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Sample records for onychomycosis

  1. Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Oliverio; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Welsh, Esperanza

    2010-03-01

    Onychomycosis is a frequent nail disease caused by dermatophytes, yeasts, and nondermatophyte molds. Trichophyton rubrum, T mentagrophytes, and Epidermophyton floccosum are the most common etiologic agents worldwide. Candida spp are the most frequent among the yeasts. Diagnosis is corroborated by direct microscopic examination, culture, and histomycology with periodic acid-Schiff stain. Other new methods of diagnosis are discussed. Treatment is based on oral antifungals: terbinafine, itraconazole, and fluconazole, including other emerging triazole drugs. Therapeutic outcome with ciclopirox and amorolfine lacquers alone and combined with systemic therapy are also reviewed, as well as the new nail enhancers and physical and chemical removal of the diseased nails.

  2. [Treatment of onychomycosis].

    PubMed

    Feuilhade de Chauvin, M

    2014-12-01

    A positive mycological examination is required before discussion of treatment of onychomycosis. Onychomycosis is most commonly due to dermatophytes in association with tinea pedis and/or tinea manuum. It is a catched infection. Candida onychomycosis is a rare opportunistic infection and onychomycosis due to non-dermatophytic moulds is very rare as a "chance mishap". The treatment of dermatophyte onychomycosis takes each infected part of the nail into account. Topical antifungal agents should be reserved for mild to moderate onychomycosis. Systemic antifungal agents are required to severe onychomycosis. In all cases, removal of infected nail parts is useful to facilitate the penetration of antifungal drugs and eradication of reinfection sites may be done to prevent recurrences and relapses. In primary, Candida onychomycosis treatment with topical antifungal drugs may be effective but in case of treatment failure, a systemic therapy is required. Suppression predisposing factors is useful. The treatment of non-dermatophytic moulds onychomycosis is still a challenge. Except Neoscytalidium spp., which mimic a dermatophytosis, non-dermatophytic moulds may be isolated from dystrophic nails and it is always difficult to specify their role as a primary pathogen or as a colonizer of nails. The available topical and systemic antifungal drugs are not effective against these non-dermatophytic moulds except itraconazole for onychomycosis due to Aspergillus spp. New therapy such as light and laser therapy are in evaluation.

  3. Onychomycosis. A Mexican survey.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Roberto; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Padilla, Ma Carmen; Arce, Martín; Atoche, Carlos; Barba, José; Campos, Pablo; Fernández, Ramón; Mayorga, Jorge; Nazar, Dulce; Ocampo, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a nail infection caused by dermatophytes, Candida and molds. We aimed to obtain an estimated frequency of onychomycosis in out-patients in private practice through a survey in ten representative cities of Mexico. 12,637 ambulatory patients voluntarily agreed to participate in this National Survey, answering 17 questions on onychomycosis, regardless if they had or did not have any clinical suspicion of onychomycosis. 53% of them were seen for the first time and their main complaint was not onychomycosis. The study was performed in the private offices of 300 physicians in different cities. 48% were clinically diagnosed with onychomycosis. Toenails were affected in 88%, fingernails in 5% and both in 7%. Onychomycosis was diagnosed more frequently in the nails of the first toes and of the thumbs. The main complaint was nail thickening and aesthetic changes. Other associated diseases were diabetes (22%) and arterial hypertension (21%). This survey showed the high frequency of onychomycosis. An intentional search with mycological confirmation is needed in out-patients attending general practice with other complaints, to detect undiagnosed cases.

  4. Tinea and Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore

    2016-06-01

    Onychomycosis and tinea pedis are common fungal infections affecting the nails and feet, respectively. Two newly approved topical agents for onychomycosis are efinaconazole and tavaborole, both of which have demonstrated respectable cure rates in clinical studies. For tinea pedis, naftifine 2% and luliconazole 1% are new agents, both administered for relatively short courses, that may foster greater adherence Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S110-S113. PMID:27537822

  5. Nail clipping in onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    Bertanha, Laura; Chiacchio, Nilton Di

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is the most prevalent onychopathy and it requires a correct early diagnosis. Currently, the diagnostic gold standard is the association of direct mycological test with culture; however, it shows variable sensitivity. The histopathological examination of the distal nail plate, called clipping, has shown to be an adjuvant in diagnosing onychomycosis. This is an easy-to-perform, relatively cheap examination that is little dependent of the examiner, rapidly provides results, has high sensitivity, and for patients it is painless and harmless.

  6. Onychomycosis Due to Nondermatophytic Molds

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Min; Ha, Gyoung Yim

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there have been many studies about onychomycosis due to nondermatophytic molds (NDM), few studies about etiologic agents including NDM in onychomycosis have been reported in Korea. Objective: This study investigated onychomycosis due to NDM in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Objective This study investigated onychomycosis due to NDM in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Methods In the 10-year period from 1999~2009, we reviewed 59 patients with onychomycosis due to NDM. The etiologic agents were identified by cultures on Sabouraud's Dextrose agar with and without cycloheximide. In some cases, internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis was done. NDM isolated considered pathogens when the presence of fungal elements was identified by direct microscopy observation and in follow-up cultures yielding the same fungi. Results Onychomycosis due to NDM comprised 2.3% of all onychomycosis. Of the 59 patients with onychomycosis due to NDM, 84.7% were toenail onychomycosis and 15.3% were fingernail onychomycosis. The incidence rate was highest in the fifth decade (27.1%). The ratio of male to female patients was 1:1.6. The frequency of associated diseases, in descending order, was hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cerebral hematoma. Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (86.4%) was the most common clinical type of onychomycosis. Aspergillus spp. was the most frequently isolated etiologic agent of onychomycosis due to NDM (83.0%). Other causative agents were Scopulariopsis brevicaulis (10.2%), Acremonium spp. (3.4%), Fusarium solani (1.7%), and Chaetomium globosum (1.7%). Conclusion Because of the increase in onychomycosis due to NDM, we suggest the need of a careful mycological examination in patients with onychomycosis. PMID:22577268

  7. Plasma treatment of onychomycosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zilan; Roe, Jeff; Grammer, Tim; Him, Yeon-Ho; Graves, David B.

    2015-09-01

    Onychomycosis or fungal infection of the toenail or fingernail is a common affliction. Approximately 10% of the world's adult population is estimated to suffer from onychomycosis. Current treatment options such as topical creams, oral drugs, or laser treatments are generally limited by a variety of problems. We present results for an alternative onychomycosis treatment scheme using atmospheric pressure cold air plasmas. Using thinned cow hoof as a model nail material, we tested the ability of various plasma sources to act through the model nail to eradicate either bacteria or fungus deposited on the opposite side. Following 20 minute exposure to a surface microdischarge (SMD) device operating in room air, we observed a ~ 2 log reduction of E. coli. A similar result was obtained against T. rubrum after 45 min plasma treatment. NOx species concentration penetrating through the model nail as well as uptake into the nail were measured as a function of nail thickness. We propose that these plasma-generated species, or perhaps their reaction products, are responsible for at least part of the observed anti-microbial effect. We also explore the use of ultraviolet light acting in synergy with plasma-generated chemical species.

  8. Understanding Onychomycosis Resolving Diagnostic Dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    No scientifically rigorous, large, prospective studies have been done to document the true prevalence of onychomycosis; the reported rates vary mainly by climate and by population, but the overall prevalence in the United States is estimated to be at least 10%. Advanced age and diabetes are the most commonly reported risk factors for onychomycosis. The differential diagnosis of onychomycosis is lengthy, and visual inspection alone is not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis-direct microscopic examination of a wet-mount preparation with 10% to 20% potassium hydroxide is the first-line diagnostic test. PMID:27074698

  9. Onychomycosis due to opportunistic molds*

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Herrera, Erick Obed; Arroyo-Camarena, Stefanie; Tejada-García, Diana Luz; Porras-López, Carlos Francisco; Arenas, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Onychomycosis are caused by dermatophytes and Candida, but rarely by non- dermatophyte molds. These opportunistic agents are filamentous fungi found as soil and plant pathogens. OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of opportunistic molds in onychomycosis. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 4,220 cases with onychomycosis, diagnosed in a 39-month period at the Institute of Dermatology and Skin surgery "Prof. Dr. Fernando A. Cordero C." in Guatemala City, and confirmed with a positive KOH test and culture. RESULTS: 32 cases (0.76%) of onychomycosis caused by opportunistic molds were confirmed. The most affected age group ranged from 41 to 65 years (15 patients, 46.9%) and females were more commonly affected (21 cases, 65.6%) than males. Lateral and distal subungual onychomycosis (OSD-L) was detected in 20 cases (62.5%). The microscopic examination with KOH showed filaments in 19 cases (59.4%), dermatophytoma in 9 cases (28.1%), spores in 2 cases (6.25%), and filaments and spores in 2 cases (6.25%). Etiologic agents: Aspergillus sp., 11 cases (34.4%); Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, 8 cases (25.0%); Cladosporium sp., 3 cases (9.4%); Acremonium sp., 2 cases (6.25%); Paecilomyces sp., 2 cases (6.25%); Tritirachium oryzae, 2 cases (6.25%); Fusarium sp., Phialophora sp., Rhizopus sp. and Alternaria alternate, 1 case (3.1%) each. CONCLUSIONS: We found onychomycosis by opportunistic molds in 0.76% of the cases and DLSO was present in 62.5%. The most frequent isolated etiological agents were: Aspergillus sp. and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. PMID:26131862

  10. Onychomycosis caused by Aspergillus versicolor.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, Stefano; Chiaratti, Anna; Harak, Henry

    2010-07-01

    We report a case of onychomycosis caused by Aspergillus versicolor in a 66-year-old female patient. The infection was characterised clinically by yellowish pigmentation of the nail plate and mild nail bed hyperkeratosis of the first left toe. All other nails were normal. Three direct microscopical examinations of nail samples revealed the presence of hyaline hyphae as well as conidiophores. Pure colonies of A. versicolor were found in three cultures. The patient was successfully treated with oral itraconazole. PMID:19422523

  11. Onychomycosis: Strategies to Minimize Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Elewski, Boni E; Rosen, Ted; Caldwell, Bryan; Pariser, David M; Kircik, Leon H; Bhatia, Neal; Tosti, Antonella

    2016-03-01

    Recurrence (relapse or re-infection) in onychomycosis is common, occurring in 10% to 53% of patients. However, data on prevalence is limited as few clinical studies follow patients beyond 12 months. It has been suggested that recurrence after continuous terbinafine treatment may be less common than with intermittent or continuous itraconazole therapy, probably due to the fungicidal activity of terbinafine, although these differences tended not to be significant. Relapse rates also increase with time, peaking at month 36. Although a number of factors have been suggested to play a role in recurrence, only the co-existence of diabetes has been shown to have a significant impact. Data with topical therapy is sparse; a small study showed amorolfine prophylaxis may delay recurrence. High concentrations of efinaconazole have been reported in the nail two weeks' post-treatment suggesting twice monthly prophylaxis with topical treatments may be a realistic option, and may be an important consideration in diabetic patients with onychomycosis. Data suggest that prophylaxis may need to be continued for up to three years for optimal effect. Treating tinea pedis and any immediate family members is also critical. Other preventative strategies include avoiding communal areas where infection can spread (such as swimming pools), and decontaminating footwear. PMID:26954312

  12. Onychomycosis Caused by Chaetomium globosum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Min; Lee, Myung Hoon; Suh, Moo Kyu; Ha, Gyoung Yim; Kim, Heesoo; Choi, Jong Soo

    2013-05-01

    Onychomycosis is usually caused by dermatophytes, but some nondermatophytic molds and yeasts are also associated with invasion of nails. The genus Chaetomium is a dematiaceous nondermatophytic mold found in soil and plant debris as a saprophytic fungus. We report the first Korean case of onychomycosis caused by Chaetomium globosum in a 35-year-old male. The patient showed brownish-yellow discoloration and subungual hyperkeratosis on the right toenails (1st and 5th) and left toenails (1st and 4th). Direct microscopic examination of scraping on the potassium hydroxide preparation revealed septate hyphae and repeated cultures on Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) without cycloheximide slants showed the same fast-growing colonies, which were initially velvety white then turned to dark gray to brown. However, there was no growth of colony on SDA with cycloheximide slants. Brown-colored septated hyphae, perithecia and ascospores were shown in the slide culture. The DNA sequence of internal transcribed spacer region of the clinical sample was a 100% match to that of C. globosum strain ATCC 6205 (GenBank accession number EF524036.1). We confirmed C. globosum by KOH mount, colony, and light microscopic morphology and DNA sequence analysis. The patient was treated with 250 mg oral terbinafine daily and topical amorolfine 5% nail lacquer for 3 months.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  14. Case of Onychomycosis Caused by Microsporum racemosum

    PubMed Central

    García-Martos, Pedro; Gené, Josepa; Solé, María; Mira, José; Ruíz-Henestrosa, Ricardo; Guarro, Josep

    1999-01-01

    We report the case of a Spanish 60-year-old female who presented in 1997 with onychomycosis of the left thumbnail following an injury caused by a fresh fish bone. Microsporum racemosum was repeatedly cultured from nail scrapings, and its identity was confirmed by sequencing the isolate’s ITS1/ITS2 and 5.8S rRNA regions. The patient was successfully treated with itraconazole, which was administered for 12 weeks. This represents the first case of onychomycosis due to M. racemosum and the first time that this species has been isolated from a human in Europe. PMID:9854108

  15. Treatment of Onychomycosis – a Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Pajaziti, Laura; Vasili, Ermira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of the nail unit. Anatomical and physiological characteristics of the nail apparatus impose the need for long-term treatment to achieve complete cure. Goal: The main goal of this project is to study the effectiveness of several treatment protocols for onychomycosis based on Scoring Clinical Index for Onychomycosis (SCIO). Material and methods: The study included 133 patients with onychomycosis, diagnosed by KOH microscopy and culture. Based on disease severity, patients were grouped into groups with SCIO values: 6-9, and 12-16. These groups were randomly subdivided to 5 subgroups according to the given treatment protocols: fluconazole 150 mg 1x weekly, itraconazole continual therapy, itraconazole pulse therapy, terbinafine 250 mg/d, and terbinafine + ciclopirox 8% lacquer, respectively. The cure rate was evaluated at the end of 48 week. Results: The obtained cure rates according to the above mentioned protocols were: 92.30%, 81.81%, 83.33%, 90.90%, and 100%, respectively for groups of patients with SCIO values 6 – 9. Within patients with SCIO values 12-16, were achieved cure rates as follows: 78.57%, 78.57%, 75%, 80%, and 86.66%. Conclusions: There was no statistically significant difference in cure rate between five treatment protocols applied in this study. In patients with high SCIO values is expected a decrease in cure rate. PMID:26261386

  16. Onychomycosis Associated with Exophiala oligosperma in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yu-Min; Rajendran, Ranjith Kumar; Lin, Ying-Fang; Kirschner, Roland; Hu, Sindy

    2016-02-01

    A fungus was isolated from a nail of a 54-year-old female patient with onychomycosis in Taiwan. Based on ITS rDNA as well as beta tubulin gene sequences and microscopic analyses, this fungus was identified as Exophiala oligosperma. This is the first record of E. oligosperma in Taiwan. Negative keratin azure test indicates that keratin degradation is not involved in cases of E. oligosperma associated with skin and nail diseases. PMID:26378025

  17. [How I treat... onychomycosis by topical therapy].

    PubMed

    Piérard, G E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    2015-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a frequent and challenging disease to treat. Well conducted oral therapies are commonly quite effective for a short term period. However, recurrences are frequent. Topical therapies appear globally less active. Studies in this field are rare, although the promotional advertisements to the general public abound nowadays. Various microscopic fungi (dermatophytes, yeasts, molds) should be targeted by the treatment, In addition, the distinct activity conditions of both growth and quiescence of the pathogen fungi should be influenced by the treatments. This is not frequently considered by drug companies and encountered in practice. The antifungal drug penetration inside all the nail layers is important to be performed. PMID:25902599

  18. [How I treat... onychomycosis by topical therapy].

    PubMed

    Piérard, G E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    2015-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a frequent and challenging disease to treat. Well conducted oral therapies are commonly quite effective for a short term period. However, recurrences are frequent. Topical therapies appear globally less active. Studies in this field are rare, although the promotional advertisements to the general public abound nowadays. Various microscopic fungi (dermatophytes, yeasts, molds) should be targeted by the treatment, In addition, the distinct activity conditions of both growth and quiescence of the pathogen fungi should be influenced by the treatments. This is not frequently considered by drug companies and encountered in practice. The antifungal drug penetration inside all the nail layers is important to be performed.

  19. Great toenail onychomycosis caused by Syncephalastrum racemosum.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Milos D; Bulajić, Nina

    2006-01-01

    Nondermatophyte molds are fungi found in soil and decaying plant debris and are generally considered to be uncommon or secondary pathogens of diseased nails. Prevalence rates of onychomycoses caused by nondermatophyte molds range between 1.45 percent and 17.60 percent. The most common nondermatophyte molds associated with nail disease are Scopulariopsis, Scytalidium, Fusarium, Aspergillus and Onychocola canadensis. Syncephalastrum racemosum, a nondermatophyte mold, belongs to the class Zygomycetae. Only one well-documented case of human disease attributed to this organism has been described. We describe a 45-year-old man with culture proven toenail onychomycosis due to Syncephalstrum racemosum.

  20. Network Meta-Analysis of Onychomycosis Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditya K.; Daigle, Deanne; Foley, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many onychomycosis treatments have not been directly compared in head-to-head clinical trials. Objective: To determine the relative efficacy of onychomycosis treatments using network meta-analysis (NMA). Methods We conducted a systematic review and NMA of mycological cure rates. Results Nineteen trials were included in the network. Terbinafine 250 mg was significantly superior to all treatments except itraconazole 400 mg pulse therapy. The itraconazole 400 mg pulse regimen was significantly superior to all topicals except efinaconazole 10% nail solution. Itraconazole 200 mg was significantly superior to all topical treatments, while fluconazole 150-450 mg, efinaconazole 10% nail solution, tavaborole 5% nail solution, ciclopirox nail lacquer 8%, terbinafine nail solution, and amorolfine 5% nail lacquer were significantly superior to placebo. Conclusions Newly developed topicals have improved the odds ratios (ORs) of mycological cure, yet these ORs were not significantly greater than preexisting topical treatments. Further experience with these agents will reveal their clinical significance, and head-to-head trials are warranted. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:27170937

  1. Onychomycosis by molds. Report of 78 cases.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Cruz-Aguilar, Pamela; Ponce, Rosa María

    2007-01-01

    A retrospective study of onychomycohosis by molds was carried out during a 14-year period (1992-2005). All cases were clinically and mycologically proven (repetitive KOH and culture) and then each of the molds was identified. A total of 5,221 cases of onychomycosis were evaluated, 78 of which were molds (1.49%). Mean patient age was 44.1 years. 75/78 cases occurred in toenails. Associated factors were detected in 39/78 (50.0%) cases, with the major ones being: peripheral vascular disease, contact with soil, and trauma. The most frequent clinical presentation was distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (DLSO), in 54/78 cases (69%). The most frequent causative agents were: Scopulariopsis brevicaulis in 34/78 cases and Aspergillus niger in 13/78 cases. Onychomycoses by molds are infrequent; in this study they accounted for 1.49% of cases. The clinical features are virtually similar to those caused by dermatophytes, which makes the clinicomycological tests necessary.

  2. Onychomycosis by Fusarium oxysporum probably acquired in utero

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Vania O.; Vicente, Vania A.; Werner, Betina; Gomes, Renata R.; Fornari, Gheniffer; Herkert, Patricia F.; Rodrigues, Cristina O.; Abagge, Kerstin T.; Robl, Renata; Camiña, Ricardo H

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum has been described as a pathogen causing onychomycosis, its incidence has been increasing in immunocompetent and disseminated infection can occur in immunosuppressed individuals. We describe the first case of congenital onychomycosis in a child caused by Fusarium oxysporum. The infection being acquired in utero was proven by molecular methods with the identification of the fungus both in the nail and placenta, most probably as an ascending contamination/infection in a HIV-positive, immunosuppressed mother. PMID:25383318

  3. Onychomycosis: Evaluation, Treatment Options, Managing Recurrence, and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Tracey C

    2016-07-01

    Onychomycosis is the most common nail disease seen in podiatric practice. Effective long-term management remains problematic. We need to treat onychomycosis effectively to prevent its progression into a severe, debilitating, and painful condition, and to manage recurrence. With new agents now available and greater discussion on management strategies, this article reviews the appropriate evaluation of the disease, treatment options, and optimal patient outcomes. PMID:27215153

  4. Essential Oils for Treatment for Onychomycosis: A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Flores, Fernanda C; Beck, Ruy C R; da Silva, Cristiane de B

    2016-02-01

    Onychomycosis are fungal infections affecting finger and toenails mainly caused by dermatophyte fungi and some Candida species. Low cure rates and frequent recurrence, development of a fungal resistance front to various antimicrobial agents topical and systemic, and an ineffective topical treatment make onychomycosis difficult to treat. Essential oils are excellent candidates for the topical treatment for onychomycosis because the development of resistance by fungi is rare, and the presence of side effects is low. They are composed of a complex variety of compounds, mainly terpenes, with low molecular weight, which may easily penetrate into the nail plate, finding the fungi elements. The complex mixture confers a broad antifungal spectrum of action, through interaction with biological membranes, interference in radical and enzymatic reaction of fungi cells. Essential oils may become the source of new therapeutic molecules, and the use of an essential oil incorporated into a topical formulation is an interesting, safe, and effective alternative for the treatment for onychomycosis. However, studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of essential oils in the treatment for onychomycosis in vivo. This mini-review aims to present the potential use of essential oils for the treatment for onychomycosis, focusing on the last decade.

  5. Essential Oils for Treatment for Onychomycosis: A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Flores, Fernanda C; Beck, Ruy C R; da Silva, Cristiane de B

    2016-02-01

    Onychomycosis are fungal infections affecting finger and toenails mainly caused by dermatophyte fungi and some Candida species. Low cure rates and frequent recurrence, development of a fungal resistance front to various antimicrobial agents topical and systemic, and an ineffective topical treatment make onychomycosis difficult to treat. Essential oils are excellent candidates for the topical treatment for onychomycosis because the development of resistance by fungi is rare, and the presence of side effects is low. They are composed of a complex variety of compounds, mainly terpenes, with low molecular weight, which may easily penetrate into the nail plate, finding the fungi elements. The complex mixture confers a broad antifungal spectrum of action, through interaction with biological membranes, interference in radical and enzymatic reaction of fungi cells. Essential oils may become the source of new therapeutic molecules, and the use of an essential oil incorporated into a topical formulation is an interesting, safe, and effective alternative for the treatment for onychomycosis. However, studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of essential oils in the treatment for onychomycosis in vivo. This mini-review aims to present the potential use of essential oils for the treatment for onychomycosis, focusing on the last decade. PMID:26481920

  6. Onychomycosis caused by Scopulariopsis brevicaulis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Hoon; Hwang, Sung Min; Suh, Moo Kyu; Ha, Gyoung Yim; Kim, Heesoo; Park, Jeong Young

    2012-05-01

    Onychomycosis is usually caused by dermatophytes, but some nondermatophytic molds and yeasts are also associated with invasion of nails. Scopulariopsis brevicaulis is a nondermatophytic mold found in soil as a saprophyte. We report two cases of onychomycosis caused by S. brevicaulis in a 48-year-old male and a 79-year-old female. The two patients presented with a typical distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis. Direct microscopic examination of the potassium hydroxide preparation revealed fungal elements. From toenail lesions of the patients, brown colonies with powdery surface, which are a characteristic of S. brevicaulis, were cultured on two Sabouraud's dextrose agar plates. Three cultures taken from nail plates within a 2-week interval yielded similar findings. Numerous branched conidiophores with chains of rough walled, lemon-shaped conidia were observed in slide culture by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer for the two clinical isolates were identical to that of S. brevicaulis strain WM 04.498. To date, a total of 13 cases of S. brevicaulis onychomycosis including the two present cases have been reported in Korea. Mean age of the patients was 46.1 years, with a higher prevalence in males (69.2%). Toenail involvement was observed in all cases including a case involving both fingernail and toenail. The most frequent clinical presentation was distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis in 12 cases, while one case was proximal subungual onychomycosis.

  7. Onychomycosis diagnosis using fluorescence and infrared imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Ana Paula; Fortunato, Thereza Cury; Stringasci, Mirian D.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Inada, Natalia M.

    2015-06-01

    Onychomycosis is a common disease of the nail plate, constituting approximately half of all cases of nail infection. Onychomycosis diagnosis is challenging because it is hard to distinguish from other diseases of the nail lamina such as psoriasis, lichen ruber or eczematous nails. The existing methods of diagnostics so far consist of clinical and laboratory analysis, such as: Direct Mycological examination and culture, PCR and histopathology with PAS staining. However, they all share certain disadvantages in terms of sensitivity and specificity, time delay, or cost. This study aimed to evaluate the use of infrared and fluorescence imaging as new non-invasive diagnostic tools in patients with suspected onychomycosis, and compare them with established techniques. For fluorescence analysis, a Clinical Evince (MM Optics®) was used, which consists of an optical assembly with UV LED light source wavelength 400 nm +/- 10 nm and the maximum light intensity: 40 mW/cm2 +/- 20%. For infrared analysis, a Fluke® Camera FKL model Ti400 was used. Patients with onychomycosis and control group were analyzed for comparison. The fluorescence images were processed using MATLAB® routines, and infrared images were analyzed using the SmartView® 3.6 software analysis provided by the company Fluke®. The results demonstrated that both infrared and fluorescence could be complementary to diagnose different types of onychomycosis lesions. The simplicity of operation, quick response and non-invasive assessment of the nail patients in real time, are important factors to be consider for an implementation.

  8. Tavaborole topical solution, 5% for the treatment of toenail onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Zane, L T; Plattner, J; Chanda, S; Coronado, D; Merchant, T; Alley, M R K; Gupta, A K

    2015-10-01

    Tavaborole topical solution, 5% (tavaborole) is a novel, boron-based, antifungal pharmaceutical agent indicated for treatment of toenail onychomycosis due to the dermatophytes Trichophyton rubrum or Trichophyton mentagrophytes. In preclinical studies, tavaborole effectively penetrated through full-thickness, non-diseased cadaver fingernails, including those with up to four layers of nail polish. Limited systemic absorption was observed following topical application of tavaborole. In phase III clinical trials involving patients with distal subungual onychomycosis affecting 20-60% of a target great toenail, significantly more patients treated with tavaborole versus vehicle achieved completely clear nail with negative mycology following daily application for 48 weeks. Treatment-emergent adverse events reported by at least 1% of patients treated with tavaborole and at a greater frequency versus vehicle included ingrown toenail, exfoliation, erythema and dermatitis. Treatment discontinuations were uncommon. Results from preclinical studies and phase III clinical trials establish tavaborole as a safe and efficacious treatment for toenail onychomycosis. PMID:26583302

  9. Antifungal Drugs for Onychomycosis: Efficacy, Safety, and Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore; Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    In 1996, oral terbinafine joined itraconazole and fluconazole on the short list of systemic medications that could be used to treat onychomycosis (although fluconazole was not approved for this indication by the US Food and Drug Administration [FDA], it was commonly used for this purpose). In 1999, ciclopirox was the first topical treatment to be FDA approved. The addition of the topical antifungal agents efinaconazole and tavaborole in 2014 expanded the roster of medications available to more effectively manage onychomycosis in a wide range of patients, including those for whom comorbid conditions, concomitant medications, or patient preference limited the use of systemic antifungals. PMID:27074700

  10. Concepts in Onychomycosis Treatment and Recurrence Prevention: An Update.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore

    2016-03-01

    In considering therapy for onychomycosis, the most important factor to take into account is patient selection rather than treatment selection. Patients should be screened and evaluated for the extent of nail involvement, the amount of subungual debris, the degree of dystrophy, their ability and willingness to follow the regimen, and whether comorbidities are present that may affect the efficacy and/or safety of one or more therapies. Onychomycosis is a chronic disease with a high recurrence rate. Commonsense measures to reduce the risk for reinfection include patient education and a clinician-patient team approach to long-term management. PMID:27074701

  11. An update on photodynamic therapies in the treatment of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Simmons, B J; Griffith, R D; Falto-Aizpurua, L A; Nouri, K

    2015-07-01

    Onychomycosis is a common fungal infection of the nails that is increasing in prevalence in the old, diabetics and immunocompromised. Onychomycosis presents a therapeutic challenge that can lead to significant reductions in quality of life leading to both physical and psychological consequences. Current treatment modalities are difficult to implement due to the poor penetration of topical treatments to the nail bed, the slow growing nature of nails and the need for prolonged use of topical and/or oral medications. Standard of care medications have cure rates of 63-76% that leads to a high propensity of treatment failures and recurrences. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) offers an alternative treatment for onychomycosis. Methylene blue dye, methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) and aminolevulinic acid (ALA) have been used as photosensitizers with approximately 630 nm light. These modalities are combined with pre-treatment of urea and/or microabrasion for better penetration. PDT treatments are well tolerated with only mild transient pain, burning and erythema. In addition, significant cure rates for patients who have contraindications to oral medications or failed standard medications can be obtained. With further enhancements in photosensitizer permeability, decreased pre-treatment and photosensitizer incubation times, PDT can be a more efficient and cost-effective in office based treatment for onychomycosis. However, more large-scale randomized control clinical trials are needed to access the efficacy of PDT treatments. PMID:25589056

  12. An update on photodynamic therapies in the treatment of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Simmons, B J; Griffith, R D; Falto-Aizpurua, L A; Nouri, K

    2015-07-01

    Onychomycosis is a common fungal infection of the nails that is increasing in prevalence in the old, diabetics and immunocompromised. Onychomycosis presents a therapeutic challenge that can lead to significant reductions in quality of life leading to both physical and psychological consequences. Current treatment modalities are difficult to implement due to the poor penetration of topical treatments to the nail bed, the slow growing nature of nails and the need for prolonged use of topical and/or oral medications. Standard of care medications have cure rates of 63-76% that leads to a high propensity of treatment failures and recurrences. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) offers an alternative treatment for onychomycosis. Methylene blue dye, methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) and aminolevulinic acid (ALA) have been used as photosensitizers with approximately 630 nm light. These modalities are combined with pre-treatment of urea and/or microabrasion for better penetration. PDT treatments are well tolerated with only mild transient pain, burning and erythema. In addition, significant cure rates for patients who have contraindications to oral medications or failed standard medications can be obtained. With further enhancements in photosensitizer permeability, decreased pre-treatment and photosensitizer incubation times, PDT can be a more efficient and cost-effective in office based treatment for onychomycosis. However, more large-scale randomized control clinical trials are needed to access the efficacy of PDT treatments.

  13. Onychomycosis: Potential of Nail Lacquers in Transungual Delivery of Antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Hemlata; Pathak, Kamla

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis constitutes the most common fungal infection of the nail (skin beneath the nail bed) that affects the finger as well as toe nails. It is an infection that is initiated by yeasts, dermatophytes, and nondermatophyte molds. Nail lacquers are topical solutions intended only for use on fingernails as well as toenails and have been found to be useful in the treatment of onychomycosis. Thus, in the present review an attempt has been made to focus on the treatment aspects of onychomycosis and the ungual delivery of antifungals via nail lacquer. Several patents issued on nail lacquer till date have also been discussed. Penetration efficiency was assessed by several researchers across the human nail plate to investigate the potentiality of nail lacquer based formulations. Various clinical trials have also been conducted in order to evaluate the safety and efficacy of nail lacquers in delivering antifungal agents. Thus, it can be concluded that nail lacquer based preparations are efficacious and stable formulations. These possess tremendous potential for clinical topical application to the nail bed in the treatment of onychomycosis. PMID:27123362

  14. Morphopathological aspects of healthy nails and nails affected by onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Zaikovska, Olga; Pilmane, Mara; Kisis, Janis

    2014-09-01

    Patients of onychomycosis are common in the dermatology practice. Contemporary morphology creates opportunities to study the functional units of the nail when such infections occur from morphopathological point of view. There were 22 nails biopsies from onychomycosis patients taken for the research of morphopathological changes in the thickened nail plate affected by onychomycosis. Samples of cadaverous' nails were used as a control material. The material was stained with haematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical methods. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling reaction and periodic acid-Schiff reaction were also performed. We found patchy hypertrophy in the granulose layer of the epidermis, with focal acanthosis. In the horn layer, we identified nests of parakeratosis of various sizes, with incorporations of homogenous and eosinophil masses. We found high levels of interleukin 6 and interleukin 10 positive cells in the nail bed and in the bloodstream. Interleukin 1, however, was not a part of any of the functional units of any of the nails. Significant amount of fibres containing human beta defensin-2 were found in the bed and plate of the nail. Therefore one can conclude that as regards the nails affected by onychomycosis, the most effective morphopathogenical processes include cytokine and defensin excretion occurrence in the nail bed.

  15. Psychosocial perception of adults with onychomycosis: a blinded, controlled comparison of 1,017 adult Hong Kong residents with or without onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A survey was conducted amongst 1,017 Hong Kong residents ages 18 and over to determine their knowledge of fungal nail infections (onychomycosis) and the psychosocial impact of the disease on the relationships, social lives and careers of sufferers. Methods The Fungal Nail Perception Survey was conducted by email and online between May 29th and June 10th, 2013. Participants were shown three photographs of people with and without onychomycosis of the toenails. Respondents were asked ten questions (repeated for each picture) to ascertain their perceptions of the people in the pictures. Questions were related to perceptions around the ability of sufferers and non-sufferers to form relationships with others, social activities of sufferers and non-sufferers, perceptions of the effect of the disease on the potential for career success, and awareness of fungal nail disease and health. The sub-population who themselves suffered from onychomycosis were asked about self-perception as well as their perception of others with onychomycosis. Results Compared with non-sufferers, survey respondents perceived those with onychomycosis as less likely to be able to form good relationships. They also indicated that they would be more likely to exclude sufferers than non-sufferers from social activities and that they would be more likely to feel uncomfortable when sitting or standing beside an infected person than beside an uninfected person. Respondents perceived people with onychomycosis to be less able to perform well in their chosen career than with someone without onychomycosis. Interestingly, those respondents who themselves were infected felt socially excluded, upset and embarrassed by their infection. Conclusions Onychomycosis may lead to stigmatization and social exclusion. Misconceptions of onychomycosis are high and education about the disease needs to be improved. Early recognition and treatment of the disease is essential to avoid complications and improve

  16. Growing Incidence of Non-Dermatophyte Onychomycosis in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Marjan; Ghasemi, Zeinab; Shidfar, Mohammad Reza; Hosseinpour, Leila; Khodadadi, Hossein; Zomorodian, Kamiar; Mirhendi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-dermatophyte onychomycosis (NDO) is caused by a wide range of mold fungi other than dermatophytes, and has been reported at various rates in different countries worldwide. Studies on the incidence of NDO in the community are essential for understanding its epidemiology and control, as well as for the appropriate treatment of these infections. Objectives In this study, the incidence of NDO in Tehran, Iran, was compared to the incidence of onychomycoses due to dermatophytes and yeasts. Methods From 2014 through 2015, samples from a total of 1,069 patients with suspected fungal nail diseases, who were referred to three medical mycology laboratories in Tehran, were collected and subjected to direct examination (all samples) and culture (788 samples). Differentiation of the causative agents of onychomycosis was based on microscopic observation of characteristic fungal elements in the nail samples and growth of a significant number of identical colonies on the culture plate. Results Based on only direct microscopy, onychomycosis was diagnosed in 424 (39.6%) cases, among which 35.8% were caused by dermatophytes, 32.7% by yeasts, and 29.3% by non-dermatophyte molds (NDMs), while 2.2% were mixed infections. Direct exam was significantly more sensitive than culture for the diagnosis. The most commonly isolated NDMs were Aspergillus spp. (69.3%, n = 52), followed by Fusarium spp. (n = 7). The other isolated species were Paecilomyces spp., Scopulariopsis spp., Acremonium spp., Cladosporium spp., and Chrysosporium spp., with only one case of each. Conclusions An increasing frequency of NDO compared to onychomycosis due to other causative agents has been noticeable over the past few years in Iran. This epidemiological data may be useful in the development of preventive and educational strategies. PMID:27800138

  17. Usefulness of Photodynamic Therapy in the Management of Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Robres, P; Aspiroz, C; Rezusta, A; Gilaberte, Y

    2015-12-01

    Onychomycosis, or fungal infection of the nails, is one of the most prevalent fungal diseases in the general population. Treatment is of limited effectiveness, tedious, and must be administered for long periods. Furthermore, systemic antifungal agents are associated with adverse effects. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) may prove to be a viable alternative in the treatment of superficial skin infections, including onychomycosis. We review articles relating to the usefulness of PDT in onychomycosis in both in vitro and in vivo settings and discuss the potential and limitations of various photosensitizing agents. In vivo, methylene blue and 5-aminolevulinic acid have led to cure rates in 80% and 43% of cases, respectively, at 12 months. Finally, based on data in the literature and our own experience, we propose a protocol of 3 PDT sessions, separated by an interval of 1 or 2 weeks, using methyl aminolevulinate 16% as a photosensitizing agent and red light (λ=630 nm, 37 J.cm(-2)). Each session is preceded by the topical application of urea 40% over several days. Clinical trials are needed to optimize PDT protocols and to identify those patients who will benefit most from this treatment.

  18. Laser therapies for onychomycosis - critical evaluation of methods and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Francuzik, W; Fritz, K; Salavastru, C

    2016-06-01

    The number of medical devices designed specifically to treat onychomycosis has recently increased, although their mechanism of action is not clear. We evaluated available laser therapies for onychomycosis by reviewing the existing literature. Twenty-two reports, published in peer-reviewed journals and as white papers out of 926 initial search results conveyed enough details to be included in this study. In most cases, the methodology of the trials described in the papers we reviewed was not comprehensive and the reporting of outcomes was not unified. We therefore found it hard to compare different clinical trials to one another. The majority of studies (81.82%) reported using an Nd:YAG laser device to treat onychomycosis. A total of 47.37% of the studies which used a 1064 device (and 47.83% of all studies we reviewed) reported that all treated patients responded positively to laser therapy. A total of 60% of studies reported achieving a complete cure (no clinical symptoms, nor negative mycology) in at least 50% of the treated patients. A low number of adverse events and their mild intensity were consistently reported across all studies, which makes this form of therapy particularly attractive to patients with contraindications for receiving systemic antifungal medication. In order to achieve more unified, comparable studies in the future, we suggest that researchers report a minimum set of outcome measurements: the calculation of the infected nail area pre- and posttreatment, as well as the number of patients achieving mycological, clinical and complete cures.

