Science.gov

Sample records for online news sources

  1. Inexpensive News Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Ellen D.; Wall, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Describes consumer or business-oriented online services that provide access to current news information and offers a less expensive alternative to standard online databases. Online clipping services are discussed, their costs are examined, and profiles of five services are compared: CompuServe, CompuServe as a gateway to IQuest, DELPHI, DIALCOM,…

  2. Online resources for news about toxicology and other environmental topics.

    PubMed

    South, J C

    2001-01-12

    Technology has revolutionized researchers' ability to find and retrieve news stories and press releases. Thanks to electronic library systems and telecommunications--notably the Internet--computer users in seconds can sift through millions of articles to locate mainstream articles about toxicology and other environmental topics. But that does not mean it is easy to find what one is looking for. There is a confusing array of databases and services that archive news articles and press releases: (1) some are free; others cost thousands of dollars a year to access, (2) some include hundreds of newspaper and magazine titles; others cover only one publication, (3) some contain archives going back decades; others have just the latest news, (4) some offer only journalistically balanced reports from mainstream news sources; others mix news with opinions and advocacy and include reports from obscure or biased sources. This article explores ways to find news online - particularly news about toxicology, hazardous chemicals, environmental health and the environment in general. The article covers web sites devoted to environmental news; sites and search engines for general-interest news; newspaper archives; commercial information services; press release distribution services and archives; and other resources and strategies for finding articles in the popular press about toxicology and the environment. PMID:11164981

  3. Scientific Sources' Perception of Network News Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Barbara; Singletary, Michael

    Recent polls seem to indicate that many Americans rely on television as a credible and primary source of news. To test the accuracy of this news, a study examined three networks' newscasts of science news, the attitudes of the science sources toward reporting in their field, and the factors related to accuracy. The Vanderbilt News Archives Index…

  4. News from Online: More Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-09-01

    on to Evaporative Cooling at http://www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/bec/evap_cool.html. The cartoon professors begin the explanation with a picture of steam rising from a cup of hot coffee. Next is an applet with atoms in a parabolic magnetic trap at http://www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/applets/bec.html. The height of the magnetic trap can be changed in order to allow for escape of the most energetic atoms, resulting in cooling so that the Bose-Einstein Condensate is formed. Physics 2000 demands robust computing power. Check the system requirements on the introductory screen before venturing too far into this site. Martin V. Goldman, from the University of Colorado at Boulder, is the Director of Physics 2000, which received support from the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and the National Science Foundation. David Rea is the Technical Director, and many others help make this excellent site possible. Mark your calendars: October 31 through December 3, 1999! Bookmark this site-- http://www.ched-ccce.org/confchem/1999/d/index.html --and sign up. The Winter 1999 CONFCHEM Online Conference will focus on Developments in Spectroscopy and Innovative Strategies for Teaching Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Curriculum. Scott Van Bramer of Widener University is the conference chair. Experts will present six papers, each to be followed by online discussions. CONFCHEM Online Conferences are sponsored by the American Chemical Society Division of Chemical Education's Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE). Several Online Conferences are held each year--all are well worth your time. World Wide Web Addresses EMSpectrum Explorer http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/EMSpectrum/emspectrum.html Light and Energy http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/index.html Emission Spectrum Java Applet http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/applets/emission/index.html Absorption Java Applet http://mc2.cchem

  5. News from Online: Kitchen Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    2000-10-01

    And one of the best sources for kitchen activities is the JCE Classroom Activities from the Journal of Chemical Education, edited by Nancy S. Gettys and Erica K. Jacobsen. Go to Anthocyanins: A Colorful Class of Compounds for acid-base indicators made from another item in the kitchen, purple cabbage--my favorite kitchen chemistry experiment.

  6. Media Credibility Reconsidered: Synergy between On-Air and Online News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucy, Erik P.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the combined effects of on-air and online network news exposure, placing student and adult news consumers in broadcast news, online news, and telewebbing conditions. Indicates that perceptions of network news credibility are affected by channel used. Offers evidence for the existence of a synergy effect between on-air and online news. (PM)

  7. Engagement with News Content in Online Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Reports indicate that as the Internet is displacing traditional news sources, younger users continue to be disconnected from the news. Fortunately, the Internet provides new ways of sharing and discussing news stories with others through social networking sites such as Facebook, which may be important for engaging users in the news they read…

  8. An Evaluation of Online Machine Translation of Arabic into English News Headlines: Implications on Students' Learning Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadhim, Kais A.; Habeeb, Luwaytha S.; Sapar, Ahmad Arifin; Hussin, Zaharah; Abdullah, Muhammad Ridhuan Tony Lim

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, online Machine Translation (MT) is used widely with translation software, such as Google and Babylon, being easily available and downloadable. This study aims to test the translation quality of these two machine systems in translating Arabic news headlines into English. 40 Arabic news headlines were selected from three online sources,…

  9. Decoding the codes: A content analysis of the news coverage of genetic cloning by three online news sites and three national daily newspapers, 1996 through 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Jon E.

    This study compared news coverage of genetic cloning research in three online news sites (CNN.com, ABC.com, and MSNBC.com) and three national daily newspapers (The New York Times, The Washington Post, and USA Today). The study involved the analysis of 230 online and print news articles concerning genetic cloning published from 1996 through 1998. Articles were examined with respect to formats, sources, focus, tone, and assessments about the impact of cloning research. Findings indicated that while print news formats remained relatively constant for the duration of this study, online news formats changed significantly with respect to the kinds of media used to represent the news, the layouts used to represent cloning news, and the emphasis placed on audio-visual content. Online stories were as much as 20 to 70% shorter than print stories. More than 50% of the articles appearing online were composed by outside sources (wire services, guest columnists, etc.). By comparison, nearly 90% of the articles published by print newspapers were written "in-house" by science reporters. Online news sites cited fewer sources and cited a smaller variety of sources than the newspapers examined here. In both news outlets, however, the sources most frequently cited were those with vested interests in furthering cloning research. Both online and print news coverage of cloning tends to focus principally on the technical procedures and on the future benefits of cloning. More than 60% of the articles focused on the techniques and technologies of cloning. Less than 25% of the articles focused on social, ethical, or legal issues associated with cloning. Similarly, articles from all six sources (75%) tended to be both positive and future-oriented. Less than 5% of the total articles examined here had a strongly negative or critical tone. Moreover, both online and print news sources increasingly conveyed a strong sense of acceptance about the possibility of human cloning. Data from this study

  10. Changing news: re-adjusting science studies to online newspapers.

    PubMed

    Riesch, Hauke

    2011-11-01

    With the newspapers' recent move to online reporting, traditional norms and practices of news reporting have changed to accommodate the new realities of online news writing. In particular, online news is much more fluid and prone to change in content than the traditional hard-copy newspapers--online newspaper articles often change over the course of the following days or even weeks as they respond to criticisms and new information becoming available. This poses a problem for social scientists who analyse newspaper coverage of science, health and risk topics, because it is no longer clear who has read and written what version, and what impact they potentially had on the national debates on these topics. In this note I want to briefly flag up this problem through two recent examples of U.K. national science stories and discuss the potential implications for PUS media research.

  11. Using the News: An Examination of the Value and Use of News Sources in CMC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Steve

    1997-01-01

    Investigates how members of a Usenet newsgroup value and use news sources. Finds that electronic news sources predominated and that media use was not tied to the user's geographic locale. Raises several questions for future research. (RS)

  12. Teachable Moments in the News - an Online Resource Solar System Science News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhala, H. A. T.; Miller, E. A.; Goldstein, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Teachable Moments in the News (www.challenger.org/tmn/) is an online resource developed at Challenger Center for Space Science Education that takes recent news stories related to Solar System science and places them in a context relevant to the grades K-12 science curriculum. Using stories such as the launch of the MESSENGER spacecraft to Mercury, Teachable Moments in the News is meant to provide a seamless pathway from the news desk to the classroom. For each news item, an overview of the story is provided, along with high-quality inquiry-based, standards-driven lessons and links to more in-depth articles. Teachable Moments in the News is also a great tool for scientists who wish to stay informed of the recent events in Solar System exploration. The archived back issues of the quarterly published Web digest allow for a quick refresher on the most important news stories over the past several months. The very accessible nature of the stories makes the resource valuable for college students, and even the general public, as a means to keep up-to-date about current developments in planetary astronomy. Furthermore, college and university teachers can easily adapt many of the lessons to fit into the curriculum of an undergraduate astronomy course. During the poster session, we welcome suggestions from the scientific community on ways to enhance the usefulness of Teachable Moments in the News. For example, researchers could form partnerships with Teachable Moments in the News to provide news stories on their current research to be featured on the Web site. We invite researchers interested in this education and public outreach tool to visit the poster and provide suggestions on how to make the resource work as effectively as possible.

  13. Television News Sources and News Channels: A Study in Agenda-Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Dan

    Noting that media agenda-setting research has seldom examined how the initial media agenda develops, a study examined the connection between news sources and agenda setting by means of a content analysis of sources and channels appearing in network television news and local television news. The findings were compared to similar studies of…

  14. TV News Sources and News Channels: A Study in Agenda-Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Dan

    1987-01-01

    Examines news sources and news channels appearing in local and national television newscasts, focusing on how media agenda-setting develops. Notes a high reliance on routine news by television journalists, as well as a high reliance on experts and officials. Suggests that officials and executives dominate the agenda-building process in television…

  15. News from Online: Industrial Chemicals and Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-02-01

    of the American Chemical Society Divisions of Polymer Chemistry and Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering and General Electric Corporation. The POLYED site, http:/ /chemdept.uwsp.edu/polyed/index.htm, is hosted by the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. This National Center for Polymer Education is another good place to go for information. More education is available at the Ziegler Research Group Home Page at http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/index.html . Go to Metallocene as Olefin Polymerization Catalysis: An Introduction ( http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/met_intro.html ) for historical accounts of metallocene and Ziegler-Natta catalysts. Movies are available here too. This Canadian site is well-documented and educational. Back at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, The Why Files site at http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu helps bring important chemical and technology news to the public. Go to the archived files of October 1997 ( http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu/shorties/catalyst.html ) to find information about the importance of low-temperature metallocene catalysts. The Why Files received funding from the National Science Foundation. Go here for science information in an easy-to-read format. One of the driving forces toward better catalysis is the attempt to reach 100% product, combining efficiency with lowered pollution. Companies can look to the Environmental Protection Agency for information: Environsense at http://es.epa.gov/ is pledged to offer "Common Sense Solutions to Environmental Problems". So where can we get these polymers? The American Chemical Society can help. Go to Chemcylopedia at http://pubs.acs.org/chemcy99/ for great information. Both purchasers and users of chemicals can benefit from this site. Searches can be made on the chemical or on the supplier. Information provided includes CAS Registry Numbers and special shipping requirements as well as potential applications. Do you remember that we started with paper? Let

  16. Online Sources of Competitive Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagers, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Presents an approach to using online sources of information for competitor intelligence (i.e., monitoring industry and tracking activities of competitors); identifies principal sources; and suggests some ways of making use of online databases. Types and sources of information and sources and database charts are appended. Eight references are…

  17. News from Online: What's New with Chime?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorland, Liz

    2002-07-01

    The Chime plugin (pronounced like the bells) provides a simple route to presenting interactive molecular structures to students via the Internet or in classroom presentations. Small inorganic molecules, ionic structures, organic molecules and giant macromolecules can all be viewed in several formats including ball and stick and spacefilling. Extensive Chime resources on the Internet allow chemistry and biochemistry instructors to create their own Web pages or to use some of the many tutorials for students already online. This article describes about twenty Chime-based Web sites in three categories: Chime Resources, Materials for Student and Classroom Use, and Structure Databases. A list of links is provided.

  18. Quantifying the role of online news in linking conservation research to Facebook and Twitter.

    PubMed

    Papworth, S K; Nghiem, T P L; Chimalakonda, D; Posa, M R C; Wijedasa, L S; Bickford, D; Carrasco, L R

    2015-06-01

    Conservation science needs to engage the general public to ensure successful conservation interventions. Although online technologies such as Twitter and Facebook offer new opportunities to accelerate communication between conservation scientists and the online public, factors influencing the spread of conservation news in online media are not well understood. We explored transmission of conservation research through online news articles with generalized linear mixed-effects models and an information theoretic approach. In particular, we assessed differences in the frequency conservation research is featured on online news sites and the impact of online conservation news content and delivery on Facebook likes and shares and Twitter tweets. Five percent of articles in conservation journals are reported in online news, and the probability of reporting depended on the journal. There was weak evidence that articles on climate change and mammals were more likely to be featured. Online news articles about charismatic mammals with illustrations were more likely to be shared or liked on Facebook and Twitter, but the effect of news sites was much larger. These results suggest journals have the greatest impact on which conservation research is featured and that news site has the greatest impact on how popular an online article will be on Facebook and Twitter. PMID:25626890

  19. Quantifying the role of online news in linking conservation research to Facebook and Twitter.

    PubMed

    Papworth, S K; Nghiem, T P L; Chimalakonda, D; Posa, M R C; Wijedasa, L S; Bickford, D; Carrasco, L R

    2015-06-01

    Conservation science needs to engage the general public to ensure successful conservation interventions. Although online technologies such as Twitter and Facebook offer new opportunities to accelerate communication between conservation scientists and the online public, factors influencing the spread of conservation news in online media are not well understood. We explored transmission of conservation research through online news articles with generalized linear mixed-effects models and an information theoretic approach. In particular, we assessed differences in the frequency conservation research is featured on online news sites and the impact of online conservation news content and delivery on Facebook likes and shares and Twitter tweets. Five percent of articles in conservation journals are reported in online news, and the probability of reporting depended on the journal. There was weak evidence that articles on climate change and mammals were more likely to be featured. Online news articles about charismatic mammals with illustrations were more likely to be shared or liked on Facebook and Twitter, but the effect of news sites was much larger. These results suggest journals have the greatest impact on which conservation research is featured and that news site has the greatest impact on how popular an online article will be on Facebook and Twitter.

  20. Still "Live at the Scene": An Exploration of Timely Television News Broadcasts Repurposed as Online Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Jennifer Marie

    2012-01-01

    Technology has afforded journalists a myriad of new opportunities to promote and publish content online. This project provides an overview of many of the new practices that have become standard operating procedures for digital media news creation and examines how the heavy imprint of traditional media news values are not contextualized within the…

  1. Examining Perceptions about Mandatory Influenza Vaccination of Healthcare Workers through Online Comments on News Stories

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yang; Pereira, Jennifer A.; Quach, Susan; Bettinger, Julie A.; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Corace, Kimberly; Garber, Gary; Feinberg, Yael; Guay, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to understand online public perceptions of the debate surrounding the choice of annual influenza vaccinations or wearing masks as a condition of employment for healthcare workers, such as the one enacted in British Columbia in August 2012. Methods Four national and 82 local (British Columbia) Canadian online news sites were searched for articles posted between August 2012 and May 2013 containing the words “healthcare workers” and “mandatory influenza vaccinations/immunizations” or “mandatory flu shots and healthcare workers.” We included articles from sources that predominantly concerned our topic of interest and that generated reader comments. Two researchers coded the unedited comments using thematic analysis, categorizing codes to allow themes to emerge. In addition to themes, the comments were categorized by: 1) sentiment towards influenza vaccines; 2) support for mandatory vaccination policies; 3) citing of reference materials or statistics; 4) self-identified health-care worker status; and 5) sharing of a personal story. Results 1163 comments made by 648 commenters responding to 36 articles were analyzed. Popular themes included concerns about freedom of choice, vaccine effectiveness, patient safety, and distrust in government, public health, and the pharmaceutical industry. Almost half (48%) of commenters expressed a negative sentiment toward the influenza vaccine, 28% were positive, 20% were neutral, and 4% expressed mixed sentiment. Of those who commented on the policy, 75% did not support the condition to work policy, while 25% were in favour. Of the commenters, 11% self-identified as healthcare workers, 13% shared personal stories, and 18% cited a reference or statistic. Interpretation The perception of the influenza vaccine in the comment sections of online news sites is fairly poor. Public health agencies should consider including online forums, comment sections, and social media sites as part of their

  2. Words analysis of online Chinese news headlines about trending events: a complex network perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajiao; Fang, Wei; An, Haizhong; Huang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Because the volume of information available online is growing at breakneck speed, keeping up with meaning and information communicated by the media and netizens is a new challenge both for scholars and for companies who must address public relations crises. Most current theories and tools are directed at identifying one website or one piece of online news and do not attempt to develop a rapid understanding of all websites and all news covering one topic. This paper represents an effort to integrate statistics, word segmentation, complex networks and visualization to analyze headlines' keywords and words relationships in online Chinese news using two samples: the 2011 Bohai Bay oil spill and the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. We gathered all the news headlines concerning the two trending events in the search results from Baidu, the most popular Chinese search engine. We used Simple Chinese Word Segmentation to segment all the headlines into words and then took words as nodes and considered adjacent relations as edges to construct word networks both using the whole sample and at the monthly level. Finally, we develop an integrated mechanism to analyze the features of words' networks based on news headlines that can account for all the keywords in the news about a particular event and therefore track the evolution of news deeply and rapidly.

  3. Words Analysis of Online Chinese News Headlines about Trending Events: A Complex Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huajiao; Fang, Wei; An, Haizhong; Huang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Because the volume of information available online is growing at breakneck speed, keeping up with meaning and information communicated by the media and netizens is a new challenge both for scholars and for companies who must address public relations crises. Most current theories and tools are directed at identifying one website or one piece of online news and do not attempt to develop a rapid understanding of all websites and all news covering one topic. This paper represents an effort to integrate statistics, word segmentation, complex networks and visualization to analyze headlines’ keywords and words relationships in online Chinese news using two samples: the 2011 Bohai Bay oil spill and the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. We gathered all the news headlines concerning the two trending events in the search results from Baidu, the most popular Chinese search engine. We used Simple Chinese Word Segmentation to segment all the headlines into words and then took words as nodes and considered adjacent relations as edges to construct word networks both using the whole sample and at the monthly level. Finally, we develop an integrated mechanism to analyze the features of words’ networks based on news headlines that can account for all the keywords in the news about a particular event and therefore track the evolution of news deeply and rapidly. PMID:25807376

  4. Headless, hungry, and unhealthy: a video content analysis of obese persons portrayed in online news.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Rebecca M; Peterson, Jamie Lee; DePierre, Jenny A; Luedicke, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The news media has substantial influence on public perceptions of social and health issues. This study conducted a video content analysis to examine portrayals of obese persons in online news reports about obesity. The authors downloaded online news videos about obesity (N = 371) from 5 major news websites and systematically coded visual portrayals of obese and nonobese adults and youth in these videos. The authors found that 65% of overweight/obese adults and 77% of overweight/obese youth were portrayed in a negative, stigmatizing manner across multiple obesity-related topics covered in online news videos. In particular, overweight/obese individuals were significantly more likely than were nonoverweight individuals to be portrayed as headless, with an unflattering emphasis on isolated body parts, from an unflattering rear view of their excess weight, eating unhealthy foods, engaging in sedentary behavior, and dressed in inappropriately fitting clothing. Nonoverweight individuals were significantly more likely to be portrayed positively. In conclusion, obese children and adults are frequently stigmatized in online news videos about obesity. These findings have important implications for public perceptions of obesity and obese persons and may reinforce negative societal weight bias.

  5. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    EPS AWARD WINNERS Award for outreach to Physics Education authors; TEACHER TRAINING Helping teachers specialize in physics; AAPT SUMMER MEETING The science of light; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Do you believe in skepticism?; E-LEARNING Massive investment in Swedish online learning; UK SCIENCE YEAR News from Science Year; 11-16 CURRICULUM Naming the energy parts; TEACHER TRAINING Electronic Discussion Group for Trainee Teachers; PUBLICATIONS Physics on Course 2002; WALES Physics in Powys; HIGHER EDUCATION HE solutions to the physics teacher shortage; SCOTLAND The 27th Scottish Stirling Meeting; NORTHERN IRELAND Belfast physics teachers' meeting; SCOTLAND Physics Summer School, Edinburgh 2001; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Physics education research: massive growth; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Just-In-Time Teaching;

  6. A Summarization System for Chinese News from Multiple Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsin-Hsi; Kuo, June-Jei; Huang, Sheng-Jie; Lin, Chuan-Jie; Wung, Hung-Chia

    2003-01-01

    Proposes a summarization system for multiple documents that employs named entities and other signatures to cluster news from different sources, as well as punctuation marks, linking elements, and topic chains to identify the meaningful units (MUs). Using nouns and verbs to identify similar MUs, focusing and browsing models are applied to represent…

  7. Strategy and Structure for Online News Production - Case Studies of CNN and NRK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumsvik, Arne H.

    This cross-national comparative case study of online news production analyzes the strategies of Cable News Network (CNN) and the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK), aiming at understanding of the implications of organizational strategy on the role of journalists, explains why traditional media organizations have a tendency to develop a multi-platform approach (distributing content on several platforms, such as television, online, mobile) rather than developing the cross-media (with interplay between media types) or multimedia approach anticipated by both scholars and practitioners.

  8. Frequently cited sources in cancer news coverage: a content analysis examining the relationship between cancer news content and source citation.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Cortney M; Jensen, Jakob D; Stryker, Jo Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The media are a frequent and sometimes sole source of cancer information for many people. News coverage of cancer can be influential to cancer-related practices such as prevention or detection behaviors, and sources cited by journalists may be influential in shaping this coverage. A content analysis (n = 3,656 stories) revealed that the most frequently cited sources in cancer news articles-research institutions and medical journals-receive disproportionately more attention compared to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the American Cancer Society (ACS), and pharmaceutical companies. Research institutions were cited twice as frequently as medical journals, and more than three times as frequently as pharmaceutical companies. Most clinical trial stories were optimistic or neutral in tone, and tone was significantly related to citations of pharmaceutical companies and medical journals. Implications for effects of cancer coverage on behaviors, and the influence of sources such as research institutions and pharmaceutical companies, are discussed.

  9. Frequently cited sources in cancer news coverage: a content analysis examining the relationship between cancer news content and source citation.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Cortney M; Jensen, Jakob D; Stryker, Jo Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The media are a frequent and sometimes sole source of cancer information for many people. News coverage of cancer can be influential to cancer-related practices such as prevention or detection behaviors, and sources cited by journalists may be influential in shaping this coverage. A content analysis (n = 3,656 stories) revealed that the most frequently cited sources in cancer news articles-research institutions and medical journals-receive disproportionately more attention compared to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the American Cancer Society (ACS), and pharmaceutical companies. Research institutions were cited twice as frequently as medical journals, and more than three times as frequently as pharmaceutical companies. Most clinical trial stories were optimistic or neutral in tone, and tone was significantly related to citations of pharmaceutical companies and medical journals. Implications for effects of cancer coverage on behaviors, and the influence of sources such as research institutions and pharmaceutical companies, are discussed. PMID:19784789

  10. Journals Online News: Dispersing Collection Management Information on the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, Anne; And Others

    Journals Online News (JON) is a World Wide Web site created and maintained by the Collection Development Team at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) Libraries in order to speak with the UTK community about journals-related issues. Its primary function at present is to provide UTK faculty and other interested parties with the latest…

  11. Making Sense of Intimate Partner Violence in Late Life: Comments from Online News Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brossoie, Nancy; Roberto, Karen A.; Barrow, Katie M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain insight into public awareness of intimate partner violence (IPV) in late life by how individuals respond to incidents of IPV reported in the newspaper. Design and Methods: Using grounded theory techniques, online news items covering 24 incidents of IPV in late life, and the reader comments posted to…

  12. In Search of Hyperlocal News: An Examination of the Organizational, Technological and Economic Forces that Shape 21st Century Approaches to Independent Online Journalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horning, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many popular media reports have observed a new phenomenon in news known as hyperlocal online news. While some accounts suggest that hyperlocal is different from community news in that it focuses on news at the neighborhood level or on areas that are often less frequently covered by the mainstream media, little research has…

  13. Taking It to the Web: Youth News Moves Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grusin, Elinor Kelley; Edmondson, Aimee

    2003-01-01

    Notes that the youth market is one of the most important in helping to stop newspapers' declining circulation. Explains that some newspapers have taken youth content online because Web sites can be customized based on individual interests of specific age groups. Examines a sample of Web sites for teens and preteens sponsored by daily newspapers.…

  14. Extraction of Temporal Networks from Term Co-Occurrences in Online Textual Sources

    PubMed Central

    Popović, Marko; Štefančić, Hrvoje; Sluban, Borut; Kralj Novak, Petra; Grčar, Miha; Mozetič, Igor; Puliga, Michelangelo; Zlatić, Vinko

    2014-01-01

    A stream of unstructured news can be a valuable source of hidden relations between different entities, such as financial institutions, countries, or persons. We present an approach to continuously collect online news, recognize relevant entities in them, and extract time-varying networks. The nodes of the network are the entities, and the links are their co-occurrences. We present a method to estimate the significance of co-occurrences, and a benchmark model against which their robustness is evaluated. The approach is applied to a large set of financial news, collected over a period of two years. The entities we consider are 50 countries which issue sovereign bonds, and which are insured by Credit Default Swaps (CDS) in turn. We compare the country co-occurrence networks to the CDS networks constructed from the correlations between the CDS. The results show relatively small, but significant overlap between the networks extracted from the news and those from the CDS correlations. PMID:25470498

  15. News from Online: Using the Web for Your Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1998-09-01

    Have you decided to put your course online? Do you wish you had access to a package that would help you set up your course outline on the Web? There is real help out there for you. Look to the University of Hawaii and the Maui Community College for assistance, http://www.ecet.mauicc.hawaii.edu/. This Advanced Technology Education (ATE) project, funded by NSF, provides tools for setting up your course online including quiz- building and easy-to-use forms. And because you are an educator, it is free for your use. You can also try out a commercial product to see if you like it. For instance, WebCT will give you a guest account at http://homebrew.cs.ubc.ca/webct/try/.

  16. News of Hurricane Andrew: The Agenda of Sources and the Sources' Agendas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salwen, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    Studies quotations in newspaper coverage of Hurricane Andrew, showing that individuals who were not affiliated with government or business were quoted most often. Shows that most sources were quoted as experts, with individuals represented as suffering victims, providing the news media with human interest quotations. Notes that most sources…

  17. Making Sense of Intimate Partner Violence in Late Life: Comments From Online News Readers

    PubMed Central

    Brossoie, Nancy; Roberto, Karen A.; Barrow, Katie M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain insight into public awareness of intimate partner violence (IPV) in late life by how individuals respond to incidents of IPV reported in the newspaper. Design and Methods: Using grounded theory techniques, online news items covering 24 incidents of IPV in late life, and the reader comments posted to them were analyzed. The news items were examined for incident details, story framing, and reporting style. An open coding process (Charmaz, K. [2006]. Constructing grounded theory: A practical guide through qualitative analysis. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.) was used to generate a comprehensive understanding of themes and patterns in the comments posted by readers. Results: Few posters indicated that incidents were episodes of IPV. As many posters struggled to make sense of incidents, they attempted to remove guilt from the perpetrator by assigning blame elsewhere. Comments were influenced by personal assumptions and perspectives about IPV, relationships, and old age; reporting style of the news items; and comments posted by other posters. Implications: Altering public views of IPV in late life requires raising awareness through education, reframing the ways in which information is presented, and placing greater emphasis on the context of the violence. By engaging interactive news media, reporters, participatory journalists, and policymakers can enhance public recognition and understanding of IPV in late life. PMID:22547086

  18. Online Sources for Competitor Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Arthur

    Competitor information gathering is a key aspect of business planning. Information can be collected from either published or unpublished sources. Unpublished information will often be verified based on material from published sources. Published information is more likely to be factual and includes financial, stockmarket, press, market and…

  19. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    Belfast: On the next level above Galileo Wales: 2nd All Wales Physics Teachers Meeting England: Good afternoon Natural Philosphers... Communication: Posters win prizes Careers: Physics On Course 2004 Visits: Refreshing Physics Sport: Cheating at baseball Physics on Stage: Polish performance Space: Forces that affect GPS satellites New Zealand: It’s not All Black News these days New Initiatives: NOISE Physics on Stage 3: Lively stars heading for ESA

  20. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Meetings: Physics Teachers@CERN 2003 Education Group Annual Conference: Observations by a first-time participant... Summer Workshop: Making Music Competition: Physics in the fast lane Bristol Festival of Physics: Ice cream ice-breakers Online Resources: Old favourites go online UK Curriculum: What does society want? UK Curriculum: Assessment of Science Learning 14-19 Forthcoming Events

  1. Online bibliographic sources in hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Havener, W. Michael

    2001-01-01

    Traditional commercial bibliographic databases and indexes provide some access to hydrology materials produced by the government; however, these sources do not provide comprehensive coverage of relevant hydrologic publications. This paper discusses bibliographic information available from the federal government and state geological surveys, water resources agencies, and depositories. In addition to information in these databases, the paper describes the scope, styles of citing, subject terminology, and the ways these information sources are currently being searched, formally and informally, by hydrologists. Information available from the federal and state agencies and from the state depositories might be missed by limiting searches to commercially distributed databases.

  2. An Experimental Investigation of News Source and the Hostile Media Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arpan, Laura M.; Raney, Arthur A.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the interaction among different news sources, individual levels of partisanship, and the hostile media effect in sports news. Explains that university students read a balanced story about their home-town college football team in one of three newspapers: the home-town, the cross-state rival university's town, or a neutral town paper.…

  3. College and University Administrators' Views about Serving as News Sources for Student Reporters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Liz; Wernsman, Robert

    Student journalists at colleges and universities routinely interview and quote collegiate administrators for campus-based news stories; however, the role of those administrators as news sources apparently has not been considered. A study examined the role of administrators and their assessment of student journalists. A questionnaire was sent to 5…

  4. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Italy’s Physics Olympiad creates greater interest and motivation House of Experiments: 'humour helps in the teaching of science' Science takes stage in Germany PPARC news: guide and awards Schools newspaper competition focuses on Venus Website offers practical advice SHAP workshop will sharpen up teachers' skills Students will soon use Faulkes Telescope North to see the stars Talk takes a tour of the universe ASE 2004 Welsh physicists share secrets Switch students on to physics Teachers Awards 2004 recognize quality of teaching AAPT spends winter in Miami sun Schools Physics Group meeting will take place at Rugby School

  5. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    AWARDS Presentations to top students; PHYSICS IN PRIMARY SCIENCE Amaze and inspire; WEB RESOURCES PhysicsClub goes live; EVENTS GIREP develops thinking; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Carbon dating may not run to time; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Vocational qualifications; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Flanders gears up for curriculum change; EXHIBITIONS Building the Universe; EVENTS Physics Discipline Network VII; SPECIAL NEWS FEATURE Progress in UK post-16 courses; Teaching Advancing Physics... the story so far; An outside observer's view of Advancing Physics; Student views of SHAP; Results from the SHAP pilot: successful and girl-friendly; AWARDS Royal visit to publisher;

  6. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-07-01

    Einstein Year: Argentina remembers Einstein’s visit Health and Beauty: The sweet smell of fragrant molecules Austria: Physics and society top the bill Canada: Innovative teaching strategies pave the way for modern physics Publications: New online journal lets young scientists speak for themselves Forthcoming Events

  7. Effects of distracting ads and cognitive control on the processing of online news stories with stereotype-related information.

    PubMed

    Kononova, Anastasia G

    2013-05-01

    An experiment (N=123) examined how individuals cognitively process online news stories depicting African-American characters with stereotype-consistent and -inconsistent attributes and whether distracting online ads interfere with story processing. Two cognitive control functions, updating and inhibition, were predicted to moderate the effects of distracting ads. Recall of characters' attributes and overall characters' description were included in the study as dependent measures. Findings indicated that distracting online ads hinder recall of information about and descriptions of story characters. Inhibition and updating affect dependent measures and moderate the effects of distracting online ads on characters' descriptions.

  8. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    Astronomy: Trust founder receives heavenly honour Africa: UK teaching methods make the difference in Rwandan schools Spaced Out: UK-based scale model places Jodrell Bank at the centre of our solar system Teaching Support: Teacher Network makes its mark in the classroom Correction Art on Stage: Galileo lacks momentum Meeting: Teachers are inspired by US gathering Online Study: PPLATO Foundation promotes new avenue to university study Conference: GIREP '04 creates atmosphere of 'curiosity and enthusiasm' Meeting: SonSD meeting allows exchange of teaching ideas Competition: Win a digital camera! Physics in Perspective: Events highlight how rewarding physics can be Meeting: ASE conference to deliver the best of Physics Education

  9. Understanding Public Perceptions of the HPV Vaccination Based on Online Comments to Canadian News Articles

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Yael; Pereira, Jennifer A.; Quach, Susan; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Crowcroft, Natasha S.; Wilson, Sarah E.; Guay, Maryse; Lei, Yang; Deeks, Shelley L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the variation in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage across Canada, and debate regarding delivery of HPV vaccines in Catholic schools, we studied online comments on Canadian news websites to understand public perceptions of HPV and HPV vaccine. Methods We searched English- and French-language Canadian news websites for 2012 articles that contained the terms “HPV” or “human papillomavirus.” Articles about HPV vaccinations that contained at least one comment were included. Two researchers independently coded comments, analyzing them for emerging themes. Results We identified 3073 comments from 1198 individuals in response to 71 news articles; 630 (52.6%) individuals expressed positive sentiments about HPV vaccination (2.5 comments/individual), 404 (33.7%) were negative (3.0 comments/individual), 34 (2.8%) were mixed (1.5 comments/individual) and 130 (10.8%) were neutral (1.6 comments/individual). Vaccine-supportive commenters believed the vaccine is safe and effective. Common themes in negative comments included concerns regarding HPV vaccine safety and efficacy, distrust of pharmaceutical companies and government, and belief that school-age children are too young for HPV vaccine. Many comments focused on whether the Catholic Church has the right to inform health policy for students, and discussion often evolved into debates regarding HPV and sexual behaviour. We noted that many individuals doubted the credibility of vaccine safety information. Conclusion The majority of commenters do not appear to be against HPV vaccination, but public health messaging that focuses on both the vaccine’s safety profile, and its use as a means to prevent cancer rather than sexually transmitted HPV infection may facilitate its acceptance. PMID:26053866

  10. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    Resources: Online schools video library GIREP Seminar: A seminar not a conference New Teaching Resource: Free living for teachers Space: NASA proposes MEER - Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic-Reboost Electronic Teaching Materials: Superconductivity motivates need for upper secondary curriculum subjects Gifted and Talented: Seminars seek challenges Space: Comet chasing Particle Physics: Playing with single electrons Physics on Stage: Teachers explore the meaning of life Physics on Stage: Greek national event Physics on Stage: Physics on the Slovak stage Physics on Stage: Clubbing in Germany Physics on Stage: The Sun's star performance Higher Education: Physics: so refreshing USA: Broadening the Base AAPT Summer Meeting: US teachers in good form Astronomy: High school astronomy in the Czech Republic Space: Express to Mars Particle Physics: Journey to the centre of the Earth? ASE 2004: Flight from the ASE Physics Songs: A powerful melody Teacher Training: European training looks for ideal model

  11. Political Ads vs. News as Sources of Issue Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Xinshu; Chaffee, Steven H.

    A study reexamined survey data collected in late October 1984 in order to test the validity of the generalization that people are influenced more by television ads than they are by television news. Sampling was based on random digit dialing in Dane County, Wisconsin, and 416 interviews conducted by telephone. Data analysis indicated that the…

  12. Online sources of herbal product information.

    PubMed

    Owens, Christopher; Baergen, Ralph; Puckett, Derek

    2014-02-01

    Herbal products are commonly used to treat clinical conditions and are often purchased online without the supervision of a healthcare provider. The use of herbals remains controversial because of widespread exaggerated claims of clinical efficacy and safety. We conducted an online search of 13 common herbals (including black cohosh, echinacea, garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, kava, saw palmetto, and St John's wort) and reviewed the top 50 Web sites for each using a Google search. We analyzed clinical claims, warnings, and other safety information. A total of 1179 Web sites were examined. Less than 8% of retail sites provided information regarding potential adverse effects, drug interactions, and other safety information; only 10.5% recommended consultation with a healthcare professional. Less than 3% cited scientific literature to accompany their claims. Key safety information is still lacking from many online sources of herbal information. Certain nonretail site types may be more reliable, but physicians and other healthcare professionals should be aware of the variable quality of these sites to help patients make more informed decisions. PMID:24290486

  13. Teaching Journalism Students about Confidential Whistleblower Sources: An Analysis of Introductory News Writing Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huxford, John; Moore, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Whistleblowers are a key journalistic source for many current news stories. However, reporters pursuing these major stories must navigate the dilemma between transparent full disclosure and protecting their confidential source. Professional journalists begin their journey as students, and students begin their journey in the classroom with a…

  14. Maintaining a News Perspective Remotely through Online Information Retrieval: Task-Based Web Experiences of Foreign News Correspondents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Kuanyuh Tony

    2009-01-01

    A two-stage mixed methods approach was used to examine how foreign correspondents stationed in the United States use World Wide Web technology to maintain their news perspectives remotely. Despite emerging technology playing an increasingly significant role in the production of international journalism, the subject under investigation has been…

  15. How Do Washington's Newspaper Editors Evaluate Their Sources of Agricultural News?--A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, M. W.

    This report presents the results of a questionnaire sent to the daily and weekly newspaper editors in Washington to evaluate their sources of agricultural news. Responses were obtained from 16 of 21 daily newspaper editors queried and 63 of 140 weekly editors. The questionnaire was designed to check the accuracy of newspapers' mailing addresses,…

  16. Audiovisual News, Cartoons, and Films as Sources of Authentic Language Input and Language Proficiency Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2012-01-01

    In today's audiovisually driven world, various audiovisual programs can be incorporated as authentic sources of potential language input for second language acquisition. In line with this view, the present research aimed at discovering the effectiveness of exposure to news, cartoons, and films as three different types of authentic audiovisual…

  17. Musicking Online: Organizing Reference Sources in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeto, Kimmy

    2012-01-01

    Online music research resources took center stage at the second plenary session "Wrangling the Information Universe: Moving From Institutional Portals to a Shared Resource for Online Music Sources" held on Friday, February 17, 2012, at the Music Library Association (MLA) 2012 Annual Meeting in Dallas, Texas. The Reference Sources Subcommittee…

  18. News coverage of controversial emerging technologies. Evidence for the issue attention cycle in print and online media.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ashley A; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the issue attention cycle for print and online media coverage of a scientific publication examining the deaths of Chinese factory workers due to lung damage from chronic exposure to nanoparticles. The results of the nanoparticle study, published in 2009, embody news values that would make the study a prime candidate for press coverage, namely, novelty, negativity, controversy, and potential widespread impact. Nevertheless, mentions of the event in traditional English-language print media were nearly nonexistent. Online media, on the other hand, gave the story greater coverage. This case study exemplifies why online media may not be bound to the same issue attention cycle that print media are for controversial scientific events. PMID:23379318

  19. Earned Media and Public Engagement With CDC’s "Tips From Former Smokers" Campaign: An Analysis of Online News and Blog Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Rachel; Szczypka, Glen; Vera, Lisa; Emery, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    . Comment coding revealed approximately equal levels of opposition and support overall. We identified four common arguments among oppositional comments: government intrusion on personal behaviors, problematic allocation of governmental spending, questionable science, and challenges regarding campaign efficacy. Supportive comments tended to convey personal stories and emotions. Conclusions The Tips campaign received limited coverage on either online news or blog sources, but the limited number of stories generated engagement among online audiences. In addition to the content and volume of blog and news coverage, audience comments and websites’ mechanisms for sharing stories via social media are likely to determine the influence of online earned media. In order to facilitate meaningful evaluation of public health campaigns within the rapidly advancing media environment, there is a need for the public health community to build consensus regarding collection and assessment of engagement data. PMID:25604520

  20. National Cancer Institute News

    MedlinePlus

    ... Workshop NCI Annual Fact Book NCI Visuals Online Social Media @NCIMedia NCI YouTube Subscribe to NCI News Releases ... posts Subscribe Events Scientific Meetings and Lectures Conferences Social Media Events News Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 ...

  1. Analysis of the Capacity of Google Trends to Measure Interest in Conservation Topics and the Role of Online News.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Le T P; Papworth, Sarah K; Lim, Felix K S; Carrasco, Luis R

    2016-01-01

    With the continuous growth of internet usage, Google Trends has emerged as a source of information to investigate how social trends evolve over time. Knowing how the level of interest in conservation topics--approximated using Google search volume--varies over time can help support targeted conservation science communication. However, the evolution of search volume over time and the mechanisms that drive peaks in searches are poorly understood. We conducted time series analyses on Google search data from 2004 to 2013 to investigate: (i) whether interests in selected conservation topics have declined and (ii) the effect of news reporting and academic publishing on search volume. Although trends were sensitive to the term used as benchmark, we did not find that public interest towards conservation topics such as climate change, ecosystem services, deforestation, orangutan, invasive species and habitat loss was declining. We found, however, a robust downward trend for endangered species and an upward trend for ecosystem services. The quantity of news articles was related to patterns in Google search volume, whereas the number of research articles was not a good predictor but lagged behind Google search volume, indicating the role of news in the transfer of conservation science to the public.

  2. Analysis of the Capacity of Google Trends to Measure Interest in Conservation Topics and the Role of Online News

    PubMed Central

    Nghiem, Le T. P.; Papworth, Sarah K.; Lim, Felix K. S.; Carrasco, Luis R.

    2016-01-01

    With the continuous growth of internet usage, Google Trends has emerged as a source of information to investigate how social trends evolve over time. Knowing how the level of interest in conservation topics—approximated using Google search volume—varies over time can help support targeted conservation science communication. However, the evolution of search volume over time and the mechanisms that drive peaks in searches are poorly understood. We conducted time series analyses on Google search data from 2004 to 2013 to investigate: (i) whether interests in selected conservation topics have declined and (ii) the effect of news reporting and academic publishing on search volume. Although trends were sensitive to the term used as benchmark, we did not find that public interest towards conservation topics such as climate change, ecosystem services, deforestation, orangutan, invasive species and habitat loss was declining. We found, however, a robust downward trend for endangered species and an upward trend for ecosystem services. The quantity of news articles was related to patterns in Google search volume, whereas the number of research articles was not a good predictor but lagged behind Google search volume, indicating the role of news in the transfer of conservation science to the public. PMID:27028399

  3. Analysis of the Capacity of Google Trends to Measure Interest in Conservation Topics and the Role of Online News.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Le T P; Papworth, Sarah K; Lim, Felix K S; Carrasco, Luis R

    2016-01-01

    With the continuous growth of internet usage, Google Trends has emerged as a source of information to investigate how social trends evolve over time. Knowing how the level of interest in conservation topics--approximated using Google search volume--varies over time can help support targeted conservation science communication. However, the evolution of search volume over time and the mechanisms that drive peaks in searches are poorly understood. We conducted time series analyses on Google search data from 2004 to 2013 to investigate: (i) whether interests in selected conservation topics have declined and (ii) the effect of news reporting and academic publishing on search volume. Although trends were sensitive to the term used as benchmark, we did not find that public interest towards conservation topics such as climate change, ecosystem services, deforestation, orangutan, invasive species and habitat loss was declining. We found, however, a robust downward trend for endangered species and an upward trend for ecosystem services. The quantity of news articles was related to patterns in Google search volume, whereas the number of research articles was not a good predictor but lagged behind Google search volume, indicating the role of news in the transfer of conservation science to the public. PMID:27028399

  4. Viruses, Trojan Horses, and Other Badware: Information and Implications for Online Searchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clancy, Steve

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the various forms of computer viruses and the threat they pose to online databases. Available protection programs are described, and a list of online sources of protection programs and news is provided. (14 references) (CLB)

  5. Evaluating Online Sources: Helping Students Determine Trustworthiness, Readability, and Usefulness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baildon, Mark; Baildon, Rindi

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, young people are interacting with information from a range of complex online sources (e.g., images, videos, websites, etc.) that inform them about content that is typically part of social studies. This makes helping students learn to become skilled careful and critical readers of all texts (from textbooks, trade books, magazines, and…

  6. Source reduction from chemical plants using on-line optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Pike, R.W.; Hertwig, T.A.

    1995-12-01

    An effective approach for source reduction in chemical plants has been demonstrated using on-line optimization with flowsheeting (ASPEN PLUS) for process optimization and parameter estimation and the Tjao-Biegler algorithm implemented in a mathematical programming language (GAMS/MINOS) for data reconciliation and gross error detection. Results for a Monsanto sulfuric acid plant with a Bailey distributed control system showed a 25% reduction in the sulfur dioxide emissions and a 17% improvement in the profit over the current operating conditions. Details of the methods used are described.

  7. Research News

    MedlinePlus

    Research News - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis ... Email Home Research Research News & Progress Research News Research News Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print Read ...

  8. Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST): Online ICA and source localization.

    PubMed

    Pion-Tonachini, Luca; Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Makeig, Scott; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2015-01-01

    The Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a noninvasive functional brain activity recording method that shows promise for becoming a 3-D cortical imaging modality with high temporal resolution. Currently, most of the tools developed for EEG analysis focus mainly on offline processing. This study introduces and demonstrates the Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), an extension to the widely distributed EEGLAB environment. REST allows blind source separation of EEG data in real-time using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis (ORICA), plus near real-time localization of separated sources. Two source localization methods are available to fit equivalent current dipoles or estimate spatial source distributions of selected sources. Selected measures of raw EEG data or component activations (e.g. time series of the data, spectral changes over time, equivalent current dipoles, etc.) can be visualized in near real-time. Finally, this study demonstrates the accuracy and functionality of REST with data from two experiments and discusses some relevant applications.

