra Sadat; Moudi, Ehsan; Bijani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fearless removal of tooth structure during canal preparation and shaping has negative effects on the prognosis of treatment. On the other hand, sufficient pre-enlargement facilitates exact measurement of the apical size. The present in vitro study aimed to compare the efficacy of Gates-Glidden drills, K3, ProTaper, FlexMaster and RaCe instruments in dentin removal during coronal flaring using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: A total of 40 mandibular molars were selected and the coronal areas of their mesiobuccal and mesiolingual root canals were randomly prepared with either mentioned instruments. Pre- and post-instrumentation CBCT images were taken and the thickness of canal walls was measured in 1.5- and 3-mm distances from the furcation area. Data were analyzed using the one-way ANOVA. Tukey’s post hoc tests were used for two-by-two comparisons. Results: At 1.5-mm distance, there was no significant difference between different instruments. However, at 3-mm distances, Gates-Glidden drills removed significantly more dentin compared to FlexMaster files (mean=0.18 mm) (P<0.02); however, two-by-two comparisons did not reveal any significant differences between the other groups. Conclusion: All tested instruments can be effectively used in clinical settings for coronal pre-enlargement. PMID:26525955

  20. Diagnostic value of cone-beam CT in histologically confirmed otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liktor, Balázs; Révész, Péter; Csomor, Péter; Gerlinger, Imre; Sziklai, István; Karosi, Tamás

    2014-08-01

    This retrospective case review was performed with the aim to asses the value of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the preoperative diagnosis of otosclerosis. A total of 32 patients with histologically confirmed stapedial otosclerosis, who underwent unilateral stapedectomies were analyzed. Preoperative temporal bone CBCT scans were performed in all cases. CBCT imaging was characterized by a slice thickness of 0.3 mm and multiplanar image reconstruction. Histopathologic examination of the removed stapes footplates was performed in all cases. Findings of CBCT were categorized according to Marshall's grading system (from grade 0 to grade 3). Histopathologic results were correlated to multiplanar reconstructed CBCT scans, respectively. Histologically active foci of otosclerosis (n = 21) were identified by CBCT in all cases with a sensitivity of 100 %. However, CBCT was unable to detect histologically inactive otosclerosis (n = 11, sensitivity = 0 %). According to CBCT scans, no retrofenestral lesions were found and all positive cases were recruited into the grade 1 group indicating solely fenestral lesions at the anterior pole of stapes footplates. In conclusion, CBCT is a reliable imaging method with considerably lower radiation dose than high-resolution CT (HRCT) in the preoperative diagnosis of otosclerosis. These results indicate that CBCT has high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of hypodense lesions due to histologically active otosclerosis.

  1. Fast three-dimensional superimposition of cone beam computed tomography for orthopaedics and orthognathic surgery evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Weissheimer, A.; Menezes, L. M.; Koerich, L.; Pham, J.; Cevidanes, L. H. S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a method for fast three-dimensional (3D) superimposition of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in growing patients and adults (surgical cases). The sample consisted of CBCT scans of 18 patients. For 10 patients, as the gold standard, the spatial position of the pretreatment CBCT was reoriented, saved as a reoriented volume, and then superimposed on the original image. For eight patients, four non-growing and four growing, the pre- and post-treatment scans were superimposed. Fast voxel-based superimposition was performed, with registration at the anterior cranial base. This superimposition process took 10–15 s. The fit of the cranial base superimposition was verified by qualitative visualization of the semi-transparent axial, sagittal, and coronal cross-sectional slices of all corresponding anatomical structures. Virtual 3D surface models of the skull were generated via threshold segmentation, and superimposition errors in the reoriented models and the results of treatment for the treated cases were evaluated by 3D surface distances on colour-coded maps. The superimposition error of the spatial reorientation and for growing and non-growing patients was <0.5 mm, which is acceptable and clinically insignificant. The voxel-based superimposition method evaluated was reproducible in different clinical conditions, rapid, and applicable for research and clinical practice. PMID:25935632

  2. Analysis of Interfraction Prostate Motion Using Megavoltage Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bylund, Kevin C. Bayouth, John E.; Smith, Mark C.; Hass, A. Curtis; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M..

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Determine the degree of interfraction prostate motion and its components measured by using daily megavoltage (MV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Methods and Materials: A total of 984 daily MV CBCT images from 24 patients undergoing definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer were analyzed retrospectively. Pretreatment couch shifts, based on physician registration of MV CBCT to planning CT data sets, were used as a measure of daily interfraction motion. Off-line bony registration was performed to separate bony misalignment from internal organ motion. Interobserver and intraobserver variation studies were performed on 20 MV CBCT images. Results: Mean interfraction prostate motion was 6.7 mm, with the greatest single-axis deviation in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction. The largest positional inaccuracy was accounted for by systematic deviations in bony misalignment, whereas random deviations occurred from bony misalignment and internal prostate motion. In the aggregate, AP motion did not correlate with days elapsed since beginning therapy or on average with rectal size at treatment planning. Interobserver variation was greatest in the AP direction, decreased in experienced observers, and further decreased in intraobserver studies. Mean interfraction motion during the first 6 days of therapy, when used as a subsequent offset, reduced acceptable AP planning target volume margins by 50%. Conclusion: The MV CBCT is a practical direct method of daily localization that shows significant interfraction motion with respect to conventional three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy margins, similar to that measured in other modalities.

  3. Cone-beam CT analysis of patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared to normal controls

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ruben; Looney, Stephen; Kalathingal, Sajitha; De Rossi, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the upper airway dimensions of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and control subjects using a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit commonly applied in clinical practice in order to assess airway dimensions in the same fashion as that routinely employed in a clinical setting. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis utilizing existing CBCT scans to evaluate the dimensions of the upper airway in OSA and control subjects. The CBCT data of sixteen OSA and sixteen control subjects were compared. The average area, average volume, total volume, and total length of the upper airway were computed. Width and anterior-posterior (AP) measurements were obtained on the smallest axial slice. Results OSA subjects had a significantly smaller average airway area, average airway volume, total airway volume, and mean airway width. OSA subjects had a significantly larger airway length measurement. The mean A-P distance was not significantly different between groups. Conclusion OSA subjects have a smaller upper airway compared to controls with the exception of airway length. The lack of a significant difference in the mean A-P distance may indicate that patient position during imaging (upright vs. supine) can affect this measurement. Comparison of this study with a future prospective study design will allow for validation of these results. PMID:27051634

  4. Linac-integrated kV-cone beam CT: Technical features and first applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oelfke, Uwe . E-mail: u.oelfke@dkfz.de; Tuecking, Thomas M.Sc.; Nill, Simeon; Seeber, Annete; Hesse, Bernd; Huber, Peter; Thilmann, Christoph

    2006-04-01

    Abstract-: One of the most prominent imaging techniques in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is the acquisition of cone beam computed tomographies (CBCTs) at the linac with the patient in treatment position. CBCTs provide accurate 3-dimensional (3D) knowledge about the patient's anatomy for every treatment fraction and are therefore well suited for all adaptive corrections of errors related to interfractional uncertainties of the treatment process. In this paper, we first describe the technical development and implementation of this new imaging technique at our linac, i.e., the hardware components and their operating parameters are discussed in detail for a standard image acquisition of CBCTs. Then, an extension of this approach for the acquisition of complete images for extended field of views-the 'shifted detector' technique-is presented followed by a first investigation of how CBCTs can be reliably used for adaptive dose calculations. Finally, a first clinical application, the process of automatic patient positioning based on CBCT images, is discussed. From our investigations, we conclude that the technical development of linac-integrated CBCTs bears an enormous potential for the correction of interfractional treatment errors. However, image quality and reconstruction speed of the images leave room for improvement. The development of clinical strategies for the optimal application of this new image modality in a clinical environment is one the major tasks for the future.

  5. Extra projection data identification method for fast-continuous-rotation industrial cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Duan, Shengling; Duan, Jinghui; Wang, Xiaolong; Li, Xingdong; Meng, Fanyong; Zhang, Jianhai

    2013-01-01

    Fast-continuous-rotation is an effective measure to improve the scanning speed and decrease the radiation dose for cone-beam CT. However, because of acceleration and deceleration of the motor, as well as the response lag of the scanning control terminals to the host PC, uneven-distributed and redundant projections are inevitably created, which seriously decrease the quality of the reconstruction images. In this paper, we first analyzed the aspects of the theoretical sequence chart of the fast-continuous-rotation mode. Then, an optimized sequence chart was proposed by extending the rotation angle span to ensure the effective 2π-span projections were situated in the stable rotation stage. In order to match the rotation angle with the projection image accurately, structure similarity (SSIM) index was used as a control parameter for extraction of the effective projection sequence which was exactly the complete projection data for image reconstruction. The experimental results showed that SSIM based method had a high accuracy of projection view locating and was easy to realize.

  6. Breast density quantification with cone-beam CT: a post-mortem study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Travis; Ding, Huanjun; Le, Huy Q; Ducote, Justin L; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-12-07

    Forty post-mortem breasts were imaged with a flat-panel based cone-beam x-ray CT system at 50 kVp. The feasibility of breast density quantification has been investigated using standard histogram thresholding and an automatic segmentation method based on the fuzzy c-means algorithm (FCM). The breasts were chemically decomposed into water, lipid, and protein immediately after image acquisition was completed. The per cent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis was used as the gold standard for breast density comparison. Both image-based segmentation techniques showed good precision in breast density quantification with high linear coefficients between the right and left breast of each pair. When comparing with the gold standard using %FGV from chemical analysis, Pearson's r-values were estimated to be 0.983 and 0.968 for the FCM clustering and the histogram thresholding techniques, respectively. The standard error of the estimate was also reduced from 3.92% to 2.45% by applying the automatic clustering technique. The results of the postmortem study suggested that breast tissue can be characterized in terms of water, lipid and protein contents with high accuracy by using chemical analysis, which offers a gold standard for breast density studies comparing different techniques. In the investigated image segmentation techniques, the FCM algorithm had high precision and accuracy in breast density quantification. In comparison to conventional histogram thresholding, it was more efficient and reduced inter-observer variation.

  7. Assessment of the relationship between the maxillary molars and adjacent structures using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun-Hoa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relationship between the roots of the maxillary molars and the maxillary sinus using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and measured the distances between the roots of the maxillary molars and the sinus floor as well as the thickness of the bone between the root and the alveolar cortical plate. Materials and Methods The study sample consisted of 83 patients with normally erupted bilateral maxillary first and second molars. A total of 332 maxillary molars were examined using CBCT images. The vertical relationship of each root with the maxillary sinus was classified into four types on CBCT cross-sectional images. The distance between the sinus floor and root and the bone thickness between the root and alveolar cortical plate were measured. Results In the buccal roots of the maxillary molars, a root protruding into the sinus occurred most frequently. A root projecting laterally along the sinus cavity was most common in the palatal roots of the maxillary first molars. The mesiobuccal roots of the maxillary second molar were closest to the sinus. The mesiobuccal roots of the first molars were closest to the cortical plate. Conclusion The relationship between the roots of the maxillary molars and the sinus differed between the buccal and palatal roots. A root protruding into the sinus occurred more frequent in the buccal roots of the maxillary molars. The mesiobuccal root of the maxillary second molar was closest to the maxillary sinus floor and farthest from the alveolar cortical plate. PMID:23301207

  8. Evaluation of canalis basilaris medianus using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zahedpasha, Samir; Rathore, Sonali A.; Mupparapu, Mel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report is to present two cases of canalis basilaris medianus as identified on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the base of the skull. The CBCT data sets were sent for radiographic consultation. In both cases, multi-planar views revealed an osseous defect in the base of the skull in the clivus region, the sagittal view showed a unilateral, well-defined, non-corticated, track-like low-attenuation osseous defect in the clivus. The appearance of the defect was highly reminiscent of a fracture of the clivus. The borders of osseous defect were smooth, and no other radiographic signs suggestive of osteolytic destructive processes were noted. Based on the overall radiographic examination, a radiographic impression of canalis basilaris medianus was made. Canalis basilaris medianus is a rare anatomical variant and is generally observed on the clivus. Due to its potential association with meningitis, it should be recognized and reported to avoid potential complications. PMID:27358822

  9. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  10. Articular Eminence Inclination, Height, and Condyle Morphology on Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    İlgüy, Dilhan; İlgüy, Mehmet; Fişekçioğlu, Erdoğan; Dölekoğlu, Semanur; Ersan, Nilüfer

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between articular eminence inclination, height, and thickness of the roof of the glenoid fossa (RGF) according to age and gender and to assess condyle morphology including incidental findings of osseous characteristics associated with osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods. CBCT images of 105 patients were evaluated retrospectively. For articular eminence inclination and height, axial views on which the condylar processes were seen with their widest mediolateral extent being used as a reference view for secondary reconstruction. Condyle morphology was categorized both in the sagittal and coronal plane. Results. The mean values of eminence inclination and height of males were higher than those of females (P < 0.05). There were significant differences in the RGF thickness in relation to sagittal condyle morphology. Among the group of OA, the mean value of the RGF thickness for “OA-osteophyte” group was the highest (1.59 mm), whereas the lowest RGF values were seen in the “OA-flattening.” Conclusion. The sagittal osteoarthritic changes may have an effect on RGF thickness by mechanical stimulation and changed stress distribution. Gender has a significant effect on eminence height (Eh) and inclination. PMID:24696193

  11. Rapid maxillary expansion effects: An alternative assessment method by means of cone-beam tomography

    PubMed Central

    Melgaço, Camilo Aquino; Columbano, José; Jurach, Estela Maris; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Gonçalves; Sant'Anna, Eduardo Franzotti; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study aims to develop a method to assess the changes in palatal and lingual cross-sectional areas in patients submitted to rapid maxillary expansion (RME). METHODS: The sample comprised 31 Class I malocclusion individuals submitted to RME and divided into two groups treated with Haas (17 patients) and Hyrax (14 patients) expanders. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired at T0 (before expansion ) and T1 (six months after screw stabilization). Maxillary and mandibular cross-sectional areas were assessed at first permanent molars and first premolars regions and compared at T0 and T1. Mandibular occlusal area was also analyzed. RESULTS: Maxillary cross-sectional areas increased in 56.18 mm2 and 44.32 mm2 for the posterior and anterior regions. These values were smaller for the mandible, representing augmentation of 40.32 mm2 and 39.91 mm2 for posterior and anterior sections. No differences were found when comparing both expanders. Mandibular occlusal area increased 43.99mm2 and mandibular incisors proclined. Increments of 1.74 mm and 1.7 mm occurred in mandibular intermolar and interpremolar distances. These same distances presented increments of 5.5 mm and 5.57 mm for the maxillary arch. CONCLUSION: Occlusal and cross-sectional areas increased significantly after RME. The method described seems to be reliable and precise to assess intraoral area changes. PMID:25715721

  12. Condylar asymmetry in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis assessed by cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Huntjens, Elisabeth; Kiss, Gabriel; Wouters, Carine; Carels, Carine

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of condylar asymmetry in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and analysis software. For 20 patients (14 girls and six boys; mean age 11.21 +/- 3.54 years), resultant cross-sectional images of the left and right temporomandibular joints (TMJs) were semi-automatically segmented, and exact registration of the right, with respect to the flipped left grey-level condyle, was obtained. Visual inspection of the volume images in 360 degree rotation showed a wide variety of condylar destruction patterns, ranging from small erosions within the cortex to almost complete deformation of the condylar head. Because segmentation was restricted to the delineation of the cortical region, possible changes in the deeper zones were not reproduced. Descriptive statistics [median and interquartile range (IQR)] and diagrams (frequency distribution) were used to assess the results. Initial analysis of condylar volume (including both flipped left and right) showed a median value for volume of 0.844 cm(3) (IQR 0.323), while the median value for volume difference between both condyles was 0.051 cm(3) (IQR 0.098). Analysis of the degree of asymmetry showed a median value of 26.18 per cent (IQR 14.46). Using the CBCT-based method, it was shown that condylar asymmetry was a common feature in children with JIA. The degree of asymmetry was variable, but significant in the majority of the subjects.

  13. Task-Based Regularization Design for Detection of Intracranial Hemorrhage in Cone-Beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Prompt and reliable detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is critical to treatment of a number of neurological disorders. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems are potentially suitable for detecting ICH (contrast 40-80 HU, size down to 1 mm) at the point of care but face major challenges in image quality requirements. Statistical reconstruction demonstrates improved noise-resolution tradeoffs in CBCT head imaging, but its capability in improving image quality with respect to the task of ICH detection remains to be fully investigated. Moreover, statistical reconstruction typically exhibits nonuniform spatial resolution and noise characteristics, leading to spatially varying detectability of ICH for a conventional penalty. In this work, we propose a spatially varying penalty design that maximizes detectability of ICH at each location throughout the image. We leverage theoretical analysis of spatial resolution and noise for a penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) estimator, and employ a task-based imaging performance descriptor in terms of detectability index using a nonprewhitening observer model. Performance prediction was validated using a 3D anthropomorphic head phantom. The proposed penalty achieved superior detectability throughout the head and improved detectability in regions adjacent to the skull base by ~10% compared to a conventional uniform penalty. PWLS reconstruction with the proposed penalty demonstrated excellent visualization of simulated ICH in different regions of the head and provides further support for development of dedicated CBCT head scanning at the point-of-care in the neuro ICU and OR.

  14. Implementation of sensitivity and resolution modeling for SPECT with cone-beam collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Kunniyur, Vikram R.; Lee, Wei; Gangal, Kedar R.; Coman, Ioana L.; Lipson, Edward D.; Karczewski, Deborah A.; Thomas, F. Deaver; Feiglin, David H.

    2005-04-01

    We implemented a fully-3D ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) algorithm with attenuation compensation, distance-dependent blurring (DDB), and sensitivity modeling for SPECT performed with a cone-beam collimator (CBC). The experimentally obtained detector response to point sources across FOV was fitted to a two-dimensional Gaussian function with its width (FWHM) varying linearly with the source-to-detector distance and with very weak sensitivity dependence on the emission angle. We obtained CBC SPECT scans of a physical point-source phantom, a Defrise phantom, and a female patient, and we investigated performance of our algorithm. To correctly simulate DDB and sensitivity, a blurring kernel with a radius of up to 10 elements had to be used for a 128¥128 acquisition matrix, and volumetric ray tracing rather than line-element-based ray tracing has to be implemented. In the point-source phantom reconstruction we evaluated the uniformity of FWHM for the radial, tangential and longitudinal directions, and sensitivity vs. distance. An isotropic and stationary resolution was obtained at any location by OSEM with DDB and sensitivity modeling, only when volumetric ray tracing was used. We analyzed axial and transaxial profiles obtained for the Defrise phantom and evaluated the reconstructed breast SPECT patient images. The proposed fully-3D OSEM reconstruction algorithm with DBB and sensitivity modeling, and attenuation compensation with volumetric rays tracing is efficient and effective with significant resolution and sensitivity recovery.