  19. Epidemiology of onychomycosis in Italy: prevalence data and risk factor identification.

    PubMed

    Papini, Manuela; Piraccini, Bianca Maria; Difonzo, Elisa; Brunoro, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of onychomycosis differs according to geographic area and over time and is influenced by several factors. The epidemiology of onychomycosis in Italy is still unclear. To evaluate the prevalence of onychomycosis in a representative sample of the Italian population a group of Dermatologists and General Practitioners carried out an observational survey on the patients coming to their office during a 1-month period. Any patient with skin or systemic disease giving their consent was enrolled. Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, lifestyles, history of previous mycosis, clinical aspects of onychomycosis and mycological evaluation were studied. A total of 8331 patients (56.7% female and 43.3% male) were evaluated. More than half of them were aged ≥46 years. Onychomycosis was diagnosed in 14.2% of patients. Big toe and thumb were the most frequently affected nails. Onychomycosis was moderate-severe in 74.1% of the cases. Mycological tests were positive in 81.3% of the cases. Dermatophytes were found in 76.6% of the cases, yeasts in 17.2% and moulds in 6.3%. Risk factors and/or comorbidities were present in 68.2% of the cases. This survey showed a 14% prevalence of onychomycosis in the evaluated population. The main risk factors were previous onychomycosis, diabetes, hallux valgus and use of occlusive footwear. PMID:26412300

  20. Amorolfine vs. ciclopirox – lacquers for the treatment of onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Szewczyk, Anna E.; Bienias, Wojciech; Wojciechowska, Agnieszka; Pastuszka, Marta; Oszukowska, Magdalena; Kaszuba, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Amorolfine 5% and ciclopirox 8% nail lacquers are commonly used in topical treatment of onychomycosis. These formulations may be used alone or in combination with oral antifungal agents. Amorolfine and ciclopirox are valuable therapeutic options, however, their usage in monotherapy should be limited. Proper amorolfine and ciclopirox penetration through the nail plate is provided by transungual drug delivery systems. Although amorolfine and ciclopirox have a different mode of action, they both exhibit a broad antifungal activity. The use of antifungal nail lacquers in combination with oral agents, such as terbinafine and itraconazole, improves efficacy of antifungal therapy. PMID:25821426

  1. A Case of Onychomycosis Caused by Rhodotorula glutinis

    PubMed Central

    Uludag Altun, Hatice; Turk Aribas, Emel; Gorpelioglu, Canan; Karabicak, Nilgun

    2014-01-01

    Rhodotorula spp. have emerged as opportunistic pathogens, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The current study reports a case of onychomycosis caused by Rhodotorula glutinis in a 74-year-old immunocompetent female. The causative agent was identified as R. glutinis based on the pinkish-orange color; mucoid-appearing yeast colonies on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar at 25°C; morphological evaluation in the Corn Meal-Tween 80 agar; observed oval/round budding yeast at 25°C for 72 hours; no observed pseudohyphae; positive urease activity at 25°C for 4 days; and assimilation features detected by API ID 32C kit and automated Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card 2 system. Antifungal susceptibility test results were as follows: amphotericin B (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL), fluconazole (MIC = 128 µg/mL), itraconazole (MIC = 0.125 µg/mL), voriconazole (MIC = 1 µg/mL), posaconazole (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL), anidulafungin (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL), and caspofungin (MIC = 16 µg/mL). Antifungal therapy was initiated with oral itraconazole at a dose of 400 mg/day; seven-day pulse therapy was planned at intervals of three weeks. Clinical recovery was observed in the clinical evaluation of the patient before the start of the third cure. Although R. glutinis has rarely been reported as the causative agent of onychomycosis, it should be considered. PMID:25328721

  2. A Case of Onychomycosis Caused by Rhodotorula glutinis.

    PubMed

    Uludag Altun, Hatice; Meral, Tuba; Turk Aribas, Emel; Gorpelioglu, Canan; Karabicak, Nilgun

    2014-01-01

    Rhodotorula spp. have emerged as opportunistic pathogens, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The current study reports a case of onychomycosis caused by Rhodotorula glutinis in a 74-year-old immunocompetent female. The causative agent was identified as R. glutinis based on the pinkish-orange color; mucoid-appearing yeast colonies on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar at 25°C; morphological evaluation in the Corn Meal-Tween 80 agar; observed oval/round budding yeast at 25°C for 72 hours; no observed pseudohyphae; positive urease activity at 25°C for 4 days; and assimilation features detected by API ID 32C kit and automated Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card 2 system. Antifungal susceptibility test results were as follows: amphotericin B (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL), fluconazole (MIC = 128 µg/mL), itraconazole (MIC = 0.125 µg/mL), voriconazole (MIC = 1 µg/mL), posaconazole (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL), anidulafungin (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL), and caspofungin (MIC = 16 µg/mL). Antifungal therapy was initiated with oral itraconazole at a dose of 400 mg/day; seven-day pulse therapy was planned at intervals of three weeks. Clinical recovery was observed in the clinical evaluation of the patient before the start of the third cure. Although R. glutinis has rarely been reported as the causative agent of onychomycosis, it should be considered.

  3. Sensitivity of fungi isolated from onychomycosis to Eugenia cariophyllata essential oil and eugenol.

    PubMed

    Gayoso, C W; Lima, E O; Oliveira, V T; Pereira, F O; Souza, E L; Lima, I O; Navarro, D F

    2005-03-01

    The antifungal activity of Eugenia cariophyllata essential oil and eugenol, its major constituent, on fungal strains isolated from onychomycosis was evaluated. The natural products presented prominent antifungal action with MIC of 1% and 4%, respectively. PMID:15752642

  4. New Concepts in Median Nail Dystrophy, Onychomycosis, and Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Nail Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Nathan Y.; Leung, Alexander K. C.; Metelitsa, Andrei I.; Adams, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Nails are underutilized as diagnostic tools, despite being involved in many dermatologic conditions. This paper explores new concepts in the treatment of median nail dystrophy (MND), onychomycosis, and the nail pathology of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). A Pubmed database literature search was conducted for MND treatment, onychomycosis treatment, and HFMD nail pathology. Only papers published after January 2008 were reviewed. The results showed that 0.1% tacrolimus ointment can be an effective treatment for MND. Early studies on laser therapy indicate that it is a safe and efficacious treatment option for onychomycosis, compared to conventional oral antifungal agents. Vicks VapoRub (The Proctor & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH) is effective against onychomycosis and is a reasonable option in patients who choose to forgo conventional treatments. Lastly, there is evidence to support a correlation between HFMD and onychomadesis. PMID:22462009

  5. New concepts in median nail dystrophy, onychomycosis, and hand, foot, and mouth disease nail pathology.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Nathan Y; Leung, Alexander K C; Metelitsa, Andrei I; Adams, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Nails are underutilized as diagnostic tools, despite being involved in many dermatologic conditions. This paper explores new concepts in the treatment of median nail dystrophy (MND), onychomycosis, and the nail pathology of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). A Pubmed database literature search was conducted for MND treatment, onychomycosis treatment, and HFMD nail pathology. Only papers published after January 2008 were reviewed. The results showed that 0.1% tacrolimus ointment can be an effective treatment for MND. Early studies on laser therapy indicate that it is a safe and efficacious treatment option for onychomycosis, compared to conventional oral antifungal agents. Vicks VapoRub (The Proctor & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH) is effective against onychomycosis and is a reasonable option in patients who choose to forgo conventional treatments. Lastly, there is evidence to support a correlation between HFMD and onychomadesis.

  6. The prevalence of culture-confirmed toenail onychomycosis in at-risk patient populations.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Daigle, D; Foley, K A

    2015-06-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of the nail and is the most common nail affliction in the general population. Certain patient populations are at greater risk of infection and the prevalence of onychomycosis reported in the literature has yet to be summarized across these at-risk groups. We performed a systematic review of the literature and calculated pooled prevalence estimates of onychomycosis in at-risk patient populations. The prevalence of dermatophyte toenail onychomycosis was as follows: general population 3.22% (3.07, 3.38), children 0.14% (0.11, 0.18), the elderly 10.28% (8.63, 12.18), diabetic patients 8.75% (7.48, 10.21), psoriatic patients 10.22% (8.61, 12.09), HIV positive patients 10.40% (8.02, 13.38), dialysis patients 11.93% (7.11, 19.35) and renal transplant patients 5.17% (1.77, 14.14). Dialysis patients had the highest prevalence of onychomycosis caused by dermatophytes, elderly individuals had the highest prevalence of onychomycosis caused by yeasts (6.07%; 95% CI = 3.58, 10.11) and psoriatic patients had the highest prevalence of onychomycosis caused by non-dermatophyte moulds (2.49%; 95% CI = 1.74, 3.55). An increased prevalence of onychomycosis in certain patient populations may be attributed to impaired immunity, reduced peripheral circulation and alterations to the nail plate which render these patients more susceptible to infection.

  7. Review of antifungal therapy and the severity index for assessing onychomycosis: part I.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Hay, Rod J; Garduno, Javier I

    2008-01-01

    This review outlines recent data on treatment modalities and outcomes with antifungal therapy in onychomycosis. Included are topical, mechanical, chemical and systemic treatments or a combination thereof. Topical treatments, or transungual drug delivery systems (TUDDS), including ciclopirox and amorolfine were shown to be effective if used alone for mild-moderate nail involvement. Specifically, superficial white onychomycosis (SWO) restricted to the dorsum of the nail plate and moderate distal lateral subungual onychomycosis (DLSO). Mechanical treatments were mostly effective as adjuncts to topical therapy which include nail avulsion and abrasion. In particular, partial nail avulsion aids topical therapy in DLSO and partial subungual onychomycosis for a more effective therapy. Chemical avulsion is a painless method of debridement which uses a keratinolysis formula that is effective only in limited and early disease. Systemic therapies have been shown to be effective with terbinafine and itraconazole is suggested as being the most cost-effective therapy. Systemic therapies require consideration of side effects and monitoring by both patient and physician prior to treatment application. An effective suggestion is the use of a topical with debridement for mild-moderate onychomycosis and systemic (terbinafine) plus topical for severe onychomycosis. Most treatment modalities will require long-term use from 3 to 9 months to be most effective, with strategies presented in Part II of this review. PMID:18484426

  8. Molecular Identification of Candida Species Isolated from Onychomycosis in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaobo; Ling, Bo; Yang, Xianwei; Liao, Wanqing; Pan, Weihua; Yao, Zhirong

    2015-12-01

    Candida is a common cause of onychomycosis, especially for fingernail onychomycosis. In this study, two simple PCR-based assays combined with the internal transcribed spacers sequencing were performed to reveal the prevalence of Candida species including emerging species in onychomycosis, and triazole antifungal susceptibility profiles for Candida species were also evaluated. Among 210 Candida strains isolated from onychomycosis, Candida parapsilosis was the most common species (54.3%), followed by C. albicans (23.3%) and C. metapsilosis (9.5%). However, C. metapsilosis became the second leading species in toenail onychomycosis and accounted for 19.5% of Candida isolates from toenail samples. C. nivariensis, an emerging species, was firstly recovered from a toenail sample. Other emerging species such as C. orthopsilosis, C. pararugosa and C. fabryi were also identified by molecular tools. C. metapsilosis isolates exhibited significantly higher fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentrations than those exhibited by C. parapsilosis and C. albicans (P < 0.001). This study provides insight into the prevalence, distribution and susceptibility profiles of Candida species including emerging Candida species in onychomycosis.

  9. Application of Nail Polish During Topical Management of Onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2016-01-01

    Topical antifungal management of toenail onychomycosis has been fraught with several therapeutic challenges including difficulty gaining access to the site of infection and the need for prolonged durations of therapy. In addition, there has been a marked lack of information on the impact of toenail polish application on drug penetration after application. This article reviews available data from studies evaluating the effect of nail polish on antifungal drag penetration using ex vivo laboratory models with cadaver fingernail plates with both tavaborole 5% solution and efinaconazole 10% solution. In addition, changes in nail polish appearance and color transfer to applicators are also discussed, with changes noted with topical efinaconazole. Importantly, there are no data on whether or not nail polish application alters the efficacy of these topical agents.

  10. Application of Nail Polish During Topical Management of Onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2016-01-01

    Topical antifungal management of toenail onychomycosis has been fraught with several therapeutic challenges including difficulty gaining access to the site of infection and the need for prolonged durations of therapy. In addition, there has been a marked lack of information on the impact of toenail polish application on drug penetration after application. This article reviews available data from studies evaluating the effect of nail polish on antifungal drag penetration using ex vivo laboratory models with cadaver fingernail plates with both tavaborole 5% solution and efinaconazole 10% solution. In addition, changes in nail polish appearance and color transfer to applicators are also discussed, with changes noted with topical efinaconazole. Importantly, there are no data on whether or not nail polish application alters the efficacy of these topical agents. PMID:27672416

  11. The Prevalence and Species Composition of Malassezia yeasts in Patients with Clinically Suspected Onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Prohic, Asja; Kuskunovic-Vlahovljak, Suada; Sadikovic, Tamara Jovovic; Cavaljuga, Semra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There are limited numbers of studies which focused on the identification of Malassezia yeasts to a species level in onychomycosis. Therefore, the aim of our study was to determine the prevalence and species composition of Malassezia yeasts in patients with clinically suspected onychomycosis and to examine if the range of species varies with patient gender, age, site of involvement and clinical pattern of onychomycosis. Methods: Specimens were taken from 785 patients presenting signs of onychomycosis and then incubated on Sabouraud dextrose agar and modified Dixon agar. The yeasts isolated were identified according to their macroscopic and microscopic features and physiological characteristics. Results: Malassezia species were diagnosed both by microscopy and culture in fourteen (1.8%) patients. M. globosa was the predominant, if not only, species identified from nail samples. Mixed cultures were observed in five cases: in 4 cases Malassezia was co-isolated with Candida albicans and in one case with dermatophyte. Fingernails were affected more frequently than toenails (85.7%) and distolateral subungual onychomycosis was the most common clinical type (78.6%). Conclusion: No significant differences were found in the distribution of Malassezia species isolated according to demographic parameters. PMID:26005253

  12. Clinico-Mycological Study of Dermatophyte Toenail Onychomycosis in New Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pravesh; Singal, Archana; Pandhi, Deepika; Das, Shukla

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There is a constant need to define the epidemiological and mycological characteristics of onychomycosis (OM) for optimal management strategies. Objectives: To define the epidemiological and mycological characteristics of patients with dermatophyte toenail OM in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Hundred consecutive patients of KOH and culture-positive dermatophyte toenail OM were subjected to detailed history, clinical examination and investigations. Results: Maximum number of patients (40%) belonged to 31-45 years age group and there was a male preponderance (M:F = 6.7:1). The mean duration of disease was 54 months. Thirty-three patients had fingernail involvement in addition to the toenail OM and 37% had co-existent cutaneous dermatophyte infection. Discoloration was the most common symptom (98%). Ninety-four (94%) patients had distal lateral subungual onychomycosis (DSLO) while two had superficial onychomycosis (SO) and only one had proximal superficial onychomycosis (PSO). Trichophyton interdigitale was the most common etiological agent (61%) followed by Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton verrucosum. Conclusions: Toenail OM is more common in males. DSLO was the most common clinical variant and T. interdigitale the most common etiological fungus responsible for toenail OM in our region. The importance of early diagnosis and treatment is highlighted as long-standing toenail OM predisposes to fingernail onychomycosis and recurrent tinea pedis. PMID:25814703

  13. Patient considerations in the management of toe onychomycosis – role of efinaconazole

    PubMed Central

    LaSenna, Charlotte E; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a difficult diagnosis to manage and treatment is sometimes avoided, as this diagnosis is often wrongly perceived as a cosmetic problem. However, onychomycosis has a negative impact on patients’ quality of life, affecting social interaction, psychological well-being, and physical activities. Onychomycosis is also a risk factor for patients with diabetes, with proven increased rates of cellulitis, gangrene, and foot ulcers. Treatments are only mild to moderately effective, and rates of relapse and reinfection are high. Oral treatments require laboratory monitoring due to risk of hepatotoxicity and may be contraindicated in some patients due to risk of drug–drug interactions. Topical treatments require prolonged application and are not very effective. Efinaconazole 10% solution is a new topical triazole treatment for mild to moderate distal subungual onychomycosis, with good efficacy and without the need for debridement of nails. In onychomycosis of the toenails, efinaconazole 10% solution is documented to have a statistically significant, positive impact on patient satisfaction and quality of life. PMID:26170638

  14. Onychomycosis treated with a dilute povidone–iodine/dimethyl sulfoxide preparation

    PubMed Central

    Capriotti, Kara; Capriotti, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Background Povidone–iodine (PVP-I) 10% aqueous solution is a well-known, nontoxic, commonly used topical antiseptic with no reported incidence of fungal resistance. We have been using a low-dose formulation of 1% PVP-I (w/w) in a solution containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in our clinical practice for a variety of indications. Presented here is our clinical experience with this novel formulation in a severe case of onychomycosis that was resistant to any other treatment. Findings A 49-year-old woman who had been suffering from severe onychomycosis for years presented after failing to find any remedy including over the counter (OTC), topical, and systemic oral prescribed therapies. Conclusion The topical povidone–iodine/DMSO system was very effective in this case at alleviating the signs and symptoms of onychomycosis. This novel combination warrants further investigation in randomized, controlled trials to further elucidate its clinical utility. PMID:26491374

  15. Procedure to diagnose onychomycosis through changes in emissivity on infrared images.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor-Mora, Carlos; Vega, Arturo Gonzalez; Garay-Sevilla, Maria Eugenia; Padilla-Medina, José Alfredo; Arteaga-Murillo, Lauro Ivan

    2013-11-01

    A noninvasive, quick, reliable, and relatively cheap procedure for the diagnosis of onychomycosis is put forward. It is known that a nail may show an abnormal appearance, although only 50% of all the nails having such an appearance may owe it to the presence of onychomycosis; hence, adequate diagnosis of nail disease is needed for appropriate prescription of medication and treatment of the nail. In order to contribute to the process of improvement in the diagnosis, a procedure based on the analysis of medium-range infrared images is presented in which it is possible to observe energy changes mostly due to the changes in emissivity of the nail. As a nail is more affected by onychomycosis, such changes become more intense. Also, it was found that a nail without onychomycosis has a lower temperature than toe skin, but has a higher emission of energy. Fifty percent of the ailments that may a cause a fingernail or toenail to have an abnormal appearance are not considered in the present work.

  16. Development of a novel in vitro onychomycosis model for the evaluation of topical antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Sleven, Reindert; Lanckacker, Ellen; Boulet, Gaëlle; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2015-05-01

    A novel in vitro onychomycosis model was developed to easily predict the topical activity potential of novel antifungal drugs. The model encompasses drug activity and diffusion through bovine hoof slices in a single experimental set-up. Results correspond well with the antifungal susceptibility assay and Franz cell diffusion test.

  17. Prevalence of toenail onychomycosis among diabetics at a primary care facility in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Leelavathi, M; Azimah, M N; Kharuddin, N F; Tzar, M N

    2013-05-01

    Onychomycosis increases the risk of developing secondary bacterial infection and cellulitis if left untreated. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of onychomycosis among diabetics and its associated factors. A cross sectional study using universal sampling of all type 1 and 2 diabetic patients attending a primary care facility of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) from January to March 2011 was conducted. Samples were taken from clinically abnormal nails and from the first right toenail in the absence of nail abnormalities and cultured for fungal elements. A total of 151 diabetics participated in the study. The mean patient age was 60.7 +/- 9.1 years. A total of 123 nail samples (81.5%) were culture positive for fungal elements. A positive correlation was found between onychomycosis and increasing age (p = 0.011) and clinically abnormal nails (p < 0.05). There were no significant correlations with gender, ethnic group, duration of diabetes, types of diabetes or glycemic control. The prevalence of onychomycosis among diabetics in our study was high.

  18. “In vitro” antifungal activity of ozonized sunflower oil on yeasts from onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Guerrer, L.V.; Cunha, K. C.; Nogueira, M. C. L.; Cardoso, C. C.; Soares, M. M. C. N.; Almeida, M. T. G.

    2012-01-01

    The “in vitro” antifungal activity of ozonized sunflower oil (Bioperoxoil®) was tested on 101 samples of yeasts originating from onychomycosis using the disk diffusion method. The oil was efficacious against several clinical fungal strains: Candida parapsilosis, Candida albicans, Trichosporon asahii, Candida tropicalis and Candida guilliermondii. PMID:24031958

  19. A case of fungal keratitis and onychomycosis simultaneously infected by Trichophyton species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fungal keratitis is difficult to treat that can result in corneal blindness requiring penetrating keratoplasty and in fungal endothalmitis. We report a case of fungal keratitis and onychomycosis simultaneously infected by Trichophyton. Case presentation A 77-year old male presented with ocular pain, conjunctival injection, and severe loss of vision in his left eye. His best corrected visual acuity was hand movements in the left eye, and slit-lamp examination showed a corneal ulcer with feathery margin and hypopyon. Bacterial and fungal smear/culture showed no organism, and there was no improvement in spite of treatment with topical fortified 5% cefazolin and 2% tobramycin. Trichophyton species was identified by repeated cultures. We found onychomycosis on the patient’s foot, where the same fungal species were identified. Regimen was changed to topical itraconazole and systemic intravenous itraconazole. No clinical improvement was observed, so therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty and cryotherapy was done with continuation of antifungal therapy. The graft was clear at postoperative 1 month and no evidence of recurrence was found. Conclusion It is important to identify the pathogen of keratitis because early identification of pathogen causing keratitis provides the appropriate treatment in early phase of keratitis. It is necessary to search for other fungal skin infections such as onychomycosis and athelete’s foot considering the fungal keratitis following skin infection. In addition, fungal skin infection including onychomycosis should be treated for prevention of fungal keratitis as soon as possible. PMID:25015110

  20. Prevalence of toenail onychomycosis among diabetics at a primary care facility in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Leelavathi, M; Azimah, M N; Kharuddin, N F; Tzar, M N

    2013-05-01

    Onychomycosis increases the risk of developing secondary bacterial infection and cellulitis if left untreated. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of onychomycosis among diabetics and its associated factors. A cross sectional study using universal sampling of all type 1 and 2 diabetic patients attending a primary care facility of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) from January to March 2011 was conducted. Samples were taken from clinically abnormal nails and from the first right toenail in the absence of nail abnormalities and cultured for fungal elements. A total of 151 diabetics participated in the study. The mean patient age was 60.7 +/- 9.1 years. A total of 123 nail samples (81.5%) were culture positive for fungal elements. A positive correlation was found between onychomycosis and increasing age (p = 0.011) and clinically abnormal nails (p < 0.05). There were no significant correlations with gender, ethnic group, duration of diabetes, types of diabetes or glycemic control. The prevalence of onychomycosis among diabetics in our study was high. PMID:24050080

  1. Onychomycosis does not always require systemic treatment for cure: a trial using topical therapy.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Shiela Fallon; Chan, Yuin C; Chan, Yiong H; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2013-01-01

    Standard teaching dictates that systemic therapy is required for treatment of onychomycosis. It is unknown whether topical antifungal therapy is effective for pediatric nail infections. This prospective, randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study was conducted in the Pediatric Dermatology Research Unit at Rady Children's Hospital to determine whether topical antifungal therapy is efficacious for pediatric onychomycosis. Forty patients ages 2 to 16 years with nonmatrix onychomycosis were randomized 1:3 to ciclopirox lacquer or vehicle lacquer. Ciclopirox lacquer or vehicle was applied daily for 32 weeks, with weekly removal of the lacquer and mechanical trimming. Those with poor response were crossed over to active drug at week 12. Thirty-seven patients completed the 32-week study, and follow-up data were collected 1 year after completion of the study from 24 patients. Mycologic cure, effective treatment, and complete cure were assessed, as well as adverse events and effect on quality of life. Mycologic cure was 70% in the treated group and 20% in the vehicle arm (p = 0.03) at week 12. At end of the study (week 32), 77% of treated patients achieved mycologic cure and 71% effective treatment, compared with 22% of the control group. Ninety-two percent of those who were cured and followed for 1 year remained clear. Topical antifungal lacquer (ciclopirox) can be an effective option for children with nonmatrix onychomycosis. Pediatric onychomycosis does not always require systemic therapy and responds better to topical therapy than does adult disease.

  2. Novel topical formulations of Terbinafine-HCl for treatment of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Tanrıverdi, Sakine Tuncay; Özer, Özgen

    2013-03-12

    Terbinafine hydrochloride (TBF-HCl) is an active substance that is using for treatment of onychomycosis. Onychomycosis is a fungal infection which is the most common disease of nail plate. The nail plate is a barrier which prevents effective topical treatment of ungual disorders. In this study, TBF-HCl loaded liposome and ethosome formulations and also gel form of these formulations were prepared. The formulations were characterized and in vitro and ex vivo release studies were performed. Nail characterization studies were also performed to examine the effect of formulations and experimental conditions on nail surface. As a result, all formulations can serve as efficient formulations for ungual application of TBF-HCl. By the way, the results of the accumulation studies suggested that liposome poloxamer gel formulation could be promising system for ungual drug delivery due to the better accumulation and easier application of the formulation. PMID:23295582

  3. Onychomycosis of Toenails and Post-hoc Analyses with Efinaconazole 10% Solution Once-daily Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Topical treatment for toenail onychomycosis has been fraught with a long-standing reputation of poor efficaey, primarily due to physical properties of the nail unit that impede drug penetration. Newer topical agents have been formulated as Solution, which appear to provide better therapeutic response in properly selected patients. It is important to recognize the impact the effects that mitigating and concomitant factors can have on efficaey. These factors include disease severity, gender, presence of tinea pedis, and diabetes. This article reviews results achieved in Phase 3 pivotal studies with topical efinaconazole 10% Solution applied once daily for 48 weeks with a focus on how the aforementioned factors influenced therapeutic outcomes. It is important for clinicians treating patients for onychomycosis to evaluate severity, treat concomitant tinea pedis, address control of diabetes if present by encouraging involvement of the patient’s primary care physician, and consider longer treatment courses when clinically relevant. PMID:27047631

  4. Novel topical formulations of Terbinafine-HCl for treatment of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Tanrıverdi, Sakine Tuncay; Özer, Özgen

    2013-03-12

    Terbinafine hydrochloride (TBF-HCl) is an active substance that is using for treatment of onychomycosis. Onychomycosis is a fungal infection which is the most common disease of nail plate. The nail plate is a barrier which prevents effective topical treatment of ungual disorders. In this study, TBF-HCl loaded liposome and ethosome formulations and also gel form of these formulations were prepared. The formulations were characterized and in vitro and ex vivo release studies were performed. Nail characterization studies were also performed to examine the effect of formulations and experimental conditions on nail surface. As a result, all formulations can serve as efficient formulations for ungual application of TBF-HCl. By the way, the results of the accumulation studies suggested that liposome poloxamer gel formulation could be promising system for ungual drug delivery due to the better accumulation and easier application of the formulation.

  5. Onychomycosis due to Candida parapsilosis in a Child with Ventricular Septal Defect: An Unusual Predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Hosuru Subramanya, Supram; Hamal, Deependra; Nayak, Niranjan; Gokhale, Shishir

    2016-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is emerging as a potential pathogen for onychomycosis. A 4-year-old male child with perimembranous ventricular septal defect (VSD) was admitted with features of cystitis and was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics. Two weeks later, he developed yellowish discoloration of nails of both hands. The sloughed out nail, on microscopy, showed numerous yeast forms that were identified as Candida parapsilosis by both phenotypic and genotypic methods. Antifungal sensitivity testing of the isolate was performed by microbroth dilution method in accordance with CLSI guidelines. Patient was successfully treated with topical amphotericin B and oral fluconazole. Thus, one should have a high index of suspicion of C. parapsilosis onychomycosis, especially when the patient is in the paediatric age group, presenting with unusual predisposing condition like congenital heart disease, and is on broad spectrum antibiotics. PMID:27195165

  6. Onychomycosis caused by an isolate conforming to the description of Trichophyton raubitschekii.

    PubMed

    Papini, Manuela; Greco, Consuelo; Pileri, Ferruccio

    2004-06-01

    Trichophyton raubitschekii is currently regarded as a synonymous name betokening a variant form of Trichophyton rubrum. Nonetheless, isolates conforming to this morphotaxonomic concept have morphological, physiological and clinical features very different from those of typical T. rubrum. Isolates are mainly obtained from subjects originating from certain tropical and subtropical countries, and are mainly obtained from upper body skin infections, rarely from onychomycosis. In this paper the authors report the first known Italian case of onychomycosis caused by such an isolate. The patient, a male student from Cameroon, had a typical fingernail tinea unguium, without any other sign of skin or nail infection. 'T. raubitschekii' was identified on morphological and physiological grounds by the following features: velvety colony surface, brownish pigment, abundant macroconidia and microconidia, and positive urease activity. Such isolates may prove very difficult to identify correctly, especially in areas like Italy where T. rubrum is normally seen only as isolates presenting a strongly differing phenotype.

  7. Clinical and mycological features of onychomycosis in central Tunisia: a 22 years retrospective study (1986-2007).

    PubMed

    Dhib, I; Fathallah, A; Yaacoub, A; Zemni, R; Gaha, R; Said, M B

    2013-05-01

    Onychomycosis is the most frequently encountered nail disease and may be difficult to diagnose and treat. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, the clinical and mycological characteristics of onychomycosis in central Tunisia. It is a retrospective study performed over a 22-year period (1986-2007). It included 7151 patients (4709 women and 2442 men) with suspected fingernails and/or toenails onychomycosis. The patients were referred to the Mycology-Parasitology Laboratory of Farhat Hached hospital in Sousse for mycological examination. Both direct microscopy and culture of the nail material were performed to diagnose and identify the causative fungal species. Onychomycosis was confirmed in 78.6% of investigated patients (5624/7151). The positivity rate was higher in women as compared with men. In both men and women, fingernails were most frequently involved than toenails. No significant relation was found between gender and toenails onychomycosis, whereas fingernails were frequently involved in women. As far as aetiological agents are considered, dermatophytes, yeast and moulds were responsible for 49.9%, 47.4% and 2.7% of onyxis cases respectively. In fingernail infections, yeast were the most frequent fungi (83.6%), Candida albicans being the leading species (51.6%). In contrast, in toenail infections, dermatophytes were more frequent (74.1%). Trichophyton rubrum was by far the dominant species (88.1%). Yeast were observed more frequently in women whereas dermatophytes were more common in men. Moulds were involved in 4.2% of cases. The most frequent species were Aspergillus sp. and Chrysosporium sp. Onychomycosis is a frequent disease in central Tunisia. T. rubrum is the predominant agent in toenails infection and yeast, mainly C. albicans, in fingernails onychomycosis.

  8. Development and comparison of two devices for treatment of onychomycosis by photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ana Paula da; Chiandrone, Daniel José; Tinta, Jefferson Wanderson Rossi; Kurachi, Cristina; Inada, Natalia Mayumi; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2015-06-01

    Onychomycosis is the most common nail disorder. The treatment for this type of infection is one of the main difficult ones in clinical practice, due to the fact that the nails are nonvascularized structures, which compromise the penetration of drugs delivered systemically and favor slow nail growth. We present two devices based on light-emitting diode arrays as light sources for the treatment of onychomycosis by photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT is an emerging technique that uses a photosensitizer (PS) activated by light in the presence of oxygen. The PS absorbs energy from light and transfers it to oxygen, producing reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl radicals, superoxide, and singlet oxygen which inactivate fungi and bacteria. Our proposal is the use of a portable and secure light source device in patients with onychomycosis. Additional advantages are the low cost involved, the possibility of topical treatment rather than systemic and the simplicity of operation. These advantages are important to ensure the implementation of this technology for the treatment of an impacting health problem.

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Onychomycosis Perspectives from a Joint Podiatric Medicine-Dermatology Roundtable.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Tracey C; Joseph, Warren S; Scher, Richard K; Tosti, Antonella; Plasencia, Jesse; Pariser, David M; Markinson, Bryan C

    2016-03-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal infection, and, as such, one of the goals of treatment should be eradication of the infective agent. Despite this, in contrast to dermatologists, many podiatric physicians do not include antifungals in their onychomycosis treatment plans. Before initiating treatment, confirmation of mycologic status via laboratory testing (eg, microscopy with potassium hydroxide preparation, histopathology with periodic acid-Schiff staining, fungal culture, and polymerase chain reaction) is important; however, more podiatric physicians rely solely on clinical signs than do dermatologists. These dissimilarities may be due, in part, to differences between specialties in training, reimbursement patterns, or practice orientation, and to explore these differences further, a joint podiatric medicine-dermatology roundtable was convened. In addition, treatment options have been limited owing to safety concerns with available oral antifungals and relatively low efficacy with previously available topical treatments. Recently approved topical treatments-efinaconzole and tavaborole-offer additional options for patients with mild-to-moderate disease. Debridement alone has no effect on mycologic status, and it is recommended that it be used in combination with an oral or topical antifungal. There is little to no clinical evidence to support the use of lasers or over-the-counter treatments for onychomycosis. After a patient has achieved cure (absence of clinical signs or absence of fungus with minimal clinical signs), lifestyle and hygiene measures, prophylactic/maintenance treatment, and proactive treatment for tinea pedis, including in family members, may help maintain this status. PMID:27031556

  10. Natural coniferous resin lacquer in treatment of toenail onychomycosis: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, Pentti; Sipponen, Arno; Lohi, Jouni; Soini, Marjo; Tapanainen, Riikka; Jokinen, Janne J

    2013-01-01

    In in vitro tests, natural coniferous resin from the Norway spruce (Picea abies) is strongly antifungal. In this observational study, we tested the clinical effectiveness of a lacquer composed of spruce resin for topical treatment of onychomycosis. Thirty-seven patients with clinical diagnosis of onychomycosis were enrolled into the study. All patients used topical resin lacquer treatment daily for 9 months. A mycological culture and potassium hydroxide (KOH) stain were done from nail samples in the beginning and in the end of the study. Treatment was considered effective, if a mycological culture was negative and there was an apparent clinical cure. At study entry, 20 patients (20/37; 54%; 95% CI: 38–70) had a positive mycological culture and/or positive KOH stain for dermatophytes. At study end, the result of 13 patients was negative (13/19; 68%; 95% CI: 48–89). In one case (1/14; 7%; 95% CI: 0–21) the mycological culture was initially negative, but it turned positive during the study period. By 14 compliant patients (14/32; 44%; 95% CI: 27–61), resin lacquer treatment was considered clinically effective: complete healing took place in three cases (9%) and partial healing in 11 cases (85%). The results indicate some evidence of clinical efficacy of the natural coniferous resin used for topical treatment of onychomycosis. PMID:23131104

  11. Fusarium solani onychomycosis of the thumbnail coinfected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Seok; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Shin, Min-Kyung; Lee, Mu-Hyoung

    2011-03-01

    Fusarium species are non-dermatophytic moulds, which are commonly known soil saprophytes and important plant pathogens, and have been frequently reported to be aetiological agents of opportunistic infections in humans. The prevalence of onychomycosis caused by Fusarium species varies in the literature because of geographical differences in mould distribution and diagnostic methods. Onychomycosis caused by Fusarium species is considered rare in Korea, and only four cases have been described to date. Pseudomonas aeruginosa also can infect nails and cause green nail syndrome, and recent research has shown that fungal infection may potentiate the colonisation or growth of P. aeruginosa within a nail. Furthermore, such coinfection with P. aeruginosa can prevent the isolation of the fungus because of bacterial overgrowth in culture. The authors report the cases of two immunocompetent patients with F. solani onychomycosis coinfected with P. aeruginosa. Both presented with a greenish/yellowish discolouration and thickening of a thumbnail, and were treated with systemic ciprofloxacin in combination with itraconazole or terbinafine.

  12. Natural coniferous resin lacquer in treatment of toenail onychomycosis: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Sipponen, Pentti; Sipponen, Arno; Lohi, Jouni; Soini, Marjo; Tapanainen, Riikka; Jokinen, Janne J

    2013-05-01

    In in vitro tests, natural coniferous resin from the Norway spruce (Picea abies) is strongly antifungal. In this observational study, we tested the clinical effectiveness of a lacquer composed of spruce resin for topical treatment of onychomycosis. Thirty-seven patients with clinical diagnosis of onychomycosis were enrolled into the study. All patients used topical resin lacquer treatment daily for 9 months. A mycological culture and potassium hydroxide (KOH) stain were done from nail samples in the beginning and in the end of the study. Treatment was considered effective, if a mycological culture was negative and there was an apparent clinical cure. At study entry, 20 patients (20/37; 54%; 95% CI: 38-70) had a positive mycological culture and/or positive KOH stain for dermatophytes. At study end, the result of 13 patients was negative (13/19; 68%; 95% CI: 48-89). In one case (1/14; 7%; 95% CI: 0-21) the mycological culture was initially negative, but it turned positive during the study period. By 14 compliant patients (14/32; 44%; 95% CI: 27-61), resin lacquer treatment was considered clinically effective: complete healing took place in three cases (9%) and partial healing in 11 cases (85%). The results indicate some evidence of clinical efficacy of the natural coniferous resin used for topical treatment of onychomycosis.

  13. Comparative study on keratin structural changes in onychomycosis and normal human finger nail specimens by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wei; Meng, Yaoyong; Xiao, Jun; Zhang, Pingli; Zhang, Hao

    2013-04-01

    For the purpose of investigating the secondary structural changes of keratins in onychomycosis patient nail, Raman spectra of nail clippings from onychomycosis patients were obtained and used to describe the molecular structure differences from normal nail specimens. Raman spectroscopy revealed that nail from onychomycosis patients had a significant decrease in the content of the sulfur-containing amino acids in comparison to normal nail. And the spectral analysis also demonstrated that the disulfide bonds had the trend to the energetically less favored gauche-gauche-trans (g-g-t) forms in onychomycosis patient nail samples. These results showed that the increased amounts of less stable disulfide conformers were contributed to or associated with the nail brittleness observed in onychomycosis patients. We also found that the positions of the S-S band (500-550 cm-1) in onychomycosis patients were different, which gave us an indication that the disulfide groups might be related to the histopathological level and morphological characteristics. In the region of amide I, the α-helical (1652 cm-1) and β-sheet (1671 cm-1) content changed, these ratios (peak area of 1652 cm-1 divided by peak area of the 1671 cm-1) were between 0.67 and 0.75, while drastically altered ratios for the two conformers were changed to 0.25-0.63 in onychomycosis patient nail, the α-helix form seriously decreased in comparison to the normal nail. This result suggested unfolding of proteins and a more amorphous structure in the onychomycosis nail. On the other hand, the amide III (unordered) band intensity, assigned to the random coil form in normal nail clippings, at 1250 cm-1 is much higher than that for the amide III (α) content (1272 cm-1), and the peak area ratios of random coil band and α-helix band were about 10.00, while in the onychomycosis nail, these ratios were close to 2.00, the random coil form remarkably decreased. All the results of the present work implied that fungal erosion

  14. Treatment of Onychomycosis with Efinaconazole 10% Topical Solution and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Elewski, Bom E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the benefits of efinaconazole topical solution, 10% on quality of life in onychomycosis patients. Methods: An analysis of 1,655 patients, aged 18 to 70 years, randomized to receive efinaconazole topical solution, 10%, or vehicle from two identical multicenter, double-blind, vehicle-controlled, 48-week studies evaluating safety and efficacy. The primary endpoint was complete cure rate (0% clinical involvement of target toenail, and both negative potassium hydroxide examination and fungal culture); clinical improvement defined as ≤ 10-percent improvement in nail involvement both at Week 52. Quality of life was assessed using a validated OnyCOE-t™ questionnaire. Improvement in quality of life was compared in those patients clinically and not clinically improved. Results: Efinaconazole topical solution, 10%, was significantly more effective than vehicle irrespective of QoL domain. Greatest improvement in mean score was seen in those domains with the lowest baseline scores. All mean scores in the group considered to have clinically improved with efinaconazole exceeded 80.0 at Week 52. Mean treatment satisfaction scores with efinaconazole in those patients who were clinically improved increased from 79.9 (Week 24) to 89.2 (Week 52), compared to a corresponding drop in those patients considered not improved from 65.3 to 58.0. The correlation between change in percent affected nail and change in mean domain scores was significant with efinaconazole for all domains. Limitations: A period of 52 weeks may be too brief to evaluate improvement in quality of life in onychomycosis patients. Some of the questions in the OnyCOE-t questionnaire may be more relevant than others to the study population and the onychomycosis population as a whole. Conclusion: Once-daily efinaconazole topical solution, 10%, provided statistically greater improvement in all aspects of quality of life compared to vehicle. Improvement was most marked in those patients considered

  15. Terbinafine hydrochloride loaded liposome film formulation for treatment of onychomycosis: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tanrıverdi, Sakine Tuncay; Hilmioğlu Polat, Süleyha; Yeşim Metin, Dilek; Kandiloğlu, Gülşen; Özer, Özgen

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of nail unit that is caused by dermatophytes. Oral Terbinafine hydrochloride (TBF-HCl) is being used for the treatment of onychomycosis since 24 years. The side effects caused by the systemic application and limitations of topical administration of this drug regarding the diffusion through nail lead to the development of a new formulation based on, TBF-HCl-loaded liposome. The newly obtained film formulations were prepared and characterized via several parameters, such as physical appearance, drug content, thickness, bioadhesive properties and tensile strength. In vitro and ex vivo permeation studies were performed to select an optimum film formulation for antifungal activity to show the efficiency of formulations regarding the treatment of onychomycosis. The in vitro release percentages of drug were found 71.6 ± 3.28, 54.4 ± 4.26, 56.1 ± 7.48 and 46.0 ± 2.43 for liposome loaded pullulan films (LI-P, LII-P) and liposome loaded Eudragit films (LI-E, LII-E), respectively. The accumulated drug in the nail plates were found 31.16 ± 4.22, 24.81 ± 5.35, 8.17 ± 1.81 and 8.92 ± 3.37 for LI-P, LII-P, LI-E and LII-E, respectively, which within therapeutic range for all film formulations. The accumulated drug in the nail plate was found within therapeutic range for all film formulations. The efficacy of the selected TBF-HCl-loaded liposome film formulation was compared with TBF-HCl-loaded liposome, ethosome, liposome poloxamer gel and ethosome chitosan gel formulations. It was found that TBF-HCl-loaded liposome film formulation had better antifungal activity on fungal nails which make this liposome film formulation promising for ungual therapy of fungal nail infection.