  9. An Update on Electronic Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Katherine

    1987-01-01

    This review of new developments and products in online services discusses trends in travel related services; full text databases; statistical source databases; an emphasis on regional and international business news; and user friendly systems. (Author/CLB)

  10. Adolescent Health Literacy: The Importance of Credible Sources for Online Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaddar, Suad F.; Valerio, Melissa A.; Garcia, Carolyn M.; Hansen, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Little research has examined adolescent health literacy and its relationship with online health information sources. The purpose of this study is to explore health literacy among a predominantly Hispanic adolescent population and to investigate whether exposure to a credible source of online health information, MedlinePlus[R], is…

  11. How Users Take Advantage of Different Forms of Interactivity on Online News Sites: Clicking, E-Mailing, and Commenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boczkowski, Pablo J.; Mitchelstein, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the uptake of multiple interactive features on news sites. It looks at the thematic composition of the most clicked, most e-mailed, and most commented stories during periods of heightened and routine political activity. Results show that (a) during the former period, the most commented stories were more likely to be focused on…

  12. The exposure of the nursing profession in online and print media

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Rodrigo José Martins; Graveto, João Manuel Garcia de Nascimento; Queiroz, Ana Maria Correia Albuquerque

    2014-01-01

    Objective to describe the coverage of news concerning the nursing profession in the Portuguese media: informative sites on the Internet and in print media. Method a total of 1,271 health news items were collected in September and October of 2011 (956 online news items and 325 news items originating from the press review of the Portuguese Order of Nurses). Statistical analysis was used to characterize the variables. Results nurses were the sources of information in 6.6% of cases, suggesting limited media exposure. The health news collected is characterized by a production based on limited information sources, that is, male and official sources, on information disseminated by news agencies focused on economic and political issues in the health field. Conclusion the presence of nurses in the news concerning nursing health is reduced. We suggest that nurses develop public communication skills to disseminate the importance of their profession in society and their relationship with the media. PMID:24553715

  13. Multi-source information diffusion in online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Fei; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2015-07-01

    Individual spreading behavior in online social networks is closely related to user activity, tie strength, and other user and network features. The results concentrate on personal spreading decisions; however, whether these features promote the global information diffusion and increase the macroscopic density of infected agents, remains unclear to us. In this paper, we propose a multi-source diffusion model in which agents may create new messages and spread other agents’ messages. Agents receive many messages, and each time they select a certain message preferentially to spread in consideration of different features. Simulation results show the density of infected agents for different messages follows a power-law distribution in both scale-free and small-world networks. Selecting the largest author degree, author activity and tie strength preferentially can advance the overall diffusion process. Weak tie bias is the least effective feature for multiple information diffusion, but it helps to diffuse a single message. Unexpectedly, the bias of interest similarity does not have an apparent effect. Integrated with the influence on individual diffusion behavior, strong tie bias is a significant feature both for local and global diffusion.

  14. Use of Online Sources of Information by Dental Practitioners: Findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Funkhouser, Ellen; Agee, Bonita S.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Qvist, Vibeke; McClelland, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Estimate the proportion of dental practitioners who use online sources of information for practice guidance. Methods From a survey of 657 dental practitioners in The Dental Practice Based Research Network, four indicators of online use for practice guidance were calculated: read journals online, obtained continuing education (CDE) through online sources, rated an online source as most influential, and reported frequently using an online source for guidance. Demographics, journals read, and use of various sources of information for practice guidance in terms of frequency and influence were ascertained for each. Results Overall, 21% (n=138) were classified into one of the four indicators of online use: 14% (n=89) rated an online source as most influential and 13% (n=87) reported frequently using an online source for guidance; few practitioners (5%, n=34) read journals online, fewer (3%, n=17) obtained CDE through online sources. Use of online information sources varied considerably by region and practice characteristics. In general, the 4 indicators represented practitioners with as many differences as similarities to each other and to offline users. Conclusion A relatively small proportion of dental practitioners use information from online sources for practice guidance. Variation exists regarding practitioners’ use of online source resources and how they rate the value of offline information sources for practice guidance. PMID:22994848

  15. Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST): Online ICA and source localization.

    PubMed

    Pion-Tonachini, Luca; Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Makeig, Scott; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2015-08-01

    The Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a noninvasive functional brain activity recording method that shows promise for becoming a 3-D cortical imaging modality with high temporal resolution. Currently, most of the tools developed for EEG analysis focus mainly on offline processing. This study introduces and demonstrates the Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), an extension to the widely distributed EEGLAB environment. REST allows blind source separation of EEG data in real-time using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis (ORICA), plus near real-time localization of separated sources. Two source localization methods are available to fit equivalent current dipoles or estimate spatial source distributions of selected sources. Selected measures of raw EEG data or component activations (e.g. time series of the data, spectral changes over time, equivalent current dipoles, etc.) can be visualized in near real-time. Finally, this study demonstrates the accuracy and functionality of REST with data from two experiments and discusses some relevant applications. PMID:26737199

  16. Television News as a Source of Information: What Gets Across and What Doesn't. A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Haluk; And Others

    Seeking to uncover some of the factors involved in the comprehension of televised news, a study examined the responses of 425 television news viewers to questions about a news story appearing on a national network's evening newscast. The subjects were asked to name the stories they recalled from the newscast. Then the respondents' recall of the…

  17. Heuristic versus Systematic Processing of Specialist versus Generalist Sources in Online Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Yoon Jeon; Sundar, S. Shyam

    2010-01-01

    In exploring why specialist sources (e.g., CNN.com) are more persuasive than generalist sources (e.g., CBS.com), this study examines theoretical mechanisms related to information-processing differences caused by these sources. When we have a chain of sources (Websites and agents) in online media, does specialization of one of them bias the…

  18. Women Are Seen More than Heard in Online Newspapers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Sen; Lansdall-Welfare, Thomas; Sudhahar, Saatviga; Carter, Cynthia; Cristianini, Nello

    2016-01-01

    Feminist news media researchers have long contended that masculine news values shape journalists' quotidian decisions about what is newsworthy. As a result, it is argued, topics and issues traditionally regarded as primarily of interest and relevance to women are routinely marginalised in the news, while men's views and voices are given privileged space. When women do show up in the news, it is often as "eye candy," thus reinforcing women's value as sources of visual pleasure rather than residing in the content of their views. To date, evidence to support such claims has tended to be based on small-scale, manual analyses of news content. In this article, we report on findings from our large-scale, data-driven study of gender representation in online English language news media. We analysed both words and images so as to give a broader picture of how gender is represented in online news. The corpus of news content examined consists of 2,353,652 articles collected over a period of six months from more than 950 different news outlets. From this initial dataset, we extracted 2,171,239 references to named persons and 1,376,824 images resolving the gender of names and faces using automated computational methods. We found that males were represented more often than females in both images and text, but in proportions that changed across topics, news outlets and mode. Moreover, the proportion of females was consistently higher in images than in text, for virtually all topics and news outlets; women were more likely to be represented visually than they were mentioned as a news actor or source. Our large-scale, data-driven analysis offers important empirical evidence of macroscopic patterns in news content concerning the way men and women are represented.

  19. Women Are Seen More than Heard in Online Newspapers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Sen; Lansdall-Welfare, Thomas; Sudhahar, Saatviga; Carter, Cynthia; Cristianini, Nello

    2016-01-01

    Feminist news media researchers have long contended that masculine news values shape journalists' quotidian decisions about what is newsworthy. As a result, it is argued, topics and issues traditionally regarded as primarily of interest and relevance to women are routinely marginalised in the news, while men's views and voices are given privileged space. When women do show up in the news, it is often as "eye candy," thus reinforcing women's value as sources of visual pleasure rather than residing in the content of their views. To date, evidence to support such claims has tended to be based on small-scale, manual analyses of news content. In this article, we report on findings from our large-scale, data-driven study of gender representation in online English language news media. We analysed both words and images so as to give a broader picture of how gender is represented in online news. The corpus of news content examined consists of 2,353,652 articles collected over a period of six months from more than 950 different news outlets. From this initial dataset, we extracted 2,171,239 references to named persons and 1,376,824 images resolving the gender of names and faces using automated computational methods. We found that males were represented more often than females in both images and text, but in proportions that changed across topics, news outlets and mode. Moreover, the proportion of females was consistently higher in images than in text, for virtually all topics and news outlets; women were more likely to be represented visually than they were mentioned as a news actor or source. Our large-scale, data-driven analysis offers important empirical evidence of macroscopic patterns in news content concerning the way men and women are represented. PMID:26840432

  20. Women Are Seen More than Heard in Online Newspapers

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Sen; Lansdall-Welfare, Thomas; Sudhahar, Saatviga; Carter, Cynthia; Cristianini, Nello

    2016-01-01

    Feminist news media researchers have long contended that masculine news values shape journalists’ quotidian decisions about what is newsworthy. As a result, it is argued, topics and issues traditionally regarded as primarily of interest and relevance to women are routinely marginalised in the news, while men’s views and voices are given privileged space. When women do show up in the news, it is often as “eye candy,” thus reinforcing women’s value as sources of visual pleasure rather than residing in the content of their views. To date, evidence to support such claims has tended to be based on small-scale, manual analyses of news content. In this article, we report on findings from our large-scale, data-driven study of gender representation in online English language news media. We analysed both words and images so as to give a broader picture of how gender is represented in online news. The corpus of news content examined consists of 2,353,652 articles collected over a period of six months from more than 950 different news outlets. From this initial dataset, we extracted 2,171,239 references to named persons and 1,376,824 images resolving the gender of names and faces using automated computational methods. We found that males were represented more often than females in both images and text, but in proportions that changed across topics, news outlets and mode. Moreover, the proportion of females was consistently higher in images than in text, for virtually all topics and news outlets; women were more likely to be represented visually than they were mentioned as a news actor or source. Our large-scale, data-driven analysis offers important empirical evidence of macroscopic patterns in news content concerning the way men and women are represented. PMID:26840432

  1. The changing information environment for nanotechnology: online audiences and content.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ashley A; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A

    2010-05-01

    The shift toward online communication in all realms, from print newspapers to broadcast television, has implications for how the general public consumes information about nanotechnology. The goal of this study is threefold: to investigate who is using online sources for information and news about science and nanotechnology, to examine what the general public is searching for online with regards to nanotechnology, and to analyze what they find in online content of nanotechnology. Using survey data, we find those who report the Internet as their primary source of science and technology news are diverse in age, more knowledgeable about science and nanotechnology, highly educated, male, and more diverse racially than users of other media. In a comparison of demographic data on actual visits by online users to general news and science Web sites, science sites attracted more male, non-white users from the Western region of the United States than news sites did. News sites, on the other hand, attracted those with a slightly higher level of education. Our analysis of published estimates of keyword searches on nanotechnology reveals people are turning to the Internet to search for keyword searches related to the future, health, and applications of nanotechnology. A content analysis of online content reveals health content dominates overall. Comparisons of content in different types of sites-blogs, government, and general sites-are conducted. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11051-010-9860-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  2. Incremental visual text analytics of news story development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajic, Milos; Najm-Araghi, Mohammad; Mansmann, Florian; Keim, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Online news sources produce thousands of news articles every day, reporting on local and global real-world events. New information quickly replaces the old, making it difficult for readers to put current events in the context of the past. Additionally, the stories have very complex relationships and characteristics that are difficult to model: they can be weakly or strongly connected, or they can merge or split over time. In this paper, we present a visual analytics system for exploration of news topics in dynamic information streams, which combines interactive visualization and text mining techniques to facilitate the analysis of similar topics that split and merge over time. We employ text clustering techniques to automatically extract stories from online news streams and present a visualization that: 1) shows temporal characteristics of stories in different time frames with different level of detail; 2) allows incremental updates of the display without recalculating the visual features of the past data; 3) sorts the stories by minimizing clutter and overlap from edge crossings. By using interaction, stories can be filtered based on their duration and characteristics in order to be explored in full detail with details on demand. To demonstrate the usefulness of our system, case studies with real news data are presented and show the capabilities for detailed dynamic text stream exploration.

  3. A Citation Analysis of Psychology Students' Use of Sources in Online Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Nancy Evans; Barnard, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Reference lists from two assignments of psychology students in university-level online distance learning (ODL) were analyzed for number and type of sources and mark achieved. Most referenced were resources relevant to the assignment and provided by instructors. Use changed across assignments: Instructor sources were used more on the first…

  4. Citing Internet Addresses: A How-To Guide for Referencing Online Sources in Student Bibliographies. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Tim

    This paper provides easy-to-understand guidelines for citing online information in student bibliographies. Citation structure and examples are provided for each type of Internet source. Guidelines are included for the following Internet sources: electronic mail; Gopher; File Transfer Protocol (FTP); Telnet; World Wide Web; Usenet Newsgroups;…

  5. An Online Platform for Resources and Collaborative Research on Earthquake Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingbaijam, K. S.; Mai, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    We develop the online platform http://equake-rc.info for collaborative research on earthquake sources. The platform has three main features: (1) finite-fault earthquake source models (SRCMOD) database, (2) Source Inversion Validation (SIV) Benchmarks and its Wiki, and (3) software Codes for Earthquake Rupture and ground-motion Simulation (CERS). SRCMOD collects and disseminates source models of past earthquakes. SIV aims at benchmarking the current state-of-the-art in earthquake source inversions and developing robust approaches to quantify uncertainties in the source models. CERS currently has three software packages. These include 'RupGen' for generating synthetic earthquake rupture models, 'Stress2Slip' for computing on-fault static stress changes corresponding to a slip distribution, and 'BB-Simulation' for computing and integrating high frequency synthetics with low frequency waveforms to generate hybrid broadband seismograms. We envision that this online platform will be useful in advancing research on earthquake source processes and earthquake engineering.

  6. Novel Data Sources for Women’s Health Research: Mapping Breast Screening Online Information Seeking Through Google Trends

    PubMed Central

    Dehkordy, Soudabeh Fazeli; Carlos, Ruth C.; Hall, Kelli S.; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Millions of people use online search engines every day to find health-related information and voluntarily share their personal health status and behaviors in various Web sites. Thus, data from tracking of online information seeker’s behavior offer potential opportunities for use in public health surveillance and research. Google Trends is a feature of Google which allows internet users to graph the frequency of searches for a single term or phrase over time or by geographic region. We used Google Trends to describe patterns of information seeking behavior in the subject of dense breasts and to examine their correlation with the passage or introduction of dense breast notification legislation. Materials and Methods In order to capture the temporal variations of information seeking about dense breasts, the web search query “dense breast” was entered in the Google Trends tool. We then mapped the dates of legislative actions regarding dense breasts that received widespread coverage in the lay media to information seeking trends about dense breasts over time. Results Newsworthy events and legislative actions appear to correlate well with peaks in search volume of “dense breast”. Geographic regions with the highest search volumes have either passed, denied, or are currently considering the dense breast legislation. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that any legislative action and respective news coverage correlate with increase in information seeking for “dense breast” on Google, suggesting that Google Trends has the potential to serve as a data source for policy-relevant research. PMID:24998689

  7. Teaching Students to Report and Write the News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Gail Cohen

    1978-01-01

    Draws on resources in the ERIC system to discuss the following aspects of student journalism: recognizing and gathering the news; interviewing news sources; writing clear, concise, and accurate news stories; and understanding journalism law and ethics. (KS)

  8. Apportionment of urban aerosol sources in Chongqing (China) using synergistic on-line techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Yang, Fumo

    2016-04-01

    The sources of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during wintertime at a background urban location in Chongqing (southwestern China) have been determined. Aerosol chemical composition analyses were performed using multiple on-line techniques, such as single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) for single particle chemical composition, on-line elemental carbon-organic carbon analyzer (on-line OC-EC), on-line X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for elements, and in-situ Gas and Aerosol Compositions monitor (IGAC) for water-soluble ions in PM2.5. All the datasets from these techniques have been adjusted to a 1-h time resolution for receptor model input. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) has been used for resolving aerosol sources. At least six sources, including domestic coal burning, biomass burning, dust, traffic, industrial and secondary/aged factors have been resolved and interpreted. The synergistic on-line techniques were helpful for identifying aerosol sources more clearly than when only employing the results from the individual techniques. This results are useful for better understanding of aerosol sources and atmospheric processes.

  9. Breaking news dissemination in the media via propagation behavior based on complex network theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nairong; An, Haizhong; Gao, Xiangyun; Li, Huajiao; Hao, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-01

    The diffusion of breaking news largely relies on propagation behaviors in the media. The tremendous and intricate propagation relationships in the media form a complex network. An improved understanding of breaking news diffusion characteristics can be obtained through the complex network research. Drawing on the news data of Bohai Gulf oil spill event from June 2011 to May 2014, we constructed a weighted and directed complex network in which media are set as nodes, the propagation relationships as edges and the propagation times as the weight of the edges. The primary results show (1) the propagation network presents small world feature, which means relations among media are close and breaking news originating from any node can spread rapidly; (2) traditional media and official websites are the typical sources for news propagation, while business portals are news collectors and spreaders; (3) the propagation network is assortative and the group of core media facilities the spread of breaking news faster; (4) for online media, news originality factor become less important to propagation behaviors. This study offers a new insight to explore information dissemination from the perspective of statistical physics and is beneficial for utilizing the public opinion in a positive way.

  10. Online recursive independent component analysis for real-time source separation of high-density EEG.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Mullen, Tim; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Online Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithms have recently seen increasing development and application across a range of fields, including communications, biosignal processing, and brain-computer interfaces. However, prior work in this domain has primarily focused on algorithmic proofs of convergence, with application limited to small `toy' examples or to relatively low channel density EEG datasets. Furthermore, there is limited availability of computationally efficient online ICA implementations, suitable for real-time application. This study describes an optimized online recursive ICA algorithm (ORICA), with online recursive least squares (RLS) whitening, for blind source separation of high-density EEG data. It is implemented as an online-capable plugin within the open-source BCILAB (EEGLAB) framework. We further derive and evaluate a block-update modification to the ORICA learning rule. We demonstrate the algorithm's suitability for accurate and efficient source identification in high density (64-channel) realistically-simulated EEG data, as well as real 61-channel EEG data recorded by a dry and wearable EEG system in a cognitive experiment. PMID:25570830

  11. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76

  12. What Does the Eye See? Reading Online Primary Source Photographs in History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levesque, Stephane; Ng-A-Fook, Nicholas; Corrigan, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study looks at how a sample of preservice teachers and historians read visuals in the context of school history. The participants used eye tracking technology and think-aloud protocol, as they examined a series of online primary source photographs from a virtual exhibit. Voluntary participants (6 students and 2 professional…

  13. Educative Experiences of Rural Junior High History Fair Participants Seeking and Evaluating Online Primary Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Riley Todd

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological ethnographic multi-case study's purpose was to gain insight into experiences of rural junior high History Fair participants as they searched for and evaluated online primary sources. Drawing on the theories of Dewey and Kuhlthau, the study examined how the participants searched the Internet, what strategies they used to…

  14. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House

    Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  15. Real-Time Adaptive EEG Source Separation Using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Mullen, Tim R; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-03-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has been widely applied to electroencephalographic (EEG) biosignal processing and brain-computer interfaces. The practical use of ICA, however, is limited by its computational complexity, data requirements for convergence, and assumption of data stationarity, especially for high-density data. Here we study and validate an optimized online recursive ICA algorithm (ORICA) with online recursive least squares (RLS) whitening for blind source separation of high-density EEG data, which offers instantaneous incremental convergence upon presentation of new data. Empirical results of this study demonstrate the algorithm's: 1) suitability for accurate and efficient source identification in high-density (64-channel) realistically-simulated EEG data; 2) capability to detect and adapt to nonstationarity in 64-ch simulated EEG data; and 3) utility for rapidly extracting principal brain and artifact sources in real 61-channel EEG data recorded by a dry and wearable EEG system in a cognitive experiment. ORICA was implemented as functions in BCILAB and EEGLAB and was integrated in an open-source Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), supporting applications in ICA-based online artifact rejection, feature extraction for real-time biosignal monitoring in clinical environments, and adaptable classifications in brain-computer interfaces. PMID:26685257

  16. Technology: News Readers and Other Handy Utilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how there are advantages and disadvantages to using an Internet News Reader instead of a Web browser. The major advantage is that one can read the headlines and short summaries of news articles from dozens of sources quickly. Another advantage the author points out to news readers is that one gets a short…

  17. High temperature ion source for an on-line isotope separator

    DOEpatents

    Mlekodaj, Ronald L.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced size ion source for on-line use with a cyclotron heavy-ion beam is provided. A sixfold reduction in source volume while operating with similar input power levels results in a 2000.degree. C. operating temperature. A combined target/window normally provides the reaction products for ionization while isolating the ion source plasma from the cyclotron beam line vacuum. A graphite felt catcher stops the recoiling reaction products and releases them into the plasma through diffusion and evaporation. Other target arrangements are also possible. A twenty-four hour lifetime of unattended operation is achieved, and a wider range of elements can be studied than was heretofore possible.

  18. Do News Media Messages Mitigate the Effect of Corporate Environmental Ads? A Test of Source Credibility and Message Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, John; Greer, Jennifer

    Factors that influence attitudes toward a corporate environmental advertisement and its sponsoring company were examined with a quasi-experimental design. Subjects (undergraduate students) read one of five news stories about an ad touting an oil company's active environmental involvement to test for the effects of publication credibility and…

  19. The laser ion source trap for highest isobaric selectivity in online exotic isotope productiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwellnus, F.; Blaum, K.; Catherall, R.; Crepieux, B.; Fedosseev, V.; Gottwald, T.; Kluge, H.-J.; Marsh, B.; Mattolat, C.; Rothe, S.; Stora, T.; Wendt, K.

    2010-02-01

    The improvement in the performance of a conventional laser ion source in the laser ion source and trap (LIST) project is presented, which envisages installation of a repeller electrode and a linear Paul trap/ion guide structure. This approach promises highest isobaric purity and optimum temporal and spatial control of the radioactive ion beam produced at an online isotope separator facility. The functionality of the LIST was explored at the offline test separators of University of Mainz (UMz) and ISOLDE/CERN, using the UMz solid state laser system. Ionization efficiency and selectivity as well as time structure and transversal emittance of the produced ion beam was determined. Next step after complete characterization is the construction and installation of the radiation-hard final trap structure and its first online application.

  20. The laser ion source trap for highest isobaric selectivity in online exotic isotope production.

    PubMed

    Schwellnus, F; Blaum, K; Catherall, R; Crepieux, B; Fedosseev, V; Gottwald, T; Kluge, H-J; Marsh, B; Mattolat, C; Rothe, S; Stora, T; Wendt, K

    2010-02-01

    The improvement in the performance of a conventional laser ion source in the laser ion source and trap (LIST) project is presented, which envisages installation of a repeller electrode and a linear Paul trap/ion guide structure. This approach promises highest isobaric purity and optimum temporal and spatial control of the radioactive ion beam produced at an online isotope separator facility. The functionality of the LIST was explored at the offline test separators of University of Mainz (UMz) and ISOLDE/CERN, using the UMz solid state laser system. Ionization efficiency and selectivity as well as time structure and transversal emittance of the produced ion beam was determined. Next step after complete characterization is the construction and installation of the radiation-hard final trap structure and its first online application. PMID:20192370

  1. Uses and Values for News on Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Thomas F.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses cable television subscribers' perceptions and consumption patterns of television news and describes a survey that compared broadcast and cable television news viewing habits. Media dependency and media consumption are considered, attitudes toward news sources and the perceived monetary value of the Cable News Network (CNN) are studied,…

  2. News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Milliot, Jim; Bing, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Reviews library news for 1997. Highlights public library budgets, examined by number of patrons served; Internet filters and censorship; librarians and the media; private and government funding sources; outsourcing; expectations for growth in the publishing industry, emphasizing the Asian economic crisis; and new ideas from the next generation of…

  3. News from Online: Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uffelman, Erich S.

    2004-01-01

    Green chemistry closely relates to energy and environmental problems, and includes the promotion of environmental friendly products and systems within the framework of renewable resources. Various websites on green chemistry are reviewed, one of which lists the 12 commandments of this particular subject.

  4. News from On-Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1997-09-01

    Hearing from readers is always a pleasure. Nicholas J. Turro emailed in reference to my June commentary (J. Chem. Educ. 1997, 74, 621) to tell me about the history of WEB-ster (http://ep.llnl.gov/msds/orgchem/Web-sters_Org_Chem.html). Andy Goshe, an undergraduate student from Ohio University who spent last summer at Columbia University, produced the precursor of WEB-ster. Good job, Andy!

  5. The changing information environment for nanotechnology: online audiences and content

    PubMed Central

    Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A.

    2010-01-01

    The shift toward online communication in all realms, from print newspapers to broadcast television, has implications for how the general public consumes information about nanotechnology. The goal of this study is threefold: to investigate who is using online sources for information and news about science and nanotechnology, to examine what the general public is searching for online with regards to nanotechnology, and to analyze what they find in online content of nanotechnology. Using survey data, we find those who report the Internet as their primary source of science and technology news are diverse in age, more knowledgeable about science and nanotechnology, highly educated, male, and more diverse racially than users of other media. In a comparison of demographic data on actual visits by online users to general news and science Web sites, science sites attracted more male, non-white users from the Western region of the United States than news sites did. News sites, on the other hand, attracted those with a slightly higher level of education. Our analysis of published estimates of keyword searches on nanotechnology reveals people are turning to the Internet to search for keyword searches related to the future, health, and applications of nanotechnology. A content analysis of online content reveals health content dominates overall. Comparisons of content in different types of sites—blogs, government, and general sites—are conducted. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11051-010-9860-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21170132

  6. Customized News in Your Mailbox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudich, Joe

    1996-01-01

    Customized Internet services deliver news and selected research via e-mail, fax, Web browser, or their own software. Some are clipping services while others are full-fledged online newspapers. Most charge a monthly subscription fee, but a few are free to registered users. Provides the addresses, cost, scope, and evaluation of eight services. (PEN)

  7. High-Pressure Photon Ionization Source for TOFMS and Its Application for Online Breath Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Jiang, Jichun; Hua, Lei; Hou, Keyong; Xie, Yuanyuan; Chen, Ping; Liu, Wei; Li, Qingyun; Wang, Shuang; Li, Haiyang

    2016-09-20

    Photon ionization mass spectrometry (PI-MS) is a widely used technique for the online detection of trace substances in complex matrices. In this work, a new high-pressure photon ionization (HPPI) ion source based on a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) Kr lamp was developed for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). The detection sensitivity was improved by elevating the ion source pressure to about 700 Pa. A radio frequency (RF)-only quadrupole was employed as the ion guide system following the HPPI source to achieve high ion transmission efficiency. In-source collision induced dissociation (CID) was conducted for accurate chemical identification by varying the voltage between the ion source and the ion guide. The high humidity of the breath air can promote the detection of some compounds with higher ionization potentials (IPs) that could not be well detected by single photon ionization (SPI) at low pressure. Under 100% relative humidity (37 °C), the limits of detection down to 0.015 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) for aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were obtained. This HPPI-TOFMS system was preliminarily applied for online investigations of the exhaled breath from both healthy nonsmoker and smoker subjects, demonstrating its analytical capacity for complicated gases analysis. Subsequently, several frequently reported VOCs in the breath of healthy volunteers, i.e., acetone, isoprene, 2-butanone, ethanol, acetic acid, and isopropanol, were successfully identified and quantified. PMID:27574033

  8. Using Extensible Markup Language (XML) for the Single Source Delivery of Educational Resources by Print and Online: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Lucas

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to provide an introduction to Extensible Markup Language (XML) by looking at its use in a single source publishing approach to the provision of teaching resources in both hardcopy and online. Using the development of the International Baccalaureate Organisation's online Economics Subject Guide as a practical example, this…

  9. Sources and types of online information that breast cancer patients read and discuss with their doctors

    PubMed Central

    MALONEY, ERIN K.; D’AGOSTINO, THOMAS A.; HEERDT, ALEXANDRA; DICKLER, MAURA; LI, YUELIN; OSTROFF, JAMIE S.; BYLUND, CARMA L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Most research examining the impact of patients seeking online health information treats internet information homogenously, rather than recognizing that there are multiple types and sources of available information. The present research was conducted to differentiate among sources and types of internet information that patients search for, intend to discuss with their doctors, and recall discussing with their doctors, and to determine how accurate and hopeful patients rate this information. Methods We surveyed 70 breast cancer patients recruited from the waiting rooms of breast medical oncology and surgery clinics. The main variables in the study were as follows: (1) the sources and types of online information patients have read, intended to discuss, and actually discussed with their doctors, and (2) how accurately and hopefully they rated this information to be. Results Patients read information most frequently from the websites of cancer organizations, and most often about side effects. Patients planned to discuss fewer types of information with their doctors than they had read about. They most often intended to discuss information from cancer organization websites or WebMD, and the material was most often about alternative therapies, side effects, and proven or traditional treatments. Some 76.8% of total participants rated the information they had read as very or somewhat accurate, and 61% rated the information they had read as very or somewhat hopeful. Significance of Results Internet information varies widely by source and type. Differentiating among sources and types of information is essential to explore the ways in which online health information impacts patients’ experiences. PMID:24182945

  10. Sources of Information and Behavioral Patterns in Online Health Forums: Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Friede, Tim; Grabowski, Jens; Koschack, Janka; Makedonski, Philip; Himmel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of patients are raising their voice in online forums. This shift is welcome as an act of patient autonomy, reflected in the term “expert patient”. At the same time, there is considerable concern that patients can be easily misguided by pseudoscientific research and debate. Little is known about the sources of information used in health-related online forums, how users apply this information, and how they behave in such forums. Objective The intent of the study was to identify (1) the sources of information used in online health-related forums, and (2) the roles and behavior of active forum visitors in introducing and disseminating this information. Methods This observational study used the largest German multiple sclerosis (MS) online forum as a database, analyzing the user debate about the recently proposed and controversial Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI) hypothesis. After extracting all posts and then filtering relevant CCSVI posts between 01 January 2008 and 17 August 2012, we first identified hyperlinks to scientific publications and other information sources used or referenced in the posts. Employing k-means clustering, we then analyzed the users’ preference for sources of information and their general posting habits. Results Of 139,912 posts from 11,997 threads, 8628 posts discussed or at least mentioned CCSVI. We detected hyperlinks pointing to CCSVI-related scientific publications in 31 posts. In contrast, 2829 different URLs were posted to the forum, most frequently referring to social media, such as YouTube or Facebook. We identified a total of 6 different roles of hyperlink posters including Social Media Fans, Organization Followers, and Balanced Source Users. Apart from the large and nonspecific residual category of the “average user”, several specific behavior patterns were identified, such as the small but relevant groups of CCSVI-Focused Responders or CCSVI Activators. Conclusions The bulk

  11. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76

  12. A news media analysis of economic sanction effects on access to medicine in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kheirandish, Mehrnaz; Rashidian, Arash; Bigdeli, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In the past decades economic sanctions have been used by different countries or international organizations in order to deprive target countries of some transactions. While the sanctions do not target health care systems or public health structures, they may, in fact, affect the availability of health care in target countries. In this study, we used media analysis to assess the impacts of recent sanctions imposed by the Central Bank of Iran in 2012 on access to medicines in Iran. Methods: We searched different sources of written news media including a database of nonspecialized weeklies and magazines, online news sources, web pages of daily newspapers and healthcare oriented weeklies from 2011 to 2013. We searched the sources using the general term “medicine” to reduce the chances of missing relevant items. The identified news media were read, and categorized under three groups of items announcing “shortage of medicines,” “medicines related issues” and “no shortage.” We conducted trend analyzes to see whether the news media related to access to medicines were affected by the economic sanctions. Findings: A total number of 371 relevant news media were collected. The number of news media related to medicines substantially increased in the study period: 30 (8%), 161 (43%) and 180 (49%) were published in 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively. While 145 (39%) of media items referred to the shortage of medicines, 97 (26%) reported no shortage or alleviating of concerns. Conclusion: Media analysis suggests a clear increase in the number of news media reporting a shortage in Iran after the sanctions. In 2013, there were accompanying increases in the number of news media reporting alleviation of the shortages of medicines. Our analysis provides evidence of negative effects of the sanctions on access to medicines in Iran. PMID:26645026

  13. The Changing Landscape of Science News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riordon, James

    2011-03-01

    Social media are revolutionizing the ways that people communicate and the ways they get their news. Traditional news outlets are in decline, and no subject area is declining faster than science news. Every day there are fewer professional science journalists working in traditional media. On the other hand, ever greater numbers of scientists, science enthusiasts, and online journalists are turning to blogs, podcasts, eBooks, twitter feeds, and social media sites like Facebook and Tumbler to spread news about science. I will present an overview of the state of science journalism and speculate on the likely directions it seems to be heading. I will also offer some general guidelines to help scientists understand what makes a good science news story, as well as suggesting ways that they can get their work in the news.

  14. Online Artifact Removal for Brain-Computer Interfaces Using Support Vector Machines and Blind Source Separation

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Sebastian; Bensch, Michael; Mellinger, Jürgen; Bogdan, Martin; Kübler, Andrea; Birbaumer, Niels; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    We propose a combination of blind source separation (BSS) and independent component analysis (ICA) (signal decomposition into artifacts and nonartifacts) with support vector machines (SVMs) (automatic classification) that are designed for online usage. In order to select a suitable BSS/ICA method, three ICA algorithms (JADE, Infomax, and FastICA) and one BSS algorithm (AMUSE) are evaluated to determine their ability to isolate electromyographic (EMG) and electrooculographic (EOG) artifacts into individual components. An implementation of the selected BSS/ICA method with SVMs trained to classify EMG and EOG artifacts, which enables the usage of the method as a filter in measurements with online feedback, is described. This filter is evaluated on three BCI datasets as a proof-of-concept of the method. PMID:18288259

  15. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House

    National Chemistry Week (NCW)

    National Chemistry Week Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles).

    Awards Announced

    Passer Award

    Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are:
    • George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL
    • Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH
    • Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA
    • Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA
    • Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL
    • Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section

    Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist

  16. Antecedents to agenda setting and framing in health news: an examination of priority, angle, source, and resource usage from a national survey of U.S. health reporters and editors.

    PubMed

    Wallington, Sherrie Flynt; Blake, Kelly; Taylor-Clark, Kalahn; Viswanath, K

    2010-01-01

    The influence of news media on audience cognitions, attitudes, and behaviors in the realm of politics, race relations, science, and health has been extensively documented.Agenda setting and framing studies show that news media influence how people develop schema and place priorities on issues, with media stories serving as a major source of issue frames. Although news media are an important intermediary in the translation of scientific knowledge to different publics, little has been documented about the production of health news and factors that may predict media agenda setting and framing in health journalism. We used data from a 2005 national survey of U.S. health reporters and editors to examine predictors of source, resource, story angle, and frame usage among reporters and editors by variables such as organizational structure, individual characteristics of respondents (such as education and years working as a journalist),and perceptions of occupational autonomy. Multivariable logistic regression models revealed several differences among U.S. health reports and editors in the likelihood of using a variety of news sources, resources, priorities, and angles in reporting. Media agenda setting and framing theories suggest that practitioners familiar with media processes can work with journalists to frame messages, thereby increasing the probability of accurate and effective reporting. Results from this study may help to inform interactions between public health and medical practitioners and the press [corrected]. PMID:20390978

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MeV-GeV counterparts of TeV sources (Rappoldi+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappoldi, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Longo, F.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Verrecchia, F.; Tavani, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Chen, A. W.; Colafrancesco, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Giuliani, A.; Morselli, A.; Sabatini, S.; Vercellone, S.

    2016-05-01

    The analysis described in this paper has been applied to a reference sample of TeV sources extracted from the online TeVCat catalog (http://tevcat.uchicago.edu/ (Wakely S., and Horan D.). This online catalog is continuously updated with new sources detected by TeV experiments, and for each source it provides many parameters such as coordinates, source type, flux, and estimated distance (when available). The analysis has been performed using the data collected by the main AGILE instrument, the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID). (2 data files).

  18. Online Analysis of {gamma}-ray Sources with H.E.S.S

    SciTech Connect

    Fuessling, M.; Dalton, M.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Schwanke, U.; Jung, I.; Stegmann, C.

    2008-12-24

    Some of the {gamma}-ray sources detected by the H.E.S.S. experiment display irregular, often flare-like emission behaviour. A method to detect these outbursts as fast as possible is highly desirable. At H.E.S.S., first results from an offline analysis of pre-calibrated data can be obtained on-site approximately one hour after run end. We present a development and implementation of online analysis software that performs calibration and analysis of data at the time they are being taken allowing for a fast confirmation of observational results and appropriate reaction by the on-site shift crew.

  19. ELATE: an open-source online application for analysis and visualization of elastic tensors.

    PubMed

    Gaillac, Romain; Pullumbi, Pluton; Coudert, François-Xavier

    2016-07-13

    We report on the implementation of a tool for the analysis of second-order elastic stiffness tensors, provided with both an open-source Python module and a standalone online application allowing the visualization of anisotropic mechanical properties. After describing the software features, how we compute the conventional elastic constants and how we represent them graphically, we explain our technical choices for the implementation. In particular, we focus on why a Python module is used to generate the HTML web page with embedded Javascript for dynamical plots. PMID:27199239

  20. ELATE: an open-source online application for analysis and visualization of elastic tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillac, Romain; Pullumbi, Pluton; Coudert, François-Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We report on the implementation of a tool for the analysis of second-order elastic stiffness tensors, provided with both an open-source Python module and a standalone online application allowing the visualization of anisotropic mechanical properties. After describing the software features, how we compute the conventional elastic constants and how we represent them graphically, we explain our technical choices for the implementation. In particular, we focus on why a Python module is used to generate the HTML web page with embedded Javascript for dynamical plots.

  1. ELATE: an open-source online application for analysis and visualization of elastic tensors.

    PubMed

    Gaillac, Romain; Pullumbi, Pluton; Coudert, François-Xavier

    2016-07-13

    We report on the implementation of a tool for the analysis of second-order elastic stiffness tensors, provided with both an open-source Python module and a standalone online application allowing the visualization of anisotropic mechanical properties. After describing the software features, how we compute the conventional elastic constants and how we represent them graphically, we explain our technical choices for the implementation. In particular, we focus on why a Python module is used to generate the HTML web page with embedded Javascript for dynamical plots.

  2. cctbx news

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Zwart, Peter H.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Adams, Paul D.

    2006-11-22

    The 'Computational Crystallography Toolbox' (cctbx, http://cctbx.sourceforge.net/) is the open-source component of the Phenix project (http://www.phenix-online.org/). Most recent cctbx developments are geared towards supporting new features of the phenix.refine application. Thus, the open-source mmtbx (macromolecular toolbox) module is currently being most rapidly developed. In this article we give an overview of some of the recent developments. However, the main theme of this article is the presentation of a light-weight example command-line application that was specifically developed for this newsletter: sequence alignment and superposition of two molecules read from files in PDB format. This involves parameter input based on the Phil module presented in Newsletter No. 5, fast reading of the PDB files with the new iotbx.pdb.input class, simple sequence alignment using the new mmtbx.alignment module, and use of the Kearsley (1989) superposition algorithm to find the least-squares solution for superposing C-alpha positions. The major steps are introduced individually, followed by a presentation of the complete application. The example application is deliberately limited in functionality to make it concise enough for this article. The main goal is to show how the open-source components are typically combined into an application. Even though the example is quite specific to macromolecular crystallography, we believe it will also be useful for a small-molecule audience interested in utilizing the large open-source library of general crystallographic algorithms (see our previous articles in this newsletter series) to build an application. We describe recent developments of the Computational Crystallography Toolbox.

  3. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leeds. Physics at Work Exhibition: 12-14 September, University of Cambridge The year 2000 Exhibition will be the 16th organized by Brenda Jennison. The exhibition will be held at the Cavendish Laboratory and further details can be obtained from Brenda at the University (tel: 01223 332888, fax: 01223 332894 or e-mail: bmj10@cam.ac.uk). News on GNVQ science The Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry are currently financing the compilation of a directory of resources to assist teachers in identifying and selecting suitable materials for teaching the new GNVQ science specifications. Work on the first part of the directory will soon be completed and it is hoped to publish the material in both print and electronic forms before the end of the summer term. This first part covers resources - all evaluated by practising GNVQ teachers - supporting the teaching of the compulsory units for Advanced GNVQ Science. A small team comprising a physics teacher, a chemistry teacher and a biology teacher, all involved with GNVQ programmes and led by Dr Ken Gadd, has carried out the work. They have established a network of teachers around the country to help with the evaluation of curriculum materials. The next part of the project will be to examine the feasibility of providing a similar listing for the optional units at this level. Future development, depending on the availability of funds, will extend the project to Intermediate level programmes in science, including the Part One, once its structure has been agreed at QCA. Further information about the Directory and the next phase of development will be available in the autumn. Activities Physics on Stage The future of science, technology and the ensuing wealth creation potential for Britain will depend on the quality of science education in schools today. Yet the numbers studying physics, which underpins science and engineering, are falling. This problem is currently

  4. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House

    National Chemistry Week (NCW)

    National Chemistry Week Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles).

    Awards Announced

    Passer Award

    Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are:
    • George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL
    • Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH
    • Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA
    • Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA
    • Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL
    • Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section

    Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist

  5. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House

    Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  6. Computer News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several news stories about computers and technology. (1) Applied Science Associates of Narragansett, Rhode Island is providing computer modeling technology to help locate the remains to the USS Bonhomme Richard, which sank in 1779 after claiming a Revolutionary War victory. (2) Whyville, the leading edu-tainment virtual world…

  7. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

  8. First on-line results for As and F beams from HRIBF target/ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stracener, D.W.; Carter, H.K.; Kormicki, J.; Breitenbach, J.B.; Blackmon, J.C.; Smith, M.S.; Bardayan, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The first on-line tests of the ion sources to provide radioactive ion beams of {sup 69,70}As and {sup 17,18}F for the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) have been performed using the UNISOR facility at HRIBF. The target/ion source is an electron beam plasma (EBP) source similar to the ISOLDE design. The measured efficiencies for {sup 69}As and {sup 70}AS were 0.5 {+-} 0.2% and 0.8 {+-} 0.3%, respectively. The arsenic hold-up time in the tested target ion source was 3.6 {+-} 0.3 hours as measured with {sup 72}As at a target temperature of 1300 {degrees}C. The measured efficiencies for {sup 17}F and {sup 18}F were 0.0052 {+-} 0.0008% and 0.06 {+-} 0.02%, respectively. The source hold-up time for fluorine was measured with Al{sup 18}F since 88% of the observed radioactive fluorine was found in this molecule. The Al{sup 18}F hold-up time was 16.4 {+-} 0.8 minutes at a target temperature of 1470 {degrees}C.

  9. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift

  10. Reader Response to Front Pages with Modular Format and Color [and] Newspaper Errors: Source Perception, Reporter Response and Some Causes. American Newspaper Publishers Association (ANPA) News Research Report No. 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Click, J. W.; And Others

    Two studies were conducted, the first to determine reader response to newspaper front pages with modular format and color, and the second to examine source perception and reporter response to errors in news stories. Results of the first study revealed that respondents in three cities preferred modular front pages to other modern format pages and…

  11. Analyzing the Appropriateness of Internet-Based School News Programs for Social Studies Classrooms: "CNN Student News" as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journell, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a research study on the appropriateness for social studies classrooms of "CNN Student News," a free online news program specifically aimed at middle and high school students. The author conducted a content analysis of "CNN Student News" during October 2012 and evaluated the program's content for…

  12. First on-line results for As and F beams from HRIBF target/ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, H.K.; Kormicki, J.; Stracener, D.W.; Breitenbach, J.B.; Blackmon, J.C.; Smith, M.S.; Bardayan, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The first on-line tests of the ion sources to provide radioactive ion beams of {sup 69,70}As and {sup 17,18}F for the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility have been performed using the UNISOR facility at HRIBF. For {sup 70}As the measured efficiency is 0.8 {+-} 0.3% with a hold-up time of 3.6 {+-} 0.3 hours as measured with {sup 72}As at a target temperature of 1,270 C. For {sup 17}F the efficiency for Al{sup 17}F is 0.0024 {+-} 0.0008% with a hold-up time of 16.4 {+-} 0.8 m as measured with Al{sup 18}F at a target temperature of 1,470 C.

  13. Inquiring minds acquiring wellness: uses of online and offline sources for health information.

    PubMed

    Dobransky, Kerry; Hargittai, Eszter

    2012-01-01

    Variation in ability to access and use health information is a key pathway through which social status may impact health. Digital media offer new opportunities for health information seeking, potentially lowering barriers to such content. Using a data set with nuanced information about what sources a diverse group of college students consults for different types of health material, coupled with detailed measures of Internet experiences, this article explores factors related to where young adults turn for health content. Results suggest considerable sex differences in practices across sources of health information. We also find differences in Hispanic students' actions based on parents' country of origin across sources. Finally, challenging assumptions about the universal savvy of young adults, findings suggest that those who are more highly skilled with the Internet are more likely to use it for health information seeking, and Internet experiences are especially important for explaining who turns to online discussions in this realm. Our findings not only contribute to a better understanding of health information seeking and health inequality, but also point to possible sites of intervention to ameliorate health disparities.

  14. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift

  15. Open-Source Learning Management System and Web 2.0 Online Social Software Applications as Learning Platforms for an Elementary School in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Lee Yong; Lim, Cher Ping; Lye, Sze Yee; Ng, Kay Joo; Lim, Siew Khiaw

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses how an elementary-level future school in Singapore implements and uses various open-source online platforms, which are easily available online and could be implemented with minimal software cost, for the purpose of teaching and learning. Online platforms have the potential to facilitate students' engagement for independent and…

  16. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    Unification of Journal Options Beginning in 2000, the Journal subscription form will get much simpler and your Journal subscription will bring you even more than previously. Below is an outline of how the new system will work for individuals. Subscriptions for Individuals

    • Beginning September 1, 1999, all Journal print subscriptionscurrent, continuing, new, and renewalwill bring you monthly print issues and give you full access to JCE Online+everything that we have online.
    • If you don't want paper copy of your issue, there is a No-Print Optionwe donate your print copy to our Teacher Workshop Program and you have full access to everything online.
    • If you do want both paper and online but don't want to keep back issuessaving storage spaceyou can purchase JCE CD each year.
    A chart illustrating this new system appears below. It lists all subscription choices for individuals in the U. S., for ACS Student Affiliates, and for non-U.S. individuals. Other Subscription Rates There are now two types of subscriptions for libraries. These are described under New IP-Address Option for Libraries, below. For information about Promotional (larger quantities for workshops, classes, etc.) or Gift Subscription Award Certificate rates, contact the Journal (jce@chem.wisc.edu); 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608/262-5153. Extensions for Current JCE Online Subscribers At present there are more than 1,000 subscribers to JCE Online+: we think of these as our technological pioneers. These subscribers will have their subscriptions automatically extended according to the scheme below.

    Online Subscription Expires

    JCE Subscriptions Extended By

    Sept. 1, 1999 - Feb. 29, 2000
  17. A comparison of NEWS and SPARROW models to understand sources of nitrogen delivered to US coastal areas

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative contributions of different anthropogenic and natural sources of in-stream nitrogen (N) cannot be directly measured at whole-watershed scales. Hence, source attribution estimates beyond the scale of small catchments must rely on models. Although such estimates have be...

  18. News Research for Better Newspapers, Volume Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Comp.

    The findings of research studies that come from a variety of sources and concern newspapers, some aspects of television news, and news media audiences are summarized briefly. Among the topics are audience characteristics, content of stories, readership, headlines and makeup, editorial policy, and editorial administration and personnel. Most of the…

  19. Broadcast Journalism; An Introduction to News Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mark W.

    The important features of writing news for radio and television are covered in this book. Ways to write colorful, accurate, and timely stories are explained with the emphasis on the differences between broadcast and newspaper stories. Other subjects treated are sources of news (including explanations of how the Associated Press copy works and how…

  20. Foreign News Agency Influences on a Developing Country Press (Egypt).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisenborn, Ray E.