  15. 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction using multi-organ meshes for sliding motion modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zichun; Gu, Xuejun; Mao, Weihua; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    A simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) strategy was proposed for 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) reconstruction and showed excellent results in both phantom and lung cancer patient studies. In the original SMEIR algorithm, the deformation vector field (DVF) was defined on voxel grid and estimated by enforcing a global smoothness regularization term on the motion fields. The objective of this work is to improve the computation efficiency and motion estimation accuracy of SMEIR for 4D-CBCT through developing a multi-organ meshing model. Feature-based adaptive meshes were generated to reduce the number of unknowns in the DVF estimation and accurately capture the organ shapes and motion. Additionally, the discontinuity in the motion fields between different organs during respiration was explicitly considered in the multi-organ mesh model. This will help with the accurate visualization and motion estimation of the tumor on the organ boundaries in 4D-CBCT. To further improve the computational efficiency, a GPU-based parallel implementation was designed. The performance of the proposed algorithm was evaluated on a synthetic sliding motion phantom, a 4D NCAT phantom, and four lung cancer patients. The proposed multi-organ mesh based strategy outperformed the conventional Feldkamp–Davis–Kress, iterative total variation minimization, original SMEIR and single meshing method based on both qualitative and quantitative evaluations. PMID:26758496

  16. Deformable image registration of CT and truncated cone-beam CT for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Xin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-11-01

    Truncation of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image, mainly caused by the limited field of view (FOV) of CBCT imaging, poses challenges to the problem of deformable image registration (DIR) between computed tomography (CT) and CBCT images in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). The missing information outside the CBCT FOV usually causes incorrect deformations when a conventional DIR algorithm is utilized, which may introduce significant errors in subsequent operations such as dose calculation. In this paper, based on the observation that the missing information in the CBCT image domain does exist in the projection image domain, we propose to solve this problem by developing a hybrid deformation/reconstruction algorithm. As opposed to deforming the CT image to match the truncated CBCT image, the CT image is deformed such that its projections match all the corresponding projection images for the CBCT image. An iterative forward-backward projection algorithm is developed. Six head-and-neck cancer patient cases are used to evaluate our algorithm, five with simulated truncation and one with real truncation. It is found that our method can accurately register the CT image to the truncated CBCT image and is robust against image truncation when the portion of the truncated image is less than 40% of the total image. Part of this work was presented at the 54th AAPM Annual Meeting (Charlotte, NC, USA, 29 July-2 August 2012).

  17. Prevalence and Morphologic Characteristics of Ponticulus Posticus: Analysis Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Soylu, Emrah; Arikan, Mehtap Payveren; Ozcan, Gozde; Amuk, Mehmet; Kocoglu, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the prevalence and morphologic characteristics of ponticulus posticus (PP) by using cervical 3-dimensional (3-D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan images. Methods This was a retrospective study conducted by selecting cervical 3-D CBCT images of 698 patients, which were examined for the presence and types of PP. Results In 257 patients, 438 PPs, complete or partial, bilateral or unilateral, were identified on the 698 cervical 3-D CBCT scans; therefore, the prevalence was 36.8%. Bilateral complete PP and partial PP were observed in 6.3% and 16.2% of subjects, respectively. There was a significant difference in the prevalence between males and females (P = .001) and between the right and left sides between males and females, but not between age groups. Conclusion Ponticulus posticus is a relatively common anomaly in this Turkish sample, which may have implications for those who perform clinical procedures on the upper cervical spine. PMID:26778928

  18. Normal Variations of Sphenoid Sinus and the Adjacent Structures Detected in Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Azadeh; Ghafari, Roshanak; AnjomShoa, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The sphenoid sinus is a common target of paranasal surgery. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery is likely to endanger the anatomic variations of vital structures adjacent to the sphenoid sinus. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the variations of sphenoid sinus and the related structures by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method In this descriptive-analytic study, CBCT images of 103 patients aged above 20-years were selected (206 sides). Degree of pneumatization of sphenoid sinus, pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process, pterygoid process, protrusion of optic canal, vidian canal, and foramen rotundum, as well as prevalence of sinus septa were recorded. Examinations were performed using On-Demand software (Version 1); data were analyzed by using chi-square test. Results There was a statistically significant correlation between the pterygoid pneumatization and vidian canal protrusion (p< 0.001), and foramen rotundum protrusion (p< 0.001). The optic canal protrusion was found to be significantly associated with the anterior clinoid pneumatization and pterygoid process (p< 0.001). Statistically significant relationship was also observed between the carotid canal protrusion and pterygoid process pneumatization (p< 0.001). Conclusion The anatomical variations of the sphenoid sinus tend to give rise to a complexity of symptoms and potentially serious complications. This variability necessitates a comprehensive understanding of the regional sphenoid sinus anatomy by a detailed CBCT sinus examination. PMID:26966706

  19. Digital panoramic radiography versus cone beam computed tomography in the delineation of maxillomandibular tumors.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Barros, Renata Quirino de; Abilio, Vanessa Maria Freire; Yamamoto, Angela Toshie Araki; Melo, Daniela Pita de; Godoy, Gustavo Pina; Bento, Patricia Meira

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to compare the efficacy of digital panoramic radiography (DPR) with that of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for delineation of odontogenic and nonodontogenic tumors. From November 2009 through March 2011, 23 tumors in the maxillomandibular complex were diagnosed by histopathological examination. All DPRs and CBCTs were obtained and analyzed by a single previously calibrated radiologist, who considered the following radiographic aspects: clarity of the lesion edges, relation with dental elements, involvement of adjacent anatomical structures, cortical bone expansion and disruption, and, if present, type of involved anatomical structures and site of bone expansion and disruption. Of 23 patients, 15 (65.2%) were male and 8 (34.8%) were female. The tumor was classified as odontogenic in 73.9% of patients and nonodontogenic in 26.1% of patients. Analysis revealed that 56.5% of the tumors were located in the mandible, 34.8% in the maxilla, and 8.7% in both arches. For all analyzed variables, CBCTs offered more accurate details than did DPRs. Panoramic radiography should not be the examination of choice to visualize lesions in the maxillomandibular complex.

  20. Hybrid Cone-Beam Tomographic Reconstruction: Incorporation of Prior Anatomical Models to Compensate for Missing Data

    PubMed Central

    Sadowsky, Ofri; Lee, Junghoon; Sutter, E. Grant; Wall, Simon J.; Prince, Jerry L.; Taylor, Russell H.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method for improving the quality of cone-beam tomographic reconstruction done with a C-arm. C-arm scans frequently suffer from incomplete information due to image truncation, limited scan length, or other limitations. Our proposed “hybrid reconstruction” method injects information from a prior anatomical model, derived from a subject-specific CT or from a statistical database (atlas), where the C-arm x-ray data is missing. This significantly reduces reconstruction artifacts with little loss of true information from the x-ray projections. The methods consist of constructing anatomical models, fast rendering of digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) projections of the models, rigid or deformable registration of the model and the x-ray images, and fusion of the DRR and x-ray projections, all prior to a conventional filtered back-projection algorithm. Our experiments, conducted with a mobile image intensifier C-arm, demonstrate visually and quantitatively the contribution of data fusion to image quality, which we assess through comparison to a “ground truth” CT. Importantly, we show that a significantly improved reconstruction can be obtained from a C-arm scan as short as 90° by complementing the observed projections with DRRs of two prior models, namely an atlas and a pre-operative same-patient CT. The hybrid reconstruction principles are applicable to other types of C-arms as well. PMID:20667807

  1. Fast three-dimensional superimposition of cone beam computed tomography for orthopaedics and orthognathic surgery evaluation.

    PubMed

    Weissheimer, A; Menezes, L M; Koerich, L; Pham, J; Cevidanes, L H S

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a method for fast three-dimensional (3D) superimposition of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in growing patients and adults (surgical cases). The sample consisted of CBCT scans of 18 patients. For 10 patients, as the gold standard, the spatial position of the pretreatment CBCT was reoriented, saved as a reoriented volume, and then superimposed on the original image. For eight patients, four non-growing and four growing, the pre- and post-treatment scans were superimposed. Fast voxel-based superimposition was performed, with registration at the anterior cranial base. This superimposition process took 10-15s. The fit of the cranial base superimposition was verified by qualitative visualization of the semi-transparent axial, sagittal, and coronal cross-sectional slices of all corresponding anatomical structures. Virtual 3D surface models of the skull were generated via threshold segmentation, and superimposition errors in the reoriented models and the results of treatment for the treated cases were evaluated by 3D surface distances on colour-coded maps. The superimposition error of the spatial reorientation and for growing and non-growing patients was <0.5mm, which is acceptable and clinically insignificant. The voxel-based superimposition method evaluated was reproducible in different clinical conditions, rapid, and applicable for research and clinical practice.

  2. Deformable Image Registration of CT and Truncated Cone-beam CT for Adaptive Radiation Therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Xin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-01-01

    Truncation of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image, mainly caused by the limited field of view (FOV) of CBCT imaging, poses challenges to the problem of deformable image registration (DIR) between CT and CBCT images in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). The missing information outside the CBCT FOV usually causes incorrect deformations when a conventional DIR algorithm is utilized, which may introduce significant errors in subsequent operations such as dose calculation. In this paper, based on the observation that the missing information in the CBCT image domain does exist in the projection image domain, we propose to solve this problem by developing a hybrid deformation/reconstruction algorithm. As opposed to deforming the CT image to match the truncated CBCT image, the CT image is deformed such that its projections match all the corresponding projection images for the CBCT image. An iterative forward-backward projection algorithm is developed. Six head-and-neck cancer patient cases are used to evaluate our algorithm, five with simulated truncation and one with real truncation. It is found that our method can accurately register the CT image to the truncated CBCT image and is robust against image truncation when the portion of the truncated image is less than 40% of the total image. PMID:24169817

  3. The current status of cone beam computed tomography imaging in orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kapila, S; Conley, R S; Harrell, W E

    2011-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) has become an increasingly important source of three dimensional (3D) volumetric data in clinical orthodontics since its introduction into dentistry in 1998. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight the current understanding of, and evidence for, the clinical use of CBCT in orthodontics, and to review the findings to answer clinically relevant questions. Currently available information from studies using CBCT can be organized into five broad categories: 1, the assessment of CBCT technology; 2, its use in craniofacial morphometric analyses; 3, incidental and missed findings; 4, analysis of treatment outcomes; and 5, efficacy of CBCT in diagnosis and treatment planning. The findings in these topical areas are summarized, followed by current indications and protocols for the use of CBCT in specific cases. Despite the increasing popularity of CBCT in orthodontics, and its advantages over routine radiography in specific cases, the effects of information derived from these images in altering diagnosis and treatment decisions has not been demonstrated in several types of cases. It has therefore been recommended that CBCT be used in select cases in which conventional radiography cannot supply satisfactory diagnostic information; these include cleft palate patients, assessment of unerupted tooth position, supernumerary teeth, identification of root resorption and for planning orthognathic surgery. The need to image other types of cases should be made on a case-by-case basis following an assessment of benefits vs risks of scanning in these situations. PMID:21159912

  4. Implementation of the FDK algorithm for cone-beam CT on the cell broadband engine architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherl, Holger; Koerner, Mario; Hofmann, Hannes; Eckert, Wieland; Kowarschik, Markus; Hornegger, Joachim

    2007-03-01

    In most of today's commercially available cone-beam CT scanners, the well known FDK method is used for solving the 3D reconstruction task. The computational complexity of this algorithm prohibits its use for many medical applications without hardware acceleration. The brand-new Cell Broadband Engine Architecture (CBEA) with its high level of parallelism is a cost-efficient processor for performing the FDK reconstruction according to the medical requirements. The programming scheme, however, is quite different to any standard personal computer hardware. In this paper, we present an innovative implementation of the most time-consuming parts of the FDK algorithm: filtering and back-projection. We also explain the required transformations to parallelize the algorithm for the CBEA. Our software framework allows to compute the filtering and back-projection in parallel, making it possible to do an on-the-fly-reconstruction. The achieved results demonstrate that a complete FDK reconstruction is computed with the CBEA in less than seven seconds for a standard clinical scenario. Given the fact that scan times are usually much higher, we conclude that reconstruction is finished right after the end of data acquisition. This enables us to present the reconstructed volume to the physician in real-time, immediately after the last projection image has been acquired by the scanning device.

  5. Effect of anatomical backgrounds on detectability in volumetric cone beam CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Minah; Park, Subok; Baek, Jongduk

    2016-03-01

    As anatomical noise is often a dominating factor affecting signal detection in medical imaging, we investigate the effects of anatomical backgrounds on signal detection in volumetric cone beam CT images. Signal detection performances are compared between transverse and longitudinal planes with either uniform or anatomical backgrounds. Sphere objects with diameters of 1mm, 5mm, 8mm, and 11mm are used as the signals. Three-dimensional (3D) anatomical backgrounds are generated using an anatomical noise power spectrum, 1/fβ, with β=3, equivalent to mammographic background [1]. The mean voxel value of the 3D anatomical backgrounds is used as an attenuation coefficient of the uniform background. Noisy projection data are acquired by the forward projection of the uniform and anatomical 3D backgrounds with/without sphere lesions and by the addition of quantum noise. Then, images are reconstructed by an FDK algorithm [2]. For each signal size, signal detection performances in transverse and longitudinal planes are measured by calculating the task SNR of a channelized Hotelling observer with Laguerre-Gauss channels. In the uniform background case, transverse planes yield higher task SNR values for all sphere diameters but 1mm. In the anatomical background case, longitudinal planes yield higher task SNR values for all signal diameters. The results indicate that it is beneficial to use longitudinal planes to detect spherical signals in anatomical backgrounds.

  6. Location and classification of Canalis sinuosus for cone beam computed tomography: avoiding misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Manhães Júnior, Luiz Roberto Coutinho; Villaça-Carvalho, Maria Fernanda Lima; Moraes, Mari Eli Leonelli; Lopes, Sérgio Lúcio Pereira de Castro; Silva, Milena Bortolotto Felippe; Junqueira, José Luiz Cintra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the presence, location and, multiplanar distance of the canalis sinuosus (CS) between the incisive foramen and the anterior maxillary alveolar ridge using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Therefore, 500 CBCT maxillary images obtained from male and female patients aged 20 to 80 years were selected to assist in the dental treatment. Low-quality tomographic images were discarded. All images were captured with the i-CATTM Classic tomograph and assessed using the XoranCatTM software. The axial sections were analyzed at the incisive foramen in order to verify the CS presence in laterality and location. Furthermore, linear measurements of the nasal cavity floor, buccal cortical bone, and alveolar ridge crest were made. All the collected data were statistically analyzed. Results show a variation of the CS in relation to the classification and distance of anatomical structures, but no significant difference between the right and left sides. It should be highlighted that CBCT is necessary before invasive procedures in order to preserve important anatomical structures. In conclusion, the location of the CS varies in relation to the alveolar ridge crest and buccal cortical bone, assuming that it is going to be located by the upper lateral incisor palatine.

  7. Local intensity feature tracking and motion modeling for respiratory signal extraction in cone beam CT projections.

    PubMed

    Dhou, Salam; Motai, Yuichi; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2013-02-01

    Accounting for respiration motion during imaging can help improve targeting precision in radiation therapy. We propose local intensity feature tracking (LIFT), a novel markerless breath phase sorting method in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan images. The contributions of this study are twofold. First, LIFT extracts the respiratory signal from the CBCT projections of the thorax depending only on tissue feature points that exhibit respiration. Second, the extracted respiratory signal is shown to correlate with standard respiration signals. LIFT extracts feature points in the first CBCT projection of a sequence and tracks those points in consecutive projections forming trajectories. Clustering is applied to select trajectories showing an oscillating behavior similar to the breath motion. Those "breathing" trajectories are used in a 3-D reconstruction approach to recover the 3-D motion of the lung which represents the respiratory signal. Experiments were conducted on datasets exhibiting regular and irregular breathing patterns. Results showed that LIFT-based respiratory signal correlates with the diaphragm position-based signal with an average phase shift of 1.68 projections as well as with the internal marker-based signal with an average phase shift of 1.78 projections. LIFT was able to detect the respiratory signal in all projections of all datasets.

  8. Breast density quantification with cone-beam CT: A post-mortem study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Travis; Ding, Huanjun; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Forty post-mortem breasts were imaged with a flat-panel based cone-beam x-ray CT system at 50 kVp. The feasibility of breast density quantification has been investigated using standard histogram thresholding and an automatic segmentation method based on the fuzzy c-means algorithm (FCM). The breasts were chemically decomposed into water, lipid, and protein immediately after image acquisition was completed. The percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis was used as the gold standard for breast density comparison. Both image-based segmentation techniques showed good precision in breast density quantification with high linear coefficients between the right and left breast of each pair. When comparing with the gold standard using %FGV from chemical analysis, Pearson’s r-values were estimated to be 0.983 and 0.968 for the FCM clustering and the histogram thresholding techniques, respectively. The standard error of the estimate (SEE) was also reduced from 3.92% to 2.45% by applying the automatic clustering technique. The results of the postmortem study suggested that breast tissue can be characterized in terms of water, lipid and protein contents with high accuracy by using chemical analysis, which offers a gold standard for breast density studies comparing different techniques. In the investigated image segmentation techniques, the FCM algorithm had high precision and accuracy in breast density quantification. In comparison to conventional histogram thresholding, it was more efficient and reduced inter-observer variation. PMID:24254317

  9. Assessment of the role of cone beam computed sialography in diagnosing salivary gland lesions

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Wahed, Nagla'a; Abo-Taleb, Noha Saleh Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess cone-beam computed (CBCT) sialography imaging in the detection of different changes associated with lesions of salivary glands. Materials and Methods This study consisted of 8 cases with signs and symptoms from salivary gland lesions. Conventional sialography using digital panoramic and lateral oblique radiographs and CBCT sialography were performed for each subject. The radiographs were evaluated by 3 radiologists independently of each other. The results were compared between conventional sialography and CBCT sialography in the evaluation of various lesions associated with the salivary glands. Results There was an agreement between the radiologists in interpreting the lesions that affected salivary glands with both techniques. The detection of the presence of stones or filling defects, stenosis, ductal evagination, dilatation, and space occupying lesions was 83% for conventional sialography compared with CBCT sialography. CBCT sialography was superior to conventional sialography in revealing stones, stenosis, and strictures, especially in the second and third order branches. Conclusion It would be advisable to perform CBCT sialography in cases of obstructive salivary gland diseases for better demonstration of the ductal system of the gland. PMID:23524990

  10. Detection of Procedural Errors during Root Canal Instrumentation using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; da Costa, Marcus Vinícius Corrêa; Dorilêo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati; de Oliveira, Helder Fernandes; Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Borges, Álvaro Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated procedural errors made during root canal preparation with nickel-titanium (NiTi) instruments, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging method. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 human mandibular molars were divided into five groups (n = 20) according to the NiTi system used for root canal preparation: Group 1 - BioRaCe, Group 2 - K3, Group 3 - ProTaper, Group 4 - Mtwo and Group 5 - Hero Shaper. CBCT images were obtained to detect procedural errors made during root canal preparation. Two examiners evaluated the presence or absence of fractured instruments, perforations, and canal transportations. Chi-square test was used for statistical analyzes. The significance level was set at a=5%. Results: In a total of 300 prepared root canals, 43 (14.33%) procedural errors were detected. Perforation was the procedural errors most commonly observed (58.14%). Most of the procedural errors were observed in the mesiobuccal root canal (48.84%). In the analysis of procedural errors, there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) between the groups of NiTi instruments. The root canals instrumented with BioRaCe had significantly less procedural errors. Conclusions: CBCT permitted the detection of procedural errors during root canal preparation. The frequency of procedural errors was low when root canals preparation was accomplished with BioRaCe system. PMID:25878475

  11. The current status of cone beam computed tomography imaging in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Kapila, S; Conley, R S; Harrell, W E

    2011-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) has become an increasingly important source of three dimensional (3D) volumetric data in clinical orthodontics since its introduction into dentistry in 1998. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight the current understanding of, and evidence for, the clinical use of CBCT in orthodontics, and to review the findings to answer clinically relevant questions. Currently available information from studies using CBCT can be organized into five broad categories: 1, the assessment of CBCT technology; 2, its use in craniofacial morphometric analyses; 3, incidental and missed findings; 4, analysis of treatment outcomes; and 5, efficacy of CBCT in diagnosis and treatment planning. The findings in these topical areas are summarized, followed by current indications and protocols for the use of CBCT in specific cases. Despite the increasing popularity of CBCT in orthodontics, and its advantages over routine radiography in specific cases, the effects of information derived from these images in altering diagnosis and treatment decisions has not been demonstrated in several types of cases. It has therefore been recommended that CBCT be used in select cases in which conventional radiography cannot supply satisfactory diagnostic information; these include cleft palate patients, assessment of unerupted tooth position, supernumerary teeth, identification of root resorption and for planning orthognathic surgery. The need to image other types of cases should be made on a case-by-case basis following an assessment of benefits vs risks of scanning in these situations.