  16. Evaluation of Nd:YAG laser device efficacy on onychomycosis: a case series of 30 patients.

    PubMed

    Helou, J; Maatouk, I; Hajjar, M A; Moutran, R

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, pharmacologic molecules have been the only available treatments for onychomycosis. Laser treatments were introduced for recurrent or resistant cases or in patients in whom oral treatments are contra-indicated. Some devices were approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Neodymium yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) is used for onychomycosis as a short-pulse or a long-pulse system. We aim to evaluate the efficacy of the short-pulse Nd:YAG in treating onychomycosis, its side effects, cure rates, and 12-month recurrence rates. Efficacy was evaluated based on a subjective measure of patient satisfaction on a scale from 1 to 10, and an objective measure based on the results of the mycologic cultures. Medical records of 30 patients were reviewed. Ages ranged from 22 to 85, with a mean of 44. Mycologic cure at 12 months was not achieved in 5 patients (16.67%) who had received laser treatment. None of these patients showed any signs of clinical improvement. Twenty patients (66.67%) were completely cured at 12 months, with corroborating negative mycologic cultures. The remaining five patients (16.67%) had discordance between their clinical cure status and their mycologic cultures. Side effects were reported by 7 patients out of 30 (33%): pain within 48 hours of the treatment session, burning sensation in the treated nail bed area. Our primary end point of negative mycologic cultures at 12 months was seen in 24 out of 30 (80%) of our patients. Similar culture cure rates have not been reported before, not even with systemic treatments with oral antifungals. However, few limitations should warrant us (False-negative results in fungal cultures; time limitation; sample size…). Still, we propose that this alternative should be offered for patients in whom antifungals are contraindicated or for patients previously treated, but not cured by oral antifungals, and in elderly and polymedicated patients. PMID:26537779

  17. An investigation of how fungal infection influences drug penetration through onychomycosis patient’s nail plates

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, W.J.; Jones, S.A.; Traynor, M.J.; Guesné, S.; Murdan, S.; Brown, M.B.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of onychomycosis remains problematic even though there are several potent antifungal agents available for patient use. The aim of this investigation was to understand whether the structural modifications that arise when a patient’s nail become infected plates influences the permeation of drugs into the nail following topical application. It was hoped that through improving understanding of the nail barrier in the diseased state, the development of more effective topical treatments for onychomycosis could be facilitated. The permeation of three compounds with differing hydrophobicities, caffeine, terbinafine and amorolfine (clog D at pH 7.4 of −0.55, 3.72 and 4.49 respectively), was assessed across both healthy and onychomycosis infected, full thickness, human nail plate sections. Transonychial water loss (TOWL) measurements performed on the healthy and diseased nails supported previous observations that the nail behaves like a porous barrier given the lack of correlation between TOWL values with the thicker, diseased nails. The flux of the more hydrophilic caffeine was twofold greater across diseased in comparison with the healthy nails, whilst the hydrophobic molecules terbinafine and amorolfine showed no statistically significant change in their nail penetration rates. Caffeine flux across the nail was found to correlate with the TOWL measurements, though no correlation existed for the more hydrophobic drugs. These data supported the notion that the nail pores, opened up by the infection, facilitated the passage of hydrophilic molecules, whilst the keratin binding of hydrophobic molecules meant that their transport through the nail plate was unchanged. Therefore, in order to exploit the structural changes induced by nail fungal infection it would be beneficial to develop a small molecular weight, hydrophilic antifungal agent, which exhibits low levels of keratin binding. PMID:26969264

  18. Development of topical therapeutics for management of onychomycosis and other nail disorders: a pharmaceutical perspective.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Mustafa M A

    2015-02-10

    The human nail plate is a formidable barrier to drug permeation. Development of therapeutics for management of nail diseases thus remains a challenge. This article reviews the current knowledge and recent advances in the field of transungual drug delivery and provides guidance on development of topical/ungual therapeutics for management of nail diseases, with special emphasis on management of onychomycosis, the most common nail disease. Selection of drug candidates, drug delivery approaches, and evaluation of formulations are among the topics discussed. A comprehensive mathematical description for transungual permeation is also introduced.

  19. Descriptive study of onychomycosis in a hospital in São Paulo

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Clarissa Santos de Carvalho; Zaitz, Clarisse; Framil, Valéria Maria de Souza; Ottoboni, Thaíssa Santos de Carvalho; Tonoli, Melissa Santos de Carvalho; Ribeiro, Renata Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    Onychomychosis, a nail fungus infection is the most frequent nail ailment, constituting about half of all nail disorders. It can be caused by dermatophytes, non-dermatophytes, yeasts and Prothoteca spp. Methods include 5407 samples of patients with suspected onychomycosis, studied from January 2002 to December 2006, by direct mycological examination and fungi culture. The diagnosis of onychomycosis was confirmed in samples from 3822 direct mycological and/or culture positive. The diagnosis was established by culture for fungi. Among the 1.428 identified agents, the dermatophytes were responsible for 68.6% (N = 980) of cases, followed by yeasts with 27.6% (N = 394), non-dermatophytes fungi with 2.2% (N = 31), Prothoteca spp with 0.1% (N = 2), and associations with 1.5% (N = 22). Females were more affected, with 66% (N = 2527) of cases, and the most affected age group ranged from 31 to 60 years of age (median 47 years). Fungal microbiota is often changed in the world, both quantitatively and qualitatively, and is affected by several environmental factors. Thus, the periodic review of the composition of this microbiota is important to evaluate the epidemiology and thus proportion a better therapeutic response. PMID:26273263

  20. Efinaconazole topical solution, 10%: formulation development program of a new topical treatment of toenail onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, V; Pillai, R

    2015-07-01

    Transungual drug delivery of antifungals is considered highly desirable to treat common nail disorders such as onychomycosis, due to localized effects, and improved adherence resulting from minimal systemic adverse events. However, the development of effective topical therapies has been hampered by poor nail penetration. An effective topical antifungal must permeate through, and under the dense keratinized nail plate to the site of infection in the nail bed and nail matrix. We present here the formulation development program to provide effective transungual and subungual delivery of efinaconazole, the first topical broad spectrum triazole specifically developed for onychomycosis treatment. We discuss the important aspects encompassing the formulation development program for efinaconazole topical solution, 10%, focusing on its solubility in a number of solvents, in vitro penetration through the nail, and in vivo efficacy. Efinaconazole topical solution, 10% is a stable, non-lacquer, antifungal with a unique combination of ingredients added to an alcohol-based formulation to provide low surface tension and good wetting properties. This low surface tension is believed to affect effective transungual delivery of efinaconazole and believed to provide a dual mode of delivery by accessing the nail bed by wicking into the space between the nail and nail plate. PMID:25940933

  1. Influence of human nail etching for the assessment of topical onychomycosis therapies.

    PubMed

    Repka, Michael A; Mididoddi, Praveen K; Stodghill, Steven P

    2004-09-10

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the physico-chemical properties of hot-melt extruded films containing ketoconazole and to determine the influence of 'nail etching' on film bioadhesion and drug permeability for the assessment of topical onychomycosis therapies. Hot-melt extrusion (HME) was used to prepare films containing 20% w/w ketoconazole. Ketoconazole 0.125% gel was also prepared using Carbopol 974P NF. Films were processed at a temperature range of 115-120 degrees C utilizing a Killion extruder (KLB-100), and were evaluated for post-extrusion drug content, content uniformity, bioadhesion, thermal behavior and nail drug permeation. The extruded films demonstrated excellent content uniformity and post-processing drug content. Tensile and peel tests were recorded to determine the bioadhesive profiles. In this study, work of adhesion and peak adhesive force determinations using the peel tests provided more sensitive results for evaluating the bioadhesivity of the HME films than the tensile tests. The in vitro permeability profiles have demonstrated, that nail samples treated with an 'etchant' demonstrated a significant increase in drug permeability compared to control. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms indicated that ketoconazole was in solid solution within the HME films. These findings are encouraging for the future design and formulation of novel drug delivery systems for the topical treatment of onychomycosis.

  2. Efinaconazole topical solution, 10%: formulation development program of a new topical treatment of toenail onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, V; Pillai, R

    2015-07-01

    Transungual drug delivery of antifungals is considered highly desirable to treat common nail disorders such as onychomycosis, due to localized effects, and improved adherence resulting from minimal systemic adverse events. However, the development of effective topical therapies has been hampered by poor nail penetration. An effective topical antifungal must permeate through, and under the dense keratinized nail plate to the site of infection in the nail bed and nail matrix. We present here the formulation development program to provide effective transungual and subungual delivery of efinaconazole, the first topical broad spectrum triazole specifically developed for onychomycosis treatment. We discuss the important aspects encompassing the formulation development program for efinaconazole topical solution, 10%, focusing on its solubility in a number of solvents, in vitro penetration through the nail, and in vivo efficacy. Efinaconazole topical solution, 10% is a stable, non-lacquer, antifungal with a unique combination of ingredients added to an alcohol-based formulation to provide low surface tension and good wetting properties. This low surface tension is believed to affect effective transungual delivery of efinaconazole and believed to provide a dual mode of delivery by accessing the nail bed by wicking into the space between the nail and nail plate.

  3. Combination therapy for onychomycosis using a fractional 2940-nm Er:YAG laser and 5 % amorolfine lacquer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lu, Sha; Huang, Huaiqiu; Li, Xiqing; Cai, Wenying; Ma, Jianchi; Xi, Liyan

    2016-09-01

    Onychomycosis remains difficult to cure by traditional methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combination therapy with a fractional erbium yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser and 5 % amorolfine lacquer on onychomycosis. Nine patients with bilateral nails affected by distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis were included. The bilateral nails of each patient were divided into two groups. The 20 affected nails on one side of each patient as group 1 were treated with a fractional Er:YAG laser once a week and 5 % amorolfine lacquer twice weekly, while the 20 nails on the symmetrical side of each patient as group 2 were treated with amorolfine lacquer only. The laser treatment was conducted at weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 12 in group 1. The clinical improvement, onychomycosis severity index (OSI), maximum linear clear nail growth (MLCNG), and mycological cure rate were evaluated. At week 24, 18 of 20 (90 %) nails in group 1 had achieved obvious clinical responses. The mean OSI score showed a significant decrease (5.24) and the average MLCNG was 3.1 mm in group 1. At week 24, 15 of 20 (75 %) nails achieved a negative mycological examination in group 1, compared with four of 20 (20 %) nails in group 2. The treatments were well-tolerated by most patients. This clinical study suggests that combination therapy of a fractional 2940-nm Er:YAG laser and 5 % amorolfine lacquer is an effective, safe, and convenient treatment method for onychomycosis. PMID:27339057

  4. Toenail onychomycosis in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome: treatment with terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Herranz, P; García, J; De Lucas, R; González, J; Peña, J M; Díaz, R; Casado, M

    1997-10-01

    Skin infections caused by dermatophytes are one of the most frequent dermatological complications in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) resulting from infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Tinea unguium associated with AIDS is characterized by being clinically more aggressive and therapeutically more difficult to treat than in the general population. Terbinafine is considered to be a first-choice option for the treatment of dermatophyte onychomycosis in immunocompetent individuals. This drug has been used in a series of 21 HIV-positive patients diagnosed with tinea unguium for 1 year in the University Hospital La Paz, Madrid. All patients underwent a subsequent clinical follow-up for 6 months. The results showed a high percentage of clinical and mycological cures, as well as maintenance of the response after follow-up; no drug interactions or significant adverse effects related to the drug under study were recorded.

  5. [Bilateral proximal cellulitis and onychomycosis in both big toes due to Fusarium solani].

    PubMed

    Torres-Rodríguez, Josep M; Sellart-Altisent, Maite

    2006-12-01

    We report a case of proximal fold cellulitis in both big toes, associated with a bilateral proximal onychomycosis and an intertrigo of the fourth space due to Fusarium solani. The infection occurred in an immunocompetent man with diabetes mellitus type II. Apparently, the infection was acquired in a tropical country and once the patient was in Spain the infection progressed causing nail detachment (onychomadesis). Seven months later a relapse that affected the left toenail occurred. The patient was treated topically with chemical toenail avulsion contained 40% urea associated with bifonazole followed by ciclopirox-olamine nail lacquer for 12 months. Complete cure without relapse was observed after 10 years of follow-up. In vitro antifungal susceptibility study demonstrated that two of the recovered isolates were both resistant to itraconazole and voriconazole.

  6. First description of onychomycosis caused by Chrysosporium keratinophilum in captive Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus).

    PubMed

    Pin, Didier; Vidémont, Emilie; Derian-Autier, Dominique; Guillot, Jacques; Plouzeau, Eric

    2011-03-01

    Seven Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus) presented within a period of several months with onychodystrophy, onychomadesis, and severe digital tumefaction. Histopathologic findings included a pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia of the claw matrix surrounding a cavity filled with keratin and septate hyphae stained with periodic acid Schiff reagent. The fungal species Chrysosporium keratinophilum was identified on cultures. The wallabies were orally treated with ketoconazole (15 mg/kg s.i.d.) for 20 wk. Material and enclosures were cleaned and sprayed with 0.2% enilconazole solution once a month over a period of 4 mo. No improvement of advanced cases was observed, but no new case appeared for the next 6 mo. The positive mycological culture and the invasion of tissues on histopathologic examination suggested that the fungal species C. keratinophilum was implicated in this claw disease. This is the first report of onychomycosis caused by C. keratinophilum in animals. PMID:22946390

  7. Cutaneous hyalohyphomycosis and onychomycosis caused by Onychocola canadensis: report of the first case from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erbagci, Zülal; Balci, Iclal; Erkiliç, Suna; Zer, Yasemin; Inci, Ramazan

    2002-08-01

    We present the first Turkish case of skin and nail infection due to Onychocola canadensis in an otherwise healthy farmer who frequently worked barefoot on soil. Cutaneous involvement consisted of scaly and hyperkeratotic lesions resembling tinea pedis, erythematous plaques, and dermal papulonodules of various sizes simulating Majocchi's granuloma. Repeated cultures from nail plates, skin scrapings and needle aspiration materials from papules or nodules all yielded the same mold on Sabouroud dextrose media with and without cycloheximide, trichophyton agar, and potato dextrose agar at 26 degrees C. The causal isolate was identified as Onychocola canadensis Sigler gen. et sp. nov., a slow-growing arthroconidial hyphomycete, on the basis of its colonial and microscopic morphology. While skin lesions were responsive to daily itraconazole in a dose of 200 mg for three months, the onychomycosis was resistant to therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first presentation of O. canadensis as the cause of cutaneous hyalohyphomycosis to date.

  8. Use of restriction fragment length polymorphism to identify Candida species, related to onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Rasoul; Badiee, Parisa; Badali, Hamid; Abastabar, Mahdi; Safa, Ahmad Hosseini; Hadipour, Mahboubeh; Yazdani, Hajar; Heshmat, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Onychomycosis is one of the most common clinical forms of fungal infections due to both filamentous fungi and yeasts. The genus of Candida is one of the most prominent causes of onychomycosis in all around the world. Although Candida albicans is still the most frequent cause of nail infections, use of broad-spectrum antifungal agents has led to a shift in the etiology of C. albicans to non-albicans species. The aim of the present study is rapid and precise identification of candida species isolated from nail infection by using of PCR-RFLP technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 360 clinical yeast strains were collected from nail infections in Iran. Genomic DNA was extracted using FTA; cards. ITS1-5.8SrDNA-ITS2 region was amplified using universal primers and subsequently products were digested with the restriction enzyme MspI. For identification of newly described species (C. parapsilosis complex), the SADH gene was amplified, followed by digestion with Nla III restriction enzyme. Results: Candida albicans was the most commonly isolated species (41.1%), followed by C. parapsilosis (21.4%), C. tropicalis (12.8%), C. kefyr (9.4%), C. krusei (5.5%), C. orthopsilosis (4.1%), C. glabrata (2.8%), C. guilliermondii (1.4%), C. rugosa (0.8%), and C. lusitaniae (0.5%). Patients in the age groups of 51-60 and 81-90 years had the highest and lowest distribution of positive specimens, respectively. Conclusion: Rapid and precise identification of Candida species from clinical specimens lead to appropriate therapeutic plans. PMID:26015921

  9. The low keratin affinity of efinaconazole contributes to its nail penetration and fungicidal activity in topical onychomycosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Keita; Sugimoto, Noriaki; Hosaka, Shinya; Katafuchi-Nagashima, Maria; Arakawa, Yoshio; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki; Jo Siu, William; Pillai, Radhakrishnan

    2014-07-01

    Onychomycosis is a common fungal nail disease that is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. Keratin affinity of topical drugs is an important physicochemical property impacting therapeutic efficacy. To be effective, topical drugs must penetrate the nail bed and retain their antifungal activity within the nail matrix, both of which are adversely affected by keratin binding. We investigated these properties for efinaconazole, a new topical antifungal for onychomycosis, compared with those of the existing topical drugs ciclopirox and amorolfine. The efinaconazole free-drug concentration in keratin suspensions was 14.3%, significantly higher than the concentrations of ciclopirox and amorolfine, which were 0.7% and 1.9%, respectively (P < 0.001). Efinaconazole was released from keratin at a higher proportion than in the reference drugs, with about half of the remaining keratin-bound efinaconazole removed after washing. In single-dose in vitro studies, efinaconazole penetrated full-thickness human nails into the receptor phase and also inhibited the growth of Trichophyton rubrum under the nail. In the presence of keratin, efinaconazole exhibited fungicidal activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes comparable to that of amorolfine and superior to that of ciclopirox. In a guinea pig onychomycosis model with T. mentagrophytes infection, an efinaconazole solution significantly decreased nail fungal burden compared to that of ciclopirox and amorolfine lacquers (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the high nail permeability of efinaconazole and its potent fungicidal activity in the presence of keratin are related to its low keratin affinity, which may contribute to its efficacy in onychomycosis. PMID:24752277

  10. The low keratin affinity of efinaconazole contributes to its nail penetration and fungicidal activity in topical onychomycosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Keita; Sugimoto, Noriaki; Hosaka, Shinya; Katafuchi-Nagashima, Maria; Arakawa, Yoshio; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki; Jo Siu, William; Pillai, Radhakrishnan

    2014-07-01

    Onychomycosis is a common fungal nail disease that is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. Keratin affinity of topical drugs is an important physicochemical property impacting therapeutic efficacy. To be effective, topical drugs must penetrate the nail bed and retain their antifungal activity within the nail matrix, both of which are adversely affected by keratin binding. We investigated these properties for efinaconazole, a new topical antifungal for onychomycosis, compared with those of the existing topical drugs ciclopirox and amorolfine. The efinaconazole free-drug concentration in keratin suspensions was 14.3%, significantly higher than the concentrations of ciclopirox and amorolfine, which were 0.7% and 1.9%, respectively (P < 0.001). Efinaconazole was released from keratin at a higher proportion than in the reference drugs, with about half of the remaining keratin-bound efinaconazole removed after washing. In single-dose in vitro studies, efinaconazole penetrated full-thickness human nails into the receptor phase and also inhibited the growth of Trichophyton rubrum under the nail. In the presence of keratin, efinaconazole exhibited fungicidal activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes comparable to that of amorolfine and superior to that of ciclopirox. In a guinea pig onychomycosis model with T. mentagrophytes infection, an efinaconazole solution significantly decreased nail fungal burden compared to that of ciclopirox and amorolfine lacquers (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the high nail permeability of efinaconazole and its potent fungicidal activity in the presence of keratin are related to its low keratin affinity, which may contribute to its efficacy in onychomycosis.

  11. Microemulsion-based antifungal gel delivery to nail for the treatment of onychomycosis: formulation, optimization, and efficacy studies.

    PubMed

    Barot, Bhavesh S; Parejiya, Punit B; Patel, Hetal K; Mehta, Dharmik M; Shelat, Pragna K

    2012-12-01

    Onychomycosis is the most common nail disease affecting nail plate and nail bed. Onychomycosis causes onycholysis which creates cavity between the nail plate and nail bed, where drug formulations could be applied, providing a direct contact of drug with the nail bed facilitating drug delivery on the infected area. The purpose of the present study was to design and evaluate the potential of microemulsion-based gel as colloidal carrier for itraconazole for delivery into onycholytic nails for effective treatment of onychomycosis. Itraconazole-loaded microemulsions were prepared and optimized using D-optimal design. The microemulsion containing 6.24 % oil, 36 % Smix, and 57.76 % water was selected as the optimized batch (MEI). The globule size and drug loading of the optimized batch were 48.2 nm and 12.13 mg/ml, respectively. Diffused reflectance FTIR studies were performed to study drug-excipient incompatibility. Ex vivo permeation studies were carried out using bovine hoof and human cadaver skin as models for nail plate and nail bed, respectively. Microemulsion-based itraconazole gel (MBGI) showed better penetration and retention in human skin as well as bovine hoof as compared to commercial preparation (market formulation, MFI). The cumulative amount of itraconazole permeated from the MBGI after 12 h was 73.39 ± 3.55 μg cm(-2) which was 1.8 times more than MF. MBGI showed significantly higher ex vivo antifungal activity (P < 0.05) against Candida albicans and Trichophyton rubrum when compared to MFI. Stability studies showed that MBGI was stable at refrigeration and room temperature for 3 months. It was concluded that drug-loaded gel could be a promising formulation for effective treatment of onychomycosis. PMID:25787325

  12. The association of fractional CO2 laser 10.600nm and photodynamic therapy in the treatment of onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Guilherme Bueno; Antonio, João Roberto; Antonio, Carlos Roberto; Tomé, Fernanda Alves

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of the nails caused in most cases by dermatophytes Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Despite numerous available antifungal drugs for therapy of this infection, the cure rate is low, with high rates of relapse after treatment and side effects. OBJECTIVES To present a new option for the treatment of onychomycosis, in search of a more effective and rapid method than conventional ones. METHODS Patients underwent two sessions of CO2 fractional laser 10.600nm associated with photodynamic therapy. Mycological and digital photography were performed before and after the treatment. RESULTS McNemar test with continuity correction and degrees of freedom = 1: for clinical cure rate, 13.06, with p=0.00005; for mycological cure, 17.05, with p=0.00005; 72% felt fully satisfied with the procedure. CONCLUSIONS The use of fractional CO2 laser 10.600nm associated with photodynamic therapy can be effective in the treatment of onychomycosis, decreasing the risk of systemic lesions that may be triggered with prolonged use of oral antifungals. PMID:26375214

  13. Genetic diversity of Aspergillus species isolated from onychomycosis and Aspergillus hongkongensis sp. nov., with implications to antifungal susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Chi-Ching; Hui, Teresa W S; Lee, Kim-Chung; Chen, Jonathan H K; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Tam, Emily W T; Chan, Jasper F W; Wu, Andrea L; Cheung, Mei; Tse, Brian P H; Wu, Alan K L; Lai, Christopher K C; Tsang, Dominic N C; Que, Tak-Lun; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-02-01

    Thirteen Aspergillus isolates recovered from nails of 13 patients (fingernails, n=2; toenails, n=11) with onychomycosis were characterized. Twelve strains were identified by multilocus sequencing as Aspergillus spp. (Aspergillus sydowii [n=4], Aspergillus welwitschiae [n=3], Aspergillus terreus [n=2], Aspergillus flavus [n=1], Aspergillus tubingensis [n=1], and Aspergillus unguis [n=1]). Isolates of A. terreus, A. flavus, and A. unguis were also identifiable by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The 13th isolate (HKU49(T)) possessed unique morphological characteristics different from other Aspergillus spp. Molecular characterization also unambiguously showed that HKU49(T) was distinct from other Aspergillus spp. We propose the novel species Aspergillus hongkongensis to describe this previously unknown fungus. Antifungal susceptibility testing showed most Aspergillus isolates had low MICs against itraconazole and voriconazole, but all Aspergillus isolates had high MICs against fluconazole. A diverse spectrum of Aspergillus species is associated with onychomycosis. Itraconazole and voriconazole are probably better drug options for Aspergillus onychomycosis.

  14. Analysis of genetic polymorphism of the HLA-B and HLA-DR loci in patients with dermatophytic onychomycosis and in their first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    García-Romero, M T; Granados, J; Vega-Memije, M E; Arenas, R

    2012-01-01

    Onychomycosis is known to have predisposing factors and a high prevalence within families that cannot be explained by within-family transmission. We determined the frequency of HLA-B and HLA-DR haplotypes in 25 families of Mexican patients with onychomycosis in order to define the role of the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in genetic susceptibility to this infection. Seventy-eight subjects participated in the study, 47 with onychomycosis and 31 healthy individuals. The frequencies of the HLA-B and HLA-DR haplotypes were compared with those found in first-degree relatives without onychomycosis and in a historic control group of healthy individuals. The frequencies in the controls were similar to those of the healthy relatives of the patients. However, on comparison of the patients with historic controls, we detected a higher frequency of the HLA-DR8 haplotype (P=.03; odds ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-36). These findings suggest that there are polymorphisms in genes of the MHC that increase susceptibility to onychomycosis, particularly haplotype HLA-DR8.

  15. [Analysis of genetic polymorphism of the HLA-B and HLA-DR loci in patients with dermatophytic onychomycosis and in their first-degree relatives].

    PubMed

    García-Romero, M T; Granados, J; Vega-Memije, M E; Arenas, R

    2012-01-01

    Onychomycosis is known to have predisposing factors and a high prevalence within families that cannot be explained by within-family transmission. We determined the frequency of HLA-B and HLA-DR haplotypes in 25 families of Mexican patients with onychomycosis in order to define the role of the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in genetic susceptibility to this infection. Seventy-eight subjects participated in the study, 47 with onychomycosis and 31 healthy individuals. The frequencies of the HLA-B and HLA-DR haplotypes were compared with those found in first-degree relatives without onychomycosis and in a historic control group of healthy individuals. The frequencies in the controls were similar to those of the healthy relatives of the patients. However, on comparison of the patients with historic controls, we detected a higher frequency of the HLA-DR8 haplotype (P=.03; odds ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-36). These findings suggest that there are polymorphisms in genes of the MHC that increase susceptibility to onychomycosis, particularly haplotype HLA-DR8.

  16. A Novel Vehicle for Enhanced Drug Delivery Across the Human Nail for the Treatment of Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Rob; Weaver, Sean; Caserta, Francesco; Brown, Marc B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use in vitro nail models to investigate the potential of a novel base formulation (Recura) containing either fluconazole or miconazole for the treatment of onychomycosis in comparison to two commercial comparators (Jublia and a Penlac generic). Initially, a modified Franz cell was used, where sections of human nail served as the barrier through which drug penetrated into an agar-filled chamber infected with dermatophytes. A second study was performed using a novel infected nail model where dermatophytes grew into human nail and adenosine triphosphate levels were used as biological marker for antimicrobial activity. The novel enhancing system Recura increased the permeation of both existing drugs through human nail sections mounted in a modified Franz cell. Furthermore, the infected nail model also confirmed that the system also enhanced the permeation through infected nail resulting in a decrease in adenosine triphosphate levels superior (P ≤ 0.05) to Penlac generic and equivalent (P > 0.05) to the commercial comparator Jublia. This study demonstrated that with the use of a novel permeation-enhancing formulation base, Recura enhances delivery of miconazole and fluconazole when applied ungually such that the efficacy was equivalent or superior to commercial comparators. Such a topically applied system has the possibility of overcoming the systemic side effects of antifungals when taken orally. PMID:27125057

  17. An open comparative study of nail drilling as adjunctive treatment for toenail onychomycosis (.).

    PubMed

    Shemer, A; Gupta, A K; Amichai, B; Farhi, R; Baran, R; Daniel, C R; Daigle, D; Foley, K A

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Novel treatment regimens are being developed to improve drug penetration through the nail plate. This study investigated the efficacy of nail drilling regimens for the treatment of onychomycosis. Methods Participants were assigned to holes with combination (oral plus topical terbinafine) therapy (Group 1), holes with topical terbinafine (Group 2) or topical terbinafine only (Group 3). Measurement of clear nail and mycology was performed at baseline and at weeks 4, 10, 16, 22 and 28. Mixed linear models were used to compare mean percent clear nail. Mycological cure rates were also tabulated for each group. Tolerability and adverse events were documented. Results Ninety-eight participants were enrolled (106 nails). Both groups with holes had significantly higher percentage of clear nail compared with topical terbinafine alone. Although no significant difference between the two groups where holes were drilled in the nail plate, Group 1 demonstrated improvement over Group 3 earlier than Group 2 (visit 2 versus visit 4). Group 1 also had the highest mycological cure rates. Conclusion Treatment with holes plus topical terbinafine produces significantly greater improvement in toenails' appearance and higher mycological cure rates compared to treating the dorsal aspect of the nail plate with topical terbinafine alone.

  18. A Novel Vehicle for Enhanced Drug Delivery Across the Human Nail for the Treatment of Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Rob; Weaver, Sean; Caserta, Francesco; Brown, Marc B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use in vitro nail models to investigate the potential of a novel base formulation (Recura) containing either fluconazole or miconazole for the treatment of onychomycosis in comparison to two commercial comparators (Jublia and a Penlac generic). Initially, a modified Franz cell was used, where sections of human nail served as the barrier through which drug penetrated into an agar-filled chamber infected with dermatophytes. A second study was performed using a novel infected nail model where dermatophytes grew into human nail and adenosine triphosphate levels were used as biological marker for antimicrobial activity. The novel enhancing system Recura increased the permeation of both existing drugs through human nail sections mounted in a modified Franz cell. Furthermore, the infected nail model also confirmed that the system also enhanced the permeation through infected nail resulting in a decrease in adenosine triphosphate levels superior (P ≤ 0.05) to Penlac generic and equivalent (P > 0.05) to the commercial comparator Jublia. This study demonstrated that with the use of a novel permeation-enhancing formulation base, Recura enhances delivery of miconazole and fluconazole when applied ungually such that the efficacy was equivalent or superior to commercial comparators. Such a topically applied system has the possibility of overcoming the systemic side effects of antifungals when taken orally.

  19. Geomyces pannorum as a possible causative agent of dermatomycosis and onychomycosis in two patients.

    PubMed

    Zelenková, Hana

    2006-01-01

    Chrysosporium pannorum (Link) Hughes is a soil keratinophilic fungus present in organic residues, on human skin surface and in the general environment of human beings. Clear evidence for the pathogenicity of this fungus for human beings was lacking. In 1999, a case of fungal infection in a chow-chow dog and its owner was published, where Chrysosporium pannorum (Link) Hughes was determined as the only possible infection trigger. The State Hygiene Institute in Bratislava repeatedly confirmed the cultivation results. Chrysosporium pannorum (Link) Hughes was detected in the material provided by a ZOO: camel, tiger and antelope hair, whereby the same finding as in the dog mentioned above was described, i.e. extensive alopecic foci of various size. Since 2000 the cultivations have been monitored with due care. Eight positive cultivations of Chrysosporium pannorum (Link) Hughes have been detected until now, two of them in patients with a flair for horticulture. In a male patient, fingernail onychomycosis with affected skin on forearms, hands and fingers was determined. In a female patient only nail plates were affected. Chrysosporium pannorum was confirmed to be the only possible pathogen. Therapy with itraconazole produced excellent results in both patients and no relapses were recorded. Based on our repeated findings it is concluded that the evidence for non-pathogenicity of Chrysosporium pannorum should be revised.

  20. Onychomycosis treated with itraconazole or griseofulvin alone with and without a topical antimycotic or keratolytic agent.

    PubMed

    Arenas, R; Fernández, G; Domínguez, L

    1991-08-01

    An open, comparative, randomized study was conducted using griseofulvin or itraconazole for the treatment of onychomycosis of the foot. Group I (45 patients) received itraconazole and Group II (45 patients) received griseofulvin. Each group was divided into three subgroups that received different topical treatment: antimycotic cream (isoconazole 1%), keratolytic cream (urea 40%), or placebo cream. The itraconazole group showed complete clearance in combination with isoconazole cream in 73.3% (11 of 15 patients), in combination with keratolytic cream in 78.5% (11 of 14 patients), and in combination with placebo cream in 91.6% (11 of 12 patients). The griseofulvin group showed complete clearance in combination with isoconazol cream in 46.1% (7 of 15 patients), in combination with keratolytic cream in 42.8% (6 of 15 patients), and in combination with placebo cream in 26.6% (4 of 15 patients). The itraconazole group showed better results compared with the griseofulvin group when the chi-square statistical method was used.

  1. An open comparative study of nail drilling as adjunctive treatment for toenail onychomycosis (.).

    PubMed

    Shemer, A; Gupta, A K; Amichai, B; Farhi, R; Baran, R; Daniel, C R; Daigle, D; Foley, K A

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Novel treatment regimens are being developed to improve drug penetration through the nail plate. This study investigated the efficacy of nail drilling regimens for the treatment of onychomycosis. Methods Participants were assigned to holes with combination (oral plus topical terbinafine) therapy (Group 1), holes with topical terbinafine (Group 2) or topical terbinafine only (Group 3). Measurement of clear nail and mycology was performed at baseline and at weeks 4, 10, 16, 22 and 28. Mixed linear models were used to compare mean percent clear nail. Mycological cure rates were also tabulated for each group. Tolerability and adverse events were documented. Results Ninety-eight participants were enrolled (106 nails). Both groups with holes had significantly higher percentage of clear nail compared with topical terbinafine alone. Although no significant difference between the two groups where holes were drilled in the nail plate, Group 1 demonstrated improvement over Group 3 earlier than Group 2 (visit 2 versus visit 4). Group 1 also had the highest mycological cure rates. Conclusion Treatment with holes plus topical terbinafine produces significantly greater improvement in toenails' appearance and higher mycological cure rates compared to treating the dorsal aspect of the nail plate with topical terbinafine alone. PMID:27032812

  2. Characterization of Antifungal Activity and Nail Penetration of ME1111, a New Antifungal Agent for Topical Treatment of Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Yuji; Takei-Masuda, Naomi; Kubota, Natsuki; Takahata, Sho; Ohyama, Makoto; Kaneda, Kaori; Iida, Maiko; Maebashi, Kazunori

    2016-02-01

    Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis) is a prevalent disease in many areas of the world, with a high incidence approaching 23%. Available antifungals to treat the disease suffer from a number of disadvantages, necessitating the discovery of new efficacious and safe antifungals. Here, we evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity and nail penetration ability of ME1111, a novel antifungal agent, along with comparator drugs, including ciclopirox, amorolfine, terbinafine, and itraconazole. ME1111 showed potent antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (the major etiologic agents of onychomycosis) strains isolated in Japan and reference fungal strains with an MIC range of 0.12 to 0.5 mg/liter and an MIC50 and MIC90 of 0.5 mg/liter for both. Importantly, none of the tested isolates showed an elevated ME1111 MIC. Moreover, the antifungal activity of ME1111 was minimally affected by 5% wool keratin powder in comparison to the other antifungals tested. The ME1111 solution was able to penetrate human nails and inhibit fungal growth in a dose-dependent manner according to the TurChub assay. In contrast, 8% ciclopirox and 5% amorolfine nail lacquers showed no activity under the same conditions. ME1111 demonstrated approximately 60-fold-greater selectivity in inhibition of Trichophyton spp. than of human cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that ME1111 possesses potent antidermatophyte activity, maintains this activity in the presence of keratin, and possesses excellent human nail permeability. These results suggest that ME1111 is a promising topical medication for the treatment of onychomycosis and therefore warrants further clinical evaluation. PMID:26643333

  3. Characterization of Antifungal Activity and Nail Penetration of ME1111, a New Antifungal Agent for Topical Treatment of Onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Takei-Masuda, Naomi; Kubota, Natsuki; Takahata, Sho; Ohyama, Makoto; Kaneda, Kaori; Iida, Maiko; Maebashi, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis) is a prevalent disease in many areas of the world, with a high incidence approaching 23%. Available antifungals to treat the disease suffer from a number of disadvantages, necessitating the discovery of new efficacious and safe antifungals. Here, we evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity and nail penetration ability of ME1111, a novel antifungal agent, along with comparator drugs, including ciclopirox, amorolfine, terbinafine, and itraconazole. ME1111 showed potent antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (the major etiologic agents of onychomycosis) strains isolated in Japan and reference fungal strains with an MIC range of 0.12 to 0.5 mg/liter and an MIC50 and MIC90 of 0.5 mg/liter for both. Importantly, none of the tested isolates showed an elevated ME1111 MIC. Moreover, the antifungal activity of ME1111 was minimally affected by 5% wool keratin powder in comparison to the other antifungals tested. The ME1111 solution was able to penetrate human nails and inhibit fungal growth in a dose-dependent manner according to the TurChub assay. In contrast, 8% ciclopirox and 5% amorolfine nail lacquers showed no activity under the same conditions. ME1111 demonstrated approximately 60-fold-greater selectivity in inhibition of Trichophyton spp. than of human cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that ME1111 possesses potent antidermatophyte activity, maintains this activity in the presence of keratin, and possesses excellent human nail permeability. These results suggest that ME1111 is a promising topical medication for the treatment of onychomycosis and therefore warrants further clinical evaluation. PMID:26643333

  4. Characterization of Antifungal Activity and Nail Penetration of ME1111, a New Antifungal Agent for Topical Treatment of Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Yuji; Takei-Masuda, Naomi; Kubota, Natsuki; Takahata, Sho; Ohyama, Makoto; Kaneda, Kaori; Iida, Maiko; Maebashi, Kazunori

    2016-02-01

    Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis) is a prevalent disease in many areas of the world, with a high incidence approaching 23%. Available antifungals to treat the disease suffer from a number of disadvantages, necessitating the discovery of new efficacious and safe antifungals. Here, we evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity and nail penetration ability of ME1111, a novel antifungal agent, along with comparator drugs, including ciclopirox, amorolfine, terbinafine, and itraconazole. ME1111 showed potent antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (the major etiologic agents of onychomycosis) strains isolated in Japan and reference fungal strains with an MIC range of 0.12 to 0.5 mg/liter and an MIC50 and MIC90 of 0.5 mg/liter for both. Importantly, none of the tested isolates showed an elevated ME1111 MIC. Moreover, the antifungal activity of ME1111 was minimally affected by 5% wool keratin powder in comparison to the other antifungals tested. The ME1111 solution was able to penetrate human nails and inhibit fungal growth in a dose-dependent manner according to the TurChub assay. In contrast, 8% ciclopirox and 5% amorolfine nail lacquers showed no activity under the same conditions. ME1111 demonstrated approximately 60-fold-greater selectivity in inhibition of Trichophyton spp. than of human cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that ME1111 possesses potent antidermatophyte activity, maintains this activity in the presence of keratin, and possesses excellent human nail permeability. These results suggest that ME1111 is a promising topical medication for the treatment of onychomycosis and therefore warrants further clinical evaluation.

  5. Self-controlled Study of Onychomycosis Treated with Long-pulsed Nd:YAG 1064-nm Laser Combined with Itraconazole

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Jun-Ying; Zhuo, Feng-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of the nail plate and subungual area. In this study, we examined the efficacy of laser treatment using self-controlled study programs involving a long-pulsed Nd:YAG 1064-nm laser combined with oral medication. Methods: Self-controlled strategies were followed in this study. The patients received treatment with oral itraconazole in conjunction with long-pulsed Nd:YAG 1064-nm laser treatment at the nails of the unilateral limb once a week for a total of four times. A total of 84 affected nails were divided into Group A (mild to moderate) and Group B (severe) according to disease severity. Affected nails with the same Scoring Clinical Index for Onychomycosis scores were selected to compare the therapeutic effects of the pure medication treatment group and the combination treatment group with a 24-week follow-up period. Results: In Group A, at the 8th, 16th, and 24th weeks of follow-up, the efficacies in the pure medication treatment group were 81.0%, 81.0%, and 90.5%, respectively, while those in the combination treatment group were 100%, 95.2%, and 90.5%, respectively. The differences between groups were not significant (8th week: χ2 = 4.421, P > 0.05; 16th week: χ2 = 2.043, P > 0.05; 24th week: χ2 = 0.00, P > 0.05). In Group B, at the 8th, 16th, and 24th weeks of follow-up, the efficacies in the pure medication treatment group were 61.9%, 66.7%, and 52.4%, respectively, while those in the combination treatment group were 95.2%, 90.5%, and 100%, respectively. The differences between groups at the 8th and 24th weeks of follow-up were statistically significant (8th week: χ2 = 6.929, P < 0.05; 24th week: χ2 = 13.125, P < 0.05). Conclusions: For patients with mild or moderate onychomycosis, we recommended a pure medication treatment or combination treatment with medication and laser. For those patients with severe onychomycosis, we recommended a combination of medication and laser therapy. PMID:27503017

  6. In Vitro Antifungal Activity of ME1111, a New Topical Agent for Onychomycosis, against Clinical Isolates of Dermatophytes

    PubMed Central

    Isham, N.; Long, L.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of onychomycosis has improved considerably over the past several decades following the introduction of the oral antifungals terbinafine and itraconazole. However, these oral agents suffer from certain disadvantages, including drug interactions and potential liver toxicity. Thus, there is a need for new topical agents that are effective against onychomycosis. ME1111 is a novel selective inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase (complex II) of dermatophyte species, whose small molecular weight enhances its ability to penetrate the nail plate. In this study, we determined the antifungal activity of ME1111 against dermatophyte strains, most of which are known to cause nail infections, as measured by the MIC (n = 400) and the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) (n = 300). Additionally, we examined the potential for resistance development in dermatophytes (n = 4) following repeated exposure to ME1111. Our data show that the MIC90 of ME1111 against dermatophyte strains was 0.25 μg/ml, which was equivalent to that of the comparators amorolfine and ciclopirox (0.25 and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively). ME1111 was fungicidal at clinically achievable concentrations against dermatophytes, and its MFC90s against Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes were 8 μg/ml, comparable to those of ciclopirox. Furthermore, ME1111, as well as ciclopirox, did not induce resistance in 4 dermatophytes tested. Our studies show that ME1111 possesses potent antifungal activity and suggest that it has low potential for the development of resistance in dermatophytes. PMID:26055386

  7. Tinea pedis and onychomycosis frequency in diabetes mellitus patients and diabetic foot ulcers. A cross sectional – observational study

    PubMed Central

    Akkus, Gamze; Evran, Mehtap; Gungor, Dilek; Karakas, Mehmet; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Impaired cellular immunity and reduced phagocytic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes facilitate the development of skin fungal and bacterial infections due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. In our study, we aimed to assess onychomycosis and/or tinea pedis frequency in diabetic patients, and effects on the development of chronic complications, particularly foot ulcer. Methods: We included 227 diabetic patients in the study. Forty-three patients had diabetic foot ulcer. We screened and recorded demographic characteristics, HbA1c levels of patients, and presence of complications We examined patients dermatologically, and collected samples by scalpel from skin between toes, and from sole, toe nail, and area surrounding nails from suspected to have fungal infection. Results: Native positivity between toes was higher in men compared to women (p<0.05). We obtained significant relation between HbA1c elevation and native positivity between toes (p<0.05). Fungal infection between toes, at sole and toe nail significantly increased in patients with diabetic foot ulcer compared to patients without diabetic foot ulcer (p<0.05). Moreover, native positivity in patients with diabetic foot ulcer correlated with presence of fungal infection examination findings (p<0.05). Conclusion: Fungal infections were more frequently observed in the presence of poor glycemic control and peripheral vascular disease in diabetic patients in compliance with the literature, and the presence of fungal infection may also responsible for the development of foot ulcers. PMID:27648034

  8. Tinea pedis and onychomycosis frequency in diabetes mellitus patients and diabetic foot ulcers. A cross sectional – observational study

    PubMed Central

    Akkus, Gamze; Evran, Mehtap; Gungor, Dilek; Karakas, Mehmet; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Impaired cellular immunity and reduced phagocytic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes facilitate the development of skin fungal and bacterial infections due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. In our study, we aimed to assess onychomycosis and/or tinea pedis frequency in diabetic patients, and effects on the development of chronic complications, particularly foot ulcer. Methods: We included 227 diabetic patients in the study. Forty-three patients had diabetic foot ulcer. We screened and recorded demographic characteristics, HbA1c levels of patients, and presence of complications We examined patients dermatologically, and collected samples by scalpel from skin between toes, and from sole, toe nail, and area surrounding nails from suspected to have fungal infection. Results: Native positivity between toes was higher in men compared to women (p<0.05). We obtained significant relation between HbA1c elevation and native positivity between toes (p<0.05). Fungal infection between toes, at sole and toe nail significantly increased in patients with diabetic foot ulcer compared to patients without diabetic foot ulcer (p<0.05). Moreover, native positivity in patients with diabetic foot ulcer correlated with presence of fungal infection examination findings (p<0.05). Conclusion: Fungal infections were more frequently observed in the presence of poor glycemic control and peripheral vascular disease in diabetic patients in compliance with the literature, and the presence of fungal infection may also responsible for the development of foot ulcers.

  9. A new model of in vitro fungal biofilms formed on human nail fragments allows reliable testing of laser and light therapies against onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Vila, Taissa Vieira Machado; Rozental, Sonia; de Sá Guimarães, Claudia Maria Duarte

    2015-04-01

    Onychomycoses represent approximately 50 % of all nail diseases worldwide. In warmer and more humid countries like Brazil, the incidence of onychomycoses caused by non-dermatophyte molds (NDM, including Fusarium spp.) or yeasts (including Candida albicans) has been increasing. Traditional antifungal treatments used for the dermatophyte-borne disease are less effective against onychomycoses caused by NDM. Although some laser and light treatments have demonstrated clinical efficacy against onychomycosis, their US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval as "first-line" therapy is pending, partly due to the lack of well-demonstrated fungicidal activity in a reliable in vitro model. Here, we describe a reliable new in vitro model to determine the fungicidal activity of laser and light therapies against onychomycosis caused by Fusarium oxysporum and C. albicans. Biofilms formed in vitro on sterile human nail fragments were treated with 1064 nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser (Nd:YAG), 420 nm intense pulsed light (IPL) IPL 420, followed by Nd:YAG, or near-infrared light ((NIR) 700-1400 nm). Light and laser antibiofilm effects were evaluated using cell viability assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All treatments were highly effective against C. albicans and F. oxysporum biofilms, resulting in decreases in cell viability of 45-60 % for C. albicans and 92-100 % for F. oxysporum. The model described here yielded fungicidal activities that matched more closely to those observed in the clinic, when compared to published in vitro models for laser and light therapies. Thus, our model might represent an important tool for the initial testing, validation, and "fine-tuning" of laser and light therapies against onychomycosis. PMID:25471266

  10. Application of Nail Polish During Topical Management of Onychomycosis: Are Data Available to Guide the Clinician About What to Tell Their Patients?

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2016-08-01

    Topical antifungal management of toenail onychomycosis has been fraught with several therapeutic challenges including difficulty gaining access to the site of infection and the need for prolonged durations of therapy. In addition, there has been a marked lack of information on the impact of toenail polish application on drug penetration after application. This article reviews available data from studies evaluating the effect of nail polish on antifungal drag penetration using ex vivo laboratory models with cadaver fingernail plates with both tavaborole 5% solution and efinaconazole 10% solution. In addition, changes in nail polish appearance and color transfer to applicators are also discussed, with changes noted with topical efinaconazole. Importantly, there are no data on whether or not nail polish application alters the efficacy of these topical agents. PMID:27672416

  11. Efficacy Coefficients Determined Using Nail Permeability and Antifungal Activity in Keratin-Containing Media Are Useful for Predicting Clinical Efficacies of Topical Drugs for Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshiki; Sugiura, Keita; Hashimoto, Takashi; Ueda, Akane; Konno, Yoshihiro; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. In order to obtain an in vitro index that is relevant to the clinical efficacy of topical anti-onychomycosis drugs, we profiled five topical drugs: amorolfine, ciclopirox, efinaconazole, luliconazole, and terbinafine, for their nail permeabilities, keratin affinities, and anti-dermatophytic activities in the presence of keratin. Efinaconazole and ciclopirox permeated full-thickness human nails more deeply than luliconazole. Amorolfine and terbinafine did not show any detectable permeation. The free-drug concentration of efinaconazole in a 5% human nail keratin suspension was 24.9%, which was significantly higher than those of the other drugs (1.1-3.9%). Additionally, efinaconazole was released from human nail keratin at a greater proportion than the other drugs. The MICs of the five drugs for Trichophyton rubrum were determined at various concentrations of keratin (0-20%) in RPMI 1640 medium. The MICs of ciclopirox were not affected by keratin, whereas those of efinaconazole were slightly increased and those of luliconazole and terbinafine were markedly increased in the presence of 20% keratin. Efficacy coefficients were calculated using the nail permeation flux and MIC in media without or with keratin. Efinaconazole showed the highest efficacy coefficient, which was determined using MIC in media with keratin. The order of efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media rather than keratin-free media was consistent with that of complete cure rates in previously reported clinical trials. The present study revealed that efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media are useful for predicting the clinical efficacies of topical drugs. In order to be more effective, topical drugs have to possess higher efficacy coefficients. PMID:27441843

  12. Efficacy Coefficients Determined Using Nail Permeability and Antifungal Activity in Keratin-Containing Media Are Useful for Predicting Clinical Efficacies of Topical Drugs for Onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. In order to obtain an in vitro index that is relevant to the clinical efficacy of topical anti-onychomycosis drugs, we profiled five topical drugs: amorolfine, ciclopirox, efinaconazole, luliconazole, and terbinafine, for their nail permeabilities, keratin affinities, and anti-dermatophytic activities in the presence of keratin. Efinaconazole and ciclopirox permeated full-thickness human nails more deeply than luliconazole. Amorolfine and terbinafine did not show any detectable permeation. The free-drug concentration of efinaconazole in a 5% human nail keratin suspension was 24.9%, which was significantly higher than those of the other drugs (1.1–3.9%). Additionally, efinaconazole was released from human nail keratin at a greater proportion than the other drugs. The MICs of the five drugs for Trichophyton rubrum were determined at various concentrations of keratin (0–20%) in RPMI 1640 medium. The MICs of ciclopirox were not affected by keratin, whereas those of efinaconazole were slightly increased and those of luliconazole and terbinafine were markedly increased in the presence of 20% keratin. Efficacy coefficients were calculated using the nail permeation flux and MIC in media without or with keratin. Efinaconazole showed the highest efficacy coefficient, which was determined using MIC in media with keratin. The order of efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media rather than keratin-free media was consistent with that of complete cure rates in previously reported clinical trials. The present study revealed that efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media are useful for predicting the clinical efficacies of topical drugs. In order to be more effective, topical drugs have to possess higher efficacy coefficients. PMID:27441843

  13. Efficacy Coefficients Determined Using Nail Permeability and Antifungal Activity in Keratin-Containing Media Are Useful for Predicting Clinical Efficacies of Topical Drugs for Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshiki; Sugiura, Keita; Hashimoto, Takashi; Ueda, Akane; Konno, Yoshihiro; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. In order to obtain an in vitro index that is relevant to the clinical efficacy of topical anti-onychomycosis drugs, we profiled five topical drugs: amorolfine, ciclopirox, efinaconazole, luliconazole, and terbinafine, for their nail permeabilities, keratin affinities, and anti-dermatophytic activities in the presence of keratin. Efinaconazole and ciclopirox permeated full-thickness human nails more deeply than luliconazole. Amorolfine and terbinafine did not show any detectable permeation. The free-drug concentration of efinaconazole in a 5% human nail keratin suspension was 24.9%, which was significantly higher than those of the other drugs (1.1-3.9%). Additionally, efinaconazole was released from human nail keratin at a greater proportion than the other drugs. The MICs of the five drugs for Trichophyton rubrum were determined at various concentrations of keratin (0-20%) in RPMI 1640 medium. The MICs of ciclopirox were not affected by keratin, whereas those of efinaconazole were slightly increased and those of luliconazole and terbinafine were markedly increased in the presence of 20% keratin. Efficacy coefficients were calculated using the nail permeation flux and MIC in media without or with keratin. Efinaconazole showed the highest efficacy coefficient, which was determined using MIC in media with keratin. The order of efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media rather than keratin-free media was consistent with that of complete cure rates in previously reported clinical trials. The present study revealed that efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media are useful for predicting the clinical efficacies of topical drugs. In order to be more effective, topical drugs have to possess higher efficacy coefficients.

  14. Onychomycosis of Toenails and Post-hoc Analyses with Efinaconazole 10% Solution Once-daily Treatment: Impact of Disease Severity and Other Concomitant Associated Factors on Selection of Therapy and Therapeutic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2016-02-01

    Topical treatment for toenail onychomycosis has been fraught with a long-standing reputation of poor efficaey, primarily due to physical properties of the nail unit that impede drug penetration. Newer topical agents have been formulated as Solution, which appear to provide better therapeutic response in properly selected patients. It is important to recognize the impact the effects that mitigating and concomitant factors can have on efficaey. These factors include disease severity, gender, presence of tinea pedis, and diabetes. This article reviews results achieved in Phase 3 pivotal studies with topical efinaconazole 10% Solution applied once daily for 48 weeks with a focus on how the aforementioned factors influenced therapeutic outcomes. It is important for clinicians treating patients for onychomycosis to evaluate severity, treat concomitant tinea pedis, address control of diabetes if present by encouraging involvement of the patient's primary care physician, and consider longer treatment courses when clinically relevant. PMID:27047631

  15. Onychomycosis of Toenails and Post-hoc Analyses with Efinaconazole 10% Solution Once-daily Treatment: Impact of Disease Severity and Other Concomitant Associated Factors on Selection of Therapy and Therapeutic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2016-02-01

    Topical treatment for toenail onychomycosis has been fraught with a long-standing reputation of poor efficaey, primarily due to physical properties of the nail unit that impede drug penetration. Newer topical agents have been formulated as Solution, which appear to provide better therapeutic response in properly selected patients. It is important to recognize the impact the effects that mitigating and concomitant factors can have on efficaey. These factors include disease severity, gender, presence of tinea pedis, and diabetes. This article reviews results achieved in Phase 3 pivotal studies with topical efinaconazole 10% Solution applied once daily for 48 weeks with a focus on how the aforementioned factors influenced therapeutic outcomes. It is important for clinicians treating patients for onychomycosis to evaluate severity, treat concomitant tinea pedis, address control of diabetes if present by encouraging involvement of the patient's primary care physician, and consider longer treatment courses when clinically relevant.

  16. Fungal Nail Infection (Onychomycosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... vinegar, vitamin E oil, Vicks® VapoRub®, or tea tree oil. When to Seek Medical Care Fungal nail ... Trusted Links Related diseases: Psoriasis View all diseases Community: Discussion Forum Skinmatters Blog About Us | Terms of ...

  17. The Effect of Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm Laser in the Treatment of Onychomycosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kalokasidis, Kostas; Onder, Meltem; Trakatelli, Myrto-Georgia; Richert, Bertrand; Fritz, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective clinical study, the Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm laser (Light Age, Inc., Somerset, NJ, USA) was used on 131 onychomycosis subjects (94 females, 37 males; ages 18 to 68 years). Mycotic cultures were taken and fungus types were detected. The laser protocol included two sessions with a one-month interval. Treatment duration was approximately 15 minutes per session and patients were observed over a 3-month time period. Laser fluencies of 14 J/cm2 were applied at 9 billionths of a second pulse duration and at 5 Hz frequency. Follow-up was performed at 3 months with mycological cultures. Before and after digital photographs were taken. Adverse effects were recorded and all participants completed “self-evaluation questionnaires” rating their level of satisfaction. All subjects were well satisfied with the treatments, there were no noticeable side effects, and no significant differences were found treating men versus women. At the 3-month follow-up 95.42% of the patients were laboratory mycologically cured of fungal infection. This clinical study demonstrates that fungal nail infections can be effectively and safely treated with Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm laser. It can also be combined with systemic oral antifungals providing more limited treatment time. PMID:24396343

  18. The Effect of Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm Laser in the Treatment of Onychomycosis In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kalokasidis, Kostas; Onder, Meltem; Trakatelli, Myrto-Georgia; Richert, Bertrand; Fritz, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective clinical study, the Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm laser (Light Age, Inc., Somerset, NJ, USA) was used on 131 onychomycosis subjects (94 females, 37 males; ages 18 to 68 years). Mycotic cultures were taken and fungus types were detected. The laser protocol included two sessions with a one-month interval. Treatment duration was approximately 15 minutes per session and patients were observed over a 3-month time period. Laser fluencies of 14 J/cm(2) were applied at 9 billionths of a second pulse duration and at 5 Hz frequency. Follow-up was performed at 3 months with mycological cultures. Before and after digital photographs were taken. Adverse effects were recorded and all participants completed "self-evaluation questionnaires" rating their level of satisfaction. All subjects were well satisfied with the treatments, there were no noticeable side effects, and no significant differences were found treating men versus women. At the 3-month follow-up 95.42% of the patients were laboratory mycologically cured of fungal infection. This clinical study demonstrates that fungal nail infections can be effectively and safely treated with Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm laser. It can also be combined with systemic oral antifungals providing more limited treatment time.

  19. Onychomycosis due to Hendersonula toruloidea in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Gugnani, H C; Nzelibe, F K; Osunkwo, I C

    1986-06-01

    Clinical features of a case of finger and toe nail infection due to Hendersonula toruloidea and the characteristics of the isolate are described. The isolate was sensitive to clotrimazole at a concentration of 10 micrograms ml-1. The patient responded well to topical application of a lotion of this antimycotic.

  20. [Onychomycosis frequency in psoriatic patients in a tertiary care hospital].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Tovar, Luis Javier; Arévalo-López, Alfredo; Domínguez-Aguilar, Sofía; Manzano-Gayosso, Patricia; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca; López Martínez, Rubén; Silva González, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: los cambios ungueales en los pacientes con psoriasis pueden ser muy parecidos a la onicomicosis y, por lo tanto, las infecciones fúngicas pueden ser subdiagnosticadas. Se investigó la frecuencia de onicomicosis en manos y pies de 150 pacientes con psoriasis de un servicio de dermatología. Métodos: se obtuvieron los datos clínicos de la psoriasis. Se cultivaron escamas de las uñas en agar dextrosa Sabouraud con y sin antibióticos y se hizo un examen directo con KOH. Resultados: de los 150 pacientes, 67 (45 %) presentaron uñas sanas; 42 (28 %) tuvieron onicomicosis, y 41 (27 %) onicopatía sin infección. Las alteraciones ungueales en las manos estuvieron más asociadas con onicopatía psoriásica (82.5 %); los cambios de las uñas de los pies se asociaron más frecuentemente a infección fúngica (26.4 frente a 9.45 % en psoriasis). De 20 cultivos positivos, se aislaron 22 agentes: 11 Candida spp. (50 %). Como factor de riesgo para desarrollar onicomicosis, el tiempo de evolución de la psoriasis mostró una diferencia significativa (p = 0.03). Conclusión: en los pacientes con psoriasis, las alteraciones ungueales de manos se deben principalmente a psoriasis, mientras que los cambios ungueales en los pies se asocian a onicomicosis. Esta fue causada principalmente por Candida sp. El único factor de riesgo asociado para onicomicosis fue la larga evolución de la psoriasis.

  1. Ungual and trans-ungual iontophoretic delivery of terbinafine for the treatment of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anroop B; Kim, Hyun D; Chakraborty, Bireswar; Singh, Jagpal; Zaman, Muhammad; Gupta, Aditya; Friden, Phillip M; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2009-11-01

    The application of iontophoresis was demonstrated in the nail drug delivery of terbinafine (TH) recently. This study explored a systematic assessment of this approach to enhance the drug delivery using a novel topical formulation, and the subsequent release of TH from the drug loaded nails. For the first time, a nail on-agar plate model was used to study the release of drug from the iontophoresis (0.5 mA/cm(2)) loaded nails. In addition, the activity of the drug released from the drug loaded nail plate was studied against Trichophyton rubrum. An increase in applied current density and current duration enhanced the transport of TH into and through the nail plate. In vitro release of drug from the iontophoretic loaded nails into agar plates exhibited 2-phase release pattern. The amount of drug released in both of the in vitro models was comparable, and the nails loaded using iontophoresis continued to release levels of TH > 2 orders of magnitude above the minimum inhibitory concentration over at least 52 days. Results indicate that iontophoresis enhances the delivery of terbinafine into and through the nail plate and suggest that the use of this treatment approach could result in a safe and more efficacious outcome with less frequent treatments. PMID:19340887

  2. Dermatopharmacology of ciclopirox nail lacquer topical solution 8% in the treatment of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bohn, M; Kraemer, K T

    2000-10-01

    Ciclopirox is a synthetic hydroxypyridone antifungal agent. In contrast to the azoles, glucuronidation is the main metabolic pathway of ciclopirox; therefore interactions with drugs metabolized via the cytochrome P450 system are unlikely Ciclopirox is also distinct from the common systemic agents, which interfere with sterol biosynthesis. In fact, ciclopirox chelates trivalent cations (such as Fe3+), inhibits metal-dependent enzymes that are responsible for degradation of toxic metabolites in the fungal cells, and targets diverse metabolic (eg, respiratory) and energy producing processes in microbial cells. Ciclopirox is a broad spectrum antimicrobial with activity against all the usual dermatophytes as well as yeast and nondermatophyte molds. It has demonstrated activity against gram positive and negative bacteria, including resistant strains of Staphlococcus aureus. Ciclopirox exhibits fungal inhibitory activity (minimum inhibitory concentration < 4 microg/mL for dermatophytes) as well as fungicidal activity; to date resistance to the drug has not been identified. Ciclopirox has been formulated in a nail lacquer delivery system. After evaporation of volatile solvents in the lacquer, the concentration of ciclopirox in the remaining lacquer film reaches approximately 35%, providing a high concentration gradient for penetration into the nail. Radiolabel data demonstrate penetration into infected nails after only 1 application of the lacquer. Ciclopirox nail lacquer is a topical product that provides an active fungicidal agent in a delivery system capable of promoting nail penetration. With repeated applications, the antifungal agent is homogeneously distributed through all layers of the toenail achieving concentrations of ciclopirox in excess of inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations for most pathogens. Although ciclopirox readily penetrates nails, very low levels of ciclopirox are recoverable systemically, even after chronic use. Ciclopirox nail lacquer 8% is a topical product that provides an active fungicidal agent in a delivery system capable of penetrating nails.

  3. Ungual and trans-ungual iontophoretic delivery of terbinafine for the treatment of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anroop B; Kim, Hyun D; Chakraborty, Bireswar; Singh, Jagpal; Zaman, Muhammad; Gupta, Aditya; Friden, Phillip M; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2009-11-01

    The application of iontophoresis was demonstrated in the nail drug delivery of terbinafine (TH) recently. This study explored a systematic assessment of this approach to enhance the drug delivery using a novel topical formulation, and the subsequent release of TH from the drug loaded nails. For the first time, a nail on-agar plate model was used to study the release of drug from the iontophoresis (0.5 mA/cm(2)) loaded nails. In addition, the activity of the drug released from the drug loaded nail plate was studied against Trichophyton rubrum. An increase in applied current density and current duration enhanced the transport of TH into and through the nail plate. In vitro release of drug from the iontophoretic loaded nails into agar plates exhibited 2-phase release pattern. The amount of drug released in both of the in vitro models was comparable, and the nails loaded using iontophoresis continued to release levels of TH > 2 orders of magnitude above the minimum inhibitory concentration over at least 52 days. Results indicate that iontophoresis enhances the delivery of terbinafine into and through the nail plate and suggest that the use of this treatment approach could result in a safe and more efficacious outcome with less frequent treatments.

  4. Dermoscopic patterns in patients with a clinical diagnosis of onychomycosis—results of a prospective study including data of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and culture examination

    PubMed Central

    Jesús-Silva, Miriam América; Fernández-Martínez, Ramón; Roldán-Marín, Rodrigo; Arenas, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background: Onychomycosis is the most common nail disease, representing 50% of cases affecting the nail apparatus. The diagnosis is made by clinical examination along with the KOH exam of the nail and culture of the sample. However, not all dermatologists have access to a mycology lab. Objective: To determine the correlation between KOH examination and dermoscopic patterns in patients with clinical diagnosis of onychomycosis. Patients/Methods: A descriptive, open, observational, prospective, cross-sectional study of 178 patients with clinical suspicion of onychomycosis was conducted. All patients underwent clinical examination, dermoscopy with a DermLite PHOTO dermatoscope (3Gen, San Juan Capistrano, CA, USA), KOH assessment and culture analysis. The most frequent dermoscopic patterns were identified and their correlation with the clinical subtype of onychomycosis was analyzed. Results: The study included 178 patients with clinical suspicion of onychomycosis. Of these, 155 (87.1%) had positive direct KOH examination for onychomycosis. Eighty-seven patients (56.13%) presented with clinical onychomycosis pattern of total dystrophic onychomycosis (TDO), 67 (43.23%) with distal lateral subungual onychomycosis (DLSO), 1 (0.65%) with trachyonychia). Dermoscopic patterns of onychomycosis showed the following frequencies: the spiked pattern was present in 22 patients (14.19%), longitudinal striae pattern in 51 patients (32.9%) and linear edge pattern in 21 patients (13.55%). We identified a pattern described as “distal irregular termination” in 41 patients with TDO and 26 with DLSO. Conclusions: This is the fist study conducted in a Mexican population that uses dermoscopy as a diagnostic tool along with the KOH examination for the diagnosis of onychomycosis. Dermoscopy may be used as an important diagnostic tool when evaluating nail disease. However, it should not be used as the only diagnostic criteria for onychomycosis. PMID:26114050

  5. Fungal nail infection

    MedlinePlus

    Nails - fungal infection; Onychomycosis; Infection - fungal - nails; Tinea unguium ... hair, nails, and outer skin layers. Common fungal infections include: Athlete's foot Jock itch Ringworm on the ...

  6. Onycholysis and Chromonychia: A Case Caused by Trichosporon inkin

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Springall, María Fernanda; Arroyo-Escalante, Sara; Arenas, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts cause only 5-10% of onychomycosis; the most common yeast is Candida albicans, and rarely Trichosporon spp. is found. Recently, it has become an important cause of fungemia with a high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. Superficial infections caused by Trichosporon spp., including piedra and onychomycosis, occur in immunocompetent patients. Herein, we report a case of a fungal nail infection characterized by onycholysis and chromonychia caused by Trichosporon inkin. PMID:27171745

  7. Epidemiology of superficial fungal diseases in French Guiana: a three-year retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Simonnet, Christine; Berger, Franck; Gantier, Jean-Charles

    2011-08-01

    A three-year retrospective analysis of fungi isolated from specimens of patients with superficial fungal infections in French Guiana is presented. Clinical samples from 726 patients with presumptive diagnoses of onychomycosis (28.2% of the patients), tinea capitis (27.8%), superficial cutaneous mycoses of the feet (22.0%), and of other areas of the body (21.9%), were assessed by microscopic examination and culture. Dermatophytes accounted for 59.2% of the isolates, followed by yeasts (27.5%) and non-dermatophytic molds (13.1%). Trichophyton rubrum was the most common dermatophyte recovered from cases of onychomycosis (67.4%), tinea pedis (70.6%) and tinea corporis (52.4%). In contrast, Trichophyton tonsurans was the predominant species associated with tinea capitis (73.9%). Yeasts were identified as the principal etiologic agents of onychomycosis of the fingernails (74.2%), whereas molds were found mainly in cases of onychomycosis of the toenails. In such instances, Neoscytalidium dimidiatum (70.8%) was the most common mold recovered in culture. In conclusion, the prevalence of T. rubrum and the occurrence of onychomycosis and fungal infections of the feet in French Guiana are similar to results reported from Europe, whereas the frequency of tinea capitis and the importance of T. tonsurans in such infections are similar to the situation in the Americas.

  8. Enhancing transungual delivery and spreading of efinaconazole under the nail plate through a unique formulation approach.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon H

    2014-12-01

    Onychomycosis is a very common nail disorder seen in dermatological practice. It is difficult to treat successfully for a multitude of reasons, and although topical antifungal therapy might be considered ideal for mild to moderate onychomycosis, efficacy has been limited by poor nail penetration of active ingredient through the nail plate into the nail bed and nail matrix to the site of infection. The intrinsic properties of an antifungal and its vehicle formulation are both considered important contributors to effective treatment. Here we review the formulation approach to efinaconazole topical solution, 10% an effective and well-tolerated treatment for onychomycosis. We demonstrate that the low surface tension formulation affords better penetration of efinaconazole through the nail plate, and also to the site of infection by spreading into the space between the nail and nail bed. PMID:25607788

  9. Penetration of ((14)C)-Efinaconazole Topical Solution, 10%, Does Not Appear to be Influenced by Nail Polish.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A; Stein Gold, Linda; Korotzer, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Onychomycosis is a common nail disorder with significant medical impacts and aesthetic consequences. Patients seek treatment for several reasons, including the unsightliness of the nail(s). Even with successful management, it takes months for the diseased nail to appear cosmetically normal. Patients commonly apply nail polish to mask the appearance of the dystrophic nail, though it is contraindicated with the currently available topical lacquers for onychomycosis. The authors' nonclinical study using a cadaver nail model showed that penetration of efinaconazole topical solution, 10%, a new antifungal being developed for the treatment of mild-to-moderate toenail onychomycosis, was not influenced by application of nail polish. Polishes showed an increase in surface tackiness with repeated efinaconazole topical solution, 10% application. The medical and aesthetic significance of the authors' findings have yet to be assessed clinically. PMID:25276275

  10. Enhancing transungual delivery and spreading of efinaconazole under the nail plate through a unique formulation approach.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon H

    2014-12-01

    Onychomycosis is a very common nail disorder seen in dermatological practice. It is difficult to treat successfully for a multitude of reasons, and although topical antifungal therapy might be considered ideal for mild to moderate onychomycosis, efficacy has been limited by poor nail penetration of active ingredient through the nail plate into the nail bed and nail matrix to the site of infection. The intrinsic properties of an antifungal and its vehicle formulation are both considered important contributors to effective treatment. Here we review the formulation approach to efinaconazole topical solution, 10% an effective and well-tolerated treatment for onychomycosis. We demonstrate that the low surface tension formulation affords better penetration of efinaconazole through the nail plate, and also to the site of infection by spreading into the space between the nail and nail bed.

  11. Penetration of (14C)-Efinaconazole Topical Solution, 10%, Does Not Appear to be Influenced by Nail Polish

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Linda Stein; Korotzer, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a common nail disorder with significant medical impacts and aesthetic consequences. Patients seek treatment for several reasons, including the unsightliness of the nail(s). Even with successful management, it takes months for the diseased nail to appear cosmetically normal. Patients commonly apply nail polish to mask the appearance of the dystrophic nail, though it is contraindicated with the currently available topical lacquers for onychomycosis. The authors’ nonclinical study using a cadaver nail model showed that penetration of efinaconazole topical solution, 10%, a new antifungal being developed for the treatment of mild-to-moderate toenail onychomycosis, was not influenced by application of nail polish. Polishes showed an increase in surface tackiness with repeated efinaconazole topical solution, 10% application. The medical and aesthetic significance of the authors’ findings have yet to be assessed clinically. PMID:25276275

  12. Penetration of ((14)C)-Efinaconazole Topical Solution, 10%, Does Not Appear to be Influenced by Nail Polish.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A; Stein Gold, Linda; Korotzer, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Onychomycosis is a common nail disorder with significant medical impacts and aesthetic consequences. Patients seek treatment for several reasons, including the unsightliness of the nail(s). Even with successful management, it takes months for the diseased nail to appear cosmetically normal. Patients commonly apply nail polish to mask the appearance of the dystrophic nail, though it is contraindicated with the currently available topical lacquers for onychomycosis. The authors' nonclinical study using a cadaver nail model showed that penetration of efinaconazole topical solution, 10%, a new antifungal being developed for the treatment of mild-to-moderate toenail onychomycosis, was not influenced by application of nail polish. Polishes showed an increase in surface tackiness with repeated efinaconazole topical solution, 10% application. The medical and aesthetic significance of the authors' findings have yet to be assessed clinically.

  13. Efinaconazole: first global approval.

    PubMed

    Patel, Trina; Dhillon, Sohita

    2013-11-01

    A non-lacquer 10% topical solution of efinaconazole, developed by Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, received its first global approval in Canada in October 2013 for the treatment of onychomycosis. The product is under regulatory review in the US and Japan. The mechanism of anti-fungal activity of efinaconazole, a small-molecule triazole compound, appears to be similar to that of other anti-fungal triazoles, namely ergosterol synthesis inhibition. In particular, it appears to inhibit 14α demethylase, an enzyme involved in the conversion of lanosterol to ergosterol, resulting in secondary degenerative changes. This article summarizes the milestones in the development of efinaconazole leading to this first approval for onychomycosis.

  14. Onychomatricoma with misleading features.

    PubMed

    Fayol, J; Baran, R; Perrin, C; Labrousse, F

    2000-01-01

    Onychomatricoma is a rare tumour of the nail matrix with peculiar clinical and histological features and electron microscopic findings. We report on 5 cases with appearances which were misleading. Three presented as longitudinal melanonychia, a previously unreported observation. One case had the appearance of a cutaneous horn. In 3 of the 5 cases the tumour was associated with an onychomycosis and this may thus have been a predisposing factor in the secondary fungal infestation. Onychomatricoma appears as a multi-faceted tumour which can be mimicked by longitudinal melanonychia and/or onychomycosis. PMID:11200837

  15. Diagnosis and management of tinea infections.

    PubMed

    Ely, John W; Rosenfeld, Sandra; Seabury Stone, Mary

    2014-11-15

    Tinea infections are caused by dermatophytes and are classified by the involved site. The most common infections in prepubertal children are tinea corporis and tinea capitis, whereas adolescents and adults are more likely to develop tinea cruris, tinea pedis, and tinea unguium (onychomycosis). The clinical diagnosis can be unreliable because tinea infections have many mimics, which can manifest identical lesions. For example, tinea corporis can be confused with eczema, tinea capitis can be confused with alopecia areata, and onychomycosis can be confused with dystrophic toenails from repeated low-level trauma. Physicians should confirm suspected onychomycosis and tinea capitis with a potassium hydroxide preparation or culture. Tinea corporis, tinea cruris, and tinea pedis generally respond to inexpensive topical agents such as terbinafine cream or butenafine cream, but oral antifungal agents may be indicated for extensive disease, failed topical treatment, immunocompromised patients, or severe moccasin-type tinea pedis. Oral terbinafine is first-line therapy for tinea capitis and onychomycosis because of its tolerability, high cure rate, and low cost. However, kerion should be treated with griseofulvin unless Trichophyton has been documented as the pathogen. Failure to treat kerion promptly can lead to scarring and permanent hair loss.

  16. Fusarium spp. is able to grow and invade healthy human nails as a single source of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Galletti, J; Negri, M; Grassi, F L; Kioshima-Cotica, É S; Svidzinski, T I E

    2015-09-01

    Onychomycosis caused by Fusarium spp. is emerging, but some factors associated with its development remain unclear, such as whether this genus is keratinolytic. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of Fusarium to use the human nail as a single source of nutrients. We also performed an epidemiological study and antifungal susceptibility testing of Fusarium spp. that were isolated from patients with onychomycosis. The epidemiological study showed that Fusarium species accounted for 12.4 % of onychomycosis cases, and it was the most common among nondermatophyte molds. The most frequent species identified were F. oxysporum (36.5 %), F. solani (31.8 %), and F. subglutinans (8.3 %). Fluconazole was not active against Fusarium spp., and the response to terbinafine varied according to species. Fusarium was able to grow in vitro without the addition of nutrients and invade healthy nails. Thus, we found that Fusarium uses keratin as a single source of nutrients, and the model proposed herein may be useful for future studies on the pathogenesis of onychomycosis.

  17. Trichosporon isolation from human ungueal infections: is there a pathogenic role?*

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, Alba Regina; Nishikawa, Marília Martins; de Mondino, Silvia Suzana Bona; de Macedo, Heloisa Werneck; da Rocha, Elisabeth Martins da Silva; Baptista, Andrea Regina de Souza

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although dermatophytes are considered the major cause of onychomycosis, many reports have incriminated non-dermatophyte moulds and yeasts in the disease’s etiology. Successive Trichosporon isolation from onychomycosis has led to the genus being suspected as a nail primary pathogen. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of Trichosporon isolation in onychomycosis patients who attended a mycology diagnostic service in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between January 2003 and December 2006. The study also includes a worldwide review on Trichosporon isolation prevalence in ungueal disease, emphasizing T. ovoides. METHODS This retrospective study was conducted with the support of staff from the Mycology Laboratory at the Dermatological Service of Rio de Janeiro’s Santa Casa da Misericórdia (MLDS). RESULTS Mycological analysis provided positive results equaling 47/5036 (0.93%) for Trichosporon spp.; obtained mainly as a single agent (72.35%), and from mixed cultures (27.65%; X2= 6.397; p= 0.018). The great majority belongs to the T. ovoides species (91.5%; n=43), obtained as a single isolate (74.41%; n= 32/43; X2 = 7.023; p= 0.014). CONCLUSIONS Although T. ovoides is classically associated as an etiologic agent of white piedra, this study highlights its potential as a human nail disease pathogen. Our study opens doors for future epidemiologic and virulence factors aimed at determining whether T. ovoides is an important causative agent of onychomycosis in Brazil. PMID:27192516

  18. Dermatophyte infections.

    PubMed

    Hainer, Barry L

    2003-01-01

    Dermatophytes are fungi that require keratin for growth. These fungi can cause superficial infections of the skin, hair, and nails. Dermatophytes are spread by direct contact from other people (anthropophilic organisms), animals (zoophilic organisms), and soil (geophilic organisms), as well as indirectly from fomites. Dermatophyte infections can be readily diagnosed based on the history, physical examination, and potassium hydroxide (KOH) microscopy. Diagnosis occasionally requires Wood's lamp examination and fungal culture or histologic examination. Topical therapy is used for most dermatophyte infections. Cure rates are higher and treatment courses are shorter with topical fungicidal allylamines than with fungistatic azoles. Oral therapy is preferred for tinea capitis, tinea barbae, and onychomycosis. Orally administered griseofulvin remains the standard treatment for tinea capitis. Topical treatment of onychomycosis with ciclopirox nail lacquer has a low cure rate. For onychomycosis, "pulse" oral therapy with the newer imidazoles (itraconazole or fluconazole) or allylamines (terbinafine) is considerably less expensive than continuous treatment but has a somewhat lower mycologic cure rate. The diagnosis of onychomycosis should be confirmed by KOH microscopy, culture, or histologic examination before therapy is initiated, because of the expense, duration, and potential adverse effects of treatment.

  19. Multiple medical problems following agent orange exposure.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, J L; Islam, A; Akhter, S; Dembinski, W; Kulaylat, M; Ambrus, C M

    2004-01-01

    A patient exposed to agent orange and a gunshot wound during the Vietnam War has developed multiple medical problems including nocardiosis, onychomycosis (Trichophyton rubrum), multiple thromboembolic episodes, hemochromatosis, diabetes mellitus type 2, diabetic neuropathy, activated protein C resistance (without Leyden V 1st mutation), degree A-V block, lung cancer (metastatic adenocarcinoma), carpal tunnel syndrome and arthritis. PMID:18084883

  20. Pulmonary Fungal Infection Caused by Neoscytalidium dimidiatum

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Luke; Lee, Samuel A.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Lindner, Jonathan; Fan, Hongxin

    2015-01-01

    Neoscytalidium dimidiatum is a mold known to cause onychomycosis and dermatomycosis; however, it is an extremely rare cause of systemic infection. We report a case of pulmonary infection with Neoscytalidium dimidiatum in an immunocompromised patient and discuss in vitro susceptibility data from this case and previous literature. PMID:25948605

  1. [Infections of finger and toe nails due to fungi and bacteria].

    PubMed

    Nenoff, P; Paasch, U; Handrick, W

    2014-04-01

    Infections of the finger and the toe nails are most frequently caused by fungi, primarily dermatophytes. Causative agents of tinea unguium are mostly anthropophilic dermatophytes. Both in Germany, and worldwide, Trichophyton rubrum represents the main important causative agent of onychomycoses. Yeasts are isolated from fungal nail infections, both paronychia and onychomycosis far more often than generally expected. This can represent either saprophytic colonization as well as acute or chronic infection of the nail organ. The main yeasts causing nail infections are Candida parapsilosis, and Candida guilliermondii; Candida albicans is only in third place. Onychomycosis due to molds, or so called non-dermatophyte molds (NDM), are being increasingly detected. Molds as cause of an onychomycosis are considered as emerging pathogens. Fusarium species are the most common cause of NDM onychomycosis; however, rare molds like Onychocola canadensis may be found. Bacterial infections of the nails are caused by gram negative bacteria, usually Pseudomonas aeruginosa (recognizable because of green or black coloration of the nails) but also Klebsiella spp. and gram positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment of onychomycosis includes application of topical antifungal agents (amorolfine, ciclopirox). If more than 50 % of the nail plate is affected or if more than three out of ten nails are affected by the fungal infection, oral treatment using terbinafine (in case of dermatophyte infection), fluconazole (for yeast infections), or alternatively itraconazole are recommended. Bacterial infections are treated topically with antiseptic agents (octenidine), and in some cases with topical antibiotics (nadifloxacin, gentamicin). Pseudomonas infections of the nail organ are treated by ciprofloxacin; other bacteria are treated according to the results of culture and sensitivity testing.

  2. In vitro antagonistic activity of monoterpenes and their mixtures against 'toe nail fungus' pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ramsewak, Russel S; Nair, Muraleedharan G; Stommel, Manfred; Selanders, Louise

    2003-04-01

    The antibiotic effect of the active ingredients in Meijer medicated chest rub (eucalyptus oil, camphor and menthol) as well as the inactive ingredients (thymol, oil of turpentine, oil of nutmeg and oil of cedar leaf) were studied in vitro using the fungal pathogens responsible for onychomycosis, such as the dermatophytes Tricophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum canis, Epidermophyton fl occosum and Epidermophyton stockdale. The zones of inhibition data revealed that camphor (1). menthol (2). thymol (3). and oil of Eucalyptus citriodora were the most efficacious components against the test organisms. The MIC(100) for mixtures of these four components in various carrier solvents revealed that formulations consisting of 5 mg/mL concentrations of each have a potential to be efffective in controlling onychomycosis. PMID:12722144

  3. Different physicochemical properties of antimycotic agents are relevant for penetration into and through human nails.

    PubMed

    Neubert, R H H; Gensbügel, C; Jäckel, A; Wartewig, S

    2006-07-01

    This article reports the characterization of the physicochemical properties of two important antifungal topical drugs, amorolfine and ciclopirox. Furthermore, the release of the drugs from commercial lacquer formulations for treatment of onychomycosis was studied using the online FTIR-ATR technique. Based on the physicochemical background of these two drugs and their release from commercial lacquer formulations for treatment of onychomycosis, the suitability of these drugs for optimized local antifungal therapy to human nails is discussed. Amorolfine appears to be more suitable for drug delivery to human nails because it penetrates into the nails via the hydrophilic pathway. Furthermore amorolfine penetrates very well into fungal cells, due to the pH value of the nail, as well as the pKa value of this antimycotic agent and the lipophilic properties of its base form.

  4. In Vitro penetration of a novel oxaborole antifungal (AN2690) into the human nail plate.

    PubMed

    Hui, Xiaoying; Baker, Stephen J; Wester, Ronald C; Barbadillo, Sherry; Cashmore, Anne K; Sanders, Virginia; Hold, Karin M; Akama, Tsutomu; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Plattner, Jacob J; Maibach, Howard I

    2007-10-01

    Onychomycosis is a challenging fungal infection to treat topically, likely due to the unique properties of the nail plate. This seemingly impenetrable barrier has high resistance to the passage of antifungal drugs in sufficient concentrations to kill the causative fungi deep in the nail bed. Recently, a new class of antifungal agent was described, termed oxaboroles, which have broad-spectrum activity. These oxaboroles were designed with properties believed to be required to allow for easier transit through the nail plate. Herein, we report (i) the nail penetration results of four oxaboroles that led to the selection of AN2690, (ii) the results of the nail penetration of AN2690 from four vehicles, and (iii) the nail penetration of AN2690 in its chosen vehicle compared to a commercial control, ciclopirox. AN2690 has superior penetration compared to ciclopirox, and achieves levels within and under the nail plate that suggest it has the potential to be an effective topical treatment for onychomycosis.

  5. Tinea imbricata: autosomal dominant pattern of susceptibility in a polygamous indigenous family of the Nahuatl zone in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, A; Araiza, J; Koffman-Alfaro, Susana; Paredes-Solis, Vanessa; Cuevas-Covarrubias, S; Rivera, M R

    2004-08-01

    We report on 9 confirmed cases of tinea imbricata (Tokelau, infection due to Trichophyton concentricum) out of 16 family members. They had a common mother with three different fathers. The genetic analysis of the family suggests an autosomal dominant pattern of susceptibility. Most cases (8/9) were presented as concentric and lamellar forms. One patient also had onychomycosis due to T. concentricum. Only two out of nine cases had a positive response to trichophytin.

  6. Skin and nail mycoses in patients with diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Papini, M; Cicoletti, M; Fabrizi, V; Landucci, P

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects all socioeconomic and age groups and its incidence is rapidly increasing worldwide. The diabetic foot complication represents one of the most complex and serious complications in these patients. Fungal infections can also contribute to the severity of the diabetic foot. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of foot skin and toenail mycosis in a group of 75 patients with diabetic foot complication and in a matched control group. Diabetic patients showed onychomycosis in 53.3% and foot skin mycosis in 46.7% of the cases, with a prevalence of both fungal infections significantly higher than that observed in the control group. At least one type of these fungal infections was present in 69.3% of diabetic subjects with a highly significant difference compared to control group (P<0.001). Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale were the most common species responsible of both nail and skin infections. Candida spp, Fusarium spp, Aspergillus spp and other moulds. were found in about 1/3 onychomycosis. Previous toe amputation was significantly associated with both skin and nail mycosis. The present study confirms that both tinea pedis and onychomycosis have a high prevalence in subjects suffering from diabetic foot complication, and that the problem of fungal infections of the foot in diabetic subjects is still highly underestimated. Consequently, there is an important clinical rationale for careful mycological examination of diabetic foot and an adequate treatment tailored for each individual patient according to the fungal species involved.

  7. Alternaria infections: laboratory diagnosis and relevant clinical features.

    PubMed

    Pastor, F J; Guarro, J

    2008-08-01

    The genus Alternaria contains several species of melanized hyphomycetes that cause opportunistic human infections. The published literature contains 210 reported cases of human alternarioses between 1933 and the present day. The most frequent clinical manifestations are cutaneous and subcutaneous infections (74.3%), followed by oculomycosis (9.5%), invasive and non-invasive rhinosinusitis (8.1%) and onychomycosis (8.1%). Immunosuppression is frequently associated with cutaneous and subcutaneous infections and rhinosinusitis. The most important risk factors for cutaneous and subcutaneous infections are solid organ transplantation and Cushing's syndrome, and those for rhinosinusitis are bone marrow transplants. Having been exposed to soil and garbage is common in all cases of oculomycosis, with corticotherapy being a risk factor in 50% of these cases. Previous contact with soil and/or trauma to the nails is associated with most cases of onychomycosis. In general, alternariosis shows a good response to conventional antifungal drugs. On some occasions, steroid suppression or reduction is sufficient to resolve an infection. Itraconazole is the antifungal drug used most frequently to successfully treat onychomycosis and cutaneous and subcutaneous infections. Posaconazole and voriconazole are promising therapeutic options, with the latter being especially so for oculomycosis.

  8. Identification of three yeast species using the conventional and internal transcribed spacer region sequencing methods as first or second global record from human superficial infections.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sater, Mohamed Ahmed; Moubasher, Abdel-Aal Hassan; Soliman, Zeinab

    2016-10-01

    During the mycological analysis of skin and nail samples taken from patients with onychomycosis and tineas in Assiut city, it is interesting to report that yeast fungi were the main causal agents being cultured from 45.79% of total cases. In general, 21 species of yeast were isolated. Some of these are reported for the first time from clinical specimens. From the literature available up-to-date around the world, this study reports for the first time Saccharomycopsis fibuligera as the causal agent of four clinical cases: two onychomycoses, one tinea capitis and one tinea amiantacea. Also, it is reported here the second record for Trichosporon dohaense from a case of onychomycosis of a 40-year-old woman (after its original description in 2009 by Taj-Aldeen et al. J Clin Microbiol 47: 1791). Candida galli was also reported for the first time from clinical specimen (tinea unguium) in 2014 by Galán-Sánchez et al. Mycopathol 178: 303, and this study reports the second case of onychomycosis by C. galli. These strains were identified on the basis of their phenotypic, biochemical, physiological and genotypic features. Strains and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene sequences of these species are deposited at Assiut University Mycological Center Culture Collection (AUMC) and National Center for Biotechnological Information (NCBI) respectively. PMID:27392537

  9. Miltefosine is effective against Candida albicans and Fusarium oxysporum nail biofilms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Machado Vila, Taissa Vieira; Sousa Quintanilha, Natália; Rozental, Sonia

    2015-11-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal nail infection that represents ∼50 % of all nail disease cases worldwide. Clinical treatment with standard antifungals frequently requires long-term systemic therapy to avoid chronic disease. Onychomycosis caused by non-dermatophyte moulds, such as Fusarium spp., and yeasts, such as Candida spp., is particularly difficult to treat, possibly due to the formation of drug-resistant fungal biofilms on affected areas. Here, we show that the alkylphospholipid miltefosine, used clinically against leishmaniasis and cutaneous breast metastases, has potent activity against biofilms of Fusarium oxysporum and Candida albicans formed on human nail fragments in vitro. Miltefosine activity was compared with that of commercially available antifungals in the treatment of biofilms at two distinct developmental phases: formation and maturation (pre-formed biofilms). Drug activity towards biofilms formed on nail fragments and on microplate surfaces (microdilution assays) was evaluated using XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] assays, and drug effects on fingernail biofilms were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For F. oxysporum, miltefosine at 8 μg ml- 1 inhibited biofilm formation by 93%, whilst 256 μg ml- 1 reduced the metabolic activity of pre-formed nail biofilms by 93%. Treatment with miltefosine at 1000 μg ml- 1 inhibited biofilm formation by 89% and reduced the metabolic activity of pre-formed C. albicans biofilms by 99%. SEM analyses of biofilms formed on fingernail fragments showed a clear reduction in biofilm biomass after miltefosine treatment, in agreement with XTT results. Our results show that miltefosine has potential as a therapeutic agent against onychomycosis and should be considered for in vivo efficacy studies, especially in topical formulations for refractory disease treatment. PMID:26404553

  10. Mycology - an update. Part 1: Dermatomycoses: causative agents, epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nenoff, Pietro; Krüger, Constanze; Ginter-Hanselmayer, Gabriele; Tietz, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-03-01

    Dermatomycoses are caused most commonly by dermatophytes. The anthropophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum is still the most frequent causative agent worldwide. Keratinolytic enzymes, e.g. hydrolases and keratinases, are important virulence factors of T. rubrum. Recently, the cysteine dioxygenase was found as new virulence factor. Predisposing host factors play a similarly important role for the development of dermatophytosis of the skin and nails. Chronic venous insufficiency, diabetes mellitus, disorders of cellular immunity, and genetic predisposition should be considered as risk factors for onychomycosis. A new alarming trend is the increasing number of cases of onychomycosis - mostly due to T. rubrum - in infancy. In Germany, tinea capitis is mostly caused by zoophilic dermatophytes, in particular Microsporum canis. New zoophilic fungi, primarily Trichophyton species of Arthroderma benhamiae, should be taken into differential diagnostic considerations of tinea capitis, tinea faciei, and tinea corporis. Source of infection are small household pets, particularly rodents, like guinea pigs. Anthropophilic dermatophytes may be introduced by families which immigrate from Africa or Asia to Europe. The anthropophilic dermatophytes T. violaceum, T. tonsurans (infections occurring in fighting sports clubs as "tinea gladiatorum capitis et corporis") and M. audouinii are causing outbreaks of small epidemics of tinea corporis and tinea capitis in kindergartens and schools. Superficial infections of the skin and mucous membranes due to yeasts are caused by Candida species. Also common are infections due to the lipophilic yeast fungus Malassezia. Today, within the genus Malassezia more than 10 different species are known. Malassezia globosa seems to play the crucial role in pityriasis versicolor. Molds (also designated non-dermatophyte molds, NDM) are increasingly found as causative agents in onychomycosis. Besides Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, several species of

  11. Candida Parapsilosis and Candida Guillermondii: Emerging Pathogens in Nail Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Fich, Felix; Abarzúa-Araya, Alvaro; Pérez, Mario; Nauhm, Yalile; León, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Onychomycosis of the fingernails and toenails is generally caused by dermatophytes and yeasts. Toenail mycoses involve mainly dermatophytes but when Candida is also involved, the strain most commonly isolated worldwide is C. albicans. Aims: To determine Candida strains prevailing in onychomycosis. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, observational and descriptive study of fungal cultures retrieved from the registry of the microbiology laboratory of the Pontificia Universidad Católica was performed. Specimens obtained from patients attending the healthcare network between December 2007 and December 2010 was analyzed. Statistical Analysis: A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Candida was retrieved from 467 of 8443 specimens (52% fingernails and 48% toenails). Cultures were negative in 5320 specimens (63.6%). Among Candida-positive cultures, parapsilosis was the most commonly isolated strain with 202 cases (43.3%). While isolates of Candida guillermondii were 113 (24.2%), those of Candida albicans were 110 (23.6%), those of spp. were 20 (4.3%) and there were 22 cases of other isolates (4.71%). Among the 467 patients with positive cultures for Candida, 136 (29,1%) were men and 331 (70,9%) were women. All patients were older than 18 years old. Clinical files were available for only 169 of the 467 patients with positive cultures for Candida. For those, age, gender, underlying illnesses and use of immunossupresive agents during the trial was reviewed. Conclusions: The present study shows that both C. parapsilosis as well as C. guillermondii appear as emerging pathogens that would be in fact taking the place of C. albicans as the most commonly isolated pathogen in patients with Candida onychomycosis. The relative percentage of C parapsilosis increases every year. Identification of Candida strains as etiological agents of nail candidiasis becomes relevant to the management both nail as well as systemic candidiasis, in view of the

  12. Miltefosine is effective against Candida albicans and Fusarium oxysporum nail biofilms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Machado Vila, Taissa Vieira; Sousa Quintanilha, Natália; Rozental, Sonia

    2015-11-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal nail infection that represents ∼50 % of all nail disease cases worldwide. Clinical treatment with standard antifungals frequently requires long-term systemic therapy to avoid chronic disease. Onychomycosis caused by non-dermatophyte moulds, such as Fusarium spp., and yeasts, such as Candida spp., is particularly difficult to treat, possibly due to the formation of drug-resistant fungal biofilms on affected areas. Here, we show that the alkylphospholipid miltefosine, used clinically against leishmaniasis and cutaneous breast metastases, has potent activity against biofilms of Fusarium oxysporum and Candida albicans formed on human nail fragments in vitro. Miltefosine activity was compared with that of commercially available antifungals in the treatment of biofilms at two distinct developmental phases: formation and maturation (pre-formed biofilms). Drug activity towards biofilms formed on nail fragments and on microplate surfaces (microdilution assays) was evaluated using XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] assays, and drug effects on fingernail biofilms were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For F. oxysporum, miltefosine at 8 μg ml- 1 inhibited biofilm formation by 93%, whilst 256 μg ml- 1 reduced the metabolic activity of pre-formed nail biofilms by 93%. Treatment with miltefosine at 1000 μg ml- 1 inhibited biofilm formation by 89% and reduced the metabolic activity of pre-formed C. albicans biofilms by 99%. SEM analyses of biofilms formed on fingernail fragments showed a clear reduction in biofilm biomass after miltefosine treatment, in agreement with XTT results. Our results show that miltefosine has potential as a therapeutic agent against onychomycosis and should be considered for in vivo efficacy studies, especially in topical formulations for refractory disease treatment.

  13. Clinical forms of dermatophytosis (ringworm infection).

    PubMed

    Degreef, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    Dermatophytic infections of the skin, hairs and nails are very common and are very variable in aspect. In skin, inflammatory symptoms are often absent, but in other cases they may be very pronounced, in particular when caused by zoophilic dermatophytes. In onychomycosis, it is very difficult to make the differential diagnosis with other causes of onychodystrophy on purely clinical grounds; indeed, even in case of fungal infection, the causative agent can be suspected on clinical grounds only in a minority of cases. The clinical presentation of skin infections, infections of the scalp and beard, and the nails are presented more in detail.

  14. Fusarium infections of the skin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K.; Baran, Robert; Summerbell, Richard C.

    2000-04-01

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous and may be found in the soil, air and on plants. Fusarium species can cause mycotoxicosis in humans following ingestion of food that has been colonized by the fungal organism. In humans, Fusarium species can also cause disease that is localized, focally invasive or disseminated. The pathogen generally affects immunocompromised individuals with infection of immunocompetent persons being rarely reported. Localized infection includes septic arthritis, endophthalmitis, osteomyelitis, cystitis and brain abscess. In these situations relatively good response may be expected following appropriate surgery and oral antifungal therapy. Disseminated infection occurs when two or more noncontiguous sites are involved. Over eighty cases have been reported, many of which had a hematologic malignancy including neutropenia. The species most commonly involved include Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum, and Fusarium moniliforme (also termed F. verticillioides). The diagnosis of Fusarium infection may be made on histopathology, gram stain, mycology, blood culture, or serology. Portals of entry of disseminated infection include the respiratory tract, the gastrointestinal tract, and cutaneous sites.The skin can be an important and an early clue to diagnosis since cutaneous lesions may be observed at an early stage of the disease and in about seventy-five cases of disseminated Fusarium infection. Typical skin lesions may be painful red or violaceous nodules, the center of which often becomes ulcerated and covered by a black eschar. The multiple necrotizing lesions are often observed on the trunk and the extremities. Onychomycosis most commonly due to F. oxysporum or F. solani has been reported. The onychomycosis may be of several types: distal and lateral subungual (DLSO), white superficial (WSO), and proximal subungual (PSO). In proximal subungual onychomycosis there may be associated leukonychia and/or periungual inflammation. Patients with Fusarium

  15. Fusarium nail and skin infection: a report of eight cases from Natal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Calado, Nicácia Barbosa; Sousa, Francisco; Gomes, Nadja Oliveira; Cardoso, Fernando Ramos; Zaror, Luis Conrado; Milan, Eveline Pipolo

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium spp. are non-dermatophytic hyaline moulds distributed worldwide and recovered from the nature as soil saprophytes and plant pathogens. Human infections are usually precipitated by local or systemic predisposing factors and disseminated infection is associated with impaired immune responses. We report eight cases of cutaneous lesions caused by Fusarium spp. All patients were immunocompetent. Seven cases with presented onychomycosis and one patient with interdigital intertrigo. It is important to alert the medical community about the relevance of the opportunistic fungi, such as Fusarium spp., which have emerged as human infectious agents, emphasizing the importance of correct etiological identification, allowing for appropriate treatment.

  16. Acquired Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenails

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Ashley; Scher, Richard K.; Avarbock, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malalignment is the lateral deviation of the nail plate along the longitudinal axis due to the lateral rotation of the nail matrix. The nail plate grows out in ridges caused by repeated microtrauma to the nail. Common complications include onychomycosis, Pseudomonas infection and acute or chronic paronychia. Treatment options range from conservative management to surgical options including realignment and nail matrixectomy. Congenital malalignment usually presents in infancy or childhood, but we present two cases of acquired malalignment occurring in the teenage years. PMID:27171597

  17. [Dermatophytoses in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Arenas, Roberto

    2002-06-01

    The dermatophytic infections are superficial mycoses common in Mexico, they have an estimated frequency of 5% in dermatological outpatients. In this review we present a global view of these mycoses as well as their etiological agents in tinea capitis, tinea pedis, tinea corporis, tinea cruris and onychomycosis and also uncommon infections such as tinea imbricata and epidermophytosis of the diaper area. We also analyze these infections in diabetic patients, healthy carriers and dermatophytic infections in pets and laboratory animals. The most important publications about dermatophytosis in Mexico in the dermatological, epidemiological or mycological area are reviewed, specially those published in the last ten years.

  18. A center's callosities.

    PubMed

    Adams, B B; Lucky, A W

    2001-02-01

    We present a case report of a 14-year-old white male who developed hyperkeratotic plaques on the distal aspects of 2 toes. He was referred by his primary care physician for the treatment of onychomycosis. With questioning, the patient stated that he played center for his high school basketball team. After physical examination, he was diagnosed with callosities caused by his basketball activities. Proper nail hygiene and wearing of larger footwear resulted in improvement of his callosities. Sports-related cutaneous injuries should be included in the differential diagnosis of nail and toe abnormalities.

  19. Onychoprotothecosis: An uncommon presentation of protothecosis.

    PubMed

    Gandham, N R; Vyawahare, C R; Chaudhaury, N; Shinde, R A

    2015-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a fairly common condition seen in a dermatology clinic. Dermatophytes Trichophyton and Epidermophyton are the known filamentous fungi implicated. The yeast-like fungi such as Candida less commonly cause Onychomycosis. The genus Prototheca may on preliminary observation resemble yeast-like fungi but a detailed microscopy will reveal the absence of budding and presence of endospores. Onychoprotothecosis is an uncommon presentation of human protothecosis. Of the two Prototheca species (Prototheca zopfii and Prototheca wickerhamii) known to cause the disease, P. wickerhamii has been reported more commonly. We report a culture proven case of this condition caused by P. zopfii. The patient, a 55-year-old housewife presented with discolouration and breaking off of the right thumb and forefinger nails since a period of six months. Samples of nail scrapping sent to the Microbiology Laboratory were culture-positive for Prototheca. Speciation by the automated Vitek-2 system (bioMerieux) identified the isolate as P. zopfii, which was further confirmed at PGI, Chandigarh. PMID:26068353

  20. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P < .05) with a permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative. PMID:22124008

  1. In Vitro penetration of a novel oxaborole antifungal (AN2690) into the human nail plate.

    PubMed

    Hui, Xiaoying; Baker, Stephen J; Wester, Ronald C; Barbadillo, Sherry; Cashmore, Anne K; Sanders, Virginia; Hold, Karin M; Akama, Tsutomu; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Plattner, Jacob J; Maibach, Howard I

    2007-10-01

    Onychomycosis is a challenging fungal infection to treat topically, likely due to the unique properties of the nail plate. This seemingly impenetrable barrier has high resistance to the passage of antifungal drugs in sufficient concentrations to kill the causative fungi deep in the nail bed. Recently, a new class of antifungal agent was described, termed oxaboroles, which have broad-spectrum activity. These oxaboroles were designed with properties believed to be required to allow for easier transit through the nail plate. Herein, we report (i) the nail penetration results of four oxaboroles that led to the selection of AN2690, (ii) the results of the nail penetration of AN2690 from four vehicles, and (iii) the nail penetration of AN2690 in its chosen vehicle compared to a commercial control, ciclopirox. AN2690 has superior penetration compared to ciclopirox, and achieves levels within and under the nail plate that suggest it has the potential to be an effective topical treatment for onychomycosis. PMID:17621679

  2. [Nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi isolated in Le Dantec University hospital of Dakar in 2014: Epidemiological, clinical and mycological study].

    PubMed

    Diongue, K; Diallo, M A; Badiane, A S; Seck, M C; Ndiaye, M; Ndoye, N W; Ndiaye, Y D; Dieye, B; Déme, A; Ndiaye, I M; Ndir, O; Ndiaye, D

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, the incidence of superficial fungal infections involving nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi increased considerably. The objective of this work was to analyze the epidemiological, clinical and mycological fungal infections due to nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi diagnosed in the laboratory of parasitology-mycology of Le Dantec hospital in Dakar. With a retrospective study of the various cases of nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi isolated in the laboratory of parasitology-mycology during the period of November 2013 to December 2014, we collected 22 cases of infections in 11 men and 11 women; age ranging from 17 to 75 years with a mean of 45.3 years (sex ratio=1): eight cases of intertrigo, seven cases of onychomycosis, four cases of palmoplantar keratoderma (KPP), a case of onychomycosis associated with interdigital intertrigo, a case of infectious myositis and one case of African histoplasmosis. We have isolated and identified a total of 22 nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi: ten Fusarium, five Trichosporon, two Chrysosporium, two Geotrichum, one Rhodotorula, one Neoscytalidium dimidiatum and one Histoplasma capsulatum var. duboisii. So we are seeing the emergence of nondermatophytic and noncandidal increasingly isolated from superficial and local lesions. These fungi, generally contaminants or commensal, cause a problem regarding their direct involvement in pathological processes in which they are isolated. So we should respect the recommendations proposed for their involvement in pathological processes and, by a collaboration between clinician and biologist, demonstrate their real involvement through effective, targeted treatment.

  3. Production of Fusaric Acid by Fusarium spp. in Pure Culture and in Solid Medium Co-Cultures.

    PubMed

    Bohni, Nadine; Hofstetter, Valérie; Gindro, Katia; Buyck, Bart; Schumpp, Olivier; Bertrand, Samuel; Monod, Michel; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2016-03-18

    The ability of fungi isolated from nails of patients suffering from onychomycosis to induce de novo production of bioactive compounds in co-culture was examined. Comparison between the metabolite profiles produced by Sarocladium strictum, by Fusarium oxysporum, and by these two species in co-culture revealed de novo induction of fusaric acid based on HRMS. Structure confirmation of this toxin, using sensitive microflow NMR, required only three 9-cm Petri dishes of fungal culture. A targeted metabolomics study based on UHPLC-HRMS confirmed that the production of fusaric acid was strain-dependent. Furthermore, the detected toxin levels suggested that onychomycosis-associated fungal strains of the F. oxysporum and F. fujikuroi species complexes are much more frequently producing fusaric acid, and in higher amount, than strains of the F. solani species complex. Fusarium strains producing no significant amounts of this compound in pure culture, were shown to de novo produce that compound when grown in co-culture. The role of fusaric acid in fungal virulence and defense is discussed.

  4. [Key messages in nail disease].

    PubMed

    Goettmann, Sophie

    2014-11-01

    Nail diseases are varied, and their diagnosis is often difficult. Misdiagnosis can result in failure to recognize a severe disease in urgent need of treatment and in the prescription of treatments that are inappropriate, long, ineffective, and expensive. Acute paronychia must be managed rapidly, treated with antiseptics several times a day, and closely monitored. Nail lichen must be recognized early and treated rapidly and appropriately to prevent permanent scarring. All chronic pain (to shocks or cold) of the tip of a finger or toe should suggest a glomus tumor. Any unexplained persistent single-finger onychopathy should in principle cause the physician to suspect a tumor, carcinoma, or melanoma and to order a histologic examination. An onychopathy must not be treated as an onychomycosis without diagnostic certainty. Repeated microtraumas of the toenails cause injuries that absolutely must be differentiated from onychomycosis. In growth of the big toenail can often be avoided by appropriate cutting of the nails, leaving in place the lateral parts of the nail plate. PMID:25451634

  5. [Superficial mycoses: comparative study between type 2 diabetic patients and a non-diabetic control group].

    PubMed

    García-Humbría, Leila; Richard-Yegres, Nicole; Pérez-Blanco, Maigualida; Yegres, Francisco; Mendoza, Mireya; Acosta, Arnaldo; Hernández, Rosaura; Zárraga, Eluz

    2005-03-01

    Superficial mycoses are considered to affect more frequently patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2), specially onychomycosis and Tinea pedis. The purpose of this study was to compare the dermatophytoses, candidiasis and Pitiriasis versicolor frequency between 40 patients with DM-2 and 40 healthy persons of either sex, 40 years old or more. Clinical, metabolic, mycologic and inmunologic studies against Candida albicans, were carried out. Both diabetics 75% (30/40) and controls 65% (26/40) presented a high frequency of superficial mycoses (no significant difference p = 0.329). Pitiriasis versicolor was not detected in diabetic patients. They presented Tinea unguium, concomitant with Tinea pedis, with a higher frequency. The predominant dermatophyte was Trichophyton rubrum 18/23 (78%) in diabetics and 8/16 (50%) in non diabetics. Candida was isolated as commensal from oral mucous: 23/40 (58%) in diabetics and 21/40 (52%) in non diabetics (serotipo A was the more frequent), and from onychomycosis: 11/40 (28%) in diabetics and 12/40 (30%) in non diabetics. The immunological response was the same in both groups: celular 100%, humoral 20%. No statistical correlation among superficial mycoses, blood glucose level, glycosylated hemoglobin values or the time suffering the disease was observed. The high susceptibility to dermatophytes and Candida sp. infection showed to be associated with age and no with the diabetic type 2 condition in those patients.

  6. Childhood nail alterations in Polish population.

    PubMed

    Sobjanek, Michał; Michajłowski, Igor; Konczalska, Monika; Włodarkiewicz, Adam; Roszkiewicz, Jadwiga

    2012-01-01

    The epidemiology and nature of childhood nail apparatus pathology is not well known. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequency and nature of nail alterations in Polish pediatric patients. Among 1588 patients diagnosed and treated at our clinic due to nail alterations, 82 (5.16%) patients under age 16 were selected. The most frequent (36.59%) diagnosis were variants of normal nails, which were observed in 30 patients. The most common pathology were viral warts (19.51%). Differences in the distribution of onychomycosis and viral warts in children and adults were statistically significant. Onychomycosis was more common in adults (60.39% vs. 9.76%), whereas viral warts were more common in children (19.51% vs. 5.86%; P<0.0001). Melanonychia was diagnosed in one (1.22%) case. Benign and malignant tumors were not observed. In conclusion, distribution of nail apparatus pathology in children is different comparing with adults. In the group of children under 6 years of age, there were mainly variants of normal nails, whereas in older children viral infection and acquired structural disorders were recorded. The risk of nail apparatus malignancy in childhood seems to be extremely low. PMID:22726282

  7. Drug delivery to the nail following topical application.

    PubMed

    Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2002-04-01

    The absorption of drugs into the nail unit, following topical application to the nail plate, is highly desirable to treat nail disorders, such as onychomycosis (fungal infections of the nail). Nail permeability is however quite low and limits topical therapy to early/mild disease states. In this paper, the recent research into ungual drug delivery is reviewed. The nail unit and the two most common diseases affecting the nail--onychomycosis and nail psoriasis--are briefly described to set the scene and to give an overview of the nature and scope of the problem. The factors, which affect drug uptake and permeation through the nail plate such as solute molecular size, hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity, charge, and the nature of the vehicle, are then discussed, followed by ways of enhancing drug transport into and through the nail plate. Finally, drug-containing nail lacquers which, like cosmetic varnish, are brushed onto the nail plates to form a film, and from which drug is released and penetrates into the nail, are reviewed.

  8. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P < .05) with a permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative.

  9. An in vitro study of the antimicrobial effects of indigo naturalis prepared from Strobilanthes formosanus Moore.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yin-Ru; Li, Ann; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Yin-Ku

    2013-01-01

    Indigo naturalis is effective in treating nail psoriasis coexisting with microorganism infections. This study examines the antimicrobial effects of indigo naturalis prepared from Strobilanthes formosanus Moore. Eight bacterial and seven fungal strains were assayed using the agar diffusion method to examine the effects of indigo naturalis and its bioactive compounds. The bioactive compounds of indigo naturalis were purified sequentially using GFC, TLC, and HPLC. Their structures were identified using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. UPLC-MS/MS was applied to compare the metabolome profiles of indigo naturalis ethyl-acetate (EA) extract and its source plant, Strobilanthes formosanus Moore. The results of in vitro antimicrobial assays showed that indigo naturalis EA-extract significantly (≥1 mg/disc) inhibits Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermis and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)) and mildly inhibits non-dermatophytic onychomycosis pathogens (Aspergillus fumigates and Candida albicans), but has little effect on dermatophyes. Isatin and tryptanthrin were identified as the bioactive compounds of indigo naturalis using S. aureus and S. epidermis as the bioassay model. Both bioactive ingredients had no effect on all tested fungi. In summary, indigo naturalis prepared from Strobilanthes formosanus Moore exhibits antimicrobial effects on Staphylococcus and non-dermatophytic onychomycosis pathogens. Tryptanthrin and isatin may be its major bioactive ingredients against Staphylococcus and the inhibitory effect on MRSA may be due to other unidentified ingredients. PMID:24284490

  10. Clinical spectrum of exophiala infections and a novel Exophiala species, Exophiala hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Tsang, Chris C C; Ling, Ian W H; Chan, Jasper F W; Leung, Shui-Yee; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P

    2013-01-01

    We characterized 12 Exophiala strains isolated from patients over a 15-year period to the species level using phenotypic tests and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and Rpb1 sequencing and described the clinical spectrum of the 12 patients. Eight patients had nail or skin infections, two had invasive infections, and two had colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. ITS and Rpb1 sequencing showed that 11 of the 12 strains were known Exophiala species (E. oligosperma [n = 3], E. jeanselmei [n = 2], E. lecanii-corni [n = 2], E. bergeri [n = 1], E. cancerae [n = 1], E. dermatitidis [n = 1], and E. xenobiotica [n = 1]), which included the first reported cases of onychomycosis caused by E. bergeri and E. oligosperma. The 12th strain (HKU32(T)), isolated from the nail clipping of the right big toe of a 68-year-old female patient with onychomycosis, possessed unique morphological characteristics distinct from other Exophiala species. It grew very slowly and had a velvety colony texture after 28 days, short conidiophores of the same olivaceous color as the supporting hyphae, numerous spores, and no chlamydospore-like cells. ITS, Rpb1, β-tubulin, and β-actin gene sequencing unambiguously showed that HKU32(T) was clustered with but formed branches distinct from other Exophiala species in phylogenetic trees. We propose the new species Exophiala hongkongensis to describe this novel fungus. PMID:23152554

  11. Clinical Spectrum of Exophiala Infections and a Novel Exophiala Species, Exophiala hongkongensis

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Antonio H. Y.; Tsang, Chris C. C.; Ling, Ian W. H.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Leung, Shui-Yee; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2013-01-01

    We characterized 12 Exophiala strains isolated from patients over a 15-year period to the species level using phenotypic tests and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and Rpb1 sequencing and described the clinical spectrum of the 12 patients. Eight patients had nail or skin infections, two had invasive infections, and two had colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. ITS and Rpb1 sequencing showed that 11 of the 12 strains were known Exophiala species (E. oligosperma [n = 3], E. jeanselmei [n = 2], E. lecanii-corni [n = 2], E. bergeri [n = 1], E. cancerae [n = 1], E. dermatitidis [n = 1], and E. xenobiotica [n = 1]), which included the first reported cases of onychomycosis caused by E. bergeri and E. oligosperma. The 12th strain (HKU32T), isolated from the nail clipping of the right big toe of a 68-year-old female patient with onychomycosis, possessed unique morphological characteristics distinct from other Exophiala species. It grew very slowly and had a velvety colony texture after 28 days, short conidiophores of the same olivaceous color as the supporting hyphae, numerous spores, and no chlamydospore-like cells. ITS, Rpb1, β-tubulin, and β-actin gene sequencing unambiguously showed that HKU32T was clustered with but formed branches distinct from other Exophiala species in phylogenetic trees. We propose the new species Exophiala hongkongensis to describe this novel fungus. PMID:23152554

  12. Aspergillus pragensis sp. nov. discovered during molecular reidentification of clinical isolates belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi.

    PubMed

    Hubka, Vit; Lyskova, Pavlina; Frisvad, Jens C; Peterson, Stephen W; Skorepova, Magdalena; Kolarik, Miroslav

    2014-08-01

    The identity of nine clinical isolates recovered from Czech patients and presumptively identified as Aspergillus sp. section Candidi based on colony morphology was revised using sequences of β-tubulin, calmodulin gene sequence, and internal transcribed spacer rDNA. Six isolates were from suspected and proven onychomycosis, one from otitis externa, and two associated with probable invasive aspergillosis. The results showed that one Aspergillus candidus isolate was the cause of otitis externa, and both isolates obtained from sputa of patients with probable invasive aspergillosis were reidentified as A. carneus (sect. Terrei) and A. flavus (sect. Flavi). Three isolates from nail scrapings were identified as A. tritici, a verified agent of nondermatophyte onychomycosis. One isolate from toenail was determined to be A. candidus and the two isolates belonged to a hitherto undescribed species, Aspergillus pragensis sp. nov. This species is well supported by phylogenetic analysis based on β-tubulin and calmodulin gene and is distinguishable from other members of sect. Candidi by red-brown reverse on malt extract agar, slow growth on Czapek-Dox agar and inability to grow at 37°C. A secondary metabolite analysis was also provided with comparison of metabolite spectrum to other species. Section Candidi now encompasses five species for which a dichotomous key based on colony characteristics is provided. All clinical isolates were tested for susceptibilities to selected antifungal agents using the Etest and disc diffusion method. Overall sect. Candidi members are highly susceptible to common antifungals.

  13. Rare case of disseminated fusariosis in a young patient with graft vs. host disease following an allogeneic transplant

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Alina; Colita, Anca; Ianosi, Gabriel; Neagoe, Daniela; Branisteanu, Daciana Elena; Calina, Daniela; Docea, Anca Oana; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Ianosi, Simona Laura

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium infection is a severe fungal infection caused by fungi of the genus Fusarium. It most commonly occurs in immunocompromised patients with malignant hematological comorbidities or secondary to hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The classical route of contamination is through inhalation but infection may also occur through contiguity with a skin lesion. This report describes the case of a 24-year-old woman who developed graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) at 220 days after receiving an allogeneic stem cell transplant from a sibling donor for Hodgkin disease. On day 330 after transplant the patient presented with fever and several painful subcutaneous, tender, red nodules with ulcerative and necrotic features on the pelvic region and right leg, extensive glass infiltrative lesions in the lungs and pansinusitis; however, the patient did not have onychomycosis. Following skin biopsy, culture of cutaneous lesions, computed tomography (CT) scanning of the lungs and CT scanning and magnetic resonance imaging of facial sinuses the patient was diagnosed with disseminated Fusarium species infection. Despite intensive treatment with voriconazole, the patient succumbed with respiratory insufficiency on day 400 after transplant. This case is noteworthy because the patient did not have any additional risk associated with the allogeneic transplant; there was no transplant mismatch, no severe neutropenia and no prior clinical signs of onychomycosis. The association of skin lesions with GVHD lesions increased the initial immunosuppression and delayed diagnosis. PMID:27698695

  14. Rare case of disseminated fusariosis in a young patient with graft vs. host disease following an allogeneic transplant

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Alina; Colita, Anca; Ianosi, Gabriel; Neagoe, Daniela; Branisteanu, Daciana Elena; Calina, Daniela; Docea, Anca Oana; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Ianosi, Simona Laura

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium infection is a severe fungal infection caused by fungi of the genus Fusarium. It most commonly occurs in immunocompromised patients with malignant hematological comorbidities or secondary to hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The classical route of contamination is through inhalation but infection may also occur through contiguity with a skin lesion. This report describes the case of a 24-year-old woman who developed graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) at 220 days after receiving an allogeneic stem cell transplant from a sibling donor for Hodgkin disease. On day 330 after transplant the patient presented with fever and several painful subcutaneous, tender, red nodules with ulcerative and necrotic features on the pelvic region and right leg, extensive glass infiltrative lesions in the lungs and pansinusitis; however, the patient did not have onychomycosis. Following skin biopsy, culture of cutaneous lesions, computed tomography (CT) scanning of the lungs and CT scanning and magnetic resonance imaging of facial sinuses the patient was diagnosed with disseminated Fusarium species infection. Despite intensive treatment with voriconazole, the patient succumbed with respiratory insufficiency on day 400 after transplant. This case is noteworthy because the patient did not have any additional risk associated with the allogeneic transplant; there was no transplant mismatch, no severe neutropenia and no prior clinical signs of onychomycosis. The association of skin lesions with GVHD lesions increased the initial immunosuppression and delayed diagnosis.

  15. Superficial mycotic infections of the foot in a native pediatric population: a pathogenic role for Trichosporon cutaneum?

    PubMed

    Archer-Dubon, Carla; Orozco-Topete, Rocío; Leyva-Santiago, Jaime; Arenas, Roberto; Carbajosa, Josefina; Ysunza, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Superficial mycotic infections of the feet are usually caused by Tricophyton rubrum, predominantly affecting adults and resulting from the use of occlusive footwear. We carried out a mycologic study of superficial foot infections in a rural school in Mexico where most people wear a leather, nonocclusive sandal. Forty students had clinical signs of 50 fungal infections of the foot: 39 athlete's foot and 11 onychomycosis. Thirty-one boys and 9 girls were studied. Hyphae were seen in 11 cases of athlete's foot and 5 of onychomycosis. Twenty-one cultures were positive (42%). The most frequently isolated fungi were the opportunistic Trichosporon cutaneum in 42.8%, Candida sp. (23.8%), Trichophyton mentagrophytes (23.8%), and Candida glabrata (9.5%). Superficial mycotic infections of the feet and nails were most frequent in children and adolescents who usually wear nonocclusive shoes. The most frequent pathogens were Candida sp. and T. mentagrophytes. It is interesting to note the prevalence of T. cutaneum that has recently been implicated in mycoses of the feet and nails. We did not isolate T. rubrum in any patient.

  16. Chronically recurrent and widespread tinea corporis due to Trichophyton rubrum in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Kong, Q T; Du, X; Yang, R; Huang, S Y; Sang, H; Liu, W D

    2015-04-01

    A 31-year-old immunocompetent male who presented with a 4-year history of extensive erythematous and scaly plaques involving the abdomen, gluteal and inguen regions with concomitant tinea pedis and onychomycosis is described. Diagnosis was based on positive mycological examination and positive histopathologic examination. Species identification was performed by growth on Sabouraud dextrose agar and by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer regions of the rDNA region. The pathogen identified was Trichophyton rubrum. The same fungal species was cultured from his abdominal, gluteal, foot and toenail. A combination therapy with systemic terbinafine and topically applied terbinafine cream was successful. A 1-year follow-up did not show any recurrence of infection.

  17. [Isolation of Sporothrix pallida complex in clinical and environmental samples from Chile].

    PubMed

    Cruz Choappa, Rodrigo M; Vieille Oyarzo, Peggy I; Carvajal Silva, Laura C

    2014-01-01

    The isolation of S. pallida complex from medical samples and home garden soil of a patient in Chile is here in reported. Fungi of the Sporothrix schenckii complex can cause various infections. In Chile, the medical and environmental isolates of these this complex are rare. The aim of this study was to identify an unusual agent in a case of onychomycosis and to detect its presence in the patient's home garden. For this purpose, clinical samples were obtained by scraping the patient's subungueal first right toe nail as well as by taking soil samples from different areas of her home garden. Species identification was performed by morphophysiology and one of the strains isolated from the patient's toe nail was sent to CBS for molecular confirmation (14.062). S. pallida complex was identified both from the patient's toe nail and samples taken from her home garden.

  18. Basidiomycosis: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lacaz, C da S; Heins-Vaccari, E M; De Melo, N T; Hernandez-Arriagada, G L

    1996-01-01

    The basidiomycosis, fungal infections provoked by basidiomycetes or agaric fungi have been recorded at growing frequencies in the medical literature, especially after the advent of AIDS in 1991. The basidiospores of these fungi, scattered in the atmosphere and transported by winds or air currents, reach the maxillary sinuses through the nasal route, most of the times causing signs and symptoms of chronic sinusitis. Basidiomycetes have also been isolated from sputum, especially Schizophyllum commune. Lesions of the buccal mucosa, brain abscesses, onychomycosis and endocarditis have been described, with a growing interest in this type of deep mycosis on the part of mycologists and infectologists. The present paper reports descriptions of mycetism as well as infectious processes caused by basidiomycetes, such as Schizophyllum commune, Ustilago maydis (= Ustilago zeae) and Coprinus cinereus.

  19. Fusarium Solani: a causative agent of skin and nail infections.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Thomas S; Dias, Meena

    2012-07-01

    Fusarium spp are non-dermatophytic hyaline moulds found as saprophytes and plant pathogens. Human infections are probably a result of various precipitating predisposing factors of impaired immune status. Immunocompetent individuals of late are also vulnerable to various unassuming saprophytic and plant pathogens. To stress the need to identify correctly and institute appropriate antifungal therapy in newly emerging human fungal infectious agents. Repeated mycological sampling of the skin and nails of the suspected fungal infection were processed as per the standard format including direct microscopy and fungal culture on Sabouraud's dextrose agar. The fungus was isolated as Fusarium solani. Fusarium is an important plant pathogen and soil saprophyte. Infection is acquired by direct inoculation or inhalation of spores. It is associated with a variety of diseases like keratitis, onychomycosis, eumycetoma, skin lesions and disseminated diseases.

  20. Microsporum gypseum infection in the Siena area in 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Romano, C; Massai, L; Gallo, A; Fimiani, M

    2009-01-01

    Fourteen cases of dermatophytosis caused by Microsporum gypseum, representing 6.8% of all dermatophytic infections reported, were diagnosed in Siena, Italy, between 2005 and 2006. There were as follows: six cases of tinea corporis, one case of tinea corporis associated with tinea capitis, one case of tinea corporis associated with tinea barbae, one kerion on the head, one tinea cruris, one tinea faciei, one tinea barbae, two onychomycosis. In the three subjects with tinea corporis, the clinical appearance was impetigo-like, psoriasis-like and pityriasis rosea-like respectively. In another case, the lesion was indicative of tinea imbricata. The diagnosis was based on mycological examination. In six cases, the source of infection was a cat, whereas in the others it was contact with soil.

  1. Unusual Localisation for Onychomatricoma on the 5th Toenail: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Coutellier, A.; Théate, I.

    2016-01-01

    Onychomatricoma is a rare and benign tumour of the nail matrix but originates rarely from the ventral portion of the proximal nail fold. This tumour is characterised by fingerlike projections that invade the nail plate. This lesion, of unknown aetiology, is typically asymptomatic with slow progression. Localisation on the finger is the most frequently described. We report the case of a 68-year-old woman who has an onychomatricoma in an unusual location, the fifth toe of the left foot. Due to its clinical appearance, the tumour can be confused with and treated as onychomycosis. However, if it is resistant to an oral antifungal well behaved treatment, one must consider onychomatricoma diagnosis. PMID:27478656

  2. A 70-Year-Old Man With Large Cervical and Mediastinal Lymphadenopathies

    PubMed Central

    Narechania, Shraddha; Valent, Jason; Farver, Carol

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 70-year-old man with enlarged mediastinal and cervical lymph nodes that provided interesting radiologic and pathologic observations. The 70-year-old black man was found to have enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. He had symptoms of atypical chest pain and generalized weakness for 2 weeks prior to the diagnosis. He denied shortness of breath, fever, chills, or night sweats. He was treated for hypertension and onychomycosis. Basic laboratory findings were within normal limits. Pulmonary function tests at the time of presentation showed FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC ratio of 123% predicted, 133% predicted, and 0.7, respectively. Meanwhile, total lung capacity and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity were 103% and 107% predicted, respectively. Two weeks before he presented to our institution, the patient underwent bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsies of the right lower lobe and endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of the right hilar lymph nodes. PMID:26149568

  3. Transonychial water loss in healthy and diseased nails.

    PubMed

    Krönauer, C; Gfesser, M; Ring, J; Abeck, D

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the transonychial water loss (TOWL) in both healthy and affected nails in different diseases and to compare it with the transepidermal water loss (TEWL). TOWL was measured by a new evaporimetric method: Plasticine was used to fix the protection cover of the evaporimeter probe to the nails. The TOWL behaved contrary to the TEWL. Affected nails in patients with atopic eczema (p <0.01), psoriasis (p<0.05) and onychomycosis (p<0.001) showed a significantly lower TOWL than did nails of healthy test subjects. The decrease in TOWL in diseased nails in comparison to healthy nails could be due to the formation of a stratum granulosum in atopic, psoriatic or fungus-affected nails, as this layer is normally absent in healthy nails. PMID:11558871

  4. Antifungal activity of 10 Guadeloupean plants.

    PubMed

    Biabiany, Murielle; Roumy, Vincent; Hennebelle, Thierry; François, Nadine; Sendid, Boualem; Pottier, Muriel; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Rouaud, Isabelle; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, Françoise; Joseph, Henry; Bourgeois, Paul; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François

    2013-11-01

    Screening of the antifungal activities of ten Guadeloupean plants was undertaken to find new extracts and formulations against superficial mycoses such as onychomycosis, athlete's foot, Pityriasis versicolor, as well as the deep fungal infection Pneumocystis pneumonia. For the first time, the CMI of these plant extracts [cyclohexane, ethanol and ethanol/water (1:1, v/v)] was determined against five dermatophytes, five Candida species, Scytalidium dimidiatum, a Malassezia sp. strain and Pneumocystis carinii. Cytotoxicity tests of the most active extracts were also performed on an HaCat keratinocyte cell line. Results suggest that the extracts of Bursera simaruba, Cedrela odorata, Enterolobium cyclocarpum and Pluchea carolinensis have interesting activities and could be good candidates for developing antifungal formulations. PMID:23280633

  5. Maxillary sinusitis caused by Lasiodiplodia theobromae.

    PubMed

    Kindo, A J; Pramod, C; Anita, S; Mohanty, S

    2010-01-01

    Lasiodiplodia (monotypic) comprises a very small proportion of the fungal biota. It is a common plant pathogen in tropical and subtropical regions. Clinical reports on its association with onychomycosis, corneal ulcer and phaeohyphomycosis are available. However, Lasiodiplodia theobromae causing fungal sinusitis has not been reported. We present here a case of fungal sinusitis in a 30-year-old woman, who came to the ENT OPD (out patient department) with complaints of intermittent bleeding and nasal discharge from the left side for a week. The patient complained of headache, predominantly on the left side and heaviness on and off since two months. Diagnosis was based on radiological and mycological evidence; the patient underwent endoscopic surgery and was started on antifungal treatment. PMID:20404468

  6. Evaluation of the morphological effects of TDT 067 (terbinafine in Transfersome) and conventional terbinafine on dermatophyte hyphae in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ghannoum, M; Isham, N; Henry, W; Kroon, H-A; Yurdakul, S

    2012-05-01

    TDT 067 is a novel, carrier-based dosage form of terbinafine in Transfersome (1.5%) formulated for topical delivery of terbinafine to the nail, nail bed, and surrounding tissue. We examined the effects of TDT 067 and conventional terbinafine on the morphology of dermatophytes. Trichophyton rubrum hyphae were exposed to TDT 067 or terbinafine (15 mg/ml) and examined under white light, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Subungual debris from patients treated with TDT 067 in a clinical trial was also examined. Exposure of T. rubrum hyphae to TDT 067 led to rapid and extensive ultrastructural changes. Hyphal distortion was evident as early as 4 h after exposure to TDT 067. After 24 h, there was complete disruption of hyphal structure with few intact hyphae remaining. Exposure to terbinafine resulted in morphological alterations similar to those seen with TDT 067; however, the effects of TDT 067 were more extensive, whereas a portion of hyphae remained intact after 24 h of exposure to terbinafine. Lipid droplets were observed under TEM following 30 min of exposure to TDT 067, which after 24 h had filled the intracellular space. These effects were confirmed in vivo in subungual debris from patients with onychomycosis who received topical treatment with TDT 067. The Transfersome in TDT 067 may potentiate the action of terbinafine by delivering terbinafine more effectively to its site of action inside the fungus. Our in vivo data confirm that TDT 067 can enter fungus in the nail bed of patients with onychomycosis and exert its antifungal effects. PMID:22354309

  7. Permeation studies of novel terbinafine formulations containing hydrophobins through human nails in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vejnovic, Ivana; Huonder, Cornelia; Betz, Gabriele

    2010-09-15

    Existing treatments of onychomycosis are not satisfactory. Oral therapies have many side effects and topical formulations are not able to penetrate into the human nail plate and deliver therapeutical concentrations of active agent in situ. The purpose of the present study was to determine the amount of terbinafine, which permeates through the human nail plate, from liquid formulations containing enhancers, namely hydrophobins A-C in the concentration of 0.1% (w/v). The used reference solution contained 10% (w/v) of terbinafine in 60% (v/v) ethanol/water without enhancer. Permeability studies have been performed on cadaver nails using Franz diffusion cells modified to mount nail plates and filled with 60% (v/v) ethanol/water in the acceptor chamber. Terbinafine was quantitatively determined by HPLC. The amount of terbinafine remaining in the nail was extracted by 96% ethanol from pulverized nail material after permeation experiment and presented as percentage of the dry nail weight before the milling test. Permeability coefficient (PC) of terbinafine from reference solution was determined to be 1.52E-10 cm/s. Addition of hydrophobins improved PC in the range of 3E-10 to 2E-9 cm/s. Remaining terbinafine reservoir in the nail from reference solution was 0.83% (n=2). An increase of remaining terbinafine reservoir in the nail was observed in two out of three tested formulations containing hydrophobins compared to the reference. In all cases, known minimum inhibitory concentration of terbinafine for dermatophytes (0.003 microg/ml) has been exceeded in the acceptor chamber of the diffusion cells. All tested proteins (hydrophobins) facilitated terbinafine permeation after 10 days of permeation experiment, however one of them achieved an outstanding enhancement factor of 13.05 compared to the reference. Therefore, hydrophobins can be included in the list of potential enhancers for treatment of onychomycosis. PMID:20620203

  8. Skin disorders in peritoneal dialysis patients: An underdiagnosed subject

    PubMed Central

    Gursu, Meltem; Uzun, Sami; Topcuoğlu, Derya; Koc, Leyli Kadriye; Yucel, Lamiye; Sumnu, Abdullah; Cebeci, Egemen; Ozkan, Oktay; Behlul, Ahmet; Koc, Leyla; Ozturk, Savas; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine all skin changes in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients followed up in our unit. METHODS: Patients on PD program for at least three months without any known chronic skin disease were included in the study. Patients with already diagnosed skin disease, those who have systemic diseases that may cause skin lesions, patients with malignancies and those who did not give informed consent were excluded from the study. All patients were examined by the same predetermined dermatologist with all findings recorded. The demographic, clinical and laboratory data including measures of dialysis adequacy of patients were recorded also. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows 16.0 standard version was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Among the patients followed up in our PD unit, those without exclusion criteria who gave informed consent, 38 patients were included in the study with male/female ratio and mean age of 26/12 and 50.3 ± 13.7 years, respectively. The duration of CKD was 7.86 ± 4.16 years and the mean PD duration was 47.1 ± 29.6 mo. Primary kidney disease was diabetic nephropathy in 11, nephrosclerosis in six, uropathologies in four, chronic glomerulonephritis in three, chronic pyelonephritis in three, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in three patients while cause was unknown in eight patients. All patients except for one patient had at least one skin lesion. Loss of lunula, onychomycosis and tinea pedis are the most frequent skin disorders recorded in the study group. Diabetic patients had tinea pedis more frequently (P = 0.045). No relationship of skin findings was detected with primary renal diseases, comorbidities and medications that the patients were using. CONCLUSION: Skin abnormalities are common in in PD patients. The most frequent skin pathologies are onychomycosis and tinea pedis which must not be overlooked. PMID:27458566

  9. Opportunistic fungi in lake water and fungal infections in associated human population in Dal Lake, Kashmir.

    PubMed

    Bandh, Suhaib A; Kamili, Azra N; Ganai, Bashir A; Lone, Bashir A

    2016-04-01

    Natural habitats of opportunistic fungal pathogens are outside of the host; therefore, it is critically important to understand their ecology and routes of transmission. In this study, we investigated the presence of human pathogenic opportunistic fungi in lake water and incidence of fungal infections in associated population in Kashmir, India. Six hundred forty water samples were taken on seasonal basis from a wide network of sampling stations of the lake for an extended period of two years for screening their occurrence. The samples were inoculated onto rose bengal agar, malt extract agar, potato dextrose agar and other specified culture media supplemented with Chloramphenicol and Streptomycin followed by incubation at 37 °C. All the samples were positive for fungi, which were later identified by sequencing the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region aided by classical morphological culture techniques and physiological profiling. The whole process led to the isolation of sixteen species of opportunistic fungal pathogens belonging to genus Aspergillus, Candida, Penicillium, Cryptococcus, Fusarium, Rhizopus and Mucor in decreasing order of prevalence. Furthermore, 20% population (n = 384) of Dal inhabitants was examined for possible fungal infections and it was observed that only 8.07% individuals were positive for fungal infections with 4.68% skin infection cases, 2.34% onychomycosis cases and 1.04% candidiasis cases. Scrapings from onychomycosis and candidiasis patients showed the presence of Aversicolor and Calbicans respectively, resembling exactly the strains isolated from the lake water. However, the skin infection was because of a dermatophyte not isolated for the lake water. Higher prevalence of infection (6.77%) was seen in people using lake water followed by a positive prevalence of 1.30% using tap water. The results of present study suggest that the lake inhabitants are at a greater risk of getting life threatening fungal diseases which may lead to

  10. Evaluation of the morphological effects of TDT 067 (terbinafine in Transfersome) and conventional terbinafine on dermatophyte hyphae in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ghannoum, M; Isham, N; Henry, W; Kroon, H-A; Yurdakul, S

    2012-05-01

    TDT 067 is a novel, carrier-based dosage form of terbinafine in Transfersome (1.5%) formulated for topical delivery of terbinafine to the nail, nail bed, and surrounding tissue. We examined the effects of TDT 067 and conventional terbinafine on the morphology of dermatophytes. Trichophyton rubrum hyphae were exposed to TDT 067 or terbinafine (15 mg/ml) and examined under white light, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Subungual debris from patients treated with TDT 067 in a clinical trial was also examined. Exposure of T. rubrum hyphae to TDT 067 led to rapid and extensive ultrastructural changes. Hyphal distortion was evident as early as 4 h after exposure to TDT 067. After 24 h, there was complete disruption of hyphal structure with few intact hyphae remaining. Exposure to terbinafine resulted in morphological alterations similar to those seen with TDT 067; however, the effects of TDT 067 were more extensive, whereas a portion of hyphae remained intact after 24 h of exposure to terbinafine. Lipid droplets were observed under TEM following 30 min of exposure to TDT 067, which after 24 h had filled the intracellular space. These effects were confirmed in vivo in subungual debris from patients with onychomycosis who received topical treatment with TDT 067. The Transfersome in TDT 067 may potentiate the action of terbinafine by delivering terbinafine more effectively to its site of action inside the fungus. Our in vivo data confirm that TDT 067 can enter fungus in the nail bed of patients with onychomycosis and exert its antifungal effects.

  11. Permeation studies of novel terbinafine formulations containing hydrophobins through human nails in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vejnovic, Ivana; Huonder, Cornelia; Betz, Gabriele

    2010-09-15

    Existing treatments of onychomycosis are not satisfactory. Oral therapies have many side effects and topical formulations are not able to penetrate into the human nail plate and deliver therapeutical concentrations of active agent in situ. The purpose of the present study was to determine the amount of terbinafine, which permeates through the human nail plate, from liquid formulations containing enhancers, namely hydrophobins A-C in the concentration of 0.1% (w/v). The used reference solution contained 10% (w/v) of terbinafine in 60% (v/v) ethanol/water without enhancer. Permeability studies have been performed on cadaver nails using Franz diffusion cells modified to mount nail plates and filled with 60% (v/v) ethanol/water in the acceptor chamber. Terbinafine was quantitatively determined by HPLC. The amount of terbinafine remaining in the nail was extracted by 96% ethanol from pulverized nail material after permeation experiment and presented as percentage of the dry nail weight before the milling test. Permeability coefficient (PC) of terbinafine from reference solution was determined to be 1.52E-10 cm/s. Addition of hydrophobins improved PC in the range of 3E-10 to 2E-9 cm/s. Remaining terbinafine reservoir in the nail from reference solution was 0.83% (n=2). An increase of remaining terbinafine reservoir in the nail was observed in two out of three tested formulations containing hydrophobins compared to the reference. In all cases, known minimum inhibitory concentration of terbinafine for dermatophytes (0.003 microg/ml) has been exceeded in the acceptor chamber of the diffusion cells. All tested proteins (hydrophobins) facilitated terbinafine permeation after 10 days of permeation experiment, however one of them achieved an outstanding enhancement factor of 13.05 compared to the reference. Therefore, hydrophobins can be included in the list of potential enhancers for treatment of onychomycosis.

  12. Review of antifungal therapy, part II: treatment rationale, including specific patient populations.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Hay, Rod J; Garduno, Javier I

    2008-01-01

    This portion of the antifungal review focuses on treatment rationale and suggestions, including special populations such as the elderly, children, and pregnant and immunocompromised individuals. In elderly individuals, the pathogen may be associated with certain comorbidities; treatment should begin with local treatments such as debridement (mechanical or chemical) and a topical. In children, the pathogen most commonly isolated is Trichophyton rubrum. Children should be examined for concomitant tinea and treatment options can begin with a chemical debridement (non-painful) and a topical, with non-responders being treated with combination therapy as in adults. It is suggested that blood tests are monitored at baseline and every 4-8 weeks in children on systemic therapy. Terbinafine is the only systemic in category B and local therapies should be the primary treatment modalities in pregnancy. Prevalence of onychomycosis is high in immunocompromised patients with higher relapse rates after treatment. The same fungal infections that are seen in healthy populations are usually represented in the immunocompromised host. There is a stepwise approach that is suggested in the treatment of onychomycosis. Before treatment, several factors should be determined, which include risk for failure and compliance issues. Strategies for therapy include monotherapy, combination therapy, supplemental therapy, and intermittent therapy. Topical monotherapy is effective in early distal nail disease and for the prevention of reinfection of the cured nail. Combination therapy is an appropriate progression of therapy for patients who failed monotherapy or are at risk for failure. Combined therapies are shown to increase cure rates. Mechanical interventions are essential in reducing fungal burdens to allow other modalities to penetrate, especially in dermatophytomas and onycholysis. PMID:18569273

  13. Scopulariopsis brevicaulis as the cause of dermatomycosis.

    PubMed

    Petanović, Mirna; Tomić Paradzik, Maja; Kristof, Zeljka; Cvitković, Ante; Topolovac, Zdenka

    2010-01-01

    Scopulariopsis (S.) brevicaulis (Saccardo) Bainier 1907 is a ubiquitous fungus frequently isolated as a saprophyte from various layers of the soil, wood, straw, paper, food, and occasionally in animals and humans. This nondermatophyte filamentous fungus is multiresistant and is frequently associated with onychomycosis in humans. In the last two decades, the number of reports on its pathogenic role in different localized and disseminated infections has been on an increase. Identification was done by native KOH microscopy and culture on the Mycobios selective agar (Biolife). From January 1, 2002 till January 23, 2008, a total of 7161 samples were examined by use of mycology methods; S. brevicaulis accounted for 39 (2.2%) of 1834 (25.6%) positive samples. During the study period, S. brevicaulis was isolated from nail, skin and scalp scrapings of 39 patients (17 male and 22 female), mean age ( SD) 43.920.7 (range 8-87) years. Specimens were most frequently obtained from the foot (n=16; 41%), i.e. great toe nail in 10 and other foot areas in 6 cases, followed by palm and fingers in 8 (20.5%), scalp in 3 (7.7%) and other parts of the body in 12 (30.8%) cases. Most of the study subjects lived in a rural setting (n=22; 56%), working as farmers in close contact with the soil and domestic animals. Seventeen (44%) subjects were from urban setting (n=9) or unknown place of residence (n=8). Underlying risk factors were present in 29 (74%) of 39 study subjects, some of them with multiple risk factors. Besides close contact with the soil, the most common predisposing factors were various dermatoses (atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, dysseborrhea, etc.), lower extremity circulatory insufficiency, trauma, microtrauma, and metabolic disorders. Although the clinical picture of onychomycosis caused by S. brevicaulis shows some specific features, timely sampling for mycology is crucial to verify the diagnosis and to identify the causative agent prior to the introduction of appropriate

  14. Luliconazole for the treatment of fungal infections: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Deepshikha; Bharti, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Luliconazole is an imidazole antifungal agent with a unique structure, as the imidazole moiety is incorporated into the ketene dithioacetate structure. Luliconazole is the R-enantiomer, and has more potent antifungal activity than lanoconazole, which is a racemic mixture. In this review, we summarize the in vitro data, animal studies, and clinical trial data relating to the use of topical luliconazole. Preclinical studies have demonstrated excellent activity against dermatophytes. Further, in vitro/in vivo studies have also shown favorable activity against Candida albicans, Malassezia spp., and Aspergillus fumigatus. Luliconazole, although belonging to the azole group, has strong fungicidal activity against Trichophyton spp., similar to that of terbinafine. The strong clinical antifungal activity of luliconazole is possibly attributable to a combination of strong in vitro antifungal activity and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in the skin. Clinical trials have demonstrated its superiority over placebo in dermatophytosis, and its antifungal activity to be at par or even better than that of terbinafine. Application of luliconazole 1% cream once daily is effective even in short-term use (one week for tinea corporis/cruris and 2 weeks for tinea pedis). A Phase I/IIa study has shown excellent local tolerability and a lack of systemic side effects with use of topical luliconazole solution for onychomycosis. Further studies to evaluate its efficacy in onychomycosis are underway. Luliconazole 1% cream was approved in Japan in 2005 for the treatment of tinea infections. It has recently been approved by US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of interdigital tinea pedis, tinea cruris, and tinea corporis. Topical luliconazole has a favorable safety profile, with only mild application site reactions reported occasionally. PMID:25285056

  15. An overview of topical antifungal therapy in dermatomycoses. A North American perspective.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Einarson, T R; Summerbell, R C; Shear, N H

    1998-05-01

    Dermatophytes cause fungal infections of keratinised tissues, e.g. skin, hair and nails. The organisms belong to 3 genera, Trichophyton, Epidermophyton and Microsporum. Dermatophytes may be grouped into 3 categories based on host preference and natural habitat. Anthropophilic species predominantly infect humans, geophilic species are soil based and may infect both humans and animals, zoophilic species generally infect non-human mammals. It is important to confirm mycologically the clinical diagnosis of onychomycosis and other tinea infections prior to commencing therapy. The identity of the fungal organism may provide guidance about the appropriateness of a given topical antifungal agent. Special techniques may be required to obtain the best yield of fungal organisms from a given site, especially the scalp and nails. It is also important to realise the limitations of certain diagnostic aids e.g., Wood's light examination is positive in tinea capitis due to M. canis and M. audouinii (ectothrix organisms); however, Wood's light examination is negative in T. tonsurans (endothrix organism). Similarly, it is important to be aware that cicloheximide in culture medium will inhibit growth of non-dermatophytes. Appropriate media are therefore required to evaluate the growth of some significant non-dermatophyte moulds. For tinea infections other than tinea capitis and tinea unguium, topical antifungals may be considered. For effective therapy of tinea capitis an oral antifungal is generally necessary. Similarly, oral antifungals are the therapy of choice, especially if onychomycosis is moderate to severe. Furthermore, where the tinea infection involves a large area, in an immunocompromised host or if infection is recurrent with poor response to topical agents, then oral antifungal therapy may be necessary. Topical antifungal agents may be broadly divided into specific and nonspecific agents. The former group includes the polyenes, azoles, allylamines, amorolfine, ciclopirox

  16. Dermatological disease in the older age group: a cross-sectional study in aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Maneka S; Vandal, Alain C; Jarrett, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of dermatological disease in aged care facilities, and the relationship between cognitive or physical disability and significant disease. Setting 2 large aged care facilities in Auckland, New Zealand, each providing low and high level care. Participants All 161 residents of the facilities were invited to participate. The only exclusion criterion was inability to obtain consent from the individual or designated guardian. 88 participants were recruited—66 females (75%), 22 males (25%) with average age 87.1 years (SD 5.5 years). Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary—presence of significant skin disease (defined as that which in the opinion of the investigators needed treatment or was identified as a patient concern) diagnosed clinically on full dermatological examination by a dermatologist or dermatology trainee. Secondary—functional and cognitive status (Rehabilitation Complexity Scale and Abbreviated Mental Test Score). Results 81.8% were found to have at least one significant condition. The most common disorders were onychomycosis 42 (47.7%), basal cell carcinoma 13 (14.8%), asteototic eczema 11 (12.5%) and squamous cell carcinoma in situ 9 (10.2%). Other findings were invasive squamous cell carcinoma 7 (8%), bullous pemphigoid 2 (2.3%), melanoma 2 (2.3%), lichen sclerosus 2 (2.3%) and carcinoma of the breast 1 (1.1%). Inflammatory disease was more common in those with little physical disability compared with those with serious physical disability (OR 3.69; 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6, p=0.04). No significant association was found between skin disease and cognitive impairment. Conclusions A high rate of dermatological disease was found. Findings ranged from frequent but not life-threatening conditions (eg, onychomycosis), to those associated with a significant morbidity (eg, eczema, lichen sclerosus and bullous pemphigoid), to potentially life-threatening (eg, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma and breast cancer

  17. Insights into drug delivery across the nail plate barrier.

    PubMed

    Saner, Manish V; Kulkarni, Abhijeet D; Pardeshi, Chandrakantsing V

    2014-11-01

    Topical therapy is at the forefront in treating nail ailments (especially onychomycosis and nail psoriasis) due to its local effects, which circumvents systemic adverse events, improves patient compliance and reduces treatment cost. However, the success of topical therapy has been hindered due to poor penetration of topical therapeutics across densely keratinized nail plate barrier. For effective topical therapy across nail plate, ungual drug permeation must be enhanced. Present review is designed to provide an insight into prime aspects of transungual drug delivery viz. nail structure and physiology, various onychopathies, techniques of nail permeation enhancement and in vitro models for trans-nail drug permeation studies. Updated list of drug molecules studied across the nail plate and key commercial products have been furnished with sufficient depth. Patents pertinent to, and current clinical status of transungual drug delivery have also been comprehensively reviewed. This is the first systematic critique encompassing the detailed aspects of transungual drug delivery. In our opinion, transungual drug delivery is a promising avenue for researchers to develop novel formulations, augmenting pharmaceutical industries to commercialize the products for nail disorders. PMID:24964054

  18. Ungual and transungual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, H N; Juluri, Abhishek; Desai, B G; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2012-08-01

    Topical therapy is desirable in treatment of nail diseases like onychomycosis (fungal infection of nail) and psoriasis. The topical treatment avoids the adverse effects associated with systemic therapy, thereby enhancing the patient compliance and reducing the treatment cost. However the effectiveness of the topical therapies has been limited due to the poor permeability of the nail plate to topically applied therapeutic agents. Research over the past one decade has been focused on improving the transungual permeability by means of chemical treatment, penetration enhancers, mechanical and physical methods. The present review is an attempt to discuss the different physical and chemical methods employed to increase the permeability of the nail plate. Minimally invasive electrically mediated techniques such as iontophoresis have gained success in facilitating the transungual delivery of actives. In addition drug transport across the nail plate has been improved by filing the dorsal surface of the nail plate prior to application of topical formulation. But attempts to improve the trans-nail permeation using transdermal chemical enhancers have failed so far. Attempts are on to search suitable physical enhancement techniques and chemical transungual enhancers in view to maximize the drug delivery across the nail plate. PMID:22149347

  19. Enhancing the nail permeability of topically applied drugs.

    PubMed

    Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2008-11-01

    The topical therapy of nail diseases, especially of onychomycosis, and to a smaller extent, of nail psoriasis, is desirable to avoid the side effects associated with their systemic therapy, to increase patient compliance and reduce the cost of treatment. Systemic therapy is however the mainstay of treatment due to the poor permeability of the nail plate to topically applied drugs. For effective topical therapy, ungual drug permeation must be enhanced. This can be achieved by disrupting the nail plate using physical techniques or chemical agents. Alternatively, drug permeation into the intact nail plate may be encouraged, for example, by iontophoresis or by formulating the drug within a vehicle which enables high drug partition out of the vehicle and into the nail plate. The physical techniques (manual and electrical nail abrasion, acid etching, ablation by lasers, microporation, application of low-frequency ultrasound and electric currents) and chemicals (thiols, sulphites, hydrogen peroxide, urea, water, enzymes) that have shown ungual enhancer activity are discussed in this review. Optimal drug formulation, while crucial to ungual drug delivery, is only briefly reviewed due to the limited literature. PMID:18976136

  20. A preformulation strategy for the selection of penetration enhancers for a transungual formulation.

    PubMed

    Palliyil, Biji; Lebo, David B; Patel, Pankil R

    2013-06-01

    Onychomycosis is associated with the cutaneous fungal infection of the nail and the nail folds (skin surrounding the nail). It is therefore important to target drug delivery into the nail folds along with nail plate and the nail bed. Systematic and strategic selection of the penetration enhancers specific for the skin and the nail is discussed. Twelve penetration enhancers were screened for their ability to improve solubility, in vitro nail penetration, in vitro skin permeation, and in vitro skin penetration of the antifungal drug ciclopirox olamine. In contrast to transdermal drug delivery, the main selection criteria for skin penetration enhancer in topical drug delivery were increased drug accumulation in the epidermis and minimal permeation across the skin. Thiourea improved the solubility and nail penetration of ciclopirox olamine. It also showed enhancement in the transungual diffusion of the drug. Propylene glycol showed a 12-fold increase in solubility and 3-fold increase in epidermal accumulation of ciclopirox olamine, while minimizing the transdermal movement of the drug. Thiourea was the selected nail permeation enhancer and propylene glycol was the selected skin penetration enhancer of ciclopirox olamine. A combination of the selected enhancers was also explored for its effect on drug delivery to the nail and nail folds. The enhancer combination reduced the penetration of ciclopirox in the skin and also the permeation through the nail. The proposed preformulation strategy helps to select appropriate enhancers for optimum topical delivery and paves way towards an efficient topical formulation for passive transungual drug delivery. PMID:23572254

  1. Size and Charge Dependence of Ion Transport in Human Nail Plate.

    PubMed

    Baswan, Sudhir M; Li, S Kevin; LaCount, Terri D; Kasting, Gerald B

    2016-03-01

    The electrical properties of human nail plate are poorly characterized yet are a key determinate of the potential to treat nail diseases, such as onychomycosis, using iontophoresis. To address this deficiency, molar conductivities of 17 electrolytes comprising 12 ionic species were determined in hydrated human nail plate in vitro. Cation transport numbers across the nail for 11 of these electrolytes were determined by the electromotive force method. Effective ionic mobilities and diffusivities at infinite dilution for all ionic species were determined by regression analysis. The ratios of diffusivities in nail to those in solution were found to correlate inversely with the hydrodynamic radii of the ions according to a power law relationship having an exponent of -1.75 ± 0.27, a substantially steeper size dependence than observed for similar experiments in skin. Effective diffusivities of cations in nail were 3-fold higher than those of comparably sized anions. These results reflect the strong size and charge selectivity of the nail plate for ionic conduction and diffusion. The analysis implies that efficient transungual iontophoretic delivery of ionized drugs having radii upward of 5 Å (molecular weight, ca. ≥ 340 Da) will require chemical or mechanical alteration of the nail plate. PMID:26886342

  2. Ciclopirox vs amorolfine: in vitro penetration into and permeation through human healthy nails of commercial nail lacquers.

    PubMed

    Monti, Daniela; Tampucci, Silvia; Chetoni, Patrizia; Burgalassi, Susi; Mailland, Federico

    2014-02-01

    One of the pre-requisite for a successful topical antifungal drug indicated for onychomycosis is its bioavailability into the nail unit for achieving fungal eradication and clinical benefit. The aim of this study was to compare in vitro permeation/penetration through and into human nails of amorolfine (MRF) from a 5% anhydrous commercial formulation (Loceryl®) and ciclopirox (CPX) from the 8% aqueous formulation in hydroxypropyl chitosan (HPCH) technology (Onytec®). The ability of the active ingredient to reach efficacious concentrations to inhibit nail pathogens was also evaluated. The amounts of drug permeated and retained in human healthy nails were determined using a suitably modified diffusion apparatus. HPLC analysis of the samples was performed. The HPCH-based CPX formulation demonstrated an efficient penetration into and permeation through the nail plates. Conversely, Loceryl® produced an amount of MRF permeated through and penetrated into the human toenails significantly lower than CPX. The evaluation of the efficacy index showed a higher potential efficacy of Onytec® with respect to Loceryl® on nail pathogens. The present work not only reinforced the previous results on different experimental substrates, but pointed out the superiority of HPCH-based Onytec® formulation containing CPX with respect to Loceryl® commercial product with MRF, both in terms of higher permeation through and penetration into the human nail, and for the efficacy towards the most common ungual pathogens. PMID:24509963

  3. Infected nail plate model made of human hair keratin for evaluating the efficacy of different topical antifungal formulations against Trichophyton rubrum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lusiana; Reichl, Stephan; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2013-08-01

    A novel model of infected nail plate for testing the efficacy of topical antifungal formulations has been developed. This model utilized keratin film made of human hair keratin as a nail plate model. Subsequent to infection by Trichophyton rubrum, the common causative agent of onychomycosis, keratin films as infected nail plate models were treated with selected topical formulations, that is cream, gel, and nail lacquer. Bovine hoof was compared to keratin film. In contrast to the common antifungal susceptibility test, the antifungal drugs tested were applied as ready-to-use formulations because the vehicle may modify and control the drug action both in vitro and in vivo. Extrapolating the potency of an antifungal drug from an in vitro susceptibility test only would not be representative of the in vivo situation since these drugs are applied as ready-to-use formulations, for example as a nail lacquer. Although terbinafine has been acknowledged to be the most effective antifungal agent against T. rubrum, its antifungal efficacy was improved by its incorporation into an optimal formulation. Different gels proved superior to cream. Therefore, this study is able to discriminate between efficacies of different topical antifungal formulations based on their activities against T. rubrum. PMID:23419812

  4. TranScreen-N: Method for rapid screening of trans-ungual drug delivery enhancers.

    PubMed

    Murthy, S Narasimha; Vaka, Siva Ram Kiran; Sammeta, Srinivasa Murthy; Nair, Anroop B

    2009-11-01

    Topical monotherapy of nail diseases such as onychomycosis and nail psoriasis has been less successful due to poor permeability of the human nail plate to topically administered drugs. Chemical enhancers are utilized to improve the drug delivery across the nail plate. Choosing the most effective chemical enhancers for the given drug and formulation is highly critical in determining the efficacy of topical therapy of nail diseases. Screening the large pool of enhancers using currently followed diffusion cell experiments would be tedious and expensive. The main objective of this study is to develop TranScreen-N, a high throughput method of screening trans-ungual drug permeation enhancers. It is a rapid microwell plate based method which involves two different treatment procedures; the simultaneous exposure treatment and the sequential exposure treatment. In the present study, several chemicals were evaluated by TranScreen-N and by diffusion studies in the Franz diffusion cell (FDC). Good agreement of in vitro drug delivery data with TranScreen-N data provided validity to the screening technique. In TranScreen-N technique, the enhancers can be grouped according to whether they need to be applied before or simultaneously with drugs (or by either procedures) to enhance the drug delivery across the nail plate. TranScreen-N technique can significantly reduce the cost and duration required to screen trans-ungual drug delivery enhancers. PMID:19363796

  5. Controlled nail delivery of a novel lipophilic antifungal agent using various modern drug carrier systems as well as in vitro and ex vivo model systems.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Sandy; Meyer, Jean-Philippe; Kiesow, Andreas; Mrestani, Yahya; Wohlrab, Johannes; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2014-04-28

    The penetration behavior into human nails and animal hoof membranes of a novel antifungal agent (EV-086K) for the treatment of onychomycosis was investigated in this study. The new drug provides a high lipophilicity which is adverse for penetration into nails. Therefore, four different formulations were developed, with particular focus on a colloidal carrier system (CCS) due to its penetration enhancing properties. On the one hand, ex vivo penetration experiments on human nails were performed. Afterwards the human nail plates were cut by cryomicrotome in order to quantify the drug concentration in the dorsal, intermediate and ventral nail layer using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection. On the other hand, equine and bovine hoof membranes were used to determine the in vitro penetration of the drug into the acceptor compartment of an online diffusion cell coupled with Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. In combination, both results should exhibit a correlation between the EV-086K penetration behavior in human nail plates and animal hoof membranes. The investigations showed that the developed CCS could increase drug delivery through the human nail most compared to other formulations (nail lacquer, solution and hydrogel). Using animal hooves in the online diffusion cell, we were able to calculate pharmacokinetic data of the penetration process, especially diffusion and permeability coefficients. Finally, a qualitative correlation between the penetration results of human nails and equine hooves was established. PMID:24560884

  6. Effect of hydration on the permeation of ketoconazole through human nail plate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gunt, Hemali B; Kasting, Gerald B

    2007-12-01

    The impact of hydration on the permeation of the antifungal drug, ketoconazole, through excised human nails in vitro was evaluated in diffusion cell studies. Nails treated with [(3)H]ketoconazole solvent-deposited onto the dorsal surface were maintained in incubators at 32 degrees C and exposed sequentially to relative humidities (dorsal side) of 15, 40, 80 and 100% over a period of 40 days. The ventral side was bathed in a pH 7.4 phosphate buffer. Ascending and descending humidity regimens were tested. Increasing the ambient RH from 15 to 100% enhanced permeation of radiolabel associated with [(3)H]ketoconazole by a factor of three. Diffusivities estimated from these data and the associated nail water contents (estimated in a separate study) can be described by a free volume theory. Therefore, formulations or treatments, which increase nail hydration, have potential to improve topical therapy for onychomycosis, if a favorable balance between drug delivery and growth conditions for the dermatophytes can be achieved. PMID:17928205

  7. Hydration of nail plate: a novel screening model for transungual drug permeation enhancers.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, P; Saini, T R

    2012-10-15

    Drug delivery by topical route for the treatment of onychomycosis, a nail fungal infection, is challenging due to the unique barrier properties of the nail plate which imparts high resistance to the passage of antifungal drugs. Permeation enhancers are used in transungual formulations to improve the drug flux across the nail plate. Selection of the effective permeation enhancer among the available large pool of permeation enhancers is a difficult task. Screening the large number of permeation enhancers using conventional Franz diffusion cells is laborious and expensive. The objective of present study was to evolve a simple, accurate and rapid method for screening of transungual drug permeation enhancers based on the principle of hydration of nail plate. The permeation enhancer which affects the structural or physicochemical properties of nail plate would also affect their hydration capacity. Two screening procedures namely primary and secondary screenings were evolved wherein hydration and uptake of ciclopirox olamine by nail plates were measured. Hydration enhancement factor, HEF(24) and drug uptake enhancement factor, UEF(24) were determined for screening of 23 typical permeation enhancers. The Pearson's correlation coefficient between HEF(24) and UEF(24) was determined. A good agreement between the HEF(24) and UEF(24) data proved the validity of the proposed nail plate hydration model as a screening technique for permeation enhancers. PMID:22705091

  8. 1st meeting on topical drug delivery to the nail.

    PubMed

    Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2007-07-01

    The first ever symposium dedicated solely to drug delivery to the nail following topical application was held on the 2nd April 2007, in London, UK, organised by Dr Clive Roper (Charles River Laboratories, Scotland) and Dr Sudaxshina Murdan (School of Pharmacy, University of London, UK), under the auspices of Skin Forum. The 1-day meeting was attended by approximately 35 delegates from industry, academia and hospitals, and provided a much-needed forum for the presentation and discussion of research and problems in this emerging field. Topical drug delivery is especially suitable for onychomycosis (fungal infections of the nail plate and/or nail bed) and nail psoriasis, which affect 2 - 13 and 1 - 3% of the general population, respectively, and make up the bulk of nail disorders. Topical therapy would avoid the adverse events and drug interactions of systemic antifungal agents and the pain of injection when antipsoriatic agents are injected into affected nail folds. However, successful topical therapy is extremely challenging due to the very low permeability of the nail plate. Five speakers spoke about various aspects of topical drug delivery to the nail, including review of the nail plate structure, function, diseases, their existing therapies (systemic and topical), limitations and global sales. The need for effective topical drug delivery to the nail to overcome the problems associated with present treatment, and the fact that there are few topical formulations available for the treatment of nail fungal infections and psoriasis, and the even fewer effective formulations, was highlighted. PMID:17683257

  9. Trans-ungual iontophoretic delivery of terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anroop B; Vaka, Siva Ram K; Sammeta, Srinivasa M; Kim, Hyun D; Friden, Phillip M; Chakraborty, Bireswar; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2009-05-01

    Successful treatment of deep-seated nail infections remains elusive as the delivery of efficacious levels of antifungal drug to the site of action is very difficult. The aim of the present study was to attain rapid trans-ungual delivery of an antifungal agent, terbinafine, via the topical route using iontophoresis. Initial studies revealed that application of current (0.5 mA/cm(2)) could significantly enhance the trans-ungual delivery of terbinafine. An increase in the applied current or duration of current application enhanced the trans-ungual delivery of terbinafine. Permeation of terbinafine through the nail and drug load in the nail correlated well with the applied electrical dose. Release of drug from nails loaded using iontophoresis followed a two-phase release profile. Light microscopy studies substantiated the capability of iontophoresis to drive a charged molecule across the nail plate. The results of these studies indicate that iontophoresis could be developed as a potential technique for onychomycosis therapy. PMID:18781625

  10. A 20-year survey of tinea faciei.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Aste; Laura, Atzori; Natalia, Aste; Monica, Pau

    2010-11-01

    Tinea faciei is an uncommon dermatophytosis affecting the glabrous skin of the face. Between 1988 and 2007 at the Dermatology Department of Cagliari University, 107 cases of tinea faciei have been diagnosed, involving 72 females and 35 males, aged 2-72 years. Incidence peaks were observed between 6 and 15 years (48.59%) and between 36 and 45 years (17.76%). Males below and females above 15 years of age were the most affected. In 61 patients (57.1%), typical forms of tinea faciei were observed, whereas in 46 (42.9%), atypical forms were observed, mainly mimicking discoid lupus erythematosus (nine cases), and polymorphous light eruption (eight cases). Typical cases were present in younger patients, aged between 2 and 15 years, while atypical forms were distributed in any of the decades, but mostly between 36 and 72 years. Of the 46 cases of atypical presentation, 33 were females. The isolated dermatophytes were Microsporum canis (63 cases), Trichophyton rubrum (24 cases) and T. mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes (20 cases). Seven males and two females aged 4-10 years were also affected by tinea capitis and eight patients (three males and five females) of various ages by tinea corporis. Eleven patients (two males and nine females) aged >35 years were affected by onychomycosis. All patients recovered after local and/or systemic antifungal therapy, without relapse or side effects.

  11. State of the art diagnostic of mold diseases: a practical guide for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Beirão, F; Araujo, R

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of fungal diseases changed, and molds have been increasingly associated with high mortality in severe immunocompromised patients. Invasive mold diseases may originate from the airborne conidia through inhalation or inoculation in skin fissures associated with indwelling catheters, wounds, burns, or onychomycosis. The diagnosis and treatment of fungal diseases is problematic and raises considerable challenges. Diagnosis of invasive mold diseases includes several methodologies, of which the most commonly used are the cultural methods, antigen testing, nucleic acid detection, and radiological imaging. Galactomannan and (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan detection significantly improved mold diagnosis in the last decade. Several molecular strategies have been proposed over the years but no consensus was achieved for standardized protocols or cut-off values. Recently, the first commercially available molecular assay for detection of Aspergillus was tested and the results were highly reproducible. In addition, blood cultures may also be helpful for invasive aspergillosis by following a novel procedure for the recovery of Aspergillus spp. from blood cultures. The association of distinct diagnostic methods, particularly molecular tests, galactomannan, and/or (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan detection, may provide earlier and more sensitive diagnosis of mold diseases and be indicative for early antifungal treatment. Accurate routine use of diagnostic tests can be cost-effective for laboratories and be of great value to patients.

  12. [Optical coherence tomography].

    PubMed

    von Braunmühl, T

    2015-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was introduced in the 1990s in dermatology and is nowadays established as a noninvasive high-resolution technique for the in vivo evaluation of the skin. To date several studies have been successfully demonstrated the application of OCT for various dermatological questions. The main indication for OCT in the daily practice is the noninvasive diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer such as actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. OCT has also been shown to be a valuable tool in treatment monitoring and evaluation of therapeutic success of noninvasive treatment strategies like topical immune modulators or photodynamic treatment. Other potential applications for OCT include inflammatory diseases, microbial or parasitic infestations of the skin, e.g. scabies mites or onychomycosis. In recent years high-definition OCT devices have been developed that can potentially be used for the evaluation of melanocytic lesions and, due to the higher resolution, for the visualization of intrafollicular demodex mites. Furthermore different commercially available devices offer-in addition to the cross-sectional images-a fast-generated horizontal (en face) imaging mode. With respect to resolution and penetration depth the OCT technique is taking a middle position in comparison to other noninvasive imaging devices in dermatology such as sonography and reflectance confocal microscopy. PMID:25809459

  13. New and emerging yeast pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, K C

    1995-01-01

    The most common yeast species that act as agents of human disease are Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The incidence of infections by other yeasts has increased during the past decade. The most evident emerging pathogens are Malassezia furfur, Trichosporon beigelii, Rhodotorula species, Hansenula anomala, Candida lusitaniae, and Candida krusei. Organisms once considered environmental contaminants or only industrially important, such as Candida utilis and Candida lipolytica, have now been implicated as agents of fungemia, onychomycosis, and systemic disease. The unusual yeasts primarily infect immunocompromised patients, newborns, and the elderly. The role of central venous catheter removal and antifungal therapy in patient management is controversial. The antibiograms of the unusual yeasts range from resistant to the most recent azoles and amphotericin B to highly susceptible to all antifungal agents. Current routine methods for yeast identification may be insufficient to identify the unusual yeasts within 2 days after isolation. The recognition of unusual yeasts as agents of sometimes life-threatening infection and their unpredictable antifungal susceptibilities increase the burden on the clinical mycology laboratory to pursue complete species identification and MIC determinations. Given the current and evolving medical practices for management of seriously ill patients, further evaluations of the clinically important data about these yeasts are needed. PMID:8665465

  14. [Optical coherence tomography].

    PubMed

    von Braunmühl, T

    2015-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was introduced in the 1990s in dermatology and is nowadays established as a noninvasive high-resolution technique for the in vivo evaluation of the skin. To date several studies have been successfully demonstrated the application of OCT for various dermatological questions. The main indication for OCT in the daily practice is the noninvasive diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer such as actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. OCT has also been shown to be a valuable tool in treatment monitoring and evaluation of therapeutic success of noninvasive treatment strategies like topical immune modulators or photodynamic treatment. Other potential applications for OCT include inflammatory diseases, microbial or parasitic infestations of the skin, e.g. scabies mites or onychomycosis. In recent years high-definition OCT devices have been developed that can potentially be used for the evaluation of melanocytic lesions and, due to the higher resolution, for the visualization of intrafollicular demodex mites. Furthermore different commercially available devices offer-in addition to the cross-sectional images-a fast-generated horizontal (en face) imaging mode. With respect to resolution and penetration depth the OCT technique is taking a middle position in comparison to other noninvasive imaging devices in dermatology such as sonography and reflectance confocal microscopy.

  15. Spectrum of Fusarium infections in tropical dermatology evidenced by multilocus sequencing typing diagnostics.

    PubMed

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; Feng, Peiying; Ahmed, Sarah; Sudhadham, Montarop; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium species are emerging causative agents of superficial, cutaneous and systemic human infections. In a study of the prevalence and genetic diversity of 464 fungal isolates from a dermatological ward in Thailand, 44 strains (9.5%) proved to belong to the genus Fusarium. Species identification was based on sequencing a portion of translation elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1-α), rDNA internal transcribed spacer and RNA-dependent polymerase subunit II (rpb2). Our results revealed that 37 isolates (84%) belonged to the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), one strain matched with Fusarium oxysporum (FOSC) complex 33, while six others belonged to the Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex. Within the FSSC two predominant clusters represented Fusarium falciforme and recently described F. keratoplasticum. No gender differences in susceptibility to Fusarium were noted, but infections on the right side of the body prevailed. Eighty-nine per cent of the Fusarium isolates were involved in onychomycosis, while the remaining ones caused paronychia or severe tinea pedis. Comparing literature data, superficial infections by FSSC appear to be prevalent in Asia and Latin America, whereas FOSC is more common in Europe. The available data suggest that Fusarium is a common opportunistic human pathogens in tropical areas and has significant genetic variation worldwide.

  16. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo*

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. Objective We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the correlations between nail abnormalities and various clinical parameters. Methods This study included 100 vitiligo patients and 100 healthy subjects. Full medical histories were collected from the subjects, who underwent thorough general and nail examinations. All nail changes were noted. In the event of clinical suspicion of a fungal infection, additional mycological investigations were performed. Results Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in the patients (78%) than in the controls (55%) (p=0.001). Longitudinal ridging was the most common finding (42%), followed by (in descending order): leukonychia, an absent lunula, onycholysis, nail bed pallor, onychomycosis, splinter hemorrhage and nail plate thinning. The frequency of longitudinal ridging was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in vitiligo patients than in controls. Systematic examination of the nails in such patients is useful because nail abnormalities are frequent. However, the causes of such abnormalities require further study. Longitudinal ridging and leukonychia were the most common abnormalities observed in this study. PMID:27579738

  17. Malassezia skin diseases in humans.

    PubMed

    Difonzo, E M; Faggi, E; Bassi, A; Campisi, E; Arunachalam, M; Pini, G; Scarfì, F; Galeone, M

    2013-12-01

    Although Malassezia yeasts are a part of the normal microflora, under certain conditions they can cause superficial skin infection, such as pityriasis versicolor (PV) and Malassezia folliculitis. Moreover the yeasts of the genus Malassezia have been associated with seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and, less commonly, with confluent and reticulated papillomatosis, onychomycosis, and transient acantholytic dermatosis. The study of the clinical role of Malassezia species has been surrounded by controversy due to the relative difficulty in isolation, cultivation, and identification. This review focuses on the clinical, mycologic, and immunologic aspects of the various skin diseases associated with Malassezia. Moreover, since there exists little information about the epidemiology and ecology of Malassezia species in the Italian population and the clinical significance of these species is not fully distinguished, we will report data about a study we carried out. The aim of our study was the isolation and the identification of Malassezia species in PV-affected skin and non-affected skin in patients with PV and in clinically healthy individuals without any Malassezia associated skin disease. PMID:24442041

  18. [Cutaneous Malassezia infections and Malassezia associated dermatoses: An update].

    PubMed

    Nenoff, P; Krüger, C; Mayser, P

    2015-06-01

    The lipophilic yeast fungus Malassezia (M.) spp. is the only fungal genus or species which is part of the physiological human microbiome. Today, at least 14 different Malassezia species are known; most of them can only be identified using molecular biological techniques. As a facultative pathogenic microorganism, Malassezia represents the causative agent both of superficial cutaneous infections and of blood stream infections. Pityriasis versicolor is the probably most frequent infection caused by Malassezia. Less common, Malassezia folliculitis occurs. There is only an episodic report on Malassezia-induced onychomycosis. Seborrhoeic dermatitis represents a Malassezia-associated inflammatory dermatosis. In addition, Malassezia allergenes should be considered as the trigger of "Head-Neck"-type atopic dermatitis. Ketoconazole possesses the strongest in vitro activity against Malassezia, and represents the treatment of choice for topical therapy of pityriasis versicolor. Alternatives include other azole antifungals but also the allylamine terbinafine and the hydroxypyridone antifungal agent ciclopirox olamine. "Antiseborrhoeic" agents, e.g. zinc pyrithione, selenium disulfide, and salicylic acid, are also effective in pityriasis versicolor. The drug of choice for oral treatment of pityriasis versicolor is itraconazole; an effective alternative represents fluconazole. Seborrhoeic dermatitis is best treated with topical medication, including topical corticosteroids and antifungal agents like ketoconazole or sertaconazole. Calcineurin inhibitors, e.g. pimecrolimus and tacrolimus, are reliable in seborrhoeic dermatitis, however are used off-label. PMID:25968082

  19. [Chronotherapy and relativity theory].

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, N A

    2008-01-01

    The course of time itself in alive organisms is treated from positions of the special theory of the relativity created by A. Einstein in 1905 and added by the Nobel winners H.A.Lorentsem, M. Plankom, M. fon Laue. These achievements of fundamental physics have been put in a basis of special medical technology "Resonant chronophytotherapy" (SMT RCPT) which is applied in practice of treatment of chronic diseases for 27 years. Grass tinctures in various dosages are used in SMT RCPT, which patients take once a day during precisely designated time. Parameters "dosage-time" daily vary. SMT RCPT have been conducted in treatment of epilepsy bronchial asthma, rheumatism, sclerodermia, hypertension, chronic glomerulonephritis, vegeto-vascular dystonia, female sterility, circular alopecia, vitiligo, eczema, psoriasis, onychomycosis. SMT RCPT does have adverse events, has no contra-indications to its use, directed, first of all, on elimination of nonspecific signs of a disease, reduces dependence and complications of the use of chemical synthetic preparations. SMT RCPT can be combined with any kind of specific treatment. Internet-variant of SMT RCPT has been developed. Chronomedicine is priority tendency in industrialized countries of the world--the USA, the Great Britain, Germany, France, Russia, China, Japan and appears on lead positions among alternative methods of treatment, both traditional, and non-traditional. PMID:19145832

  20. In vitro model of infected stratum corneum for the efficacy evaluation of poloxamer 407-based formulations of ciclopirox olamine against Trichophyton rubrum as well as differential scanning calorimetry and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Täuber, Anja; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2015-10-15

    Superficial fungal skin infections are a common disease and concern 20-25% of the world's population with the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum being the main trigger. Due to autoinoculation, fungal skin infections of the feet (tinea pedis) often occur simultaneously with fungal nail infections (onychomycosis). Therefore, the overall objective was the development and characterisation of poloxamer 407-based formulations with the antimycotic active ingredient ciclopirox olamine (CPX) for simultaneous antifungal therapy. The formulations consisted of poloxamer 407, water, isopropyl alcohol, propylene glycol and medium chain triglycerides in given ratios. The in vitro antifungal efficacy against T. rubrum was tested in a novel in vitro model of infected stratum corneum in comparison to a marketed semi-solid formulation containing 1% (w/w) ciclopirox olamine and a marketed nail lacquer containing 8% ciclopirox. Several liquid poloxamer 407-based formulations with only 1% CPX completely inhibited fungal growth after 6 days of incubation, whereas the marketed semi-solid formulation did not inhibit fungal growth. Differential scanning calorimetry studies revealing the interaction between the formulations and the SC showed that increasing isopropyl alcohol/propylene glycol concentrations as well as increasing CPX concentrations caused increasing endothermic transition shifts. Moreover, stability studies at 30 °C exhibited only a slight decrease of the CPX amount after 12 months of storage. Each formulation contained >90% of the initial CPX concentration after termination of the stability studies. PMID:26276254

  1. [Chronotherapy and relativity theory].

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, N A

    2008-01-01

    The course of time itself in alive organisms is treated from positions of the special theory of the relativity created by A. Einstein in 1905 and added by the Nobel winners H.A.Lorentsem, M. Plankom, M. fon Laue. These achievements of fundamental physics have been put in a basis of special medical technology "Resonant chronophytotherapy" (SMT RCPT) which is applied in practice of treatment of chronic diseases for 27 years. Grass tinctures in various dosages are used in SMT RCPT, which patients take once a day during precisely designated time. Parameters "dosage-time" daily vary. SMT RCPT have been conducted in treatment of epilepsy bronchial asthma, rheumatism, sclerodermia, hypertension, chronic glomerulonephritis, vegeto-vascular dystonia, female sterility, circular alopecia, vitiligo, eczema, psoriasis, onychomycosis. SMT RCPT does have adverse events, has no contra-indications to its use, directed, first of all, on elimination of nonspecific signs of a disease, reduces dependence and complications of the use of chemical synthetic preparations. SMT RCPT can be combined with any kind of specific treatment. Internet-variant of SMT RCPT has been developed. Chronomedicine is priority tendency in industrialized countries of the world--the USA, the Great Britain, Germany, France, Russia, China, Japan and appears on lead positions among alternative methods of treatment, both traditional, and non-traditional.

  2. Nail psoriasis in an adult successfully treated with a series of herbal skin care products family – a case report.

    PubMed

    Tirant, M; Hercogovấ, J; Fioranelli, M; Gianfaldoni, S; Chokoeva, A A; Tchernev, G; Wollina, U; Novotny, F; Roccia, M G; Maximov, G K; França, K; Lotti, T

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory dermatosis that causes significant distress and morbidity. Approximately 50% of patients with cutaneous psoriasis and 90% of patients with psoriatic arthritis demonstrate nail involvement of their psoriasis. Left untreated, nail psoriasis may progress to debilitating nail disease that leads to not only impairment of function but also on quality of life. We report the case of a 50-year-old male patient with recalcitrant nail dystrophies on the fingers since the age of 40, who responded successfully to Dr. Michaels® product family. The patient had a 35-year history of plaque psoriasis localised on the scalp, ears, groin, limbs, and trunk and with psoriatic arthritis. The nail symptoms consisted of onycholysis, onychomycosis, leukonychia, transverse grooves, nail plate crumbling and paronychia of the periungal skin. This case represents the efficacy and safety of the Dr. Michaels® (Soratinex® and Nailinex®) product family with successful resolution of nail dystrophies and surrounding paronychia with no reported adverse events.

  3. Polish dermatology in the 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The beginnings of Polish dermatology date back to the first half of the 19th century in Kraków. The first textbook of dermatology was written by Ludwik Bierkowski. Later the progress in the development of this field of medicine was due to Franciszek Krzyształowicz, Marian Grzybowski, Franciszek Walter, and Jan Alkiewicz. Krzyształowicz's most remarkable achievements were related to his studies of the Treponema pallidum of syphilis. Grzybowski's main contribution to international dermatology was the first description in the medical literature of a specific variant of keratoacanthoma, which has since then been called Grzybowski's eruptive keratoacanthoma or generalized eruptive keratoacanthoma - Grzybowski's variant. Alkiewicz described trachyonychia, or twenty-nail dystrophy, a disease that became well established in the dermatological literature; he also described the so-called transverse net in onychomycosis. Walter identified the syphilitic skin and bone lesions in some figures carved in the Veit Stoss's altar in Kraków, thus presenting the famous thesis of the non-American origin of syphilis in Europe. Considering all these achievements, it is the goal of this paper to review Polish contributions to international dermatology. PMID:18173613

  4. The Spectrum of Cutaneous Infection in Diabetic Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Single-Center Study from Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El-Khalawany, Mohamed A; Mahmoud, Ali M

    2014-01-01

    Context: Hepatitis-C virus (HCV) infection and diabetes mellitus (DM) have a significant association with skin disorders. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of HCV infection on the pattern of cutaneous infections among diabetic patients. Methods and Material: A prospective study included diabetic patients who attended Al-Hussein University hospital, Cairo during the period from 2008 to 2010. Patients were examined for skin infections, and investigated for HCV infection. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS (version 11.5). Results: The study included 163 patients (102 males and 61 females) with a mean age of 46.2 ± 4.83 years. Ninety five patients (58.3%) were HCV+ve (group A) while 68 patients (41.8%) were HCV-ve (group B). Skin infections in group A included fungal (48.4%), viral (26.3%), bacterial (22.1%) and parasitic (3.2%) while in group B, the spectrum included bacterial (41.2%), fungal (39.7%), viral (11.7%) and parasitic (7.4%). Onychomycosis was the commonest infection in group A (25.2%) compared with folliculitis in group B (19.1%). Cutaneous infections in HCV+ patients were more characterized by increased severity, aggressive course, resistance to treatment and rapid relapse. Conclusions: HCV infection has a significant impact in increasing and changing the spectrum of skin infections in diabetic patients. Severe and resistant infections in diabetics could be an important sign of HCV infection. PMID:24891654

  5. Heat profiles of laser-irradiated nails.

    PubMed

    Paasch, Uwe; Nenoff, Pietro; Seitz, Anna-Theresa; Wagner, Justinus A; Kendler, Michael; Simon, Jan C; Grunewald, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a worldwide problem with no tendency for self-healing, and existing systemic treatments achieve disease-free nails in only 35 to 76% of cases. Recently, treatment of nail fungus with a near-infrared laser has been introduced. It is assumed that fungal eradication is mediated by local heat. To investigate if laser treatment has the potential to eradicate fungal hyphae and arthrospores, laser heat application and propagation needs to be studied in detail. This study aimed to measure nail temperatures using real-time videothermography during laser irradiation. Treatment was performed using 808- and 980-nm linear scanning diode lasers developed for hair removal, enabling contact-free homogeneous irradiation of a human nail plate in one pass. Average and peak temperatures increased pass by pass, while the laser beam moved along the nail plates. The achieved mean peak temperatures (808 nm: 74.1 to 112.4°C, 980 nm: 45.8 to 53.5°C), as well as the elevation of average temperatures (808 nm: 29.5 to 38.2°C, 980 nm: 27.1 to 32.6°C) were associated with pain that was equivalent to that of hair removal procedures and was not significantly different for various wavelengths. The linear scanning laser devices provide the benefits of contact-free homogeneous heating of the human nail while ensuring adequate temperature rises.

  6. Controlled nail delivery of a novel lipophilic antifungal agent using various modern drug carrier systems as well as in vitro and ex vivo model systems.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Sandy; Meyer, Jean-Philippe; Kiesow, Andreas; Mrestani, Yahya; Wohlrab, Johannes; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2014-04-28

    The penetration behavior into human nails and animal hoof membranes of a novel antifungal agent (EV-086K) for the treatment of onychomycosis was investigated in this study. The new drug provides a high lipophilicity which is adverse for penetration into nails. Therefore, four different formulations were developed, with particular focus on a colloidal carrier system (CCS) due to its penetration enhancing properties. On the one hand, ex vivo penetration experiments on human nails were performed. Afterwards the human nail plates were cut by cryomicrotome in order to quantify the drug concentration in the dorsal, intermediate and ventral nail layer using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection. On the other hand, equine and bovine hoof membranes were used to determine the in vitro penetration of the drug into the acceptor compartment of an online diffusion cell coupled with Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. In combination, both results should exhibit a correlation between the EV-086K penetration behavior in human nail plates and animal hoof membranes. The investigations showed that the developed CCS could increase drug delivery through the human nail most compared to other formulations (nail lacquer, solution and hydrogel). Using animal hooves in the online diffusion cell, we were able to calculate pharmacokinetic data of the penetration process, especially diffusion and permeability coefficients. Finally, a qualitative correlation between the penetration results of human nails and equine hooves was established.

  7. 1st meeting on topical drug delivery to the nail.

    PubMed

    Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2007-07-01

    The first ever symposium dedicated solely to drug delivery to the nail following topical application was held on the 2nd April 2007, in London, UK, organised by Dr Clive Roper (Charles River Laboratories, Scotland) and Dr Sudaxshina Murdan (School of Pharmacy, University of London, UK), under the auspices of Skin Forum. The 1-day meeting was attended by approximately 35 delegates from industry, academia and hospitals, and provided a much-needed forum for the presentation and discussion of research and problems in this emerging field. Topical drug delivery is especially suitable for onychomycosis (fungal infections of the nail plate and/or nail bed) and nail psoriasis, which affect 2 - 13 and 1 - 3% of the general population, respectively, and make up the bulk of nail disorders. Topical therapy would avoid the adverse events and drug interactions of systemic antifungal agents and the pain of injection when antipsoriatic agents are injected into affected nail folds. However, successful topical therapy is extremely challenging due to the very low permeability of the nail plate. Five speakers spoke about various aspects of topical drug delivery to the nail, including review of the nail plate structure, function, diseases, their existing therapies (systemic and topical), limitations and global sales. The need for effective topical drug delivery to the nail to overcome the problems associated with present treatment, and the fact that there are few topical formulations available for the treatment of nail fungal infections and psoriasis, and the even fewer effective formulations, was highlighted.

  8. Effect of hydration on the permeation of ketoconazole through human nail plate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gunt, Hemali B; Kasting, Gerald B

    2007-12-01

    The impact of hydration on the permeation of the antifungal drug, ketoconazole, through excised human nails in vitro was evaluated in diffusion cell studies. Nails treated with [(3)H]ketoconazole solvent-deposited onto the dorsal surface were maintained in incubators at 32 degrees C and exposed sequentially to relative humidities (dorsal side) of 15, 40, 80 and 100% over a period of 40 days. The ventral side was bathed in a pH 7.4 phosphate buffer. Ascending and descending humidity regimens were tested. Increasing the ambient RH from 15 to 100% enhanced permeation of radiolabel associated with [(3)H]ketoconazole by a factor of three. Diffusivities estimated from these data and the associated nail water contents (estimated in a separate study) can be described by a free volume theory. Therefore, formulations or treatments, which increase nail hydration, have potential to improve topical therapy for onychomycosis, if a favorable balance between drug delivery and growth conditions for the dermatophytes can be achieved.

  9. Ciclopirox vs amorolfine: in vitro penetration into and permeation through human healthy nails of commercial nail lacquers.

    PubMed

    Monti, Daniela; Tampucci, Silvia; Chetoni, Patrizia; Burgalassi, Susi; Mailland, Federico

    2014-02-01

    One of the pre-requisite for a successful topical antifungal drug indicated for onychomycosis is its bioavailability into the nail unit for achieving fungal eradication and clinical benefit. The aim of this study was to compare in vitro permeation/penetration through and into human nails of amorolfine (MRF) from a 5% anhydrous commercial formulation (Loceryl®) and ciclopirox (CPX) from the 8% aqueous formulation in hydroxypropyl chitosan (HPCH) technology (Onytec®). The ability of the active ingredient to reach efficacious concentrations to inhibit nail pathogens was also evaluated. The amounts of drug permeated and retained in human healthy nails were determined using a suitably modified diffusion apparatus. HPLC analysis of the samples was performed. The HPCH-based CPX formulation demonstrated an efficient penetration into and permeation through the nail plates. Conversely, Loceryl® produced an amount of MRF permeated through and penetrated into the human toenails significantly lower than CPX. The evaluation of the efficacy index showed a higher potential efficacy of Onytec® with respect to Loceryl® on nail pathogens. The present work not only reinforced the previous results on different experimental substrates, but pointed out the superiority of HPCH-based Onytec® formulation containing CPX with respect to Loceryl® commercial product with MRF, both in terms of higher permeation through and penetration into the human nail, and for the efficacy towards the most common ungual pathogens.

  10. Size and Charge Dependence of Ion Transport in Human Nail Plate.

    PubMed

    Baswan, Sudhir M; Li, S Kevin; LaCount, Terri D; Kasting, Gerald B

    2016-03-01

    The electrical properties of human nail plate are poorly characterized yet are a key determinate of the potential to treat nail diseases, such as onychomycosis, using iontophoresis. To address this deficiency, molar conductivities of 17 electrolytes comprising 12 ionic species were determined in hydrated human nail plate in vitro. Cation transport numbers across the nail for 11 of these electrolytes were determined by the electromotive force method. Effective ionic mobilities and diffusivities at infinite dilution for all ionic species were determined by regression analysis. The ratios of diffusivities in nail to those in solution were found to correlate inversely with the hydrodynamic radii of the ions according to a power law relationship having an exponent of -1.75 ± 0.27, a substantially steeper size dependence than observed for similar experiments in skin. Effective diffusivities of cations in nail were 3-fold higher than those of comparably sized anions. These results reflect the strong size and charge selectivity of the nail plate for ionic conduction and diffusion. The analysis implies that efficient transungual iontophoretic delivery of ionized drugs having radii upward of 5 Å (molecular weight, ca. ≥ 340 Da) will require chemical or mechanical alteration of the nail plate.

  11. Trans-ungual iontophoretic delivery of terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anroop B; Vaka, Siva Ram K; Sammeta, Srinivasa M; Kim, Hyun D; Friden, Phillip M; Chakraborty, Bireswar; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2009-05-01

    Successful treatment of deep-seated nail infections remains elusive as the delivery of efficacious levels of antifungal drug to the site of action is very difficult. The aim of the present study was to attain rapid trans-ungual delivery of an antifungal agent, terbinafine, via the topical route using iontophoresis. Initial studies revealed that application of current (0.5 mA/cm(2)) could significantly enhance the trans-ungual delivery of terbinafine. An increase in the applied current or duration of current application enhanced the trans-ungual delivery of terbinafine. Permeation of terbinafine through the nail and drug load in the nail correlated well with the applied electrical dose. Release of drug from nails loaded using iontophoresis followed a two-phase release profile. Light microscopy studies substantiated the capability of iontophoresis to drive a charged molecule across the nail plate. The results of these studies indicate that iontophoresis could be developed as a potential technique for onychomycosis therapy.

  12. Insights into drug delivery across the nail plate barrier.

    PubMed

    Saner, Manish V; Kulkarni, Abhijeet D; Pardeshi, Chandrakantsing V

    2014-11-01

    Topical therapy is at the forefront in treating nail ailments (especially onychomycosis and nail psoriasis) due to its local effects, which circumvents systemic adverse events, improves patient compliance and reduces treatment cost. However, the success of topical therapy has been hindered due to poor penetration of topical therapeutics across densely keratinized nail plate barrier. For effective topical therapy across nail plate, ungual drug permeation must be enhanced. Present review is designed to provide an insight into prime aspects of transungual drug delivery viz. nail structure and physiology, various onychopathies, techniques of nail permeation enhancement and in vitro models for trans-nail drug permeation studies. Updated list of drug molecules studied across the nail plate and key commercial products have been furnished with sufficient depth. Patents pertinent to, and current clinical status of transungual drug delivery have also been comprehensively reviewed. This is the first systematic critique encompassing the detailed aspects of transungual drug delivery. In our opinion, transungual drug delivery is a promising avenue for researchers to develop novel formulations, augmenting pharmaceutical industries to commercialize the products for nail disorders.

  13. Enhancing the nail permeability of topically applied drugs.

    PubMed

    Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2008-11-01

    The topical therapy of nail diseases, especially of onychomycosis, and to a smaller extent, of nail psoriasis, is desirable to avoid the side effects associated with their systemic therapy, to increase patient compliance and reduce the cost of treatment. Systemic therapy is however the mainstay of treatment due to the poor permeability of the nail plate to topically applied drugs. For effective topical therapy, ungual drug permeation must be enhanced. This can be achieved by disrupting the nail plate using physical techniques or chemical agents. Alternatively, drug permeation into the intact nail plate may be encouraged, for example, by iontophoresis or by formulating the drug within a vehicle which enables high drug partition out of the vehicle and into the nail plate. The physical techniques (manual and electrical nail abrasion, acid etching, ablation by lasers, microporation, application of low-frequency ultrasound and electric currents) and chemicals (thiols, sulphites, hydrogen peroxide, urea, water, enzymes) that have shown ungual enhancer activity are discussed in this review. Optimal drug formulation, while crucial to ungual drug delivery, is only briefly reviewed due to the limited literature.

  14. A preformulation strategy for the selection of penetration enhancers for a transungual formulation.

    PubMed

    Palliyil, Biji; Lebo, David B; Patel, Pankil R

    2013-06-01

    Onychomycosis is associated with the cutaneous fungal infection of the nail and the nail folds (skin surrounding the nail). It is therefore important to target drug delivery into the nail folds along with nail plate and the nail bed. Systematic and strategic selection of the penetration enhancers specific for the skin and the nail is discussed. Twelve penetration enhancers were screened for their ability to improve solubility, in vitro nail penetration, in vitro skin permeation, and in vitro skin penetration of the antifungal drug ciclopirox olamine. In contrast to transdermal drug delivery, the main selection criteria for skin penetration enhancer in topical drug delivery were increased drug accumulation in the epidermis and minimal permeation across the skin. Thiourea improved the solubility and nail penetration of ciclopirox olamine. It also showed enhancement in the transungual diffusion of the drug. Propylene glycol showed a 12-fold increase in solubility and 3-fold increase in epidermal accumulation of ciclopirox olamine, while minimizing the transdermal movement of the drug. Thiourea was the selected nail permeation enhancer and propylene glycol was the selected skin penetration enhancer of ciclopirox olamine. A combination of the selected enhancers was also explored for its effect on drug delivery to the nail and nail folds. The enhancer combination reduced the penetration of ciclopirox in the skin and also the permeation through the nail. The proposed preformulation strategy helps to select appropriate enhancers for optimum topical delivery and paves way towards an efficient topical formulation for passive transungual drug delivery.

  15. Infected nail plate model made of human hair keratin for evaluating the efficacy of different topical antifungal formulations against Trichophyton rubrum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lusiana; Reichl, Stephan; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2013-08-01

    A novel model of infected nail plate for testing the efficacy of topical antifungal formulations has been developed. This model utilized keratin film made of human hair keratin as a nail plate model. Subsequent to infection by Trichophyton rubrum, the common causative agent of onychomycosis, keratin films as infected nail plate models were treated with selected topical formulations, that is cream, gel, and nail lacquer. Bovine hoof was compared to keratin film. In contrast to the common antifungal susceptibility test, the antifungal drugs tested were applied as ready-to-use formulations because the vehicle may modify and control the drug action both in vitro and in vivo. Extrapolating the potency of an antifungal drug from an in vitro susceptibility test only would not be representative of the in vivo situation since these drugs are applied as ready-to-use formulations, for example as a nail lacquer. Although terbinafine has been acknowledged to be the most effective antifungal agent against T. rubrum, its antifungal efficacy was improved by its incorporation into an optimal formulation. Different gels proved superior to cream. Therefore, this study is able to discriminate between efficacies of different topical antifungal formulations based on their activities against T. rubrum.

  16. TranScreen-N: Method for rapid screening of trans-ungual drug delivery enhancers.

    PubMed

    Murthy, S Narasimha; Vaka, Siva Ram Kiran; Sammeta, Srinivasa Murthy; Nair, Anroop B

    2009-11-01

    Topical monotherapy of nail diseases such as onychomycosis and nail psoriasis has been less successful due to poor permeability of the human nail plate to topically administered drugs. Chemical enhancers are utilized to improve the drug delivery across the nail plate. Choosing the most effective chemical enhancers for the given drug and formulation is highly critical in determining the efficacy of topical therapy of nail diseases. Screening the large pool of enhancers using currently followed diffusion cell experiments would be tedious and expensive. The main objective of this study is to develop TranScreen-N, a high throughput method of screening trans-ungual drug permeation enhancers. It is a rapid microwell plate based method which involves two different treatment procedures; the simultaneous exposure treatment and the sequential exposure treatment. In the present study, several chemicals were evaluated by TranScreen-N and by diffusion studies in the Franz diffusion cell (FDC). Good agreement of in vitro drug delivery data with TranScreen-N data provided validity to the screening technique. In TranScreen-N technique, the enhancers can be grouped according to whether they need to be applied before or simultaneously with drugs (or by either procedures) to enhance the drug delivery across the nail plate. TranScreen-N technique can significantly reduce the cost and duration required to screen trans-ungual drug delivery enhancers.

  17. Hydration of nail plate: a novel screening model for transungual drug permeation enhancers.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, P; Saini, T R

    2012-10-15

    Drug delivery by topical route for the treatment of onychomycosis, a nail fungal infection, is challenging due to the unique barrier properties of the nail plate which imparts high resistance to the passage of antifungal drugs. Permeation enhancers are used in transungual formulations to improve the drug flux across the nail plate. Selection of the effective permeation enhancer among the available large pool of permeation enhancers is a difficult task. Screening the large number of permeation enhancers using conventional Franz diffusion cells is laborious and expensive. The objective of present study was to evolve a simple, accurate and rapid method for screening of transungual drug permeation enhancers based on the principle of hydration of nail plate. The permeation enhancer which affects the structural or physicochemical properties of nail plate would also affect their hydration capacity. Two screening procedures namely primary and secondary screenings were evolved wherein hydration and uptake of ciclopirox olamine by nail plates were measured. Hydration enhancement factor, HEF(24) and drug uptake enhancement factor, UEF(24) were determined for screening of 23 typical permeation enhancers. The Pearson's correlation coefficient between HEF(24) and UEF(24) was determined. A good agreement between the HEF(24) and UEF(24) data proved the validity of the proposed nail plate hydration model as a screening technique for permeation enhancers.

  18. Ungual and transungual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, H N; Juluri, Abhishek; Desai, B G; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2012-08-01

    Topical therapy is desirable in treatment of nail diseases like onychomycosis (fungal infection of nail) and psoriasis. The topical treatment avoids the adverse effects associated with systemic therapy, thereby enhancing the patient compliance and reducing the treatment cost. However the effectiveness of the topical therapies has been limited due to the poor permeability of the nail plate to topically applied therapeutic agents. Research over the past one decade has been focused on improving the transungual permeability by means of chemical treatment, penetration enhancers, mechanical and physical methods. The present review is an attempt to discuss the different physical and chemical methods employed to increase the permeability of the nail plate. Minimally invasive electrically mediated techniques such as iontophoresis have gained success in facilitating the transungual delivery of actives. In addition drug transport across the nail plate has been improved by filing the dorsal surface of the nail plate prior to application of topical formulation. But attempts to improve the trans-nail permeation using transdermal chemical enhancers have failed so far. Attempts are on to search suitable physical enhancement techniques and chemical transungual enhancers in view to maximize the drug delivery across the nail plate.

  19. Application of Hansen Solubility Parameters to predict drug-nail interactions, which can assist the design of nail medicines.

    PubMed

    Hossin, B; Rizi, K; Murdan, S

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesised that Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSPs) can be used to predict drug-nail affinities. Our aims were to: (i) determine the HSPs (δD, δP, δH) of the nail plate, the hoof membrane (a model for the nail plate), and of the drugs terbinafine HCl, amorolfine HCl, ciclopirox olamine and efinaconazole, by measuring their swelling/solubility in organic liquids, (ii) predict nail-drug interactions by comparing drug and nail HSPs, and (iii) evaluate the accuracy of these predictions using literature reports of experimentally-determined affinities of these drugs for keratin, the main constituent of the nail plate and hoof. Many solvents caused no change in the mass of nail plates, a few solvents deswelled the nail, while others swelled the nail to varying extents. Fingernail and toenail HSPs were almost the same, while hoof HSPs were similar, except for a slightly lower δP. High nail-terbinafine HCl, nail-amorolfine HCl and nail-ciclopirox olamine affinities, and low nail-efinaconazole affinities were then predicted, and found to accurately match experimental reports of these drugs' affinities to keratin. We therefore propose that drug and nail Hansen Solubility Parameters may be used to predict drug-nail interactions, and that these results can assist in the design of drugs for the treatment of nail diseases, such as onychomycosis and psoriasis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the application of HSPs in ungual research.

  20. Heat profiles of laser-irradiated nails.

    PubMed

    Paasch, Uwe; Nenoff, Pietro; Seitz, Anna-Theresa; Wagner, Justinus A; Kendler, Michael; Simon, Jan C; Grunewald, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a worldwide problem with no tendency for self-healing, and existing systemic treatments achieve disease-free nails in only 35 to 76% of cases. Recently, treatment of nail fungus with a near-infrared laser has been introduced. It is assumed that fungal eradication is mediated by local heat. To investigate if laser treatment has the potential to eradicate fungal hyphae and arthrospores, laser heat application and propagation needs to be studied in detail. This study aimed to measure nail temperatures using real-time videothermography during laser irradiation. Treatment was performed using 808- and 980-nm linear scanning diode lasers developed for hair removal, enabling contact-free homogeneous irradiation of a human nail plate in one pass. Average and peak temperatures increased pass by pass, while the laser beam moved along the nail plates. The achieved mean peak temperatures (808 nm: 74.1 to 112.4°C, 980 nm: 45.8 to 53.5°C), as well as the elevation of average temperatures (808 nm: 29.5 to 38.2°C, 980 nm: 27.1 to 32.6°C) were associated with pain that was equivalent to that of hair removal procedures and was not significantly different for various wavelengths. The linear scanning laser devices provide the benefits of contact-free homogeneous heating of the human nail while ensuring adequate temperature rises. PMID:24407504

  1. In vitro model of infected stratum corneum for the efficacy evaluation of poloxamer 407-based formulations of ciclopirox olamine against Trichophyton rubrum as well as differential scanning calorimetry and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Täuber, Anja; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2015-10-15

    Superficial fungal skin infections are a common disease and concern 20-25% of the world's population with the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum being the main trigger. Due to autoinoculation, fungal skin infections of the feet (tinea pedis) often occur simultaneously with fungal nail infections (onychomycosis). Therefore, the overall objective was the development and characterisation of poloxamer 407-based formulations with the antimycotic active ingredient ciclopirox olamine (CPX) for simultaneous antifungal therapy. The formulations consisted of poloxamer 407, water, isopropyl alcohol, propylene glycol and medium chain triglycerides in given ratios. The in vitro antifungal efficacy against T. rubrum was tested in a novel in vitro model of infected stratum corneum in comparison to a marketed semi-solid formulation containing 1% (w/w) ciclopirox olamine and a marketed nail lacquer containing 8% ciclopirox. Several liquid poloxamer 407-based formulations with only 1% CPX completely inhibited fungal growth after 6 days of incubation, whereas the marketed semi-solid formulation did not inhibit fungal growth. Differential scanning calorimetry studies revealing the interaction between the formulations and the SC showed that increasing isopropyl alcohol/propylene glycol concentrations as well as increasing CPX concentrations caused increasing endothermic transition shifts. Moreover, stability studies at 30 °C exhibited only a slight decrease of the CPX amount after 12 months of storage. Each formulation contained >90% of the initial CPX concentration after termination of the stability studies.

  2. [Cutaneous Malassezia infections and Malassezia associated dermatoses: An update].

    PubMed

    Nenoff, P; Krüger, C; Mayser, P

    2015-06-01

    The lipophilic yeast fungus Malassezia (M.) spp. is the only fungal genus or species which is part of the physiological human microbiome. Today, at least 14 different Malassezia species are known; most of them can only be identified using molecular biological techniques. As a facultative pathogenic microorganism, Malassezia represents the causative agent both of superficial cutaneous infections and of blood stream infections. Pityriasis versicolor is the probably most frequent infection caused by Malassezia. Less common, Malassezia folliculitis occurs. There is only an episodic report on Malassezia-induced onychomycosis. Seborrhoeic dermatitis represents a Malassezia-associated inflammatory dermatosis. In addition, Malassezia allergenes should be considered as the trigger of "Head-Neck"-type atopic dermatitis. Ketoconazole possesses the strongest in vitro activity against Malassezia, and represents the treatment of choice for topical therapy of pityriasis versicolor. Alternatives include other azole antifungals but also the allylamine terbinafine and the hydroxypyridone antifungal agent ciclopirox olamine. "Antiseborrhoeic" agents, e.g. zinc pyrithione, selenium disulfide, and salicylic acid, are also effective in pityriasis versicolor. The drug of choice for oral treatment of pityriasis versicolor is itraconazole; an effective alternative represents fluconazole. Seborrhoeic dermatitis is best treated with topical medication, including topical corticosteroids and antifungal agents like ketoconazole or sertaconazole. Calcineurin inhibitors, e.g. pimecrolimus and tacrolimus, are reliable in seborrhoeic dermatitis, however are used off-label.

  3. Heat profiles of laser-irradiated nails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paasch, Uwe; Nenoff, Pietro; Seitz, Anna-Theresa; Wagner, Justinus A.; Kendler, Michael; Simon, Jan C.; Grunewald, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a worldwide problem with no tendency for self-healing, and existing systemic treatments achieve disease-free nails in only 35 to 76% of cases. Recently, treatment of nail fungus with a near-infrared laser has been introduced. It is assumed that fungal eradication is mediated by local heat. To investigate if laser treatment has the potential to eradicate fungal hyphae and arthrospores, laser heat application and propagation needs to be studied in detail. This study aimed to measure nail temperatures using real-time videothermography during laser irradiation. Treatment was performed using 808- and 980-nm linear scanning diode lasers developed for hair removal, enabling contact-free homogeneous irradiation of a human nail plate in one pass. Average and peak temperatures increased pass by pass, while the laser beam moved along the nail plates. The achieved mean peak temperatures (808 nm: 74.1 to 112.4°C, 980 nm: 45.8 to 53.5°C), as well as the elevation of average temperatures (808 nm: 29.5 to 38.2°C, 980 nm: 27.1 to 32.6°C) were associated with pain that was equivalent to that of hair removal procedures and was not significantly different for various wavelengths. The linear scanning laser devices provide the benefits of contact-free homogeneous heating of the human nail while ensuring adequate temperature rises.

  4. [Tinea in the genital area : A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge].

    PubMed

    Ginter-Hanselmayer, G; Nenoff, P; Kurrat, W; Propst, E; Durrant-Finn, U; Uhrlaß, S; Weger, W

    2016-09-01

    Pubogenital tinea or tinea genitalis represents a rare type of dermatophytosis which, however, is increasingly being diagnosed. The mons pubis is affected, but also the outer regions to the penis shaft and the labia together with the groins. Pubogenital tinea is a more superficial erythrosquamous type, but strong inflammatory dermatomycoses of the genital area as tinea genitalis profunda ranging to kerion celsi are observed. A total of 30 patients (14-63 years of age, 11 men and 19 women) with pubogenital tinea are described. Most patients originated from Graz, Austria, while 2 patients were from Germany (Saxony and Isle of Sylt). Causative agents were mainly zoophilic dermatophytes: Microsporum (M.) canis (11), Trichophyton (T.) interdigitale (9), T. anamorph of Arthroderma benhamiae (2), and T. verrucosum (1). Anthropophilic fungi were T. rubrum (6) and T. tonsurans (1). Anamnestic questions should include contact with pets, physical activities, and travel. Genital shaving and concurrent tinea pedis and onychomycosis are disposing factors. Treatment consisted of oral antifungals except in the three women who were pregnant. Preferably, itraconazole or terbinafine was used, while in a single case, fluconazole was administered. Griseofulvin was not used, because this classic systemic antifungal agent is not allowed any more in Austria. In one patient, oral antifungal therapy was changed from itraconazole to terbinafine due to inefficacy.

  5. Evaluation of the Efficacy of ME1111 in the Topical Treatment of Dermatophytosis in a Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Long, L.; Hager, C.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of dermatophytoses, including onychomycosis, has come a long way over the past few decades with the introduction of oral antifungals (e.g., terbinafine and itraconazole). However, with these advancements in oral therapies come several undesirable effects, such as kidney and liver toxicity, along with drug-drug interactions. Consequently, there is a need for new topical agents that are effective against dermatophytosis. ME1111 is a topical antifungal under development. In this study, the in vivo efficacy of ME1111 was compared to that of ciclopirox in the topical treatment of dermatophytosis caused by Trichophyton mentagrophytes using a guinea pig model. Animals were treated with the topical antifungals starting at 3 days postinfection, with each agent being applied once daily for seven consecutive days. After the treatment period, the clinical and mycological efficacies were evaluated. The data showed that both antifungals demonstrated significant clinical and mycological efficacies; however, ME1111 showed clinical efficacy superior to that of ciclopirox (46.9% and 25.0%, respectively, with a P value of <0.001). The potent efficacy of ME1111 could be attributed to its properties, such as low keratin binding. PMID:26833160

  6. [Sports-associated dermatophytoses : An overview].

    PubMed

    Mayser, P; Handrick, W; Nenoff, P

    2016-09-01

    Because of high exposure (e. g. swimmers and athletes competing on mats) and disposition (e. g. microtraumata of the skin in runners) athletes are prone to a higher risk for mycotic infections by dermatophytes. In disciplines with close contact during competition-especially wrestlers and judoists-infections by the anthropophilic Trichophyton (T.) tonsurans are most important (tinea gladiatorum). These infections are highly contagious and often cause small epidemics especially if the primary source of infection is not promptly recognized. The environment of the athletes (e. g. mats) and asymptomatic carriers may be sources of further spread. Tinea pedis with its clinical manifestations seems to be often underdiagnosed and insufficiently treated. Environmental contamination by fungal spores may be responsible for the significantly higher level of mycotic infections of the feet in children and adolescents active in sports. There is a higher risk for spread of the infection to the toe nails (onychomycosis) and for consecutive infections by bacteria (e. g. erysipelas). More rarely infections by zoophilic or geophilic dermatophytes are seen in athletes (e.g. equestrians). Education and more intensive measures of prevention and environmental decontamination are essential for all dermatophytoses associated with sports. PMID:27385109

  7. [Tinea in the genital area : A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge].

    PubMed

    Ginter-Hanselmayer, G; Nenoff, P; Kurrat, W; Propst, E; Durrant-Finn, U; Uhrlaß, S; Weger, W

    2016-09-01

    Pubogenital tinea or tinea genitalis represents a rare type of dermatophytosis which, however, is increasingly being diagnosed. The mons pubis is affected, but also the outer regions to the penis shaft and the labia together with the groins. Pubogenital tinea is a more superficial erythrosquamous type, but strong inflammatory dermatomycoses of the genital area as tinea genitalis profunda ranging to kerion celsi are observed. A total of 30 patients (14-63 years of age, 11 men and 19 women) with pubogenital tinea are described. Most patients originated from Graz, Austria, while 2 patients were from Germany (Saxony and Isle of Sylt). Causative agents were mainly zoophilic dermatophytes: Microsporum (M.) canis (11), Trichophyton (T.) interdigitale (9), T. anamorph of Arthroderma benhamiae (2), and T. verrucosum (1). Anthropophilic fungi were T. rubrum (6) and T. tonsurans (1). Anamnestic questions should include contact with pets, physical activities, and travel. Genital shaving and concurrent tinea pedis and onychomycosis are disposing factors. Treatment consisted of oral antifungals except in the three women who were pregnant. Preferably, itraconazole or terbinafine was used, while in a single case, fluconazole was administered. Griseofulvin was not used, because this classic systemic antifungal agent is not allowed any more in Austria. In one patient, oral antifungal therapy was changed from itraconazole to terbinafine due to inefficacy. PMID:27488308

  8. Oral Antifungal Drugs in the Treatment of Dermatomycosis.

    PubMed

    Tsunemi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Oral antifungal drugs are used primarily to treat tinea unguium; however, they are also useful for other types of tinea. For example, a combination of topical and oral antifungal drugs is effective in hyperkeratotic tinea pedis that is unresponsive to topical monotherapy. In cases of tinea facialis adjacent to the eyes, ears, or mouth, or widespread tinea corporis, or tinea cruris involving the complex skin folds of the external genitalia, it is difficult to apply topical drugs to all the lesions; therefore, oral antifungal drugs are necessary. Oral antifungal drugs are also useful not only for tinea but for widespread pityriasis versicolor and Malassezia folliculitis, candidal onychomycosis, and candidal paronychia and onychia. Topical antifungal drugs are in fact unsuitable for some mycoses. In tinea capitis, for example, irritation by topical drugs is likely to enhance inflammation; therefore, oral antifungal drug monotherapy is preferable. In interdigital tinea pedis with erosion or contact dermatitis, topical drugs are difficult to use because they tend to cause irritant dermatitis, resulting in exacerbation of the condition. In such cases, treatment should begin with a combination of topical corticosteroid therapy and oral antifungal drugs active against dermatophytes. Topical antifungal drugs are used after the complications resolve. A combination of topical and oral antifungal drugs can shorten the treatment period, thus improving patient adherence to topical treatment. Oral antifungal drugs are useful because of their wide range of applications in the treatment of dermatomycosis. PMID:27251319

  9. [Distribution of Luliconazole in Nail Plate by In Vitro Permeation and Efficacy by Zone of Inhibition Test after Treatment of Luliconazole Nail Solution].

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Miyamae, Akiko; Arai, Masakazu; Minemura, Aya; Nozawa, Akira; Kubota, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the character of luliconazole nail solution we have developed, we investigated luliconazole distribution and antifungal activity in nail plate. An in vitro permeation study which measured luliconazole concentration of sliced nail in the transverse direction after treatment of luliconazole nail solution was conducted to investigate for concentration dependency and the influences of nail thickness and treatment duration. When 0.2, 1, 3, 5, and 7.5% luliconazole nail solutions were used, luliconazole was detected in the all the layers of nail and there was a concentration gradient from the dorsal side to deep nail layers. The luliconazole concentration was almost same after 14-day treatment with 5% luliconazole nail solution when using nails of different thicknesses. And we confirmed that concentration of luliconazole into the nail was increased depending on the treatment duration. In zone of inhibition test after 14-day treatment, 5% luliconazole nail solution showed statistically high formation rate of zones of inhibition compared to 8% ciclopirox nail lacquer. Above all, these data suggested that 5% luliconazole nail solution has the potential to show high therapeutic effect for onychomycosis.

  10. Taxonomy, biology, and clinical aspects of Fusarium species.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, P E; Dignani, M C; Anaissie, E J

    1994-01-01

    There are several taxonomic systems available for identifying Fusarium species. The philosophy used in each taxonomic system is discussed as well as problems encountered in working with Fusarium species in culture. Fusarium species are toxigenic, and the mycotoxins produced by these organisms are often associated with animal and human diseases. The implications for the association of the carcinogens, fumonisins, produced by Fusarium moniliforme and other Fusarium species with human diseases are discussed. Foreign-body-associated fusarial infection such as keratitis in contact lens wearers, onychomycosis, skin infections, and disseminated multiorgan infections are discussed. Disseminated fusarial hyalohyphomycosis has emerged as a significant, usually fatal infection in the immunocompromised host. Successful outcome is determined by the degree of immunosuppression, the extent of the infection, and the presence of a removable focus such as an indwelling central venous catheter. These infections may be clinically suspected on the basis of a constellation of clinical and laboratory findings, which should lead to prompt therapy, probably with one of the newer antifungal agents. Perhaps the use of such agents or the use of colony-stimulating factors may improve the outcome of this devastating infection. However, until new approaches for treatment develop, effective preventive measures are urgently needed. Images PMID:7834602

  11. The Malassezia genus in skin and systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gaitanis, Georgios; Magiatis, Prokopios; Hantschke, Markus; Bassukas, Ioannis D; Velegraki, Aristea

    2012-01-01

    In the last 15 years, the genus Malassezia has been a topic of intense basic research on taxonomy, physiology, biochemistry, ecology, immunology, and metabolomics. Currently, the genus encompasses 14 species. The 1996 revision of the genus resulted in seven accepted taxa: M. furfur, M. pachydermatis, M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. obtusa, M. restricta, and M. slooffiae. In the last decade, seven new taxa isolated from healthy and lesional human and animal skin have been accepted: M. dermatis, M. japonica, M. yamatoensis, M. nana, M. caprae, M. equina, and M. cuniculi. However, forthcoming multidisciplinary research is expected to show the etiopathological relationships between these new species and skin diseases. Hitherto, basic and clinical research has established etiological links between Malassezia yeasts, pityriasis versicolor, and sepsis of neonates and immunocompromised individuals. Their role in aggravating seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff, folliculitis, and onychomycosis, though often supported by histopathological evidence and favorable antifungal therapeutic outcomes, remains under investigation. A close association between skin and Malassezia IgE binding allergens in atopic eczema has been shown, while laboratory data support a role in psoriasis exacerbations. Finally, metabolomic research resulted in the proposal of a hypothesis on the contribution of Malassezia-synthesized aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands to basal cell carcinoma through UV radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:22232373

  12. The Malassezia Genus in Skin and Systemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Magiatis, Prokopios; Hantschke, Markus; Bassukas, Ioannis D.; Velegraki, Aristea

    2012-01-01

    Summary: In the last 15 years, the genus Malassezia has been a topic of intense basic research on taxonomy, physiology, biochemistry, ecology, immunology, and metabolomics. Currently, the genus encompasses 14 species. The 1996 revision of the genus resulted in seven accepted taxa: M. furfur, M. pachydermatis, M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. obtusa, M. restricta, and M. slooffiae. In the last decade, seven new taxa isolated from healthy and lesional human and animal skin have been accepted: M. dermatis, M. japonica, M. yamatoensis, M. nana, M. caprae, M. equina, and M. cuniculi. However, forthcoming multidisciplinary research is expected to show the etiopathological relationships between these new species and skin diseases. Hitherto, basic and clinical research has established etiological links between Malassezia yeasts, pityriasis versicolor, and sepsis of neonates and immunocompromised individuals. Their role in aggravating seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff, folliculitis, and onychomycosis, though often supported by histopathological evidence and favorable antifungal therapeutic outcomes, remains under investigation. A close association between skin and Malassezia IgE binding allergens in atopic eczema has been shown, while laboratory data support a role in psoriasis exacerbations. Finally, metabolomic research resulted in the proposal of a hypothesis on the contribution of Malassezia-synthesized aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands to basal cell carcinoma through UV radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:22232373

  13. Nail psoriasis in an adult successfully treated with a series of herbal skin care products family – a case report.

    PubMed

    Tirant, M; Hercogovấ, J; Fioranelli, M; Gianfaldoni, S; Chokoeva, A A; Tchernev, G; Wollina, U; Novotny, F; Roccia, M G; Maximov, G K; França, K; Lotti, T

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory dermatosis that causes significant distress and morbidity. Approximately 50% of patients with cutaneous psoriasis and 90% of patients with psoriatic arthritis demonstrate nail involvement of their psoriasis. Left untreated, nail psoriasis may progress to debilitating nail disease that leads to not only impairment of function but also on quality of life. We report the case of a 50-year-old male patient with recalcitrant nail dystrophies on the fingers since the age of 40, who responded successfully to Dr. Michaels® product family. The patient had a 35-year history of plaque psoriasis localised on the scalp, ears, groin, limbs, and trunk and with psoriatic arthritis. The nail symptoms consisted of onycholysis, onychomycosis, leukonychia, transverse grooves, nail plate crumbling and paronychia of the periungal skin. This case represents the efficacy and safety of the Dr. Michaels® (Soratinex® and Nailinex®) product family with successful resolution of nail dystrophies and surrounding paronychia with no reported adverse events. PMID:27498654

  14. [Treatment of onychomycoses].

    PubMed

    Halmy, Klára

    2003-10-12

    The author reviews the prevalence of onychomycoses and the factors influencing it. Among the precipitating factors, age and various predisposing diseases play a role in the development of the disease play a role in the development of the disease. The problem affects the toenails more frequently than the fingernails. Distal subungual onychomycosis caused by dermatophytons is most often seen among the various types of the disease. Yeasts and moulds mainly act as contaminants. New diagnostic methods facilitate more precise diagnosis but they cannot replace basic mycological investigations. Orally administered antifungal agents have appeared in the foreground of treatment. Among them fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafin derivatives can safely be applied in combination with certain cauterants. Each of the three agents are effective in approximately 70-80% of cases, especially when applied on fingernails. Combined therapy, such as the application of oral antimycotics and antifungal lacquerers or oral treatment accompanied by the surgical, laser or chemical removal of the affected nail regions, can improve the results. Surviving fungal residues in the substance of the nail may restart the disease. Relapse may also be attributed to neglecting the desinfection of shoes. When choosing the drugs, drug interaction should also be considered. The above three oral antimycotics have few (1-20%) side effects, gastrointestinal ones being the most common among them. A transitory elevation in hepatic enzyme levels may sometimes occur but the changes go back to normal after treatment is over.

  15. Ciclopirox: recent nonclinical and clinical data relevant to its use as a topical antimycotic agent.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Alessandro; Monti, Daniela; Togni, Giuseppe; Mailland, Federico

    2010-11-12

    developed for fungal skin infections and vaginal candidiasis, and is currently well established in these indications. More recently, the drug has been clinically investigated in seborrhoeic dermatitis and onychomycosis, showing good efficacy and excellent tolerability. Emphasis in this review is given to a ciclopirox medicated nail lacquer, which is based on an original technology and has superior properties in terms of its affinity to keratin and nail permeation. It has been found to have superior efficacy and safety to another commercially available formulation in the treatment of onychomycosis. The safety features of ciclopirox are well known. The topical drug is devoid of systemic adverse reactions. Mild local reactions characterized by a burning sensation of the skin, irritation, redness, pain or pruritus, generally in less than 5% of treated patients, can be observed following skin and vaginal application. With nail application, the most common adverse event is the appearance of mild erythema in 5% of the treated population. As a general conclusion, although less effective than some oral antimycotic agents in various indications, ciclopirox compares very well in terms of the benefit/risk ratio due to its excellent tolerability and complete absence of serious adverse effects.

  16. Genotyping of Fusarium Isolates from Onychomycoses in Colombia: Detection of Two New Species Within the Fusarium solani Species Complex and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Suarez, Marcela; Cano-Lira, José Francisco; de García, María Caridad Cepero; Sopo, Leticia; De Bedout, Catalina; Cano, Luz Elena; García, Ana María; Motta, Adriana; Amézquita, Adolfo; Cárdenas, Martha; Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Guarro, Josep; Restrepo, Silvia; Celis, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Fusariosis have been increasing in Colombia in recent years, but its epidemiology is poorly known. We have morphologically and molecularly characterized 89 isolates of Fusarium obtained between 2010 and 2012 in the cities of Bogotá and Medellín. Using a multi-locus sequence analysis of rDNA internal transcribed spacer, a fragment of the translation elongation factor 1-alpha (Tef-1α) and of the RNA-dependent polymerase subunit II (Rpb2) genes, we identified the phylogenetic species and circulating haplotypes. Since most of the isolates studied were from onychomycoses (nearly 90 %), we carried out an epidemiological study to determine the risk factors associated with such infections. Five phylogenetic species of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), i.e., F. falciforme, F. keratoplasticum, F. lichenicola, F. petroliphilum, and FSSC 6 as well as two of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC), i.e., FOSC 3 and FOSC 4, were identified. The most prevalent species were FOSC 3 (38.2%) followed by F. keratoplasticum (33.7%). In addition, our isolates were distributed into 23 haplotypes (14 into FOSC and nine into FSSC). Two of the FSSC phylogenetic species and two haplotypes of FSSC were not described before. Our results demonstrate that recipients of pedicure treatments have a lower probability of acquiring onychomycosis than those not receiving such treatments. The antifungal susceptibility of all the isolates to five clinically available agents showed that amphotericin B was the most active drug, while the azoles exhibited lower in vitro activity. PMID:26943726

  17. Sporothrix chilensis sp. nov. (Ascomycota: Ophiostomatales), a soil-borne agent of human sporotrichosis with mild-pathogenic potential to mammals.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Cruz Choappa, Rodrigo; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2016-02-01

    A combination of phylogeny, evolution, morphologies and ecologies has enabled major advances in understanding the taxonomy of Sporothrix species, including members exhibiting distinct lifestyles such as saprobes, human/animal pathogens, and insect symbionts. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS1/2 + 5.8s sequences split Sporothrix genus in two well-defined groups with dissimilar ecologies. Species embedded in the Sporothrix schenckii complex are frequently agents of human and animal sporotrichosis, and some of these are responsible for large sapronoses and zoonoses around the warmer temperate regions of the world. At the other extreme, basal saprophytic species evolved in association with decaying wood and soil, and are rarely found to cause human disease. We propose to create a new taxa, Sporothrix chilensis sp. nov., to accommodate strains collected from a clinical case of onychomycosis as well as from environmental origins in Chile. Multigene analyses based on ITS1/2 + 5.8s region, beta-tubulin, calmodulin and translation elongation factor 1α revealed that S. chilensis is a member of the Sporothrix pallida complex, and the nearest taxon is Sporothrix mexicana, a rare soil-borne species, non-pathogenic to humans. The ITS region serves as a primary barcode marker, while each one of the protein-coding loci easily recognized species boundaries providing sufficient information for species identification. A disseminated model of murine sporotrichosis revealed a mild-pathogenic potential, with lung invasion. Although S. chilensis is not a primary pathogen, accidental infection may have an impact in the immunosuppressed population. With the introduction of distinct species with similar routes of transmission but different virulence, identification of Sporothrix agents at the species level is mandatory. PMID:26781380

  18. Sporothrix chilensis sp. nov. (Ascomycota: Ophiostomatales), a soil-borne agent of human sporotrichosis with mild-pathogenic potential to mammals.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Cruz Choappa, Rodrigo; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2016-02-01

    A combination of phylogeny, evolution, morphologies and ecologies has enabled major advances in understanding the taxonomy of Sporothrix species, including members exhibiting distinct lifestyles such as saprobes, human/animal pathogens, and insect symbionts. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS1/2 + 5.8s sequences split Sporothrix genus in two well-defined groups with dissimilar ecologies. Species embedded in the Sporothrix schenckii complex are frequently agents of human and animal sporotrichosis, and some of these are responsible for large sapronoses and zoonoses around the warmer temperate regions of the world. At the other extreme, basal saprophytic species evolved in association with decaying wood and soil, and are rarely found to cause human disease. We propose to create a new taxa, Sporothrix chilensis sp. nov., to accommodate strains collected from a clinical case of onychomycosis as well as from environmental origins in Chile. Multigene analyses based on ITS1/2 + 5.8s region, beta-tubulin, calmodulin and translation elongation factor 1α revealed that S. chilensis is a member of the Sporothrix pallida complex, and the nearest taxon is Sporothrix mexicana, a rare soil-borne species, non-pathogenic to humans. The ITS region serves as a primary barcode marker, while each one of the protein-coding loci easily recognized species boundaries providing sufficient information for species identification. A disseminated model of murine sporotrichosis revealed a mild-pathogenic potential, with lung invasion. Although S. chilensis is not a primary pathogen, accidental infection may have an impact in the immunosuppressed population. With the introduction of distinct species with similar routes of transmission but different virulence, identification of Sporothrix agents at the species level is mandatory.

  19. Genotyping of Fusarium Isolates from Onychomycoses in Colombia: Detection of Two New Species Within the Fusarium solani Species Complex and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Suarez, Marcela; Cano-Lira, José Francisco; de García, María Caridad Cepero; Sopo, Leticia; De Bedout, Catalina; Cano, Luz Elena; García, Ana María; Motta, Adriana; Amézquita, Adolfo; Cárdenas, Martha; Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Guarro, Josep; Restrepo, Silvia; Celis, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Fusariosis have been increasing in Colombia in recent years, but its epidemiology is poorly known. We have morphologically and molecularly characterized 89 isolates of Fusarium obtained between 2010 and 2012 in the cities of Bogotá and Medellín. Using a multi-locus sequence analysis of rDNA internal transcribed spacer, a fragment of the translation elongation factor 1-alpha (Tef-1α) and of the RNA-dependent polymerase subunit II (Rpb2) genes, we identified the phylogenetic species and circulating haplotypes. Since most of the isolates studied were from onychomycoses (nearly 90 %), we carried out an epidemiological study to determine the risk factors associated with such infections. Five phylogenetic species of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), i.e., F. falciforme, F. keratoplasticum, F. lichenicola, F. petroliphilum, and FSSC 6 as well as two of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC), i.e., FOSC 3 and FOSC 4, were identified. The most prevalent species were FOSC 3 (38.2%) followed by F. keratoplasticum (33.7%). In addition, our isolates were distributed into 23 haplotypes (14 into FOSC and nine into FSSC). Two of the FSSC phylogenetic species and two haplotypes of FSSC were not described before. Our results demonstrate that recipients of pedicure treatments have a lower probability of acquiring onychomycosis than those not receiving such treatments. The antifungal susceptibility of all the isolates to five clinically available agents showed that amphotericin B was the most active drug, while the azoles exhibited lower in vitro activity.

  20. In vitro permeation and penetration of ciclopirox olamine from poloxamer 407-based formulations--comparison of isolated human stratum corneum, bovine hoof plates and keratin films.

    PubMed

    Täuber, Anja; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2015-07-15

    Fungal infections of skin and/or nails are common diseases resulting in major challenges in topical treatment. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to develop a dermal formulation targeting both tinea pedis and onychomycosis. The antifungal agent ciclopirox olamine (CPX) was incorporated into a variety of poloxamer 407-based formulations and analysed regarding its in vitro permeation and penetration behaviour across keratin films (KF) and bovine hoof plates as artificial nail models as well as human stratum corneum (SC). The novel compositions consisted of poloxamer 407 (P407), double distilled water, propylene glycol, isopropyl alcohol and medium chain triglycerides in given ratios. All the formulations exhibited semi-solid to liquid consistencies and were isotropic under a polarising microscope. Upon CPX incorporation, the formulations became softer and the yield stresses decreased. Increasing temperature led to higher complex viscosities. Permeation coefficients (P) from P407-based formulations across KF and bovine hoof plates and normalised retained CPX amounts in KF and bovine hoof plates were higher in comparison to the nail lacquer Ciclopoli(®) as a marketed reference. Data of KF and bovine hoof plates were comparable, therefore KF are suggested as artificial nail model for in vitro permeation studies besides the well-accepted nail model of bovine hoof plates. With regard to SC permeation, several liquid formulations indicated higher P in comparison to the references Ciclopoli(®) and the antimycotic skin formulation Selergo(®) 1% cream, while the normalised retained API amounts in SC were higher in comparison with Selergo(®) 1% cream or in the same range as Ciclopoli(®). PMID:25895717

  1. 21-year retrospective study of the prevalence of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis in patients suspected of superficial mycoses

    PubMed Central

    Macura, Anna B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the genus Scopulariopsis, Scopulariopsis brevicaulis is the most common aetiological agent of infections in humans. It usually affects nails and is one of the commonest moulds associated with onychomycoses. Other forms of infections (skin, subcutaneous, deep tissues, and disseminated infections) have also been described. Aim To examine the prevalence of S. brevicaulis in clinical materials obtained from patients suspected of keratinized tissues mycoses. Material and methods The analysis of the prevalence of S. brevicaulis in clinical specimens was based on mycological test's results carried out for patients who were referred with a suspicion of superficial mycoses to the Department of Mycology, Chair of Microbiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College from 1992 till 2012. Results In the years 1992–2012 16,815 clinical samples (nail scrapings, nail swabs, skin scrapings, skin swabs, hair) were collected. Pathogenic fungi were detected in 7193 samples and S. brevicaulis was present in 255 (3.5%). The prevalence of S. brevicaulis in males and females was comparable. The species was most often isolated from toenails (80%), both from males and females. In the analysed period we observed a decrease in the prevalence of S. brevicaulis. In most cases (60%) S. brevicaulis occurred alone in 40% of S. brevicaulis positive cultures, other fungi were also isolated. The fungi most frequently isolated with S. brevicaulis were Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, Penicillium sp., Candida sp., and Aspergillus sp. Conclusions Scopulariopsis brevicaulis is not a common cause of superficial fungal infections of keratinized tissues, but is a typical mould associated with toenail onychomycosis. A proper identification of this species in onychomycoses is essential for the implementation of effective antifungal therapy. PMID:26161060

  2. [Nail susceptibility to fungal infection in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes under long term poor glycaemia control].

    PubMed

    Macura, Anna B; Gasińska, Teresa; Pawlik, Bolesław; Obłoza, Aneta

    2007-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a common disorder in adults. Its prevalence increases also in diabetics. The objective of the study was: 1) evaluation of finger and toe nail susceptibility to Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes infection in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes with long term glycaemia under poor control as compared with healthy persons, and 2) checking whether or not various aetiology of type 1 and type 2 diabetes may influence the intensity of fungal nail infection. The materials comprised finger and toe nails sampled from 26 patients with type 1 diabetes (20 females and 6 males at average age 51 +/- 10 years), 25 patients with type 2 diabetes (17 females and 8 males at average age 58 +/- 4 years). Twenty two healthy volunteers (18 females and 4 males at average age 47 +/- 14 years) served as controls. All of the diabetics (except one with type 1 diabetes and four with type 2 diabetes) had increased fasting glycaemia; moreover, all of them had poor controlled long term glycaemia because the concentration of glycated haemoglobin HbAlc exceeded 7.5%. The patients with type 1 diabetes were treated with insulin while those with type 2 diabetes with diet only (one person), with gliclazide (sixteen persons), with glimepirid (five persons), and with metformin (four persons). Enhanced fingernail susceptibility to Candida albicans infection was detected in 38.5% of the patients with type 1 diabetes, in 28% of those with type 2 diabetes, and in 22.7% of the controls. Intensive toenail infection was found in 34.6%, 20%, and 22.7% respectively. Enhanced fingernail susceptibility to Trichophyton mentagrophytes infection was found in 30.8% of the patients with type 1 diabetes, in 48% of those with type 2 diabetes, and in 4.54% of the controls while intensive toenail infection in 15.4%, 20%, and 18,2% respectively. Statistical analysis gave evidence of statistically significant higher susceptibility to infection of finger and toe nails with T. mentagrophytes

  3. Skin conditions in figure skaters, ice-hockey players and speed skaters: part II - cold-induced, infectious and inflammatory dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Tlougan, Brook E; Mancini, Anthony J; Mandell, Jenny A; Cohen, David E; Sanchez, Miguel R

    2011-11-01

    Participation in ice-skating sports, particularly figure skating, ice hockey and speed skating, has increased in recent years. Competitive athletes in these sports experience a range of dermatological injuries related to mechanical factors: exposure to cold temperatures, infectious agents and inflammation. Part I of this two part review discussed the mechanical dermatoses affecting ice-skating athletes that result from friction, pressure, and chronic irritation related to athletic equipment and contact with surfaces. Here, in Part II, we review the cold-induced, infectious and inflammatory skin conditions observed in ice-skating athletes. Cold-induced dermatoses experienced by ice-skating athletes result from specific physiological effects of cold exposure on the skin. These conditions include physiological livedo reticularis, chilblains (pernio), Raynaud phenomenon, cold panniculitis, frostnip and frostbite. Frostbite, that is the literal freezing of tissue, occurs with specific symptoms that progress in a stepwise fashion, starting with frostnip. Treatment involves gradual forms of rewarming and the use of friction massages and pain medications as needed. Calcium channel blockers, including nifedipine, are the mainstay of pharmacological therapy for the major nonfreezing cold-induced dermatoses including chilblains and Raynaud phenomenon. Raynaud phenomenon, a vasculopathy involving recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes in response to cold, is especially common in figure skaters. Protective clothing and insulation, avoidance of smoking and vasoconstrictive medications, maintaining a dry environment around the skin, cold avoidance when possible as well as certain physical manoeuvres that promote vasodilation are useful preventative measures. Infectious conditions most often seen in ice-skating athletes include tinea pedis, onychomycosis, pitted keratolysis, warts and folliculitis. Awareness, prompt treatment and the use of preventative measures are

  4. Fungal Planet description sheets: 400-468.

    PubMed

    Crous, P W; Wingfield, M J; Richardson, D M; Le Roux, J J; Strasberg, D; Edwards, J; Roets, F; Hubka, V; Taylor, P W J; Heykoop, M; Martín, M P; Moreno, G; Sutton, D A; Wiederhold, N P; Barnes, C W; Carlavilla, J R; Gené, J; Giraldo, A; Guarnaccia, V; Guarro, J; Hernández-Restrepo, M; Kolařík, M; Manjón, J L; Pascoe, I G; Popov, E S; Sandoval-Denis, M; Woudenberg, J H C; Acharya, K; Alexandrova, A V; Alvarado, P; Barbosa, R N; Baseia, I G; Blanchette, R A; Boekhout, T; Burgess, T I; Cano-Lira, J F; Čmoková, A; Dimitrov, R A; Dyakov, M Yu; Dueñas, M; Dutta, A K; Esteve-Raventós, F; Fedosova, A G; Fournier, J; Gamboa, P; Gouliamova, D E; Grebenc, T; Groenewald, M; Hanse, B; Hardy, G E St J; Held, B W; Jurjević, Ž; Kaewgrajang, T; Latha, K P D; Lombard, L; Luangsa-Ard, J J; Lysková, P; Mallátová, N; Manimohan, P; Miller, A N; Mirabolfathy, M; Morozova, O V; Obodai, M; Oliveira, N T; Ordóñez, M E; Otto, E C; Paloi, S; Peterson, S W; Phosri, C; Roux, J; Salazar, W A; Sánchez, A; Sarria, G A; Shin, H-D; Silva, B D B; Silva, G A; Smith, M Th; Souza-Motta, C M; Stchigel, A M; Stoilova-Disheva, M M; Sulzbacher, M A; Telleria, M T; Toapanta, C; Traba, J M; Valenzuela-Lopez, N; Watling, R; Groenewald, J Z

    2016-06-01

    ), Ochroconis dracaenae (on Dracaena reflexa), Rasamsonia columbiensis (air of a hotel conference room), Paecilomyces tabacinus (on Nicotiana tabacum), Toxicocladosporium hominis (from human broncoalveolar lavage fluid), Nothophoma macrospora (from respiratory secretion of a patient with pneumonia), and Penidiellopsis radicularis (incl. Penidiellopsis gen. nov.) from a human nail. Novel taxa described from Malaysia include Prosopidicola albizziae (on Albizzia falcataria), Proxipyricularia asari (on Asarum sp.), Diaporthe passifloricola (on Passiflora foetida), Paramycoleptodiscus albizziae (incl. Paramycoleptodiscus gen. nov.) on Albizzia falcataria, and Malaysiasca phaii (incl. Malaysiasca gen. nov.) on Phaius reflexipetalus. Two species are newly described from human patients in the Czech Republic, namely Microascus longicollis (from toenails of patient with suspected onychomycosis), and Chrysosporium echinulatum (from sole skin of patient). Furthermore, Alternaria quercicola is described on leaves of Quercus brantii (Iran), Stemphylium beticola on leaves of Beta vulgaris (The Netherlands), Scleroderma capeverdeanum on soil (Cape Verde Islands), Scleroderma dunensis on soil, and Blastobotrys meliponae from bee honey (Brazil), Ganoderma mbrekobenum on angiosperms (Ghana), Geoglossum raitviirii and Entoloma kruticianum on soil (Russia), Priceomyces vitoshaensis on Pterostichus melas (Carabidae) (Bulgaria) is the only one for which the family is listed, Ganoderma ecuadoriense on decaying wood (Ecuador), Thyrostroma cornicola on Cornus officinalis (Korea), Cercophora vinosa on decorticated branch of Salix sp. (France), Coprinus pinetorum, Coprinus littoralis and Xerocomellus poederi on soil (Spain). Two new genera from Colombia include Helminthosporiella and Uwemyces on leaves of Elaeis oleifera. Two species are described from India, namely Russula intervenosa (ectomycorrhizal with Shorea robusta), and Crinipellis odorata (on bark of Mytragyna parviflora). Novelties from Thailand

  5. Fungal Planet description sheets: 400-468.

    PubMed

    Crous, P W; Wingfield, M J; Richardson, D M; Le Roux, J J; Strasberg, D; Edwards, J; Roets, F; Hubka, V; Taylor, P W J; Heykoop, M; Martín, M P; Moreno, G; Sutton, D A; Wiederhold, N P; Barnes, C W; Carlavilla, J R; Gené, J; Giraldo, A; Guarnaccia, V; Guarro, J; Hernández-Restrepo, M; Kolařík, M; Manjón, J L; Pascoe, I G; Popov, E S; Sandoval-Denis, M; Woudenberg, J H C; Acharya, K; Alexandrova, A V; Alvarado, P; Barbosa, R N; Baseia, I G; Blanchette, R A; Boekhout, T; Burgess, T I; Cano-Lira, J F; Čmoková, A; Dimitrov, R A; Dyakov, M Yu; Dueñas, M; Dutta, A K; Esteve-Raventós, F; Fedosova, A G; Fournier, J; Gamboa, P; Gouliamova, D E; Grebenc, T; Groenewald, M; Hanse, B; Hardy, G E St J; Held, B W; Jurjević, Ž; Kaewgrajang, T; Latha, K P D; Lombard, L; Luangsa-Ard, J J; Lysková, P; Mallátová, N; Manimohan, P; Miller, A N; Mirabolfathy, M; Morozova, O V; Obodai, M; Oliveira, N T; Ordóñez, M E; Otto, E C; Paloi, S; Peterson, S W; Phosri, C; Roux, J; Salazar, W A; Sánchez, A; Sarria, G A; Shin, H-D; Silva, B D B; Silva, G A; Smith, M Th; Souza-Motta, C M; Stchigel, A M; Stoilova-Disheva, M M; Sulzbacher, M A; Telleria, M T; Toapanta, C; Traba, J M; Valenzuela-Lopez, N; Watling, R; Groenewald, J Z

    2016-06-01

    ), Ochroconis dracaenae (on Dracaena reflexa), Rasamsonia columbiensis (air of a hotel conference room), Paecilomyces tabacinus (on Nicotiana tabacum), Toxicocladosporium hominis (from human broncoalveolar lavage fluid), Nothophoma macrospora (from respiratory secretion of a patient with pneumonia), and Penidiellopsis radicularis (incl. Penidiellopsis gen. nov.) from a human nail. Novel taxa described from Malaysia include Prosopidicola albizziae (on Albizzia falcataria), Proxipyricularia asari (on Asarum sp.), Diaporthe passifloricola (on Passiflora foetida), Paramycoleptodiscus albizziae (incl. Paramycoleptodiscus gen. nov.) on Albizzia falcataria, and Malaysiasca phaii (incl. Malaysiasca gen. nov.) on Phaius reflexipetalus. Two species are newly described from human patients in the Czech Republic, namely Microascus longicollis (from toenails of patient with suspected onychomycosis), and Chrysosporium echinulatum (from sole skin of patient). Furthermore, Alternaria quercicola is described on leaves of Quercus brantii (Iran), Stemphylium beticola on leaves of Beta vulgaris (The Netherlands), Scleroderma capeverdeanum on soil (Cape Verde Islands), Scleroderma dunensis on soil, and Blastobotrys meliponae from bee honey (Brazil), Ganoderma mbrekobenum on angiosperms (Ghana), Geoglossum raitviirii and Entoloma kruticianum on soil (Russia), Priceomyces vitoshaensis on Pterostichus melas (Carabidae) (Bulgaria) is the only one for which the family is listed, Ganoderma ecuadoriense on decaying wood (Ecuador), Thyrostroma cornicola on Cornus officinalis (Korea), Cercophora vinosa on decorticated branch of Salix sp. (France), Coprinus pinetorum, Coprinus littoralis and Xerocomellus poederi on soil (Spain). Two new genera from Colombia include Helminthosporiella and Uwemyces on leaves of Elaeis oleifera. Two species are described from India, namely Russula intervenosa (ectomycorrhizal with Shorea robusta), and Crinipellis odorata (on bark of Mytragyna parviflora). Novelties from Thailand