    To analyze the patterns of newspaper news sources in a developing nation and the geographic focus of news and news subject matter categories, an analysis was conducted of the English-language "Egyptian Gazette," the official organ of the Arab Socialist Union. Primary data for the study were the front pages selected at random from the newspaper…

    1. The Flow of Foreign News into Six Arab Gulf Newspapers.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Al-Habib, Abdulrahman Ibrahim

      In order to determine the nature of foreign news coverage in the Arab Gulf states, a study examined six newspapers in these states (one in each country) in regard to the volume, news sources, and kinds of news (both subject categories and regions covered). Data were selected from 12 issues (one from each month) in 1986 from the following…

    2. News Icons and the Mainstreaming of Social Change.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Bennett, W. Lance; Lawrence, Regina G.

      1995-01-01

      Defines news icons, and discusses life cycle of a news icon. Offers a case study of coverage patterns of a garbage barge that for three months in 1987 was rejected at every port. Finds that the incident provided an occasion for journalists and their sources to refigure cultural scripts about garbage and recycling to produce news as cultural forum.…

    3. Investigating the News Seeking Behavior of Young Adults

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Qayyum, M. Asim; Williamson, Kirsty; Liu, Ying-Hsang; Hider, Philip

      2010-01-01

      This study investigated the news-seeking and browsing behaviours of young adults, partly in the context of everyday life information seeking (ELIS), in order to explore their perceptions of and attitudes towards print and online news media. The study is significant because traditional print newspapers face a steady decline in their readership with…

    4. Toward a Model of Sources of Influence in Online Education: Cognitive Learning and the Effects of Web 2.0

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Carr, Caleb T.; Zube, Paul; Dickens, Eric; Hayter, Carolyn A.; Barterian, Justin A.

      2013-01-01

      To explore the integration of education processes into social media, we tested an initial model of student learning via interactive web tools and theorized three sources of influence: interpersonal, intrapersonal, and masspersonal. Three-hundred thirty-seven students observed an online lecture and then completed a series of scales. Structural…

    5. Measuring News Media Literacy

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

      2015-01-01

      News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

    6. Trusting Social Media as a Source of Health Information: Online Surveys Comparing the United States, Korea, and Hong Kong

      PubMed Central

      Song, Hayeon; Omori, Kikuko; Kim, Jihyun; Tenzek, Kelly E; Hawkins, Jennifer Morey; Lin, Wan-Ying; Jung, Joo-Young

      2016-01-01

      Background The Internet has increasingly become a popular source of health information by connecting individuals with health content, experts, and support. More and more, individuals turn to social media and Internet sites to share health information and experiences. Although online health information seeking occurs worldwide, limited empirical studies exist examining cross-cultural differences in perceptions about user-generated, experience-based information compared to expertise-based information sources. Objective To investigate if cultural variations exist in patterns of online health information seeking, specifically in perceptions of online health information sources. It was hypothesized that Koreans and Hongkongers, compared to Americans, would be more likely to trust and use experience-based knowledge shared in social Internet sites, such as social media and online support groups. Conversely, Americans, compared to Koreans and Hongkongers, would value expertise-based knowledge prepared and approved by doctors or professional health providers more. Methods Survey questionnaires were developed in English first and then translated into Korean and Chinese. The back-translation method ensured the standardization of questions. Surveys were administered using a standardized recruitment strategy and data collection methods. Results A total of 826 participants living in metropolitan areas from the United States (n=301), Korea (n=179), and Hong Kong (n=337) participated in the study. We found significant cultural differences in information processing preferences for online health information. A planned contrast test revealed that Koreans and Hongkongers showed more trust in experience-based health information sources (blogs: t 451.50=11.21, P<.001; online support group: t 455.71=9.30, P<.001; social networking sites [SNS]: t 466.75=11.36, P<.001) and also reported using blogs (t 515.31=6.67, P<.001) and SNS (t 529.22=4.51, P<.001) more frequently than Americans

    7. Reducing the Spatial Distance between Printed and Online Information Sources by Means of Mobile Technology Enhances Learning: Using 2D Barcodes

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Ozcelik, Erol; Acarturk, Cengiz

      2011-01-01

      Online information sources, such as pictures and animations on web pages are frequently used for complementing printed course material in educational contexts. The concurrent use of online and printed information sources by students, however, requires going back and forth between physically separated course material, such as a course book and a…

    8. Hot news recommendation system from heterogeneous websites based on bayesian model.

      PubMed

      Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

      2014-01-01

      The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

    9. First application of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) for on-line experiments at ISOLDE

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Fink, D. A.; Richter, S. D.; Bastin, B.; Blaum, K.; Catherall, R.; Cocolios, T. E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Ghys, L.; Gottberg, A.; Imai, N.; Kron, T.; Lecesne, N.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Mendonca, T. M.; Pauwels, D.; Rapisarda, E.; Ramos, J. P.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, M.; Stora, T.; Van Beveren, C.; Wendt, K. D. A.

      2013-12-01

      The Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) provides a new mode of operation for the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) at ISOLDE/CERN, reducing the amount of surface-ionized isobaric contaminants by up to four orders of magnitude. After the first successful on-line test at ISOLDE in 2011 the LIST was further improved in terms of efficiency, selectivity, and reliability through several off-line tests at Mainz University and at ISOLDE. In September 2012, the first on-line physics experiments to use the LIST took place at ISOLDE. The measurements of the improved LIST indicate more than a twofold increase in efficiency compared to the LIST of the 2011 run. The suppression of surface-ionized francium contaminants has enabled the first in-source laser spectroscopy of 217Po and 219Po.

    10. Sources of Traffic and Visitors’ Preferences Regarding Online Public Reports of Quality: Web Analytics and Online Survey Results

      PubMed Central

      Hibbard, Judith H; Greaves, Felix; Dudley, R Adams

      2015-01-01

      Background In the context of the Affordable Care Act, there is extensive emphasis on making provider quality transparent and publicly available. Online public reports of quality exist, but little is known about how visitors find reports or about their purpose in visiting. Objective To address this gap, we gathered website analytics data from a national group of online public reports of hospital or physician quality and surveyed real-time visitors to those websites. Methods Websites were recruited from a national group of online public reports of hospital or physician quality. Analytics data were gathered from each website: number of unique visitors, method of arrival for each unique visitor, and search terms resulting in visits. Depending on the website, a survey invitation was launched for unique visitors on landing pages or on pages with quality information. Survey topics included type of respondent (eg, consumer, health care professional), purpose of visit, areas of interest, website experience, and demographics. Results There were 116,657 unique visitors to the 18 participating websites (1440 unique visitors/month per website), with most unique visitors arriving through search (63.95%, 74,606/116,657). Websites with a higher percent of traffic from search engines garnered more unique visitors (P=.001). The most common search terms were for individual hospitals (23.25%, 27,122/74,606) and website names (19.43%, 22,672/74,606); medical condition terms were uncommon (0.81%, 605/74,606). Survey view rate was 42.48% (49,560/116,657 invited) resulting in 1755 respondents (participation rate=3.6%). There were substantial proportions of consumer (48.43%, 850/1755) and health care professional respondents (31.39%, 551/1755). Across websites, proportions of consumer (21%-71%) and health care professional respondents (16%-48%) varied. Consumers were frequently interested in using the information to choose providers or assess the quality of their provider (52.7%, 225

    11. PALEOMAGNETISM.ORG - AN Online Multi-Platform and Open Source Environment for Paleomagnetic Analysis

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Koymans, M. R.; Langereis, C. G.; Pastor-Galán, D.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.

      2015-12-01

      This contribution provides an overview of the features of Paleomagnetism.org, a new open-source online environment for paleomagnetic analysis that is supported by all modern browsers on multiple platforms. The core functionality of Paleomagnetism.org is written in JavaScript and maintains an interactive website in which paleomagnetic data can be interpreted, evaluated, visualized, and exported. Although being an online platform, the data processing is performed client-sided within the browser to respect the integrity of the data and users. In the interpretation portal, principle component analysis (Kirschvink et al., 1981) can be applied on visualized demagnetization data (Zijderveld, 1967). The interpreted directions and great circles can be combined using the iterative procedure of (McFadden and McElhinny, 1988). The resulting magnetic directions can be used in the statistics portal or exported as raw tabulated data and figures. The available tools in the statistics portal cover standard Fisher statistics for directional data and virtual geomagnetic poles (Fisher, 1953; Butler, 1992; Deenen et al., 2011). Other tools include the eigenvector approach foldtest (Tauxe and Watson, 1994), a bootstrapped reversal test (Tauxe et al., 2009), and the classical reversal test of (McFadden and McElhinny, 1990). An implementation exists for the detection and correction of inclination shallowing in sediments (Tauxe and Kent, 2004; Tauxe et al., 2008) and a module to visualize custom or default APWP reference frames (Torsvik et al., 2012; Kent and Irving, 2010; Besse and Courtillot, 2002) for continent-bearing plates. Paleomagnetism.org provides an integrated approach for researchers to export tabulated and visualized (e.g. equal area projections) paleomagnetic data. The portals construct a custom exportable file that can be shared with other researchers and included in public databases. With a publication, this custom file can be appended and would contain all data used in the

    12. News & Announcements

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      1999-09-01

      Unification of Journal Options Beginning in 2000, the Journal subscription form will get much simpler and your Journal subscription will bring you even more than previously. Below is an outline of how the new system will work for individuals. Subscriptions for Individuals

      • Beginning September 1, 1999, all Journal print subscriptionscurrent, continuing, new, and renewalwill bring you monthly print issues and give you full access to JCE Online+everything that we have online.
      • If you don't want paper copy of your issue, there is a No-Print Optionwe donate your print copy to our Teacher Workshop Program and you have full access to everything online.
      • If you do want both paper and online but don't want to keep back issuessaving storage spaceyou can purchase JCE CD each year.
      A chart illustrating this new system appears below. It lists all subscription choices for individuals in the U. S., for ACS Student Affiliates, and for non-U.S. individuals. Other Subscription Rates There are now two types of subscriptions for libraries. These are described under New IP-Address Option for Libraries, below. For information about Promotional (larger quantities for workshops, classes, etc.) or Gift Subscription Award Certificate rates, contact the Journal (jce@chem.wisc.edu); 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608/262-5153. Extensions for Current JCE Online Subscribers At present there are more than 1,000 subscribers to JCE Online+: we think of these as our technological pioneers. These subscribers will have their subscriptions automatically extended according to the scheme below.

      Online Subscription Expires

      JCE Subscriptions Extended By

      Sept. 1, 1999 - Feb. 29, 2000
    13. Coverage of Alzheimer's disease from 1984 to 2008 in television news and information talk shows in the United States: an analysis of news framing.

      PubMed

      Kang, Seok; Gearhart, Sherice; Bae, Hyuhn-Suhck

      2010-12-01

      This study examined 1371 TV news transcripts on Alzheimer's disease (AD) from 6 TV news networks during a 25-year period (1984-2008) employing the news framing perspective. Issues, sources, and episodic-thematic news about AD derived from the news framing perspective were analyzed. Results revealed that AD issues, such as treatments, personal stories, celebrities, and policy increased over time, whereas other issues including facts, causes, signs, and diagnosis received relatively limited news attention. Correlation analyses among episodic-thematic frames, issues, and sources found that episodic-thematic frames were positively linked with such issues as personal stories and policy and sources, including patients and politicians. The results suggest that although TV news covers episodic frames more than thematic ones, both frames can interact with each other to influence personal and social news about AD. Particularly, the role of celebrity affecting AD news at both individual and social levels is salient.

    14. Healthy depictions? Depicting adoption and adoption news events on broadcast news.

      PubMed

      Kline, Susan L; Chatterjee, Karishma; Karel, Amanda I

      2009-01-01

      Given that the public uses the media to learn about adoption as a family form, this study analyzes U.S. television news coverage of adoption between 2001 and 2005 (N = 309 stories), to identify the types of news events covered about adoption. A majority of news stories covered fraud, crime, legal disputes, and negative international adoption cases. Adoptees as defective or unhealthy were depicted more in negative news event stories, birth parents appeared less overall, and adoptive parents were most likely to have healthy depictions in positively oriented adoption experience, big family, and reunion stories. Although three quarters of the stories used primary adoption participants as news sources, one-third of the negative event stories did not contain healthy depictions of adoption participants. The authors discuss ways journalists and researchers might improve adoption news coverage.

    15. Paleomagnetism.org: An online multi-platform open source environment for paleomagnetic data analysis

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Koymans, Mathijs R.; Langereis, Cor G.; Pastor-Galán, Daniel; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

      2016-08-01

      This contribution provides an overview of Paleomagnetism.org, an open-source, multi-platform online environment for paleomagnetic data analysis. Paleomagnetism.org provides an interactive environment where paleomagnetic data can be interpreted, evaluated, visualized, and exported. The Paleomagnetism.org application is split in to an interpretation portal, a statistics portal, and a portal for miscellaneous paleomagnetic tools. In the interpretation portal, principle component analysis can be performed on visualized demagnetization diagrams. Interpreted directions and great circles can be combined to find great circle solutions. These directions can be used in the statistics portal, or exported as data and figures. The tools in the statistics portal cover standard Fisher statistics for directions and VGPs, including other statistical parameters used as reliability criteria. Other available tools include an eigenvector approach foldtest, two reversal test including a Monte Carlo simulation on mean directions, and a coordinate bootstrap on the original data. An implementation is included for the detection and correction of inclination shallowing in sediments following TK03.GAD. Finally we provide a module to visualize VGPs and expected paleolatitudes, declinations, and inclinations relative to widely used global apparent polar wander path models in coordinates of major continent-bearing plates. The tools in the miscellaneous portal include a net tectonic rotation (NTR) analysis to restore a body to its paleo-vertical and a bootstrapped oroclinal test using linear regressive techniques, including a modified foldtest around a vertical axis. Paleomagnetism.org provides an integrated approach for researchers to work with visualized (e.g. hemisphere projections, Zijderveld diagrams) paleomagnetic data. The application constructs a custom exportable file that can be shared freely and included in public databases. This exported file contains all data and can later be

    16. OxMaR: open source free software for online minimization and randomization for clinical trials.

      PubMed

      O'Callaghan, Christopher A

      2014-01-01

      Minimization is a valuable method for allocating participants between the control and experimental arms of clinical studies. The use of minimization reduces differences that might arise by chance between the study arms in the distribution of patient characteristics such as gender, ethnicity and age. However, unlike randomization, minimization requires real time assessment of each new participant with respect to the preceding distribution of relevant participant characteristics within the different arms of the study. For multi-site studies, this necessitates centralized computational analysis that is shared between all study locations. Unfortunately, there is no suitable freely available open source or free software that can be used for this purpose. OxMaR was developed to enable researchers in any location to use minimization for patient allocation and to access the minimization algorithm using any device that can connect to the internet such as a desktop computer, tablet or mobile phone. The software is complete in itself and requires no special packages or libraries to be installed. It is simple to set up and run over the internet using online facilities which are very low cost or even free to the user. Importantly, it provides real time information on allocation to the study lead or administrator and generates real time distributed backups with each allocation. OxMaR can readily be modified and customised and can also be used for standard randomization. It has been extensively tested and has been used successfully in a low budget multi-centre study. Hitherto, the logistical difficulties involved in minimization have precluded its use in many small studies and this software should allow more widespread use of minimization which should lead to studies with better matched control and experimental arms. OxMaR should be particularly valuable in low resource settings.

    17. News and Announcements

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      1999-02-01

      News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

    18. Quantifying discrepancies in opinion spectra from online and offline networks.

      PubMed

      Lee, Deokjae; Hahn, Kyu S; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Park, Juyong

      2015-01-01

      Online social media such as Twitter are widely used for mining public opinions and sentiments on various issues and topics. The sheer volume of the data generated and the eager adoption by the online-savvy public are helping to raise the profile of online media as a convenient source of news and public opinions on social and political issues as well. Due to the uncontrollable biases in the population who heavily use the media, however, it is often difficult to measure how accurately the online sphere reflects the offline world at large, undermining the usefulness of online media. One way of identifying and overcoming the online-offline discrepancies is to apply a common analytical and modeling framework to comparable data sets from online and offline sources and cross-analyzing the patterns found therein. In this paper we study the political spectra constructed from Twitter and from legislators' voting records as an example to demonstrate the potential limits of online media as the source for accurate public opinion mining, and how to overcome the limits by using offline data simultaneously.

    19. The Digital Distribution of Public Health News Surrounding the Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: A Longitudinal Infodemiology Study

      PubMed Central

      Tang, Tang; Ji, Kai; Ulrich-Schad, Jessica

      2015-01-01

      Background New media changes the dissemination of public health information and misinformation. During a guest appearance on the Today Show, US Representative Michele Bachmann claimed that human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines could cause “mental retardation”. Objective The purpose of this study is to explore how new media influences the type of public health information users access, as well as the impact to these platforms after a major controversy. Specifically, this study aims to examine the similarities and differences in the dissemination of news articles related to the HPV vaccination between Google News and Twitter, as well as how the content of news changed after Michele Bachmann’s controversial comment. Methods This study used a purposive sampling to draw the first 100 news articles that appeared on Google News and the first 100 articles that appeared on Twitter from August 1-October 31, 2011. Article tone, source, topics, concerns, references, publication date, and interactive features were coded. The intercoder reliability had a total agreement of .90. Results Results indicate that 44.0% of the articles (88/200) about the HPV vaccination had a positive tone, 32.5% (65/200) maintained a neutral tone, while 23.5% (47/200) presented a negative tone. Protection against diseases 82.0% (164/200), vaccine eligibility for females 75.5% (151/200), and side effects 59.0% (118/200) were the top three topics covered by these articles. Google News and Twitter articles significantly differed in article tone, source, topics, concerns covered, types of sources referenced in the article, and uses of interactive features. Most notably, topic focus changed from public health information towards political conversation after Bachmann’s comment. Before the comment, the HPV vaccine news talked more often about vaccine dosing (P<.001), duration (P=.005), vaccine eligibility for females (P=.03), and protection against diseases (P=.04) than did the later pieces. After the

    20. Investigation of possible sources of water-soluble organic carbon particles observed with an online monitoring system

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Park, Seung S.; Ko, Jae M.; Cho, Sung Y.

      2011-06-01

      In this study, an instrument for the continuous measurements of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) component in fine particulate matter was developed and its field measurement results were presented. The instrument for collecting atmospheric aerosol particles for the online WSOC analysis uses an aerosol growth technology. Briefly, ambient particles, with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 μm, are collected via a cyclone inlet collector by rapidly mixing saturated water vapor with the ambient aerosol. The resulting supersaturated water vapor condenses on all the particles. The resulting liquid is separated from the air stream by an air-liquid separator, filtered, and the carbon content quantified using a total organic carbon analyzer, providing a continuous 4-min integral measurement. An evaluation of the accuracy of the online WSOC measurement system was performed by comparing the results with 24-h filter-based measurement data. The relationship between the 24-h averages of the 4-min data and the 24-h integrated data of the WSOC measurements indicated that the online WSOC concentration was 16% lower than that of the filter-based measurement. The online measurements of WSOC in fine particles were performed in September 2009 at a photochemical network near an industrial complex. Conditional probability functions were used to identify likely local emission source locations of the WSOC observed at the site, indicating that the major WSOC contribution to the site came mostly from the southeasterly (120-150°) and southwesterly (165-210°) directions, which brought air from a coal-fired power plant and traffic on the roads. Based on the temporal evolutions of SO 2 and WSOC concentrations, wind direction with respect to the station angle of individual sources, wind speed, and source distance, it was shown that the presence of concurrent transients in SO 2 and WSOC concentrations observed for a specific period is likely due to the influence of coal-fired power plants.

      1. Older Adults' Use of Online and Offline Sources of Health Information and Constructs of Reliance and Self-Efficacy for Medical Decision Making.

        PubMed

        Hall, Amanda K; Bernhardt, Jay M; Dodd, Virginia

        2015-01-01

        We know little about older adults' use of online and offline health information sources for medical decision making despite increasing numbers of older adults who report using the Internet for health information to aid in patient-provider communication and medical decision making. Therefore we investigated older adult users and nonusers of online and offline sources of health information and factors related to medical decision making. Survey research was conducted using random digit dialing of Florida residents' landline telephones. The Decision Self-Efficacy Scale and the Reliance Scale were used to measure relationships between users and nonusers of online health information. Study respondents were 225 older adults (age range = 50-92 years, M = 68.9, SD = 10.4), which included users (n = 105) and nonusers (n = 119) of online health information. Users and nonusers differed in frequency and types of health sources sought. Users of online health information preferred a self-reliant approach and nonusers of online health information preferred a physician-reliant approach to involvement in medical decisions on the Reliance Scale. This study found significant differences between older adult users and nonusers of online and offline sources of health information and examined factors related to online health information engagement for medical decision making. PMID:26054777

      2. Evaluation of online information sources on alien species in Europe: the need of harmonization and integration.

        PubMed

        Gatto, Francesca; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Vandekerkhove, Jochen; Zenetos, Argyro; Cardoso, Ana Cristina

        2013-06-01

        Europe is severely affected by alien invasions, which impact biodiversity, ecosystem services, economy, and human health. A large number of national, regional, and global online databases provide information on the distribution, pathways of introduction, and impacts of alien species. The sufficiency and efficiency of the current online information systems to assist the European policy on alien species was investigated by a comparative analysis of occurrence data across 43 online databases. Large differences among databases were found which are partially explained by variations in their taxonomical, environmental, and geographical scopes but also by the variable efforts for continuous updates and by inconsistencies on the definition of "alien" or "invasive" species. No single database covered all European environments, countries, and taxonomic groups. In many European countries national databases do not exist, which greatly affects the quality of reported information. To be operational and useful to scientists, managers, and policy makers, online information systems need to be regularly updated through continuous monitoring on a country or regional level. We propose the creation of a network of online interoperable web services through which information in distributed resources can be accessed, aggregated and then used for reporting and further analysis at different geographical and political scales, as an efficient approach to increase the accessibility of information. Harmonization, standardization, conformity on international standards for nomenclature, and agreement on common definitions of alien and invasive species are among the necessary prerequisites. PMID:23609303

      3. Evaluation of Online Information Sources on Alien Species in Europe: The Need of Harmonization and Integration

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Gatto, Francesca; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Vandekerkhove, Jochen; Zenetos, Argyro; Cardoso, Ana Cristina

        2013-06-01

        Europe is severely affected by alien invasions, which impact biodiversity, ecosystem services, economy, and human health. A large number of national, regional, and global online databases provide information on the distribution, pathways of introduction, and impacts of alien species. The sufficiency and efficiency of the current online information systems to assist the European policy on alien species was investigated by a comparative analysis of occurrence data across 43 online databases. Large differences among databases were found which are partially explained by variations in their taxonomical, environmental, and geographical scopes but also by the variable efforts for continuous updates and by inconsistencies on the definition of "alien" or "invasive" species. No single database covered all European environments, countries, and taxonomic groups. In many European countries national databases do not exist, which greatly affects the quality of reported information. To be operational and useful to scientists, managers, and policy makers, online information systems need to be regularly updated through continuous monitoring on a country or regional level. We propose the creation of a network of online interoperable web services through which information in distributed resources can be accessed, aggregated and then used for reporting and further analysis at different geographical and political scales, as an efficient approach to increase the accessibility of information. Harmonization, standardization, conformity on international standards for nomenclature, and agreement on common definitions of alien and invasive species are among the necessary prerequisites.

      4. Evaluation of online information sources on alien species in Europe: the need of harmonization and integration.

        PubMed

        Gatto, Francesca; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Vandekerkhove, Jochen; Zenetos, Argyro; Cardoso, Ana Cristina

        2013-06-01

        Europe is severely affected by alien invasions, which impact biodiversity, ecosystem services, economy, and human health. A large number of national, regional, and global online databases provide information on the distribution, pathways of introduction, and impacts of alien species. The sufficiency and efficiency of the current online information systems to assist the European policy on alien species was investigated by a comparative analysis of occurrence data across 43 online databases. Large differences among databases were found which are partially explained by variations in their taxonomical, environmental, and geographical scopes but also by the variable efforts for continuous updates and by inconsistencies on the definition of "alien" or "invasive" species. No single database covered all European environments, countries, and taxonomic groups. In many European countries national databases do not exist, which greatly affects the quality of reported information. To be operational and useful to scientists, managers, and policy makers, online information systems need to be regularly updated through continuous monitoring on a country or regional level. We propose the creation of a network of online interoperable web services through which information in distributed resources can be accessed, aggregated and then used for reporting and further analysis at different geographical and political scales, as an efficient approach to increase the accessibility of information. Harmonization, standardization, conformity on international standards for nomenclature, and agreement on common definitions of alien and invasive species are among the necessary prerequisites.

      5. Using a network menu and the UMLS Information Sources Map to facilitate access to online reference materials.

        PubMed Central

        Clyman, J I; Powsner, S M; Paton, J A; Miller, P L

        1993-01-01

        As computer technology advances, clinicians and biomedical researchers are becoming more dependent upon information from online databases and information systems. By using specially configured computer workstations and high-speed computer networks, it is now possible to access this information in a rapid and straightforward manner. To empower users by providing these capabilities, the authors are assembling a variety of network workstations to be located throughout Yale-New Haven Medical Center. At the heart of the workstation is NetMenu, a program designed to help users connect to a number of important online information systems, including a hospital order entry and results reporting system, a drug reference, bibliographic retrieval systems, and educational programs. In addition, as part of the National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) project, the authors have developed a local prototype of the UMLS Information Sources Map (ISM) and a companion query assistant program to complement the NetMenu in helping users select and connect automatically to information services relevant to a particular question. The ISM query assistant draws from a listing of many online information sources accessible via local and international networks. PMID:8472006

      6. Online tuning of impedance matching circuit for long pulse inductively coupled plasma source operation—An alternate approach

        SciTech Connect

        Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M. Chakraborty, A.; Kraus, W.; Gahlaut, A.; Bansal, G.

        2014-01-15

        Impedance matching circuit between radio frequency (RF) generator and the plasma load, placed between them, determines the RF power transfer from RF generator to the plasma load. The impedance of plasma load depends on the plasma parameters through skin depth and plasma conductivity or resistivity. Therefore, for long pulse operation of inductively coupled plasmas, particularly for high power (∼100 kW or more) where plasma load condition may vary due to different reasons (e.g., pressure, power, and thermal), online tuning of impedance matching circuit is necessary through feedback. In fusion grade ion source operation, such online methodology through feedback is not present but offline remote tuning by adjusting the matching circuit capacitors and tuning the driving frequency of the RF generator between the ion source operation pulses is envisaged. The present model is an approach for remote impedance tuning methodology for long pulse operation and corresponding online impedance matching algorithm based on RF coil antenna current measurement or coil antenna calorimetric measurement may be useful in this regard.

      7. The Baghdad that Was: Using Primary Sources to Teach World History

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Schur, Joan Brodsky

        2009-01-01

        That primary source documents have the power to bring the past alive is no news to social studies teachers. What is new in the last 10 years is the number of digitized documents available online that teachers can download and use in their classrooms. Encouraging teachers to utilize this ever-increasing treasure trove of resources was the goal of…

      8. Surgical videos online: a survey of prominent sources and future trends.

        PubMed

        Dinscore, Amanda; Andres, Amy

        2010-01-01

        This article determines the extent of the online availability and quality of surgical videos for the educational benefit of the surgical community. A comprehensive survey was performed that compared a number of online sites providing surgical videos according to their content, production quality, authority, audience, navigability, and other features. Methods for evaluating video content are discussed as well as possible future directions and emerging trends. Surgical videos are a valuable tool for demonstrating and teaching surgical technique and, despite room for growth in this area, advances in streaming video technology have made providing and accessing these resources easier than ever before.

      9. They Came, They Liked, They Commented: Social Influence on Facebook News Channels.

        PubMed

        Winter, Stephan; Brückner, Caroline; Krämer, Nicole C

        2015-08-01

        Due to the increasing importance of social networking sites as sources of information, news media organizations have set up Facebook channels in which they publish news stories or links to articles. This research investigated how journalistic texts are perceived in this new context and how reactions of other users change the influence of the main articles. In an online experiment (N=197), a Facebook posting of a reputable news site and the corresponding article were shown. The type of user comments and the number of likes were systematically varied. Negative comments diminished the persuasive influence of the article, while there were no strengthening effects of positive comments. When readers perceived the topic as personally relevant, comments including relevant arguments were more influential than comments with subjective opinions, which can be explained by higher levels of elaboration. However, against expectations of bandwagon perceptions, a high number of likes did not lead to conformity effects, which suggests that exemplifying comments are more influential than statistical user representations. Results are discussed with regard to effects of news media content and the mechanisms of social influence in Web 2.0. PMID:26252927

      10. They Came, They Liked, They Commented: Social Influence on Facebook News Channels.

        PubMed

        Winter, Stephan; Brückner, Caroline; Krämer, Nicole C

        2015-08-01

        Due to the increasing importance of social networking sites as sources of information, news media organizations have set up Facebook channels in which they publish news stories or links to articles. This research investigated how journalistic texts are perceived in this new context and how reactions of other users change the influence of the main articles. In an online experiment (N=197), a Facebook posting of a reputable news site and the corresponding article were shown. The type of user comments and the number of likes were systematically varied. Negative comments diminished the persuasive influence of the article, while there were no strengthening effects of positive comments. When readers perceived the topic as personally relevant, comments including relevant arguments were more influential than comments with subjective opinions, which can be explained by higher levels of elaboration. However, against expectations of bandwagon perceptions, a high number of likes did not lead to conformity effects, which suggests that exemplifying comments are more influential than statistical user representations. Results are discussed with regard to effects of news media content and the mechanisms of social influence in Web 2.0.

      11. Cohesiveness in financial news and its relation to market volatility.

        PubMed

        Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Smuc, Tomislav

        2014-01-01

        Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets.

      12. Cohesiveness in Financial News and its Relation to Market Volatility

        PubMed Central

        Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Šmuc, Tomislav

        2014-01-01

        Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets. PMID:24849598

      13. An Offline-Online Android Application for Hazard Event Mapping Using WebGIS Open Source Technologies

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Olyazadeh, Roya; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Sudmeier-Rieux, Karen; Derron, Marc-Henri; Devkota, Sanjaya

        2016-04-01

        Nowadays, Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) plays an important role in better understanding and managing disaster risk reduction around the world. National and local government, NGOs and other stakeholders are increasingly seeking and producing data on hazards. Most of the hazard event inventories and land use mapping are based on remote sensing data, with little ground truthing, creating difficulties depending on the terrain and accessibility. Open Source WebGIS tools offer an opportunity for quicker and easier ground truthing of critical areas in order to analyse hazard patterns and triggering factors. This study presents a secure mobile-map application for hazard event mapping using Open Source WebGIS technologies such as Postgres database, Postgis, Leaflet, Cordova and Phonegap. The objectives of this prototype are: 1. An Offline-Online android mobile application with advanced Geospatial visualisation; 2. Easy Collection and storage of events information applied services; 3. Centralized data storage with accessibility by all the service (smartphone, standard web browser); 4. Improving data management by using active participation in hazard event mapping and storage. This application has been implemented as a low-cost, rapid and participatory method for recording impacts from hazard events and includes geolocation (GPS data and Internet), visualizing maps with overlay of satellite images, viewing uploaded images and events as cluster points, drawing and adding event information. The data can be recorded in offline (Android device) or online version (all browsers) and consequently uploaded through the server whenever internet is available. All the events and records can be visualized by an administrator and made public after approval. Different user levels can be defined to access the data for communicating the information. This application was tested for landslides in post-earthquake Nepal but can be used for any other type of hazards such as flood, avalanche

      14. Investigation of Using Online Video Case Discussions in Teacher Education: Sources of Evidence of Mathematics Learning

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Osmanoglu, Aslihan; Koc, Yusuf; Isiksal, Mine

        2013-01-01

        The purpose of this study was to explore pre-service and in-service mathematics teachers' analyses of student learning in a video case of mathematics instruction via an online learning forum. The study was conducted in the context of three different mathematics methods courses in a 4-year college in the Midwestern United States. Twenty-six…

      15. Teachers Making Connections: Online Communities as a Source of Professional Learning

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Duncan-Howell, Jennifer

        2010-01-01

        The impact of the Internet on our lives has been pervasive. People are increasingly turning to the social interaction available on the Internet to satisfy their needs, whether these are professional or personal. The Internet offers users fast access to social contacts such as online chat groups and discussion lists, helping us to make connections…

      16. Teaching the Scientific Method Using Current News Articles

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Palmer, Laura K.; Mahan, Carolyn G.

        2013-01-01

        We describe a short (less than 50 minutes) activity using news articles from sources such as "Science Daily" to teach students the steps of the scientific method and the difference between primary and secondary literature sources. The flexibility in choosing news articles to examine allowed us to tailor the activity to the specific interests of…

      17. Few Seniors Go Online for Health-Care Needs

        MedlinePlus

        ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160204.html Few Seniors Go Online for Health-Care Needs Study calls into ... that many older adults do use cellphones and go online for some things. But health care, apparently, ...

      18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Interferometer phase calibration sources (Patnaik+ 1998)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Patnaik, A. R.; Browne, I. W. A.; Wilkinson, P. N.; Wrobel, J. M.

        2000-01-01

        The catalogue contains compact radio sources with accurate positions observed with the Very Large Array (VLA). These sources are primarily intended for use as phase calibration sources for the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN); the sources are also suitable as phase calibrators for the VLA and can be considered as candidate phase calibrators for very long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) networks. The accuracy of the position is 12 mas for sources in Paper I, 14 mas for sources in Paper II, and 55 mas for sources in Paper III. (2 data files).

      19. Online Education: Growing, but Painfully

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Parry, Marc

        2009-01-01

        Evolve or dissolve. That advice, from a recent report on virtual universities, played out in two news stories last May 2009. The University of Texas' online division is staring down a deep budget hole as it loses a longtime subsidy. In Utah, budget cuts have killed a 10-campus online consortium. Those and other predicaments reflect the growing…

      20. What makes gambling news?

        PubMed

        McMullan, J L; Mullen, J

        2001-01-01

        This paper examines print media coverage of casino and electronic gambling in one Canadian province from 1992 to 1997. It provides a theme analysis of content of 234 gambling stories printed in the top two daily newspapers in Nova Scotia. The findings of our content analysis indicate that pro-gambling corporate and political newspaper sources waged a successful media campaign and constructed a powerful public rhetoric in support of new gambling products, services, and institutions. The media, for their part, gave visibility and form to these structured messages. They helped create expectations about gambling and economics and gambling and government. Law and order, and moral and medical discourses about gambling, we discovered, were minor representations in the news coverage, although moral narratives were a pervasive secondary theme in much of the reporting. At bottom, the press produced a "politics of truth" about gambling that was both an external exercise of power and an internal organizational production. PMID:11842527

      1. News clippings for introductory astronomy

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Bobrowsky, Matthew

        1999-09-01

        Most students entering our introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors arrive not merely lacking scientific facts-they also have misconceptions about the nature of science, and many have a handicapping ``science anxiety'' (in addition to math anxiety). So I have added a ``current science'' requirement to our introductory course. Each student must compile a file of five astronomy news articles taken from readily available sources.

      2. A guide to reading health care news stories.

        PubMed

        Schwitzer, Gary

        2014-07-01

        From April 16, 2006, through May 30, 2013, a team of reviewers from HealthNewsReview.org, many of whom were physicians, evaluated the reporting by US news organizations on new medical treatments, tests, products, and procedures. After reviewing 1889 stories (approximately 43% newspaper articles, 30% wire or news services stories, 15% online pieces [including those by broadcast and magazine companies], and 12% network television stories), the reviewers graded most stories unsatisfactory on 5 of 10 review criteria: costs, benefits, harms, quality of the evidence, and comparison of the new approach with alternatives. Drugs, medical devices, and other interventions were usually portrayed positively; potential harms were minimized, and costs were ignored. Our findings can help journalists improve their news stories and help physicians and the public better understand the strengths and weaknesses of news media coverage of medical and health topics. PMID:24796314

      3. Modeling Online Health Information-Seeking Behavior in China: The Roles of Source Characteristics, Reward Assessment, and Internet Self-Efficacy.

        PubMed

        Cao, Weidan; Zhang, Xinyao; Xu, Kaibin; Wang, Yuanxin

        2016-09-01

        The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003 marked the explosion of health information seeking online in China and the increasing emergence of Chinese health websites. There are both benefits and potential hazards of people's online health information seeking. This article intended to test part of Wilson's second model of information behavior, including source characteristics and activating mechanisms, and to identify the relationships among perceived access, perceived expertise credibility, reward assessment, Internet self-efficacy, and online health information-seeking behavior. Data were drawn from face-to-face surveys and an online survey of health information seekers (N = 393) in China. The results showed that source characteristics predicted activating mechanisms, which in turn predicted online health information-seeking behavior. Activating mechanisms, that is, reward assessment and Internet self-efficacy, mediated the relationship between source characteristics (i.e., access and credibility) and online health information-seeking behavior. Strategies for improving information access, expertise credibility, and Internet self-efficacy are discussed in order to maximize the benefits of online health information seeking and to minimize the potential harm.

      4. "Good News" Tune Makes Discussion of "Bad News" Sing.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Sneed, Don

        1984-01-01

        Recommends playing Anne Murray's recording of "A Little Good News" to promote discussion about the nature of news and Bobbie Gentry's "Ode to Billy Joe" for discussion on writing news stories about suicides. (CRH)

      5. Sustaining an Online, Shared Community Resource for Models, Robust Open source Software Tools and Data for Volcanology - the Vhub Experience

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Patra, A. K.; Valentine, G. A.; Bursik, M. I.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Jones, M.; Simakov, N.; Aghakhani, H.; Jones-Ivey, R.; Kosar, T.; Zhang, B.

        2015-12-01

        Over the last 5 years we have created a community collaboratory Vhub.org [Palma et al, J. App. Volc. 3:2 doi:10.1186/2191-5040-3-2] as a place to find volcanology-related resources, and a venue for users to disseminate tools, teaching resources, data, and an online platform to support collaborative efforts. As the community (current active users > 6000 from an estimated community of comparable size) embeds the tools in the collaboratory into educational and research workflows it became imperative to: a) redesign tools into robust, open source reusable software for online and offline usage/enhancement; b) share large datasets with remote collaborators and other users seamlessly with security; c) support complex workflows for uncertainty analysis, validation and verification and data assimilation with large data. The focus on tool development/redevelopment has been twofold - firstly to use best practices in software engineering and new hardware like multi-core and graphic processing units. Secondly we wish to enhance capabilities to support inverse modeling, uncertainty quantification using large ensembles and design of experiments, calibration, validation. Among software engineering practices we practice are open source facilitating community contributions, modularity and reusability. Our initial targets are four popular tools on Vhub - TITAN2D, TEPHRA2, PUFF and LAVA. Use of tools like these requires many observation driven data sets e.g. digital elevation models of topography, satellite imagery, field observations on deposits etc. These data are often maintained in private repositories that are privately shared by "sneaker-net". As a partial solution to this we tested mechanisms using irods software for online sharing of private data with public metadata and access limits. Finally, we adapted use of workflow engines (e.g. Pegasus) to support the complex data and computing workflows needed for usage like uncertainty quantification for hazard analysis using physical

      6. Measuring the Interestingness of News Articles

        SciTech Connect

        Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

        2007-09-24

        An explosive growth of online news has taken place. Users are inundated with thousands of news articles, only some of which are interesting. A system to filter out uninteresting articles would aid users that need to read and analyze many articles daily, such as financial analysts and government officials. The most obvious approach for reducing the amount of information overload is to learn keywords of interest for a user (Carreira et al., 2004). Although filtering articles based on keywords removes many irrelevant articles, there are still many uninteresting articles that are highly relevant to keyword searches. A relevant article may not be interesting for various reasons, such as the article's age or if it discusses an event that the user has already read about in other articles. Although it has been shown that collaborative filtering can aid in personalized recommendation systems (Wang et al., 2006), a large number of users is needed. In a limited user environment, such as a small group of analysts monitoring news events, collaborative filtering would be ineffective. The definition of what makes an article interesting--or its 'interestingness'--varies from user to user and is continually evolving, calling for adaptable user personalization. Furthermore, due to the nature of news, most articles are uninteresting since many are similar or report events outside the scope of an individual's concerns. There has been much work in news recommendation systems, but none have yet addressed the question of what makes an article interesting.

      7. Web-MCQ: a set of methods and freely available open source code for administering online multiple choice question assessments.

        PubMed

        Hewson, Claire

        2007-08-01

        E-learning approaches have received increasing attention in recent years. Accordingly, a number of tools have become available to assist the nonexpert computer user in constructing and managing virtual learning environments, and implementing computer-based and/or online procedures to support pedagogy. Both commercial and free packages are now available, with new developments emerging periodically. Commercial products have the advantage of being comprehensive and reliable, but tend to require substantial financial investment and are not always transparent to use. They may also restrict pedagogical choices due to their predetermined ranges of functionality. With these issues in mind, several authors have argued for the pedagogical benefits of developing freely available, open source e-learning resources, which can be shared and further developed within a community of educational practitioners. The present paper supports this objective by presenting a set of methods, along with supporting freely available, downloadable, open source programming code, to allow administration of online multiple choice question assessments to students.

      8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Swift/UVOT Serendipitous Source Catalog (Yershov, 2015)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Yershov, V. N.

        2015-11-01

        The first version of the Swift UVOT serendipitous source catalogue (UVOTSSC) provides positions and magnitudes, as well as errors and upper limits of confirmed sources for observations taken from start of operations in 2005 until October 1st of 2010. The first version of the Swift UVOT Serendipitous Source Catalogue (UVOTSSC) has been produced by processing the image data obtained from the Swift Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) from the beginning of the mission (2005) until 1st of October of 2010. The data processing was performed at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL, University College London, U.K.) using Swift FTOOLS from NASA's High Energy Astrophysics Software (HEASoft-6.11), with some customising of the UVOT packages in order to get more complete source detection and properly apply quality flags to those sources that were detected within the UVOT image artefacts. The total number of observations with 17'x17' images used for version 1 of the catalogue is 23,059, giving 6,200,016 sources in total, of which 2,027,265 have multiple entries in the source table because they have been detected in more than one observation. Some sources were only observed in one filter. The total number of entries in the source table is 13,860,568. The S/N ratio for all sources exceeds 5 for at least one UVOT filter, the rest of the filters having a S/N greater than 3. (3 data files).

      9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Compact radio sources near Galactic center (Pynzar'+, 2014)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Pynzar', A. V.; Shishov, V. I.

        2014-07-01

        Using literature data on approximately 400 compact radio sources detected with the Very Large Array and located in the direction of the Galactic center within 2° of the compact source Sgr A*, 69 sources whose angular sizes are determined by scattering on electron density inhomogeneities were distinguished. Fifty-five of these are extragalactic, two are supercompact HII regions, ten are sources of maser emission, and two are variable Galactic sources. The excess of the apparent angular sizes of maser sources within 2° of the Galactic center above the mean size of objects of this class in other parts of the Galaxy found in many studies cannot be explained purely by the effect of scattering of their radio emission on interstellar plasma inhomogeneities. The angular sizes of these objects are increased due to scattering only within Galactic longitudes of about 0.4° and Galactic latitudes less than 0.1°. The turbulent medium responsible for scattering of radio emission of compact sources in the immediate vicinity of the Galactic center is strongly concentrated toward the compact source Sgr A* at the Galactic center. No extragalactic sources are observed within 0.4° in longitude and 0.2° in latitude of the Galactic center, because of their low brightness due to the superstrong scattering in this region. Data on scatter broadening can be used to study the distribution of turbulent plasma near the Galactic center. (3 data files).

      10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 86GHz VLBI survey of compact radio sources (Lobanov+ 2000)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Lobanov; A. P.; Krichbaum; T. P.; Graham; D. A.; Witzel; A.; Kraus; A.; Zensus; J. A.; Britzen; S.; Greve; A.; Grewing; M.

        2000-10-01

        File table1 contains the list of observed sources, providing the source coordinates (J2000) and redshift, detection status, type, optical magnitude, and brightness temperature of the radio emission. File table4 contains the description of the VLBI data, and provide the observed total and correlated flux densities, the parameters of single gaussian component model fits, and the parameters of hybrid images of the observed sources. File table5 contains multicomponent model fits for the sources with detected extended structures and the brightness temperatures derived from these model fits. (3 data files).

      11. Live Blogging Science News: The Rosetta Mission

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Clark, S.

        2016-03-01

        When one of the world's most popular online news websites decides to cover a space science event live, you know that something big is brewing. Stuart Clark reports on how live blogging can be used for science reporting and how an idea that was triggered by his observations during the Rosetta flyby of the asteroid Lutetia and the landing of the Curiosity rover on Mars led to him live blogging two of Rosetta's most memorable occasions for The Guardian newspaper.

      12. Computational models of consumer confidence from large-scale online attention data: crowd-sourcing econometrics.

        PubMed

        Dong, Xianlei; Bollen, Johan

        2015-01-01

        Economies are instances of complex socio-technical systems that are shaped by the interactions of large numbers of individuals. The individual behavior and decision-making of consumer agents is determined by complex psychological dynamics that include their own assessment of present and future economic conditions as well as those of others, potentially leading to feedback loops that affect the macroscopic state of the economic system. We propose that the large-scale interactions of a nation's citizens with its online resources can reveal the complex dynamics of their collective psychology, including their assessment of future system states. Here we introduce a behavioral index of Chinese Consumer Confidence (C3I) that computationally relates large-scale online search behavior recorded by Google Trends data to the macroscopic variable of consumer confidence. Our results indicate that such computational indices may reveal the components and complex dynamics of consumer psychology as a collective socio-economic phenomenon, potentially leading to improved and more refined economic forecasting.

      13. Computational models of consumer confidence from large-scale online attention data: crowd-sourcing econometrics.

        PubMed

        Dong, Xianlei; Bollen, Johan

        2015-01-01

        Economies are instances of complex socio-technical systems that are shaped by the interactions of large numbers of individuals. The individual behavior and decision-making of consumer agents is determined by complex psychological dynamics that include their own assessment of present and future economic conditions as well as those of others, potentially leading to feedback loops that affect the macroscopic state of the economic system. We propose that the large-scale interactions of a nation's citizens with its online resources can reveal the complex dynamics of their collective psychology, including their assessment of future system states. Here we introduce a behavioral index of Chinese Consumer Confidence (C3I) that computationally relates large-scale online search behavior recorded by Google Trends data to the macroscopic variable of consumer confidence. Our results indicate that such computational indices may reveal the components and complex dynamics of consumer psychology as a collective socio-economic phenomenon, potentially leading to improved and more refined economic forecasting. PMID:25826692

      14. Computational Models of Consumer Confidence from Large-Scale Online Attention Data: Crowd-Sourcing Econometrics

        PubMed Central

        2015-01-01

        Economies are instances of complex socio-technical systems that are shaped by the interactions of large numbers of individuals. The individual behavior and decision-making of consumer agents is determined by complex psychological dynamics that include their own assessment of present and future economic conditions as well as those of others, potentially leading to feedback loops that affect the macroscopic state of the economic system. We propose that the large-scale interactions of a nation's citizens with its online resources can reveal the complex dynamics of their collective psychology, including their assessment of future system states. Here we introduce a behavioral index of Chinese Consumer Confidence (C3I) that computationally relates large-scale online search behavior recorded by Google Trends data to the macroscopic variable of consumer confidence. Our results indicate that such computational indices may reveal the components and complex dynamics of consumer psychology as a collective socio-economic phenomenon, potentially leading to improved and more refined economic forecasting. PMID:25826692

      15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Methanol masers towards IRAS sources (van der Walt+ 1995)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        van der, Walt D. J.; Gaylard, M. J.; MacLeod, G. C.