  12. Geometric calibration using bundle adjustment for cone-beam computed tomography devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladikos, Alexander; Wein, Wolfgang

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel geometric calibration procedure for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) devices with arbitrary geometry using a calibration phantom containing steel beads. In contrast to typical calibration procedures the position of the beads does not have to be known precisely as it is also recovered during calibration. In addition, the arrangement of the beads inside the phantom is very flexible and does not have to follow hard constraints. The bead centers are extracted with subpixel precision from the projection images while taking the absorption properties of the calibration phantom into account. Based on the recovered center positions and phantom geometry, the projection geometry is computed for every projection image. This geometry can be arbitrary and does not have to lie on a specific path, e.g. a circle. This allows to calibrate devices with reproducible mechanical errors in the gantry movement. We present an evaluation of the point extraction and the calibration procedure on ground-truth data and show reconstruction results on a device calibrated using the proposed calibration method.

  13. Measurement of inter and intra fraction organ motion in radiotherapy using cone beam CT projection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, T. E.; Amer, A. M.; Moore, C. J.

    2008-02-01

    A method is presented for extraction of intra and inter fraction motion of seeds/markers within the patient from cone beam CT (CBCT) projection images. The position of the marker is determined on each projection image and fitted to a function describing the projection of a fixed point onto the imaging panel at different gantry angles. The fitted parameters provide the mean marker position with respect to the isocentre. Differences between the theoretical function and the actual projected marker positions are used to estimate the range of intra fraction motion and the principal motion axis in the transverse plane. The method was validated using CBCT projection images of a static marker at known locations and of a marker moving with known amplitude. The mean difference between actual and measured motion range was less than 1 mm in all directions, although errors of up to 5 mm were observed when large amplitude motion was present in an orthogonal direction. In these cases it was possible to calculate the range of motion magnitudes consistent with the observed marker trajectory. The method was shown to be feasible using clinical CBCT projections of a pancreas cancer patient.

  14. Scatter correction for cone-beam computed tomography using moving blocker strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Mao, Weihua; Solberg, Timothy

    2011-03-01

    One well-recognized challenge of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the presence of scatter contamination within the projection images. Scatter degrades the CBCT image quality by decreasing the contrast, introducing shading artifacts and leading to inaccuracies in the reconstructed CT number. We propose a blocker-based approach to simultaneously estimate scatter signal and reconstruct the complete volume within the field of view (FOV) from a single CBCT scan. A physical strip attenuator (i.e., "blocker"), consists of lead strips, is inserted between the x-ray source and the patient. The blocker moves back and forth along z-axis during the gantry rotation. The two-dimensional (2D) scatter fluence is estimated by interpolating the signal from the blocked regions. A modified Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm and an iterative reconstruction based on the constraint optimization are used to reconstruct CBCT images from un-blocked projection data after the scatter signal is subtracted. An experimental study is performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed scatter correction scheme. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced in CBCT using the proposed strategy. In the experimental study using a CatPhan©600 phantom, CT number errors in the selected regions of interest are reduced from 256 to less than 20. The proposed method allows us to simultaneously estimate the scatter signal in projection data, reduce the imaging dose and obtain complete volumetric information within the FOV.

  15. A local and iterative neural reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Ignazio

    2010-04-01

    This work presents a new neural algorithm designed for the reconstruction of tomographic images from Cone Beam data. The main objective of this work is the search of a new reconstruction method, able to work locally, more robust in presence of noisy data and in situations with a small number of projections. This study should be intended as the first step to evaluate the potentialities of the proposed algorithm. The algorithm is iterative and based on a set of neural networks that are working locally and sequentially. All the x-rays passing through a cell of the volume to be reconstructed, give origin to a neural network which is a single-layer perceptron network. The network does not need a training set but uses the line integral of a single x-ray as ground-truth of each output neuron. The neural network uses a gradient descent algorithm in order to minimize a local cost function by varying the value of the cells to be reconstructed. The proposed strategy was first evaluated in conditions where the quality and quantity of input data varies widely, using a the Shepp-Logan Phantom. The algorithm was also compared with the iterative ART algorithm and the well known filtered backprojection method. The results show how the proposed algorithm is much more accurate even in the presence of noise and under conditions of lack of data. In situations with little noise the reconstruction, after a few iterations, is almost identical to the original.

  16. Multiscale registration of planning CT and daily cone beam CT images for adaptive radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paquin, Dana; Levy, Doron; Xing Lei

    2009-01-15

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is the incorporation of daily images in the radiotherapy treatment process so that the treatment plan can be evaluated and modified to maximize the amount of radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to healthy tissue. Registration of planning images with daily images is thus an important component of ART. In this article, the authors report their research on multiscale registration of planning computed tomography (CT) images with daily cone beam CT (CBCT) images. The multiscale algorithm is based on the hierarchical multiscale image decomposition of E. Tadmor, S. Nezzar, and L. Vese [Multiscale Model. Simul. 2(4), pp. 554-579 (2004)]. Registration is achieved by decomposing the images to be registered into a series of scales using the (BV, L{sup 2}) decomposition and initially registering the coarsest scales of the image using a landmark-based registration algorithm. The resulting transformation is then used as a starting point to deformably register the next coarse scales with one another. This procedure is iterated at each stage using the transformation computed by the previous scale registration as the starting point for the current registration. The authors present the results of studies of rectum, head-neck, and prostate CT-CBCT registration, and validate their registration method quantitatively using synthetic results in which the exact transformations our known, and qualitatively using clinical deformations in which the exact results are not known.

  17. Configuration of the inferior alveolar canal as detected by cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Umadevi P; Yazdi, Mehran H; Nayar, Gautam M; Parry, Heath; Katkar, Rujuta A; Nair, Madhu K

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the course of the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) including its frequently seen variations in relation to root apices and the cortices of the mandible at fixed pre-determined anatomic reference points using cone beam volumetric computed tomography (CBVCT). Material and Methods: This retrospective study utilized CBVCT images from 44 patients to obtain quantifiable data to localize the IAC. Measurements to the IAC were made from the buccal and lingual cortical plates (BCP/LCP), inferior border of the mandible and the root apices of the mandibular posterior teeth and canine. Descriptive analysis was used to map out the course of the IAC. Results: IACs were noted to course superiorly toward the root apices from the second molar to the first premolar and closer to the buccal cortical plate anteriorly. The canal was closest to the LCP at the level of the second molar. In 32.95% of the cases, the canal was seen at the level of the canine. Conclusions: This study indicates that caution needs to be exercised during endodontic surgical procedures in the mandible even at the level of the canine. CBVCT seems to provide an optimal, low-dose, 3D imaging modality to help address the complexities in canal configuration. PMID:24347885

  18. Descriptive study of the bifid mandibular canals and retromolar foramina: cone beam CT vs panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Muinelo-Lorenzo, J; Suárez-Quintanilla, J A; Fernández-Alonso, A; Marsillas-Rascado, S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the presence and morphologic characteristics of bifid mandibular canals (BMCs) and retromolar foramens (RFs) using cone beam CT (CBCT) and to determine their visualization on panoramic radiographs (PANs). Methods: A sample of 225 CBCT examinations was analysed for the presence of BMCs, as well as length, height, diameter and angle. The diameter of the RF was also determined. Subsequently, corresponding PANs were analysed to determine whether the BMCs and RFs were visible or not. Results: The BMCs were observed on CBCT in 83 out of the 225 patients (36.8%). With respect to gender, statistically significant differences were found in the number of BMCs. There were also significant differences in anatomical characteristics of the types of BMCs. Only 37.8% of the BMCs and 32.5% of the RFs identified on CBCT were also visible on PANs. The diameter had a significant effect on the capability of PANs to visualize BMCs and RFs (B = 0.791, p = 0.035; B = 1.900, p = 0.017, respectively). Conclusions: PANs are unable to sufficiently identify BMCs and RFs. The diameter of these anatomical landmarks represents a relevant factor for visualization on PANs. Pre-operative images using only PANs may lead to underestimation of the presence of BMCs and to surgical complications and anaesthetic failures, which could have been avoided. For true determination of BMCs, a CBCT device should be considered better than a PAN. PMID:24785820

  19. Deriving Hounsfield units using grey levels in cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mah, P; Reeves, T E; McDavid, W D

    2010-01-01

    Objectives An in vitro study was performed to investigate the relationship between grey levels in dental cone beam CT (CBCT) and Hounsfield units (HU) in CBCT scanners. Methods A phantom containing 8 different materials of known composition and density was imaged with 11 different dental CBCT scanners and 2 medical CT scanners. The phantom was scanned under three conditions: phantom alone and phantom in a small and large water container. The reconstructed data were exported as Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) and analysed with On Demand 3D® by Cybermed, Seoul, Korea. The relationship between grey levels and linear attenuation coefficients was investigated. Results It was demonstrated that a linear relationship between the grey levels and the attenuation coefficients of each of the materials exists at some “effective” energy. From the linear regression equation of the reference materials, attenuation coefficients were obtained for each of the materials and CT numbers in HU were derived using the standard equation. Conclusions HU can be derived from the grey levels in dental CBCT scanners using linear attenuation coefficients as an intermediate step. PMID:20729181

  20. Bilateral and pseudobilateral tonsilloliths: Three dimensional imaging with cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mısırlıoglu, Melda; Nalcaci, Rana; Yardımcı, Selmi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Tonsilloliths are calcifications found in the crypts of the palatal tonsils and can be detected on routine panoramic examinations. This study was performed to highlight the benefits of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of tonsilloliths appearing bilaterally on panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods The sample group consisted of 7 patients who had bilateral radiopaque lesions at the area of the ascending ramus on panoramic radiographs. CBCT images for every patient were obtained from both sides of the jaw to determine the exact locations of the lesions and to rule out other calcifications. The calcifications were evaluated on the CBCT images using Ez3D2009 software. Additionally, the obtained images in DICOM format were transferred to ITK SNAP 2.4.0 pc software for semiautomatic segmentation. Segmentation was performed using contrast differences between the soft tissues and calcifications on grayscale images, and the volume in mm3 of the segmented three dimensional models were obtained. Results CBCT scans revealed that what appeared on panoramic radiographs as bilateral images were in fact unilateral lesions in 2 cases. The total volume of the calcifications ranged from 7.92 to 302.5mm3. The patients with bilaterally multiple and large calcifications were found to be symptomatic. Conclusion The cases provided the evidence that tonsilloliths should be considered in the differential diagnosis of radiopaque masses involving the mandibular ramus, and they highlight the need for a CBCT scan to differentiate pseudo- or ghost images from true bilateral pathologies. PMID:24083209

  1. Assessment of Mandibular Distraction Regenerate Using Ultrasonography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Dabas, Jitender; Mohanty, Sujata; Chaudhary, Zainab; Rani, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is becoming a popular method of reconstruction for maxillofacial bony deformities or defects secondary to trauma or surgical tumor ablation. However, the technique is very sensitive in terms of the rate and rhythm of distraction. Because of this, there is a need for monitoring of the distraction regenerate during the distraction as well as the consolidation period. The present study was conducted to assess the regenerate using two imaging modalities, namely, ultrasonography (USG) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to determine their relative efficacies and to weigh their clinical usefulness in assessment of DO regenerate. The study was conducted on 12 patients (18 sites) who underwent mandibular distraction for correction of facial deformities. The results showed that overall USG correlated better with the condition of regenerate (r = 0.606) as compared with CBCT (r = 0.476). However, USG was less effective as compared with CBCT in assessing the regenerate once corticomedullary differentiation occurred in the bone. PMID:26889351

  2. Cone-beam computed tomography as a surgical guide to impacted anterior teeth

    PubMed Central

    Jeremias, Fabiano; Fragelli, Camila Maria Bullio; Mastrantonio, Simone Di Salvo; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes; dos Santos-Pinto, Ary; Pansani, Cyneu Aguiar

    2016-01-01

    Surgical procedure for removal of impacted teeth is a challenge for clinicians as it involves accuracy in the diagnosis and localization of the dental elements. The cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), compared to the conventional radiography, has a greater potential to provide complementary information because of its three-dimensional (3D) images, reducing the possibility of failures in surgical procedures. Two 10-year-old boys presented with aesthetic issues associated with the juxtaposition of ectopic teeth with the permanent ones. Both two-dimensional and 3D preoperative radiographic diagnostic sets were produced. The occlusal and panoramic radiographs were not enough for proper localization of impacted incisors. Thus, the CBCT was used as a surgical guide. After 2 years of longitudinal following, no lesion was recorded, and the orthodontic treatment has proven successful. In all cases, CBCT contributed to both diagnosis and correct localization of supernumerary teeth, aiding the professional in the treatment planning, and consequently in the clinical success. The surgeries were completely safe, avoiding damage in noble structures, and providing a better recovering of the patients. PMID:26962322

  3. Digital replacement of the distorted dentition acquired by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nairn, N J; Ayoub, A F; Barbenel, J; Moos, K; Naudi, K; Ju, X; Khambay, B S

    2013-11-01

    During cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning, intra-oral metallic objects may produce streak artefacts, which impair the occlusal surface of the teeth. This study aimed to determine the accuracy of replacement of the CBCT dentition with a more accurate dentition and to determine the clinical feasibility of the method. Impressions of the teeth of six cadaveric skulls with unrestored dentitions were taken and acrylic base plates constructed incorporating radiopaque registration markers. Each appliance was fitted to the skull and a CBCT performed. Impressions were taken of the dentition with the devices in situ and dental models were produced. These were CBCT-scanned and the images of the skulls and models imported into computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software and aligned on the registration markers. The occlusal surfaces of each dentition were then replaced with the occlusal image of the corresponding model. The absolute mean distance between the registration markers in the skulls and the dental models was 0.09±0.02mm, and for the dentition was 0.24±0.09mm. When the method was applied to patients, the distance between markers was 0.12±0.04mm for the maxilla and 0.16±0.02mm for the mandible. It is possible to replace the inaccurate dentition on a CBCT scan using this method and to create a composite skull which is clinically acceptable.

  4. Quantitative Assessment of Cervical Vertebral Maturation Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Korean Girls

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Bo-Ram; Kim, Yong-Il; Maki, Koutaro; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6–18 years of age). CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) was used to demarcate the odontoid process and the body of the second cervical vertebra, based on the dentocentral synchondrosis. Correlation coefficient analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were used for each parameter of the cervical vertebrae (P < 0.05). Forty-seven of 64 parameters from CBCT-generated CVM (independent variables) exhibited statistically significant correlations (P < 0.05). The multiple regression model with the greatest R2 had six parameters (PH2/W2, UW2/W2, (OH+AH2)/LW2, UW3/LW3, D3, and H4/W4) as independent variables with a variance inflation factor (VIF) of <2. CBCT-generated CVM was able to include parameters from the second cervical vertebral body and odontoid process, respectively, for the multiple regression models. This suggests that quantitative analysis might be used to estimate skeletal maturation status. PMID:25878721

  5. Accuracy of digital periapical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography in detecting external root resorption

    PubMed Central

    Geha, Hassem; Sankar, Vidya; Teixeira, Fabricio B.; McMahan, Clyde Alex; Noujeim, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital intraoral radiography in diagnosing simulated small external root resorption cavities. Materials and Methods Cavities were drilled in 159 roots using a small spherical bur at different root levels and on all surfaces. The teeth were imaged both with intraoral digital radiography using image plates and with CBCT. Two sets of intraoral images were acquired per tooth: orthogonal (PA) which was the conventional periapical radiograph and mesioangulated (SET). Four readers were asked to rate their confidence level in detecting and locating the lesions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the accuracy of each modality in detecting the presence of lesions, the affected surface, and the affected level. Analysis of variation was used to compare the results and kappa analysis was used to evaluate interobserver agreement. Results A significant difference in the area under the ROC curves was found among the three modalities (P=0.0002), with CBCT (0.81) having a significantly higher value than PA (0.71) or SET (0.71). PA was slightly more accurate than SET, but the difference was not statistically significant. CBCT was also superior in locating the affected surface and level. Conclusion CBCT has already proven its superiority in detecting multiple dental conditions, and this study shows it to likewise be superior in detecting and locating incipient external root resorption. PMID:26389057

  6. Three-dimensional analysis of deciduous maxillary anterior teeth using cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jung, M-S; Lee, S-P; Kim, G-T; Choi, S-C; Park, J-H; Kim, J-W

    2012-03-01

    The recent introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) into the medical field has allowed the nondestructive investigation of internal structures at relatively low cost and radiation exposure. The accuracy of CBCT in both two and three dimensions has been demonstrated, and CBCT has been used successfully for craniofacial anatomy. Knowing the anatomical structure of deciduous teeth is essential for clinical dentistry. However, the root structure of deciduous teeth is rarely reported because of the scarcity of intact deciduous teeth without root resorption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the intact root form of deciduous teeth using CBCT. Data from 38 young children was analyzed using an image-analyzing program. The degree of buccal dilacerations was 26.3° for deciduous maxillary central incisors (DMA), 16.5° for deciduous maxillary lateral incisors (DMB), and 17.5° for deciduous maxillary canines (DMC) in about half of the root length. The crown-to-root ratios were 0.52 for DMA, 0.48 for DMB, and 0.52 for DMC. These data will be helpful for understanding the development of dentition, and for clinical dentistry.

  7. Three-dimensional maxillary and mandibular regional superimposition using cone beam computed tomography: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Koerich, L; Burns, D; Weissheimer, A; Claus, J D P

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to validate a novel method for fast regional superimposition of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The method can be used with smaller field of view scans, thereby allowing for a lower radiation dose. This retrospective study used two dry skulls and secondary data from 15 patients who had more than one scan taken using the same machine. Two observers tested two types of regional voxel-based superimposition: maxillary and mandibular. The registration took 10-15s. Three-dimensional surface models of the maxillas and mandibles were generated via standardized threshold segmentation, and the accuracy and reproducibility of the superimpositions were assessed using the iterative closest point technique to measure the root mean square (RMS) distance between the images. Five areas were measured and a RMS≤0.25 was considered successful. Descriptive statistics and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to compare the intra-observer measurement reproducibility. The ICC was ≥0.980 for all of the variables and the highest RMS found was 0.241. The inter-observer reproducibility was assessed case by case and was perfect (RMS 0) for 68% (23 out of 34) of the superimpositions done and not clinically significant (RMS≤0.25) for the other 32%. The method is fast, accurate, and reproducible and is an alternative to cranial base superimposition.

  8. Evaluation of the validity of the Bolton Index using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    PubMed Central

    Llamas, José M.; Cibrián, Rosa; Gandía, José L.; Paredes, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the reliability and reproducibility of calculating the Bolton Index using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and to compare this with measurements obtained using the 2D Digital Method. Material and Methods: Traditional study models were obtained from 50 patients, which were then digitized in order to be able to measure them using the Digital Method. Likewise, CBCTs of those same patients were undertaken using the Dental Picasso Master 3D® and the images obtained were then analysed using the InVivoDental programme. Results: By determining the regression lines for both measurement methods, as well as the difference between both of their values, the two methods are shown to be comparable, despite the fact that the measurements analysed presented statistically significant differences. Conclusions: The three-dimensional models obtained from the CBCT are as accurate and reproducible as the digital models obtained from the plaster study casts for calculating the Bolton Index. The differences existing between both methods were clinically acceptable. Key words:Tooth-size, digital models, bolton index, CBCT. PMID:22549690

  9. Accuracy and reliability of linear measurements using tangential projection and cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Dakhil-Alian, Mansour; Bahreinian, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing a cross-sectional image is essential for preimplant assessments. Computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) images are very expensive and provide high radiation dose. Tangential projection is a very simple, available, and low-dose technique that can be used in the anterior portion of mandible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of tangential projection in preimplant measurements in comparison to CBCT. Materials and Methods: Three dry edentulous human mandibles were examined in five points at intercanine region using tangential projection and CBCT. The height and width of the ridge were measured twice by two observers. The mandibles were then cut, and real measurements were obtained. The agreement between real measures and measurements obtained by either technique, and inter- and intra-observer reliability were tested. Results: The measurement error was less than 0.12 for tangential technique and 0.06 for CBCT. The agreement between the real measures and measurements from radiographs were higher than 0.87. Tangential projection slightly overestimated the distances, while there was a slight underestimation in CBCT results. Conclusion: Considering the low cost, low radiation dose, simplicity and availability, tangenital projection would be adequate for preimplant assessment in edentulous patients when limited numbers of implants are required in the anterior mandible. PMID:26005469

  10. Method of visualisation influences accuracy of measurements in cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Patcas, Raphael; Angst, Christine; Kellenberger, Christian J; Schätzle, Marc A; Ullrich, Oliver; Markic, Goran

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the potential impact of different visualisation methods of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on the accuracy of linear measurements of calcified structures, and assessed their interchangeability. High resolution (0.125 mm voxel) CBCT scans were obtained from eight cadaveric heads. The distance between the alveolar bone ridge and the incisal edge was determined for all mandibular incisors and canines, both anatomically and with measurements based on the following five CBCT visualisation methods: isosurface, direct volume rendering, multiplanar reformatting (MPR), maximum intensity projection of the volume of interest (VOIMIP), and average intensity projection of the volume of interest (VOIAvIP). All radiological methods were tested for repeatability and compared with anatomical results for accuracy, and limits of agreement were established. Interchangeability was evaluated by reviewing disparities between the methods and disclosing deterministic differences. Fine intra- and inter-observer repeatability was asserted for all visualisation methods (intraclass correlation coefficient ≤0.81). Measurements were most accurate when performed on MPR images and performed most disappointingly on isosurface-based images. Direct volume rendering, VOIMIP and VOIAvIP achieved acceptable results. It can be concluded that visualisation methods influence the accuracy of CBCT measurements. The isosurface viewing method is not recommended, and multiplanar reformatted images should be favoured for linear measurements of calcified structures.

  11. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Periapical Radiography in Internal Root Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Zahrasadat; Moudi, Ehsan; Bijani, Ali; Mahmoudi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and periapical (PA) radiography in detecting internal root resorption. Methods and Materials: Eighty single rooted human teeth with visible pulps in PA radiography were split mesiodistally along the coronal plane. Internal resorption like lesions were created in three areas (cervical, middle and apical) in labial wall of the canals in different diameters. PA radiography and CBCT images were taken from each tooth. Two observers examined the radiographs and CBCT images to evaluate the presence of resorption cavities. The data were statistically analyzed and degree of agreement was calculated using Cohen’s kappa (k) values. Results: The mean±SD of agreement coefficient of kappa between the two observers of the CBCT images was calculated to be 0.681±0.047. The coefficients for the direct, mesial and distal PA radiography were 0.405±0.059, 0.421±0.060 and 0.432±0.056, respectively (P=0.001). The differences in the diagnostic accuracy of resorption of different sizes were statistically significant (P<0.05); however, the PA radiography and CBCT, had no statistically significant differences in detection of internal resorption lesions in the cervical, middle and apical regions. Conclusion: Though, CBCT has a higher sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value in comparison with conventional radiography, this difference was not significant. PMID:26843878

  12. Performance of cone-beam CT using a flat-panel imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masahiro; Tsunoo, Takanori; Satoh, Kazumasa; Matsusita, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Masahiro; Fukuda, Yasushi

    2001-06-01

    An active matrix flat-panel imager (FPI) is a good candidate for the 2-dimensional detector of cone beam CT (CBCT), because it has a wider dynamic range and less geometrical distortion than video-fluoroscopic system so far employed. However the performance of FPI-based CBCT has not been sufficiently examined yet. The aim of this work is to examine the performance of CBCT using a FPI with several phantoms. An X-ray tube, a phantom and a FPI were aligned on an experimental table. The FPI was PaxScan2520 provided by Varian Medical Systems. It has an active area of approximately 180x240mm and the pixel size is 127 micrometer. CsI is used as a scintillator. The phantom was rotated with 1-degree steps while 360 projection frames (1408x1888 active pixels each frame) were collected. 2x2 pixels were combined into a single pixel to reduce noise. 512x512x512 voxels were reconstructed with the Feldkamp method. The comparison was made between reconstructed images with or without scatter rejecting grid. The uniformity and linearity of reconstruction value was drastically improved with the grid. Scatter rejection using a thin-vane collimator was also examined, and it showed more effective than the grid.

  13. Accuracy and precision of cone beam computed tomography in periodontal defects measurement (systematic review)

    PubMed Central

    Anter, Enas; Zayet, Mohammed Khalifa; El-Dessouky, Sahar Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Systematic review of literature was made to assess the extent of accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool for measurement of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect. A systematic search of PubMed electronic database and a hand search of open access journals (from 2000 to 2015) yielded abstracts that were potentially relevant. The original articles were then retrieved and their references were hand searched for possible missing articles. Only articles that met the selection criteria were included and criticized. The initial screening revealed 47 potentially relevant articles, of which only 14 have met the selection criteria; their CBCT average measurements error ranged from 0.19 mm to 1.27 mm; however, no valid meta-analysis could be made due to the high heterogeneity between the included studies. Under the limitation of the number and strength of the available studies, we concluded that CBCT provides an assessment of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect with a minimum reported mean measurements error of 0.19 ± 0.11 mm and a maximum reported mean measurements error of 1.27 ± 1.43 mm, and there is no agreement between the studies regarding the direction of the deviation whether over or underestimation. However, we should emphasize that the evidence to this data is not strong. PMID:27563194

  14. Comparison of Tissue Density in Hounsfield Units in Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Varshowsaz, Masoud; Goorang, Sepideh; Ehsani, Sara; Azizi, Zeynab; Rahimian, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bone quality and quantity assessment is one of the most important steps in implant treatment planning. Different methods such as computed tomography (CT) and recently suggested cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with lower radiation dose and less time and cost are used for bone density assessment. This in vitro study aimed to compare the tissue density values in Hounsfield units (HUs) in CBCT and CT scans of different tissue phantoms with two different thicknesses, two different image acquisition settings and in three locations in the phantoms. Materials and Methods: Four different tissue phantoms namely hard tissue, soft tissue, air and water were scanned by three different CBCT and a CT system in two thicknesses (full and half) and two image acquisition settings (high and low kVp and mA). The images were analyzed at three sites (middle, periphery and intermediate) using eFilm software. The difference in density values was analyzed by ANOVA and correction coefficient test (P<0.05). Results: There was a significant difference between density values in CBCT and CT scans in most situations, and CBCT values were not similar to CT values in any of the phantoms in different thicknesses and acquisition parameters or the three different sites. The correction coefficients confirmed the results. Conclusions: CBCT is not reliable for tissue density assessment. The results were not affected by changes in thickness, acquisition parameters or locations. PMID:27928239

  15. Imaging characteristics of distance-driven method in a prototype cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sunghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Lee, Haenghwa; Lee, Donghoon; Seo, Chang-Woo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has widely been used and studied in both medical imaging and radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate our newly developed CBCT system by implementing a distance-driven system modeling technique in order to produce excellent and accurate cross-sectional images. For the purpose of comparing the performance of the distance-driven methods, we also performed pixel-driven and ray-driven techniques when conducting forward- and back-projection schemes. We conducted the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) to retrieve a volumetric information of scanned chest phantom. The results indicated that contrast-to-noise (CNR) of the reconstructed images by using FDK and SART showed 8.02 and 15.78 for distance-driven, whereas 4.02 and 5.16 for pixel-driven scheme and 7.81 and 13.01 for ray-driven scheme, respectively. This could demonstrate that distance-driven method described more closely the chest phantom compared to pixel- and ray-driven. However, both elapsed time for modeling a system matrix and reconstruction time took longer time when performing the distance-driven scheme. Therefore, future works will be directed toward reducing computational time to acceptable limits for real applications.

  16. Evaluation of enamel pearls by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    PubMed Central

    Akgül, Nilgün; Caglayan, Fatma; Durna, Nurhan; Sümbüllü, Muhammed A.; Akgül, Hayati M.; Durna, Dogan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of enamel pearls according to population, sex and tooth groups on Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) or Dental Volumetric Tomography (DVT) scans of patients, retrospectively. Study Design: In this study, 15185 teeth belonging to 768 patients, 430 female and 338 male, was performed cross-sectional examination by CBCT. The volumetric Computed Tomography used in the study is Newton FP based on flat-panel. The data were analyzed with Pearson chi-squared test. Results: Enamel pearls were detected in 36 subjects (4.69%). Of these enamel pearls, 19 were detected in male and 17 were in male. There was no statistically a significant association between prevalence of enamel pearls and sex. All of enamel pearls were detected in molar teeth, for prevalence 0.83%. Conclusion: All of enamel pearls are found upper and lower molar teeth, especially the most commonly in maxillary second and third molars. Key words: Enamel pearls, ectopic mineralization, radiography, CBCT, DVT. PMID:22143707

  17. Management of Oehler's Type III Dens Invaginatus Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Jaya; Rangarajan Sundaresan, Mohan Kumar; Ramasamy, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Dens Invaginatus is a dental malformation that poses diagnostic difficulties in the clinical context. This anomaly may increase the risk of pulp disease and can potentially complicate endodontic procedure due to the aberrant root canal anatomy. Compared to conventional radiographs, three-dimensional images obtained with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) are invaluable in the diagnosis of the extent of this anomaly and in the appropriate treatment planning. Oehler's classification (1957) for Dens Invaginatus (DI) into three types depending on the depth of the invagination has been used for treatment planning. Of the three types Type III DI is characterized by infolding of the enamel into the tooth up to the root apex and is considered as the most severe variant of DI and hence the most challenging to treat endodontically, due to the morphological complexities. This report describes a case of Oehler's Type III DI in a necrotic permanent maxillary lateral incisor in which CBCT images played a key role in diagnosis and treatment planning. The case was managed successfully by a combination of nonsurgical and surgical endodontic therapy with orthograde and retrograde thermoplastic gutta percha obturation. PMID:27069697

  18. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, Adam K. E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W. E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Gladstone, David J.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). Methods: An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp–Davis–Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. Results: 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm{sup 3} volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%–99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. Conclusions: The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water.

  19. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Adam K.; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W.; Gladstone, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). Methods: An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp–Davis–Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. Results: 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm3 volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%–99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. Conclusions: The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water. PMID:26133613

  20. Conservative Treatment of an Invaginated Maxillary Lateral Incisor with a C-shaped Canal Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Forghani, Maryam; Moghim Farooji, Elaheh; Abuchenari, Javad; Bidar, Maryam; Eslami, Neda

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the non-surgical treatment of an invaginated maxillary lateral incisor with two fused roots. The mesial root had a C-shaped canal, while the distal one had a type III dens invagination. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to help with the diagnosis and treatment decision making. Clinical and radiographic follow-up revealed satisfactory periapical repair and absence of symptoms after 15 months. PMID:26576164

  1. 2D wavelet-analysis-based calibration technique for flat-panel imaging detectors: application in cone beam volume CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    1999-05-01

    The application of the newly developed flat panel x-ray imaging detector in cone beam volume CT has attracted increasing interest recently. Due to an imperfect solid state array manufacturing process, however, defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image unavoidably exist in all kinds of flat panel x-ray imaging detectors, which will cause severe streak and ring artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image and severely degrade image quality. A calibration technique, in which the artifacts resulting from the defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image can be reduced significantly, is presented in this paper. The detection of defective elements is distinctively based upon two-dimensional (2D) wavelet analysis. Because of its inherent localizability in recognizing singularities or discontinuities, wavelet analysis possesses the capability of detecting defective elements over a rather large x-ray exposure range, e.g., 20% to approximately 60% of the dynamic range of the detector used. Three-dimensional (3D) images of a low-contrast CT phantom have been reconstructed from projection images acquired by a flat panel x-ray imaging detector with and without calibration process applied. The artifacts caused individually by defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image have been separated and investigated in detail, and the correlation with each other have also been exposed explicitly. The investigation is enforced by quantitative analysis of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the image uniformity of the cone beam reconstruction image. It has been demonstrated that the ring and streak artifacts resulting from the imperfect performance of a flat panel x-ray imaging detector can be reduced dramatically, and then the image qualities of a cone beam reconstruction image, such as contrast resolution and image uniformity are improved significantly. Furthermore, with little modification, the calibration technique presented here is also applicable

  2. Management of synodontia between dilacerated permanent maxillary central incisor and supernumerary tooth with aid of cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Das, Suroopa; Warhadpande, Manjusha M.; Redij, Saurabh Anil; Sabir, Husain; Shirude, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    A malformed tooth characterized by one or more developmental disturbances is often difficult to treat. When such teeth are present in anterior region, they pose a technical challenge for the clinician to restore esthetics as well as function. This case describes endodontic, surgical, and restorative management of fused and dilacerated maxillary central incisor. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used in the present case to aid in understanding of complicated tooth morphology and managing the case successfully. PMID:25829699

  3. Issues for Bringing Electron Beam Irradiators On-Line

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Turman, B.N.

    1999-04-20

    Irradiation of red meat and poultry has been approved by the U.S. FDA, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's rule for processing red meat is out for comment. Looking beyond the current issues of packaging materials, labeling, and consumer acceptance, this paper reviews the next step of implementation and how to remove, or at least reduce, the barriers to utilization. Polls of the user community identified their requirements for electron beam or x-ray processing of meat or poultry and their concerns about implementation for on-line processing. These needs and issues are compared to the capabilities of the accelerator industry. The critical issues of beam utilization and dose uniformity, factors affecting floor space requirements, and treatment costs are examined.

  4. Evaluation of the potential of automatic segmentation of the mandibular canal using cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Nicolaas Lucius; Meijer, Gerrit Jacobus; Kroon, Dirk-Jan; Bronkhorst, Ewald Maria; Bergé, Stefaan Jozef; Maal, Thomas Jan Jaap

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of software for automatically tracing the mandibular canal on data from cone-beam computed tomography (CT). After the data had been collected from one dentate and one edentate fresh cadaver head, both a trained Active Shape Model (ASM) and an Active Appearance Model (AAM) were used to automatically segment the canals from the mandibular to the mental foramen. Semiautomatic segmentation was also evaluated by providing the models with manual annotations of the foramina. To find out if the tracings were in accordance with the actual anatomy, we compared the position of the automatic mandibular canal segmentations, as displayed on cross-sectional cone-beam CT views, with histological sections of exactly the same region. The significance of differences between results were analysed with the help of Fisher's exact test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. When tracings based on AAM and ASM were used, differences between cone-beam CT and histological measurements varied up to 3.45mm and 4.44mm, respectively. Manual marking of the mandibular and mental foramina did not improve the results, and there were no significant differences (p=0.097) among the methods. The accuracy of automatic segmentation of the mandibular canal by the AAM and ASM methods is inadequate for use in clinical practice.