        1997-04-01

        We present the results of our second search for 6.7-GHz methanol masers towards colour-selected IRAS sources. Five hundred and twenty IRAS sources that meet the far-infrared colour criteria set by Wood & Churchwell (1989ApJ...340..265W) for ultra-compact HII regions were searched for 6.7-GHz methanol maser emission, to a sensitivity limit of 5Jy. Thirty one new maser sources were detected. We also compare the FIR colours of the newly detected maser sources with those detected by Schutte et al. (1993MNRAS.261..783S) and the IRAS counterparts of sources that have both methanol and hydroxyl maser emission. It was found that the average flux distribution of the newly detected sources differs significantly from that of all other known 6.7-GHz methanol maser sources. It is argued that the differences may be due either to intrinsic differences between the three groups of sources or to interstellar extinction. An analysis of the relation between the 6.7-GHz maser and IRAS flux densities shows that the maser flux density is always less than the 100μm flux density while only three sources have a maser flux density greater than the 60μm flux density. Far-infrared pumping of the 6.7-GHz methanol masers is therefore in principle viable although it was found that the apparent maser efficiency will exceed 10 per cent for a significant number of sources in the case of FIR pumping by photons between 50 and 100μm. The overall detection rates on the IRAS [25-12] vs [60-12] two-colour diagram are also presented. Possible new search strategies for masers in colour-selected IRAS sources are discussed. (2 data files).

      16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hubble Source Catalog (V1 and V2) (Whitmore+, 2016)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Whitmore, B. C.; Allam, S. S.; Budavari, T.; Casertano, S.; Downes, R. A.; Donaldson, T.; Fall, S. M.; Lubow, S. H.; Quick, L.; Strolger, L.-G.; Wallace, G.; White, R. L.

        2016-10-01

        The HSC v1 contains members of the WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS and WFC3/IR Source Extractor source lists from HLA version DR8 (data release 8). The crossmatching process involves adjusting the relative astrometry of overlapping images so as to minimize positional offsets between closely aligned sources in different images. After correction, the astrometric residuals of crossmatched sources are significantly reduced, to typically less than 10mas. The relative astrometry is supported by using Pan-STARRS, SDSS, and 2MASS as the astrometric backbone for initial corrections. In addition, the catalog includes source nondetections. The crossmatching algorithms and the properties of the initial (Beta 0.1) catalog are described in Budavari & Lubow (2012ApJ...761..188B). The HSC v2 contains members of the WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS and WFC3/IR Source Extractor source lists from HLA version DR9.1 (data release 9.1). The crossmatching process involves adjusting the relative astrometry of overlapping images so as to minimize positional offsets between closely aligned sources in different images. After correction, the astrometric residuals of crossmatched sources are significantly reduced, to typically less than 10mas. The relative astrometry is supported by using Pan-STARRS, SDSS, and 2MASS as the astrometric backbone for initial corrections. In addition, the catalog includes source nondetections. The crossmatching algorithms and the properties of the initial (Beta 0.1) catalog are described in Budavari & Lubow (2012ApJ...761..188B). Hubble Source Catalog Acknowledgement: Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESAC/ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA). (2 data files).

      17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SCORPIO 1 catalogue of compact radio sources (Umana+, 2015)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Leto, P.; Ingallinera, A.; Buemi, C. S.; Agliozzo, C.; Cavallaro, F.; Cerrigone, L.

        2016-06-01

        The SCORPIO1 Catalogue contains all the point-like sources detected in the first data release. The field is in the Galactic Plane, at -0.5sources is 614, the maximum flux density is 384mJy and the minimum is 0.160mJy. (1 data file).

      18. News from Online: A Spectrum of Color

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

        1999-06-01

        Thomas Chasteen's site ( http://www.shsu.edu/~chm_tgc/sounds/sound.html) shows how to separate colors using a tuneable monochromator. This graphic comes from his monochromator animation ( http://www.shsu.edu/~chemistry/monochromator/mono.gif). Science Media's site ( http://www.scimedia.com/index.html#scimedia) includes spectroscopy tutorials by Brian Tissue. This graphic can be found at http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/light/graphics/em-rad.gif (©1998 B. M. Tissue, www.scimedia.com). All the colors in the rainbow! Now that is a good place to start. Go to About Rainbows ( http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/staff/blynds/rnbw.html), a tutorial from astronomer Beverly Lynds, working with the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. The tutorial begins with a historical perspective, complete with a sketch by René Descartes in 1637. The bibliography makes this tutorial a good starting point for color exploration. About Rainbows brings you questions to explorefor example, "What happens when you look at a rainbow through dark glasses?" Try the links to these other sites. Project SkyMath: Making Mathematical Connections ( http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/staff/blynds/Skymath.html) is especially for the middle school student. Reproducible masters of these teaching modules can be printed in English and Spanish. From Project SkyMath, you can go to Blue-Skies, a user-friendly graphical interface from The Weather Underground at the University of Michigan ( http://groundhog.sprl.umich.edu/BS.html). And speaking of blue skies, look at a great site, Why is the Sky Blue at http://acept.la.asu.edu/PiN/act/sky/sky.shtml. This is a super site from the Arizona Collaborative for Excellence in the Preparation of Teachers, by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Arizona State University. If you go to Patterns in Nature: Light and Optics at http://acept.la.asu.edu/PiN/act/activities.shtml, plan to spend some time, for it is wonderful. Another link from the About Rainbows tutorial goes to an experiment that is suitable for older students, Circles of Light--The Mathematics of Rainbows at http://www.geom.umn.edu/education/calc-init/rainbow/. Frederick J. Wicklin and Paul Edelman of the University of Minnesota note that this comprehensive lab is based on a module developed by Steven Janke. Go back to About Rainbows to link to a Java applet, allowing you to change the incident angle and color of light striking a water droplet. This great teaching device is from Fu-Kwun Hwang of the National Taiwan Normal University at http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava /Rainbow/rainbow.html. And while you are here in this site (choose English or Chinese), look at the more than 30 Java applets created by F.-K. Hwang at http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava/index.html. The interactive applet on Shadow/Image and Color is great fun, (http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava/shadow /shadow.html). From mixing colors, we can go to Thomas Chasteen's fine work at http://www.shsu.edu/~chm_tgc/sounds/sound.html for an animation (and movie also) of how to separate colors using a tuneable monochromator ( http://www.shsu.edu/~chemistry/monochromator/mono.gif). This colorful graphic, showing incoming parallel white light, is clipped from that monochromator animation. While you are here at this site at Sam Houston State University, look at the other great animations and movies, including a movie showing solution-phase chemiluminescence at http://www.shsu.edu/~chm_tgc/chemilumdir/movie.html. So now that we have explored the breaking down of light into its component colors, we need to also look at another process--polarizing light. Let's go to Science Media's comprehensive site ( http://www.scimedia.com/index.html#scimedia) to examine polarized light ( http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/spec/molec/polarim.htm). Of course, most sunglasses polarize light--bringing us back to the question of the rainbow again. Explore here for a while--appreciate the beautiful visible electromagnetic spectrum at http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/light/graphics/em-visib.jpg. Great spectroscopy tutorials from Brian Tissue of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University are found at Science Media's site. One of my favorite graphics ( http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/light/graphics/em-rad.gif) reminds us of why light is electromagnetic radiation. But how to we actually see color? Go to the Access Excellence Classic Collection sponsored by Genentech, Inc. (http://www.gene.com/ae/AE/AEC/CC/). From here, go to How We See: The First Steps of Human Vision at http://www.gene.com/ae/AE/AEC/CC/vision_background.html. Here are good graphics and explanations of the roles of rod and cone cells, and lots more! And marvel a little the next time you see a rainbow. World Wide Web Addresses About Rainbows http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/staff/blynds/rnbw.html Project SkyMath: Making Mathematical Connections http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/staff/blynds/Skymath.html The Weather Underground at the University of Michigan--Blue- Skies http://groundhog.sprl.umich.edu/BS.html Why is the Sky Blue http://acept.la.asu.edu/PiN/act/sky/sky.shtml Patterns in NatureLight and Optics Activities http://acept.la.asu.edu/PiN/act/activities.shtml Circles of Lightthe Mathematics of Rainbows http://www.geom.umn.edu/education/calc-init/rainbow/ The Physics of a Rainbow http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava /Rainbow/rainbow.html The NTNU Virtual Physics Laboratory http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava /index.html Shadow/Image and Color http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava/shadow/shadow.html Thomas Chasteen's Chemistry-Based QuickTime Movies, Animations, and Streaming Audio http://www.shsu.edu/~chm_tgc/sounds/sound.html Tuneable Monochromator http://www.shsu.edu/~chemistry/monochromator/mono.gif The Chemiluminescence Home Page http://www.shsu.edu/~chm_tgc/chemilumdir/movie.html Science Hypermedia Home Page http://www.scimedia.com/index.html#scimedia Polarimetry http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/spec/molec/polarim.htm The Visible Spectrum http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/light/graphics/em-visib.jpg Propagation Direction of Electromagnetic Radiation http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/light/graphics/em-rad.gif Access Excellence Classic Collection http://www.gene.com/ae/AE/AEC/CC/ How We SeeThe First Steps of Human Vision http://www.gene.com/ae/AE/AEC/CC/vision_background.html access date for all sites: April 1999

      19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: A 5-GHz Survey of Radio Sources (Altschuler 1986)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Altschuler, D. R.

        1999-11-01

        The results of a sensitive radio survey of about 0.04 sr of extragalactic sky in a narrow strip about declination = +33 deg are reported. The measurements were made with the NRAO 91-meter Green Bank telescope at a frequency of 4760 MHz. A catalogue of the 882 sources detected above a flux density of 15 mJy is given. The area surveyed is part of that covered earlier by the NRAO 5-GHz Survey of Faint Sources, Davis (1971). The results will allow an unbiased study of the variability characteristics of sources common to both surveys. (1 data file).

      20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: DUSTiNGS. I. The Good Source Catalog (Boyer+, 2015)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Boyer, M. L.; McQuinn, K. B. W.; Barmby, P.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Gehrz, R. D.; Gordon, K. D.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Lagadec, E.; Lennon, D.; Marengo, M.; Meixner, M.; Skillman, E.; Sloan, G. C.; Sonneborn, G.; van Loon, J. Th.; Zijlstra, A.

        2015-07-01

        The DUSTiNGS (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer) survey includes uniform 3.6 and 4.5um Spitzer/IRAC imaging of 50 nearby galaxies (see table 1) between 2011 Jun 19 and 2012 Jun 23 (see table 2). The final Vega magnitudes of the high-quality point sources are reported in the DUSTiNGS "Good"-Source Catalog (GSC), which is described in Table 5 (see section 5). A full point source catalog is available at: http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/data/SPITZER/DUSTiNGS/ (3 data files).

      1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: High proper motion sources from WISE (Beamin+, 2015)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Beamin, J. C.; Ivanov, V. D.; Minniti, D.; Smart, R. L.; Muzic, K.; Mendez, R. A.; Beletsky, Y.; Bayo, A.; Gromadzki, M.; Kurtev, R.

        2016-07-01

        The ESO Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera v.2 (EFOSC2) mounted at the 3.6-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at la Silla observatory, is a versatile instrument for low-resolution spectroscopy, imaging and polarimetry. We obtained low-resolution long-slit spectra for 24 sources (see Table 1) using the same configuration for all the sources: 1 arcsec slit width, grism number one, covering a spectral range of λ=3185-10940Å with a resolution ~48Å. All the sources were observed on 2014 April 17. (3 data files).

      2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XMM sources in IC 1805 (Rauw+, 2016)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Rauw, G.; Naze, Y.

        2016-08-01

        The table provides the full catalogue of X-ray sources detected with the EPIC instruments onboard XMM-Newton inside the IC1805 cluster. The sources are ordered by increasing right ascension. The coordinates of the sources were cross-correlated with the optical and IR catalogues of Straizys et al. (2013, Cat. J/A+A/554/A3), Wolff et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJ/726/19), and the SIMBAD catalogue. We adopted in each case a correlation radius of 4 arcsec. (1 data file).

      3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GUViCS. Ultraviolet Source Catalogs (Voyer+, 2014)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Voyer, E. N.; Boselli, A.; Boissier, S.; Heinis, S.; Cortese, L.; Ferrarese, L.; Cote, P.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Peng, E. W.; Zhang, H.; Liu, C.

        2014-07-01

        These catalogs are based on GALEX NUV and FUV source detections in and behind the Virgo Cluster. The detections are split into catalogs of extended sources and point-like sources. The UV Virgo Cluster Extended Source catalog (UV_VES.fit) provides the deepest and most extensive UV photometric data of extended galaxies in Virgo to date. If certain data is not available for a given source then a null value is entered (e.g. -999, -99). UV point-like sources are matched with SDSS, NGVS, and NED and the relevant photometry and further data from these databases/catalogs are provided in this compilation of catalogs. The primary GUViCS UV Virgo Cluster Point-Like Source catalog is UV_VPS.fit. This catalog provides the most useful GALEX pipeline NUV and FUV photometric parameters, and categorizes sources as stars, Virgo members, and background sources, when possible. It also provides identifiers for optical matches in the SDSS and NED, and indicates if a match exists in the NGVS, only if GUViCS-optical matches are one-to-one. NED spectroscopic redshifts are also listed for GUViCS-NED one-to-one matches. If certain data is not available for a given source a null value is entered. Additionally, the catalog is useful for quick access to optical data on one-to-one GUViCS-SDSS matches.The only parameter available in the catalog for UV sources that have multiple SDSS matches is the total number of multiple matches, i.e. SDSSNUMMTCHS. Multiple GUViCS sources matched to the same SDSS source are also flagged given a total number of matches, SDSSNUMMTCHS, of one. All other fields for multiple matches are set to a null value of -99. In order to obtain full optical SDSS data for multiply matched UV sources in both scenarios, the user can cross-correlate the GUViCS ID of the sources of interest with the full GUViCS-SDSS matched catalog in GUV_SDSS.fit. The GUViCS-SDSS matched catalog, GUV_SDSS.fit, provides the most relevant SDSS data on all GUViCS-SDSS matches, including one

      4. With News Search Engines

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Gunn, Holly

        2005-01-01

        Although there are many news search engines on the Web, finding the news items one wants can be challenging. Choosing appropriate search terms is one of the biggest challenges. Unless one has seen the article that one is seeking, it is often difficult to select words that were used in the headline or text of the article. The limited archives of…

      5. Working with News Media.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Grosenbaugh, Dick

        To work effectively with personnel in the news media, one needs to assist them in doing their job by getting accurate information to them (in plenty of time for their deadline) and in providing information about meetings (when they do not have a reporter to cover the event). Familiarity aids in communication with news media personnel so one should…

      6. News for a Teen Market: The Lessons of Channel One.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Hoynes, William

        1998-01-01

        Describes the types of stories that Channel One covers and the characteristics and configuration of its news sources. Focusing mostly on anchor personalities and politicians, Channel One news serves as a promotional vehicle for itself and youth culture, providing a friendly environment for controversial product advertisements. Such dramatic and…

      7. Problem Areas in Science News Reporting, Writing, and Editing.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Ryan, Michael; Tankard, James W., Jr.

        Several potential "problem areas" in the science news coverage process were identified through analysis of comments written by 193 scientists who were asked to assess the accuracy of science news stories in which they were cited as the major source. The analysis led to a number of recommendations for improving the objective reporting of science…

      8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Confirmed class 0 sources list (Froebrich, 2005)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Froebrich, D.

        2005-07-01

        To obtain an as far as possible complete list of known Class 0 objects we combined the samples of candidates and sources mentioned in various publications (see all the publications in Section 2 of the paper). (5 data files).

      9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectroscopy of Sources from 87GB Catalog (Mingaliev+, 1995)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Mingaliev, M.; Khabrakhmanov, A.

        1997-05-01

        A sample of 112 sources with flux densities higher than 200mJy at the 4.85GHz and with the range of declinations from +3 till +5 degrees from the Green Bank survey catalog 87GB was observed at three frequencies: 0.96, 3.95, and 11.1GHz. The observations were performed in January and February 1992, in the Northern sector of the RATAN-600 radio telescope. The accuracy of the source right ascensions was improved by a factor of 5-10 (for 70% of the sources the accuracy of the right ascension is 0.1arcsec). About 80% of the objects studied were identified with sources from the Texas survey. (1 data file).

      10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Interferometer phase calibration sources. I (Patnaik+ 1992)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Patnaik, A. R.; Browne, I. W. A.; Wilkinson, P. N.; Wrobel, J. M.

        1997-05-01

        We present a catalogue of 800 compact radio sources in the declination range 35deg<δ<75deg whose positions have been measured to an rms accuracy of ~12milliarcsec with the VLA. They are primarily intended for use as phase reference sources for the Jodrell Bank MERLIN but they will also be suitable phase calibrators for the VLA and the VLBI networks. (2 data files).

      11. On-line experimental results of an argon gas cell-based laser ion source (KEK Isotope Separation System)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Hirayama, Y.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Imai, N.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Jung, H. S.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Sonoda, T.; Wada, M.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Van Duppen, P.

        2016-06-01

        KEK Isotope Separation System (KISS) has been developed at RIKEN to produce neutron rich isotopes with N = 126 to study the β -decay properties for application to astrophysics. The KISS is an element-selective mass-separation system which consists of an argon gas cell-based on laser ion source for atomic number selection and an ISOL mass-separation system. The argon gas cell of KISS is a key component to stop and collect the unstable nuclei produced in a multi-nucleon transfer reaction, where the isotopes of interest will be selectively ionized using laser resonance ionization. We have performed off- and on-line experiments to study the basic properties of the gas cell as well as of the KISS. We successfully extracted the laser-ionized stable 56Fe (direct implantation of a 56Fe beam into the gas cell) atoms and 198Pt (emitted from the 198Pt target by elastic scattering with a 136Xe beam) atoms from the KISS during the commissioning on-line experiments. We furthermore extracted laser-ionized unstable 199Pt atoms and confirmed that the measured half-life was in good agreement with the reported value.

      12. Tuning In: Using the News for a Content-Based ESL Class

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Moglen, Daniel

        2014-01-01

        Vast amounts of daily news content are widely available and easily accessible, and they can be converted into materials for intermediate and advanced ESL classes. This article will describe the why and how for integrating news media sources into a multiskills ESL classroom. Through the news, students are immediately engaged with the material…

      13. Personifying the Radical: How News Framing Polarizes Security Concerns and Tolerance Judgments

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Keum, Heejo; Hillback, Elliott D.; Rojas, Hernando; De Zuniga, Homero Gil; Shah, Dhavan V.; McLeod, Douglas M.

        2005-01-01

        This study examines relationships among individual dispositions, news framing of civil liberties restrictions, security concerns, and political tolerance. We theorize that news frames condition the effects of individual dispositions on security and tolerance attitudes. To explore these relationships, an online-survey experiment was conducted with…

      14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ISO FIRBACK Source Catalog at 170um (Dole+, 2001)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Dole, H.; Gispert, R.; Lagache, G.; Puget, J.-L.; Bouchet, F. R.; Cesarsky, C.; Ciliegi, P.; Clements, D. L.; Dennefeld, M.; Desert, F.-X.; Elbaz, B.; Franceschini, A.; Guiderdon, B.; Harwit, M.; Lemke, D.; Moorwood, A. F. M.; Oliver, S.; Reach, W. T.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Stickel, M.

        2001-05-01

        The FIRBACK (Far Infrared BACKground) survey is one of the deepest imaging surveys carried out at 170μm with ISOPHOT onboard ISO, and is aimed at the study of the structure of the Cosmic Far Infrared Background. This paper provides the analysis of resolved sources. After a validated process of data reduction and calibration, we perform intensive simulations to optimize the source extraction, measure the confusion noise (σc=45mJy), and give the photometric and astrometric accuracies. 196 galaxies with flux S>3σc are detected in the area of 3.89 square degrees. Counts of sources with flux S>4σc present a steep slope of 3.3+/-0.6 on a differential ``logN-logS'' plot between 180 and 500mJy. As a consequence, the confusion level is high and will impact dramatically on future IR deep surveys. This strong evolution, compared with a slope of 2.5 from Euclidian geometry, is in line with models implying a strongly evolving Luminous Infrared Galaxy population. The resolved sources account for less than 10% of the Cosmic Infrared Background at 170μm, which is expected to be resolved into sources in the 1 to 10mJy range. (6 data files).

      15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GB6 catalog of radio sources (Gregory+ 1996)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Gregory, P. C.; Scott, W. K.; Douglas, K.; Condon, J. J.

        1997-01-01

        The final set of sky maps from the Green Bank 4.85 GHz survey (Condon J.J., Broderick J.J., Seielstad G.A., Douglas K., & Gregory P.C. in 1994AJ....107.1829C) was used to construct the GB6 Catalog of sources stronger than S ~ 18 mJy in the declination range 0deg < Dec. < +75deg (Gregory P.C., Scott W.K., Douglas K., & Condon J.J. in 1996ApJS..103..427G). There are two machine-readable versions of the GB6 catalog, with coordinates precessed to B1950 (file b1950.dat) and J2000 (file j2000.dat). Each catalog file contains one line per source (75,162 lines each), and the sources are sorted by increasing B1950 or J2000 right ascension. (3 data files).

      16. Resonance ionization laser ion sources for on-line isotope separators (invited).

        PubMed

        Marsh, B A

        2014-02-01

        A Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is today considered an essential component of the majority of Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL) facilities; there are seven laser ion sources currently operational at ISOL facilities worldwide and several more are under development. The ionization mechanism is a highly element selective multi-step resonance photo-absorption process that requires a specifically tailored laser configuration for each chemical element. For some isotopes, isomer selective ionization may even be achieved by exploiting the differences in hyperfine structures of an atomic transition for different nuclear spin states. For many radioactive ion beam experiments, laser resonance ionization is the only means of achieving an acceptable level of beam purity without compromising isotope yield. Furthermore, by performing element selection at the location of the ion source, the propagation of unwanted radioactivity downstream of the target assembly is reduced. Whilst advances in laser technology have improved the performance and reliability of laser ion sources and broadened the range of suitable commercially available laser systems, many recent developments have focused rather on the laser/atom interaction region in the quest for increased selectivity and/or improved spectral resolution. Much of the progress in this area has been achieved by decoupling the laser ionization from competing ionization processes through the use of a laser/atom interaction region that is physically separated from the target chamber. A new application of gas catcher laser ion source technology promises to expand the capabilities of projectile fragmentation facilities through the conversion of otherwise discarded reaction fragments into high-purity low-energy ion beams. A summary of recent RILIS developments and the current status of laser ion sources worldwide is presented. PMID:24593628

      17. Resonance ionization laser ion sources for on-line isotope separators (invited)

        SciTech Connect

        Marsh, B. A.

        2014-02-15

        A Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is today considered an essential component of the majority of Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL) facilities; there are seven laser ion sources currently operational at ISOL facilities worldwide and several more are under development. The ionization mechanism is a highly element selective multi-step resonance photo-absorption process that requires a specifically tailored laser configuration for each chemical element. For some isotopes, isomer selective ionization may even be achieved by exploiting the differences in hyperfine structures of an atomic transition for different nuclear spin states. For many radioactive ion beam experiments, laser resonance ionization is the only means of achieving an acceptable level of beam purity without compromising isotope yield. Furthermore, by performing element selection at the location of the ion source, the propagation of unwanted radioactivity downstream of the target assembly is reduced. Whilst advances in laser technology have improved the performance and reliability of laser ion sources and broadened the range of suitable commercially available laser systems, many recent developments have focused rather on the laser/atom interaction region in the quest for increased selectivity and/or improved spectral resolution. Much of the progress in this area has been achieved by decoupling the laser ionization from competing ionization processes through the use of a laser/atom interaction region that is physically separated from the target chamber. A new application of gas catcher laser ion source technology promises to expand the capabilities of projectile fragmentation facilities through the conversion of otherwise discarded reaction fragments into high-purity low-energy ion beams. A summary of recent RILIS developments and the current status of laser ion sources worldwide is presented.

      18. Resonance ionization laser ion sources for on-line isotope separators (invited).

        PubMed

        Marsh, B A

        2014-02-01

        A Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is today considered an essential component of the majority of Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL) facilities; there are seven laser ion sources currently operational at ISOL facilities worldwide and several more are under development. The ionization mechanism is a highly element selective multi-step resonance photo-absorption process that requires a specifically tailored laser configuration for each chemical element. For some isotopes, isomer selective ionization may even be achieved by exploiting the differences in hyperfine structures of an atomic transition for different nuclear spin states. For many radioactive ion beam experiments, laser resonance ionization is the only means of achieving an acceptable level of beam purity without compromising isotope yield. Furthermore, by performing element selection at the location of the ion source, the propagation of unwanted radioactivity downstream of the target assembly is reduced. Whilst advances in laser technology have improved the performance and reliability of laser ion sources and broadened the range of suitable commercially available laser systems, many recent developments have focused rather on the laser/atom interaction region in the quest for increased selectivity and/or improved spectral resolution. Much of the progress in this area has been achieved by decoupling the laser ionization from competing ionization processes through the use of a laser/atom interaction region that is physically separated from the target chamber. A new application of gas catcher laser ion source technology promises to expand the capabilities of projectile fragmentation facilities through the conversion of otherwise discarded reaction fragments into high-purity low-energy ion beams. A summary of recent RILIS developments and the current status of laser ion sources worldwide is presented.

      19. Online coupling of pure O2 thermo-optical methods - 14C AMS for source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosols

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Agrios, Konstantinos; Salazar, Gary; Zhang, Yan-Lin; Uglietti, Chiara; Battaglia, Michael; Luginbühl, Marc; Ciobanu, Viorela Gabriela; Vonwiller, Matthias; Szidat, Sönke

        2015-10-01

        This paper reports on novel separation methods developed for the direct determination of 14C in organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), two sub-fractions of total carbon (TC) of atmospheric air particulate matter. Until recently, separation of OC and EC has been performed off-line by manual and time-consuming techniques that relied on the collection of massive CO2 fractions. We present here two on-line hyphenated techniques between a Sunset OC/EC analyzer and a MICADAS (MIni radioCArbon DAting System) accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) equipped with a gas ion source. The first implementation facilitates the direct measurement in the low sample size range (<10 μg C) with high throughput on a routine basis, while the second explores the potential for a continuous-flow real-time CO2 gas feed into the ion source. The performance achieved with reference materials and real atmospheric samples will be discussed to draw conclusions on the improvement offered in the field of 14C aerosol source apportionment.

      20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Arcetri Catalogue of H2O Maser Sources (Brand+ 1994)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Brand, J.; Cesaroni, R.; Caselli, P.; Catarzi, M.; Codella, C.; Comoretto, G.; Curioni, G. P.; Curioni, P.; di, Franco S.; Felli, M.; Giovanardi, C.; Olmi, L.; Palagi, F.; Palla, F.; Panella, D.; Pareschi, G.; Rossi, E.; Speroni, N.; Tofani, G.

        1993-11-01

        An update is presented of the Arcetri Atlas of water masers (Comoretto et al. 1990A&AS...84..179C). It contains the results of observations of water masers with the Medicina 32-m antenna. The observed sources were all discovered in the period 1989-1993, and were found either directly in the course of our own programs or were taken from the literature in which case they were re-observed at Medicina. We give the observed parameters of 214 sources in tabular form, and present all the spectra of the 141 detections. (2 data files).

      1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Transiting planets search Matlab/Octave source code (Ofir+, 2014)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Ofir, A.

        2014-01-01

        The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available here. Detailed descriptions of all inputs and outputs are given by comment lines in the file. Note: Octave does not currently support parallel for loops ("parfor"). Octave users therefore need to change the "parfor" command (line 217 of OptimalBLS.m) to "for". (7 data files).

      2. Guiding Independence: Developing a Research Tool to Support Student Decision Making in Selecting Online Information Sources

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Baildon, Rindi; Baildon, Mark

        2008-01-01

        The development and use of a research tool to guide fourth-grade students' use of information sources during a research project is described in this article. Over a period of five weeks, 21 fourth-grade students in an international school in Singapore participated in a study investigating the extent to which the use of a "research resource guide"…

      3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ultraluminous X-ray sources in nearby galaxies (Liu+, 2005)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Liu, J.-F.; Bregman, J. N.

        2005-08-01

        X-ray observations have revealed in other galaxies a class of extranuclear X-ray point sources with X-ray luminosities of 1039-1041ergs/s, exceeding the Eddington luminosity for stellar mass X-ray binaries. These ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) may be powered by intermediate-mass black holes of a few thousand MSun or stellar mass black holes with special radiation processes. In this paper, we present a survey of ULXs in 313 nearby galaxies with D25>1 within 40Mpc with 467 ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) archival observations. The HRI observations are reduced with uniform procedures, refined by simulations that help define the point source detection algorithm employed in this survey. A sample of 562 extragalactic X-ray point sources with LX=1038-1043ergs/s is extracted from 173 survey galaxies, including 106 ULX candidates within the D25 isophotes of 63 galaxies and 110 ULX candidates between 1D25 and 2D25 of 64 galaxies, from which a clean sample of 109 ULXs is constructed to minimize the contamination from foreground or background objects. (3 data files).

      4. Online Biomonitoring and Early Warning Systems for Protection of Water Sources

        EPA Science Inventory

        The ability to perform real time biomonitoring of behavioral responses and stress levels experienced by fish is important as it could be used for assessing source water toxicity as a first line of defense to protect and encourage recreational use of waterbodies. This paper propos...

      5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Optically Bright extragalactic Radio Sources II (Petrov, 2013)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Petrov, L.

        2014-06-01

        The first VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) observing campaign in 2007 resulted in the detection of 398 targets with the European VLBI Network (EVN; Bourda et al., 2010, cat. J/A+A/520/A113). During the second observing campaign, a subset of 105 sources detected in the previous campaign was observed (Bourda et al., 2011, cat. J/A+A/526/A102). Their positions were derived by Petrov (2011, cat. J/AJ/142/105) and formed the OBRS-1 (Optically Bright extragalactic Radio Sources) catalog. The remaining sources were observed in the third campaign, called OBRS-2. During the OBRS-2 campaign, there were three observing sessions with 10 VLBA (Very Long Baseline Array) stations and 5-6 EVN stations from this list: EFLSBERG, MEDICINA, ONSALA60, YEBES40M, DSS63, HARTRAO, and NOTO. Observations were made on 2010 Mar 23 (session ID gc034a), on 2011 Nov 8 (gc034bcd), and on 2011 Mar 15 (gc034ef). The OBRS-2 catalog presents precise positions of the 295 extragalactic radio sources as well as median correlated flux densities at 8.4 and 2.2GHz at baseline lengths shorter than 900km and at baseline lengths longer than 5000km. (1 data file).

      6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IPHAS DR2 Source Catalogue (Barentsen+, 2014)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Barentsen, et al.

        2014-09-01

        The INT/WFC Photometric H-Alpha Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS) is a 1860 deg^2 imaging survey of the Northern Milky Way at red visible wavelengths. It covers Galactic latitudes |b| < 5 deg and longitudes l = 30 to 215 deg in the broad-band r, i and narrow-band H-alpha filters using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) in La Palma. IPHAS Data Release 2 (DR2) is the first quality-controlled and globally calibrated source catalogue derived from the survey, providing single-epoch photometry for 219 million unique sources across 92% of the footprint. The observations were carried out between 2003 and 2012 at a median seeing of 1.1 arcsec (sampled at 0.33 arcsec/pixel) and to a mean 5-sigma depth of 21.2 (r), 20.0 (i) and 20.3 (H-alpha). The photometric calibration is in the Vega magnitude system and carries an external precision of 0.03 mag (root-mean-square error). The catalogue includes all the sources which have been detected at a signal-to-noise ratio of 5 or better in at least one band. Many applications will require a combination of quality criteria to be applied to avoid faint stars or confused sources. The choice of quality criteria tensions completeness against reliability, and hence depends on the requirements of a project. To aid users, the data release paper (arXiv:1406.4862) recommends two sets of quality criteria, named "a10" and "a10point", which should satisfy most projects. As a minimum, the "a10" criteria select objects which have been detected at the minimum level of 10-sigma in all bands, without being saturated. Additional constraints are provided by the "a10point" criteria, which require objects to be point sources free of blending, unaffected by nearby bright stars, as well as being unsaturated >10-sigma detections in all bands. Sources in both categories are flagged in the catalogue using the boolean columns a10 and a10point. Imaging and auxiliary data are available from the project website (www

      7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Chamaeleon I 870um sources (Belloche+, 2011)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Belloche, A.; Schuller, F.; Parise, B.; Andre, P.; Hatchell, J.; Jorgensen, J. K.; Bontemps, S.; Weiss, A.; Menten; K. M.; Muders, D.

        2011-01-01

        Table 2 lists the sources extracted with GAUSSCLUMPS from the filtered 870 micron continuum emission map of Chamaeleon I obtained with the bolometer camera LABOCA at the APEX telescope. These sources are listed in the order in which they were found by GAUSSCLUMPS, i.e. roughly in order of decreasing peak flux density. The 870 micron dust continuum emission map of the Chamaeleon I molecular cloud is available in FITS format. The data were obtained with the bolometer camera LABOCA at the APEX telescope. They were calibrated, reduced, co-added, gridded, smoothed to an effective angular resolution of 21.2" (FWHM), and written in FITS format with the BoA software. The flux density unit is Jy/21.2"-beam. The coordinates are equatorial (J2000) and the offsets are in RADIO projection. (6 data files).

      8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LMC point source classification in SAGE-Spec (Woods+, 2011)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Woods, P. M.; Oliveira, J. M.; Kemper, F.; van Loon, J. T.; Sargent, B. A.; Matsuura, M.; Szczerba, R.; Volk, K.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Sloan, G. C.; Lagadec, E.; McDonald, I.; Jones, O.; Gorjian, V.; Kraemer, K. E.; Gielen, C.; Meixner, M.; Blum, R. D.; Sewilo, M.; Riebel, D.; Shiao, B.; Chen, C.-H. R.; Boyer, M. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Antoniou, V.; Bernard, J.-P.; Cohen, M.; Dijkstra, C.; Galametz, M.; Galliano, F.; Gordon, K. D.; Harris, J.; Hony, S.; Hora, J. L.; Kawamura, A.; Lawton, B.; Leisenring, J. M.; Madden, S.; Marengo, M.; McGuire, C.; Mulia, A. J.; O'Halloran, B.; Olsen, K.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Reach, W. T.; Rubin, D.; Sandstrom, K.; Soszynski, I.; Speck, A. K.; Srinivasan, S.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; van Aarle, E.; van Dyk, S. D.; van Winckel, H.; Vijh, U. P.; Whitney, B.; Wilkins, A. N.

        2011-09-01

        We present the classification of 197 point sources observed with the Infrared Spectrograph in the SAGE-Spec Legacy programme on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We introduce a decision-tree method of object classification based on infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership and variability information, which is used to classify the SAGE-Spec sample of point sources. The decision tree has a broad application to mid-infrared spectroscopic surveys, where supporting photometry and variability information are available. We use these classifications to make deductions about the stellar populations of the Large Magellanic Cloud and the success of photometric classification methods. We find 90 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 29 young stellar objects, 23 post-AGB objects, 19 red supergiants, eight stellar photospheres, seven background galaxies, seven planetary nebulae, two HII regions and 12 other objects, seven of which remain unclassified. (1 data file).

      9. On-Line Commissioning of the HRIBF Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source

        SciTech Connect

        Liu, Yuan; Jost, Carola U; Mendez, II, Anthony J; Stracener, Daniel W; Williams, Cecil L; Madurga, M; Miernik, Krzysztof A; Miller, D.; Padgett, S; Paulauskas, Stanley V; Gross, Carl J; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Wolinska-Cichocka, Marzena

        2013-01-01

        A highly-selective resonant ionization laser ion source has been successfully commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the production of pure beams of short-lived nuclei for spectroscopic studies. The laser ion source provided beams of neutron-rich Ga isotopes to the Low-energy Radioactive Ion Beam Spectroscopy Station for beta decay measurements. The radioactive Ga isotopes were produced by 50-MeV proton induced fission of 238U and ionized by laser radiation using a two-step resonant ionization scheme. Isobarically pure 83Ga, 85Ga, and 86Ga beams were delivered to the experiment at approximate rates of 12000 ions/s, 100 ions/s, and 3 ions/s, respectively.

      10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The BMW-HRI source catalogue (Panzera+, 2003)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Panzera, M. R.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Lazzati, D.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Tagliaferri, G.

        2002-11-01

        The BMW-HRI catalogue is generated from US and German ROSAT HRI observations for which data have been released to the US ROSAT archive at GSFC and to the German ROSAT archive at MPE up to December 2001. A total number of 4,303 observations with exposure times longer than 100 s were analyzed automatically using a wavelet detection algorithm. The catalogue consists of 29,089 sources (detection probability greater or equal 4.2 sigma). For each source name, position, count rate, flux and extension along with the relative errors are given.The catalogue also reports results of cross-correlations with existing catalogues at different wavelengths (FIRST, GSC2, 2MASS, and IRAS). (1 data file).

      11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SAGE LMC and SMC IRAC Source Catalog (IPAC 2009)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Galaxy's; Evolution, (Sage; Sage-Smc)

        2012-02-01

        The SAGE project is a Cycle 2 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, "Spitzer Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud: Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE)", with Margaret Meixner (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Meixner et al. (2006AJ....132.2268M). The Catalog is a highly reliable list of 6.4 million sources. Faint limits for SAGE are 18.1, 17.5, 15.3, and 14.2 for IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 um, respectively. The SAGE-SMC project is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, "SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud", with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2011AJ....142..102G). The Catalog is a highly reliable list of 2.0 million sources. Faint limits for SAGE-SMC are 18.3, 17.7, 15.7, and 14.5 for IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 um, respectively. The archive tables are more complete but less reliable than the catalogs. IRAC Single Frame + Mosaic Photometry Catalog: a combination of mosaic photometry source list extracted from the combined Epoch 1 and Epoch 2 12 second frametime mosaics with all-epochs single frame source list, bandmerged with 2MASS or 2MASS6X. Detailed documentations are available from http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/data/SPITZER/SAGE/doc/ as SAGEDataProductsDescription_Sep09.pdf and from http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/data/SPITZER/SAGE-SMC/docs/ as sage-smcdeliveryapr11.pdf (2 data files).

      12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Optical ident. and redshifts of Planck SZ sources (Planck+, 2016)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Boehringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; De Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Ferragamo, A.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Hempel, A.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Keihaenen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Levrier, F.; Lietzen, H.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschenes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen J. P.; Rebol, O. R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Streblyanska, A.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

        2016-04-01

        This article is a companion paper to the Planck catalogue of SZ sources (PSZ1) published in Planck Collaboration XXIX (2014, Cat. J/A+A/581/A14). It contains the results of approximately three years of observations with telescopes at the Canary Islands observatories (IAC80, NOT, INT, TNG, WHT, and GTC), as part of the general optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck Collaboration. (2 data files).

      13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BMW-Chandra source catalog (Romano+, 2008)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Mottini, M.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

        2008-09-01

        The catalogue consists of count rates and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7keV; soft, 0.5-2keV; and hard, 2-7keV), and source positions relative to the highest signal-to-noise detection among the three bands. The wavelet algorithm also provides an estimate of the extension of the source. We include information drawn from the headers of the original files, as well, and extracted source counts in four additional energy bands, SB1 (0.5-1keV), SB2 (1-2keV), HB1 (2-4keV), and HB2 (4-7keV). We computed the sky coverage for the full catalogue and for a subset at high Galactic latitude (|b|>20deg). The complete catalogue provides a sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2keV, S/N=3) of ~8deg2 at a limiting flux of 10-13erg/cm^2/s, and ~2deg2 at a limiting flux of ~10-15erg/cm^2/s. Furthermore, we present the results of the cross-match with existing catalogues at different wavelengths (FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS, GSC2, and ChaMP). The total numbers of matches with the FIRST, IRASPSC, 2MASS, and GSC2 catalogues obtained after a closest-distance selection are 13, 87, 6700, and 4485, respectively. (2 data files).

      14. Astrophysics Source Code Library Enhancements

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Hanisch, R. J.; Allen, A.; Berriman, G. B.; DuPrie, K.; Mink, J.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Schmidt, J.; Shamir, L.; Shortridge, K.; Taylor, M.; Teuben, P. J.; Wallin, J.

        2015-09-01

        The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL)1 is a free online registry of codes used in astronomy research; it currently contains over 900 codes and is indexed by ADS. The ASCL has recently moved a new infrastructure into production. The new site provides a true database for the code entries and integrates the WordPress news and information pages and the discussion forum into one site. Previous capabilities are retained and permalinks to ascl.net continue to work. This improvement offers more functionality and flexibility than the previous site, is easier to maintain, and offers new possibilities for collaboration. This paper covers these recent changes to the ASCL.

      15. What predicts the trust of online health information?

        PubMed Central

        Kwon, Jeong Hyun; Kye, Su-Yeon; Park, Eun Young; Oh, Kyung Hee; Park, Keeho

        2015-01-01

        OBJECTIVES: Little attention has been paid to levels of trust in online sources of health information. The objective of this study was to investigate levels of trust in various sources of health information (interpersonal channels, traditional media, and Internet media), and to examine the predictors of trust in health information available on the Internet. METHODS: A questionnaire was administered to 1,300 people (20 years of age or older), evaluating levels of trust in various sources of health information. RESULTS: The highest level of trust was expressed regarding interpersonal channels, with hospital physicians regarded as the most trusted source of information age and income showed an association with trust in online information sources. Elderly people were not likely to trust Internet news sources, and high incomes were found to be strongly associated with trust in online sources of information overall. CONCLUSIONS: Public health organizations must consider the predictors for trust in various sources of information in order to employ appropriate media when targeting vulnerable individuals or developing messaging strategies for health professionals. PMID:26212505

      16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Warm IRAS sources. II. (de Grijp+, 1992)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        de Grijp, M. H. K.; Keel, W. C.; Miley, G. K.; Goudfrooij, P.; Lub, J.

        2011-01-01

        We present optical spectra for a sample of 563 high-latitude IRAS sources selected from the Point Source Catalog to have relatively warm 25 to 60 micron colours. We have shown this selection criterion to be an efficient indicator for finding Seyfert galaxies. Plots of the optical spectra are shown and the fluxes of the strongest emission lines in these spectra are tabulated. After excluding 128 sources which are clearly galactic foreground objects, we obtained spectroscopic information for 358 extragalactic objects. Emission-line ratios have been used to classify these objects, resulting in 80 Seyfert 1, 141 Seyfert 2 and 133 HII-type objects. In comparison with samples of active nuclei selected in other ways, about 50% of known Seyfert nuclei are included by our colour criteria. This fraction is larger for high luminosities, reaching 80% for quasar luminosities. For lower-luminosity objects, contamination by the host galaxies becomes important and the sample becomes seriously incomplete. It should be moderately complete and representative for core luminosities greater than 1023.5W/Hz at 12m. Finally, the infrared luminosity function for each type of object is derived; the shapes for Seyfert 1 and 2 nuclei are identical, with a type 2/type 1 space-density ratio of 3.0. Our census is consistent with an obscuration scheme for producing both types of object from a single parent population, though the origin of excess cool IR radiation Irom many Seyferts is still unclear. We note the appearance of an apparent type II supernova in IRAS 0225-103 observed in 1985 September. Its spectrum suggests that it was observed between 1 and 2 months after maximum, perhaps in a "plateau" phase. (2 data files).

      17. Comparing Electronic News Media Reports of Potential Bioterrorism-Related Incidents Involving Unknown White Powder to Reports Received by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Federal Bureau of Investigation: USA, 2009–2011

        PubMed Central

        Fajardo, Geroncio C.; Posid, Joseph; Papagiotas, Stephen; Lowe, Luis

        2015-01-01

        There have been periodic electronic news media reports of potential bioterrorism-related incidents involving unknown substances (often referred to as “white powder”) since the 2001 intentional dissemination of Bacillus anthracis through the US Postal System. This study reviewed the number of unknown “white powder” incidents reported online by the electronic news media and compared them with unknown “white powder” incidents reported to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) during a two-year period from June 1, 2009 and May 31, 2011. Results identified 297 electronic news media reports, 538 CDC reports, and 384 FBI reports of unknown “white powder.” This study showed different unknown “white powder” incidents captured by each of the three sources. However, the authors could not determine the public health implications of this discordance. PMID:25420771

      18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fermi sources with massive YSO associations (Munar-Adrover+, 2011)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Munar-Adrover, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Romero, G. E.

        2011-09-01

        Massive protostars have associated bipolar outflows that can produce strong shocks when they interact with the surrounding medium. At these shocks, particles can be accelerated up to relativistic energies. Relativistic electrons and protons can then produce gamma-ray emission, as some theoretical models predict. To identify young galactic objects that may emit gamma rays, we crossed the Fermi First Year Catalog with some catalogs of known massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), early type stars, and OB associations, and we implemented Monte Carlo simulations to find the probability of chance coincidences. We obtained a list of massive MYSOs that are spatially coincident with Fermi sources. (4 data files).

      19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Low-Frequency Variable Radio Sources Monitoring (Mitchell+, 1994)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Mitchell, K. J.; Dennison, B.; Condon, J. J.; Altschuler, D. R.; Payne, H. E.; O'dell, S. L.

        1994-07-01

        The "lowvar.dat" data set is the result of a detailed multifrequency monitoring program of 34 low-frequency variable radio sources. This consists of flux density measurements at 318, 430, 606, 880, and 1400 MHz over a five-year period. The observations were carried out with the Arecibo 305-m radiotelescope and the Green Bank 91-m radiotelescope. See the documentation by Brian Dennison, either in LaTeX (doc.tex), or in plain ascii (adc.doc) (1 data file).

      20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The population of compact radio sources in ONC (Forbrich+, 2016)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Forbrich, J.; Rivilla, V. M.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Wolk, S. J.; Meingast, S.