  5. Assessment of the Airway Characteristics in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Marwah, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of our study is to use cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to assess the dimensional changes in the nasopharyngeal soft-tissue characteristics in children of Indian origin with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP) and to compare the results with patients with ideal occlusion. Materials and methods: A sample of 20 children (10 girls, 10 boys) with repaired CLP was selected. Cone beam computed tomography scans were taken to measure the nasopharyngeal airway changes in terms of linear measurements and sagittal cross-sectional areas. Error analysis was performed to prevent systematic or random errors. Independent means t-tests and Pearson correlation analysis were used to evaluate sex differences and the correlations among the variables. Results: Nasopharyngeal soft-tissue characteristics were different in the control and the study groups. Subjects with repaired CLP had lesser lower aerial width, lower adenoidal width and lower airway width. The upper airway width was also significantly lesser. The retropalatal and the total airway area were significantly greater in the control group. Conclusion: The narrow pharyngeal airway in patients with CLP might result in functional impairment of breathing in patients. Further investigations are necessary to clarify the relationship between pharyngeal structure and airway function in patients with CLP. How to cite this article: Agarwal A, Marwah N. Assessment of the Airway Characteristics in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate using Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):5-9. PMID:27274147

  6. Determination and verification of a 2D pencil-beam kernel for a radiosurgery system with cones

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas-Verdesoto, Milton Xavier; Álvarez-Romero, José Trinidad

    2013-07-01

    The quality and correctness of dosimetric data of small fields in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) depends significantly on the election of the detector employed in the measurements. This work provides an independent method of verification of these data through the determination of a polyenergetic 2-dimensional pencil-beam kernel for a BrainLAB SRS system with cones, employing the deconvolution/convolution of a reference experimental off-axis ratio (OAR) profile (cone diameter c{sub 0} = 35 mm). The kernel in real space k{sub c{sub 0}}(r,z{sub 0}) is convolved with the ideal fluence Φ for the cones 7.5 to 35 mm in diameter to obtain the OAR profiles, and the total scatter factors, S{sub t}, which are compared with experimental values of the same quantities. The experimental OARs and S{sub t} factors are measured in water with a PTW 60003 diamond detector. Additionally, the reference OAR is corrected for beam divergence and spectral fluence fluctuations defining a function of boundary correction factors (BF). The BF and Φ functions are transformed to the conjugate space with the zeroth-order Hankel transform, appropriated to the radial symmetry of the cones. Therefore, the kernel in real space k{sub c{sub 0}}(r,z{sub 0}) is the inverse Hankel transform of the ratio of the Hankel transforms of BF and Φ. Finally, an uncertainty analysis according to the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement is carried out for 3 different values of k{sub c{sub 0}}(r,z{sub 0}). Calculated and measured OARs agree within the dose/distance-to-agreement criteria of 2%/0.12 mm; while, S{sub t} factors agree within 2%. This procedure supplies an independent method to validate the dosimetric data necessary to feed treatment planning systems for SRS with cones.

  7. High-quality 3D correction of ring and radiant artifacts in flat panel detector-based cone beam volume CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Md Kamrul

    2011-10-07

    The use of an x-ray flat panel detector is increasingly becoming popular in 3D cone beam volume CT machines. Due to the deficient semiconductor array manufacturing process, the cone beam projection data are often corrupted by different types of abnormalities, which cause severe ring and radiant artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image, and as a result, the diagnostic image quality is degraded. In this paper, a novel technique is presented for the correction of error in the 2D cone beam projections due to abnormalities often observed in 2D x-ray flat panel detectors. Template images are derived from the responses of the detector pixels using their statistical properties and then an effective non-causal derivative-based detection algorithm in 2D space is presented for the detection of defective and mis-calibrated detector elements separately. An image inpainting-based 3D correction scheme is proposed for the estimation of responses of defective detector elements, and the responses of the mis-calibrated detector elements are corrected using the normalization technique. For real-time implementation, a simplification of the proposed off-line method is also suggested. Finally, the proposed algorithms are tested using different real cone beam volume CT images and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively remove ring and radiant artifacts from cone beam volume CT images compared to other reported techniques in the literature.

  8. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30-50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening. The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ~4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT. Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ~3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ~7 to 49.7 HU, in good agreement

  9. Dose measurements for dental cone-beam CT: a comparison with MSCT and panoramic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deman, P.; Atwal, P.; Duzenli, C.; Thakur, Y.; Ford, N. L.

    2014-06-01

    To date there is a lack of published information on appropriate methods to determine patient doses from dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) equipment. The goal of this study is to apply and extend the methods recommended in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report 111 for CBCT equipment to characterize dose and effective dose for a range of dental imaging equipment. A protocol derived from the one proposed by Dixon et al (2010 Technical Report 111, American Association of Physicist in Medicine, MD, USA), was applied to dose measurements of multi-slice CT, dental CBCT (small and large fields of view (FOV)) and a dental panoramic system. The computed tomography dose index protocol was also performed on the MSCT to compare both methods. The dose distributions in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom were characterized using a thimble ionization chamber and Gafchromic™ film (beam profiles). Gafchromic™ films were used to measure the dose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom. A method was proposed to extend dose estimates to planes superior and inferior to the central plane. The dose normalized to 100 mAs measured in the center of the phantom for the large FOV dental CBCT (11.4 mGy/100 mAs) is two times lower than that of MSCT (20.7 mGy/100 mAs) for the same FOV, but approximately 15 times higher than for a panoramic system (0.6 mGy/100 mAs). The effective dose per scan (in clinical conditions) found for the dental CBCT are 167.60 ± 3.62, 61.30 ± 3.88 and 92.86 ± 7.76 mSv for the Kodak 9000 (fixed scan length of 3.7 cm), and the iCAT Next Generation for 6 cm and 13 cm scan lengths respectively. The method to extend the dose estimates from the central slice to superior and inferior slices indicates a good agreement between theory and measurement. The Gafchromic™ films provided useful beam profile data and 2D distributions of dose in phantom.

  10. Beam hardening artifacts by dental implants: Comparison of cone-beam and 64-slice computed tomography scanners

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, Farzad; Johari, Masume; Haddadi, Pezhman

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an alternative to a computed tomography (CT) scan, which is appropriate for a wide range of craniomaxillofacial indications. The long-term use of metallic materials in dentistry means that artifacts caused by metallic restorations in the oral cavity should be taken into account when utilizing CBCT and CT scanners. The aim of this study was to quantitatively compare the beam hardening artifacts produced by dental implants between CBCT and a 64-Slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, an implant drilling model similar to the human mandible was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis) were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Three series of scans were provided from the implant areas using Somatom Sensation 64-slice and NewTom VGi (CBCT) CT scanners. Identical images were evaluated by three radiologists. The artifacts in each image were determined based on pre-determined criteria. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare mean values; Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons when there was a statistical significance (P < 0.05). Results: The images of the two scanners had similar resolutions in axial sections (P = 0.299). In coronal sections, there were significant differences in the resolutions of the images produced by the two scanners (P < 0.001), with a higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner. On the whole, there were significant differences between the resolutions of the images produced by the two CT scanners (P < 0.001), with higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner in comparison to those of Somatom Sensation. Conclusion: Given the high quality of the images produced by NewTom VGi and the lower costs in comparison to CT, the use of the images of this scanner in dental procedures is recommended, especially in patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses and previous implants. PMID:24019808

  11. Task-based modeling and optimization of a cone-beam CT scanner for musculoskeletal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, P.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G. J.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This work applies a cascaded systems model for cone-beam CT imaging performance to the design and optimization of a system for musculoskeletal extremity imaging. The model provides a quantitative guide to the selection of system geometry, source and detector components, acquisition techniques, and reconstruction parameters. Methods: The model is based on cascaded systems analysis of the 3D noise-power spectrum (NPS) and noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) combined with factors of system geometry (magnification, focal spot size, and scatter-to-primary ratio) and anatomical background clutter. The model was extended to task-based analysis of detectability index (d') for tasks ranging in contrast and frequency content, and d' was computed as a function of system magnification, detector pixel size, focal spot size, kVp, dose, electronic noise, voxel size, and reconstruction filter to examine trade-offs and optima among such factors in multivariate analysis. The model was tested quantitatively versus the measured NPS and qualitatively in cadaver images as a function of kVp, dose, pixel size, and reconstruction filter under conditions corresponding to the proposed scanner. Results: The analysis quantified trade-offs among factors of spatial resolution, noise, and dose. System magnification (M) was a critical design parameter with strong effect on spatial resolution, dose, and x-ray scatter, and a fairly robust optimum was identified at M {approx} 1.3 for the imaging tasks considered. The results suggested kVp selection in the range of {approx}65-90 kVp, the lower end (65 kVp) maximizing subject contrast and the upper end maximizing NEQ (90 kVp). The analysis quantified fairly intuitive results--e.g., {approx}0.1-0.2 mm pixel size (and a sharp reconstruction filter) optimal for high-frequency tasks (bone detail) compared to {approx}0.4 mm pixel size (and a smooth reconstruction filter) for low-frequency (soft-tissue) tasks. This result suggests a specific protocol for

  12. TU-EF-207-05: Dedicated Cone-beam Breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantham, S.

    2015-06-15

    mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  13. Relationship of the Gonial Angle and Inferior Alveolar Canal Course Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Anbiaee, Najmeh; Bagherpour, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Accurate localization of the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) is extremely important in some dental treatments. Anatomical variation of the canal means that it can be difficult to locate. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of the gonial angle (GA) size and IAC position using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 61 dry adult human hemi-mandibles were used. The CBCT scans were taken of all samples and GA was measured on all CBCT scans. The samples were divided into two groups of low angle (≤125°) and high angle (>125°). The canal dimensions, length and course were evaluated. On the sagittal view, the IAC path was classified as type A, B or C. On the axial view, canal course was defined as A1 or A2 according to the mental foramen angle. Results: The average GA size was 121.8±7.05° at the right side and 123.8±6.32° at the left side. On the sagittal view, there was a significant correlation between the GA size and the canal course (P=0.04). In the high-angle group, type A was dominant; whereas in the low-angle group, type B was more common. On the axial view of IAC course, type A1 was more common (73.43%). Conclusion: The results showed that GA size was associated with IAC course. In cases with a larger GA, the canal runs in a more straightforward path, and at the same level as the mental foramen. PMID:27252759

  14. Prevalence and location of the posterior superior alveolar artery using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tehranchi, Maryam; Shahab, Shahriar; Nouri, Arash

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Insufficient knowledge of the anatomy of the maxillary sinuses prior to sinus graft surgery may lead to perioperative or postoperative complications. This study sought to characterize the position of the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) within the maxillary sinuses using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods A total of 300 patients with edentulous posterior maxillae, including 138 females and 162 males with an age range of 33-86 years, who presented to a radiology clinic between 2013 and 2015 were enrolled in this retrospective cross-sectional study. The distance from the inferior border of the PSAA to the alveolar crest according to the residual ridge classification by Lekholm and Zarb, the distance from the PSAA to the nasal septum and zygomatic arch, and the diameter and position of the PSAA were all assessed on patients' CBCT scans. The data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test and the t-test. Results The PSAA was detected on the CBCT scans of 87% of the patients; it was located beneath the sinus membrane in 47% of cases and was intraosseous in 47% of cases. The diameter of the artery was between 1 and 2 mm in most patients (72%). The mean diameter of the artery was 1.29±0.39 mm, and the mean distances from the PSAA to the zygomatic arch, nasal septum, and alveolar crest were 22.59±4.89 mm, 26.51±3.52 mm, and 16.7±3.96 mm, respectively. Conclusion The likelihood of detecting the PSAA on CBCT scans is high; its location is intraosseous or beneath the sinus membrane in most patients. Determining the exact location of the PSAA on CBCT scans preoperatively can help prevent it from being damaged during surgery. PMID:28361028

  15. Classification of impacted mandibular third molars on cone-beam CT images

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Michele; Bazzocchi, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurological involvement is a serious complication associated to the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars and the radiological investigation is the first mandatory step to assess the risk of a possible post-operative injury to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). The aim of this study was to introduce a new radiological classification that could be normally used in clinical practice to assess the relationship between an impacted third molar and mandibular canal on cone beam CT (CBCT) images. Material and Methods CBCT images of 80 patients (133 mandibular third molars) were independently studied by three members of the surgical team to draw a classification that could describe all the possible relationships between third molar and IAN on the cross-sectional images. Subsequently, the study population was subdivided according to this classification. The SPSS software, version 15.0 (SPSS® Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used for the statistical analysis. Results Eight different classes were proposed (classes 0-7) and six of them (classes 1-6) were subdivided in two subtypes (subtypes A-B). The distribution of classes showed a prevalence of buccal or apical course of the mandibular canal followed by lingual position and inter-radicular one. No differences have resulted in terms of anatomic relationship between males and females apart from a higher risk of real contact without corticalization of the canal when the IAN had a lingual course for female group. Younger patients showed an increased rate of direct contact with a reduced calibre of the canal and/or without corticalization. Conclusions The use of this classification could be a valid support in clinical practice to obtain a common language among operators in order to define the possible relationships between an impacted third molar and the mandibular canal on CBCT images. Key words:CBCT, classification, inferior alveolar nerve, third molars. PMID:26155337

  16. Enhancement of four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography by compressed sensing with Bregman iteration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kihwan; Fahimian, Benjamin P; Li, Tianfang; Suh, Tae-Suk; Lei, Xing

    2013-01-01

    In four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), there is a spatio-temporal tradeoff that currently limits the accuracy. The aim of this study is to develop a Bregman iteration based formalism for high quality 4D CBCT image reconstruction from a limited number of low-dose projections. The 4D CBCT problem is first divided into multiple 3D CBCT subproblems by grouping the projection images corresponding to the phases. To maximally utilize the information from the under-sampled projection data, a compressed sensing (CS) method with Bregman iterations is employed for solving each subproblem. We formulate an unconstrained optimization problem based on least-square criterion regularized by total-variation. The least-square criterion reflects the inconsistency between the measured and the estimated line integrals. Furthermore, the unconstrained problem is updated and solved repeatedly by Bregman iterations. The performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated through a series of simulation studies and phantom experiments, and the results are compared to those of previously implemented compressed sensing technique using other gradient-based methods as well as conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) results. The simulation and experimental studies have shown that artifact suppressed images can be obtained with as small as 41 projections per phase, which is adequate for clinical 4D CBCT reconstruction. With such small number of projections, the conventional FDK failed to yield meaningful 4D CBCT images, and CS technique using conjugate gradient was not able to recover sharp edges. The proposed method significantly reduces the radiation dose and scanning time to achieve the high quality images compared to the 4D CBCT imaging based on the conventional FDK technique and the existing CS techniques.

  17. An image-based method to synchronize cone-beam CT and optical surface tracking.

    PubMed

    Fassi, Aurora; Schaerer, Joël; Riboldi, Marco; Sarrut, David; Baroni, Guido

    2015-03-08

    The integration of in-room X-ray imaging and optical surface tracking has gained increasing importance in the field of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). An essential step for this integration consists of temporally synchronizing the acquisition of X-ray projections and surface data. We present an image-based method for the synchronization of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and optical surface systems, which does not require the use of additional hardware. The method is based on optically tracking the motion of a component of the CBCT/gantry unit, which rotates during the acquisition of the CBCT scan. A calibration procedure was implemented to relate the position of the rotating component identified by the optical system with the time elapsed since the beginning of the CBCT scan, thus obtaining the temporal correspondence between the acquisition of X-ray projections and surface data. The accuracy of the proposed synchronization method was evaluated on a motorized moving phantom, performing eight simultaneous acquisitions with an Elekta Synergy CBCT machine and the AlignRT optical device. The median time difference between the sinusoidal peaks of phantom motion signals extracted from the synchronized CBCT and AlignRT systems ranged between -3.1 and 12.9 msec, with a maximum interquartile range of 14.4 msec. The method was also applied to clinical data acquired from seven lung cancer patients, demonstrating the potential of the proposed approach in estimating the individual and daily variations in respiratory parameters and motion correlation of internal and external structures. The presented synchronization method can be particularly useful for tumor tracking applications in extracranial radiation treatments, especially in the field of patient-specific breathing models, based on the correlation between internal tumor motion and external surface surrogates.

  18. Validity of ridge mapping and cone beam computed tomography in dental implant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Ruiz, Carmen Teresa; Noriega, Jorge; Guerrero, Maria Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the validity of alveolar ridge measurements obtained with ridge mapping (RM) technique against cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) measurements. Materials and Methods: Twenty partially edentulous patients were recruited for implant placement in the Clinic of San Martin de Porres University. For all the measurements, a vacuum-formed stent was fabricated for each subject. A buccal and lingual point was made in the stent to provide a reference of measurement for each implant site. RM measurements with the stent were obtained before and after surgical flap reflection. Two calibrated observers made the CBCT images measurements. T-test was used for the statistical analysis. Values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Also, specificity and sensibility of CBCT and RM were compared. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC)_ was measure between CBCT measurements. Results: A total of 62 implants sites were evaluated. No statistical significant differences were obtained with CBCT and RM measurements (P = 0,207). Detecting proper buccal-lingual ridge, the sensitivity and specificity were 59% and 91% for RM while CBCT obtained 92% of sensitivity and 94% of specificity. Concordance was found “good” (ICC 0.82). Conclusion: Both methods provide valid measurements. Even though, we found diagnostic limitations in the RM, it demonstrated to be a useful method for its exactitude, low cost, the immediate result and no need of radiation. CBCT was recommended when the bone ridge width and height were in the less than ideal for conventional dental implant placement. PMID:26229269

  19. Length and anatomic routes of the greater palatine canal as observed by cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Zamaninaser, Asieh; Jalalian, Faranak

    2013-01-01

    Background: Greater palatine canal is used for maxillary nerve block. This procedure has some complications such as proptosis, blindness, and intravascular injection. This study aimed to determine the mean greater palatine canal length (CL) and its typical anatomic routes, as well as provide a reliable facial index for computing the CL by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data. Materials and Methods: A total of 138 CBCT scans (65 females and 73 males) were evaluated. The path of the canal and the CL were determined by sex, age, and side. The mean distance from the inferior border of the infraorbital foramen (IOF) to the crest of alveolar bone between maxillary premolar(CMP) was measured and compared with the CL. Paired t-tests, independent t-test, and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean of CL was 31.82 ± 1.37 mm (31.70 ± 2.44 mm on the right side and 31.94 ± 2.40 mm on the left side), and the values were 32.49 ± 2.37 mm in males and 30.55 ± 1.76 mm among females (P = 0.001). The mean distance from the IOF to the CMP was 32.01 ± 2.18 mm, which was not significantly different to the CL (P = 0.336). Conclusions: The mean CL was significantly different according to sex and side. The mean distance from the IOF to CMP was significantly different according to sex. On comparing the mean distance from the IOF to the CMP with the CL, no significant difference was observed. Therefore, the mean distance from the IOF to CMP may be a reliable clinical index. PMID:23946729

  20. Evaluation of the Posterior Superior Alveolar Artery Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pandharbale, Atul A.; Gadgil, Rajeev M.; Bhoosreddy, Ajay R.; Kunte, Varun R.; Ahire, Bhushan S.; Shinde, Manila R.; Joshi, Sidharth S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Maxillary posterior tooth region is an important area with respect to periapical surgery, implant placement, and sinus lifts. Posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) is located on the lateral wall of maxillary sinus and may become injured during such surgical procedures. Therefore, knowledge of the subject is essential to a clinician. The goal was to determine the anatomical relationship of posterior superior alveolar artery to the floor of maxillary sinus and alveolar crest. In our study we attempted to present the locations and course of posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Material/Methods CBCT scans of 50 patients (30 males, 20 females) who had undergone computed tomography imaging were analyzed. We assessed the visibility and location of vascular canal/notch of posterior superior alveolar artery on cross sectional images and measured the distances from lower margin to the floor of maxillary sinus and alveolar crest in the 1st molar and 2nd molar regions. Unpaired t-test was carried out in the analysis to determine the level of significance. Results Maxillary PSAA was visualized in 36 patients (70%). Mean diameter of the vessel was 0.63 mm. Mean distance between PSAA and alveolar crest was the shortest in the 2nd molar region. The mean distance between PSAA and floor of maxillary sinus was 9.96 mm. Conclusions Periapical surgeries, implants and maxillary sinus lift are performed on routine basis. PSAA is an important structure in the posterior maxillary region; the clinician should be aware of its location and course. CBCT is an excellent tool to localize the PSAA because of it provides finer details at low exposure and less radiation. It should be recommended in clinical practices. PMID:28058075

  1. Analysis of Prostate Bed Motion Using Daily Cone-Beam Computed Tomography During Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ost, Piet; De Meerleer, Gert; De Gersem, Werner; Impens, Aline; De Neve, Wilfried

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the interfraction total positioning error of the postoperative prostate bed and to quantify its components (bony misalignment [BM]and prostate bed motion [PBM]) using daily kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The role of an adaptive radiotherapy schedule (ART) was investigated. Methods and Materials: A total of 547 daily CBCT images from 15 consecutive patients who had been treated with prostate bed radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The positioning error was measured by rigid co-registration of the daily CBCT with pretreatment CT planning scan. The total positioning error was quantified by co-registration of the CBCT with the CT planning scan to match the anterior rectal wall. Automatic bony pelvis co-registration was performed to separate BM and PBM. The ART was determined by the average total positioning error from the first 5 CBCT images. Results: The systematic error for the total positioning error in the left-right, superoinferior, and anteroposterior direction was 2.69, 2.00, and 2.65 mm with a random error of 1.99, 1.49, and 2.25 mm, resulting in a planning target volume margin of 8, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. ART reduced the margin by 54%, 44%, and 40%, respectively. Systematic errors in the left-right, superoinferior, and anteroposterior direction for BM was 2.66, 1.83, and 2.60 mm and for PBM was 0.44, 0.92, and 2.50 mm with a random error of 1.88, 1.24, and 1.77 mm for BM and 0.99, 1.38, and 2.32 mm for PBM, respectively. Conclusion: Without treatment verifications, 6-8-mm planning target volume margins are required because of PBM and BM. The anteroposterior PBM was significant. An ART protocol can reduce these planning target volume margins.