        2016-08-01

        The observations were carried out with the Karl G. Jansky VLA of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory on 2012 September 30, October 2-5 under project code SD630. Data were taken using the VLA's C-band (4-8GHz) receivers in full polarization mode, with two 1GHz basebands centered at 4.736 and 7.336GHz to provide a good baseline for source spectral index determination. Apart from the first epoch, the field was simultaneously observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Mostly of interest for variability information, these data will be presented as part of a follow-up paper. (1 data file).

      1. Cloaked Attribution--What Does It Mean to News Readers? ANPA News Research Bulletin. No. 1.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Culbertson, Hugh M.; Somerick, Nancy

        A study was conducted to determine how people react to unnamed or veiled news sources in newspaper articles. A group of 283 persons, chosen at random from three contrasting communities, was asked to read two articles dealing with different topics, one with sources quoted by name and one with euphemisms ("a White House spokesman,""a city official")…

      2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ICRF2 sources of the Rio survey (Assafin+, 2013)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Assafin, M.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Andrei, A. H.; Camargo, J. I. B.; da Silva Neto, D. N.

        2014-04-01

        In our observations, we used two non-dedicated instruments, shared by the Brazilian astronomical community: the 0.6m diameter Bollen & Chivens Cassegrain telescope (F/13.5, f=8.1m) and the 1.6m diameter Perkin-Elmer Cassegrain telescope (F/10, f=16m), located at the LNA observing site, the Observatorio do Pico dos Dias, Brasopolis, Brazil (OPD/LNA) (IAU code 874; λ=+45:34:57, φ=-22:32:04, h=1870m). We added sources for observation later on, with the outcome of the ICRF-ext1 (Ma, 2001, 15th Working Meeting on European VLBI for Geodesy and Astrometry) and of the ICRF-ext2 (Fey et al., 2008, Cat. J/AJ/127/3587). Naturally, not all sources could be observed, due to prohibitive telescope time consuming. When the ICRF2 was finally released in 2009, the program at OPD/LNA had already finished. (1 data file).

      3. National PKU News

        MedlinePlus

        ... and History Staff & Board How Much Phe Guthrie-Koch Scholarship Books Resources Support Us Contact Us Donors ... new Amino Acid Analysis Results This Year’s Guthrie-Koch PKU Scholarship Winners © 2016 National PKU News

      4. Water Power Program News

        SciTech Connect

        2012-01-19

        News stories about conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the Wind and Water Power Program, and other federal agencies.

      5. Turning News into Literature.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Otten, Nick; Stelmach, Majorie

        1987-01-01

        Suggests young people can respond to news stories and political issues they feel strongly about through poetry, and presents one student's effective use of satire which lets his emotions "leak through" to the reader. (NH)

      6. CCG - News & Events

        Cancer.gov

        NCI's Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) has been widely recognized for its research efforts to facilitiate advances in cancer genomic research and improve patient outcomes. Find the latest news about and events featuring CCG.

      7. In the News.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Reece, Lauren

        2000-01-01

        A board member in an Iowa district explains the importance of presenting 4-minute summaries of educational news and trends at board meetings. In choosing items for presentation, she considers relevance, context, perspective, terminology, awareness, and national political developments. (MLH)

      8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GLIMPSE Source Catalog (I + II + 3D) (IPAC 2008)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Spitzer Science, Center

        2009-06-01

        The Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE), is a survey of Galactic Plane central parts made with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST). It covers approximately 220 square degrees, between galactic longitudes ±65° and ±1° in galactic latitude (up to 4.2° in the central parts). The four IRAC bands are centered at approximately 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0μm. The GLIMPSE combines the 3 surveys: * GLIMPSE-I covers the longitude ranges |l|=10--65° and the latitude range |b|<=1° (Benjamin et al. 2003PASP..115..953B) * GLIMPSE-II covers the longitude range of |l|<=10°, and a latitude range |b|<=1° from |l|=5--10, |b|<=1.5 for |l|=2--5, and |b|<=2° for |l|<=2. GLIMPSE-II coverage excludes the Galactic center region |l|<=1, |b|<=0.75 observed by the GALCEN GO program (PID=3677). * GLIMPSE-3D adds vertical extensions up to |b|=4.2° near the galactic center, and up to |b|=3° in selected other parts of the Galaxy (+/-10, 18.5, 25, 30, and -15 (345)°). GLIMPSE-II had two-epoch coverage for a total of three visits on the sky. The observations consisted of two 1.2 second integrations at each position in the first epoch of data taking (September 2005) and a single 1.2 second integration at each position six months later (April 2006). The highly reliable v2.0 GLIMPSEII Catalog (v2.0_GLMIIC) consists of point sources that are detected at least twice in one band and at least once in an adjacent band and a S/N > 5 cut for the band with the two detections. There are also faint and bright flux limits on the Catalog entries. The more complete v2.0 Archive (v2.0_GLMIIA) has less stringent criteria, namely two detections in any bands, those detections having a S/N > 5. The IRAC data were bandmerged with the 2MASS All-Sky Point Source Catalog. See the GLIMPSEII v2.0 Data Products & Data Delivery document for more details. The catalog available from CDS merges the 3 surveys GLIMPSE-I (v2.0), GLIMPSE-II (v2.0), and

      9. News Diffusion after the Reagan Shooting.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Bantz, Charles R.; And Others

        1983-01-01

        Provides additional evidence on the role interpersonal communication plays in the diffusion of news about crisis events. Adds information about the rapidity of such diffusion, daily routine and first source, demographic differences and communicative behavior/personal reactions, and possible effects of research methods. (PD)

      10. The Best of Chem 13 News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Thorsen, Kathy

        1999-07-01

        This column is designed to give JCE readers a few highlights from Chem 13 News, a monthly publication for chemistry educators from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, and provides annotations describing a particular activity or a variety of sources from which new and creative ideas can be extracted.

      11. Attracting Views and Going Viral: How Message Features and News-Sharing Channels Affect Health News Diffusion

        PubMed Central

        Kim, Hyun Suk

        2015-01-01

        This study examined how intrinsic as well as perceived message features affect the extent to which online health news stories prompt audience selections and social retransmissions, and how news-sharing channels (e-mail vs. social media) shape what goes viral. The study analyzed actual behavioral data on audience viewing and sharing of New York Times health news articles, and associated article content and context data. News articles with high informational utility and positive sentiment invited more frequent selections and retransmissions. Articles were also more frequently selected when they presented controversial, emotionally evocative, and familiar content. Informational utility and novelty had stronger positive associations with e-mail-specific virality, while emotional evocativeness, content familiarity, and exemplification played a larger role in triggering social media-based retransmissions. PMID:26441472

      12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ANS UV Catalogue of Point Sources (Wesselius+ 1982)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Wesselius, P. R.; van Duinen, R. J.; de Jonge, A. R. W.; Aalders, J. W. G.; Luinge, W.; Wildeman, K. J.

        2001-08-01

        This catalog is a result of the observations made with the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite (ANS) which operated between October 1974 and April 1976. The ANS satellite observed in five UV channels centered around 150, 180, 220, 250 and 330nm. The photometric bands are: ------------------------------------------------------------------------- - Band designation 15N 15W 18 22 25 33 ------------------------------------------------------------------------- - Central wavelength (nm) 154.5 154.9 179.9 220.0 249.3 329.4 Bandwidth (nm) 5.0 14.9 14.9 20.0 15.0 10.1 ------------------------------------------------------------------------- - The reported magnitudes were obtained from mean count rates converted to fluxes using the ANS absolute calibration of Wesselius et al. (1980A&A....85..221W). In addition to the ultraviolet magnitudes, the catalog contains positions taken from the satellite pointing, spectral types, and UBV data from other sources as well as comments on duplicity, variability, and miscellaneous notes concerning individual objects. (1 data file).

      13. A new debris sensor based on dual excitation sources for online debris monitoring

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Hong, Wei; Wang, Shaoping; Tomovic, Mileta M.; Liu, Haokuo; Wang, Xingjian

        2015-09-01

        Mechanical systems could be severely damaged by loose debris generated through wear processes between contact surfaces. Hence, debris detection is necessary for effective fault diagnosis, life prediction, and prevention of catastrophic failures. This paper presents a new in-line debris sensor for hydraulic systems based on dual excitation sources. The proposed sensor makes magnetic lines more concentrated while at the same time improving magnetic field uniformity. As a result the sensor has higher sensitivity and improved precision. This paper develops the sensor model, discusses sensor structural features, and introduces a measurement method for debris size identification. Finally, experimental verification is presented indicating that that the sensor can effectively detect 81 μm (cube) or larger particles in 12 mm outside diameter (OD) organic glass pipe.

      14. Monitoring of potentially toxic cyanobacteria using an online multi-probe in drinking water sources.

        PubMed

        Zamyadi, A; McQuaid, N; Prévost, M; Dorner, S

        2012-02-01

        Toxic cyanobacteria threaten the water quality of drinking water sources across the globe. Two such water bodies in Canada (a reservoir on the Yamaska River and a bay of Lake Champlain in Québec) were monitored using a YSI 6600 V2-4 (YSI, Yellow Springs, Ohio, USA) submersible multi-probe measuring in vivo phycocyanin (PC) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) fluorescence, pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, temperature, and turbidity in parallel. The linearity of the in vivo fluorescence PC and Chl-a probe measurements were validated in the laboratory with Microcystis aeruginosa (r(2) = 0.96 and r(2) = 0.82 respectively). Under environmental conditions, in vivo PC fluorescence was strongly correlated with extracted PC (r = 0.79) while in vivo Chl-a fluorescence had a weaker relationship with extracted Chl-a (r = 0.23). Multiple regression analysis revealed significant correlations between extracted Chl-a, extracted PC and cyanobacterial biovolume and in vivo fluorescence parameters measured by the sensors (i.e. turbidity and pH). This information will help water authorities select the in vivo parameters that are the most useful indicators for monitoring cyanobacteria. Despite highly toxic cyanobacterial bloom development 10 m from the drinking water treatment plant's (DWTP) intake on several sampling dates, low in vivo PC fluorescence, cyanobacterial biovolume, and microcystin concentrations were detected in the plant's untreated water. The reservoir's hydrodynamics appear to have prevented the transport of toxins and cells into the DWTP which would have deteriorated the water quality. The multi-probe readings and toxin analyses provided critical evidence that the DWTP's untreated water was unaffected by the toxic cyanobacterial blooms present in its source water. PMID:22159157

      15. Monitoring of potentially toxic cyanobacteria using an online multi-probe in drinking water sources.

        PubMed

        Zamyadi, A; McQuaid, N; Prévost, M; Dorner, S

        2012-02-01

        Toxic cyanobacteria threaten the water quality of drinking water sources across the globe. Two such water bodies in Canada (a reservoir on the Yamaska River and a bay of Lake Champlain in Québec) were monitored using a YSI 6600 V2-4 (YSI, Yellow Springs, Ohio, USA) submersible multi-probe measuring in vivo phycocyanin (PC) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) fluorescence, pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, temperature, and turbidity in parallel. The linearity of the in vivo fluorescence PC and Chl-a probe measurements were validated in the laboratory with Microcystis aeruginosa (r(2) = 0.96 and r(2) = 0.82 respectively). Under environmental conditions, in vivo PC fluorescence was strongly correlated with extracted PC (r = 0.79) while in vivo Chl-a fluorescence had a weaker relationship with extracted Chl-a (r = 0.23). Multiple regression analysis revealed significant correlations between extracted Chl-a, extracted PC and cyanobacterial biovolume and in vivo fluorescence parameters measured by the sensors (i.e. turbidity and pH). This information will help water authorities select the in vivo parameters that are the most useful indicators for monitoring cyanobacteria. Despite highly toxic cyanobacterial bloom development 10 m from the drinking water treatment plant's (DWTP) intake on several sampling dates, low in vivo PC fluorescence, cyanobacterial biovolume, and microcystin concentrations were detected in the plant's untreated water. The reservoir's hydrodynamics appear to have prevented the transport of toxins and cells into the DWTP which would have deteriorated the water quality. The multi-probe readings and toxin analyses provided critical evidence that the DWTP's untreated water was unaffected by the toxic cyanobacterial blooms present in its source water.

      16. Subject and source trends in the Star Tribune's coverage of the medical literature.

        PubMed

        McGuire, Lisa; Kelly, Julia Ann

        2003-04-01

        Medical developments are front-page news, and many health-related news reports are based on articles from the medical research literature. We analyzed the subjects and sources of literature-based medical news articles that appeared in Minnesota's largest newspaper, the Star Tribune, from May 1994 through December 2002. Data were collected by searching Health and Medicine in the News (http://www.biomed.lib.umn.edu/hmed), an online database that catalogues Star Tribune articles on health and medical topics. The most common topics of the 3,419 literature-based medical news articles appearing during the period were cancer, obesity/diet/exercise, and heart disease. The New England Journal of Medicine was the source cited most often, followed by the Journal of the American Medical Association, Science, and Nature. We compared the most common subjects covered in the news articles with those covered in MEDLINE and with the most common causes of death in the United States. Diet, smoking, AIDS, and Alzheimer's disease are represented much more often in the Star Tribune than in the medical literature in general, and articles on genetics and pregnancy were found much more often in the medical literature than in this sample of newspaper articles. Cancer and heart disease, which were the first and third most-often-covered topics in the Star Tribune, are 2 of the 3 top causes of death in this country.

      17. Portrayals of People with Cerebral Palsy in Homicide News

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Lucardie, Richard; Sobsey, Dick

        2005-01-01

        Through content analysis, employing qualitative and quantitative methods, Canadian media representation of people with cerebral palsy (PWCP) in public life was examined. Canadian NewsDisc, an online biographic database service, was used to examine the use of stigmatizing language such as afflicted by, afflicted with, suffered from, suffers from,…

      18. Computer Databases: A Survey; Part 1: General and News Databases.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        O'Leary, Mick

        1986-01-01

        Descriptions and evaluations of 13 databases devoted to computer information are presented by type under four headings: bibliographic databases; daily news services; online computer magazines; and specialized computer industry databases. Information on database producers, starting date of file, update frequency, vendors, and prices is summarized…

      19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Panchromatic SED of Herschel sources (Berta+, 2013)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D.; Brisbin, D.; Cooray, A.; Franceschini, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hwang, H. S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S.; Page, M. J.; Popesso, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Roseboom, I.; Scott, D.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.

        2016-06-01

        Combining far-infrared Herschel photometry from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) guaranteed time programs with ancillary datasets in the GOODS-N, GOODS-S and COSMOS fields, it is possible to sample the 8-500 micron spectral energy distributions of galaxies with at least 7-10 bands. Extending to the UV, optical, and near- infrared, the number of bands increases up to 43. We reproduce the distribution of galaxies in a carefully selected 10 restframe color space, based on this rich data-set, using a superposition of multi-variate Gaussian modes. We use this model to classify galaxies and build median spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of each class, which are then fitted with a modified version of the MAGPHYS code that combines stellar light, emission from dust heated by stars and a possible warm dust contribution heated by an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). The color distribution of galaxies in each of the considered fields can be well described with the combination of 6-9 classes, spanning a large range of far- to near-IR luminosity ratios, as well as different strength of the AGN contribution to bolometric luminosities. The defined Gaussian grouping is used to identify rare or odd sources. The zoology of outliers includes Herschel-detected ellipticals, very blue z~1 Lyα-break galaxies, quiescent spirals, and torus-dominated AGN with star formation. Out of these groups and outliers, a new template library is assembled, consisting of 32 SEDs describing the intrinsic scatter in the restframe UV-to-submm colors of infrared galaxies. This library is tested against L(IR) estimates with and without Herschel data included, and compared to eight other popular methods often adopted in the literature. When implementing Herschel photometry, these approaches produce L(IR) values consistent with each other within a median absolute deviation of 10-20%, the scatter being dominated more by fine tuning of the codes, rather

      20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M82 radio sources flux density variations (Gendre+, 2013)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Gendre, M. A.; Fenech, D. M.; Beswick, R. J.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Argo, M. K.

        2014-05-01

        The 2009 monitoring campaign of M82 consisted of seven wide-field MERLIN (Thomasson 1986) observations at a frequency of 4.994GHz, observed between 2009 May and 2010 April. These were made using parallel hands of circular polarization, and were correlated with a total bandwidth of 16 MHz divided into 32 channels. Across all epochs combined a total on-source integration time of 286.5h was used. Each observing epoch was reduced and analysed individually and a deep exposure map was produced by combining all of these data. In addition to these, a single e-MERLIN observation was included in this study. This observation was made in 2010 December as part of the e-MERLIN commissioning programme and used a total bandwidth of 512MHz with a median frequency of 6.26GHz. These data were correlated into four individual sub-bands each divided into 512 frequency channels. These e-MERLIN observations were observed prior the installation of the new e-MERLIN wide-band IF system in spring 2011 and consequently only one hand of polarization was used and the data displayed reduced sensitivity in parts of the observing band. (2 data files).

      1. Dynamic online surveys and experiments with the free open-source software dynQuest.

        PubMed

        Rademacher, Jens D M; Lippke, Sonia

        2007-08-01

        With computers and the World Wide Web widely available, collecting data through Web browsers is an attractive method utilized by the social sciences. In this article, conducting PC- and Web-based trials with the software package dynQuest is described. The software manages dynamic questionnaire-based trials over the Internet or on single computers, possibly as randomized control trials (RCT), if two or more groups are involved. The choice of follow-up questions can depend on previous responses, as needed for matched interventions. Data are collected in a simple text-based database that can be imported easily into other programs for postprocessing and statistical analysis. The software consists of platform-independent scripts written in the programming language PERL that use the common gateway interface between Web browser and server for submission of data through HTML forms. Advantages of dynQuest are parsimony, simplicity in use and installation, transparency, and reliability. The program is available as open-source freeware from the authors.

      2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Infrared-faint radio sources catalog (Collier+, 2014)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Collier, J. D.; Banfield, J. K.; Norris, R. P.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Kimball, A. E.; Filipovic, M. D.; Jarrett, T. H.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Tothill, N. F. H.

        2014-11-01

        The 20cm radio data come from the Unified Radio Catalog (URC) compiled by Kimball & Ivezic (2008AJ....136..684K). This radio catalogue combines data from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) VLA Sky Survey (NVSS; Condon et al., 1998, Cat. VIII/65), Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST; Becker, White & Helfand, 1995, cat. VIII/92), Green Bank 6cm survey (GB6; Gregory et al., 1996, Cat. VIII/40), the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS; Rengelink et al. 1997; de Bruyn et al. 2000, Cat. VIII/62) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6; Adelman-McCarthy et al., 2008, Cat. II/282). We use updated NVSS and FIRST data from the URC version 2.0 (Kimball & Ivezic, in preparation), which includes a number of new sources as well as updated positions and flux densities. The IR data come from WISE (Wright et al. (WISE Team) 2009, Cat. II/311), which is an all-sky survey centred at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22um (referred to as bands W1, W2, W3 and W4), with respective angular resolutions of 6.1, 6.4, 6.5 and 12.0-arcsec (full width at half-maximum, FWHM), and typical 5σ sensitivity levels of 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6mJy, with sensitivity increasing towards the ecliptic poles. (1 data file).

      3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: RASS young sources around R CrA (Neuhaeuser+, 2000)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Neuhaeuser, R.; Walter, F. M.; Covino, E.; Alcala, J. M.; Wolk, S. J.; Frink, S.; Guillout, P.; Sterzik, M. F.; Comeron, F.

        2000-11-01

        We present the ROSAT All-Sky Survey data in a 126 deg2 area around the CrA star forming region. With low-resolution spectroscopy of unidentified ROSAT sources we could find 19 new pre-main sequence stars, two of which are classical T Tauri stars, the others being weak-lined. The spectral types of these new T Tauri stars range from F7 to M6. The two new classical T Tauri stars are located towards two small cloud-lets outside of the main CrA cloud. They appear to be ~10 Myrs old, by comparing their location in the H-R diagram with isochrones for an assumed distance of 130 pc, the distance of the main CrA dark cloud. The new off-cloud weak-line T Tauri stars may have formed in similar cloudlets, which have dispersed recently. High-resolution spectra of our new T Tauri stars show that they have significantly more lithium absorption than zero-age main-sequence stars of the same spectral type, so that they are indeed young. From those spectra we also obtained rotational and radial velocities. For some stars we found the proper motion in published catalogs. The direction and velocity of the 3D space motion - south relative to the galactic plane - of the CrA T Tauri stars is consistent with the dark cloud being formed originally by a high-velocity cloud impact onto the galactic plane, which triggered the star formation in CrA. We also present VRIJHK photometry for most of the new T Tauri stars to derive their luminosities, ages, and masses. (4 data files).

      4. News media framing of childhood obesity in the United States from 2000 to 2009.

        PubMed

        Barry, Colleen L; Jarlenski, Marian; Grob, Rachel; Schlesinger, Mark; Gollust, Sarah E

        2011-07-01

        The American public holds mixed views about the desirability of government action to combat childhood obesity. The framing of coverage by news media may affect citizens' views about the causes of childhood obesity and the most appropriate strategies for addressing the problem. We analyzed the content of a 20% random sample of news stories on childhood obesity published in 18 national and regional news sources in the United States over a 10-year period (2000-2009). News media coverage patterns indicated that by 2003, childhood obesity was firmly on the news media's agenda and remained so until 2007, after which coverage decreased. We identified changes in news media framing over time and significant differences according to news source. News coverage of causes of childhood obesity that were linked to the food and beverage industry increased in the early years of the study but then decreased markedly in later years. Similarly, mention of solutions to the problem of childhood obesity that involved restrictions on the food and beverage industry followed a reverse U-shaped pattern over the 10-year study period. News stories consistently mentioned individual behavioral changes most often as a solution to the problem of childhood obesity. Television news was more likely than other news sources to focus on behavior change as a solution, whereas newspapers were more likely to identify system-level solutions such as changes that would affect neighborhoods, schools, and the food and beverage industry. PMID:21690111

      5. News media framing of childhood obesity in the United States from 2000 to 2009.

        PubMed

        Barry, Colleen L; Jarlenski, Marian; Grob, Rachel; Schlesinger, Mark; Gollust, Sarah E

        2011-07-01

        The American public holds mixed views about the desirability of government action to combat childhood obesity. The framing of coverage by news media may affect citizens' views about the causes of childhood obesity and the most appropriate strategies for addressing the problem. We analyzed the content of a 20% random sample of news stories on childhood obesity published in 18 national and regional news sources in the United States over a 10-year period (2000-2009). News media coverage patterns indicated that by 2003, childhood obesity was firmly on the news media's agenda and remained so until 2007, after which coverage decreased. We identified changes in news media framing over time and significant differences according to news source. News coverage of causes of childhood obesity that were linked to the food and beverage industry increased in the early years of the study but then decreased markedly in later years. Similarly, mention of solutions to the problem of childhood obesity that involved restrictions on the food and beverage industry followed a reverse U-shaped pattern over the 10-year study period. News stories consistently mentioned individual behavioral changes most often as a solution to the problem of childhood obesity. Television news was more likely than other news sources to focus on behavior change as a solution, whereas newspapers were more likely to identify system-level solutions such as changes that would affect neighborhoods, schools, and the food and beverage industry.

      6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Initial Gaia Source List (IGSL) (Smart, 2013)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Smart, R. L.; Nicastro, L.

        2013-11-01

        The IGSL is a compilation catalog produced for the Gaia mission. We have combined data from the following catalogs or datasets to produce a homogenous list of positons, proper motions, photometry in a blue and red band and estimates of the magnitudes in the Gaia G and G_RVS bands. Included Catalogs: Tycho2, LQRF, UCAC4, SDSS-DR9, PPMXL, GSC23, GEPC, OGLE, Sky2000, 2MASS. Note that in compiling the various entries we did not consider the individual flags. Overall, we think this catalog is reliable but there will be errors, mismatches and duplicates. The user should use this catalog with that in mind, it is fine for statistical studies that has some way to remove obviously incorrect entries but it should only be used with care for individual objects. The source catalogs used to produce the IGSL are: * The Gaia Ecliptic Pole Catalog, version 3.0 (GEPC) Altmann & Bastian 2009, "Ecliptic Poles Catalogue Version 1.1" ESA Document GAIA-C3-TN-ARI-MA-002 URL http://www.rssd.esa.int/llink/livelink/open/2885828 * GSC2.3: GSC2 version 2.3, Lasker et al. 2008AJ....136..735L (I/305) * an excerpt of the 4th version of the Gaia Initial QSO Catalog (GIQC) as compiled by the GWP-S-335-13000, formed by Alexandre H. Andrei, Christophe Barache, Dario N. da Silva Neto, Francois Taris, Geraldine Bourda, Jean-Francois Le Campion, Jean Souchay, J.J. Pereira Osorio, Julio I. Bueno de Camargo, Marcelo Assafin, Roberto Vieira Martins, Sebastien Bouquillon, Sebastien Lambert, Sonia Anton, Patrick Charlot * OGLE: Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment version III (Szymaski et al., 2011, Cat. J/AcA/61/83) * PPMXL: Positions and Proper Motions "Extra Large" Catalog, Roeser et al. (2010, Cat. I/317) * SDSS: Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 9, Cat. V/139 * UCAC4: Zacharias et al., 2012, Cat. I/322 * Tycho-2, Hoeg et al., 2000, Cat. I/259 (1 data file).

      7. On-Line Desalting of Crude Oil in the Source Region of a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Chanthamontri, C. Ken; Stopford, Andrew P.; Snowdon, Ryan W.; Oldenburg, Thomas B. P.; Larter, Stephen R.

        2014-08-01

        The presence of dissolved metal ions in waters associated with crude oils has many negative implications for the transport, processing, and refining of petroleum. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis of sodium containing crude oil samples suffers from ionization suppression, unwanted adduct formation, and an increase in the complexity of data analysis. Here, we describe a method for the reduction/elimination of these adverse effects by modification of the source region gas-inlet system of a 12 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Several acids were examined as part of this study, with the most suitable for on-line desalting found to have both high vapor pressure and low pKa; 12.1 M HCl showed the strongest desalting effect for crude oil samples with a sodium removal index (SRI) of 88%-100% ± 7% for the NaOS compound class. In comparison, a SRI of only 38% ± 9% was observed for a H2O/toluene solution-phase extraction of Oil 1. These results clearly demonstrate the increased efficacy of pseudo-vapor phase desalting with the additional advantages that initial sample solution conditions are preserved and no sample preparation is required prior to analysis.

      8. On-line desalting of crude oil in the source region of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

        PubMed

        Chanthamontri, C Ken; Stopford, Andrew P; Snowdon, Ryan W; Oldenburg, Thomas B P; Larter, Stephen R

        2014-08-01

        The presence of dissolved metal ions in waters associated with crude oils has many negative implications for the transport, processing, and refining of petroleum. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis of sodium containing crude oil samples suffers from ionization suppression, unwanted adduct formation, and an increase in the complexity of data analysis. Here, we describe a method for the reduction/elimination of these adverse effects by modification of the source region gas-inlet system of a 12 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Several acids were examined as part of this study, with the most suitable for on-line desalting found to have both high vapor pressure and low pK(a); 12.1 M HCl showed the strongest desalting effect for crude oil samples with a sodium removal index (SRI) of 88%-100% ± 7% for the NaOS compound class. In comparison, a SRI of only 38% ± 9% was observed for a H₂O/toluene solution-phase extraction of oil 1. These results clearly demonstrate the increased efficacy of pseudo-vapor phase desalting with the additional advantages that initial sample solution conditions are preserved and no sample preparation is required prior to analysis.

      9. Effects of Student-Generated Questions as the Source of Online Drill-and-Practice Activities on Learning

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Yu, Fu-Yun; Chen, Yi-Jun

        2014-01-01

        This study investigated the effects of online drill-and-practice activities using student-generated questions on academic performance and motivation as compared with online drill-and-practice using teacher-generated questions and no drill-and-practice in a student question-generation (SQG) learning context. A quasi-experimental research method was…

      10. Science News of the Year.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Science News, 1982

        1982-01-01

        Highlights major science news stories of 1982 reported in "Science News." Categories include space/astronomy, biology, chemistry, medicine, energy, physics, anthropology/paleontology, earth sciences, technology, behavior, science/society, and the environment. (JN)

      11. Science News of the Year.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Science News, 1983

        1983-01-01

        Highlights important 1983 news stories reported in Science News. Stories are categorized under: anthropology/paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; earth sciences; energy; environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology and computers. (JN)

      12. News | Division of Cancer Prevention

        Cancer.gov

        News about scientific advances in cancer prevention, program activities, and new projects are included here in NCI press releases and fact sheets, articles from the NCI Cancer Bulletin, and Clinical Trial News from the NCI website.

      13. From Reader to Writer: Citizen Journalism as News Produsage

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Bruns, Axel

        Today, participatory or citizen journalism - journalism which enables readers to become writers - exists online and offline in a variety of forms and formats, operates under a number of editorial schemes, and focuses on a wide range of topics from the specialist to the generic and the micro-local to the global. Key models in this phenomenon include veteran sites Slashdot and Indymedia, as well as news-related weblogs; more recent additions into the mix have been the South Korean OhmyNews, which in 2003 was “the most influential online news site in that country, attracting an estimated 2 million readers a day” (Gillmor, 2003a, p. 7), with its new Japanese and international offshoots, as well as the Wikipedia with its highly up-to-date news and current events section and its more recent offshoot Wikinews, and even citizen-produced video news as it is found in sites such as YouTube and Current.tv.

      14. The persuasion context and results in online opinion seeking: effects of message and source-the moderating role of network managers.

        PubMed

        Cabezudo, Rebeca San José; Izquierdo, Carmen Camarero; Pinto, Javier Rodríguez

        2013-11-01

        Online opinion networks are areas for social exchange, or conversational networks, made up of individuals actively involved in sharing experiences and opinions concerning matters of mutual interest between consumers or concerning their experience with a given product or service. We pinpoint a gap in the literature regarding how the persuasion process occurs when individuals seek opinions online, including the results process. In an attempt to find an answer, we draw on traditional theories related to information processing. These are mostly taken from the field of psychology and enable us to identify which signals or aspects of communication or opinions the individuals focus their attention on (message and source) and the value attached to such communications as well as how much they impact individuals' purchase decisions, bearing in mind the medium (or online opinion network) in which the opinions are located. Findings from those interviewed support the idea that the quality of information on the Internet, as well as trust in the source of said information, or in the opinion of network users, have an impact on the informational value obtained from involvement in this online opinion seeking and on purchasing decisions. Moreover, depending on the kind of network (firm or brand controlled, review Web sites, and user-controlled nonofficial opinion networks), the quality of the information or trust in the users will have a different bearing in the persuasion process. PMID:23790357

      15. The persuasion context and results in online opinion seeking: effects of message and source-the moderating role of network managers.

        PubMed

        Cabezudo, Rebeca San José; Izquierdo, Carmen Camarero; Pinto, Javier Rodríguez

        2013-11-01

        Online opinion networks are areas for social exchange, or conversational networks, made up of individuals actively involved in sharing experiences and opinions concerning matters of mutual interest between consumers or concerning their experience with a given product or service. We pinpoint a gap in the literature regarding how the persuasion process occurs when individuals seek opinions online, including the results process. In an attempt to find an answer, we draw on traditional theories related to information processing. These are mostly taken from the field of psychology and enable us to identify which signals or aspects of communication or opinions the individuals focus their attention on (message and source) and the value attached to such communications as well as how much they impact individuals' purchase decisions, bearing in mind the medium (or online opinion network) in which the opinions are located. Findings from those interviewed support the idea that the quality of information on the Internet, as well as trust in the source of said information, or in the opinion of network users, have an impact on the informational value obtained from involvement in this online opinion seeking and on purchasing decisions. Moreover, depending on the kind of network (firm or brand controlled, review Web sites, and user-controlled nonofficial opinion networks), the quality of the information or trust in the users will have a different bearing in the persuasion process.

      16. Science News of the Year

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Science News, 1976

        1976-01-01

        Presented is a review of important science news stories reported in Science News during 1976. Most items include a volume and page number reference to the issue of Science News in which the article appeared. Items are grouped under general major headings such as: space, astronomy, medicine, chemistry, etc. (SL)

      17. Political News and Political Consciousness

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Schertges, Claudia

        2007-01-01

        This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article…

      18. The Structure of Foreign News.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Stevenson, Robert L.; Thompson, Kirstin D.

        To examine the ways in which aspects of foreign news content are linked together, an analysis was performed on the data collected during a content analysis of foreign news in major national daily newspapers and broadcast news programs over 12 days. The analysis included the identification of (1) up to four topics from an all-inclusive descriptive…

      19. Tipping news in information accumulation system

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Shin, J. K.

        2010-05-01

        As a continuous opinion dynamics model, the information accumulation system (IAS) includes three basic mechanisms of the news, the inheritance and the diffusion as contributing to the information accumulation process of a system. A system is composed of agents who diffuse information through internal interaction, while each of them has incomplete memory or inheritance rate. The news comes from external sources of information, such as mass media. Previously the model IAS was studied only for the small news problems. In this study, a tipping news problem is considered. A key question of the problem is: what is the minimum strength of advertisement that can tip the minority opinion to a majority one? Dynamics of the IAS is briefly revisited with a special interest on nonlinear behavior of the model. In particular, it is shown that a discrete map of the IAS for a single color problem can be transformed into a logistic map, from which the dynamics of the IAS can be better understood. To show the applicability of the IAS model, the result is applied to explain the concept of the critical population size, which claims that there is a minimum population size for a social knowledge system to be continuously inherited without being lost. And critical size of the tipping news is found analytically in terms of IAS parameters. Some of the key results from the present study are compared in detail with the results from the Brownian particle model, which is believed to be the most similar model to the IAS. The concept of tipping news is used to show that a traditional society can tip at an exceptionally low inter-community exposure. Finally, the result was applied to the language competition problem.

      20. Delivering bad news to patients.

        PubMed

        Monden, Kimberley R; Gentry, Lonnie; Cox, Thomas R

        2016-01-01

        When physicians lack proper training, breaking bad news can lead to negative consequences for patients, families, and physicians. A questionnaire was used to determine whether a didactic program on delivering bad news was needed at our institution. Results revealed that 91% of respondents perceived delivering bad news as a very important skill, but only 40% felt they had the training to effectively deliver such news. We provide a brief review of different approaches to delivering bad news and advocate for training physicians in a comprehensive, structured model.

      1. Antarctic news clips, 1991

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        1991-08-01

        Published stories are presented that sample a year's news coverage of Antarctica. The intent is to provide the U.S. Antarctic Program participants with a digest of current issues as presented by a variety of writers and popular publications. The subject areas covered include the following: earth science; ice studies; stratospheric ozone; astrophysics; life science; operations; education; antarctic treaty issues; and tourism

      2. News of the Year.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        St. Lifer, Evan; And Others

        1994-01-01

        This section includes three articles that review library news from the past year. Highlights include public library budgets, examined by geographic regions; government programs; flood damage; library school closings; school library media programs; publishing industry concerns, including mergers, broadening markets, and on-demand printing; and…

      3. News Editing. Second Edition.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Westley, Bruce H.

        A revision of the first edition of "News Editing," this is a textbook for the newspaper editor. The duties of the editor are detailed, as are those of other newspaper employees. Among the basic editing skills the author includes suggestions for sentence structure, word usage, and vocabulary. Examples are given of editing for objectivity, handling…

      4. Parent News Offline, 2003.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

        2003-01-01

        This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 5 of "Parent News Offline," a publication of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN) designed to introduced those without Internet Access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The Spring 2003 issue contains the following articles: (1) "Summer Academic Programs" (Anne…

      5. E News: Report highlights

        SciTech Connect

        1995-01-01

        Three technologies are highlighted in this issue: a rooftop ice storage system for small commercial loads; chlorofluorocarbon-free electric chillers and their expected market; and the FlashBake oven, a commercial-sized oven that uses high intensity quartz lamps to cook food quickly. Regular columns on Member News and Work in Progress are included.

      6. The News, Fall 2002.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Giles, Ray, Ed.

        2002-01-01

        This fall 2002 newsletter from the Community College League of California contains several articles, news stories, and the brochure from the 2002 Annual Convention, "Celebrating the Way California LEARNS." Articles include: (1) "Nursing Shortage Poses Dilemma for Colleges: Access vs. Efficiency," a discussion of the debate over how to increase the…

      7. NewsWire, 2002.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Bowman, Gloria, Ed.; Shoemaker, Dan, Ed.

        2002-01-01

        This document presents the 3 2002 issues of the newsletter "NewsWire," (volume 5). Issue Number One focuses on collaborative Web projects. This issue begins with descriptions of four individual projects: "iEARN"; "Operation RubyThroat"; "Follow the Polar Huskies!"; and "Log in Your Animal Roadkill!" Features that follow include: "Bringing the…

      8. Arctic Warming as News - Perils and Possibilities

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Revkin, A. C.

        2015-12-01

        A science journalist in his 30th year covering human-driven climate change, including on three Arctic reporting trips, reflects on successes and setbacks as news media, environmentalists and Arctic communities have tried to convey the significance of polar change to a public for which the ends of the Earth will always largely be a place of the imagination.Novel challenges are arising in the 24/7 online media environment, as when a paper by a veteran climate scientist proposing a mechanism for abrupt sea-level rise became a big news story before it was accepted by the open-review journal to which it had been submitted. New science is digging in on possible connections between changing Arctic sea ice and snow conditions and disruptive winter weather in more temperate northern latitudes, offering a potential link between this distant region and the lives of ordinary citizens. As cutting-edge research, such work gets substantial media attention. But, as with all new areas of inquiry, uncertainty dominates - creating the potential for distracting the public and policymakers from the many aspects of anthropogenic climate change that are firmly established - but, in a way, boring because of that.With the challenges, there are unprecedented opportunities for conveying Arctic science. In some cases, researchers on expeditions are partnering with media, offering both scientists and news outlets fresh ways to convey the story of Arctic change in an era of resource constraints.Innovative uses of crittercams, webcams, and satellite observations offer educators and interested citizens a way to track and appreciate Arctic change. But more can be done to engage the public directly without the news media as an intermediary, particularly if polar scientists or their institutions test some of the established practices honed by more experienced communicators at NASA.

      9. NO news is no new news

        USGS Publications Warehouse

        Fotheringham, C.J.; Keeley, J.E.

        2005-01-01

        In the paper 'NO News', Preston et al. (2004) make a number of erroneous assumptions regarding nitrogen oxide chemistry. These authors also present some very significant misinterpretations of previous research into the effects of various nitrogen oxides on germination of post-fire followers. Methodological differences between the study by Preston et al. (2004) and previous work are also problematic, such as using NO-donors in solution versus the use of direct application of various nitrogen oxides in the gaseous phase. A closer review of these studies, with the proper understanding of nitrogen oxide chemistry, and interpretations of the available literature, would lead to the conclusion that, contrary to the authors' assertions, the Preston et al. (2004) study supports, rather than refutes, earlier findings by Keeley and Fotheringham (1997, 1998a, b, 2000). ?? CAB International 2005.

      10. Using Multimedia to Bring Science News to the Public

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        O'Riordan, C.; Stein, B.; Lorditch, E. M.

        2015-12-01

        Creative partnerships between scientists and journalists open new opportunities to bring the excitement of scientific discoveries to wider audiences. Research tells us that the majority of the general public now gets more science and technology news from the Internet than from TV sources (2014 NSF Science and Engineering Indicators). In order to reach these audiences news organizations must embrace multiple forms of multimedia. We will review recent research on how the new multimedia landscape is changing the way that science news is consumed and how news organizations are changing the way they deliver news. News programs like Inside Science, and other examples of new partnerships that deliver research news to journalists, teachers, students, and the general public will be examined. We will describe examples of successful collaborations including an article by a former Newsweek science reporter entitled "My 1975 'Cooling World' Story Doesn't Make Today's Climate Scientists Wrong," which got reprinted in Slate, RealClearScience, and mentioned in Factcheck.org and USA Today.

      11. Comparing electronic news media reports of potential bioterrorism-related incidents involving unknown white powder to reports received by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Federal Bureau of Investigation: U.S.A., 2009-2011.

        PubMed

        Fajardo, Geroncio C; Posid, Joseph; Papagiotas, Stephen; Lowe, Luis

        2015-01-01

        There have been periodic electronic news media reports of potential bioterrorism-related incidents involving unknown substances (often referred to as "white powder") since the 2001 intentional dissemination of Bacillus anthracis through the U.S. Postal System. This study reviewed the number of unknown "white powder" incidents reported online by the electronic news media and compared them with unknown "white powder" incidents reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) during a 2-year period from June 1, 2009 and May 31, 2011. Results identified 297 electronic news media reports, 538 CDC reports, and 384 FBI reports of unknown "white powder." This study showed different unknown "white powder" incidents captured by each of the three sources. However, the authors could not determine the public health implications of this discordance.

      12. Comparing electronic news media reports of potential bioterrorism-related incidents involving unknown white powder to reports received by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Federal Bureau of Investigation: U.S.A., 2009-2011.

        PubMed

        Fajardo, Geroncio C; Posid, Joseph; Papagiotas, Stephen; Lowe, Luis

        2015-01-01

        There have been periodic electronic news media reports of potential bioterrorism-related incidents involving unknown substances (often referred to as "white powder") since the 2001 intentional dissemination of Bacillus anthracis through the U.S. Postal System. This study reviewed the number of unknown "white powder" incidents reported online by the electronic news media and compared them with unknown "white powder" incidents reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) during a 2-year period from June 1, 2009 and May 31, 2011. Results identified 297 electronic news media reports, 538 CDC reports, and 384 FBI reports of unknown "white powder." This study showed different unknown "white powder" incidents captured by each of the three sources. However, the authors could not determine the public health implications of this discordance. PMID:25420771

      13. The role of provider-patient communication and trust in online sources in Internet use for health-related activities.

        PubMed

        Hou, Jiran; Shim, Minsun

        2010-01-01

        Provider-patient communication is an important factor influencing patients' satisfaction and health outcomes. This study draws upon the uses and gratification theory to examine how individuals' perception of communication with healthcare providers is associated with their Internet use for health-related activities. Using the data from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), we found that as individuals perceived their communication with providers to be less patient-centered, they were more likely to engage in various types of online health activities, such as using websites for healthy lifestyles, searching for healthcare providers, and seeking health information. Trust in online health information was also found to be a significant predictor of online health activities. The results of this study emphasized the important role of provider-patient communication in motivating individuals to turn to the Internet for health purposes. PMID:21154093

      14. A Comparison of Bad News on Radio and Television Using the News Morbidity Scale.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Haskins, Jack B.

        A reliable "news morbidity" scale was developed to measure the prevalence of bad and good news on radio and television; the scale was then used in a pilot study of one city's news output. The news morbidity scale is a seven-step scale ranging from "extremely bad" to "extremely good" news. A sample of 945 television and 1,105 radio news stories…

      15. Media sources, credibility, and perceptions of science: Learning about how people learn about science.

        PubMed

        Takahashi, Bruno; Tandoc, Edson C

        2016-08-01

        Knowledge about science and technology has become increasingly important in this age of digital information overload. It is also becoming increasingly important to understand what contributes to scientific learning, including information sources and trust in those sources. In this study, we develop and test a multivariate model to explain scientific knowledge based on past theories on learning from the news from the fields of political communication, sociology, and media psychology. We focus on the impact of sources-by platform, such as television and online, and by expertise, such as scientists and the media-in understanding what predicts scientific knowledge. The results show that interest in science not only directly predicts knowledge but also has indirect effects on knowledge through its effects on Internet use, confidence in the press, and perception of scientists. In addition, distrust on the news sources is an important pathway to learning about science. PMID:25792288

      16. Media sources, credibility, and perceptions of science: Learning about how people learn about science.

        PubMed

        Takahashi, Bruno; Tandoc, Edson C

        2016-08-01

        Knowledge about science and technology has become increasingly important in this age of digital information overload. It is also becoming increasingly important to understand what contributes to scientific learning, including information sources and trust in those sources. In this study, we develop and test a multivariate model to explain scientific knowledge based on past theories on learning from the news from the fields of political communication, sociology, and media psychology. We focus on the impact of sources-by platform, such as television and online, and by expertise, such as scientists and the media-in understanding what predicts scientific knowledge. The results show that interest in science not only directly predicts knowledge but also has indirect effects on knowledge through its effects on Internet use, confidence in the press, and perception of scientists. In addition, distrust on the news sources is an important pathway to learning about science.

      17. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

        PubMed

        Stremmel, Neil; Struck, Christopher J

        2016-07-01

        American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Neil Stremmel.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27475185

      18. Contact: Releasing the news

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Pinotti, Roberto

        The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

      19. SciNews: Incorporating Science Current Events in 21st Century Classrooms

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        DiMaggio, E.

        2011-12-01

        Middle school students are instructed with the aid of textbooks, lectures, and activities to teach topics that satisfy state standards. However, teaching materials created to convey standard-aligned science concepts often leave students asking how the content relates to their lives and why they should be learning it. Conveying relevance is important for student learning and retention, especially in science where abstract concepts can often be incorrectly perceived as irrelevant. One way to create an educational link between classroom content and everyday life is through the use of scientific current events. Students read, hear, and watch media coverage of natural events (such as the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan), but do not necessarily relate the scientific information from media sources to classroom studies. Taking advantage of these brief 'teachable moments'--when student interest is high--provides a valuable opportunity to make classroom-to-everyday life associations and to incorporate inquiry based learning. To address this need, I create pre-packaged current event materials for middle to high school teachers that align to state standards, and which are short, effective, and easy to implement in the classroom. Each lesson takes approximately 15-30 minutes to implement, allowing teachers time to facilitate brief but meaningful discussions. I assemble materials within approximately one week of the regional or global science event, consisting of short slide shows, maps, videos, pictures, and real-time data. I use a listserv to send biweekly emails to subscribed instructors containing the current event topic and a link to download the materials. All materials are hosted on the Arizona State University Education Outreach SciNews website (http://sese.asu.edu/teacher-resources) and are archived. Currently, 285 educators subscribe to the SciNews listserv, representing 36 states and 19 countries. In order to assess the effectiveness and usefulness of SciNews

      20. News and Announcements

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        1999-05-01

        Supplementary Materials The number of supplementary materials that accompany print articles has grown and also become more varied. The new guidelines for lab experiments call for supplementary materials in most cases, so that the actual materials used in lab can be made available. The From Past Issues column edited by Kathryn Williams and many of the technology columns frequently have supplements for JCE Online. An especially interesting supplement that we would like to call to the attention of readers is a collection of videos from the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, based on interviews with nuclear chemists who have discovered and studied the heaviest elements. These movies accompany the Viewpoints article, "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements-One Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee. The titles of the movies are listed below; illustrative stills are shown at the bottom of the page. Researchers involved with the segments about Lawrencium include Robert Silva, Torbjorn Sikkeland, Matti Nurmia, Robert Latimer, and Albert Ghiorso, all of whom are from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. (QuickTime 3 is needed in order to view the videos; it can be downloaded free from http://www.apple.com.)

        • A Brief Note about Plutonium, by Glenn Seaborg
        • Plutonium and Why It Was Kept a Secret
        • The Prediction of the Actinide Series, by Glenn Seaborg
        • First Chemical Separation of Lawrencium at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in 1970
        • The HILAC or Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator
        • Discovery of Lawrencium
        • How To Collect Lawrencium Atoms
        • The Discovery of Element 106-Finally
        • The Naming of Element 106
        • The Limits of Discovering the Heavy Elements
        • What Good Is a Heavy Element?
        To see these videos, view the Supplements of http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/1999/Mar/abs331.html. People: Glenn Seaborg Glenn Seaborg, frequent contributor

      1. The Evaluations of Swine Flu Magnitudes in TV News: A Comparative Analysis of Paired Influenza Pandemics.

        PubMed

        Pan, Po-Lin; Meng, Juan

        2015-01-01

        This study examined how major TV news networks covered two flu pandemics in 1976 and 2009 in terms of news frames, mortality exemplars, mortality subject attributes, vaccination, evaluation approaches, and news sources. Results showed that the first pandemic was frequently framed with the medical/scientific and political/legal issues, while the second pandemic was emphasized with the health risk issue in TV news. Both flu pandemics were regularly reported with mortality exemplars, but the focus in the first pandemic was on the flu virus threat and vaccination side effects, while the vaccination shortage was frequently revealed in the second outbreak.

      2. Science News of the Year.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Science News, 1988

        1988-01-01

        Reviews major science news stories of 1988 as reported in the pages of Science News. Covers the areas of anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, earth sciences, environment, food science, mathematics and computers, paleobiology, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. (YP)

      3. What Turns Events into News?

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Tukachinsky, Riva

        2013-01-01

        "The New York Times" is known for its slogan ''All the News That's Fit to Print.'' But how do gatekeepers decide which events meet this criterion? Although some individuals might believe that the news constitutes an undistorted reflection of the social reality, students in communication courses have the…

      4. News Flow between the Americas.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Stevenson, Robert L.; And Others

        As part of an international study of world news flow undertaken by the International Association for Mass Communication Research, a content analysis was conducted of foreign news stories in the largest circulation newspapers in Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina, as well as in six papers in the United States, and of material from the files of "Agence…

      5. Science News of the Year.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Science News, 1984

        1984-01-01

        Reviews important science news stories reported during 1984 in "Science News" magazine. These stories are in the categories of: anthropology and paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; computers; mathematics; earth science; the environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology. (JN)

      6. Science News of the Year.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Science News, 1987

        1987-01-01

        Provides a review of science news stories reported in "Science News" during 1987. References each item to the volume and page number in which the subject was addressed. Contains references on astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, earth sciences, environment, mathematics and computers, paleontology and anthropology, physics, science…

      7. Television News Exchanges in Asia.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Flournoy, Don M.

        In 1984, a project was initiated in Asia under the sponsorship of the Asia Pacific Broadcasting Union that represents a major break-through in achieving a better balance in the collection, editing, and distribution of the world's news. This break-through was the Asiavision Satellite News Exchange, which has made it possible for many Asian…

      8. Science News of the Year.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Science News, 1989

        1989-01-01

        Presented is a review of important science news stories of 1989 as reported in the pages of "Science News." Topics include anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, environment, food science, math and computers, paleobiology, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. (CW)

      9. Good, Bad or Absent: Discourses of Parents with Disabilities in Australian News Media

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Fraser, Vikki; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

        2015-01-01

        Background: News media frames public perceptions. As such, news media becomes a useful source of analysis to understand the presence (or otherwise) of people with disabilities, particularly intellectual disabilities, within parenting discourses in Australia. Method: Using Critical Discourse Analysis, this article examines major Australian…

      10. False Equivalency: Think Tank References on Education in the News Media

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Haas, Eric

        2007-01-01

        This study explores the use and presentation of information and research on education by the news media. Using content analysis, this study compares four types of think tanks--contract research, academic, advocacy, and mixed academic and advocacy--and shows how the news media represented each one as a source of research, facts, and figures on…

      11. A gas-jet transport and catcher technique for on-line production of radioactive ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion-source

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Naik, V.; Chakrabarti, A.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Karmakar, P.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Dechoudhury, S.; Mondal, M.; Pandey, H. K.; Lavanyakumar, D.; Mandi, T. K.; Dutta, D. P.; Kundu Roy, T.; Bhowmick, D.; Sanyal, D.; Srivastava, S. C. L.; Ray, A.; Ali, Md. S.

        2013-03-01

        Radioactive ion beams (RIB) have been produced on-line, using a gas-jet recoil transport coupled Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion-source at the VECC-RIB facility. Radioactive atoms/molecules carried through the gas-jet were stopped in a catcher placed inside the ECR plasma chamber. A skimmer has been used to remove bulk of the carrier gas at the ECR entrance. The diffusion of atoms/molecules through the catcher has been verified off-line using stable isotopes and on-line through transmission of radioactive reaction products. Beams of 14O (71 s), 42K (12.4 h), 43K (22.2 h), and 41Ar (1.8 h) have been produced by bombarding nitrogen and argon gas targets with proton and alpha particle beams from the K130 cyclotron at VECC. Typical measured intensity of RIB at the separator focal plane is found to be a few times 103 particles per second (pps). About 3.2 × 103 pps of 1.4 MeV 14O RIB has been measured after acceleration through a radiofrequency quadrupole linac. The details of the gas-jet coupled ECR ion-source and RIB production experiments are presented along with the plans for the future.

      12. Exploring women's responses to online media coverage of weight loss surgery.

        PubMed

        Champion, C; Glenn, N; Berry, T; Spence, J C

        2015-10-01

        The purpose of this study was to understand the reactions of women to online news articles about weight loss surgery and related reader comments. Focus groups were conducted; open-ended questions were asked to elicit responses to existing online news media content related to weight loss surgery. The participants described the online articles as predominantly supportive of weight loss surgery and in response they expressed a desire to see more critical content, including different and competing perspectives. Participants felt the online comments represented extreme perspectives and were predominately negative. These were therefore not viewed as helpful or informative. Nevertheless, readers viewed comments as a form of entertainment. Because of the aggressive and anonymous nature of reader comments in response to online news stories, the participants did not feel comfortable leaving comments themselves on the news sites. Findings highlight the importance of gathering readers' perspectives in response to interactive media content and, in particular, health information. PMID:26278398

      13. NEWS: Web's wonders!

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2000-07-01

        Introducing this month's collection of useful websites for physics teachers. If you have any suggestions for this column then please send them to us at ped@ioppublishing.co.uk Dave Pickersgill has drawn our attention to the following: www.sheffcol.ac.uk/links/ which has annotated, classified and searchable links to over 1700 educational sites. Included are around 500 science links. Members of the American Association of Physics Teachers were recently informed of a website for those hoping to arouse interest and knowledge of astronomy in their students. Space.com, a comprehensive space news website, had launched `spaceKids', a new channel specifically targeted at children complete with a gallery of space images, space and science news, stories, a space question and answer section hosted by a team of science teachers, interactive games, weekly polls and competitions. The website can be found at www.spacekids.com Those fascinated by all aspects of nuclear fusion should take a look at the General Atomics educational site: FusionEd.gat.com as well as the national site fusion.gat.com/PlasmaOutreach

      14. News and Announcements

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        1999-07-01

        New Source of Information from Advertisers The Journal has a new feature effective with the June 1999 issue. If you would like additional information about our advertisers or their products, the quickest and easiest way to get it is via JCE Online: go to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu click on Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. When you do contact our advertisers, be sure to tell them that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. This is important to them, and to us. JCE Software Receives Award The Journal recently received notice that JCE Software portion of JCE Online has been selected as a Links2Go Key Resource for the topic of chemistry software. According to Links2Go (www.links2go.com), JCE Software's home page is one of the top fifty most accessed online resources in the area of chemistry software (currently ranked 45). Thanks to all of you who have visited JCE Online and the JCE Software area to make this possible. If you haven't visited the site yet, you can go there directly (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/index.html ) as well as via our JCE Online home page. You will be greeted with a short video of nitrogen triiodide exploding and be able to get a wealth of information about our latest releases, software, CD-ROMs/Video, student resources, materials for authors and software developers. You can see color graphics from our CD-ROMs, video, and software,... Actually, if you are familiar with our Catalog, this is much better. 1999 Welch Chemistry Prize Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science at Stanford University, has been named the 1999 recipient of the Welch Award in Chemistry for his lifetime achievements in physical and analytical chemistry. Zare's interests focus on the development and application of lasers and other novel instruments to explore chemical frontiers, ranging from molecules to chemical processes, from the inside of cells to

      15. Simultaneous indoor and outdoor on-line hourly monitoring of atmospheric volatile organic compounds in an urban building. The role of inside and outside sources.

        PubMed

        de Blas, Maite; Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Lucio; Durana, Nieves; Gomez, Maria Carmen; Iza, Jon

        2012-06-01

        Indoor air quality (IAQ) has become a very important issue in recent years. As in developed countries people spend more than 90% of their time indoors, besides outdoor pollution assessment, the indoor one is also required. IAQ is not only affected by indoor sources linked to indoor activities, outdoor sources such as road or street traffic and industrial and commercial activities have their role too. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) frequently show higher indoor mixing ratios with respect to the outdoor ones, and monitoring is required to report their indoor mixing ratios. Many studies have reported average indoor VOCs' mixing ratios in different environments, but their temporal variability has not been well documented. The main objective of this work was to simultaneously measure VOCs' indoor and outdoor mixing ratios with high time-resolution in order to assess the effect of sources inside and outside the building upon indoor mixing ratios of individual VOCs. Simultaneous hourly, continuous, and on-line measurements of C(2)-C(11) VOCs were performed inside and outside the School of Engineering of Bilbao (ETSI) building, located in the city center of Bilbao, an urban area in Northern Spain. The analysis of simultaneous data allowed the classification of VOCs based on their main sources. Some VOCs were mainly emitted by indoor sources (1-pentene, 2-methylpentane, n-hexane, methylcyclopentane, benzene, 1-heptene+2,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and tetrachloroethylene) or by outdoor sources (n-heptane, C(8) alkanes except trimethylpentanes and C(9) aromatics). Other VOCs, such as toluene, were emitted by both indoor and outdoor sources. The isoprene indoor pattern indicated that its main indoor source could be the air exhaled by people occupying the building. Some halocarbons, such as trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and carbon tetrachloride may be generated from the use inside the building of chlorine bleach containing products.

      16. News and Announcements

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        1999-05-01

        Supplementary Materials The number of supplementary materials that accompany print articles has grown and also become more varied. The new guidelines for lab experiments call for supplementary materials in most cases, so that the actual materials used in lab can be made available. The From Past Issues column edited by Kathryn Williams and many of the technology columns frequently have supplements for JCE Online. An especially interesting supplement that we would like to call to the attention of readers is a collection of videos from the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, based on interviews with nuclear chemists who have discovered and studied the heaviest elements. These movies accompany the Viewpoints article, "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements-One Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee. The titles of the movies are listed below; illustrative stills are shown at the bottom of the page. Researchers involved with the segments about Lawrencium include Robert Silva, Torbjorn Sikkeland, Matti Nurmia, Robert Latimer, and Albert Ghiorso, all of whom are from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. (QuickTime 3 is needed in order to view the videos; it can be downloaded free from http://www.apple.com.)

        • A Brief Note about Plutonium, by Glenn Seaborg
        • Plutonium and Why It Was Kept a Secret
        • The Prediction of the Actinide Series, by Glenn Seaborg
        • First Chemical Separation of Lawrencium at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in 1970
        • The HILAC or Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator
        • Discovery of Lawrencium
        • How To Collect Lawrencium Atoms
        • The Discovery of Element 106-Finally
        • The Naming of Element 106
        • The Limits of Discovering the Heavy Elements
        • What Good Is a Heavy Element?
        To see these videos, view the Supplements of http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/1999/Mar/abs331.html. People: Glenn Seaborg Glenn Seaborg, frequent contributor

      17. Philosophy as news: bioethics, journalism and public policy.

        PubMed

        Goodman, K W

        1999-04-01

        News media accounts of issues in bioethics gain significance to the extent that the media influence public policy and inform personal decision making. The increasingly frequent appearance of bioethics in the news thus imposes responsibilities on journalists and their sources. These responsibilities are identified and discussed, as is (i) the concept of "news-worthiness" as applied to bioethics, (ii) the variable quality of bioethics reportage and (iii) journalists' reliance on ethicists to pass judgment. Because of the potential social and other benefits of high quality reporting on ethical issues, it is argued that journalists and their bioethics sources should explore and accommodate more productive relationships. An optimal journalism-ethics relationship will be one characterized by "para-ethics," in which journalistic constraints are noted but also in which issues and arguments are presented without oversimplification and credible disagreement is given appropriate attention.

      18. Hybrid single-source online Fourier transform coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering/optical coherence tomography.

        PubMed

        Kamali, Tschackad; Považay, Boris; Kumar, Sunil; Silberberg, Yaron; Hermann, Boris; Werkmeister, René; Drexler, Wolfgang; Unterhuber, Angelika

        2014-10-01

        We demonstrate a multimodal optical coherence tomography (OCT) and online Fourier transform coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (FTCARS) platform using a single sub-12 femtosecond (fs) Ti:sapphire laser enabling simultaneous extraction of structural and chemical ("morphomolecular") information of biological samples. Spectral domain OCT prescreens the specimen providing a fast ultrahigh (4×12  μm axial and transverse) resolution wide field morphologic overview. Additional complementary intrinsic molecular information is obtained by zooming into regions of interest for fast label-free chemical mapping with online FTCARS spectroscopy. Background-free CARS is based on a Michelson interferometer in combination with a highly linear piezo stage, which allows for quick point-to-point extraction of CARS spectra in the fingerprint region in less than 125 ms with a resolution better than 4  cm(-1) without the need for averaging. OCT morphology and CARS spectral maps indicating phosphate and carbonate bond vibrations from human bone samples are extracted to demonstrate the performance of this hybrid imaging platform.

      19. Databases toward Disseminated Use - Nikkei News Telecom -

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Kasiwagi, Akira

        The need for “searchers” - adept hands in the art of information retrieval - is increasing nowadays. Searchers have become necessary as the result of the upbeat online database market. The number of database users is rising steeply. There is the urgent need to develop potential users of general information, such as newspaper articles. Simple commands, easy operation, and low prices hold the key to general popularization of databases, and the issue lies in how the industry will get about achieving this task. Nihon Keizai Shimbun has been undertaking a wide range of possibilities with Nikkei News Telecom. Although only two years have passed since its start, results of Nikkei’s efforts are summarized below.

      20. News Photos in "Time" and "Newsweek."

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Tsang, Kuo-jen

        1984-01-01

        Investigates how news pictures in two national news magazines have portrayed the world and the United States to their readers. Concludes that both magazines used far more news pictures about the United States than about foreign countries and that international news pictures were more violent-oriented than United States pictures. (FL)

      1. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

        2011-01-01

        ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

      2. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

        2010-01-01

        ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

      3. MedlinePlus FAQ: News Coverage

        MedlinePlus

        ... gov/faq/news.html Question: I saw a news article on MedlinePlus but now I can't ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: The health news page displays the most recent news. MedlinePlus displays ...

      4. LATIN--Latin American Regional News Agency.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Nichols, John Spicer

        The establishment of a regional news agency for Latin America to improve the balance of news flow and increase the transmission of news more applicable to regional problems has often been proposed. Despite wide acceptance of the concept, the birth of the Third World's first regional news agency, Agencia Latinoamericana de Informacion (LATIN), has…

      5. Index to NASA News Releases 1995

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        1996-01-01

        This issue of the index to NASA News Releases contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, during 1995. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject index, Personal name index, News release number index, Accession number index, Speeches, and News releases.

      6. "Technologies of the Self": Michel Foucault Online.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Aycock, Alan

        1995-01-01

        Uses instances of recent postings to the USENET news group rec.games.chess to present a Foucauldian perspective on fashioning of self online. Identifies key aspects of self-fashioning. Considers implications of this Foucauldian approach for future research on Internet self-constructions. (RS)

      7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 8yr INTEGRAL/IBIS soft gamma-ray source obs. (Bird+, 2016)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Bird, A. J.; Bazzano, A.; Malizia, A.; Fiocchi, M.; Sguera, V.; Bassani, L.; Hill, A. B.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

        2016-04-01

        Here we report an all-sky soft gamma-ray source catalog based on IBIS observations performed during the first 1000 orbits of INTEGRAL. The database for the construction of the source list consists of all good-quality data available, from the launch in 2002, up to the end of 2010. This corresponds to ~110Ms of scientific public observations, with a concentrated coverage on the Galactic Plane and extragalactic deep exposures. This new catalog includes 939 sources above a 4.5σ significance threshold detected in the 17-100keV energy band, of which 120 sources represent previously undiscovered soft gamma-ray emitters. The source positions are determined, mean fluxes are provided in two main energy bands, and these are both reported together with the overall source exposure. Indicative levels of variability are provided, and outburst times and durations are given for transient sources. A comparison is made with previous IBIS catalogs and catalogs from other similar missions. (2 data files).

      8. Communicating Ebola through social media and electronic news media outlets: A cross-sectional study.

        PubMed

        Househ, Mowafa

        2016-09-01

        Social media and electronic news media activity are an important source of information for the general public. Yet, there is a dearth of research exploring the use of Twitter and electronic news outlets during significant worldly events such as the recent Ebola Virus scare. The purpose of this article is to investigate the use of Twitter and electronic news media outlets in communicating Ebola Virus information. A cross-sectional survey of Twitter data and Google News Trend data from 30 September till 29 October, 2014 was conducted. Between 30 September and 29 October, there were approximately 26 million tweets (25,925,152) that contained the word Ebola. The highest number of correlated activity for Twitter and electronic news outlets occurred on 16 October 2014. Other important peaks in Twitter data occurred on 1 October, 6 October, 8 October, and 12 October, 2014. The main influencers of the Twitter feeds were news media outlets. The study reveals a relationship between electronic news media publishing and Twitter activity around significant events such as Ebola. Healthcare organizations should take advantage of the relationship between electronic news media and trending events on social media sites such as Twitter and should work on developing social media campaigns in co-operation with leading electronic news media outlets (e.g. CNN, Yahoo, Reuters) that can have an influence on social media activity.

      9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio fluxes of 195 ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources (Le Bail+, 2016)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Le Bail, K.; Gipson, J. M.; Gordon, D.; MacMillan, D. S.; Behrend, D.; Thomas, C. C.; Bolotin, S.; Himwich, W. E.; Baver, K. D.; Corey, B. E.; Titus, M.; Bourda, G.; Charlot, P.; Collioud, A.

        2016-07-01

        The second realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2) is based on Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data at radio frequencies in X band and S band. The European Space Agency's Gaia mission, launched on 2013 December 19, started routine scientific operations in 2014 July. By scanning the whole sky, it is expected to observe ~500000 Quasi Stellar Objects in the optical domain. This means that, in the future, two extragalactic celestial reference frames, at two different frequency domains, will coexist. It will thus be important to align them very accurately. In 2012, the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux (LAB) selected 195 sources from ICRF2 that will be observed by Gaia and should be suitable for aligning the radio and optical frames: they are called ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources. The LAB submitted a proposal to the International VLBI Service (IVS) to regularly observe these ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources at the same rate as Gaia observes them in the optical realm, e.g., roughly once a month. Of the 195 sources, all but one have been successfully observed in the 12 months prior to 2015 September 01. Table1 lists the 195 ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources. Beginning in 2003 June, the Goddard VLBI group developed a program to purposefully monitor when sources were observed and to increase the observations of "under-observed" sources. In 2013 March, we added all 195 ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources to the IVS source monitoring program with an observation target of 12 successful sessions per year. (1 data file).

      10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 408MHz obs. of GPS sources from JVAS survey (Marecki+ 1999)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Marecki, A.; Falcke, H.; Niezgoda, J.; Garrington, S. T.; Patnaik, A. R.

        1999-03-01

        Observations with MERLIN at 408 MHz have been used to establish the low-frequency part of the spectra of more than a hundred compact radio sources taken from the part of the Jodrell Bank-VLA Astrometric Survey (JVAS) limited by 35°<=δ<=75°. These sources were selected from JVAS and other catalogues to have convex spectra between 1.4 and 8.4GHz, characteristic of Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum sources. We have confirmed convex shapes of the spectra of 76 objects. (3 data files).

      11. Microbial Control News - November 2011

        Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

        This is the first of a column in the Society for Invertebrate Pathology Newsletter. Entitled "Microbial Control News" this article summarizes regulatory actions in the U.S. and Canada regarding microbial insect pest control agents....

      12. Increasing Learning from TV News.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Perloff, Richard M.; And Others

        1982-01-01

        Describes an experiment that manipulated two variables, repetition and pausing for viewer "digestion" of information in a news telecast. Concludes that the use of repetition increased viewers' retention of information, but that pauses did not. (FL)

      13. The Language of Journalism in Treatments of Hormone Replacement News

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        MacDonald, Susan Peck

        2005-01-01

        Researchers studying science communication have criticized the sensationalism that often appears in journalistic accounts of science news. This article looks at the linguistic sources of that sensationalism by analyzing the journalistic coverage of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study of hormone replacement research, which was abruptly…

      14. Genetic optimism: framing genes and mental illness in the news.

        PubMed

        Conrad, P

        2001-06-01

        Over the past two decades the pace and specificity of discoveries associating genetics with mental illness has accelerated, which is reflected in an increase in news coverage about the genetics of mental disorder. The news media is a major source of public understanding of genetics and a strong influence on public discourse. This paper examines the news coverage of genetics and mental illness (i.e., bipolar illness and schizophrenia) over a 25 year period, emphasizing the peak period of 1987-1994. Using a sample of 110 news stories from 5 major American newspapers and 3 news magazines, we identify the frame of "genetic optimism" which dominated the reporting of genetics and mental illness beginning in the mid- 1980s. The structure of the frame is comprised of 3 elements: a gene for the disorder exists; it will be found; and it will be good. New discoveries of genes were announced with great fanfare, but the most promising claims could not be replicated or were retracted in short order. Despite these disconfirmations, genetic optimism persisted in subsequent news stories. While the scientific accuracy of the gene stories is high, the genetic optimism frame distorts some of the findings, misrepresents and reifies the impact of genes on mental disorder, and leaves no space for critics or an examination of potential negative impacts. The stances of reporters, scientists and editors may all in different ways contribute to the perpetuation of genetic optimism. Genetic optimism presents an overly sanguine picture of the state of genetics; as we enter the genetic age it is important to balance the extraneous "hype and hope" contained in news stories of genetics and mental illness.

      15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Revised GB/GB2 sample of radio sources (Machalski 1998)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Machalski, J.

        1997-07-01

        The revised sample of 373 extragalactic radio sources brighter than 0.2 Jy at 1.4GHz is presented. These sources, selected from the finding Green Bank surveys, were mapped at 1465 MHz using the VLA at different configurations. The biases introduced into the original GB (Maslowski, 1972AcA....22..227M) and GB2 (Machalski, 1978AcA....28..367M) catalogues by confusion as well as partial resolution by the VLA at its A-configuration, are eliminated. In effect, a number of sources have been excluded, and a few other are included into the revised sample. Now the sample is about 99, 97 and 95 per cent complete for sources with S1.4>=0.55Jy, 0.25Jy<=S1.4<0.55Jy, and 0.2Jy<=S1.4<0.25Jy, respectively. Table 3 gives the compilation of the radio, optical, and X-ray data available for the sample sources. (2 data files).

      16. Video segmentation techniques for news

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Phillips, Michael; Wolf, Wayne H.

        1996-11-01

        This paper describes our experiences in video analysis for a video library on the World Wide Web. News and documentary programs, though seemingly simple, have some characteristics which can cause problems in simple shot segmentation algorithms. We have developed a methodology, based on our experience with the analysis of several hours of news/documentary footage, which improve the results of shot segmentation on this type of material and which in turn allows for higher-quality storyboards for our video library.

      17. Upgrade of the resonance ionization laser ion source at ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility: New lasers and new ion beamsa)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Fedosseev, V. N.; Berg, L.-E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fink, D.; Launila, O. J.; Losito, R.; Marsh, B. A.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, A. M.; Wendt, K. D. A.

        2012-02-01

        The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) produces beams for the majority of experiments at the ISOLDE on-line isotope separator. A substantial improvement in RILIS performance has been achieved through a series of upgrade steps: replacement of the copper vapor lasers by a Nd:YAG laser; replacement of the old homemade dye lasers by new commercial dye lasers; installation of a complementary Ti:Sapphire laser system. The combined dye and Ti:Sapphire laser system with harmonics is capable of generating beams at any wavelength in the range of 210-950 nm. In total, isotopes of 31 different elements have been selectively laser-ionized and separated at ISOLDE, including recently developed beams of samarium, praseodymium, polonium, and astatine.

      18. Upgrade of the resonance ionization laser ion source at ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility: new lasers and new ion beams.

        PubMed

        Fedosseev, V N; Berg, L-E; Fedorov, D V; Fink, D; Launila, O J; Losito, R; Marsh, B A; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Seliverstov, M D; Sjödin, A M; Wendt, K D A

        2012-02-01

        The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) produces beams for the majority of experiments at the ISOLDE on-line isotope separator. A substantial improvement in RILIS performance has been achieved through a series of upgrade steps: replacement of the copper vapor lasers by a Nd:YAG laser; replacement of the old homemade dye lasers by new commercial dye lasers; installation of a complementary Ti:Sapphire laser system. The combined dye and Ti:Sapphire laser system with harmonics is capable of generating beams at any wavelength in the range of 210-950 nm. In total, isotopes of 31 different elements have been selectively laser-ionized and separated at ISOLDE, including recently developed beams of samarium, praseodymium, polonium, and astatine. PMID:22380244

      19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fermi-LAT flaring gamma-ray sources from FAVA (Ackermann+, 2013)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dalton, M.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; J! Ohannesso, N. G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kawano, T.; Knodlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Sanchez-Conde, M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgro, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

        2015-01-01

        We applied FAVA (Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis) to the first 47 months of Fermi/LAT observations (2008 August 4 to 2012 July 16 UTC), in weekly time intervals. The total number of weeks is 206. We considered two ranges of gamma-ray energy, E>100MeV and E>800MeV, to increase the sensitivity for spectrally soft and hard flares, respectively. We generate measured and expected count maps with a resolution of 0.25deg2 per pixel. We found LAT counterparts for 192 of the 215 FAVA sources. Most of the associated sources, 177, are AGNs. (2 data files).

      20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Second ROSAT all-sky survey (2RXS) source catalog (Boller+, 2016)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Boller, T.; Freyberg, M. J.; Truemper, J.; Haberl, F.; Voges, W.; Nandra, K.

        2016-03-01

        We have re-analysed the photon event files from the ROSAT all-sky survey. The main goal was to create a catalogue of point-like sources, which is referred to as the 2RXS source catalogue. We improved the reliability of detections by an advanced detection algorithm and a complete screening process. New data products were created to allow timing and spectral analysis. Photon event files with corrected astrometry and Moon rejection (RASS-3.1 processing) were made available in FITS format. The 2RXS catalogue will serve as the basic X-ray all-sky survey catalogue until eROSITA data become available. (5 data files).

      1. On-line biomedical databases-the best source for quick search of the scientific information in the biomedicine.

        PubMed

        Masic, Izet; Milinovic, Katarina

        2012-06-01

        Most of medical journals now has it's electronic version, available over public networks. Although there are parallel printed and electronic versions, and one other form need not to be simultaneously published. Electronic version of a journal can be published a few weeks before the printed form and must not has identical content. Electronic form of a journals may have an extension that does not contain a printed form, such as animation, 3D display, etc., or may have available fulltext, mostly in PDF or XML format, or just the contents or a summary. Access to a full text is usually not free and can be achieved only if the institution (library or host) enters into an agreement on access. Many medical journals, however, provide free access for some articles, or after a certain time (after 6 months or a year) to complete content. The search for such journals provide the network archive as High Wire Press, Free Medical Journals.com. It is necessary to allocate PubMed and PubMed Central, the first public digital archives unlimited collect journals of available medical literature, which operates in the system of the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda (USA). There are so called on- line medical journals published only in electronic form. It could be searched over on-line databases. In this paper authors shortly described about 30 data bases and short instructions how to make access and search the published papers in indexed medical journals. PMID:23322957

      2. Are luminescent bacteria suitable for online detection and monitoring of toxic compounds in drinking water and its sources?

        PubMed

        Woutersen, Marjolijn; Belkin, Shimshon; Brouwer, Bram; van Wezel, Annemarie P; Heringa, Minne B

        2011-05-01

        Biosensors based on luminescent bacteria may be valuable tools to monitor the chemical quality and safety of surface and drinking water. In this review, an overview is presented of the recombinant strains available that harbour the bacterial luciferase genes luxCDABE, and which may be used in an online biosensor for water quality monitoring. Many bacterial strains have been described for the detection of a broad range of toxicity parameters, including DNA damage, protein damage, membrane damage, oxidative stress, organic pollutants, and heavy metals. Most lux strains have sensitivities with detection limits ranging from milligrams per litre to micrograms per litre, usually with higher sensitivities in compound-specific strains. Although the sensitivity of lux strains can be enhanced by various molecular manipulations, most reported detection thresholds are still too high to detect levels of individual contaminants as they occur nowadays in European drinking waters. However, lux strains sensing specific toxic effects have the advantage of being able to respond to mixtures of contaminants inducing the same effect, and thus could be used as a sensor for the sum effect, including the effect of compounds that are as yet not identified by chemical analysis. An evaluation of the suitability of lux strains for monitoring surface and drinking water is therefore provided.

      3. Open-Source, Platform-Independent Library and Online Scripting Environment for Accessing Thermo Scientific RAW Files.

        PubMed

        Kelchtermans, Pieter; Silva, Ana S C; Argentini, Andrea; Staes, An; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Laukens, Kris; Valkenborg, Dirk; Martens, Lennart

        2015-11-01

        Mass spectrometers typically output data in proprietary binary formats. While converter suites and standardized XML formats have been developed in response, these conversion steps come with non-negligible computational time and storage space overhead. As a result, simple, everyday data inspection tasks are often beyond the skills of the mass spectrometrist, who is unable to freely access the acquired data. We therefore here describe the unthermo library for convenient, platform-independent access to Thermo Scientific RAW files and the associated online playground to transform small and easily understandable scriptlets into executable programs for end-users. By fostering the provision of code examples and snippet exchange, the interested mass spectrometrist or researcher can use this playground to quickly assemble custom scripts for their particular purpose. In this way, the data in these RAW files can be mined much more readily and directly by the user, and fast, automated raw data extraction or analysis can finally become part of the daily routine of the mass spectrometrist.

      4. ON-LINE BIOMEDICAL DATABASES–THE BEST SOURCE FOR QUICK SEARCH OF THE SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION IN THE BIOMEDICINE

        PubMed Central

        Masic, Izet; Milinovic, Katarina

        2012-01-01

        Most of medical journals now has it’s electronic version, available over public networks. Although there are parallel printed and electronic versions, and one other form need not to be simultaneously published. Electronic version of a journal can be published a few weeks before the printed form and must not has identical content. Electronic form of a journals may have an extension that does not contain a printed form, such as animation, 3D display, etc., or may have available fulltext, mostly in PDF or XML format, or just the contents or a summary. Access to a full text is usually not free and can be achieved only if the institution (library or host) enters into an agreement on access. Many medical journals, however, provide free access for some articles, or after a certain time (after 6 months or a year) to complete content. The search for such journals provide the network archive as High Wire Press, Free Medical Journals.com. It is necessary to allocate PubMed and PubMed Central, the first public digital archives unlimited collect journals of available medical literature, which operates in the system of the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda (USA). There are so called on- line medical journals published only in electronic form. It could be searched over on-line databases. In this paper authors shortly described about 30 data bases and short instructions how to make access and search the published papers in indexed medical journals. PMID:23322957

      5. Open-Source, Platform-Independent Library and Online Scripting Environment for Accessing Thermo Scientific RAW Files.

        PubMed

        Kelchtermans, Pieter; Silva, Ana S C; Argentini, Andrea; Staes, An; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Laukens, Kris; Valkenborg, Dirk; Martens, Lennart

        2015-11-01

        Mass spectrometers typically output data in proprietary binary formats. While converter suites and standardized XML formats have been developed in response, these conversion steps come with non-negligible computational time and storage space overhead. As a result, simple, everyday data inspection tasks are often beyond the skills of the mass spectrometrist, who is unable to freely access the acquired data. We therefore here describe the unthermo library for convenient, platform-independent access to Thermo Scientific RAW files and the associated online playground to transform small and easily understandable scriptlets into executable programs for end-users. By fostering the provision of code examples and snippet exchange, the interested mass spectrometrist or researcher can use this playground to quickly assemble custom scripts for their particular purpose. In this way, the data in these RAW files can be mined much more readily and directly by the user, and fast, automated raw data extraction or analysis can finally become part of the daily routine of the mass spectrometrist. PMID:26477298

      6. Global News VILLAGE: A Case Study Explication of Targeted Tutorial Development

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Schmitz, Dawn M.; Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke

        2005-01-01

        The Global News VILLAGE (Virtual Information Literacy Learning and Growing Environment) is an online tutorial developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to help undergraduates learn how to use the library to find current information about global events and issues. Supporting the interdisciplinary Global Studies curriculum, the…

      7. Characterizing popularity dynamics of online videos

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Shi, Yu-Qiang; Liao, Hao

        2016-07-01

        Online popularity has a major impact on videos, music, news and other contexts in online systems. Characterizing online popularity dynamics is nature to explain the observed properties in terms of the already acquired popularity of each individual. In this paper, we provide a quantitative, large scale, temporal analysis of the popularity dynamics in two online video-provided websites, namely MovieLens and Netflix. The two collected data sets contain over 100 million records and even span a decade. We characterize that the popularity dynamics of online videos evolve over time, and find that the dynamics of the online video popularity can be characterized by the burst behaviors, typically occurring in the early life span of a video, and later restricting to the classic preferential popularity increase mechanism.

      8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: FAUST sources in NGC 4038-39 and 6752 direction (Daniels+, 2001)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Daniels, J.; Brosch, N.; Almoznino, E.; Shemmer, O.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.

        2001-08-01

        Analysis of ultraviolet (UV) observations with the FAUST shuttle-borne telescope toward the Antennae and NGC 6752 celestial regions resulted in the detection of 46 and 221 candidate sources respectively, for a signal-to-noise ratio of 8. We discuss the source detection process and the identification of UV sources with optical counterparts. Using correlations with existing catalogues, we present reliable identifications for approximately 60 per cent of the sources. We find that most identified objects are B, A and F stars. The remaining identified objects are galaxies, a white dwarf in a binary system, and two K-type stars. Nearly all of the remaining unidentified objects have assigned optical counterparts but, lacking additional information, we give these only as best estimates. With help from new diagnostic diagrams, we suggest that these unclassified objects are main-sequence (or giant) stars within the local spiral arm or halo; or other hot evolved objects within the local spiral arm. We discuss the nature of the objects found and compare our results with those predicted from spectral and Galactic models. (5 data files).

      9. Sources and characteristics of fine particles over the Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea using online single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

        PubMed

        Fu, Huaiyu; Zheng, Mei; Yan, Caiqing; Li, Xiaoying; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yuanhang

        2015-03-01

        Marine aerosols over the East China Seas are heavily polluted by continental sources. During the Chinese Comprehensive Ocean Experiment in November 2012, size and mass spectra of individual atmospheric particles in the size range from 0.2 to 2.0 μm were measured on board by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS). The average hourly particle number (PN) was around 4560±3240 in the South Yellow Sea (SYS), 2900±3970 in the North Yellow Sea (NYS), and 1700±2220 in the Bohai Sea (BS). PN in NYS and BS varied greatly over 3 orders of magnitude, while that in SYS varied slightly. The size distributions were fitted with two log-normal modes. Accumulation mode dominated in NYS and BS, especially during episodic periods. Coarse mode particles played an important role in SYS. Particles were classified using an adaptive resonance theory based neural network algorithm (ART-2a). Six particle types were identified with secondary-containing, aged sea-salt, soot-like, biomass burning, fresh sea-salt, and lead-containing particles accounting for 32%, 21%, 18%, 16%, 4%, and 3% of total PN, respectively. Aerosols in BS were relatively enriched in particles from anthropogenic sources compared to SYS, probably due to emissions from more developed upwind regions and indicating stronger influence of continental outflow on marine environment. Variation of source types depended mainly on origins of transported air masses. This study examined rapid changes in PN, size distribution and source types of fine particles in marine atmospheres. It also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-time-resolution source apportionment by ART-2a.

      10. Sources and characteristics of fine particles over the Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea using online single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

        PubMed

        Fu, Huaiyu; Zheng, Mei; Yan, Caiqing; Li, Xiaoying; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yuanhang

        2015-03-01

        Marine aerosols over the East China Seas are heavily polluted by continental sources. During the Chinese Comprehensive Ocean Experiment in November 2012, size and mass spectra of individual atmospheric particles in the size range from 0.2 to 2.0 μm were measured on board by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS). The average hourly particle number (PN) was around 4560±3240 in the South Yellow Sea (SYS), 2900±3970 in the North Yellow Sea (NYS), and 1700±2220 in the Bohai Sea (BS). PN in NYS and BS varied greatly over 3 orders of magnitude, while that in SYS varied slightly. The size distributions were fitted with two log-normal modes. Accumulation mode dominated in NYS and BS, especially during episodic periods. Coarse mode particles played an important role in SYS. Particles were classified using an adaptive resonance theory based neural network algorithm (ART-2a). Six particle types were identified with secondary-containing, aged sea-salt, soot-like, biomass burning, fresh sea-salt, and lead-containing particles accounting for 32%, 21%, 18%, 16%, 4%, and 3% of total PN, respectively. Aerosols in BS were relatively enriched in particles from anthropogenic sources compared to SYS, probably due to emissions from more developed upwind regions and indicating stronger influence of continental outflow on marine environment. Variation of source types depended mainly on origins of transported air masses. This study examined rapid changes in PN, size distribution and source types of fine particles in marine atmospheres. It also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-time-resolution source apportionment by ART-2a. PMID:25766014

      11. Youth and violence on local television news in California.

        PubMed Central

        Dorfman, L; Woodruff, K; Chavez, V; Wallack, L

        1997-01-01

        OBJECTIVES: This study explores how local television news structures the public and policy debate on youth violence. METHODS: A content analysis was performed on 214 hours of local television news from California. Each of the 1791 stories concerning youth, violence, or both was coded and analyzed for whether it included a public health perspective. RESULTS: There were five key findings. First, violence dominated local television news coverage. Second, the specifics of particular crimes dominated coverage of violence. Third, over half of the stories on youth involved violence, while more than two thirds of the violence stories concerned youth. Fourth, episodic coverage of violence was more than five times more frequent than thematic coverage, which included links to broader social factors. Finally, only one story had an explicit public health frame. CONCLUSIONS: Local television news provides extremely limited coverage of contributing etiological factors in stories on violence. If our nation's most popular source of news continues to report on violence primarily through crime stories isolated from their social context, the chance for widespread support for public health solutions to violence will be diminished. PMID:9279266

      12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio-X-ray sources in the HDF(N) region. (Richards+, 2007)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Richards, A. M. S.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Beswick, R.; Allen, M. G.; Benson, K.; Dickson, R. C.; Garrett, M. A.; Garrington, S. T.; Gonzalez-Solarez, E.; Harrison, P. A.; Holloway, A. J.; Kettenis, M. M.; Laing, R. A.; Richards, E. A.; Thrall, H.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Walton, N. A.; Wilkinson, P. N.; Winstanley, N.

        2007-09-01

        This catalogue lists the properties of 62 radio sources in the Hubble Deep Field (North) and Flanking Fields (HDFN) which were also detected by the Chandra X-ray satellite (see Alexander et al., 2003, Cat. , file cdfn). This includes 55/92 sources brighter than 40uJy detected by MERLIN+VLA at 1.4GHz (see Muxlow et al., 2005, Cat. , Richards, 2000, Cat. ); some were also detected by the VLA at 8.4GHz (Richards et al., 1998AJ....116.1039R) including 7 selected at this frequency. The cross-matching, derivation of properties and analysis are described fully in the paper. The radio data have a positional accuracy of 15 mas with respect to the ICRS (Muxlow et al., 2005, Cat. ) but data using the GOODS HST ACS (Giavalisco et al., 2004, Cat. ) positions requires a shift of -342mas in Declination for alignment with the ICRS. We use measurements taken from the radio observations and from the literature to compile the flux densities, sizes and spectral/photon indices of the cross-matched radio+X-ray sources and their redshifts (where available), enabling us to derive the rest-frame luminosities. The 1.4-GHz detections are all resolved at 0.2-2arcsec resolution. The radio emission was classified using the source morphologies and radio spectral indices; optical and IR information was used as supporting evidence only. On this basis, starbursts outnumber radio AGN 3:1. The high-redshift starbursts have typical sizes of 5-10kpc and star formation rates of around 1000 Msun/yr, an order of magnitude more extended and intense than in the local universe. The X-ray sources are unresolved but their luminosity and spectral indices allows X-ray AGN and obscured (Type II) AGN to be identified (2004A&A...424..545P). In this way, we can distinguish between the origins of radio and X-ray emission from the same object. There is no obvious correlation between radio and X-ray luminosities nor spectral indices at z>1.3. About 70% of both the radio-selected AGN and the starburst samples were

      13. Exposure to Political Diversity Online

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Munson, Sean A.

        2012-01-01

        The Internet gives individuals more choice in political news and information sources and more tools to filter out disagreeable information. Citing the preference described by selective exposure theory--that people see and attend to information that supports their beliefs and avoid counter-attitudinal information--observers warn that people may use…

      14. Advanced source apportionment of PM2.5 using online mass spectrometry in two major cities in China

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Prevot, Andre S. H.; Elser, Miram; Huang, Rujin; Slowik, Jay; Wang, Qiyuan; Canonaco, Francesco; Bozzetti, Carlo; Cao, Junji; Baltensperger, Urs; El Haddad, Imad

        2016-04-01

        During winter 2013-2014 aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements were conducted in two major cities of China: Xi'an and Beijing. The AMS was equipped with a recently developed aerodynamic lens for direct measurements of the PM2.5 fraction for the first time in Asia (Williams et al., 2013). We could show that around 40% of the mass is lost using a conventional PM1 inlet. The statistical tool multi-linear engine 2 using constrained positive matrix factorization was used to derive the sources of organic aerosols. During the more extreme haze periods, 537 and 243 ug/m3 were recorded in Xi'an and Beijing respectively. The main results include a dominance of coal combustion in Beijing of the primary organic aerosols with a contribution of more than 90% to the cancerogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons. In Xi'an primary wood burning was a more important source. In both cities, an increase of secondary organic aerosols could be observed. The results including uncertainties will be discussed and put in perspective of previous analyses of haze in northern China including our previous analysis published in Nature (Huang et al., 2014). The study can be used as a role model for future similar analyses in Asia where the emission sources are highly complex. Huang, R.J., Cao, J.J., El Haddad, I. and Prévôt A.S.H. et al. (2014) Nature 514, 218-222. Williams, L.R., Prévôt, A.S.H., Worsnop, D.R. et al. (2013) Atmos. Meas. Tech. 6, 3271-3280.

      15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fluxes of Faint Radio Sources at 2.7/4.75 GHz (Forkert+, 1987)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Forkert, T.; Altschuler, D. R.

        1999-04-01

        This table is a compilation of revised 4.75 GHz and 2.695 GHz flux densities and corresponding spectral indices at epoch 1986.2 of a catalog of 239 sources, which has previously been published by Forkert and Altschuler, (1987A&AS...70...77F). It comprises 209 sources (marked 'A'), forming a complete, flux density limited sample above 50 mJy at 4.76 GHz in 1981.9 (Altschuler, 1986A&AS...65..267A), and 30 sources (marked 'a') below this limit, but with 5.0 GHz flux densities from 1971.0 (Davis, 1971AJ.....76..980D). The catalogue covers a narrow strip of the sky around declination of 33 degrees. The flux densities were calibrated with 3C286 on the scale of Kellermann, Pauliny-Toth and Williams (1969ApJ...157....1K). After publication of the catalog a statistical analysis for flux density variability in the data has been performed (Forkert, 1990), using 6cm flux density measurements of Davis (1971AJ.....76..980D) and Altschuler (1986A&AS...65..267A) and the 2.695 GHz flux densities of Pauliny-Toth et al. (1974A&A....35..421P), the details and results of which are going to be published elsewhere (Altschuler & Forkert, in preparation). For the purposes of this analysis it has become necessary to obtain more individual error estimates of the 1986.2 data, not dominated by the effect of overall scale errors. This revision for some of the sources also led to slightly different flux densities from those previously published. The variability study proved the flux density errors to represent the individual 1-sigma uncertainties, WITHOUT the effect of overall scale errors. From the aforementioned comparison with other measurements scale errors of ~1% at 2.695 GHz and ~3% at 4.75 GHz seem likely. (1 data file).

      16. In the News: Current Events Websites.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Byerly, Greg; Brodie, Carolyn S.

        2002-01-01

        Reviews Web sites for current events news that are appropriate for students of various ages. Discusses the possibilities for second language learning and curriculum connections and lists television sites, news magazines, classroom magazines, newspapers, and lesson plans. (LRW)

      17. Biodegradation of news inks

        SciTech Connect

        Erhan, S.Z.; Bagby, M.O.

        1995-12-01

        Printing ink vehicles that require no petroleum components were prepared by modifying vegetable oil. Physical properties of inks formulated with these vehicles meet or exceed the industry standards for lithographic and letterpress newsprint applications. Elimination of petroleum-based resin and reduced pigment requirements, due to the light vehicle color, provide a competitively priced alternative to petroleum-based inks of equal quality. These ink vehicles, made exclusively from soybean oil, were subjected to biodegradation, and the results were compared with those obtained with commercial vehicles. Results show that they degrade faster and more completely than commercial hybrid (partial) soy or mineral oil based vehicles. Fermentations were allowed to proceed for 5, 12, and 25 days. Both mono-and mixed cultures of microorganisms commonly found in soil were used. In 25 days, commercial mineral oil based vehicles degraded 17-27%, while commercial hybrid soy oil based vehicles degraded 58-68% and our 100% soy oil based vehicles degrade 82-92%. Similar studies were conducted with commercial news inks consisting of soy or mineral oil with petroleum resins along with the four colored pigments and USDA`s 100% soy oil based ink consisting of modified soybean oil and pigment. Results show that pigment slowed the degradation of ink vehicles; however, neither time nor type of pigment played a significant role. Also these inks were degraded by using {open_quotes}Modified Sturm Test{close_quotes} (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). In this method, test organisms were obtained from activated sludge, and the extent of degradation was determined by measuring carbon dioxide evolution. In all cases USDA`s ink degraded faster and more completely (for all four colors) than either hybrid soy oil based or petroleum based inks.