  2. Reducing metal artifacts in cone-beam CT images by preprocessing projection data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yongbin; Zhang Lifei; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.; Chambers, Mark; Dong Lei . E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) streak artifacts caused by metallic implants remain a challenge for the automatic processing of image data. The impact of metal artifacts in the soft-tissue region is magnified in cone-beam CT (CBCT), because the soft-tissue contrast is usually lower in CBCT images. The goal of this study was to develop an effective offline processing technique to minimize the effect. Methods and Materials: The geometry calibration cue of the CBCT system was used to track the position of the metal object in projection views. The three-dimensional (3D) representation of the object can be established from only two user-selected viewing angles. The position of the shadowed region in other views can be tracked by projecting the 3D coordinates of the object. Automatic image segmentation was used followed by a Laplacian diffusion method to replace the pixels inside the metal object with the boundary pixels. The modified projection data were then used to reconstruct a new CBCT image. The procedure was tested in phantoms, prostate cancer patients with implanted gold markers and metal prosthesis, and a head-and-neck patient with dental amalgam in the teeth. Results: Both phantom and patient studies demonstrated that the procedure was able to minimize the metal artifacts. Soft-tissue visibility was improved near or away from the metal object. The processing time was 1-2 s per projection. Conclusion: We have implemented an effective metal artifact-suppressing algorithm to improve the quality of CBCT images.

  3. Radiopacity of alloplastic bone grafts measured with cone beam computed tomography: An analysis in rabbit calvaria

    PubMed Central

    Bucchi, Cristina; Borie, Eduardo; Arias, Alain; Dias, Fernando José; Fuentes, Ramón

    2017-01-01

    Availability of adequate bone structure for dental implants is still a problem in dentistry. Alloplastic grafts, which promote bone regeneration, are used as bone substitutes in orthopedic and oral surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of three different synthetic bone grafts in rabbit calvaria, over 3 months, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Four critical-size defects were made on the calvaria of 11 rabbits. The lesions were classified into three groups according to the alloplastic grafts they received: Osteon® 70/30, Osteon collagen®, and Osteon II® groups. The fourth group received blood clot, and served as a control. The bone samples were collected and analyzed with CBCT after the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd month. One month after surgery, the lesions that received Osteon® 70/30 and Osteon collagen® grafts showed the highest radiopacity compared to the lesions with Osteon II® and blood clot. After the 2nd month, the radiopacity values between the three groups that received the grafts were more similar compared to the group with blood clot. After the 3rd month, the lesions with Osteon® 70/30 graft showed the highest radiopacity values, followed by Osteon collagen® and Osteon II® groups. The group that received blood clot showed the lowest radiopacity values. In conclusion, the grafts used in this study had higher radiopacity values compared to blood clot. Among the grafts used, the Osteon® 70/30 graft showed the highest radiopacity values in the 3-month period. PMID:27968706

  4. SU-E-T-416: VMAT Dose Calculations Using Cone Beam CT Images: A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Kuo, J; Daroui, P; Ramsinghani, N; Al-Ghazi, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) images have been used routinely for patient positioning throughout the treatment course. However, use of CBCT for dose calculation is still investigational. The purpose of this study is to assess the utility of CBCT images for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) plan dose calculation. Methods: A CATPHAN 504 phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) was used to compare the dosimetric and geometric accuracy between conventional CT and CBCT (in both full and half fan modes). Hounsfield units (HU) profiles at different density areas were evaluated. A C shape target that surrounds a central avoidance structure was created and a VMAT plan was generated on the CT images and copied to the CBCT phantom images. Patient studies included three brain patients, and one head and neck (H'N) patient. VMAT plans generated on the patients treatment planning CT was applied to CBCT images obtained during the first treatment. Isodose distributions and dosevolume- histograms (DVHs) were compared. Results: For the phantom study, the HU difference between CT and CBCT is within 100 (maximum 96 HU for Teflon CBCT images in full fan mode). The impact of these differences on the calculated dose distributions was clinically insignificant. In both phantom and patient studies, target DVHs based on CBCT images were in excellent agreement with those based on planning CT images. Mean, Median, near minimum (D98%), and near maximum (D2%) doses agreed within 0-2.5%. A slightly larger discrepancy is observed in the patient studies compared to that seen in the phantom study, (0-1% vs. 0 - 2.5%). Conclusion: CBCT images can be used to accurately predict dosimetric results, without any HU correction. It is feasible to use CBCT to evaluate the actual dose delivered at each fraction. The dosimetric consequences resulting from tumor response and patient geometry changes could be monitored.

  5. Soft-tissue imaging with C-arm cone-beam CT using statistical reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Adam S.; Webster Stayman, J.; Otake, Yoshito; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Gallia, Gary L.; Khanna, A. Jay; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-02-01

    The potential for statistical image reconstruction methods such as penalized-likelihood (PL) to improve C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) soft-tissue visualization for intraoperative imaging over conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) is assessed in this work by making a fair comparison in relation to soft-tissue performance. A prototype mobile C-arm was used to scan anthropomorphic head and abdomen phantoms as well as a cadaveric torso at doses substantially lower than typical values in diagnostic CT, and the effects of dose reduction via tube current reduction and sparse sampling were also compared. Matched spatial resolution between PL and FBP was determined by the edge spread function of low-contrast (˜40-80 HU) spheres in the phantoms, which were representative of soft-tissue imaging tasks. PL using the non-quadratic Huber penalty was found to substantially reduce noise relative to FBP, especially at lower spatial resolution where PL provides a contrast-to-noise ratio increase up to 1.4-2.2× over FBP at 50% dose reduction across all objects. Comparison of sampling strategies indicates that soft-tissue imaging benefits from fully sampled acquisitions at dose above ˜1.7 mGy and benefits from 50% sparsity at dose below ˜1.0 mGy. Therefore, an appropriate sampling strategy along with the improved low-contrast visualization offered by statistical reconstruction demonstrates the potential for extending intraoperative C-arm CBCT to applications in soft-tissue interventions in neurosurgery as well as thoracic and abdominal surgeries by overcoming conventional tradeoffs in noise, spatial resolution, and dose.

  6. Motion-aware temporal regularization for improved 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mory, Cyril; Janssens, Guillaume; Rit, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) of the free-breathing thorax is a valuable tool in image-guided radiation therapy of the thorax and the upper abdomen. It allows the determination of the position of a tumor throughout the breathing cycle, while only its mean position can be extracted from three-dimensional CBCT. The classical approaches are not fully satisfactory: respiration-correlated methods allow one to accurately locate high-contrast structures in any frame, but contain strong streak artifacts unless the acquisition is significantly slowed down. Motion-compensated methods can yield streak-free, but static, reconstructions. This work proposes a 4D-CBCT method that can be seen as a trade-off between respiration-correlated and motion-compensated reconstruction. It builds upon the existing reconstruction using spatial and temporal regularization (ROOSTER) and is called motion-aware ROOSTER (MA-ROOSTER). It performs temporal regularization along curved trajectories, following the motion estimated on a prior 4D CT scan. MA-ROOSTER does not involve motion-compensated forward and back projections: the input motion is used only during temporal regularization. MA-ROOSTER is compared to ROOSTER, motion-compensated Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (MC-FDK), and two respiration-correlated methods, on CBCT acquisitions of one physical phantom and two patients. It yields streak-free reconstructions, visually similar to MC-FDK, and robust information on tumor location throughout the breathing cycle. MA-ROOSTER also allows a variation of the lung tissue density during the breathing cycle, similar to that of planning CT, which is required for quantitative post-processing.

  7. Fast radioactive seed localization in intraoperative cone beam CT for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu-chi; Xiong, Jian-ping; Cohan, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Mageras, Gig; Zelefsky, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A fast knowledge-based radioactive seed localization method for brachytherapy was developed to automatically localize radioactive seeds in an intraoperative volumetric cone beam CT (CBCT) so that corrections, if needed, can be made during prostate implant surgery. A transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) scan is acquired for intraoperative treatment planning. Planned seed positions are transferred to intraoperative CBCT following TRUS-to-CBCT registration using a reference CBCT scan of the TRUS probe as a template, in which the probe and its external fiducial markers are pre-segmented and their positions in TRUS are known. The transferred planned seeds and probe serve as an atlas to reduce the search space in CBCT. Candidate seed voxels are identified based on image intensity. Regions are grown from candidate voxels and overlay regions are merged. Region volume and intensity variance is checked against known seed volume and intensity profile. Regions meeting the above criteria are flagged as detected seeds; otherwise they are flagged as likely seeds and sorted by a score that is based on volume, intensity profile and distance to the closest planned seed. A graphical interface allows users to review and accept or reject likely seeds. Likely seeds with approximately twice the seed volume are automatically split. Five clinical cases are tested. Without any manual correction in seed detection, the method performed the localization in 5 seconds (excluding registration time) for a CBCT scan with 512×512×192 voxels. The average precision rate per case is 99% and the recall rate is 96% for a total of 416 seeds. All false negative seeds are found with 15 in likely seeds and 1 included in a detected seed. With the new method, updating of calculations of dose distribution during the procedure is possible and thus facilitating evaluation and improvement of treatment quality.

  8. Cochlear length determination using Cone Beam Computed Tomography in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Würfel, Waldemar; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Lenarz, Thomas; Majdani, Omid

    2014-10-01

    Indications for cochlear implants are determined by audiological and medical considerations. Clinical imaging is therefore an integral element for anatomical evaluation in terms of medical considerations. Several authors have discussed the variability of cochlear shape, especially cochlear length. Cochlear length is, however, an increasingly recognized parameter in terms of preoperative evaluation. This study introduces a methodology to determine individual cochlear length in clinical setting by using Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Cochlear length determination was performed retrospectively with an OsiriX curved 3D Multiplanar Reconstruction tool on subjects who underwent temporal bone imaging from January 2011 to February 2013. Cochlear length was defined as the spiral route from the center-distal point of the bony round window along the lateral wall towards the helicotrema, which is the endpoint of the measurement. Cochlear length was measured in 436 temporal bones (218 left ears, 218 right ears, 218 subjects). The mean cochlear length was 37.6 mm (SD: ± 1.93 mm), median was 37.6 mm, range 32-43.5 mm. The cochlear length had a normal distribution. A significant difference was found between cochlear length by gender (p < .0001), but not between the left and right cochlea (p = .301) or according to age. Consideration of the cochlear length in clinical data may be an insufficiently represented parameter in cochlear implant treatment. Literature shows the impact of electrode insertion depth on residual hearing preservation and speech performance. Individual evaluation of the cochlear implant electrode choice may be the next step in personalized cochlear implant treatment as a valuable addition to existing audiological and surgical evaluation. The cochlear length determination methodology presented herein is a reproducible and clinically available parameter. Indeed, revealing a significant cochlear length span width, especially according to gender differences, may be

  9. Image quality of a cone beam O-arm 3D imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Weir, Victor; Lin, Jingying; Hsiung, Hsiang; Ritenour, E. Russell

    2009-02-01

    The O-arm is a cone beam imaging system designed primarily to support orthopedic surgery and is also used for image-guided and vascular surgery. Using a gantry that can be opened or closed, the O-arm can function as a 2-dimensional (2D) fluoroscopy device or collect 3-dimensional (3D) volumetric imaging data like a CT system. Clinical applications of the O-arm in spine surgical procedures, assessment of pedicle screw position, and kyphoplasty procedures show that the O-arm 3D mode provides enhanced imaging information compared to radiographs or fluoroscopy alone. In this study, the image quality of an O-arm system was quantitatively evaluated. A 20 cm diameter CATPHAN 424 phantom was scanned using the pre-programmed head protocols: small/medium (120 kVp, 100 mAs), large (120 kVp, 128 mAs), and extra-large (120 kVp, 160 mAs) in 3D mode. High resolution reconstruction mode (512×512×0.83 mm) was used to reconstruct images for the analysis of low and high contrast resolution, and noise power spectrum. MTF was measured using the point spread function. The results show that the O-arm image is uniform but with a noise pattern which cannot be removed by simply increasing the mAs. The high contrast resolution of the O-arm system was approximately 9 lp/cm. The system has a 10% MTF at 0.45 mm. The low-contrast resolution cannot be decided due to the noise pattern. For surgery where locations of a structure are emphasized over a survey of all image details, the image quality of the O-arm is well accepted clinically.

  10. Automatic Synthesis of Panoramic Radiographs from Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Data

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ting; Shi, Changrong; Zhao, Xing; Zhao, Yunsong; Xu, Jinqiu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automatic method of synthesizing panoramic radiographs from dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data for directly observing the whole dentition without the superimposition of other structures. This method consists of three major steps. First, the dental arch curve is generated from the maximum intensity projection (MIP) of 3D CBCT data. Then, based on this curve, the long axial curves of the upper and lower teeth are extracted to create a 3D panoramic curved surface describing the whole dentition. Finally, the panoramic radiograph is synthesized by developing this 3D surface. Both open-bite shaped and closed-bite shaped dental CBCT datasets were applied in this study, and the resulting images were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of this method. With the proposed method, a single-slice panoramic radiograph can clearly and completely show the whole dentition without the blur and superimposition of other dental structures. Moreover, thickened panoramic radiographs can also be synthesized with increased slice thickness to show more features, such as the mandibular nerve canal. One feature of the proposed method is that it is automatically performed without human intervention. Another feature of the proposed method is that it requires thinner panoramic radiographs to show the whole dentition than those produced by other existing methods, which contributes to the clarity of the anatomical structures, including the enamel, dentine and pulp. In addition, this method can rapidly process common dental CBCT data. The speed and image quality of this method make it an attractive option for observing the whole dentition in a clinical setting. PMID:27300554

  11. Three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography for assessment of mandibular changes after orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Bailey, L'Tanya J.; Tucker, Scott F.; Styner, Martin A.; Mol, Andre; Phillips, Ceib L.; Proffit, William R.; Turvey, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to assess alterations in the 3-dimensional (3D) position of the mandibular rami and condyles in patients receiving either maxillary advancement and mandibular setback or maxillary surgery only. Methods High-resolution cone-beam computed tomography scans were taken of 21 patients before and after orthognathic surgery. Ten patients with various malocclusions underwent maxillary surgery only, and 11 Class III patients received maxillary advancement and mandibular setback. Presurgery and postsurgery 3D models were registered on the surface of the cranial base. A new tool was used for graphical overlay and 3D display with color maps to visually assess the locations and to quantify positional changes in the posterior border of the mandibular rami and condyles between superimposed models. Results The average displacements in condylar position were small—0.77 mm (SD, 0.12 mm) and 0.70 mm (SD, 0.08 mm)—for 2-jaw and 1-jaw surgeries, respectively (not significant, P >.05). All 2-jaw surgery patients had backward rotational displacements of the mandibular rami (mean, 1.98 mm; SD, 1.03 mm), with a maximum surface distance change of ≥2 mm in 8 of 11 subjects. For the 1-jaw surgery, all subjects had small backward rotational displacements of the mandibular rami (mean, 0.78 mm; SD, 0.25 mm), with only 1 subject having a maximum surface distance change ≥2 mm. The difference in mean backward rotational displacement was statistically significant (P <.01). Conclusions The visualization of 3D model superimposition clearly identified the location, magnitude, and direction of mandibular displacement. The 3D imaging allowed quantification of vertical, transverse, and anteroposterior ramus displacement that accompanied mandibular, but not maxillary only, surgery. PMID:17208105

  12. Comparison of mesiodistal root angulation with posttreatment panoramic radiographs and cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bouwens, Daniel G.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Ludlow, John B.; Phillips, Ceib

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Orthodontists assess mesiodistal root angulations before, during, and after orthodontic treatment as an aid in establishing proper root position. Panoramic imaging has been useful for this purpose and is a valuable screening tool in diagnosis and planning treatment of orthodontic patients. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for imaging of the craniofacial complex creates the opportunity to evaluate 3-dimensional images compared with traditional 2-dimensional images. The purpose of this project was to compare mesiodistal root angulations by using posttreatment panoramic radiographic images and CBCT scans. Methods Mesiodistal root angulations from panoramic images and CBCT scans of 35 orthognathic surgery patients after orthodontic treatment were compared. The panoramic images were measured by using VixWin (Gendex Dental Systems, Des Plaines, Ill), and the CBCT scans by using InvivoDental 3D (version 4.1, Anatomage, San Jose, Calif). The mesiodistal root angulation of each maxillary and mandibular tooth was measured by using the occlusal plane as the reference line. With an intercept-only linear regression for correlated data (with an unstructured covariance structure), the global test of whether the mean vector of all differences for the teeth is zero was performed separately for the 2 arches. Results The global test for both arches was statistically significant (P<0.001), indicating an overall difference in root angulation between measurements from panoramic and CBCT images. There was no discernible pattern in the average differences between panoramic and CBCT measurements. Conclusions The assessment of mesiodistal tooth angulation with panoramic radiography should be approached with caution and reinforced by a thorough clinical examination of the dentition. PMID:21195286

  13. Respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography: A novel method to reduce imaging dose

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J.; Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: A novel method called respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is described whereby imaging dose can be reduced without degrading image quality. RT 4D CBCT utilizes a respiratory signal to trigger projections such that only a single projection is assigned to a given respiratory bin for each breathing cycle. In contrast, commercial 4D CBCT does not actively use the respiratory signal to minimize image dose. Methods: To compare RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, 3600 CBCT projections of a thorax phantom were gathered and reconstructed to generate a ground truth CBCT dataset. Simulation pairs of conventional 4D CBCT acquisitions and RT 4D CBCT acquisitions were developed assuming a sinusoidal respiratory signal which governs the selection of projections from the pool of 3600 original projections. The RT 4D CBCT acquisition triggers a single projection when the respiratory signal enters a desired acquisition bin; the conventional acquisition does not use a respiratory trigger and projections are acquired at a constant frequency. Acquisition parameters studied were breathing period, acquisition time, and imager frequency. The performance of RT 4D CBCT using phase based and displacement based sorting was also studied. Image quality was quantified by calculating difference images of the test dataset from the ground truth dataset. Imaging dose was calculated by counting projections. Results: Using phase based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 47% less imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Image quality differences were less than 4% at worst. Using displacement based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 57% less imaging dose on average, than conventional 4D CBCT methods; however, image quality was 26% worse with RT 4D CBCT. Conclusions: Simulation studies have shown that RT 4D CBCT reduces imaging dose while maintaining comparable image quality for phase based 4D CBCT; image quality is degraded for displacement based RT 4D

  14. Detection of horizontal root fracture using four different protocols of cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Salineiro, Fernanda Cristina Sales; Pinheiro, Lucas Rodrigues; dos Santos Júnior, Oséas; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmão Paraiso

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze four different cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) protocols to identify horizontal root fractures (HRF) in endodontically treated teeth, with or without the presence of a metallic post. Thirty extracted single-rooted human premolars were treated endodontically. Afterwards, an observer induced a horizontal fracture in 15 teeth. Each tooth was inserted in an empty mandibular socket and submitted to a computed tomography scan taken with and without the metallic post. The acquisition followed four different protocols, with different fields of view (FOV) and voxel sizes, as follows: FOV 6 X 16 cm/0.2 mm voxel; FOV 6 X 16 cm/0.25 mm voxel; FOV 8 X 8 cm/0.2 mm voxel; FOV 8 X 8 cm/0.25 mm voxel. Two observers checked all the acquisitions within a two-week interval, and the values of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and kappa were calculated. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values were better for the 8 X 8 cm/0.2 mm and 16 X 6 cm/0.25 mm protocols, ranging from 0.60 to 0.86 and 0.53 to 0.80, respectively. The intra- and interobserver concordance ranged from 0.65 to 0.72. The protocols where FOV and voxel were proportional showed better results. The 8 x 8 cm/0.2 mm protocol had the least interference from the metallic artifact. All four protocols showed a decline in values in the presence of the metallic artifact.

  15. Deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT with local intensity matching.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyoun; Plishker, William; Quon, Harry; Wong, John; Shekhar, Raj; Lee, Junghoon

    2017-02-07

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality in image-guided radiotherapy and surgery. A short scan followed by a filtered-backprojection is typically used for CBCT reconstruction. While data on the mid-plane (plane of source-detector rotation) is complete, off-mid-planes undergo different information deficiency and the computed reconstructions are approximate. This causes different reconstruction artifacts at off-mid-planes depending on slice locations, and therefore impedes accurate registration between CT and CBCT. In this paper, we propose a method to accurately register CT and CBCT by iteratively matching local CT and CBCT intensities. We correct CBCT intensities by matching local intensity histograms slice by slice in conjunction with intensity-based deformable registration. The correction-registration steps are repeated in an alternating way until the result image converges. We integrate the intensity matching into three different deformable registration methods, B-spline, demons, and optical flow that are widely used for CT-CBCT registration. All three registration methods were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient parallel computation. We tested the proposed methods on twenty five head and neck cancer cases and compared the performance with state-of-the-art registration methods. Normalized cross correlation (NCC), structural similarity index (SSIM), and target registration error (TRE) were computed to evaluate the registration performance. Our method produced overall NCC of 0.96, SSIM of 0.94, and TRE of 2.26 → 2.27 mm, outperforming existing methods by 9%, 12%, and 27%, respectively. Experimental results also show that our method performs consistently and is more accurate than existing algorithms, and also computationally efficient.

  16. Automatic intrinsic cardiac and respiratory gating from cone-beam CT scans of the thorax region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Andreas; Sauppe, Sebastian; Lell, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We present a new algorithm that allows for raw data-based automated cardiac and respiratory intrinsic gating in cone-beam CT scans. It can be summarized in three steps: First, a median filter is applied to an initially reconstructed volume. The forward projection of this volume contains less motion information and is subtracted from the original projections. This results in new raw data that contain only moving and not static anatomy like bones, that would otherwise impede the cardiac or respiratory signal acquisition. All further steps are applied to these modified raw data. Second, the raw data are cropped to a region of interest (ROI). The ROI in the raw data is determined by the forward projection of a binary volume of interest (VOI) that includes the diaphragm for respiratory gating and most of the edge of the heart for cardiac gating. Third, the mean gray value in this ROI is calculated for every projection and the respiratory/cardiac signal is acquired using a bandpass filter. Steps two and three are carried out simultaneously for 64 or 1440 overlapping VOI inside the body for the respiratory or cardiac signal respectively. The signals acquired from each ROI are compared and the most consistent one is chosen as the desired cardiac or respiratory motion signal. Consistency is assessed by the standard deviation of the time between two maxima. The robustness and efficiency of the method is evaluated using simulated and measured patient data by computing the standard deviation of the mean signal difference between the ground truth and the intrinsic signal.

  17. Sphenoid bone changes in rapid maxillary expansion assessed with cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Stepanko, Lucas S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rapid maxillary expansion (RME) is used to expand the maxilla and increase arch perimeter; yet, there are few reports on its effects on the sphenoid bone. With cone-beam computed topography (CBCT), it is possible to visualize sphenoid bone changes. The purpose of this study was to investigate sphenoid bone changes observed in conjunction with RME treatments, using CBCT. Methods Sixty patients (34 women and 26 men, aged 11–17 years) underwent RME as part of their orthodontic treatment. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a tooth-anchored group, a bone-anchored group, or a control group. Initial CBCT scans were performed preceding the RME treatment (T1) and again directly after the completion of expansion (T2). Statistical analysis included ANOVA, descriptive statistics, and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results The reliability of the landmark location was at least 0.783, and the largest ICC mean measurement error was 2.32 mm. With regard to distances, the largest change was 0.78 mm, which was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Statistical significance was established in patient groups of the same sex and treatment type for the following distance measurements: right anterior lateral pterygoid plate to the right edge of the hypophyseal fossa (d2), anterior distance between the medial pterygoid plates (d4), and anterior distance between the left medial and lateral plates (d8). Conclusions In this study, there were no clinically significant changes in the sphenoid bone due to RME treatments regardless of sex or treatment type. PMID:27668190

  18. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., <1/5th of a typical diagnostic head CT). CBCT images are available ~15 seconds after scan completion (~1 min acquisition) and reviewed at bedside using custom 3D visualization software based on the open-source Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  19. Deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT with local intensity matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Plishker, William; Quon, Harry; Wong, John; Shekhar, Raj; Lee, Junghoon

    2017-02-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality in image-guided radiotherapy and surgery. A short scan followed by a filtered-backprojection is typically used for CBCT reconstruction. While data on the mid-plane (plane of source-detector rotation) is complete, off-mid-planes undergo different information deficiency and the computed reconstructions are approximate. This causes different reconstruction artifacts at off-mid-planes depending on slice locations, and therefore impedes accurate registration between CT and CBCT. In this paper, we propose a method to accurately register CT and CBCT by iteratively matching local CT and CBCT intensities. We correct CBCT intensities by matching local intensity histograms slice by slice in conjunction with intensity-based deformable registration. The correction-registration steps are repeated in an alternating way until the result image converges. We integrate the intensity matching into three different deformable registration methods, B-spline, demons, and optical flow that are widely used for CT-CBCT registration. All three registration methods were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient parallel computation. We tested the proposed methods on twenty five head and neck cancer cases and compared the performance with state-of-the-art registration methods. Normalized cross correlation (NCC), structural similarity index (SSIM), and target registration error (TRE) were computed to evaluate the registration performance. Our method produced overall NCC of 0.96, SSIM of 0.94, and TRE of 2.26 → 2.27 mm, outperforming existing methods by 9%, 12%, and 27%, respectively. Experimental results also show that our method performs consistently and is more accurate than existing algorithms, and also computationally efficient.

  20. Estimating cancer risk from dental cone-beam CT exposures based on skin dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, Ruben; Cockmartin, Lesley; Ivanauskaité, Deimante; Urbonienė, Ausra; Gavala, Sophia; Donta, Catherine; Tsiklakis, Kostas; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bosmans, Hilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Horner, Keith; SEDENTEXCT Project Consortium, The

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to measure entrance skin doses on patients undergoing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations, to establish conversion factors between skin and organ doses, and to estimate cancer risk from CBCT exposures. 266 patients (age 8-83) were included, involving three imaging centres. CBCT scans were acquired using the SCANORA 3D (Soredex, Tuusula, Finland) and NewTom 9000 (QR, Verona, Italy). Eight thermoluminescent dosimeters were attached to the patient's skin at standardized locations. Using previously published organ dose estimations on various CBCTs with an anthropomorphic phantom, correlation factors to convert skin dose to organ doses were calculated and applied to estimate patient organ doses. The BEIR VII age- and gender-dependent dose-risk model was applied to estimate the lifetime attributable cancer risk. For the SCANORA 3D, average skin doses over the eight locations varied between 484 and 1788 µGy. For the NewTom 9000 the range was between 821 and 1686 µGy for Centre 1 and between 292 and 2325 µGy for Centre 2. Entrance skin dose measurements demonstrated the combined effect of exposure and patient factors on the dose. The lifetime attributable cancer risk, expressed as the probability to develop a radiation-induced cancer, varied between 2.7 per million (age >60) and 9.8 per million (age 8-11) with an average of 6.0 per million. On average, the risk for female patients was 40% higher. The estimated radiation risk was primarily influenced by the age at exposure and the gender, pointing out the continuing need for justification and optimization of CBCT exposures, with a specific focus on children.

  1. Radiological Protection in Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). ICRP Publication 129.

    PubMed

    Rehani, M M; Gupta, R; Bartling, S; Sharp, G C; Pauwels, R; Berris, T; Boone, J M

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this publication is to provide guidance on radiological protection in the new technology of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Publications 87 and 102 dealt with patient dose management in computed tomography (CT) and multi-detector CT. The new applications of CBCT and the associated radiological protection issues are substantially different from those of conventional CT. The perception that CBCT involves lower doses was only true in initial applications. CBCT is now used widely by specialists who have little or no training in radiological protection. This publication provides recommendations on radiation dose management directed at different stakeholders, and covers principles of radiological protection, training, and quality assurance aspects. Advice on appropriate use of CBCT needs to be made widely available. Advice on optimisation of protection when using CBCT equipment needs to be strengthened, particularly with respect to the use of newer features of the equipment. Manufacturers should standardise radiation dose displays on CBCT equipment to assist users in optimisation of protection and comparisons of performance. Additional challenges to radiological protection are introduced when CBCT-capable equipment is used for both fluoroscopy and tomography during the same procedure. Standardised methods need to be established for tracking and reporting of patient radiation doses from these procedures. The recommendations provided in this publication may evolve in the future as CBCT equipment and applications evolve. As with previous ICRP publications, the Commission hopes that imaging professionals, medical physicists, and manufacturers will use the guidelines and recommendations provided in this publication for implementation of the Commission's principle of optimisation of protection of patients and medical workers, with the objective of keeping exposures as low as reasonably achievable, taking into account economic and societal factors, and

  2. Image-based motion compensation for high-resolution extremities cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Cao, Q.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the extremities provides high spatial resolution, but its quantitative accuracy may be challenged by involuntary sub-mm patient motion that cannot be eliminated with simple means of external immobilization. We investigate a two-step iterative motion compensation based on a multi-component metric of image sharpness. Methods: Motion is considered with respect to locally rigid motion within a particular region of interest, and the method supports application to multiple locally rigid regions. Motion is estimated by maximizing a cost function with three components: a gradient metric encouraging image sharpness, an entropy term that favors high contrast and penalizes streaks, and a penalty term encouraging smooth motion. Motion compensation involved initial coarse estimation of gross motion followed by estimation of fine-scale displacements using high resolution reconstructions. The method was evaluated in simulations with synthetic motion (1-4 mm) applied to a wrist volume obtained on a CMOS-based CBCT testbench. Structural similarity index (SSIM) quantified the agreement between motion-compensated and static data. The algorithm was also tested on a motion contaminated patient scan from dedicated extremities CBCT. Results: Excellent correction was achieved for the investigated range of displacements, indicated by good visual agreement with the static data. 10-15% improvement in SSIM was attained for 2-4 mm motions. The compensation was robust against increasing motion (4% decrease in SSIM across the investigated range, compared to 14% with no compensation). Consistent performance was achieved across a range of noise levels. Significant mitigation of artifacts was shown in patient data. Conclusion: The results indicate feasibility of image-based motion correction in extremities CBCT without the need for a priori motion models, external trackers, or fiducials.

  3. Automated patient setup and gating using cone beam computed tomography projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Hanlin; Bertholet, Jenny; Ge, Jiajia; Poulsen, Per; Parikh, Parag

    2016-03-01

    In radiation therapy, fiducial markers are often implanted near tumors and used for patient positioning and respiratory gating purposes. These markers are then used to manually align the patients by matching the markers in the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction to those in the planning CT. This step is time-intensive and user-dependent, and often results in a suboptimal patient setup. We propose a fully automated, robust method based on dynamic programming (DP) for segmenting radiopaque fiducial markers in CBCT projection images, which are then used to automatically optimize the treatment couch position and/or gating window bounds. The mean of the absolute 2D segmentation error of our DP algorithm is 1.3+/- 1.0 mm for 87 markers on 39 patients. Intrafraction images were acquired every 3 s during treatment at two different institutions. For gated patients from Institution A (8 patients, 40 fractions), the DP algorithm increased the delivery accuracy (96+/- 6% versus 91+/- 11% , p  <  0.01) compared to the manual setup using kV fluoroscopy. For non-gated patients from Institution B (6 patients, 16 fractions), the DP algorithm performed similarly (1.5+/- 0.8 mm versus 1.6+/- 0.9 mm, p  =  0.48) compared to the manual setup matching the fiducial markers in the CBCT to the mean position. Our proposed automated patient setup algorithm only takes 1-2 s to run, requires no user intervention, and performs as well as or better than the current clinical setup.

  4. SU-E-J-135: Feasibility of Using Quantitative Cone Beam CT for Proton Adaptive Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jingqian, W; Wang, Q; Zhang, X; Wen, Z; Zhu, X; Frank, S; Li, H; Tsui, T; Zhu, L; Wei, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using scatter corrected cone beam CT (CBCT) for proton adaptive planning. Methods: Phantom study was used to evaluate the CT number difference between the planning CT (pCT), quantitative CBCT (qCBCT) with scatter correction and calibrated Hounsfield units using adaptive scatter kernel superposition (ASKS) technique, and raw CBCT (rCBCT). After confirming the CT number accuracy, prostate patients, each with a pCT and several sets of weekly CBCT, were investigated for this study. Spot scanning proton treatment plans were independently generated on pCT, qCBCT and rCBCT. The treatment plans were then recalculated on all images. Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) parameters and gamma analysis were used to compare between dose distributions. Results: Phantom study suggested that Hounsfield unit accuracy for different materials are within 20 HU for qCBCT and over 250 HU for rCBCT. For prostate patients, proton dose could be calculated accurately on qCBCT but not on rCBCT. When the original plan was recalculated on qCBCT, tumor coverage was maintained when anatomy was consistent with pCT. However, large dose variance was observed when patient anatomy change. Adaptive plan using qCBCT was able to recover tumor coverage and reduce dose to normal tissue. Conclusion: It is feasible to use qu antitative CBCT (qCBCT) with scatter correction and calibrated Hounsfield units for proton dose calculation and adaptive planning in proton therapy. Partly supported by Varian Medical Systems.

  5. Noninvasive differential diagnosis of dental periapical lesions in cone-beam CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kazunori; Rysavy, Steven; Flores, Arturo; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: This paper proposes a novel application of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) to an everyday clinical dental challenge: the noninvasive differential diagnosis of periapical lesions between periapical cysts and granulomas. A histological biopsy is the most reliable method currently available for this differential diagnosis; however, this invasive procedure prevents the lesions from healing noninvasively despite a report that they may heal without surgical treatment. A CAD using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers an alternative noninvasive diagnostic tool which helps to avoid potentially unnecessary surgery and to investigate the unknown healing process and rate for the lesions. Methods: The proposed semiautomatic solution combines graph-based random walks segmentation with machine learning-based boosted classifiers and offers a robust clinical tool with minimal user interaction. As part of this CAD framework, the authors provide two novel technical contributions: (1) probabilistic extension of the random walks segmentation with likelihood ratio test and (2) LDA-AdaBoost: a new integration of weighted linear discriminant analysis to AdaBoost. Results: A dataset of 28 CBCT scans is used to validate the approach and compare it with other popular segmentation and classification methods. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed method with 94.1% correct classification rate and an improvement of the performance by comparison with the Simon’s state-of-the-art method by 17.6%. The authors also compare classification performances with two independent ground-truth sets from the histopathology and CBCT diagnoses provided by endodontic experts. Conclusions: Experimental results of the authors show that the proposed CAD system behaves in clearer agreement with the CBCT ground-truth than with histopathology, supporting the Simon’s conjecture that CBCT diagnosis can be as accurate as histopathology for differentiating the periapical lesions.

  6. Evaluation of juxta-apical radiolucency in cone beam CT images

    PubMed Central

    Harada, N; Araki, K; Sano, T; Goto, T K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyse the position and relationship of juxta-apical radiolucency (JAR) to the mandibular canal and buccal and/or lingual cortical plates using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: A retrospective study was carried out to analyse the JAR on CBCT for 27 patients. These findings were compared with 27 age- and sex-matched patients without the presence of JAR, which acted as the control group. The CBCT images were analysed according to a checklist, to evaluate the position of the JAR and its relationship to the mandibular canal. Then, any thinning or perforation of either the buccal or lingual cortical plate due to JAR was noted, and a classification to quantify the thinning of cortical plates was proposed. The findings in the two groups were analysed using a paired comparison by McNemar test. Results: A statistical increased thinning of cortical plates was seen in the JAR group compared with the control group, and most of the cases were in the J3 group. None of the patients in either the JAR or the control group showed perforation of the buccal and/or lingual cortical plate on CBCT images. Conclusions: A classification to quantify the thinning of cortical plates was proposed, which may be used for objective evaluation of the thinning of the cortical plates in future studies. The present study gives an insight into the relationship of the juxta-apical area with the mandibular canal and cortical plates in the mandible using CBCT. PMID:24694213

  7. Measurement of skin dose from cone-beam computed tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To measure surface skin dose from various cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners using point-dosimeters. Materials & methods A head anthropomorphic phantom was used with nanoDOT optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters (Landauer Corp., Glenwood, IL) attached to various anatomic landmarks. The phantom was scanned using multiple exposure protocols for craniofacial evaluations in three different CBCT units and a conventional x-ray imaging system. The dosimeters were calibrated for each of the scan protocols on the different imaging systems. Peak skin dose and surface doses at the eye lens, thyroid, submandibular and parotid gland levels were measured. Results The measured skin doses ranged from 0.09 to 4.62 mGy depending on dosimeter positions and imaging systems. The average surface doses to the lens locations were ~4.0 mGy, well below the threshold for cataractogenesis (500 mGy). The results changed accordingly with x-ray tube output (mAs and kV) and also were sensitive to scan field of view (SFOV). As compared to the conventional panoramic and cephalometric imaging system, doses from all three CBCT systems were at least an order of magnitude higher. Conclusions Peak skin dose and surface doses at the eye lens, thyroid, and salivary gland levels measured from the CBCT imaging systems were lower than the thresholds to induce deterministic effects. However, our findings do not justify the routine use of CBCT imaging in orthodontics considering the lifetime-attributable risk to the individual. PMID:24192155

  8. SU-E-QI-08: Fourier Properties of Cone Beam CT Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, T; Yan, H; Jia, X; Jiang, Steve B.; Mou, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the Fourier properties of cone beam CT (CBCT) projections and apply the property to directly estimate noise level of CBCT projections without any prior information. Methods: By utilizing the property of Bessel function, we derivate the Fourier properties of the CBCT projections for an arbitrary point object. It is found that there exists a double-wedge shaped region in the Fourier space where the intensity is approximately zero. We further derivate the Fourier properties of independent noise added to CBCT projections. The expectation of the square of the module in any point of the Fourier space is constant and the value approximately equals to noise energy. We further validate the theory in numerical simulations for both a delta function object and a NCAT phantom with different levels of noise added. Results: Our simulation confirmed the existence of the double-wedge shaped region in Fourier domain for the x-ray projection image. The boundary locations of this region agree well with theoretical predictions. In the experiments of estimating noise level, the mean relative error between the theory estimation and the ground truth values is 2.697%. Conclusion: A novel theory on the Fourier properties of CBCT projections has been discovered. Accurate noise level estimation can be achieved by applying this theory directly to the measured CBCT projections. This work was supported in part by NIH(1R01CA154747-01), NSFC((No. 61172163), Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20110201110011) and China Scholarship Council.

  9. Quality Assessment of Frameless Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Lee-Cheng; Kahler, Darren; Samant, Sanjiv; Li, Jonathan; Amdur, Robert; Palta, Jatinder R.; Liu, Chihray

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: A quality assessment of intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy was performed using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Setup errors were analyzed for two groups of patients: (1) those who were positioned using a frameless SonArray (FSA) system and immobilized with a bite plate and thermoplastic (TP) mask (the bFSA group); and (2) those who were positioned by room laser and immobilized using a TP mask (the mLAS group). Methods and Materials: A quality assurance phantom was used to study the system differences between FSA and CBCT. The quality assessment was performed using an Elekta Synergy imager (XVI) (Elekta Oncology Systems, Norcross, GA) and an On-Board Imager (OBI) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for 25 patients. For the first three fractions, and weekly thereafter, the FSA system was used for patient positioning, after which CBCT was performed to obtain setup errors. Results: (1) Phantom tests: The mean differences in the isocenter displacements for the two systems was 1.2 {+-} 0.7 mm. No significant variances were seen between the XVI and OBI units (p{approx}0.208). (2)Patient tests: The mean of the displacements between FSA and CBCT were independent of the CBCT system used; mean setup errors for the bFSA group were smaller (1.2 mm) than those of the mLAS group (3.2 mm) (p < 0.005). For the mLAS patients, the 90th percentile and the maximum rotational displacements were 3{sup o} and 5{sup o}, respectively. A 4-mm drift in setup accuracy occurred over the treatment course for 1 bFSA patient. Conclusions: System differences of less than 1 mm between CBCT and FSA were seen. Error regression was observed for the bFSA patients, using CBCT (up to 4 mm) during the treatment course. For the mLAS group, daily CBCT imaging was needed to obtain acceptable setup accuracies.

  10. A Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Study on Mandibular First Molars in a Chinese Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yue; Han, Ting; Chen, Xinyu; Wan, Fang; Lu, Yating; Yan, Songhe; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) investigation on the root and canal configuration of the mandibular first molars, especially the morphology of the disto-lingual (DL) root, in a Chinese subpopulation. A total of 910 CBCT images of the mandibular first molars were collected from 455 patients who underwent CBCT examinations as a preoperative assessment for implants or orthodontic treatment. The following information was analyzed and evaluated: tooth position, gender, root and root canal number per tooth, root canal type of the mesial root(s) and distal root(s), angle of the DL root canal curvature, distance between two distal canal orifices in the teeth with DL root, and angle of disto-buccal canal orifice–disto-lingual canal orifice–mesio-lingual canal orifice (DB-DL-ML). Most of the mandibular first molars (64.9%, n = 591) had two roots with three root canals, and most of the mesial root canals (87.7%, n = 798) were type VI. The prevalence of the DL root was 22.1% (n = 201). The right side had a higher prevalence of DL root than the left side (p<0.05). Additionally, the curvature of the DL root canal were greater in the bucco-lingual (BL) orientation (30.10°±14.02°) than in the mesio-distal (MD) orientation (14.03°± 8.56°) (p<0.05). Overall there was a high prevalence of DL root in the mandibular first molars, and most of the DL roots were curved in different degrees. This study provided detailed information about the root canal morphology of the mandibular first molars in a Chinese subpopulation. PMID:26241480

  11. Assessment of bifid and trifid mandibular canals using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rashsuren, Oyuntugs; Choi, Jin-Woo; Han, Won-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prevalence of bifid and trifid mandibular canals using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, and to measure their length, diameter, and angle. Materials and Methods CBCT images of 500 patients, involving 755 hemi-mandibles, were used for this study. The presence and type of bifid mandibular canal was evaluated according to a modified classification of Naitoh et al. Prevalence rates were determined according to age group, gender, and type. Further, their diameter, length, and angles were measured using PACSPLUS Viewer and ImageJ 1.46r. Statistical analysis with chi-squared and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests was performed. Results Bifid and trifid mandibular canals were found in 22.6% of the 500 patients and 16.2% of the 755 sides. There was no significant difference between genders and among age groups. The retromolar canal type accounted for 71.3% of the identified canals; the dental canal type, 18.8%; the forward canal type, 4.1%; and the trifid canal type, 5.8%. Interestingly, seven cases of the trifid canal type, which has been rarely reported, were observed. The mean diameter of the bifid and trifid mandibular canals was 2.2 mm and that of the main mandibular canal was 4.3 mm. Their mean length was 16.9 mm; the mean superior angle was 149.2°, and the mean inferior angle was 37.7°. Conclusion Bifid and trifid mandibular canals in the Korean population were observed at a relatively high rate through a CBCT evaluation, and the most common type was the retromolar canal. CBCT is suggested for a detailed evaluation of bifid and trifid mandibular canals before mandibular surgery. PMID:25279344

  12. Small field of view cone beam CT temporomandibular joint imaging dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lukat, T D; Wong, J C M; Lam, E W N

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cone beam CT (CBCT) is generally accepted as the imaging modality of choice for visualisation of the osseous structures of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation dose of a protocol for CBCT TMJ imaging using a large field of view Hitachi CB MercuRay™ unit (Hitachi Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) with an alternative approach that utilizes two CBCT acquisitions of the right and left TMJs using the Kodak 9000® 3D system (Carestream, Rochester, NY). Methods: 25 optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters were placed in various locations of an anthropomorphic RANDO® Man phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories, Stanford, CT). Dosimetric measurements were performed for each technique, and effective doses were calculated using the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection tissue weighting factor recommendations for all protocols. Results: The radiation effective dose for the CB MercuRay technique was 223.6 ± 1.1 μSv compared with 9.7 ± 0.1 μSv (child), 13.5 ± 0.9 μSv (adolescent/small adult) and 20.5 ± 1.3 μSv (adult) for the bilateral Kodak acquisitions. Conclusions: Acquisitions of individual right and left TMJ volumes using the Kodak 9000 3D CBCT imaging system resulted in a more than ten-fold reduction in the effective dose compared with the larger single field acquisition with the Hitachi CB MercuRay. This decrease is made even more significant when lower tube potential and tube current settings are used. PMID:24048693

  13. Evaluation of robustness of maximum likelihood cone-beam CT reconstruction with total variation regularization.

    PubMed

    Stsepankou, D; Arns, A; Ng, S K; Zygmanski, P; Hesser, J

    2012-10-07

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate an iterative maximum likelihood (ML) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction with total variation (TV) regularization with respect to the robustness of the algorithm due to data inconsistencies. Three different and (for clinical application) typical classes of errors are considered for simulated phantom and measured projection data: quantum noise, defect detector pixels and projection matrix errors. To quantify those errors we apply error measures like mean square error, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and streak indicator. These measures are derived from linear signal theory and generalized and applied for nonlinear signal reconstruction. For quality check, we focus on resolution and CT-number linearity based on a Catphan phantom. All comparisons are made versus the clinical standard, the filtered backprojection algorithm (FBP). In our results, we confirm and substantially extend previous results on iterative reconstruction such as massive undersampling of the number of projections. Errors of projection matrix parameters of up to 1° projection angle deviations are still in the tolerance level. Single defect pixels exhibit ring artifacts for each method. However using defect pixel compensation, allows up to 40% of defect pixels for passing the standard clinical quality check. Further, the iterative algorithm is extraordinarily robust in the low photon regime (down to 0.05 mAs) when compared to FPB, allowing for extremely low-dose image acquisitions, a substantial issue when considering daily CBCT imaging for position correction in radiotherapy. We conclude that the ML method studied herein is robust under clinical quality assurance conditions. Consequently, low-dose regime imaging, especially for daily patient localization in radiation therapy is possible without change of the current hardware of the imaging system.

  14. GPU-based iterative cone-beam CT reconstruction using tight frame regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xun; Dong, Bin; Lou, Yifei; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-07-01

    The x-ray imaging dose from serial cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans raises a clinical concern in most image-guided radiation therapy procedures. It is the goal of this paper to develop a fast graphic processing unit (GPU)-based algorithm to reconstruct high-quality CBCT images from undersampled and noisy projection data so as to lower the imaging dose. For this purpose, we have developed an iterative tight-frame (TF)-based CBCT reconstruction algorithm. A condition that a real CBCT image has a sparse representation under a TF basis is imposed in the iteration process as regularization to the solution. To speed up the computation, a multi-grid method is employed. Our GPU implementation has achieved high computational efficiency and a CBCT image of resolution 512 × 512 × 70 can be reconstructed in ~5 min. We have tested our algorithm on a digital NCAT phantom and a physical Catphan phantom. It is found that our TF-based algorithm is able to reconstruct CBCT in the context of undersampling and low mAs levels. We have also quantitatively analyzed the reconstructed CBCT image quality in terms of the modulation-transfer function and contrast-to-noise ratio under various scanning conditions. The results confirm the high CBCT image quality obtained from our TF algorithm. Moreover, our algorithm has also been validated in a real clinical context using a head-and-neck patient case. Comparisons of the developed TF algorithm and the current state-of-the-art TV algorithm have also been made in various cases studied in terms of reconstructed image quality and computation efficiency.

  15. Evaluation of Morphology and Anatomical Measurement of Nasopalatine Canal Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Panjnoush, Mehrdad; Norouzi, Hamideh; Kheirandish, Yasaman; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Mofidi, Niloufar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Precise radiographic assessment of the nasopalatine canal is required to prevent implant failure. The purpose of the current study was to determine the three dimensional (3D) morphology, as well as the dimensions of the nasopalatine canal using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, maxillary CBCT images from 300 patients (150 men, 150 women) were retrospectively evaluated. Sagittal and coronal views were reviewed to determine the nasopalatine canal morphology and dimensions. The difference in canal dimensions between men and women was evaluated using the Student’s t-test while the difference in canal morphology between the two sexes was assessed using Chi-square test. Results: A total of 199 (66.3%) patients had type A canal (cylindrical without a branch), 69 (23%) had type B canal (a canal with a branch in the upper part), and 32 (10.7 %) had type C canal (a canal with a branch in the middle part). Incisive foramen diameter was 4.7±1.11mm on the sagittal section. Alveolar bone width in the anterior part of the canal was 12.3±1.7mm in the upper one third, 10.7±1.7mm in the middle one third, and 9.8±1.4mm in the lower one third. The angle of canal with palate was 109.5±5.7°. On the coronal sections, canal length was 14.1±3.0mm, incisive foramen diameter was 4.6±1.0mm, and canal diameter in the nasal floor was 5.1±1.0mm. Conclusions: Significant differences in canal morphology were observed among the patients and CBCT was useful in determining nasopalatine canal morphology and its dimensions before implant placement. PMID:28127321

  16. Osteoporosis prediction from the mandible using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Al Haffar, Iyad; Khattab, Razan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the use of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of osteoporosis among menopausal and postmenopausal women by using only a CBCT viewer program. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight menopausal and postmenopausal women who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) examination for hip and lumbar vertebrae were scanned using CBCT (field of view: 13 cm×15 cm; voxel size: 0.25 mm). Slices from the body of the mandible as well as the ramus were selected and some CBCT-derived variables, such as radiographic density (RD) as gray values, were calculated as gray values. Pearson's correlation, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) evaluation based on linear and logistic regression were performed to choose the variable that best correlated with the lumbar and femoral neck T-scores. Results RD of the whole bone area of the mandible was the variable that best correlated with and predicted both the femoral neck and the lumbar vertebrae T-scores; further, Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.5/0.6 (p value=0.037/0.009). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy based on the logistic regression were 50%, 88.9%, and 78.4%, respectively, for the femoral neck, and 46.2%, 91.3%, and 75%, respectively, for the lumbar vertebrae. Conclusion Lumbar vertebrae and femoral neck osteoporosis can be predicted with high accuracy from the RD value of the body of the mandible by using a CBCT viewer program. PMID:25473633

  17. Cone Beam Computed Tomography- An Effective Tool in Detecting Caries Under Fixed Dental Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Gondivkar, Shailesh Madhukar; Bhoosreddy, Ajay Ramesh; Shah, Karan Rajendra; Verma, Gaurav Ravishankar; Mehrotra, Gayatri Praveen; Nerkar, Ashwini Chandrakant

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Caries under restorations is the most common reason for re-treatment and replacement in restorative failures. To avoid failures of fixed dental prostheses, it is important to diagnose caries under it earlier. Without image degradation and metal artifacts, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) can be the solution to detect caries without removing fixed dental prostheses. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of CBCT in detecting caries under fixed dental prostheses. Materials and Methods Each specimen was scanned with CBCT for evaluation of secondary caries under fixed prostheses. Exposure parameters were 60 kVp and 3mA. Field of View (FOV) used was 8cm X 8cm. According to International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) criteria, six Grade 6 carious extracted teeth were selected. All teeth were prepared with four different specimens - full metal, metal-ceramic, full ceramic and metal-acrylic crowns for each tooth. Each specimen was scanned by CBCT. T-test was performed for mean gray value differences between caries and noncaries regions of each material. Gray values were recorded and evaluated for different parameters using two-way analysis of variance. Results Significant differences were found with respect to material (full metal, metal-ceramic, full ceramic and metal-acrylic) and situation (caries/noncaries) (p<0.001). There were no significant differences with respect to location (anterior or posterior). Mean gray values of caries and noncaries regions were found to be different for each material. Conclusion CBCT can be used as a post-treatment diagnostic technique for detecting caries under fixed prostheses without removing it. PMID:27656548

  18. Design and optimization of a dedicated cone-beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbijewski, W.; De Jean, P.; Prakash, P.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Machado, A.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    The design, initial imaging performance, and model-based optimization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) scanner for musculoskeletal extremities is presented. The system offers a compact scanner that complements conventional CT and MR by providing sub-mm isotropic spatial resolution, the ability to image weight-bearing extremities, and the capability for integrated real-time fluoroscopy and digital radiography. The scanner employs a flat-panel detector and a fixed anode x-ray source and has a field of view of ~ (20x20x20) cm3. The gantry allows a "standing" configuration for imaging of weight-bearing lower extremities and a "sitting" configuration for imaging of upper extremities and unloaded lower extremities. Cascaded systems analysis guided the selection of x-ray technique (e.g., kVp, filtration, and dose) and system design (e.g., magnification factor), yielding input-quantum-limited performance at detector signal of 100 times the electronic noise, while maintaining patient dose below 5 mGy (a factor of ~2-3 less than conventional CT). A magnification of 1.3 optimized tradeoffs between source and detector blur for a 0.5 mm focal spot. A custom antiscatter grid demonstrated significant reduction of artifacts without loss of contrast-to-noise ratio or increase in dose. Image quality in cadaveric specimens was assessed on a CBCT bench, demonstrating exquisite bone detail, visualization of intra-articular morphology, and soft-tissue visibility approaching that of diagnostic CT. The capability to image loaded extremities and conduct multi-modality CBCT/fluoroscopy with improved workflow compared to whole-body CT could be of value in a broad spectrum of applications, including orthopaedics, rheumatology, surgical planning, and treatment assessment. A clinical prototype has been constructed for deployment in pilot study trials.

  19. Clinical Applicability of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Monitoring Seroma Volume Change During Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tzu-I; Minkema, Danny; Elkhuizen, Paula; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Mourik, Anke M. van; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To determine whether cone-beam CT (CBCT) is effective in monitoring seroma reduction during breast irradiation when compared with conventional CT. Patients and Methods: This study included 19 women with Stage T1-2 breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Each patient underwent two to four CT and multiple CBCT scans (mean, 8; range, 7-13 scans) at various time intervals during radiotherapy. Seroma were contoured by two observers on all scans and checked by one radiation oncologist. Seroma clarity was determined according to The British Columbia Cancer Agency Seroma Clarity Score scale, and conformity index (CI) of the two observers was evaluated. Correlations in seroma contours and seroma characteristics between CBCT and CT, as well as interobserver variation, were examined. Results: The mean differences in seroma volume between CT and CBCT (3%, p = 0.3) and between the two observers (6%, p = 0.2) were not statistically significant. Seroma clarity correlated significantly with CI for both CT and CBCT (p = 0.02 and p = 0.001, respectively), indicating the higher the seroma clarity score, the greater the CI between the observers. With seroma clarity 3 or higher for CT and CBCT, a high level of observer concordance was shown (all CI of these scans were {>=}50%). Conclusion: Volume discrepancy between CBCT and CT and between the two observers was not statistically significant. Seroma clarity influenced observers' ability to contour on CT or CBCT equally. Therefore, CBCT is a good clinical surrogate for CT in monitoring seroma reduction during breast radiotherapy, especially for patients with seroma clarity score 3 or higher.

  20. Regularization design for high-quality cone-beam CT of intracranial hemorrhage using statistical reconstructio