      18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Monitoring compact radio sources at 2.5 + 8.2GHz (Lazio+, 2001)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Lazio, T. J. W.; Waltman, E. B.; Ghigo, F. D.; Fiedler, R. L.; Foster, R. S.; Johnston, K. J.

        2002-01-01

        We present light curves for 149 sources monitored with the Green Bank Interferometer. The light curves are at two radio frequencies (approximately 2.5 and 8.2GHz) and range from 3 to 15yr in length, covering the interval 1979-1996, and have a typical sampling of one flux density measurement every 2 days. Observations were made on a 2.4km baseline. Dual circular polarization was recorded over a 35MHz bandwidth at two frequencies in the S and X frequency bands. Until 1989 August (1989.7), the frequencies were 2.7GHz (S band) and 8.1GHz (X band); in 1989 September cryogenic receivers were installed, and the frequencies changed to 2.25GHz (S band) and 8.3GHz (X band). (2 data files).

      19. Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Lawson, P. R.; Malbet, F.

        2005-12-01

        The Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News is a website and forum for scientists, engineers, and students who share an interest in long baseline stellar interferometry. It was established in 1995 and is the focus of activity of the IAU Working Group on Optical/Infrared Interferometry. Here you will find links to projects devoted to stellar interferometry, news items, recent papers and preprints, and resources for further research. The email news forum was established in 2001 to complement the website and to facilitate exchanges and collaborations. The forum includes an email exploder and an archived list of discussions. You are invited to explore the forum and website at http://olbin.jpl.nasa.gov. Work by PRL was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

      20. "...And Now A Story about Today's News."

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Hornstein, Harvey A.

        The news media plays an important role in shaping opinions about the character of American society. Through the news, people learn about the prevalence of human benevolence or malevolence. The author conducted several tests to evaluate the effects of news on individuals of various ages and backgrounds. Experimental groups were told that they would…

      1. Muffled Drums: The News Media in Africa.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Hachten, William A.

        This book examines the news media of modern Africa--newspapers, radio, television, news agencies, and magazines. The first half of the book presents a general overview of African news media, including the following topics: the context of Africa as related to the media, the background of each form of media, government involvement, the patterns of…

      2. A Reconsideration of Bias in the News.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Stevenson, Robert L.; Greene, Mark T.

        1980-01-01

        Discusses conceptual problems with the traditional approach to the study of news bias; reports on a study conducted with 73 college students, which yielded data supporting the thesis that what news consumers see as biased news is often material that is discrepant with what they already believe. (GT)

      3. Network Evening News Coverage of Environmental Risk.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Greenberg, Michael R.; And Others

        Focusing on ABC, NBC, and CBS's evening news broadcasts from January 1984 through February 1986, a study examined network news coverage of environmental risk--defined as manmade chemical, biological, and physical agents that create risk in the indoor, outdoor, and occupational environments. Using the Vanderbilt University "Television News Index…

      4. Making the News: Jobs in TV Journalism

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Csorny, Lauren

        2009-01-01

        What do TV news workers do each day? For many of them, contributing to daily news broadcasts has changed greatly over the years. This evolution will likely continue for years to come. And more changes to news production are expected, according to Tom Weir, an associate professor at the University of South Carolina's School of Journalism and Mass…

      5. Perceptions of Advertising Influence on Broadcast News.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Brown, Hubert W.; Barnes, Beth E.

        2001-01-01

        Finds that while students (studying broadcast journalism or advertising) and practitioners (station news directors and agency media directors) were in agreement on the majority of opinion statements discussing advertising's influence on broadcast news content, except students were less bothered by advertising's influence on news content than were…

      6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GOODS Source Catalogs release r2.0z (Giavalisco+ 2008)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Giavalisco, M.

        2012-09-01

        These catalogs, prepared using the SExtractor package (Bertin & Arnouts 1996A&AS..117..393B), are based on the version v2.0 of the reduced, calibrated, stacked and mosaiced images acquired with HST and ACS as part of the GOODS ACS Treasury program and of the PANS program of search for Type Ia supernovae at high redshift. It supersedes the "Initial Results" version (Giavalisco et al. 2004ApJ...600L..93G, Cat. II/261) The catalogs are z-band based, that is, source detection has been made using the z-band images. A variety of photometric apertures defined during the detection process have then been used as "fixed apertures" in the i, v and b-band images to derive the multi-band photometry. The r2.0z catalog release is based on the v2.0 images, which have significantly longer total exposure times in the z850 bandpass, and somewhat longer exposure times in the i775 and V606 bands as well. The only significant difference in the catalogs, other than that of being based on deeper data, is that a small astrometric offset was applied to the declination of GOODS-North images (only), from a comparison with SDSS, 2MASS and VLA (Morrison et al. 2010, Cat. J/ApJS/188/178): Dec(v2.0)=Dec(v1.0)-0.320arcsec (8 data files).

      7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Compact radio sources within 30" of Sgr A* (Yusef-Zadeh+, 2015)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Bushouse, H.; Schodel, R.; Wardle, M.; Cotton, W.; Roberts, D. A.; Nogueras-Lara, F.; Gallego-Cano, E.

        2016-04-01

        We obtained two sets of A-array observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). The first set of observations of the stellar cluster at the Galactic center were obtained on 2011 July 8-9 and 2011 August 31-September 1 at 44GHz (program 11A-224). Further details of these first-epoch observations are given in Yusef-Zadeh et al. (2014ApJ...792L...1Y). We reobserved the region within 30" of Sgr A* on 2014 February 21, again using the VLA in its A-configuration at 44GHz. We also carried out A-array observations (program 14A-232) in the Ka (9mm) band on 2014 March 9 at 34.5GHz. We searched for NIR counterparts to compact radio sources using high-angular resolution AOs assisted imaging observations acquired with the VLT/NACO (NAos-COnica). A Ks-band (central wavelength 2.18um) image was obtained in a rectangular dither pattern on 2012 September 12. L'-band (3.8um) observations were obtained during various observing runs between 2012 June and September. (1 data file).

      8. Network television news coverage of environmental risks

        SciTech Connect

        Greenberg, M.R.; Sandman, P.M.; Sachsman, D.V.; Salomone, K.L.

        1989-03-01

        Despite the criticisms that surround television coverage of environmental risk, there have been relatively few attempts to measure what and whom television shows. Most research has focused analysis on a few weeks of coverage of major stories like the gas leak at Bhopal, the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, or the Mount St. Helen's eruption. To advance the research into television coverage of environmental risk, an analysis has been made of all environmental risk coverage by the network nightly news broadcasts for a period of more than two years. Researchers have analyzed all environmental risk coverage-564 stories in 26 months-presented on ABC, CBS, and NBC's evening news broadcasts from January 1984 through February 1986. The quantitative information from the 564 stories was balanced by a more qualitative analysis of the television coverage of two case studies-the dioxin contamination in Times Beach, Missouri, and the suspected methyl isocyanate emissions from the Union Carbide plant in Institute, West Virginia. Both qualitative and quantitative data contributed to the analysis of the role played by experts and environmental advocacy sources in coverage of environmental risk and to the suggestions for increasing that role.

      9. Who Is the Biggest Loser? Fat News Coverage Is a Barrier to Healthy Lifestyle Promotion.

        PubMed

        Previte, Josephine; Gurrieri, Lauren

        2015-01-01

        Through a textual and visual analysis of online news stories and public commentary about fat bodies, this article provides insights into the media's reporting on the "war on obesity." It identifies the stigmatizing role that the media plays. Specifically, the media draws on five key discourses in constructing fat bodies: pathologized, gazed upon, marginalized, controlled, and gendered. As news media coverage influences how society views health and policy issues, we argue that social marketers need to take an active role in changing the public's antifat attitudes through healthy lifestyle promotion tactics and strategies that reduce weight stigma. PMID:26674258

      10. Online Degrees.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Dolezalek, Holly

        2003-01-01

        Discusses the trend of trainers who are getting degrees through online courses delivered via the Internet. Addresses accreditation issues and what to ask before enrolling in online degree programs. (JOW)

      11. [Analysis on Emission Inventory and Temporal-Spatial Characteristics of Pollutants from Key Coal-Fired Stationary Sources in Jiangsu Province by On-Line Monitoring Data].

        PubMed

        Zhang, Ying-jie; Kong, Shao-fei; Tang, Li-li; Zhao, Tian-liang; Han, Yong-xiang; Yu, Hong-xia

        2015-08-01

        Emission inventory of air pollutants is the key to understand the spatial and temporal distribution of atmospheric pollutants and to accurately simulate the ambient air quality. The currently established emission inventories are still limited on spatial and temporal resolution which greatly influences the numerical prediction accuracy of air quality. With coal-fired stationary sources considered, this study analyzed the total emissions and monthly variation of main pollutants from them in 2012 as the basic year, by collecting the on-line monitoring data for power plants and atmospheric verifiable accounting tables of Jiangsu Province. Emission factors in documents are summarized and adopted. Results indicated that the emission amounts of SO2, NOx, TSP, PM10, PM2.5, CO, EC, OC, NMVOC and NH3 were 106.0, 278.3, 40.9, 32.7, 21.7, 582.0, 3.6, 2.5, 17.3 and 2.2 kt, respectively. They presented monthly variation with high emission amounts in February, March, July, August and December and low emissions in September and October. The reason may be that more coal are consumed which leads to the increase of pollutants emitted, to satisfy the needs, of heat and electricity power supply in cold and hot periods. Local emission factors are needed for emission inventory studies and the monthly variation should be considered when emission inventories are used in air quality simulation. PMID:26592003

      12. [Analysis on Emission Inventory and Temporal-Spatial Characteristics of Pollutants from Key Coal-Fired Stationary Sources in Jiangsu Province by On-Line Monitoring Data].

        PubMed

        Zhang, Ying-jie; Kong, Shao-fei; Tang, Li-li; Zhao, Tian-liang; Han, Yong-xiang; Yu, Hong-xia

        2015-08-01

        Emission inventory of air pollutants is the key to understand the spatial and temporal distribution of atmospheric pollutants and to accurately simulate the ambient air quality. The currently established emission inventories are still limited on spatial and temporal resolution which greatly influences the numerical prediction accuracy of air quality. With coal-fired stationary sources considered, this study analyzed the total emissions and monthly variation of main pollutants from them in 2012 as the basic year, by collecting the on-line monitoring data for power plants and atmospheric verifiable accounting tables of Jiangsu Province. Emission factors in documents are summarized and adopted. Results indicated that the emission amounts of SO2, NOx, TSP, PM10, PM2.5, CO, EC, OC, NMVOC and NH3 were 106.0, 278.3, 40.9, 32.7, 21.7, 582.0, 3.6, 2.5, 17.3 and 2.2 kt, respectively. They presented monthly variation with high emission amounts in February, March, July, August and December and low emissions in September and October. The reason may be that more coal are consumed which leads to the increase of pollutants emitted, to satisfy the needs, of heat and electricity power supply in cold and hot periods. Local emission factors are needed for emission inventory studies and the monthly variation should be considered when emission inventories are used in air quality simulation.

      13. E-SovTox: An online database of the main publicly-available sources of toxicity data concerning REACH-relevant chemicals published in the Russian language.

        PubMed

        Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Blinova, Irina; Aruoja, Villem; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Legrand, Nicolas; Kahru, Anne

        2010-08-01

        A new open-access online database, E-SovTox, is presented. E-SovTox provides toxicological data for substances relevant to the EU Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) system, from publicly-available Russian language data sources. The database contains information selected mainly from scientific journals published during the Soviet Union era. The main information source for this database - the journal, Gigiena Truda i Professional'nye Zabolevania [Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Diseases], published between 1957 and 1992 - features acute, but also chronic, toxicity data for numerous industrial chemicals, e.g. for rats, mice, guinea-pigs and rabbits. The main goal of the abovementioned toxicity studies was to derive the maximum allowable concentration limits for industrial chemicals in the occupational health settings of the former Soviet Union. Thus, articles featured in the database include mostly data on LD50 values, skin and eye irritation, skin sensitisation and cumulative properties. Currently, the E-SovTox database contains toxicity data selected from more than 500 papers covering more than 600 chemicals. The user is provided with the main toxicity information, as well as abstracts of these papers in Russian and in English (given as provided in the original publication). The search engine allows cross-searching of the database by the name or CAS number of the compound, and the author of the paper. The E-SovTox database can be used as a decision-support tool by researchers and regulators for the hazard assessment of chemical substances. PMID:20822322

      14. Science News of the Year.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Science News, 1990

        1990-01-01

        This is a review of important science news stories of 1990 as reported in the pages of this journal. Areas covered include anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, computers and math, earth sciences, environment, food science, materials science, paleobiology, physics, science and society, and space sciences. (CW)

      15. NABE News, 2000-2001.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Sosa, Alicia, Ed.

        2001-01-01

        This document contains the 2000-2001 issues of the "NABE News," a magazine about bilingual education. The theme of each issue is: (1) "Back to School: Anti-Bilingual Ballot Initiatives To Affect Thousands of LEP Students"; (2) "Serving Emerging Populations: School Districts Re-Tool To Respond to New Students' Needs"; (3) "NABE Celebrates 25 Years…

      16. Global Awareness through Video News.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        MacDonald, Errol

        At Tokai University (Japan), an English-as-a-Second-Language course in global issues through video uses the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's monthly video magazine "News in Review", published eight months a year for use in Canadian English-medium schools. Of the four segments in each magazine, usually two are about Canada or international…

      17. How to Tell Bad News

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Long, Nicholas J.

        2012-01-01

        Therapists, physicians, police officers, and emergency staff often are the messengers of bad news. They have to tell a patient, a parent, or a loved one about a death, an accident, a school shooting, a life-threatening diagnosis, a terrorist attack, or a suicide. Usually the messenger bears a heavy responsibility but has little training and seeks…

      18. Science News of the Year.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Science News, 1985

        1985-01-01

        Highlights important 1985 science stories appearing in "Science News" under these headings: anthropology and paleontology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, computers and mathematics, earth sciences, environment, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. Each entry includes the volume and page number in…

      19. Science News of the Year

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Science News, 1974

        1974-01-01

        Presents a review of important science articles of 1974 as reported in the pages of "Science News." References are given relating to the volume and page number in which the main article appeared. Life-sciences, physical sciences, earth science, environmental science, humanities and technology research are reviewed. (EB)

      20. Campus Child Care News, 1998.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Newton, Marion F., Ed.

        1998-01-01

        This document is comprised of the three 1998 issues of a newsletter disseminating information on the National Coalition for Campus Child Care Centers (NCCCC) and providing a forum for news, research, and information concerning campus child care centers. The February issue contains stories on the White House Conference on Child Care, registration…

      1. The Aesthetics of News. Revised.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Glasser, Theodore L.

        That every community needs its own distinctive newspaper is the conclusion drawn in this review of the literature on journalism and communication. Following a summary of John Dewey's definition of democracy in the introduction, the first section of the paper points out the conflict that newspapers experience in trying to be a news source…

      2. News from Online: Digging up Earth Day Resources

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Coldwell, Bernadette A.

        2006-01-01

        The soil science and soil chemistry is incorporated into teaching materials for earth day and beyond. It revealed some of the chemical properties of the soil through color and texture and the chemical processes relevant to soils abound, including the carbon and nitrogen cycles in the soil, acidification of soils through acid deposition, leaching…

      3. News from Online: Cleaning Up--Soap, Detergent, and More.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Judd, Carolyn Sweeney

        2002-01-01

        Provides a guide to web resources on cleaning and hygiene. Answers the questions, What do you want to clean--your hair? your carpet? your rusty lawn furniture? Develops special products for different tasks. Focuses on products to use and the environmental impact of our choices. (MM)

      4. Civic Journalism and Nonelite Sourcing: Making Routine Newswork of Community Connectedness.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Massey, Brian L.

        1998-01-01

        Compares the number of "average" citizens brought into the news in three newspapers. Finds nonelite information sources in numerical parity with elite sources in a civic-journalism newspaper, but finds the frequency and directness of their news voices largely unchanged. Finds that routine civic journalism did more to tone down elites' news-voice…

      5. And the good news...?

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        1999-11-01

        Along with the increase in the number of young people applying to enter higher education announced back in July, the UK Department for Education and Employment noted that over a thousand more graduates had applied for postgraduate teacher training when compared with the same time in 1998. It appeared that the `Golden hello' programme for new mathematics and science teachers had succeeded in its aim of encouraging applicants in those subjects: an increase of 37% had been witnessed for maths teaching, 33% for physics and 27% for chemistry. Primary teacher training was also well on target with over five applicants seeking each available place. Statistics for UK schools released in August by the DfEE show that 62% of primary schools and 93% of secondary schools are now linked to the Internet (the corresponding figures were 17% and 83% in 1998). On average there is now one computer for every 13 pupils at primary school and one for every eight students in secondary school. The figures show continuing progress towards the Government's target of ensuring that all schools, colleges, universities, libraries and as many community centres as possible should be online (with access to the National Grid for Learning) by 2002.

      6. Media Literacy: Good News

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Kenner, Adam; Rivera, Sheryl

        2007-01-01

        Media has always had the power to affect people on a nonverbal and emotional level. At its best, it can be a source of aesthetic pleasure and deep personal satisfaction. At its worst, citizens and consumers are exposed to psychological and political manipulation which may make them anxious and depressed, dissatisfied with what they have,…

      7. Enhancing News Literacy

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Quinn, Lena Consolini

        2009-01-01

        A revolution in media has sparked an explosion of information, thanks largely to the Internet. Despite the apparent gains in diversity of perspective and ease of access to information, the concern over the reliability of sources extends particularly to youth consumers and their ability to decipher the truth amidst this vast array of media…

      8. Identifying Event Impacts by Monitoring the News Media

        SciTech Connect

        Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E

        2008-01-01

        Assessing the potential property and social impacts of an event, such as tornado or wildfire, continues to be a challenging research area. From financial markets to disaster management to epidemiology, the importance of understanding the impacts that events create cannot be understated. Our work describes an approach to fuse information from multiple sources, then to analyze the information cycles to identify prior temporal patterns related to the impact of an event. This approach is then applied to the analysis of news reports from multiple news sources pertaining to several different natural disasters. Results show that our approach can project the severity of the impacts of certain natural disasters, such as heat waves on droughts and wild fires. In addition, results show that specific types of disaster consistently produce similar impacts when each time they occur.

      9. One year online measurements of water-soluble ions at the industrially polluted town of Nanjing, China: Sources, seasonal and diurnal variations.

        PubMed

        Wang, Honglei; An, Junlin; Cheng, Mengtian; Shen, Lijuan; Zhu, Bin; Li, Yi; Wang, Yuesi; Duan, Qing; Sullivan, Amy; Xia, Li

        2016-04-01

        Half-hourly mass concentrations water-soluble ions (WSIs) and PM2.5 were measured online a Rapid Collector of Fine Particles and Ion Chromatography system (RCFP-IC) and FH62C14 Continuous Particulate Monitor in Nanjing from October 18, 2013 to November 17, 2014. The WSIs concentration ranged from 7.07 to 333.42 μg m(-3) with an annual mean of 76.32 μg m(-3). The WSIs ranked in the order of SO4(2-) > NH4(+) > NO3(-) > Cl(-) > NO2(-) > K(+) > Ca(2+) > Na(+) > Mg(2+). The PM2.5 concentration ranged from 4.00 to 400 μg m(-3) with an annual mean of 83.58 μg m(-3). The concentrations of WSIs varied in the order of winter (115.77 μg m(-3)) > spring (76.10 μg m(-3)) > autumn (63.72 μg m(-3)) > summer (59.75 μg m(-3)), with the highest level in January (123.99 μg m(-3)) and lowest level in August (43.73 μg m(-3)). Different WSIs had distinct diurnal variations. The source analysis of the WSIs in the PCA/APCS mode illustrated that the sources consisted of secondary aerosol, coal combustion, mineral dust, biomass burning, traffic emissions and sea salt. In addition, there were seasonal variations amongst the various sources. The haze formation mechanism was different in summer and winter. The winter was dominated by NH4NO3 (18.56%), (NH4)2SO4 (28.63%), NH4(+) (11.27%), SO4(2-) (18.35%) and NO3(-) (13.13%), and by NH3 (25.93%), (NH4)2SO4 (13.37%), SO4(2-) (15.74%) and NO3(-) (9.97%) in summer. Consequently, the proportions of HCl, HNO3, NH4(+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) were much larger during haze episodes in winter, while it was dominated by NH4NO3, NH4(+), (NH4)2SO4, SO4(2-) and NO3(-) during summer haze episodes.

      10. Political science. Exposure to ideologically diverse news and opinion on Facebook.

        PubMed

        Bakshy, Eytan; Messing, Solomon; Adamic, Lada A

        2015-06-01

        Exposure to news, opinion, and civic information increasingly occurs through social media. How do these online networks influence exposure to perspectives that cut across ideological lines? Using deidentified data, we examined how 10.1 million U.S. Facebook users interact with socially shared news. We directly measured ideological homophily in friend networks and examined the extent to which heterogeneous friends could potentially expose individuals to cross-cutting content. We then quantified the extent to which individuals encounter comparatively more or less diverse content while interacting via Facebook's algorithmically ranked News Feed and further studied users' choices to click through to ideologically discordant content. Compared with algorithmic ranking, individuals' choices played a stronger role in limiting exposure to cross-cutting content.

      11. Lognormal infection times of online information spread.

        PubMed

        Doerr, Christian; Blenn, Norbert; Van Mieghem, Piet

        2013-01-01

        The infection times of individuals in online information spread such as the inter-arrival time of Twitter messages or the propagation time of news stories on a social media site can be explained through a convolution of lognormally distributed observation and reaction times of the individual participants. Experimental measurements support the lognormal shape of the individual contributing processes, and have resemblance to previously reported lognormal distributions of human behavior and contagious processes. PMID:23700473

      12. To Kill a Messenger; Television News and the Real World.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Small, William

        From his vantage point as News Director of CBS News in Washington, the author examines the role of television news in our society and gives an insider's view of the day-to-day process of selecting and presenting news. Highlighting the book are in-depth discussions of past and recent news events. The Nixon "Checkers" speech, John Kennedy's fight to…

      13. How to Write News for Broadcast and Print Media.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Dary, David

        This book is a primer on the techniques of news writing and the application of those principles to print and broadcast journalism. Chapters include: "The News Media," which presents a brief history of journalism and the foundations on which it is based; "What Is News?"; "Gathering News," which discusses news beats, reporters' qualifications, and…

      14. Consequences of Play: A Systematic Review of the Effects of Online Gaming

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Sublette, Victoria Anne; Mullan, Barbara

        2012-01-01

        Massively Multiplayer Online Games (MMOGs) have received considerable attention in news headlines describing gamers who have died while engaging in excessive play. However, more common physical and psychosocial effects attributed to online video gaming are social isolation, increased aggression, and negative academic and occupational consequences.…

      15. Biofantasies: genetics and medicine in the print news media.

        PubMed

        Petersen, A

        2001-04-01

        The contemporary news media is an important site for exploring the diverse and complex cultural images of genetics and its medical possibilities, and of the mechanisms by which these images are (re) produced and sustained. This article investigates how the print news media 'frames' stories on genetics and medicine. It is based on a discourse analysis of articles appearing in three Australian newspapers in the late 1990s. Gene stories were found to be prominent in each of the newspapers, and to emphasise the medical benefits of genetic research. Stories frequently cite and quote scientists, who explain the nature and significance of the research and/or its implications for treatment or prevention. Many stories focus on new genetic discoveries, and portray genetic researchers as involved in a quest to unlock nature's secrets. Stories of hope, and depictions of geneticists as warriors or heroes, appear regularly. The positive vision of genetics is supported by the use of particular metaphors, accompanying illustrative material, 'human interest' stories, and reference to credible sources. There is rarely mention of the influence of non-genetic factors and 'multifactorial' interactions on disorders, or questioning of the goals, direction, methods, or value of genetic research. Scientists made extensive use of the media in their efforts to maintain a positive image of research in the face of public concerns about scientists 'going too far', following the announcement of the cloning of Dolly. Boundaries were drawn between 'therapeutic cloning'--implicitly defined as 'good', useful, and legitimate--and 'reproductive cloning'--seen as 'bad', dangerous, and illegitimate. By framing news stories as they do, the print news media are likely to exert a powerful influence on public responses to health problems. With new genetic technologies becoming more integrated in preventive medicine and public health, it is important to investigate how news stories help shape the agenda for

      16. Biofantasies: genetics and medicine in the print news media.

        PubMed

        Petersen, A

        2001-04-01

        The contemporary news media is an important site for exploring the diverse and complex cultural images of genetics and its medical possibilities, and of the mechanisms by which these images are (re) produced and sustained. This article investigates how the print news media 'frames' stories on genetics and medicine. It is based on a discourse analysis of articles appearing in three Australian newspapers in the late 1990s. Gene stories were found to be prominent in each of the newspapers, and to emphasise the medical benefits of genetic research. Stories frequently cite and quote scientists, who explain the nature and significance of the research and/or its implications for treatment or prevention. Many stories focus on new genetic discoveries, and portray genetic researchers as involved in a quest to unlock nature's secrets. Stories of hope, and depictions of geneticists as warriors or heroes, appear regularly. The positive vision of genetics is supported by the use of particular metaphors, accompanying illustrative material, 'human interest' stories, and reference to credible sources. There is rarely mention of the influence of non-genetic factors and 'multifactorial' interactions on disorders, or questioning of the goals, direction, methods, or value of genetic research. Scientists made extensive use of the media in their efforts to maintain a positive image of research in the face of public concerns about scientists 'going too far', following the announcement of the cloning of Dolly. Boundaries were drawn between 'therapeutic cloning'--implicitly defined as 'good', useful, and legitimate--and 'reproductive cloning'--seen as 'bad', dangerous, and illegitimate. By framing news stories as they do, the print news media are likely to exert a powerful influence on public responses to health problems. With new genetic technologies becoming more integrated in preventive medicine and public health, it is important to investigate how news stories help shape the agenda for

      17. Communicating Bad News to Patients

        PubMed Central

        Premi, J. N.

        1981-01-01

        This article reviews the literature on doctor/patient communication, emphasizing the communication of bad news. Available information supports the view that patients want more information than they generally receive and that, contrary to popular belief, patients who are better informed benefit from the information they receive. Physicians are seen as taking a less professional approach to communication activities than to clinical problem solving. Some strategies for approaching the problems identified are outlined. PMID:11650449

      18. 'Hot' Earth in the mass media: the reliability of news reports on global warming.

        PubMed

        Carneiro, Celso Dal Ré; Toniolo, João Cláudio

        2012-06-01

        Research into the reliability of news reports on 'global warming' published by the UOL media group, Folha.com and Folha de S. Paulo reveals a tendency for positions to be polarized between complete agreement with the assertion that the causes are entirely anthropogenic (the dominant position) and complete denial. The sample comprised 676 news items from more than 3,000 published on the topic between October 2007 and October 2008. The study tested the hypothesis that the news output of the three media outlets is dominated by the positions of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In absolute terms, the panel is the most frequently cited source, since just seven news items comprised exceptions to the 'consensus.' These contrary opinions made up 1.03% of the sample.

      19. Design Scenarios for Web-Based Management of Online Information

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Hepting, Daryl H.; Maciag, Timothy

        The Internet enables access to more information, from a greater variety of perspectives and with greater immediacy, than ever before. A person may be interested in information to become more informed or to coordinate his or her local activities and place them into a larger, more global context. The challenge, as has been noted by many, is to sift through all the information to find what is relevant without becoming overwhelmed. Furthermore, the selected information must be put into an actionable form. The diversity of the Web has important consequences for the variety of ideas that are now available. While people once relied on newspaper editors to shape their view of the world, today's technology creates room for a more democratic approach. Today it is easy to pull news feeds from a variety of sources and aggregate them. It is less easy to push that information to a variety of channels. At a higher level, we might have the goal of collecting all the available information about a certain topic, on a daily basis. There are many new technologies available under the umbrella of Web 2.0, but it can be difficult to use them together for the management of online information. Web-based support for online communication management is the most appropriate choice to address the deficiencies apparent with current technologies. We consider the requirements and potential designs for such information management support, by following an example related to local food.

      20. Source Water Management for Disinfection By-Product Control using New York City's Operations Support Tool and On-Line Monitoring

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Weiss, W. J.; Becker, W.; Schindler, S.

        2012-12-01

        simulation model (OASIS, HydroLogics, Inc.), reservoir water quality models, a near real-time monitoring network, and hydrologic forecasts to provide analytical support for both long-term planning and near-term operations. The OST helps managers and operators balance multiple objectives, including water supply reliability, water quality, and environmental and community release objectives. This paper will describe the results of initial testing to evaluate the potential to reduce DBP levels by managing source water withdrawals to minimize the transport of natural organic matter (NOM) precursors from upper reservoirs. Operating rules were developed that take advantage of selective withdrawal capabilities at some upstate reservoirs and the inherent flexibility of the overall water supply system, seeking to minimize DBPs within the larger framework of water supply, water quality, environmental, and regulatory objectives. The results demonstrated that there is substantial flexibility within the system to manage DBP levels, in some cases providing the potential for reductions of DBP precursors of nearly 10%. Additional research is underway that seeks to better understand the sources of natural organic matter in the NYC watershed to provide guidance for on-line monitoring to be used with the OST to support real-time operation support for DBP control.

      1. News and Announcements

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        1999-06-01

        1999 EAS Awards The Eastern Analytical Symposium (EAS) announces the winners of their 1999 awards, which will be presented during their annual meeting, to be held November 14-19, 1999, at the Garden State Convention Center in Somerset, NJ. ACS Analytical Chemistry Division, Findeis Young Investigator Award

        • David Clemmer, Indiana University
        EAS Award for Achievements in Separation Science
        • Milton L. Lee, Brigham Young University
        EAS Award for Achievements in Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
        • Phil Williams, Grain Research Laboratory, Winnipeg, Canada
        EAS Award for Achievements in Magnetic Resonance
        • Frank A. L. Anet, University of California, Los Angeles (Emeritus)
        EAS Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Fields of Analytical Chemistry
        • Catherine Fenselau, University of Maryland at College Park
        Galactic Industries Award for Achievements in Chemometrics
        • Harald Martens, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
        Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)
        • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
        • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP)
        • Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999
        • Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
        • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953
        For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov.

        The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.

        • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
        • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
        • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
        • Faculty Start-up Grants

        • The Interaction of Production and Consumption in the News Media Social Space

          NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

          Graham, Gary; Kerrigan, Finola; Mehmood, Rashid; Rahman, Mustafizur

          Newspapers are operating in increasingly competitive and fragmented markets for audiences and advertising revenues, government media policy and changing audience requirements for news and the ways in which it is presented and delivered. A growing army of bloggers and amateur citizen journalists now delivers - but rarely edits - content for all media platforms, while new media technologies, combined with the changing structure of global news industries, are radically changing the ways in which newspapers and media business functions and struggles for profitability. Our research sought to answer the question of how the internet is impacting on producer/consumer value activities in the news media supply chain. To answer this question initial descriptive statistical analysis was performed on 51 newspapers. This was followed by a focus group undertaken with London-based news media organizations and bloggers. The findings showed that in spite of initial fear and rejection, the internet is now firmly embedded in news media supply chain operations. Firms are now using the internet as an operant resource and working proactively with consumers to develop various forms of relationship value. We highlight the role of consumers in the creation of news (editorial) content and consumer-driven moves toward a merged media platform of distribution (including television, online, mobile and printed forms). Regional news media organizations will probably continue to survive if they are able to supply a highly specialized and 'hyper local' community service. This will be in the form of 'hybrid' content: analysis, interpretation and investigative reporting in a print product that appears less than daily combined with constant updating and reader interaction on the web.

        • Hard News/Soft News Content of the National Broadcast Networks.

          ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

          Scott, David K.; Gobetz, Robert H.

          A study investigated whether the amount of "soft news" coverage for the three major American broadcast television networks increased during the period from 1972 to 1987. A total of 558 broadcasts were analyzed. Each news story was coded and placed into one of four categories concerning its timeliness and whether it was "hard" or "soft" news.…

        • Breaking bad news and discussing death.

          PubMed

          Ambuel, B; Mazzone, M F

          2001-06-01

          The ability to discuss bad news with a patient and family is one clinical skill that is essential to providing effective end-of-life care. Patients and families value direct, nontechnical explanations that are given by a physician with compassion and kindness. Patients and families also value time to talk, express their feelings and ask questions. The authors review research on delivering bad news, then describe a six step process to guide physicians in discussing bad news with patients: (1) create an appropriate environment; (2) open the meeting; (3) discuss the news; (4) develop a follow-up plan; (5) document the conference; and (6) engage in self-reflection.

        • News: Good chemical manufacturing process criteria

          EPA Science Inventory

          This news column covers topics relating to manufacturing criteria, machine to machine technology, novel process windows, green chemistry indices, business resilience, immobilized enzymes, and Bt crops.

        • News media framing of serious mental illness and gun violence in the United States, 1997-2012.

          PubMed

          McGinty, Emma E; Webster, Daniel W; Jarlenski, Marian; Barry, Colleen L

          2014-03-01

          Recent mass shootings by persons seemingly afflicted with serious mental illness (SMI) have received extensive news media coverage and prompted national dialogue about the causes of, and policy responses to, mass shootings. News media framing of SMI as a cause of gun violence may influence public attitudes about persons with SMI and support for gun violence prevention proposals. We analyzed the content of a 25% random sample of news stories on SMI and gun violence published in 14 national and regional news sources from 1997 to 2012. Across the study period, most news coverage occurred in the wake of mass shootings, and "dangerous people" with SMI were more likely than "dangerous weapons" to be mentioned as a cause of gun violence. PMID:24432874

        • News Media Framing of Serious Mental Illness and Gun Violence in the United States, 1997-2012

          PubMed Central

          Webster, Daniel W.; Jarlenski, Marian; Barry, Colleen L.

          2014-01-01

          Recent mass shootings by persons seemingly afflicted with serious mental illness (SMI) have received extensive news media coverage and prompted national dialogue about the causes of, and policy responses to, mass shootings. News media framing of SMI as a cause of gun violence may influence public attitudes about persons with SMI and support for gun violence prevention proposals. We analyzed the content of a 25% random sample of news stories on SMI and gun violence published in 14 national and regional news sources from 1997 to 2012. Across the study period, most news coverage occurred in the wake of mass shootings, and “dangerous people” with SMI were more likely than “dangerous weapons” to be mentioned as a cause of gun violence. PMID:24432874

        • News media framing of serious mental illness and gun violence in the United States, 1997-2012.

          PubMed

          McGinty, Emma E; Webster, Daniel W; Jarlenski, Marian; Barry, Colleen L

          2014-03-01

          Recent mass shootings by persons seemingly afflicted with serious mental illness (SMI) have received extensive news media coverage and prompted national dialogue about the causes of, and policy responses to, mass shootings. News media framing of SMI as a cause of gun violence may influence public attitudes about persons with SMI and support for gun violence prevention proposals. We analyzed the content of a 25% random sample of news stories on SMI and gun violence published in 14 national and regional news sources from 1997 to 2012. Across the study period, most news coverage occurred in the wake of mass shootings, and "dangerous people" with SMI were more likely than "dangerous weapons" to be mentioned as a cause of gun violence.

        • When Pictures Waste a Thousand Words: Analysis of the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic on Television News

          PubMed Central

          Luth, Westerly; Jardine, Cindy; Bubela, Tania

          2013-01-01

          Objectives Effective communication by public health agencies during a pandemic promotes the adoption of recommended health behaviours. However, more information is not always the solution. Rather, attention must be paid to how information is communicated. Our study examines the television news, which combines video and audio content. We analyse (1) the content of television news about the H1N1 pandemic and vaccination campaign in Alberta, Canada; (2) the extent to which television news content conveyed key public health agency messages; (3) the extent of discrepancies in audio versus visual content. Methods We searched for “swine flu” and “H1N1” in local English news broadcasts from the CTV online video archive. We coded the audio and visual content of 47 news clips during the peak period of coverage from April to November 2009 and identified discrepancies between audio and visual content. Results The dominant themes on CTV news were the vaccination rollout, vaccine shortages, long line-ups (queues) at vaccination clinics and defensive responses by public health officials. There were discrepancies in the priority groups identified by the provincial health agency (Alberta Health and Wellness) and television news coverage as well as discrepancies between audio and visual content of news clips. Public health officials were presented in official settings rather than as public health practitioners. Conclusion The news footage did not match the main public health messages about risk levels and priority groups. Public health agencies lost control of their message as the media focused on failures in the rollout of the vaccination campaign. Spokespeople can enhance their local credibility by emphasizing their role as public health practitioners. Public health agencies need to learn from the H1N1 pandemic so that future television communications do not add to public confusion, demonstrate bureaucratic ineffectiveness and contribute to low vaccination rates. PMID

        • Using Automated Blogging for Creation and Delivery of Topic-Centric News

          ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

          Crouse, David A.

          2013-01-01

          Every day, news relevant to Extension clientele is posted to the Internet from a variety of sources such as the popular press, scientific journals, and government agency press releases. In order to stay current with the information being published, an end-user must be following all of the possible sources of information. That task can be…

        • The Role of Practical Advice in Bioterrorism News Coverage.

          PubMed

          Swain, Kristen Alley

          2015-01-01

          This study examined the role of crisis advice appearing in US news coverage of the 2001 anthrax attacks. Coverage of any crisis can spark public outrage, including fear, speculation, and contradictory or confusing evidence, especially when the stories do not contain practical advice. Five coders analyzed 833 news stories from 272 major US newspapers, the Associated Press, National Public Radio, and 4 major US television networks. Practical advice appeared in only a quarter of the stories, even though practical advice for self-protection was mentioned 3 times more often than the vague advice that simply advised people not to panic. Public health officials provided the most practical advice, while scientists provided the least practical advice. Stories containing practical advice also provided more elucidating information, explaining why the threat was low, reducible, treatable, and detectable. Over the 3 phases of the anthrax crisis, an inverse relationship appeared between the amount of news coverage containing practical advice compared to "outrage rhetoric." Stories mentioned practical advice more often during the post-impact phase than earlier in the crisis. Elucidating, explanatory advice emphasized actions, risk comparisons, and tradeoffs. The findings indicate that when journalists use credible sources to provide practical advice and avoid speculation, their coverage can prevent the spread of misinformation and confusion during a bioterror attack. Also, journalists should provide context and sourcing when discussing advice during the outbreak and impact phases of the crisis, because these explanations could counteract outrage and threat distortion.

        • The Role of Practical Advice in Bioterrorism News Coverage.

          PubMed

          Swain, Kristen Alley

          2015-01-01

          This study examined the role of crisis advice appearing in US news coverage of the 2001 anthrax attacks. Coverage of any crisis can spark public outrage, including fear, speculation, and contradictory or confusing evidence, especially when the stories do not contain practical advice. Five coders analyzed 833 news stories from 272 major US newspapers, the Associated Press, National Public Radio, and 4 major US television networks. Practical advice appeared in only a quarter of the stories, even though practical advice for self-protection was mentioned 3 times more often than the vague advice that simply advised people not to panic. Public health officials provided the most practical advice, while scientists provided the least practical advice. Stories containing practical advice also provided more elucidating information, explaining why the threat was low, reducible, treatable, and detectable. Over the 3 phases of the anthrax crisis, an inverse relationship appeared between the amount of news coverage containing practical advice compared to "outrage rhetoric." Stories mentioned practical advice more often during the post-impact phase than earlier in the crisis. Elucidating, explanatory advice emphasized actions, risk comparisons, and tradeoffs. The findings indicate that when journalists use credible sources to provide practical advice and avoid speculation, their coverage can prevent the spread of misinformation and confusion during a bioterror attack. Also, journalists should provide context and sourcing when discussing advice during the outbreak and impact phases of the crisis, because these explanations could counteract outrage and threat distortion. PMID:26381372

        • Quaker Resources Online Index.

          ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

          Beke-Harrigan, Heidi

          The Quaker Resources Online Index is a World Wide Web-based index, including author, title, subject, and meeting indexes, that provides access to Quaker materials available on the Web. Given the current failings and shortcomings of search engines and automated key word searches, this index brings together information from a variety of sources and…

        • Online Pricing.

          ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

          Garman, Nancy; And Others

          1990-01-01

          The first of four articles describes the move by the European Space Agency to eliminate connect time charges on its online retrieval system. The remaining articles describe the pricing structure of DIALOG, compare the two pricing schemes, and discuss online pricing from the user's point of view. (CLB)

        • Mediating subpolitics in US and UK science news.

          PubMed

          Jensen, Eric

          2012-01-01

          The development of therapeutic cloning research sparked a scientific controversy pitting patients' hopes for cures against religious and anti-abortion opposition. The present study investigates this controversy by examining the production and content of Anglo-American print media coverage of the branch of embryonic stem cell research known as "therapeutic cloning." Data collection included press articles about therapeutic cloning (n = 5,185) and qualitative interviews with journalists (n = 18). Patient activists and anti-abortion groups emerged as key news sources in this coverage. Significant qualitative differences in the mediation of these subpolitical groups and their arguments for and against therapeutic cloning are identified. Results suggest that the perceived human interest news value of narratives of patient suffering may give patient advocacy groups a privileged position in journalistic coverage. Finally, Ulrich Beck's theoretical arguments about subpolitics are critically applied to the results to elicit further insights.

        • NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

          NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

          Mellema, Steve

          2000-11-01

          .andrew.cmu.edu/projects/visual. David Sokoloff (University of Oregon) and Priscilla Laws (Dickinson College) led a discussion session on the Interactive Lecture Demonstrations that they have been developing to promote active learning in the classroom. Loren Winters of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics showed some very fine work done with digital video cameras, both in producing motion videos for frame-by-frame analysis and in producing still images of high-speed phenomena. Finally, Patrick Tam of Humboldt State University in California talked about the Multimedia Resource for Learning and Online Teaching (MERLOT), a project to organize and review the proliferation of internet-based teaching materials that are rapidly becoming available. Their purpose is to make it easier for teachers like us to sift through the plethora of new innovations, to locate those that are potentially useful in our teaching, and finally to implement them effectively. You can check out the project on the web at www.merlot.org. As is evident from the number of sessions of contributed papers and the tandem conference, the quality and quantity of physics education research into new curricula and teaching methods continue to increase. A number of interesting areas were discussed including interactive lecture techniques, studio-classroom approaches combining lectures and labs, assessment techniques, and identifying and correcting student misconceptions. In addition to the plenary talks on current research topics in physics mentioned above, there were sessions on Space Physics and Hot Topics in Physics. There were sessions on professional and career concerns including Preparing Future Physics Faculty, New Faculty Experiences and Concerns, Balancing Career and Family, How Physics Topics Support the Job Market and Recruiting and Retaining Women in Physics. Whether one was a high school teacher or a university professor, this was an enjoyable and educational meeting. We all look forward to the Winter 2001 meeting from

        • Why do people Google epilepsy? An infodemiological study of online behavior for epilepsy-related search terms.

          PubMed

          Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Ausserer, Harald; Nardone, Raffaele; Tezzon, Frediano; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Trinka, Eugen

          2014-02-01

          Millions of people worldwide use the Internet daily as a source of health information. Google is the most popular search engine and is used by patients and physicians to search for online health-related information. This study aimed to evaluate changes in web search behavior occurring in English-speaking countries over time for terms related to epilepsy and epileptic seizures. Using Google Trends, data on global search queries for the terms "epilepsy", "seizure", and "seizures" between January 2004 and September 2013 were analyzed. The reduction over time in search queries for the term "epilepsy" (and, to a lesser extent, "seizures") was counterbalanced by an increased trend in searches for the term "seizure". Most terms associated with the search queries were related to symptoms of seizures, especially tonic-clonic seizures, and to seizures occurring in children. Three peaks in search volume over the period studied corresponded to news of celebrities having seizures. The volume of searches for the term "epilepsy SUDEP" was found to be enormously increased over time. Most people appear to use search engines to look for terms related to epilepsy to obtain information on seizure symptoms, possibly to aid initial self-diagnosis. Fears and worries about epileptic seizures and news on celebrities with epilepsy seem to be major factors that influence online search behavior.

        • Media Literacy, News Literacy, or News Appreciation? A Case Study of the News Literacy Program at Stony Brook University

          ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

          Fleming, Jennifer

          2014-01-01

          This case study provides practical and theoretical insights into the Stony Brook news literacy program, which is one of the most ambitious and well-funded curricular experiments in modern journalism education and media literacy. Analysis of document, interview, and observation data indicates that news literacy educators sought to teach students…

        • News and Announcements

          NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

          1999-06-01

          1999 EAS Awards The Eastern Analytical Symposium (EAS) announces the winners of their 1999 awards, which will be presented during their annual meeting, to be held November 14-19, 1999, at the Garden State Convention Center in Somerset, NJ. ACS Analytical Chemistry Division, Findeis Young Investigator Award

          • David Clemmer, Indiana University
          EAS Award for Achievements in Separation Science
          • Milton L. Lee, Brigham Young University
          EAS Award for Achievements in Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
          • Phil Williams, Grain Research Laboratory, Winnipeg, Canada
          EAS Award for Achievements in Magnetic Resonance
          • Frank A. L. Anet, University of California, Los Angeles (Emeritus)
          EAS Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Fields of Analytical Chemistry
          • Catherine Fenselau, University of Maryland at College Park
          Galactic Industries Award for Achievements in Chemometrics
          • Harald Martens, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
          Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)
          • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
          • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP)
          • Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999
          • Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
          • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953
          For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov.

          The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.

          • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
          • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
          • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
          • Faculty Start-up Grants

          • VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio sources in fields near G160.9+2.6 (HB9) (Leahy+, 1996)

            NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

            Leahy, D. A.; Roger, R. S.

            1995-09-01

            We present a catalogue of the 408MHz and 1420MHz radio sources in the region centered near Right Ascension 4h58m and Declination 46degrees (epoch 1950), i.e. near the supernova remnant HB9. The observations were made with the Synthesis Telescope at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, near Penticton, Canada. 494 sources at 408MHz and 255 sources at 1420MHz were detected. 408-1420MHz spectral indices for 101 common sources were derived. The 408MHz source list was compared with the 4850MHz sources from the Green Bank catalog. Spectral indices were determined for 165 common sources. We also compared the source lists with the IRAS and ROSAT point source catalogs for that region and have identified 16 radio sources with IRAS point sources and 3 radio sources with X-ray sources. (5 data files).

      1. News and Announcements

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        1999-04-01

        celebrate the potential for transforming education through information technology; we will bring together information resource professionals to participate in a diverse, comprehensive, carefully focused program with many opportunities for interactive and one-on-one communication. The conference has five tracks with each track having five focus areas: technical infrastructure; planning and strategy; service delivery; applications and best practices; and management and organization. Speakers at the general session include Colin Powell, retired chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Rita Colwell, director of the National Science Foundation; and Barry Munitz, president of the J. Paul Getty Trust. For more information visit the conference WWW site at http://www.educause.edu/conference/e99. Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

        • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
        • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999 Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
        • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53
        available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953 For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm or contact the DUE Information Center; phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
        • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
        • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
        • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
        • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
        • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
        • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
        • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
        Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry

      2. Improving Naive Bayes with Online Feature Selection for Quick Adaptation to Evolving Feature Usefulness

        SciTech Connect

        Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

        2007-09-19

        The definition of what makes an article interesting varies from user to user and continually evolves even for a single user. As a result, for news recommendation systems, useless document features can not be determined a priori and all features are usually considered for interestingness classification. Consequently, the presence of currently useless features degrades classification performance [1], particularly over the initial set of news articles being classified. The initial set of document is critical for a user when considering which particular news recommendation system to adopt. To address these problems, we introduce an improved version of the naive Bayes classifier with online feature selection. We use correlation to determine the utility of each feature and take advantage of the conditional independence assumption used by naive Bayes for online feature selection and classification. The augmented naive Bayes classifier performs 28% better than the traditional naive Bayes classifier in recommending news articles from the Yahoo! RSS feeds.

      3. Rate and δ13C values of CO2 produced during short-term online incubation experiments indicate two different processes with distinct carbon sources

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Osuna, R.; Breecker, D. O.; Sharp, Z. D.

        2009-12-01

        The decomposition of organic matter in soils is a fundamental process influencing the carbon cycle. The rate of microbial oxidation of organic matter is known to increase with temperature, suggesting that many soils may turn from sinks to sources of CO2 as global temperature warms. In this study, we introduce a new, online soil incubation technique that can be used to determine the rate and carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of CO2 respired during the decomposition of organic matter. Air-dried and sieved soil samples are mechanically mixed and are rewetted and preincubated in capped 50 mL tubes. Aliquots of the soils (2 - 200 mg) taken from the storage tubes are loaded into septum-capped Labco Exetainer® vials which are themselves loaded into a thermostated sample tray maintained at a constant temperature. The vials are then flushed with synthetic CO2-free air and the soils are preincubated again for several days. The incubation experiment begins when the vials are flushed a second time with synthetic air. At the end of the incubation, all of the CO2 that was produced is flushed from the vial, cryofocused in a liquid nitrogen trap and then carried into the source of a mass spectrometer in a He stream. The CO2 from each vial is sampled automatically and directed into the mass spectrometer using a Thermo Electron Gasbench II. The number of moles and the δ13C value of CO2 produced during the incubation are determined from voltages measured by the mass spectrometer. The technique allows for rapid sample analysis and short incubation times (hours to days). Incubation of multiple aliquots of the same soil mixture allows trends to be examined. Several patterns have emerged from incubations carried out to date. An initial pulse of CO2 is emitted from the soils during the first minutes of incubation. This pulse of CO2 is emitted from dry soils (i.e. never rewetted), sterilized soils, and from soils incubated in high purity He instead of synthetic air, indicating that the

      4. Computational Methods for Analyzing Health News Coverage

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        McFarlane, Delano J.

        2011-01-01

        Researchers that investigate the media's coverage of health have historically relied on keyword searches to retrieve relevant health news coverage, and manual content analysis methods to categorize and score health news text. These methods are problematic. Manual content analysis methods are labor intensive, time consuming, and inherently…

      5. Science News and the Science Classroom

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        McCullough, Laura

        2006-01-01

        Using "Science News" as a teaching tool promotes writing about science, talking about science, and broadening students' views about what science is. This article describes an ongoing assignment in which students choose one article from "Science News" each week and write a brief summary and explanation of why they picked that article. (Contains 1…

      6. Scandal Clouds News Corporation's Move into Education

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Quillen, Ian

        2011-01-01

        When News Corporation announced last fall its entry into the education technology market, some observers said the media conglomerate led by Rupert Murdoch was a bad fit for education. Between the ownership of conservative-leaning outlets like Fox News and a reputation for identifying opportunities to generate lots of revenue very quickly, News…

      7. Program Management Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

        2011-01-01

        This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Program Management Collection, which covers the topics of Assessment, Learning Disabilities, and Program Improvement. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program Management,…

      8. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

        2011-01-01

        This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program…

      9. International Flow of News: An Annotated Bibliography.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Mowlana, Hamid, Ed.

        Noting the unprecedented expansion of research in the field of international communications, much of it conducted by scholars from developing countries, this bibliography contains citations of studies on the international flow of news. The bibliography begins with an introduction to the field of research on international news flow, noting those…

      10. Developing a News Media Literacy Scale

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Ashley, Seth; Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie

        2013-01-01

        Using a framework previously applied to other areas of media literacy, this study developed and assessed a measurement scale focused specifically on critical news media literacy. Our scale appears to successfully measure news media literacy as we have conceptualized it based on previous research, demonstrated through assessments of content,…

      11. A Reconsideration of Bias in the News.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Stevenson, Robert L.; Greene, Mark T.

        This paper discusses three conceptual problems--point of view, unit of bias, and behavioral response--with using content analysis to study news bias. The paper shows that the point of view of the content analyst is not appropriate if one wants to see how news consumers define and react to bias, that the unit of bias should be the specific instance…

      12. Predicting Political News Coverage by Newspaper Characteristics.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Fowler, Gilbert Len, Jr.

        1979-01-01

        Concludes that the only significant factors explaining the amount of political news published by the Arkansas daily press during the 1972 senatorial primary election campaign were the size of the daily news hole and the number of wire services a newspaper used. (GT)

      13. Listening to Monotony: All-News Radio.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Woal, Michael

        A study analyzed statistically the monotony of all-news radio listening and identified stylistic figures that elicit attention in listeners. Subjects were 30 graduate students whose experience with radio news ranged from occasional listening over several months to regular listening five or seven days per week for several years. Respondents were…

      14. News Values and the Vividness of Information.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Kennamer, J. David

        Most journalism textbooks begin with lists of what have been called "news values." These are criteria to be used to judge the newsworthiness of issues, events, and persons. The list of news values that most journalists have memorized can be replaced with a single concept--vividness. Vividness is a characteristic of the information produced by…

      15. Kids, Crime, and Local Television News

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Yanich, Danilo

        2005-01-01

        The vast majority of crime reporting occurs on local television news and in newspapers. Although crimes are extraordinary events, they assume an ordinariness that only daily reporting can give them. The obvious question is what does the news tell us about crime. This article compares the coverage of adult crime and the coverage of what the author…

      16. NIH News in Health: September 2006

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Wein, Harrison, Ed.

        2006-01-01

        News in Health, is a monthly newsletter that provides practical health news and information. As college students arrive on campus this fall, it is a time of new experiences, new friendships and making memories that will last a lifetime. Unfortunately for many, it can also be a time of excessive drinking and dealing with its aftermath--vandalism,…

      17. Satellite News Feeds: Protecting a Transient Interest.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Atwater, Tony; And Others

        Satellite news gathering (SNG) has been widely adopted in broadcast journalism in recent years, and appears likely to grow in importance as local television news operations increase their reliance on it. However, because the technology for SNG is so new, information transmitted through SNG systems is not adequately protected under current laws.…

      18. Foreign Affairs News and the Broadcast Journalist.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Batscha, Robert M.

        Discussion of the role of the broadcast journalist in foreign affairs news is divided into four parts in this volume: (1) "The Correspondent" deals with the group characteristics of foreign correspondents and their role conceptions, (2) "Gathering the News" examines the correspondent;s view of the mechanical constraints and structural…

      19. The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study

        PubMed Central

        Vivian-Griffiths, Solveiga; Boivin, Jacky; Williams, Andy; Venetis, Christos A; Davies, Aimée; Ogden, Jack; Whelan, Leanne; Hughes, Bethan; Dalton, Bethan; Boy, Fred

        2014-01-01

        Objective To identify the source (press releases or news) of distortions, exaggerations, or changes to the main conclusions drawn from research that could potentially influence a reader’s health related behaviour. Design Retrospective quantitative content analysis. Setting Journal articles, press releases, and related news, with accompanying simulations. Sample Press releases (n=462) on biomedical and health related science issued by 20 leading UK universities in 2011, alongside their associated peer reviewed research papers and news stories (n=668). Main outcome measures Advice to readers to change behaviour, causal statements drawn from correlational research, and inference to humans from animal research that went beyond those in the associated peer reviewed papers. Results 40% (95% confidence interval 33% to 46%) of the press releases contained exaggerated advice, 33% (26% to 40%) contained exaggerated causal claims, and 36% (28% to 46%) contained exaggerated inference to humans from animal research. When press releases contained such exaggeration, 58% (95% confidence interval 48% to 68%), 81% (70% to 93%), and 86% (77% to 95%) of news stories, respectively, contained similar exaggeration, compared with exaggeration rates of 17% (10% to 24%), 18% (9% to 27%), and 10% (0% to 19%) in news when the press releases were not exaggerated. Odds ratios for each category of analysis were 6.5 (95% confidence interval 3.5 to 12), 20 (7.6 to 51), and 56 (15 to 211). At the same time, there was little evidence that exaggeration in press releases increased the uptake of news. Conclusions Exaggeration in news is strongly associated with exaggeration in press releases. Improving the accuracy of academic press releases could represent a key opportunity for reducing misleading health related news. PMID:25498121

      20. Super Searchers Go to the Source: The Interviewing and Hands-On Information Strategies of Top Primary Researchers--Online, on the Phone, and in Person. Super Searchers.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Sacks, Risa

        This book presents interviews with 12 of the best primary researchers in the business. These research professionals reveal their strategies for integrating online and offline resources, identifying experts, and getting past gatekeepers to obtain information that exists only in someone's head. Topics include how searchers use a combination of…

      1. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

        2012-01-01

        NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

      2. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Olson, W. S.

        2012-12-01

        NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

      3. Space Shuttle Status News Conference

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        2005-01-01

        Richard Gilbech, External Tank "Tiger Team" Lead, begins this space shuttle news conference with detailing the two major objectives of the team. The objectives include: 1) Finding the root cause of the foam loss on STS-114; and 2) Near and long term improvements for the external tank. Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Manager, presents a chart to explain the external tank foam loss during STS-114. He gives a possible launch date for STS-121 after there has been a repair to the foam on the External Tank. He further discusses the changes that need to be made to the surrounding areas of the plant in New Orleans, due to Hurricane Katrina. Bill Gerstemaier, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations, elaborates on the testing of the external tank foam loss. The discussion ends with questions from the news media about a fix for the foam, replacement of the tiles, foam loss avoidance, the root cause of foam loss and a possible date for a new external tank to be shipped to NASA Kennedy Space Center.

      4. Science fiction/science fact: medical genetics in news stories.

        PubMed

        Petersen, Alan; Anderson, Alison; Allan, Stuart

        2005-12-01

        News media coverage of biotechnology issues offers a rich source of fictional portrayals, with stories drawing strongly on popular imagery and metaphors in descriptions of the powers and dangers of biotechnology. This article examines how science fiction metaphors, imagery and motifs surface in British newspaper (broadsheet and tabloid) coverage of medical genetic issues, focusing on press reporting of two recent highly publicised news media events; namely, the Hashmi and Whitaker families' plights to use stem cells from a 'perfectly matched sibling' for the treatment of their diseased children. It is concerned in particular with the extent to which journalists' use of certain literary devices encourages preferred formulations of medical genetics, and thereby potentially shapes public deliberation about scientific developments and their consequences for society. Understanding how science fiction sustains science fact, and vice versa, and how the former is portrayed in news media, it is argued, would thus seem to be crucial in the effort to understand why people respond so strongly to biotechnologies, and what they imagine their consequences to be.

      5. Publicly Available Online Tool Facilitates Real-Time Monitoring Of Vaccine Conversations And Sentiments.

        PubMed

        Bahk, Chi Y; Cumming, Melissa; Paushter, Louisa; Madoff, Lawrence C; Thomson, Angus; Brownstein, John S

        2016-02-01

        Real-time monitoring of mainstream and social media can inform public health practitioners and policy makers about vaccine sentiment and hesitancy. We describe a publicly available platform for monitoring vaccination-related content, called the Vaccine Sentimeter. With automated data collection from 100,000 mainstream media sources and Twitter, natural-language processing for automated filtering, and manual curation to ensure accuracy, the Vaccine Sentimeter offers a global real-time view of vaccination conversations online. To assess the system's utility, we followed two events: polio vaccination in Pakistan after a news story about a Central Intelligence Agency vaccination ruse and subsequent attacks on health care workers, and a controversial episode in a television program about adverse events following human papillomavirus vaccination. For both events, increased online activity was detected and characterized. For the first event, Twitter response to the attacks on health care workers decreased drastically after the first attack, in contrast to mainstream media coverage. For the second event, the mainstream and social media response was largely positive about the HPV vaccine, but antivaccine conversations persisted longer than the provaccine reaction. Using the Vaccine Sentimeter could enable public health professionals to detect increased online activity or sudden shifts in sentiment that could affect vaccination uptake.

      6. Publicly Available Online Tool Facilitates Real-Time Monitoring Of Vaccine Conversations And Sentiments.

        PubMed

        Bahk, Chi Y; Cumming, Melissa; Paushter, Louisa; Madoff, Lawrence C; Thomson, Angus; Brownstein, John S

        2016-02-01

        Real-time monitoring of mainstream and social media can inform public health practitioners and policy makers about vaccine sentiment and hesitancy. We describe a publicly available platform for monitoring vaccination-related content, called the Vaccine Sentimeter. With automated data collection from 100,000 mainstream media sources and Twitter, natural-language processing for automated filtering, and manual curation to ensure accuracy, the Vaccine Sentimeter offers a global real-time view of vaccination conversations online. To assess the system's utility, we followed two events: polio vaccination in Pakistan after a news story about a Central Intelligence Agency vaccination ruse and subsequent attacks on health care workers, and a controversial episode in a television program about adverse events following human papillomavirus vaccination. For both events, increased online activity was detected and characterized. For the first event, Twitter response to the attacks on health care workers decreased drastically after the first attack, in contrast to mainstream media coverage. For the second event, the mainstream and social media response was largely positive about the HPV vaccine, but antivaccine conversations persisted longer than the provaccine reaction. Using the Vaccine Sentimeter could enable public health professionals to detect increased online activity or sudden shifts in sentiment that could affect vaccination uptake. PMID:26858390

      7. Characteristics of Medical Research News Reported on Front Pages of Newspapers

        PubMed Central

        Lai, William Yuk Yeu; Lane, Trevor

        2009-01-01

        Background The placement of medical research news on a newspaper's front page is intended to gain the public's attention, so it is important to understand the source of the news in terms of research maturity and evidence level. Methodology/Principal Findings We searched LexisNexis to identify medical research reported on front pages of major newspapers published from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002. We used MEDLINE and Google Scholar to find journal articles corresponding to the research, and determined their evidence level. Of 734 front-page medical research stories identified, 417 (57%) referred to mature research published in peer-reviewed journals. The remaining 317 stories referred to preliminary findings presented at scientific or press meetings; 144 (45%) of those stories mentioned studies that later matured (i.e. were published in journals within 3 years after news coverage). The evidence-level distribution of the 515 journal articles quoted in news stories reporting on mature research (3% level I, 21% level II, 42% level III, 4% level IV, and 31% level V) differed from that of the 170 reports of preliminary research that later matured (1%, 19%, 35%, 12%, and 33%, respectively; chi-square test, P = .0009). No news stories indicated evidence level. Fewer than 1 in 5 news stories reporting preliminary findings acknowledged the preliminary nature of their content. Conclusions/Significance Only 57% of front-page stories reporting on medical research are based on mature research, which tends to have a higher evidence level than research with preliminary findings. Medical research news should be clearly referenced and state the evidence level and limitations to inform the public of the maturity and quality of the source. PMID:19568422

      8. Making It "Real": Words and Pictures in Television News.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Goodman, Sharon; Manners, Paul

        1997-01-01

        Examines features of television news, drawing on a series of interviews conducted during the production of an Open University television program. Examines the visual and verbal conventions of news and attempts to highlight how and why news can appear convincing. Those interviewed included British Broadcasting Corporation news practitioners,…

      9. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

        2011-01-01

        ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

      10. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

        2012-01-01

        ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

      11. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

        2010-01-01

        ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

      12. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

        2013-01-01

        ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

      13. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

        2014-01-01

        ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

      14. The Role of Audiovisual Mass Media News in Language Learning

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

        2011-01-01

        The present paper focuses on the role of audio/visual mass media news in language learning. In this regard, the two important issues regarding the selection and preparation of TV news for language learning are the content of the news and the linguistic difficulty. Content is described as whether the news is specialized or universal. Universal…

      15. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1993

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        1994-01-01

        This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1993. The index is arranged in six sections: subject index, personal names index, news release number index, accession number index, speeches, and news releases.

      16. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1992

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        1993-01-01

        This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1992. The index is arranged in six sections: subject index, personal names index, news release number index, accession number index, speeches, and news releases.

      17. Readers' Trust, Socio-Demographic, and Acuity Influences in Citizen Journalism Credibility for Disrupted Online Newspapers

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Wester, Aaron Micah

        2013-01-01

        The purpose of this quantitative research study was to evaluate and determine if significant associations and linear correlations exist between reader socio-demographics, levels of trust and affinity in online citizen writer news story article content, brand loyalty, and acuity in newspaper organizations transitioning from print to online in a…

      18. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2005-05-01

        Schools lecture: Institute of Physics roadshow is a lecture series with a difference Rugby Meeting: 17th Annual Meeting for Teachers of Physics boasts an impressive schedule Courses: Year-12 pupils go to Open University Camera Competition: Enter now to win a new camera! Conference: Teachers invited to CERN in September New Zealand: Royal Society of New Zealand tackles fear of physics Bulgaria: Fairies, witches and extraterrestrials: how to teach science using theatre Schools lecture: Institute seeks speaker for its annual lecture series Competition: Critical thinking is encouraged by global warming competition Scotland: Two good reasons to visit Scotland this summer Competition: Test your knowledge Free Event: June IOP conference Conference: Also in Liverpool…

      19. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2001-11-01

        IRELAND New courses for high-tech Ireland; SCIENCE YEAR Science Year launched with a jump; THE NETHERLANDS School science teachers face uncertainty; KOREA Embedding physics in a cultural context; TEACHING RESOURCES Teacher, get your hook; ICT RESOURCES Stock-take of ICT progress; INTERNET Teachers to test-drive new physics gateway; NEW ZEALAND Physics is valued in New Zealand; JAPAN Advancing Physics in Japan; HIGHER EDUCATION Networking works in Cologne; INSTITUTE MATTERS IoP demands a better deal for physics teachers; AUSTRALIA Physics numbers decline: educators blame the low impact curriculum; SCIENCE FOR THE PUBLIC More than sixty seconds in Glasgow; INTERNET A gift selection of papers from IoP; TEACHING STYLES I know what you did last summer;

      20. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2001-01-01

        MASTERCLASSES Researchers help motivate school students; HIGHER EDUCATION Undergraduate physics inquiry launched Sir Peter; PUBLIC UNDERSTANDING OF SCIENCE Chemists take the lead to get science groups pulling together; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Spintronic Chips; LOWER SECONDARY CURRICULUM Why do we teach physics? TEACHING COMMUNITY e-Teachers; AWARDS Nobel Prize; HIGHER EDUCATION Project Phoenics; PARTICLE PHYSICS LEP Closure; TEACHER TRAINING Training salary fails to attract recruits; EVENTS Physics moves into the spotlight

      1. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2001-05-01

        LINKS WITH PRIMARY SCIENCE SAD Physics; PHYSICS RESEARCH In a hurry...; PHYSICS COMMUNITY Scottish Stirling Meeting; PHYSICS AT CONGRESS Global warming forecasts rise in skin cancer; EVENTS 2001 SET week; E-MAIL DISCUSSIONS Learning in science; STUDENT ACTIVITY Paperclip Physics; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Perspectives on Science; AWARDS Award for causing chaos; PHYSICS AT CONGRESS Physics and public heath: Do electrical power lines cause cancer? HIGHER EDUCATION First-year course development; INTERSCHOOL COLLABORATION Monitoring geomagnetic storms; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT UK course goes international; PHYSICS IN SCIENCE YEAR Website launched

      2. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2001-03-01

        PHYSICS AT ASE Warm welcome for new-look Physics Education; TEACHING COMMUNITY Conference in the Netherlands; RESEARCH Evidence based practice; PHYSICS AT ASE Teacher of Physics Awards; PHYSICS AT ASE Festival encourages science teachers; AWARDS Bragg Medal; PHYSICS AT ASE Meteorites are cool! PUBLIC UNDERSTANDING March 2001 - a science odyssey; WEB RESOURCES New website launched to support the gifted and talented; PHYSICS TEACHING A Fun lesson; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Are cell phones safe? OBITUARY Roy Schofield 1924-2000

      3. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2005-01-01

        Einstein year: Einstein is brought back to life for a year of educational events Workshop: Students reach out for the Moon Event: Masterclasses go with a bang Workshop: Students search for asteroids on Einstein's birthday Scotland: Curriculum for Excellence takes holistic approach Conference: Reporting from a mattress in Nachod Conference: 'Change' is key objective at ICPE conference 2005 Lecture: Institute of Physics Schools Lecture series Conference: Experience showcase science in Warwick National network: Science Learning Centre opens Meeting: 30th Stirling Physics Meeting breaks records Competition: Win a digital camera! Forthcoming Events

      4. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2002-05-01

        Physics on Stage: Physics on the political stage Women in Physics: Allez les girls! Curriculum: Students want ethics debate in school science Physics on Stage: Buzzing around the tulips Events: GIREP 2002 Competition: Schumacher in the shower! Higher Education: Universities consider conceptual physics courses Resources: Evaluation of Advancing Physics Research Frontiers: Physics Teachers @ CERN 2002 UK Curriculum: Preparing useful citizens China: Changing the approach NSTA Annual Convention: Innovations and simplicity Europe: European Community Science and Society Action Plan Citizenship: ASE-Wellcome Trust citizenship education initiative

      5. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Davenhall, Clive

        2012-06-01

        Herschel papers catalogued and accessible; Maskelyne papers accepted for the nation; centenary of the Hamburg Observatory; oldest astrologer's board found; Groupe Flammarion sold; ancient sundial found; keeping time (modern folk song about John Harrison).

      6. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Davenhall, Clive

        2011-09-01

        Townsend Observatory destroyed; BAA Lunar Section archives; Astro-Cymru; Royal star identified; Formation of Johannes Kepler Working Group; Tycho Brahe exhumed; Ancient observatory discovered in Iran...; ... and in Mexico; Calling all ex-occupants of interplanetary craft.

      7. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2002-11-01

        Resources: First Faulkes Telescope on its way! Events: Everything under the Sun - GIREP 2002 Experiments: The most beautiful experiment, your favourite demonstration Science year: Planet Science takes off Resources: New CD packages Lecture: Fantastic Plastic Summer workshop: The Wright Stuff Resources: Amazing Space 14-16 curriculum: 21st century science ASE conference: ASE 2003 South Africa: Sasol SciFest Earth sciences: JESEI: the answer to all your Earthly problems

      8. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2001-01-01

        Wales: Dataloggers network teachers 11-16 Science: Educational magazines with the fun bits left in! Institute of Physics: Public Awareness of Physics Awards Events: TeachSpace 2001 Australia: Chemistry and Physics in Tasmanian Agriculture Resources: From out of this world, into your lab Nobel Prize: Nobel Prize in Physics, 2001 China: Physics education for the 21st century: avoiding a crisis Resources: The Royal Astronomical Society Forthcoming Events

      9. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2007-05-01

        Cyber Workshop: The Teacher Network visits Second Life Festival: Alarm clock rings for European science Grant Project: The reality of university science Student Physics: Young physicists' tournament in Korea Environment: Climate change documentary to be shown in every secondary school in England and Wales Centenary: Glasgow celebrates life of Kelvin

      10. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        1998-04-01

        Nearly Complete Set: I have an almost complete set of J. Chem. Educ., lacking only 3-4 volumes from the early 1930's. It is in pristine condition, bound each year (except the last five years), and used gently only by myself. I am retired and willing to part with this collection for a reasonable offer - I cannot afford to donate them. Any library or individual who might have a serious interest should contact Robert Goldenberg, P. O. Box 412, Westside Station, Buffalo, NY 14213; phone: 905/871-1098; email: goldenbe@vaxxine.com.

      11. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2005-07-01

        Croatia: Rijeka’s 2005 science festival attracts an enthusiastic crowd The Middle East: METSMaC conference reaches out to teachers around the Gulf and beyond Spain: Física en Acción 5: a Spanish festival that will have you cycling the tightrope Czech Republic: Astronomy lessons for everyone Sussex Planetarium: Planetarium sets its sights high TV series: Einstein gets animated for C4 cartoon series Memorial: Honouring the great: memorial to Robert Hooke is unveiled at Westminster Abbey Awards: SHAP awards prizes for exceptional student work Group meeting: IOP’s Education Group to meet in September Forthcoming Events

      12. News

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2008-07-01

        Radioactivity: Olympic Games: dirty and decaying? Awards: SciCast rewards the best in scientific short films Conference: Teachers conference is big in Boston Workshop: Experts and teachers mingle in Mexico Awards: Olympiad holds lavish ceremony Cinema: Indiana Jones has a skull full of physics Conference: ESERA announces Turkish delight for 2009 Forthcoming Events

      13. Cancer News Coverage and Information Seeking

        PubMed Central

        NIEDERDEPPE, JEFF; FROSCH, DOMINICK L.; HORNIK, ROBERT C.

        2010-01-01

        The shift toward viewing patients as active consumers of health information raises questions about whether individuals respond to health news by seeking additional information. This study examines the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking using a national survey of adults aged 18 years and older. A Lexis-Nexis database search term was used to identify Associated Press (AP) news articles about cancer released between October 21, 2002, and April 13, 2003. We merged these data to the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), a telephone survey of 6,369 adults, by date of interview. Logistic regression models assessed the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking. Overall, we observed a marginally significant positive relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking (p < 0.07). Interaction terms revealed that the relationship was apparent only among respondents who paid close attention to health news (p < 0.01) and among those with a family history of cancer (p < 0.05). Results suggest that a notable segment of the population actively responds to periods of elevated cancer news coverage by seeking additional information, but they raise concerns about the potential for widened gaps in cancer knowledge and behavior between large segments of the population in the future. PMID:18300068

      14. A content-based news video retrieval system: NVRS

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Liu, Huayong; He, Tingting

        2009-10-01

        This paper focus on TV news programs and design a content-based news video browsing and retrieval system, NVRS, which is convenient for users to fast browsing and retrieving news video by different categories such as political, finance, amusement, etc. Combining audiovisual features and caption text information, the system automatically segments a complete news program into separate news stories. NVRS supports keyword-based news story retrieval, category-based news story browsing and generates key-frame-based video abstract for each story. Experiments show that the method of story segmentation is effective and the retrieval is also efficient.

      15. News at Nine: The value of near-real time data for reaching mass media

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Allen, J.; Ward, K.; Simmon, R. B.; Carlowicz, M. J.; Scott, M.; Przyborski, P. D.; Voiland, A. P.

        2012-12-01

        NASA's Earth Observatory (EO) is an online publication featuring NASA Earth science news and images. Since its inception in 1999, the EO team has relied heavily on near-real time satellite data to publish imagery of breaking news events, such as volcanoes, floods, fires, and dust storms. Major news outlets (Associated Press, The Weather Channel, CNN, etc.) have regularly republished Earth Observatory imagery in their coverage of events. Because of the nature of modern 24-hour news cycle, media almost always want near-real time coverage; providing it depends heavily on rapid data turnaround, user-friendly data systems, and fast data access. We will discuss how we use near-real time data and provide examples of how data systems have been transformed in the past 13 years. We will offer some thoughts on best practices (from the view of a user) in expedited data systems and the positive effect of those practices on public awareness of our content.. Finally, we will share how we work with science teams to see the potential stories in their data and the value of providing the data in a timely fashionAcquired October 9, 2010, this natural-color image shows the toxic sludge spill from an alumina plant in southern Hungary.

      16. Legal vs Ethical News-Gathering Methods.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Vahl, Rod

        1990-01-01

        Discusses legal and ethical issues surrounding methods of news-gathering, including undercover reporting, misrepresentation of the reporter's identity, fabrication, and plagiarism. Maintains that high school reporters should search out and follow guidelines for their information-seeking methods. (SR)

      17. Deciphering Media Independence: The Gulf War Debate in Television and Newspaper News.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Peer, Limor; Chestnut, Beatrice

        1995-01-01

        Explores how the form of print versus television media influenced the autonomy of coverage during the Gulf War. Examines levels of support and criticism of President Bush's policy in the media and the diversity of sources evaluating that policy. Finds that television news was more supportive of the official government line than was print media.…

      18. News Media Databases for Content Selection and Relevance in Introductory Geoscience Courses

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Cervato, Cinzia; Ridky, Robert; Jach, Joan

        2009-01-01

        A systematic assessment of media-based coverage of geoscience topics relative to those found in textbooks is presented here. The specific question addressed is to what extent fully indexed media and print news sources can provide a useful model for course development. Whereas the improvement of students' scientific literacy cannot be achieved…

      19. From the Boob Tube to the Black Box: Television News Comprehension from an Information Processing Perspective.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Woodall, W. Gill; And Others

        1983-01-01

        Reviews research on viewers' understanding and retention of television news broadcasts; discusses the cognitive processes of memory and comprehension; and develops two models, one based on episodical memory and the other on semantic networks. Guidelines are offered for research based on both of these models. More than 40 sources are cited. (EAO)

      20. New York Times Current News Physics Applications

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Cise, John

        2010-03-01

        Since 2007 I have been using NYTimes current News articles rich in graphics and physics variables for developing edited one page web (http://CisePhysics.homestead.com/files/NYT.htm) physics questions based on current events in the news. The NYTimes home page listed above contains currently ten pages with about 40 one page current edited News related physics articles per page containing: rich graphics, graphic editions by the author, edited articles, introduction to a question, questions, and answers. I use these web pages to introduce new physics concepts to students with current applications of concepts in the news. I also use these one page physics applications as pop quizzes and extra credit for students. As news happens(e.g. the 2010 Vancouver Olympics) I find the physics applications in the NYTimes articles and generate applications and questions. These new one page applications with questions are added to the home page: http://CisePhysics.homestead.com/files/NYT.htm The newest pages start with page 10 and work back in time to 9, 8, etc. The ten web pages with about 40 news articles per page are arranged in the traditional manner: vectors, kinematics, projectiles, Newton, Work & Energy, properties of matter, fluids, temperature, heat, waves, and sound. This site is listed as a resource in AAPT's Compadre site.

      1. Source Water Quality Monitoring

        EPA Science Inventory

        Presentation will provide background information on continuous source water monitoring using online toxicity monitors and cover various tools available. Conceptual and practical aspects of source water quality monitoring will be discussed.

      2. Online 1990.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Goldstein, Morris

        This paper examines the co-existence of online and CD-ROM technologies in terms of their existing pricing structures, marketing strategies, functionality, and future roles. "Fixed Price Unlimited Usage" (FPUU) pricing and flat-rate pricing are discussed as viable alternatives to current pricing practices. In addition, it is argued that the…

      3. Online Learning

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Perry, Edward H.; Pilati, Michelle L.

        2011-01-01

        Distance education, which began as correspondence courses in the nineteenth century and grew into educational television during the twentieth century, evolved into learning on the Web by the mid-1990s. Accompanying the rise in online learning has been a similar rise in organizations and publications dedicated to serving the needs of online…

      4. Implications of televised news coverage of global warming for organizational decisions

        SciTech Connect

        Nitz, M.

        1997-12-31

        Television is an important source of information for political issues in the eyes of many people. This also holds true for environmental issues. Television news is also deemed more credible than print news because {open_quotes}seeing is believing{close_quotes}. This research is also buttressed by evidence that one of the primary conversation topics among individuals is television content. So how well does television cover global warming? Unfortunately, previous research indicates that television news suffers from some serious inadequacies in its portrayal of global warming issues. This paper examines the potential impact of this coverage on organizational decisions. Organizations include businesses, government agencies, environmental action groups, media organizations, and other parties interested with the environment. The paper proposes framing theory and involvement theory as springboards for organizational decision-making.

      5. Does Local Television News Coverage Cultivate Fatalistic Beliefs about Cancer Prevention?

        PubMed

        Niederdeppe, Jeff; Fowler, Erika Franklin; Goldstein, Kenneth; Pribble, James

        2010-06-01

        A substantial proportion of American adults hold fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention despite evidence that a large proportion of cancer deaths are preventable. Several scholars suggest that news media coverage is one source of these beliefs, but scant evidence has been brought to bear on this assertion. We report findings from two studies that assess the plausibility of the claim that local television (TV) news cultivates fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention. Study 1 features a content analysis of an October 2002 national sample of local TV and newspaper coverage about cancer (n=122 television stations; n=60 newspapers). Study 2 describes an analysis of the 2005 Annenberg National Health Communication Survey (ANHCS, n=1,783 respondents). Study 1 indicates that local TV news stories were more likely than newspaper stories to mention cancer causes and scientific research and less likely to provide follow-up information. Study 2 reveals that local TV news viewing was positively associated with fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention. Overall, findings are consistent with the claim that local TV news coverage may promote fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention. We conclude with a discussion of study implications for cultivation theory and the knowledge gap hypothesis and suggest foci for future research. PMID:20563221

      6. Does Local Television News Coverage Cultivate Fatalistic Beliefs about Cancer Prevention?

        PubMed Central

        Niederdeppe, Jeff; Fowler, Erika Franklin; Goldstein, Kenneth; Pribble, James

        2008-01-01

        A substantial proportion of American adults hold fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention despite evidence that a large proportion of cancer deaths are preventable. Several scholars suggest that news media coverage is one source of these beliefs, but scant evidence has been brought to bear on this assertion. We report findings from two studies that assess the plausibility of the claim that local television (TV) news cultivates fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention. Study 1 features a content analysis of an October 2002 national sample of local TV and newspaper coverage about cancer (n=122 television stations; n=60 newspapers). Study 2 describes an analysis of the 2005 Annenberg National Health Communication Survey (ANHCS, n=1,783 respondents). Study 1 indicates that local TV news stories were more likely than newspaper stories to mention cancer causes and scientific research and less likely to provide follow-up information. Study 2 reveals that local TV news viewing was positively associated with fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention. Overall, findings are consistent with the claim that local TV news coverage may promote fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention. We conclude with a discussion of study implications for cultivation theory and the knowledge gap hypothesis and suggest foci for future research. PMID:20563221

      7. The Virtuous All-News Radio Journalist: Perceptions of News Directors.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Wulfemeyer, K. Tim; McFadden, Lori L.

        To date, most of the scholarly research and critical articles about ethics in journalism have dealt with newspapers and television rather than with radio. To help fill this gap, a study surveyed a segment of the radio news community to determine some of the attitudes, values, and beliefs of news directors concerning ethics in their workplace.…

      8. Elucidation of complex decay schemes using on-line mass separated sources and a large array of Compton-suppressed germanium detectors

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Brown, N.; Wood, J. L.; Kulp, W. D.; Furse, D.; Demand, G. A.; Garrett, P. E.; Green, K. L.; Grinyer, G. F.; Leach, K. G.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Wong, J.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D. S.; Hackman, G.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Austin, R. A. E.; Colosimo, S.; Yates, S. W.; Cross, D.

        2008-10-01

        Complex decay scheme construction using beta decay of isotopes produced by spallation and mass separation on-line at TRIUMF-ISAC and studied with the 8π array of 20 Compton-suppressed germanium detectors is described. Results from the analysis of the ^160Yb -> ^160Tm decay will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the sensitivity to weak decay branches, assignment of γ-ray lines to isobars, and the use of conversion electron coincidences to observe low-energy transitions. The goal of this work is to achieve detailed decay scheme spectroscopy far from stability with the same level of detail as obtained with the 8π array near stabilty in earlier N=90 studies [1] [2]. [1] W.D. Kulp et al., Phys. Rev. C 69, 064309 (2004). [2] W.D. Kulp et al., Phys. Rev. C 76, 034319 (2007).

      9. What the Public Was Saying about the H1N1 Vaccine: Perceptions and Issues Discussed in On-Line Comments during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

        PubMed Central

        Henrich, Natalie; Holmes, Bev

        2011-01-01

        During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, a vaccine was made available to all Canadians. Despite efforts to promote vaccination, the public's intent to vaccinate remained low. In order to better understand the public's resistance to getting vaccinated, this study addressed factors that influenced the public's decision making about uptake. To do this, we used a relatively novel source of qualitative data – comments posted on-line in response to news articles on a particular topic. This study analysed 1,796 comments posted in response to 12 articles dealing with H1N1 vaccine on websites of three major Canadian news sources. Articles were selected based on topic and number of comments. A second objective was to assess the extent to which on-line comments can be used as a reliable data source to capture public attitudes during a health crisis. The following seven themes were mentioned in at least 5% of the comments (% indicates the percentage of comments that included the theme): fear of H1N1 (18.8%); responsibility of media (17.8%); government competency (17.7%); government trustworthiness (10.7%); fear of H1N1 vaccine (8.1%); pharmaceutical companies (7.6%); and personal protective measures (5.8%). It is assumed that the more frequently a theme was mentioned, the more that theme influenced decision making about vaccination. These key themes for the public were often not aligned with the issues and information officials perceived, and conveyed, as relevant in the decision making process. The main themes from the comments were consistent with results from surveys and focus groups addressing similar issues, which suggest that on-line comments do provide a reliable source of qualitative data on attitudes and perceptions of issues that emerge in a health crisis. The insights derived from the comments can contribute to improved communication and policy decisions about vaccination in health crises that incorporate the public's views. PMID:21533161

      10. EFFECTS OF MEDICAL DISPUTES ON INTERNET COMMUNICATIONS OF NEGATIVE EMOTIONS AND NEGATIVE ONLINE WORD-OF-MOUTH.

        PubMed

        Lee, Yi-Chih; Wu, Wei-Li

        2015-08-01

        Emotions play an important role in human behavior. Negative emotions resulting from medical disputes are problems for medical personnel to solve but also have a significant impact on a hospital's reputation and people's trust in the hospital. One medical dispute case was chosen from an Internet news source to assess the correlation between people's negative emotions and negative online word-of-mouth. Convenience sampling was used in school faculties and university students who had shared their medical treatment experiences online were the research participants. A total of 221 Taiwanese participants volunteered (158 women, 63 men; ages: 26.7% under 19, 22.6% 20-29, 30.8% 30-39,19.9% over 40). Four negative emotions were measured using rating scales: uncertainty, anger, disappointment, and sadness. Four negative online word-of-mouth measures were: venting, advice search, helping receiver, and revenge. A modeled relationship was assessed by partial least square method (PLS). Then, people's positive emotions were further analyzed to assess changes after spreading negative word-of-mouth. The results showed that uncertainty had a positive effect on venting and advice search. People who felt anger or regret spread word-of-mouth in order to help the receiver. Disappointment may trigger the revenge behavior of negative word-of-mouth. Negative emotions could be relieved after engaging in the behavior of helping the receiver. PMID:26226491

      11. EFFECTS OF MEDICAL DISPUTES ON INTERNET COMMUNICATIONS OF NEGATIVE EMOTIONS AND NEGATIVE ONLINE WORD-OF-MOUTH.

        PubMed

        Lee, Yi-Chih; Wu, Wei-Li

        2015-08-01

        Emotions play an important role in human behavior. Negative emotions resulting from medical disputes are problems for medical personnel to solve but also have a significant impact on a hospital's reputation and people's trust in the hospital. One medical dispute case was chosen from an Internet news source to assess the correlation between people's negative emotions and negative online word-of-mouth. Convenience sampling was used in school faculties and university students who had shared their medical treatment experiences online were the research participants. A total of 221 Taiwanese participants volunteered (158 women, 63 men; ages: 26.7% under 19, 22.6% 20-29, 30.8% 30-39,19.9% over 40). Four negative emotions were measured using rating scales: uncertainty, anger, disappointment, and sadness. Four negative online word-of-mouth measures were: venting, advice search, helping receiver, and revenge. A modeled relationship was assessed by partial least square method (PLS). Then, people's positive emotions were further analyzed to assess changes after spreading negative word-of-mouth. The results showed that uncertainty had a positive effect on venting and advice search. People who felt anger or regret spread word-of-mouth in order to help the receiver. Disappointment may trigger the revenge behavior of negative word-of-mouth. Negative emotions could be relieved after engaging in the behavior of helping the receiver.

      12. News Expedition: Teachers go on extreme journey Summer School: Summer school inspires student Conference: Bristol plans science teaching festival Teacher Support: Make the most of your SPN support Conference: Schools can use latest physics Web Resource: Datamouse online project goes live Forthcoming Events

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        2010-01-01

        Expedition: Teachers go on extreme journey Summer School: Summer school inspires student Conference: Bristol plans science teaching festival Teacher Support: Make the most of your SPN support Conference: Schools can use latest physics Web Resource: Datamouse online project goes live Forthcoming Events

      13. Television News Uses: A Cross-National Comparison.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Levy, Mark R.

        1978-01-01

        Reports that a classification of television news uses and gratifications based on research in Leeds, England, did not adequately encompass the functions of television news for a United States audience. (GW)

      14. Mixed News on Drug Abuse Among Lesbian, Gay Americans

        MedlinePlus

        ... News on: Drug Abuse Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Mental Disorders Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Drug Abuse Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Mental Disorders About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs ...

      15. Climate Science News 2.0 at NSIDC

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Leitzell, K.; Meier, W.; Serreze, M. C.; Stroeve, J. C.; Scambos, T. A.

        2011-12-01

        How does a small science and data center step into new media? We do not have a lot of time to blog daily, maintain multiple social media accounts, monitor comments, or to constantly buff our image in the fast-changing world of social media. At the same time, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC)'s news announcements and updates on Arctic sea ice reach a huge audience. We have answers to the questions about Arctic climate change that many people are asking, and we want to share that information with people who get their news from non-traditional sources. How can we take advantage of new technologies to help our information reach the largest number of people, without overwhelming our limited resources? So far our approach has been to continue offering innovative, insightful content that in some ways sells itself. We use social media as a tool to share this popular content, emphasizing quality over quantity (We do not tweet every day, but when we do, people listen). We also use social media as a research and "buzz-monitoring" tool to learn more about and to interact with our diverse audience. Even before NSIDC ventured onto Twitter and Facebook, people were using these tools to share our content. Social media allowed us to passively enjoy their benefits, as our regular readers shared updates with their friends and colleagues. The news, analysis, and data we provide were unique, and that made them attractive to a broad readership. By dipping a toe into social media, however, we found that we could start sharing our content with more control, and that a little effort goes a long way in spreading the word. In this presentation/poster we will show how NSIDC is using Twitter, Facebook, and the new Icelights Web site, to communicate with the public about changing sea ice and climate.

      16. [Influence of the news media].

        PubMed

        Camarena Luna, R

        1991-01-01

        Newspapers, in addition to news, also cover topics of permanent interest to their readers. One such topic is sexuality. The appearance of the incurable sexually transmitted disease AIDS obliges a reconsideration of the complex and contradictory concept of sexuality. Sexuality is not often spoken of openly; rather, it is secret, hidden, and referred to obliquely. Sexuality is the manifestation and satisfaction of the sexual impulses common to all individuals. Sexuality is determined by anatomic and physiologic aspects and also by the knowledge, experiences, values, and norms internalized by the individual living in a social group. Messages about sexual conduct are constantly being received. This social part of sexuality supported by customs and morals is the part that is directly influenced by communications media. An important objective of the media is to create awareness and mold opinions. Mexico's large national circulation newspapers present different points of view about sexuality. Newspapers that continually critique homosexual practices and those that demonstrate implicit approval of pornographic videos by advertising them both present attitudes without providing opportunities to reason, compare, or support opinions. Sexuality is usually referred to indirectly and superficially in the press. Sex education may be mentioned but not the erotic implications of sexuality, and acceptance or opposition to use of condoms may be discussed without mention of psychological barriers to their use. The national press is not prepared to propose new attitudes toward sexuality in the age of AIDS. Only 1 national newspaper in Mexico regularly provides information on AIDS including aspects related to sexual pleasure and responsibility and safer sex. The majority continue with their pre-AIDS coverage of sexuality, using it to arouse interest but providing little depth. Newspapers should provide more extensive coverage on sexuality and its modifications due to AIDS, a reality

      17. [Influence of the news media].

        PubMed

        Camarena Luna, R

        1991-01-01

        Newspapers, in addition to news, also cover topics of permanent interest to their readers. One such topic is sexuality. The appearance of the incurable sexually transmitted disease AIDS obliges a reconsideration of the complex and contradictory concept of sexuality. Sexuality is not often spoken of openly; rather, it is secret, hidden, and referred to obliquely. Sexuality is the manifestation and satisfaction of the sexual impulses common to all individuals. Sexuality is determined by anatomic and physiologic aspects and also by the knowledge, experiences, values, and norms internalized by the individual living in a social group. Messages about sexual conduct are constantly being received. This social part of sexuality supported by customs and morals is the part that is directly influenced by communications media. An important objective of the media is to create awareness and mold opinions. Mexico's large national circulation newspapers present different points of view about sexuality. Newspapers that continually critique homosexual practices and those that demonstrate implicit approval of pornographic videos by advertising them both present attitudes without providing opportunities to reason, compare, or support opinions. Sexuality is usually referred to indirectly and superficially in the press. Sex education may be mentioned but not the erotic implications of sexuality, and acceptance or opposition to use of condoms may be discussed without mention of psychological barriers to their use. The national press is not prepared to propose new attitudes toward sexuality in the age of AIDS. Only 1 national newspaper in Mexico regularly provides information on AIDS including aspects related to sexual pleasure and responsibility and safer sex. The majority continue with their pre-AIDS coverage of sexuality, using it to arouse interest but providing little depth. Newspapers should provide more extensive coverage on sexuality and its modifications due to AIDS, a reality

      18. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1987

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        1988-01-01

        This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1987. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases.

      19. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1989

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        1990-01-01

        This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1989. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases.

      20. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1986

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        1987-01-01

        This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1986. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases.