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Sample records for open bps wall

  1. BPS domain walls in {N}=4 supergravity and dual flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassani, Davide; Dall'Agata, Gianguido; Faedo, Anton F.

    2013-03-01

    We establish the conditions for supersymmetric domain wall solutions to {N}=4 gauged supergravity in five dimensions. These read as BPS first-order equations for the warp factor and the scalar fields, driven by a superpotential and supplemented by a set of constraints that we specify in detail. Then we apply our results to certain consistent truncations of IIB supergravity, thus exploring their dual field theory renormalization group flows. We find a universal flow deforming superconformal theories on D3-branes at Calabi-Yau cones. Moreover, we obtain a superpotential for the solution corresponding to the baryonic branch of the Klebanov-Strassler theory, as well as the superpotential for the flow describing D3 and wrapped D5-branes on the resolved conifold.

  2. Domain Walls, near-BPS Bubbles and Probabilities in the Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Ceresole, Anna; Dall'Agata, Gianguido; Giryavets, Alexander; Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2006-06-27

    We develop a theory of static BPS domain walls in stringy landscape and present a large family of BPS walls interpolating between different supersymmetric vacua. Examples include KKLT models, STU models, type IIB multiple flux vacua, and models with several Minkowski and AdS vacua. After the uplifting, some of the vacua become dS, whereas some others remain AdS. The near-BPS walls separating these vacua may be seen as bubble walls in the theory of vacuum decay. As an outcome of our investigation of the BPS walls, we found that the decay rate of dS vacua to a collapsing space with a negative vacuum energy can be quite large. The parts of space that experience a decay to a collapsing space, or to a Minkowski vacuum, never return back to dS space. The channels of irreversible vacuum decay serve as sinks for the probability flow. The existence of such sinks is a distinguishing feature of the landscape. We show that it strongly affects the probability distributions in string cosmology.

  3. Exact BPS domain walls at finite gauge coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Filip

    2017-01-01

    Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield solitons in models with spontaneously broken gauge symmetry have been intensively studied at the infinite gauge coupling limit, where the governing equation-the so-called master equation-is exactly solvable. Except for a handful of special solutions, the standing impression is that analytic results at finite coupling are generally unavailable. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate, using domain walls in Abelian-Higgs models as the simplest example, that exact solitons at finite gauge coupling can be readily obtained if the number of Higgs fields (N) is large enough. In particular, we present a family of exact solutions, describing N domain walls at arbitrary positions in models with at least N≥2N+1. We have also found that adding together any pair of solutions can produce a new exact solution if the combined tension is below a certain limit.

  4. BPS States, Crystals, and Matrices

    DOE PAGES

    Sułkowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We review free fermion, melting crystal, and matrix model representations of wall-crossing phenomena on local, toric Calabi-Yau manifolds. We consider both unrefined and refined BPS counting of closed BPS states involving D2- and D0-branes bound to a D6-brane, as well as open BPS states involving open D2-branes ending on an additional D4-brane. Appropriate limit of these constructions provides, among the others, matrix model representation of refined and unrefined topological string amplitudes.

  5. The structure of BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro

    In this thesis we develop and apply novel techniques for analyzing BPS spectra of supersymmetric quantum field theories of class S. By a combination of wall-crossing, spectral networks and quiver methods we explore the BPS spectra of higher rank four-dimensional N = 2 super Yang-Mills, uncovering surprising new phenomena. Focusing on the SU(3) case, we prove the existence of wild BPS spectra in field theory, featuring BPS states of higher spin whose degeneracies grow exponentially with the energy. The occurrence of wild BPS states is surprising because it appears to be in tension with physical expectations on the behavior of the entropy as a function of the energy scale. The solution to this puzzle comes from realizing that the size of wild BPS states grows rapidly with their mass, and carefully analyzing the volume-dependence of the entropy of BPS states. We also find some interesting structures underlying wild BPS spectra, such as a Regge-like relation between the maximal spin of a BPS multiplet and the square of its mass, and the existence of a universal asymptotic distribution of spin-j irreps within a multiplet of given charge. We also extend the spectral networks construction by introducing a refinement in the topological classification of 2d-4d BPS states, and identifying their spin with a topological invariant known as the "writhe of soliton paths". A careful analysis of the 2d-4d wall-crossing behavior of this refined data reveals that it is described by motivic Kontsevich-Soibelman transformations, controlled by the Protected Spin Character, a protected deformation of the BPS index encoding the spin of BPS states. Our construction opens the way for the systematic study of refined BPS spectra in class S theories. We apply it to several examples, including ones featuring wild BPS spectra, where we find an interesting relation between spectral networks and certain functional equations. For class S theories of A 1 type, we derive an alternative technique for

  6. No more walls! A tale of modularity, symmetry, and wall crossing for 1/4 BPS dyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquette, Natalie M.; Volpato, Roberto; Zimet, Max

    2017-05-01

    We determine the generating functions of 1/4 BPS dyons in a class of 4d N = 4 string vacua arising as CHL orbifolds of K3 × T 2, a classification of which has been recently completed. We show that all such generating functions obey some simple physical consistency conditions that are very often sufficient to fix them uniquely. The main constraint we impose is the absence of unphysical walls of marginal stability: discontinuities of 1/4 BPS degeneracies can only occur when 1/4 BPS dyons decay into pairs of 1/2 BPS states. Formally, these generating functions in spacetime can be described as multiplicative lifts of certain supersymmetric indices (twining genera) on the worldsheet of the corresponding nonlinear sigma model on K3. As a consequence, our procedure also leads to an explicit derivation of almost all of these twining genera. The worldsheet indices singled out in this way match precisely a set of functions of interest in moonshine, as predicted by a recent conjecture.

  7. Wall Crossing of BPS States on the Conifold from Seiberg Duality and Pyramid Partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Wu-Yen; Jafferis, Daniel Louis

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we study the relation between pyramid partitions with a general empty room configuration (ERC) and the BPS states of D-branes on the resolved conifold. We find that the generating function for pyramid partitions with a length n ERC is exactly the same as the D6/D2/D0 BPS partition function on the resolved conifold in particular Kähler chambers. We define a new type of pyramid partition with a finite ERC that counts the BPS degeneracies in certain other chambers. The D6/D2/D0 partition functions in different chambers were obtained by applying the wall crossing formula. On the other hand, the pyramid partitions describe T 3 fixed points of the moduli space of a quiver quantum mechanics. This quiver arises after we apply Seiberg dualities to the D6/D2/D0 system on the conifold and choose a particular set of FI parameters. The arrow structure of the dual quiver is confirmed by computation of the Ext group between the sheaves. We show that the superpotential and the stability condition of the dual quiver with this choice of the FI parameters give rise to the rules specifying pyramid partitions with length n ERC.

  8. Liposomal Bladder Instillations for IC/BPS: an Open-Label Clinical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Kenneth M; Hasenau, Deborah; Killinger, Kim A; Chancellor, Michael B; Anthony, Michele; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intravesical instillation of liposomes is a potentially new therapeutic option for subjects with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS). The aim of this study was to explore the safety and clinical outcomes of 4 weekly instillations of sphingomyelin liposomes in an open-label cohort of subjects with IC/BPS. Methods A total of fourteen symptomatic IC/BPS subjects were treated with intravesical liposomes once a week for 4 weeks. Safety measurements included lab specimen collection, vital signs, post void residual (PVR), and assessment of adverse events (AEs). Efficacy measurements included pain visual analog scales (VAS), voiding diaries, global response assessments (GRAs), and O'Leary-Sant Interstitial Cystitis Symptom and Problem Indices (ICSI and ICPI). Results No treatment-related adverse events (AE) were reported at any time over the course of the study. Urgency VAS scores significantly decreased at 4 weeks (p=0.0029) and 8 weeks (p=0.0112) post-treatment. Pain VAS scores significantly decreased at 4 weeks post-treatment (p=0.0073). Combined ICSI and ICPI scores improved significantly at 4 weeks and 8 weeks (p=0.002 for both time points) post-treatment. Responses to GRA showed improvement at 4 weeks post- instillation. No significant decrease in urinary frequency was found. Conclusion Sphingomyelin liposome instillations were well tolerated in subjects with IC/BPS with no AEs attributed to the test article. Treatment was associated with improvements in pain, urinary urgency, and overall symptom scores. Placebo controlled clinical trials are needed to assess this potential therapy for IC/BPS. PMID:25209396

  9. BPS graphs: from spectral networks to BPS quivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabella, Maxime; Longhi, Pietro; Park, Chan Y.; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2017-07-01

    We define "BPS graphs" on punctured Riemann surfaces associated with A N -1 theories of class S. BPS graphs provide a bridge between two powerful frameworks for studying the spectrum of BPS states: spectral networks and BPS quivers. They arise from degenerate spectral networks at maximal intersections of walls of marginal stability on the Coulomb branch. While the BPS spectrum is ill-defined at such intersections, a BPS graph captures a useful basis of elementary BPS states. The topology of a BPS graph encodes a BPS quiver, even for higher-rank theories and for theories with certain partial punctures. BPS graphs lead to a geometric realization of the combinatorics of Fock-Goncharov N - triangulations and generalize them in several ways.

  10. BPS states in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyash, Evgeny

    In this thesis we discuss a number of interesting and important properties of BPS states in string theory. We study wall-crossing behavior of BPS states at large volume limit and implications of it for the OSV conjecture. We find that the weak topological coupling OSV conjecture can be true at most in a special chamber of the Kahler cone. We also clarify an interesting puzzle arising in the description of BPS states on the Higgs branch of supersymmetic quantum mechanics. Using methods of toric geometry we compute Hilbert spaces of BPS states on the compactified Higgs branch and arrive at completely consistent picture of spatial Spin(3) structure of those spaces. We introduce new kinds of walls, called Bound State Transformation(BST) walls, in the moduli space across which the nature of BPS bound states changes but the index remains continuous. These walls are necessary to explain the continuity of BPS index. BPS states can undergo recombination, conjugation or hybrids of the two when crossing a BST wall. Conjugation phenomenon happens near singularities in the moduli space and we relate massless spectra of BPS states at such singularities to monodromies around them. In cases when massless vector BPS particles are present we find new constraints on the spectrum and in particular predict the existence of magnetic monopoles becoming massless at such singularities. We give a simple physical derivation of the Kontsevich-Soibelman wall-crossing formula. Considering galaxy-like configurations of BPS particles with a central supermassive black hole with a number of stellar BPS systems around it we derive a consistency requirement on the partition function of such BPS galaxies. This requirement turns out to be nothing but Kontsevich-Soibelman wall-crossing formula. Our approach gives a generalization of the formula for the case when massless BPS particles are present.

  11. Multi-scalar tachyon potential on non-BPS domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, F. A.; Jesuíno, H. S.

    2010-07-01

    We have considered the multi-scalar and multi-tachyon fields living on a 3d domain wall embedded in a 5d dimensional Minkowski spacetime. The effective action for such a domain wall can be found by integrating out the normal m odes as vibrating modes around the domain wall solution of a truncated 5d supergravity action. The multi-scalar tachyon potential is good enough to modeling assisted inflation scenario with multi-tachyon fields. The tachyon condensation is also briefly addressed.

  12. BpsR modulates Bordetella biofilm formation by negatively regulating the expression of the Bps polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Conover, Matt S; Redfern, Crystal J; Ganguly, Tridib; Sukumar, Neelima; Sloan, Gina; Mishra, Meenu; Deora, Rajendar

    2012-01-01

    Bordetella bacteria are Gram-negative respiratory pathogens of animals, birds, and humans. A hallmark feature of some Bordetella species is their ability to efficiently survive in the respiratory tract even after vaccination. Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis form biofilms on abiotic surfaces and in the mouse respiratory tract. The Bps exopolysaccharide is one of the critical determinants for biofilm formation and the survival of Bordetella in the murine respiratory tract. In order to gain a better understanding of regulation of biofilm formation, we sought to study the mechanism by which Bps expression is controlled in Bordetella. Expression of bpsABCD (bpsA-D) is elevated in biofilms compared with levels in planktonically grown cells. We found that bpsA-D is expressed independently of BvgAS. Subsequently, we identified an open reading frame (ORF), BB1771 (designated here bpsR), that is located upstream of and in the opposite orientation to the bpsA-D locus. BpsR is homologous to the MarR family of transcriptional regulators. Measurement of bpsA and bpsD transcripts and the Bps polysaccharide levels from the wild-type and the ΔbpsR strains suggested that BpsR functions as a repressor. Consistent with enhanced production of Bps, the bpsR mutant displayed considerably more structured biofilms. We mapped the bpsA-D promoter region and showed that purified BpsR protein specifically bound to the bpsA-D promoter. Our results provide mechanistic insights into the regulatory strategy employed by Bordetella for control of the production of the Bps polysaccharide and biofilm formation.

  13. BpsR Modulates Bordetella Biofilm Formation by Negatively Regulating the Expression of the Bps Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Conover, Matt S.; Redfern, Crystal J.; Ganguly, Tridib; Sukumar, Neelima; Sloan, Gina; Mishra, Meenu

    2012-01-01

    Bordetella bacteria are Gram-negative respiratory pathogens of animals, birds, and humans. A hallmark feature of some Bordetella species is their ability to efficiently survive in the respiratory tract even after vaccination. Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis form biofilms on abiotic surfaces and in the mouse respiratory tract. The Bps exopolysaccharide is one of the critical determinants for biofilm formation and the survival of Bordetella in the murine respiratory tract. In order to gain a better understanding of regulation of biofilm formation, we sought to study the mechanism by which Bps expression is controlled in Bordetella. Expression of bpsABCD (bpsA-D) is elevated in biofilms compared with levels in planktonically grown cells. We found that bpsA-D is expressed independently of BvgAS. Subsequently, we identified an open reading frame (ORF), BB1771 (designated here bpsR), that is located upstream of and in the opposite orientation to the bpsA-D locus. BpsR is homologous to the MarR family of transcriptional regulators. Measurement of bpsA and bpsD transcripts and the Bps polysaccharide levels from the wild-type and the ΔbpsR strains suggested that BpsR functions as a repressor. Consistent with enhanced production of Bps, the bpsR mutant displayed considerably more structured biofilms. We mapped the bpsA-D promoter region and showed that purified BpsR protein specifically bound to the bpsA-D promoter. Our results provide mechanistic insights into the regulatory strategy employed by Bordetella for control of the production of the Bps polysaccharide and biofilm formation. PMID:22056934

  14. Semiclassical framed BPS states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory W.; Royston, Andrew B.; Van den Bleeken, Dieter

    2016-07-01

    We provide a semiclassical description of framed BPS states in four-dimensional {N}=2 super Yang-Mills theories probed by 't Hooft defects, in terms of a supersymmetric quantum mechanics on the moduli space of singular monopoles. Framed BPS states, like their ordinary counterparts in the theory without defects, are associated with the L 2 kernel of certain Dirac operators on moduli space, or equivalently with the L 2 cohomology of related Dolbeault operators. The Dirac/Dolbeault operators depend on two Cartan-valued Higgs vevs. We conjecture a map between these vevs and the Seiberg-Witten special coordinates, consistent with a one-loop analysis and checked in examples. The map incorporates all perturbative and nonperturbative corrections that are relevant for the semiclassical construction of BPS states, over a suitably defined weak coupling regime of the Coulomb branch. We use this map to translate wall crossing formulae and the no-exotics theorem to statements about the Dirac/Dolbeault operators. The no-exotics theorem, concerning the absence of nontrivial SU(2) R representations in the BPS spectrum, implies that the kernel of the Dirac operator is chiral, and further translates into a statement that all L 2 cohomology of the Dolbeault operator is concentrated in the middle degree. Wall crossing formulae lead to detailed predictions for where the Dirac operators fail to be Fredholm and how their kernels jump. We explore these predictions in nontrivial examples. This paper explains the background and arguments behind the results announced in the short note [1].

  15. Line defects and (framed) BPS quivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirafici, Michele

    2013-11-01

    The BPS spectrum of certain = 2 supersymmetric field theories can be determined algebraically by studying the representation theory of BPS quivers. We introduce methods based on BPS quivers to study line defects. The presence of a line defect opens up a new BPS sector: framed BPS states can be bound to the defect. The defect can be geometrically described in terms of laminations on a curve. To a lamination we associate certain elements of the Leavitt path algebra of the BPS quiver and use them to compute the framed BPS spectrum. We also provide an alternative characterization of line defects by introducing framed BPS quivers. Using the theory of (quantum) cluster algebras, we derive an algorithm to compute the framed BPS spectra of new defects from known ones. Line defects are generated from a framed BPS quiver by applying certain sequences of mutation operations. Framed BPS quivers also behave nicely under a set of "cut and join" rules, which can be used to study how = 2 systems with defects couple to produce more complicated ones. We illustrate our formalism with several examples.

  16. 4. BASEMENT WALL BENEATH SOUTH PASSAGE SHOWING STEAM TUNNEL OPENING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BASEMENT WALL BENEATH SOUTH PASSAGE SHOWING STEAM TUNNEL OPENING IN SOUTH WALL. - Pennsylvania Railroad Station, South Baggage Passage & Canopy, 1101 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  17. 10. Detail view, greenhouse, south wall. These groundlevel openings were ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail view, greenhouse, south wall. These ground-level openings were part of the original heating system used to warm the greenhouse. The openings were likely related to the flues, while a larger opening to the west (not in photograph) contained an exterior-fed iron stove. - John Bartram House & Garden, Greenhouse, 54th Street & LIndbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Sequencing BPS spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; ...

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  19. Sequencing BPS spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  20. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  1. 19. View looking N at mill wall ruins with open ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View looking N at mill wall ruins with open end of purging house in background. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Mill (Ruins), 2.65 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  2. 13. Greenhouse, east elevation. The boardandbatten wall covers an opening ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Greenhouse, east elevation. The board-and-batten wall covers an opening that was originally fitted with windows which allowed sunlight into the greenhouse. - John Bartram House & Garden, Greenhouse, 54th Street & LIndbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. Earthquake resistant structural walls: Test of walls with and without openings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, K. N.; Daniel, J. I.; Aristizabal-Ochoa, J. D.; Fiorato, A. E.; Corley, W. G.

    1981-07-01

    Two one-third scale, six-story wal specimens were subjected to inelastic load reversals representing severe earthquake forces exerted by double acting hydraulic rams, located on both sides of the wall specimens, and applied to the top of each wall. The specimens were designed of earthquake resistant reinforced concrete wall elements in coupled wall systems based on the 1976 Uniform Building Code. The loading was calculated using a modified DRAIN two-dimensional computer program with two actual earthquake records used as input ground motion data. One specimen was a solid wall and the other included six openings simulating windows. When data was normalized by yield capacities, the resonse of the two walls to the inelastic loading was similar. The presence of window openings had little effect on the deformation characteristics of the sample walls in response to the cyclic loads.

  4. Crystal Melting and Wall Crossing Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masahito

    2010-02-01

    This paper summarizes recent developments in the theory of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) state counting and the wall crossing phenomena, emphasizing in particular the role of the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting. This paper is divided into two parts, which are closely related to each other. In the first part, we discuss the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting counting BPS states. Each of the BPS state contributing to the BPS index is in one-to-one correspondence with a configuration of a molten crystal, and the statistical partition function of the melting crystal gives the BPS partition function. We also show that smooth geometry of the Calabi-Yau manifold emerges in the thermodynamic limit of the crystal. This suggests a remarkable interpretation that an atom in the crystal is a discretization of the classical geometry, giving an important clue as to the geometry at the Planck scale.In the second part we discuss the wall crossing phenomena. Wall crossing phenomena states that the BPS index depends on the value of the moduli of the Calabi-Yau manifold, and jumps along real codimension one subspaces in the moduli space. We show that by using type IIA/M-theory duality, we can provide a simple and an intuitive derivation of the wall crossing phenomena, furthermore clarifying the connection with the topological string theory. This derivation is consistent with another derivation from the wall crossing formula, motivated by multi-centered BPS extremal black holes. We also explain the representation of the wall crossing phenomena in terms of crystal melting, and the generalization of the counting problem and the wall crossing to the open BPS invariants.

  5. Crystal Melting and Wall Crossing Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masahito

    This paper summarizes recent developments in the theory of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) state counting and the wall crossing phenomena, emphasizing in particular the role of the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting. This paper is divided into two parts, which are closely related to each other. In the first part, we discuss the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting counting BPS states. Each of the BPS states contributing to the BPS index is in one-to-one correspondence with a configuration of a molten crystal, and the statistical partition function of the melting crystal gives the BPS partition function. We also show that smooth geometry of the Calabi-Yau manifold emerges in the thermodynamic limit of the crystal. This suggests a remarkable interpretation that an atom in the crystal is a discretization of the classical geometry, giving an important clue as such to the geometry at the Planck scale. In the second part, we discuss the wall crossing phenomena. Wall crossing phenomena states that the BPS index depends on the value of the moduli of the Calabi-Yau manifold, and jumps along real codimension one subspaces in the moduli space. We show that by using type IIA/M-theory duality, we can provide a simple and an intuitive derivation of the wall crossing phenomena, furthermore clarifying the connection with the topological string theory. This derivation is consistent with another derivation from the wall crossing formula, motivated by multicentered BPS extremal black holes. We also explain the representation of the wall crossing phenomena in terms of crystal melting, and the generalization of the counting problem and the wall crossing to the open BPS invariants.

  6. Discrete BPS skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaoglou, M.; Charalampidis, E. G.; Ioannidou, T. A.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2017-09-01

    A discrete analogue of the extended Bogomolny-Prasad-Sommerfeld (BPS) Skyrme model that admits time-dependent solutions is presented. Using the spacing h of adjacent lattice nodes as a parameter, we identify the spatial profile of the solution and the continuation of the relevant branch of solutions over the lattice spacing for different values of the potential (free) parameter α . In particular, we explore the dynamics and stability of the obtained solutions, finding that, while they generally seem to be prone to instabilities, for suitable values of the lattice spacing and for sufficiently large values of α , they may be long-lived in direct numerical simulations.

  7. BPS states in omega background and integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulycheva, Kseniya; Chen, Heng-yu; Gorsky, Alexander; Koroteev, Peter

    2012-10-01

    We reconsider string and domain wall central charges in {N} = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories in four dimensions in presence of the Omega background in the Nekrasov-Shatashvili (NS) limit. Existence of these charges entails presence of the corresponding topological defects in the theory — vortices and domain walls. In spirit of the 4d/2d duality we discuss the worldsheet low energy effective theory living on the BPS vortex in {N} =2 Supersymmetric Quantum Chromodynamics (SQCD). We discuss some aspects of the brane realization of the dualities between various quantum integrable models. A chain of such dualities enables us to check the AGT correspondence in the NS limit.

  8. Double Mine Building (N) wall showing clerestory slot windows opening ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Double Mine Building (N) wall showing clerestory slot windows opening above level of main roof. Note structure is built on poured concrete foundation partly buried in hillside; view in southeast - Fort McKinley, Double Mine Building, East side of East Side Drive, approximately 125 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  9. BEDROOM 1 SHOWING THE OPENING IN THE EXTERIOR WALL FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BEDROOM 1 SHOWING THE OPENING IN THE EXTERIOR WALL FOR AN AIR CONDITIONER. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 3, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. 4. Detail view north of stone wall opening between Five ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Detail view north of stone wall opening between Five Acre Lot (foreground) and Ten Acre Lot (background) with Joseph Fry Farm complex beyond - Joseph Fry Farm Landscape, 2153 South County Trail Road (U.S. Route 2), East Greenwich, Kent County, RI

  11. Generalized BPS magnetic monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M., Jr.; da Hora, E.

    2012-10-01

    We show the existence of Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) magnetic monopoles in a generalized Yang-Mills-Higgs model which is controlled by two positive functions, g(ϕaϕa) and f(ϕaϕa). This effective model, in principle, would describe the dynamics of the nonabelian fields in a chromoelectric media. We check the consistency of our generalized construction by analyzing an explicit case ruled by a parameter β. We also use the well-known spherically symmetric Ansatz to attain the corresponding self-dual equations describing the topological solutions. The overall conclusion is that the new solutions behave around the canonical one, with smaller or greater characteristic length depending on the values of β.

  12. BPS boojums in N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Masato; Blaschke, Filip; Eto, Minoru

    2017-03-01

    We study 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) composite solitons of vortex strings, domain walls, and boojums in N=2 supersymmetric Abelian gauge theories in four dimensions. We obtain solutions to the 1/4 BPS equations with the finite gauge coupling constant. To obtain numerical solutions for generic coupling constants, we construct globally correct approximate functions which allow us to easily find fixed points of gradient flow equations. We analytically/numerically confirm that the negative mass of a single boojum appearing at the endpoint of the vortex string on the logarithmically bent domain wall is equal to the half-mass of the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole. We examine various configurations and clarify how the shape of the boojum depends on the coupling constants and moduli parameters. We also find analytic solutions to the 1/4 BPS equations for specific values of the coupling constants.

  13. BPS dyons and Hesse flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bleeken, Dieter

    2012-02-01

    We revisit BPS solutions to classical N = 2 low energy effective gauge theories. It is shown that the BPS equations can be solved in full generality by the introduction of a Hesse potential, a symplectic analog of the holomorphic prepotential. We explain how for non-spherically symmetric, non-mutually local solutions, the notion of attractor flow generalizes to gradient flow with respect to the Hesse potential. Furthermore we show that in general there is a non-trivial magnetic complement to this flow equation that is sourced by the momentum current in the solution.

  14. Modeling Force Transfer around Openings in Wood-Frame Shear Walls

    Treesearch

    Minghao Li; Frank Lam; Borjen Yeh; Tom Skaggs; Doug Rammer; James Wacker

    2012-01-01

    This paper presented a modeling study on force transfer around openings (FTAO) in wood-frame shear walls detailed for FTAO. To understand the load transfer in the walls, this study used a finite-element model WALL2D, which is able to model individual wall components, including framing members, sheathing panels, oriented panel-frame nailed connections, framing...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.23 - Guarding floor and wall openings and holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... chute floor opening shall be guarded by one of the following: (i) Hinged floor opening cover of standard... use. Where operating conditions necessitate the feeding of material into any hatchway or chute opening... specifications. (2) Every chute wall opening from which there is a drop of more than 4 feet shall be guarded...

  16. The Open Classroom: Were Schools Without Walls Just Another Fad?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuban, Larry

    2004-01-01

    The open-classroom movement originated in British public elementary schools after World War II. American educators who adopted the trend viewed informal education--or, as they came to call it, open classrooms or open education--as an answer to both the American education system's critics and the problems of U.S. society. Open classrooms' focus on…

  17. BPS submodels of the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2017-06-01

    We show that the standard Skyrme model without pion mass term can be expressed as a sum of two BPS submodels, i.e., of two models whose static field equations, independently, can be reduced to first order equations. Further, these first order (BPS) equations have nontrivial solutions, at least locally. These two submodels, however, cannot have common solutions. Our findings also shed some light on the rational map approximation. Finally, we consider certain generalisations of the BPS submodels.

  18. A method for BPS equations of vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nata Atmaja, A.

    2017-05-01

    We develop a new method for obtaining the BPS equations of static vortices motivated by the results of the On-Shell method on the standard Maxwell-Higgs model and its Born-Infeld-Higgs model [1]. Our method relies on the existence of what we shall call a BPS energy function Q as such the total energy of BPS vortices EBPS are simply given by an integral of total differential of the BPS energy function, EBPS = ∫ dQ. Imposing a condition that the effective fields are independent of each other, we may define a BPS Lagrangian LBPS by EBPS ≡ - ∫d2 x LBPS. Equating this BPS Lagrangian with the corresponding effective Lagrangian, the equation is expected to be a sum of positive-semidefinite functions Leff -LBPS = ∑iN Ai2 = 0, where N is the number of effective fields. Solving this equation by parts would yields the desired BPS equations. With our method, the various known BPS equations of vortices are derived in a relatively simple procedure. We show that in all models considered here, the BPS energy function is given by a general formula Q = 2 πaF (f), where a and f are the effective fields for the gauge field and scalar field, and F‧ (f) = ± 2 f w (f), with w is an overall coupling of the scalar field's kinetic term.

  19. MAGAZINE E3. ENTRY WITH DOORS OPEN SHOWING FIRST BLAST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAGAZINE E-3-. ENTRY WITH DOORS OPEN SHOWING FIRST BLAST WALL WITH RANGE POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. 29 CFR 1910.23 - Guarding floor and wall openings and holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... someone or shall be protected by removable standard railings. (7) Every temporary floor opening shall have..., a standard toe board shall be provided. (4) Every temporary wall opening shall have adequate guards... exclusively for special purposes (such as oiling, shafting, or filling tank cars) may have the railing on...

  1. Primary closure of the abdominal wall after "open abdomen" situation.

    PubMed

    Kääriäinen, M; Kuokkanen, H

    2013-01-01

    "Open abdomen" is a strategy used to avoid or treat abdominal compartment syndrome. It has reduced mortality both in trauma and non-trauma abdominal catastrophes but also has created a challenging clinical problem. Traditionally, open abdomen is closed in two phases; primarily with a free skin graft and later with a flap reconstruction. A modern trend is to close the abdomen within the initial hospitalization. This requires multi-professional co-operation. Temporary abdominal closure methods, e.g. negative pressure wound therapy alone or combined with mesh-mediated traction, have been developed to facilitate direct fascial closure. Components separation technique, mesh reinforcement or bridging of the fascial defect with mesh and perforator saving skin undermining can be utilized in the final closure if needed. These techniques can be combined. Choice of the treatment depends on the condition of the patient and size of the fascia and skin defect, and the state of the abdominal contents. In this paper we review the literature on the closure of an open abdomen and present the policy used in our institution in the open abdomen situations.

  2. Device and method for treatment of openings in vascular and septal walls

    DOEpatents

    Singhal, Pooja; Wilson, Thomas S.; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2017-06-06

    A device, system and method for treatment of an opening in vascular and/or septal walls including patent foramen ovale. The device has wings/stops on either end, an axis core covered in a shape memory foam and is deliverable via a catheter to the affected opening, finally expanding into a vascular or septal opening where it is held in place by the expandable shape memory stops or wings.

  3. BPS states in M theory and twistorial constituents.

    PubMed

    Bandos, I A; de Azcárraga, J A; Izquierdo, J M; Lukierski, J

    2001-05-14

    We provide a complete algebraic description of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) states in M theory in terms of primary constituents that we call BPS preons. We argue that any BPS state preserving k of the 32 supersymmetries is a composite of (32-k) BPS preons. In particular, the BPS states corresponding to the basic M2 and M5 branes are composed of 16 BPS preons. By extending the M algebra to a generalized D = 11 conformal superalgebra osp(1/64) we relate the BPS preons with its fundamental representation, the D = 11 supertwistors.

  4. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. OPEN CORRIDOR ALONG SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. OPEN CORRIDOR ALONG SOUTH WALL OF BUILDING. CAMERA IS NEAR HOT CELL NO. 1, FACES WEST TOWARDS WALL OF TEST-TRAIN ASSEMBLY (TRA-632A). NOTE MOTORIZED RAIL CRANE ABOVE STAIRWAY. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-29-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Partial Multi-Walled Metal Parts Open Up New Technical Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Heinz G.

    2011-01-01

    A new fabrication process was developed which allows to build totally new mechanical constructions. Metal parts having a homogeneous structure and a complex three dimensional shape can be produced with wall sections which are multi-walled. Such constructions are already widely used in extrusion dies to optimise the flow channel geometry while the process is running. Furthermore the broadened possibilities which the fabrication process opens up can be used to solve existing problems in nearly all fields of mechanical engineering.

  6. Instantaneous response of elastic thin-walled structures with arbitrary open cross section to rapid heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Xiaoqin; Mohan, Ram V.; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1992-01-01

    A generalized modeling and analysis approach of thermally-induced coupled vibrations of elastic thin-walled configurations with arbitrary open cross sections are presented in conjunction with a unified implicit transient methodology. Limited research appears in literature which takes into account the influence of rapid thermal heating effects on structures involving various forms of coupling. As a consequence, the dynamic response of such thin-walled structures of arbitrary open cross section due to rapid heating are described here. Effects involving triple, double, and no coupling between bending and torsional vibrations caused by sudden heating on these structures are examined. Numerical test cases are presented which describe the influence of sudden heating on elastic thin-walled structures of arbitrary open cross sections.

  7. Modeling Drosophila Positional Preferences in Open Field Arenas with Directional Persistence and Wall Attraction

    PubMed Central

    Soibam, Benjamin; Goldfeder, Rachel L.; Manson-Bishop, Claire; Gamblin, Rachel; Pletcher, Scott D.; Shah, Shishir; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.; Roman, Gregg W.

    2012-01-01

    In open field arenas, Drosophila adults exhibit a preference for arena boundaries over internal walls and open regions. Herein, we investigate the nature of this preference using phenomenological modeling of locomotion to determine whether local arena features and constraints on movement alone are sufficient to drive positional preferences within open field arenas of different shapes and with different internal features. Our model has two components: directional persistence and local wall force. In regions far away from walls, the trajectory is entirely characterized by a directional persistence probability, , for each movement defined by the step size, , and the turn angle, . In close proximity to walls, motion is computed from and a local attractive force which depends on the distance between the fly and points on the walls. The directional persistence probability was obtained experimentally from trajectories of wild type Drosophila in a circular open field arena and the wall force was computed to minimize the difference between the radial distributions from the model and Drosophila in the same circular arena. The two-component model for fly movement was challenged by comparing the positional preferences from the two-component model to wild type Drosophila in a variety of open field arenas. In most arenas there was a strong concordance between the two-component model and Drosophila. In more complex arenas, the model exhibits similar trends, but some significant differences were found. These differences suggest that there are emergent features within these complex arenas that have significance for the fly, such as potential shelter. Hence, the two-component model is an important step in defining how Drosophila interact with their environment. PMID:23071591

  8. Microbubbles and Blood Brain Barrier Opening: A Numerical Study on Acoustic Emissions and Wall Stress Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Goertz, David E.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-01-01

    Focused ultrasound with microbubbles is an emerging technique for blood brain barrier (BBB) opening. Here, a comprehensive theoretical model of a bubble-fluid-vessel system has been developed which accounts for the bubble’s non-spherical oscillations inside a microvessel, and its resulting acoustic emissions. Numerical simulations of unbound and confined encapsulated bubbles were performed to evaluate the effect of the vessel wall on acoustic emissions and vessel wall stresses. Using a Marmottant shell model, the normalized second harmonic to fundamental emissions first decreased as a function of pressure (>50 kPa) until reaching a minima ("transition point") at which point they increased. The transition point of unbound compared to confined bubble populations occurred at different pressures and was associated with an accompanying increase in shear and circumferential wall stresses. As the wall stresses depend on the bubble to vessel wall distance, the stresses were evaluated for bubbles with their wall at a constant distance to a flat wall. As a result, the wall stresses were bubble size and frequency dependent and the peak stress values induced by bubbles larger than resonance remained constant versus frequency at a constant mechanical index. PMID:25546853

  9. 4d Spectra from BPS Quiver Dualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espahbodi, Sam

    We attack the question of BPS occupancy in a wide class of 4d N = 2 quantum field theories. We first review the Seiberg-Witten approach to finding the low energy Wilsonian effective action actions of such theories. In particular, we analyze the case of Gaiotto theories, which provide a large number of non-trivial examples in a unified framework. We then turn to understanding the massive BPS spectrum of such theories, and in particular their relation to BPS quivers. We present a purely 4d characterization of BPS quivers, and explain how a quiver's representation theory encodes the solution to the BPS occupancy problem. Next, we derive a so called mutation method, based on exploiting quiver dualities, to solve the quiver's representation theory. This method makes previously intractable calculations nearly trivial in many examples. As a particular highlight, we apply our methods to understand strongly coupled chambers in ADE SYM gauge theories with matter. Following this, we turn to the general story of quivers for theories of the Gaiotto class. We present a geometric approach to attaining quivers for the rank 2 theories, leading to a very elegant solution which includes a specification of quiver superpotentials. Finally, we solve these theories by an unrelated method based on gauging flavor symmetries in their various dual weakly coupled Lagrangian descriptions. After seeing that this method agrees in the rank 2 case, we will apply our new approach to the case of rank n.

  10. Near BPS skyrmions and restricted harmonic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speight, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by a class of near BPS Skyrme models introduced by Adam, Sánchez-Guillén and Wereszczyński, the following variant of the harmonic map problem is introduced: a map φ :(M, g) →(N, h) between Riemannian manifolds is restricted harmonic if it locally extremizes E2 on its SDiff(M) orbit, where SDiff(M) denotes the group of volume preserving diffeomorphisms of (M, g), and E2 denotes the Dirichlet energy. It is conjectured that near BPS skyrmions tend to restricted harmonic maps in the BPS limit. It is shown that φ is restricted harmonic if and only if φ∗ h has exact divergence, and a linear stability theory of restricted harmonic maps is developed, from which it follows that all weakly conformal maps are stable restricted harmonic. Examples of restricted harmonic maps in every degree class R3 → SU(2) and R2 →S2 are constructed. It is shown that the axially symmetric BPS skyrmions on which all previous analytic studies of near BPS Skyrme models have been based, are not restricted harmonic, casting doubt on the phenomenological predictions of such studies. The problem of minimizing E2 for φ :Rk → N over all linear volume preserving diffeomorphisms is solved explicitly, and a deformed axially symmetric family of Skyrme fields constructed which are candidates for approximate near BPS skyrmions at low baryon number. The notion of restricted harmonicity is generalized to restricted F-criticality where F is any functional on maps (M, g) →(N, h) which is, in a precise sense, geometrically natural. The case where F is a linear combination of E2 and E4, the usual Skyrme term, is studied in detail, and it is shown that inverse stereographic projection R3 →S3 ≡ SU(2) is stable restricted F-critical for every such F.

  11. Suture granuloma of the abdominal wall with intra-abdominal extension 12 years after open appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Goran; Korolija, Dragan; Skegro, Mate; Jakic-Razumovic, Jasminka

    2009-01-01

    Most complications after appendectomy occur within ten days; however, we report the unusual case of a suture granuloma 12 years after open appendectomy. The afebrile 75-year-old woman presented with a slightly painful palpable mass in the right lower abdomen. There was no nausea or vomiting and bowel movements were normal. She lost 10 kg during the 3 mo before presentation. The patient had undergone an appendectomy 12 years previously. Physical examination revealed a tender mass, 10 cm in diameter, under the appendectomy scar. The preoperative laboratory findings, tumor markers and plain abdominal radiographs were normal. Multi-slice computed tomography scanning showed an inhomogenous abdominal mass with minimal vascularization in the right lower abdomen 8.6 cm × 8 cm × 9 cm in size which communicated with the abdominal wall. The abdominal wall was thickened, weak and bulging. The abdominal wall mass did not communicate with the cecum or the ascending colon. Complete excision of the abdominal wall mass was performed via median laparotomy. Histopathological examination revealed a granuloma with a central abscess. This case report demonstrates that a preoperative diagnosis of abdominal wall mass after open appendectomy warrants the use of a wide spectrum of diagnostic modalities and consequently different treatment options. PMID:19705509

  12. Open-ended Coaxial Cavities with Corrugated Inner and Outer Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidis, Zisis C.; Avramidis, Konstantinos A.; Tigelis, Ioannis G.

    2015-05-01

    In this work an open-ended coaxial cavity with a corrugated insert and a relatively small number of corrugations on the outer wall is studied. In particular, the Spatial Harmonics Method (SHM) is employed in order to derive the TE modes characteristic equation, which is then solved by truncation for the calculation of the corresponding eigenvalues. Special care is given in the expansion functions used in order to avoid numerical instabilities in the calculation of high-order spatial terms. Various cases of outer wall corrugations are studied numerically in order to identify the effect of the outer corrugations and understand the mode coupling mechanism.

  13. The Skyrme Model in the BPS Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sánchez-Guillén, J.; Vazquez, R.; Wereszczyński, A.

    In this review, we summarize the main features of the BPS Skyrme model which provides a physically well-motivated idealization of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter: (1) it leads to zero binding energies for classical solitons (while realistic binding energies emerge owing to the semiclassical corrections, the Coulomb interaction and isospin breaking); (2) it describes a perfect non-barotropic fluid already at the microscopic (field theoretical) level which allows to study thermodynamics beyond the mean-field limit. These properties allow for an approximate but analytical calculation of binding energies of the most abundant nuclei, for a determination of the equation of state of skyrmionic matter (both in the full field theory and in a mean-field approximation) as well as the description of neutron stars as Skyrme solitons with a very good agreement with available observational data. All these results suggest that the proper low energy effective model of QCD should be close to the BPS Skyrme model in a certain sense (a "near-BPS Skyrme model"), with a prominent role played by the BPS part.

  14. On the Opening of Thick Walled Elastic Tubes: A Fluid-Structure Model for Acid Reflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sudip; Kahrilas, Peter

    2005-11-01

    A coupled fluid-structure mathematical model was developed to quantify rapid opening of thick-walled elastic tubes, a phenomenon underlying biological flows such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The wall was modeled using non-linear finite deformation theory to predict space-time radial distention of an axisymmetric tube with luminal fluid flow. Anisotropic azimuthal and longitudinal muscle-induced stresses were incorporated, and interstitial material properties were assumed isotropic and linearly elastic. Fluid flow was modeled using lubrication theory with inertial correction. Opening and flow were driven by a specified inflow pressure and zero pressure gradient was specified at outflow. No-slip and surface force balance were applied at the fluid-wall interface. Viscoelasticity was modeled with ad hoc damping and the evolution of the tube geometry was predicted at mid-layer. A potentially important discovery was made when applied to studies of initiation of opening with GERD: while material stiffness is of minor consequence, small changes in resting lumen distension (˜2 mm diameter) may be a sensitive distinguishing feature of the disease.

  15. Mixed Rademacher and BPS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Francesca; Reys, Valentin

    2017-07-01

    Dyonic 1/4-BPS states in Type IIB string theory compactified on K3 × T 2 are counted by meromorphic Jacobi forms. The finite parts of these functions, which are mixed mock Jacobi forms, account for the degeneracy of states stable throughout the moduli space of the compactification. In this paper, we obtain an exact asymptotic expansion for their Fourier coefficients, refining the Hardy-Ramanujan-Littlewood circle method to deal with their mixed-mock character. The result is compared to a low-energy supergravity computation of the exact entropy of extremal dyonic 1/4-BPS single-centered black holes, obtained by applying supersymmetric localization techniques to the quantum entropy function.

  16. High Q BPS Monopole Bags are Urchins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evslin, Jarah; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for 30 years that 't Hooft-Polyakov monopoles of charge Q greater than one cannot be spherically symmetric. Five years ago, Bolognesi conjectured that, at some point in their moduli space, BPS monopoles can become approximately spherically symmetric in the high Q limit. In this paper, we determine the sense in which this conjecture is correct. We consider an SU(2) gauge theory with an adjoint scalar field, and numerically find configurations with Q units of magnetic charge and a mass which is roughly linear in Q, for example, in the case Q = 81 we present a configuration whose energy exceeds the BPS bound by about 54%. These approximate solutions are constructed by gluing together Q cones, each of which contains a single unit of magnetic charge. In each cone, the energy is largest in the core, and so a constant energy density surface contains Q peaks and thus resembles a sea urchin.

  17. Biomass Production System (BPS) Plant Growth Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, R. C.; Crabb, T. M.

    The Biomass Production System (BPS) was developed under the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program to meet science, biotechnology and commercial plant growth needs in the Space Station era. The BPS is equivalent in size to a double middeck locker, but uses it's own custom enclosure with a slide out structure to which internal components mount. The BPS contains four internal growth chambers, each with a growing volume of more than 4 liters. Each of the growth chambers has active nutrient delivery, and independent control of temperature, humidity, lighting, and CO2 set-points. Temperature control is achieved using a thermoelectric heat exchanger system. Humidity control is achieved using a heat exchanger with a porous interface which can both humidify and dehumidify. The control software utilizes fuzzy logic for nonlinear, coupled temperature and humidity control. The fluorescent lighting system can be dimmed to provide a range of light levels. CO2 levels are controlled by injecting pure CO2 to the system based on input from an infrared gas analyzer. The unit currently does not scrub CO2, but has been designed to accept scrubber cartridges. In addition to providing environmental control, a number of features are included to facilitate science. The BPS chambers are sealed to allow CO2 and water vapor exchange measurements. The plant chambers can be removed to allow manipulation or sampling of specimens, and each chamber has gas/fluid sample ports. A video camera is provided for each chamber, and frame-grabs and complete environmental data for all science and hardware system sensors are stored on an internal hard drive. Data files can also be transferred to 3.5-inch disks using the front panel disk drive

  18. Biomass Production System (BPS) plant growth unit.

    PubMed

    Morrow, R C; Crabb, T M

    2000-01-01

    The Biomass Production System (BPS) was developed under the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program to meet science, biotechnology and commercial plant growth needs in the Space Station era. The BPS is equivalent in size to a double middeck locker, but uses its own custom enclosure with a slide out structure to which internal components mount. The BPS contains four internal growth chambers, each with a growing volume of more than 4 liters. Each of the growth chambers has active nutrient delivery, and independent control of temperature, humidity, lighting, and CO2 set-points. Temperature control is achieved using a thermoelectric heat exchanger system. Humidity control is achieved using a heat exchanger with a porous interface which can both humidify and dehumidify. The control software utilizes fuzzy logic for nonlinear, coupled temperature and humidity control. The fluorescent lighting system can be dimmed to provide a range of light levels. CO2 levels are controlled by injecting pure CO2 to the system based on input from an infrared gas analyzer. The unit currently does not scrub CO2, but has been designed to accept scrubber cartridges. In addition to providing environmental control, a number of features are included to facilitate science. The BPS chambers are sealed to allow CO2 and water vapor exchange measurements. The plant chambers can be removed to allow manipulation or sampling of specimens, and each chamber has gas/fluid sample ports. A video camera is provided for each chamber, and frame-grabs and complete environmental data for all science and hardware system sensors are stored on an internal hard drive. Data files can also be transferred to 3.5-inch disks using the front panel disk drive.

  19. Argon adsorption in open-ended single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rols, S.; Johnson, M.R.; Zeppenfeld, P.; Bienfait, M.; Vilches, O.E.; Schneble, J.

    2005-04-15

    Thermodynamic and neutron-diffraction measurements combined with molecular dynamics simulation are used to determine the adsorption energies and the structure of argon condensed in the various adsorption sites of purified open-ended single-wall nanotube bundles. On the basis of these experiments and the simulation results, a consistent adsorption scenario has been derived. The adsorption proceeds first by the population of the walls inside the open nanotubes and the formation of one-dimensional Ar chains in the grooves at the outer surface of the bundles, followed by the filling of the remaining axial sites inside the nanotubes and the completion of a quasihexagonal monolayer on the outer surface of the bundle. The measurements also provide an estimate of the relative abundance of the various adsorption sites revealing that a major part of the adsorbed Ar is stored inside the open-ended nanotubes. Nanotube bundles generally show a certain degree of heterogeneity and some interstitial sites should be populated over a range of Ar chemical potential. However, for the sample used here, diffraction data and simulations suggest that heterogeneity is not a key feature of the bundles and there is little direct evidence of interstitial sites being populated.

  20. Argon adsorption in open-ended single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rols, S.; Johnson, M. R.; Zeppenfeld, P.; Bienfait, M.; Vilches, O. E.; Schneble, J.

    2005-04-01

    Thermodynamic and neutron-diffraction measurements combined with molecular dynamics simulation are used to determine the adsorption energies and the structure of argon condensed in the various adsorption sites of purified open-ended single-wall nanotube bundles. On the basis of these experiments and the simulation results, a consistent adsorption scenario has been derived. The adsorption proceeds first by the population of the walls inside the open nanotubes and the formation of one-dimensional Ar chains in the grooves at the outer surface of the bundles, followed by the filling of the remaining axial sites inside the nanotubes and the completion of a quasihexagonal monolayer on the outer surface of the bundle. The measurements also provide an estimate of the relative abundance of the various adsorption sites revealing that a major part of the adsorbed Ar is stored inside the open-ended nanotubes. Nanotube bundles generally show a certain degree of heterogeneity and some interstitial sites should be populated over a range of Ar chemical potential. However, for the sample used here, diffraction data and simulations suggest that heterogeneity is not a key feature of the bundles and there is little direct evidence of interstitial sites being populated.

  1. Colloid retention at the meniscus-wall contact line in an open microchannel.

    PubMed

    Zevi, Yuniati; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Morales, Verónica L; Cakmak, M Ekrem; Medrano, Evelyn A; Sang, Wenjing; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2012-02-01

    Colloid retention mechanisms in partially saturated porous media are currently being researched with an array of visualization techniques. These visualization techniques have refined our understanding of colloid movement and retention at the pore scale beyond what can be obtained from breakthrough experiments. One of the remaining questions is what mechanisms are responsible for colloid immobilization at the triple point where air, water, and soil grain meet. The objective of this study was to investigate how colloids are transported to the air-water-solid (AWS) contact line in an open triangular microchannel, and then retained as a function of meniscus contact angle with the wall and solution ionic strength. Colloid flow path, meniscus shape and meniscus-wall contact angle, and colloid retention at the AWS contact line were visualized and quantified with a confocal microscope. Experimental results demonstrated that colloid retention at the AWS contact line was significant when the meniscus-wall contact angle was less than 16°, but was minimal for the meniscus-wall contact angles exceeding 20°. Tracking of individual colloids and computational hydrodynamic simulation both revealed that for small contact angles (e.g., 12.5°), counter flow and flow vortices formed near the AWS contact line, but not for large contact angles (e.g., 28°). This counter flow helped deliver the colloids to the wall surface just below the contact line. In accordance with DLVO and hydrodynamic torque calculations, colloid movement may be stopped when the colloid reached the secondary minimum at the wall near the contact line. However, contradictory to the prediction of the torque analysis, colloid retention at the AWS contact line decreased with increasing ionic strength for contact angles of 10-20°, indicating that the air-water interface was involved through both counter flow and capillary force. We hypothesized that capillary force pushed the colloid through the primary energy

  2. Universal BPS structure of stationary supergravity solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossard, Guillaume; Nicolai, Hermann; Stelle, K. S.

    2009-07-01

    We study asymptotically flat stationary solutions of four-dimensional supergravity theories via the associated fraktur G/fraktur H* pseudo-Riemannian non-linear sigma models in three spatial dimensions. The Noether charge Script C associated to fraktur G is shown to satisfy a characteristic equation that determines it as a function of the four-dimensional conserved charges. The matrix Script C is nilpotent for non-rotating extremal solutions. The nilpotency degree of Script C is directly related to the BPS degree of the corresponding solution when they are BPS. Equivalently, the charges can be described in terms of a Weyl spinor |Script Crangle of Spin*(2Script N), and then the characteristic equation becomes equivalent to a generalisation of the Cartan pure spinor constraint on |Script Crangle. The invariance of a given solution with respect to supersymmetry is determined by an algebraic `Dirac equation' on the Weyl spinor |Script Crangle. We explicitly solve this equation for all pure supergravity theories and we characterise the stratified structure of the moduli space of asymptotically Taub-NUT black holes with respect to their BPS degree. The analysis is valid for any asymptotically flat stationary solutions for which the singularities are protected by horizons. The fraktur H*-orbits of extremal solutions are identified as Lagrangian submanifolds of nilpotent orbits of fraktur G, and so the moduli space of extremal spherically symmetric black holes is identified as a Lagrangian subvariety of the variety of nilpotent elements of fraktur g. We also generalise the notion of active duality transformations to an `almost action' of the three-dimensional duality group fraktur G on asymptotically flat stationary solutions.

  3. Black holes in supergravity: the non-BPS branch

    SciTech Connect

    Gimon, Eric; Gimon, Eric G.; Larsen, Finn; Simon, Joan

    2007-10-25

    We construct extremal, spherically symmetric black hole solutions to 4D supergravity with charge assignments that preclude BPS-saturation. In particular, we determine the ground state energy as a function of charges and moduli. We find that the mass of the non-BPS black hole remains that of a marginal bound state of four basic constituents throughout the entire moduli space and that there is always a non-zero gap above the BPS bound.

  4. A gauged baby Skyrme model and a novel BPS bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2013-02-01

    The baby Skyrme model is a well-known nonlinear field theory supporting topological solitons in two space dimensions. Its action functional consist of a potential term, a kinetic term quadratic in derivatives (the "nonlinear sigma model term") and the Skyrme term quartic in first derivatives. The limiting case of vanishing sigma model term (the so-called BPS baby Skyrme model) is known to support exact soliton solutions saturating a BPS bound which exists for this model. Further, the BPS model has infinitely many symmetries and conservation laws. Recently it was found that the gauged version of the BPS baby Skyrme model with gauge group U(1) and the usual Maxwell term, too, has a BPS bound and BPS solutions saturating this bound. This BPS bound is determined by a superpotential which has to obey a superpotential equation, in close analogy to the situation in supergravity. Further, the BPS bound and the corresponding BPS solitons only may exist for potentials such that the superpotential equation has a global solution. We also briefly describe some properties of soliton solutions.

  5. BPS black hole horizons from massive IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarino, Adolfo

    2017-08-01

    The maximal four-dimensional supergravity with a dyonic ISO(7) gauging that arises from the reduction of massive IIA on a six-sphere has recently been shown to accommodate static BPS black holes with hyperbolic horizons. When restricted to the N=2 subsector that retains one vector multiplet and the universal hypermultiplet, the attractor mechanism was shown to fix both the vector charges and the scalar fields at the horizon to a unique configuration in terms of the gauging parameters. In order to assess the (non-)uniqueness of BPS black hole horizons from massive IIA, we extend the study of the attractor mechanism to other N=2 subsectors including additional matter multiplets. We note that, while extending the hypermultiplet sector does not modify the set of solutions to the attractor equations, the inclusion of additional vector multiplets results in new hyperbolic/spherical horizon configurations containing free parameters. The model with three vector multiplets and the universal hypermultiplet, which is the massive IIA analogue of the STU-model from M-theory, may play a relevant role in massive IIA holography.

  6. Lie n-algebras of BPS charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sati, Hisham; Schreiber, Urs

    2017-03-01

    We uncover higher algebraic structures on Noether currents and BPS charges. It is known that equivalence classes of conserved currents form a Lie algebra. We show that at least for target space symmetries of higher parameterized WZW-type sigma-models this naturally lifts to a Lie ( p + 1)-algebra structure on the Noether currents themselves. Applied to the Green-Schwarz-type action functionals for super p-brane sigma-models this yields super Lie ( p+1)-algebra refinements of the traditional BPS brane charge extensions of supersymmetry algebras. We discuss this in the generality of higher differential geometry, where it applies also to branes with (higher) gauge fields on their worldvolume. Applied to the M5-brane sigma-model we recover and properly globalize the M-theory super Lie algebra extension of 11-dimensional superisometries by 2-brane and 5-brane charges. Passing beyond the infinitesimal Lie theory we find cohomological corrections to these charges in higher analogy to the familiar corrections for D-brane charges as they are lifted from ordinary cohomology to twisted K-theory. This supports the proposal that M-brane charges live in a twisted cohomology theory.

  7. Interaction of a wall jet with wake behind a bluff body in an open channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Arindam; Balachandar, Ram

    2009-11-01

    Junction flow around a bluff body mounted in bed has been the subject of investigation for decades because of the unique phenomenon associated with the generation and dynamics of the horseshoe vortices. However, a more interesting flow could be the case where a small bleed flow in the form of a wall jet is allowed to pass beneath the bluff body and let interact with the horseshoe vortex. If this flow is strong, it can completely detoriates the effect of the horseshoe vortex and may result into a complex three-dimensional flow. To explore the characteristics of this kind of flow a sharp-edged bluff body was mounted in an open channel flow of nominal flow depth of 100 mm. Three flow configurations were examined: a) the body was mounted firmly on the floor, b) the body was lifted 5 mm from the bed and c) the body was lifted 10 mm from the bed. Particle image velocimetry measurement was performed at three horizontal planes, at y/H = 0.10, 0.50 and 0.80, respectively, where H is the nominal depth of flow. Time-averaged flow parameters were examined at selected streamwise locations at different vertical elevations to examine the effect of wall jet to change the characteristics of the wake.

  8. Crack opening area estimates in pressurized through-wall cracked elbows under bending

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, C.; Gilles, P.; Pignol, M.

    1997-04-01

    One of the most important aspects in the leak-before-break approach is the estimation of the crack opening area corresponding to potential through-wall cracks at critical locations during plant operation. In order to provide a reasonable lower bound to the leak area under such loading conditions, numerous experimental and numerical programs have been developed in USA, U.K. and FRG and widely discussed in literature. This paper aims to extend these investigations on a class of pipe elbows characteristic of PWR main coolant piping. The paper is divided in three main parts. First, a new simplified estimation scheme for leakage area is described, based on the reference stress method. This approach mainly developed in U.K. and more recently in France provides a convenient way to account for the non-linear behavior of the material. Second, the method is carried out for circumferential through-wall cracks located in PWR elbows subjected to internal pressure. Finite element crack area results are presented and comparisons are made with our predictions. Finally, in the third part, the discussion is extended to elbows under combined pressure and in plane bending moment.

  9. Weak coupling chambers in N=2 BPS quiver theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, El Hassan

    2012-11-01

    Using recent results on BPS quiver theory, we develop a group theoretical method to describe the quiver mutations encoding the quantum mechanical duality relating the spectra of distinct quivers. We illustrate the method by computing the BPS spectrum of the infinite weak chamber of some examples of N=2 supersymmetric gauge models without and with quark hypermultiplets.

  10. Numerical study of the effects of lamp configuration and reactor wall roughness in an open channel water disinfection UV reactor.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Tipu

    2016-07-01

    This article describes the assessment of a numerical procedure used to determine the UV lamp configuration and surface roughness effects on an open channel water disinfection UV reactor. The performance of the open channel water disinfection UV reactor was numerically analyzed on the basis of the performance indictor reduction equivalent dose (RED). The RED values were calculated as a function of the Reynolds number to monitor the performance. The flow through the open channel UV reactor was modelled using a k-ε model with scalable wall function, a discrete ordinate (DO) model for fluence rate calculation, a volume of fluid (VOF) model to locate the unknown free surface, a discrete phase model (DPM) to track the pathogen transport, and a modified law of the wall to incorporate the reactor wall roughness effects. The performance analysis was carried out using commercial CFD software (ANSYS Fluent 15.0). Four case studies were analyzed based on open channel UV reactor type (horizontal and vertical) and lamp configuration (parallel and staggered). The results show that lamp configuration can play an important role in the performance of an open channel water disinfection UV reactor. The effects of the reactor wall roughness were Reynolds number dependent. The proposed methodology is useful for performance optimization of an open channel water disinfection UV reactor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. BPS counting for knots and combinatorics on words

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, Piotr; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-11-01

    We discuss relations between quantum BPS invariants defined in terms of a product decomposition of certain series, and difference equations (quantum A-polynomials) that annihilate such series. We construct combinatorial models whose structure is encoded in the form of such difference equations, and whose generating functions (Hilbert-Poincaré series) are solutions to those equations and reproduce generating series that encode BPS invariants. Furthermore, BPS invariants in question are expressed in terms of Lyndon words in an appropriate language, thereby relating counting of BPS states to the branch of mathematics referred to as combinatorics on words. We illustrate these results in the framework of colored extremal knot polynomials: among others we determine dual quantum extremal A-polynomials for various knots, present associated combinatorial models, find corresponding BPS invariants (extremal Labastida-Mariño-Ooguri-Vafa invariants) and discuss their integrality.

  12. A note on multiply wound BPS Wilson loops in ABJM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Marco S.

    2016-09-01

    We consider BPS Wilson loops in planar ABJM theory, wound multiple times around the great circle. We compute the expectation value of the 1/6-BPS and 1/2-BPS Wilson loops to three- and two-loop order in perturbation theory, respectively, dealing with the combinatorics of multiple winding via recursive relations. For the 1/6-BPS Wilson loop we perform the computation at generic framing and at framing 1 we find agreement with the localization result. For the 1/2-BPS Wilson loop we compute the expectation value at trivial framing and by comparison with the matrix model expression we extract the framing dependence of the fermion diagrams.

  13. BPS and non-BPS kinks in a massive nonlinear S{sup 2}-sigma model

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A.; Leon, M. A. Gonzalez; Guilarte, J. Mateos

    2009-06-15

    The stability of the topological kinks of the nonlinear S{sup 2}-sigma model discovered by Alonso Izquierdo et al. is discussed by means of a direct estimation of the spectra of the second-order fluctuation operators around topological kinks. The one-loop mass shifts caused by quantum fluctuations around these kinks are computed using the Cahill-Comtet-Glauber formula. The (lack of) stability of the nontopological kinks is unveiled by application of the Morse index theorem. These kinks are identified as non-BPS states. There are two types of topological kinks coming from the twofold embedding of the sine-Gordon model in the massive nonlinear sigma model. It is shown that sine-Gordon kinks of only one type satisfy first-order equations and are accordingly BPS classical solutions. Finally, the interplay between instability and supersymmetry is explored.

  14. Spectral characteristics of airway opening and chest wall tidal flows in spontaneously breathing preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Habib, Robert H; Pyon, Kee H; Courtney, Sherry E; Aghai, Zubair H

    2003-05-01

    We compared the harmonic content of tidal flows measured simultaneously at the mouth and chest wall in spontaneously breathing very low birth weight infants (n = 16, 1,114 +/- 230 g, gestation age: 28 +/- 2 wk). Airway opening flows were measured via face mask-pneumotachograph (P-tach), whereas chest wall flows were derived from respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) excursions. Next, for each, we computed two spectral shape indexes: 1) harmonic distortion (k(d); k(d,P-tach) and k(d,RIP), respectively) defines the extent to which flows deviated from a single sine wave, and 2) the exponent of the power law (s; s(P-tach) and s(RIP), respectively), describing the spectral energy vs. frequency. P-tach and RIP flow spectra exhibited similar power law functional forms consistently in all infants. Also, mouth [s(P-tach) = 3.73 +/- 0.23% (95% confidence interval), k(d,P-tach) = 38.8 +/- 4.6%] and chest wall (s(RIP) = 3.51 +/- 0.30%, k(d,RIP) = 42.8 +/- 4.8%) indexes were similar and highly correlated (s(RIP) = 1.17 x s(P-tach) + 0.85; r(2) = 0.81; k(d,RIP) = 0.90 x k(d,P-tach) + 8.0; r(2) = 0.76). The corresponding time to peak tidal expiratory flow-to-expiratory time ratio (0.62 +/- 0.08) was higher than reported in older infants. The obtained s and k(d) values are similar to those reported in older and/or larger chronic lung disease infants, yet appreciably lower than for 1-mo-old healthy infants of closer age and/or size; this indicated increased complexity of tidal flows in very low birth weight babies. Importantly, we found equivalent flow spectral data from mouth and chest wall tidal flows. The latter are desirable because they avoid face mask artificial effects, including leaks around it, they do not interfere with ventilatory support delivery, and they may facilitate longer measurements that are useful in control of breathing assessment.

  15. Microbubbles and blood-brain barrier opening: a numerical study on acoustic emissions and wall stress predictions.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhah, Nazanin; Goertz, David E; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-05-01

    Focused ultrasound with microbubbles is an emerging technique for blood-brain barrier opening. Here, a comprehensive theoretical model of a bubble-fluid-vessel system has been developed which accounts for the bubble's nonspherical oscillations inside a microvessel, and its resulting acoustic emissions. Numerical simulations of unbound and confined encapsulated bubbles were performed to evaluate the effect of the vessel wall on acoustic emissions and vessel wall stresses. Using a Marmottant shell model, the normalized second harmonic to fundamental emissions first decreased as a function of pressure (>50 kPa) until reaching a minima ("transition point") at which point they increased. The transition point of unbound compared to confined bubble populations occurred at different pressures and was associated with an accompanying increase in shear and circumferential wall stresses. As the wall stresses depend on the bubble to vessel wall distance, the stresses were evaluated for bubbles with their wall at a constant distance to a flat wall. As a result, the wall stresses were bubble size and frequency dependent and the peak stress values induced by bubbles larger than resonance remained constant versus frequency at a constant mechanical index.

  16. Investigation on Twisting and Side Wall Opening Occurring in Curved Hat Channel Products Made of High Strength Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Masato; Fukui, Ayako; Yano, Hiroshi; Hama, Takayuki; Sunaga, Hideyuki; Makinouchi, Akitake; Asakawa, Motoo

    2011-08-01

    High strength steel sheets are becoming increasingly important for the weight reduction of automotive bodies to meet the requirements for reduced environmental impact. However, dimensional defects resulting from springback are serious issues, and effective methods of predicting and reducing such defects are necessary. In this study, we numerically and experimentally analyzed the mechanisms of dimensional inaccuracies caused by springback occurring in curved hat channel deep drawing products. The analysis was based on the static explicit FEM software "TP-STRUCT" (the solver part is known as "STAMP3D"). The results of the experiments and simulations similarly show that the twist angle is positive (right-hand system) when the drawing height is relatively large. We calculated the twist torque around the longitudinal axis using the stress distributions obtained by FE analysis. Through the investigation of twist torque and its transition during the drawing and die removal processes, we found that the negative torque generated by side wall opening occurring in the die removal process is the dominant factor of the positive twist. Knowing such mechanisms of twist in cases with a relatively large drawing height, we attempted to explore methods of reducing side wall opening by giving the side wall a stepped shape with the eventual aim of reducing twist. Consequently, we concluded that the stepped shape on the side wall has marked effects of reducing side wall opening, mainly through the elimination of bending-unbending effects on die shoulders, which was verified by observing the stress distribution obtained by FE analysis.

  17. Cosmic microwave anisotropies from BPS semilocal strings

    SciTech Connect

    Urrestilla, Jon; Bevis, Neil; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R E-mail: n.bevis@imperial.ac.uk E-mail: martin.kunz@physics.unige.ch

    2008-07-15

    We present the first ever calculation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectra from semilocal cosmic strings, obtained via simulations of a classical field theory. Semilocal strings are a type of non-topological defect arising in some models of inflation motivated by fundamental physics, and are thought to relax the constraints on the symmetry breaking scale as compared to models with (topological) cosmic strings. We derive constraints on the model parameters, including the string tension parameter {mu}, from fits to cosmological data, and find that in this regard Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) semilocal strings resemble global textures more than topological strings. The observed microwave anisotropy at l=10 is reproduced if G{mu} = 5.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} (G is Newton's constant). However as with other defects the spectral shape does not match observations, and in models with inflationary perturbations plus semilocal strings the 95% confidence level upper bound is G{mu}<2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} when CMB, Hubble key project and big bang nucleosynthesis data are used (cf G{mu}<0.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} for cosmic strings). We additionally carry out a Bayesian model comparison of several models with and without defects, showing that models with defects are neither conclusively favoured nor disfavoured at present.

  18. Functional Analysis of Cellulose and Xyloglucan in the Walls of Stomatal Guard Cells of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Yue; Anderson, Charles T.

    2016-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells are pairs of specialized epidermal cells that control water and CO2 exchange between the plant and the environment. To fulfill the functions of stomatal opening and closure that are driven by changes in turgor pressure, guard cell walls must be both strong and flexible, but how the structure and dynamics of guard cell walls enable stomatal function remains poorly understood. To address this question, we applied cell biological and genetic analyses to investigate guard cell walls and their relationship to stomatal function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using live-cell spinning disk confocal microscopy, we measured the motility of cellulose synthase (CESA)-containing complexes labeled by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-CESA3 and observed a reduced proportion of GFP-CESA3 particles colocalizing with microtubules upon stomatal closure. Imaging cellulose organization in guard cells revealed a relatively uniform distribution of cellulose in the open state and a more fibrillar pattern in the closed state, indicating that cellulose microfibrils undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal movements. In cesa3je5 mutants defective in cellulose synthesis and xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking the hemicellulose xyloglucan, stomatal apertures, changes in guard cell length, and cellulose reorganization were aberrant during fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening or abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure, indicating that sufficient cellulose and xyloglucan are required for normal guard cell dynamics. Together, these results provide new insights into how guard cell walls allow stomata to function as responsive mediators of gas exchange at the plant surface. PMID:26729799

  19. Wall-crossing made smooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioline, Boris

    2015-04-01

    In D = 4 , theories on , the index receives contributions not only from single-particle BPS states, counted by the BPS indices, but also from multi-particle states made of BPS constituents. In a recent work [1], a general formula expressing the index in terms of the BPS indices was proposed, which is smooth across walls of marginal stability and reproduces the expected single-particle contributions. In this note, I analyze the two-particle contributions predicted by this formula, and show agreement with the spectral asymmetry of the continuum of scattering states in the supersymmetric quantum mechanics of two non-relativistic, mutually non-local dyons. This may provide a physical justification for the error function profile used in the mathematics literature on indefinite theta series, and in the physics literature on black hole partition functions.

  20. Laccases Direct Lignification in the Discrete Secondary Cell Wall Domains of Protoxylem1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Mathias; Benske, Anika; Smith, Rebecca A.; Watanabe, Yoichiro; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ralph, John; Demura, Taku; Ellis, Brian; Samuels, A. Lacey

    2014-01-01

    Plants precisely control lignin deposition in spiral or annular secondary cell wall domains during protoxylem tracheary element (TE) development. Because protoxylem TEs function to transport water within rapidly elongating tissues, it is important that lignin deposition is restricted to the secondary cell walls in order to preserve the plasticity of adjacent primary wall domains. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inducible VASCULAR NAC DOMAIN7 (VND7) protoxylem TE differentiation system permits the use of mutant backgrounds, fluorescent protein tagging, and high-resolution live-cell imaging of xylem cells during secondary cell wall development. Enzymes synthesizing monolignols, as well as putative monolignol transporters, showed a uniform distribution during protoxylem TE differentiation. By contrast, the oxidative enzymes LACCASE4 (LAC4) and LAC17 were spatially localized to secondary cell walls throughout protoxylem TE differentiation. These data support the hypothesis that precise delivery of oxidative enzymes determines the pattern of cell wall lignification. This view was supported by lac4lac17 mutant analysis demonstrating that laccases are necessary for protoxylem TE lignification. Overexpression studies showed that laccases are sufficient to catalyze ectopic lignin polymerization in primary cell walls when exogenous monolignols are supplied. Our data support a model of protoxylem TE lignification in which monolignols are highly mobile once exported to the cell wall, and in which precise targeting of laccases to secondary cell wall domains directs lignin deposition. PMID:25157028

  1. Efficacy of anti-sclerostin monoclonal antibody BPS804 in adult patients with hypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Jasmin; Hemsley, Sarah; Hofmann, Christine; Kunstmann, Erdmute; Kiese, Beate; Huang, Yue; Chivers, Simon; Valentin, Marie-Anne; Borah, Babul; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Junker, Uwe; Jakob, Franz

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare genetic disorder resulting in variable alterations of bone formation and mineralization that are caused by mutations in the ALPL gene, encoding the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzyme. METHODS. In this phase IIA open-label, single-center, intra-patient, dose-escalating study, adult patients with HPP received 3 ascending intravenous doses of 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg BPS804, a fully human anti-sclerostin monoclonal antibody, on days 1, 15, and 29, respectively. Patients were followed for 16 weeks after the last dose. We assessed the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, preliminary efficacy, and safety of BPS804 administrations at specified intervals during treatment and follow-up. RESULTS. Eight patients (mean age 47.8 years) were enrolled in the study (6 females, 2 males). BPS804 treatment increased mean ALP and bone-specific ALP enzymatic activity between days 2 and 29. Transient increases in the bone formation markers procollagen type-I N-terminal propeptide (PINP), osteocalcin, and parathyroid hormone as well as a transient decrease in the bone resorption marker C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-1) were observed. Lumbar spine bone mineral density showed a mean increase by day 85 and at end of study. Treatment-associated adverse events were mild and transient. CONCLUSION. BPS804 treatment was well tolerated and resulted in increases in bone formation biomarkers and bone mineral density, suggesting that sclerostin inhibition could be applied to enhance bone mineral density, stability, and regeneration in non-life-threatening clinical situations in adults with HPP. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01406977. FUNDING. Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Basel, Switzerland. PMID:28436937

  2. Modelling of masonry infill walls participation in the seismic behaviour of RC buildings using OpenSees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, André; Rodrigues, Hugo; Arêde, António

    2015-06-01

    Recent earthquakes show that masonry infill walls should be taken into account during the design and assessment process of structures, since this type of non-structural elements increase the in-plane stiffness of the structure and consequently the natural period. An overview of the past researches conducted on the modelling of masonry infilled frame issues has been done, with discussion of past analytical investigations and different modelling approaches that many authors have proposed, including micro- and macro-modelling strategies. After this, the present work presents an improved numerical model, based on the Rodrigues et al. (J Earthq Eng 14:390-416, 2010) approach, for simulating the masonry infill walls behaviour in the computer program OpenSees. The main results of the in-plane calibration analyses obtained with one experimental test are presented and discussed. For last, two reinforced concrete regular buildings were studied and subjected to several ground motions, with and without infills' walls.

  3. Band-Gap Opening in Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Encapsulation of an Organic Salt.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Villalva, Julia; Vera-Hidalgo, Mariano; Ruiz-González, Luisa; Burzurí, Enrique; Pérez, Emilio M

    2017-09-25

    The encapsulation of viologen derivatives into metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) results in the opening of a band gap, making the SWNTs semiconducting. Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirm the encapsulation process. Through the fabrication of field-effect transistor devices, the change of the electronic structure of the tubes from metallic to semiconducting upon the encapsulation is confirmed. The opening of a gap in the band structure of the tubes was not detected in supramolecular controls. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Analysis and Parametric Investigation of Active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, James

    The static behaviour of active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams (OCSTWB) with embedded Active/Macro Fibre Composites (AFCs/MFCs) has been investigated for the purpose of advancing the fundamental theory needed in the development of advanced smart structures. An efficient code that can analyze active OCSTWB using analytical equations has been studied. Various beam examples have been investigated in order to verify this recently developed analytical active OCSTWB analysis tool. The cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force, moments and bimoment predicted by this analytical code have been compared with those predicted by the 2-D finite element beam cross section analysis codes called the Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional (VABS) analysis and the University of Michigan VABS (UM/VABS). Good agreement was observed between the results obtained from the analytical tool and VABS. The calculated cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force/moments, the constitutive relation and the six intrinstic static equilibrium equations for OCSTWB were all used together in a first-order accurate forward difference scheme in order to determine the average twist and deflections along the beam span. In order to further verify the analytical code, the static behaviour of a number of beam examples was investigated using 3-D Finite Element Analysis (FEA). For a particular cross section, the rigid body twist and displacements were minimized with the displacements of all the nodes in the 3-D FEA model that compose the cross section. This was done for a number of cross sections along the beam span in order to recover the global beam twist and displacement profiles from the 3-D FEA results. The global twist and deflections predicted by the analytical code agreed closely with those predicted by UM/VABS and 3-D FEA. The study was completed by a parametric investigation to determine the boundary conditions and the composite ply lay-ups of the active and passive plies that

  5. Exact Attractive Non-BPS STU Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Sivanandam, Navin; Soroush, Masoud; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-07-18

    We develop some properties of the non-BPS attractive STU black hole. Our principle result is the construction of exact solutions for the moduli, the metric and the vectors in terms of appropriate harmonic functions. In addition, we find a spherically-symmetric attractor carrying p{sup 0} (D6 brane) and q{sub a} (D2 brane) charges by solving the non-BPS attractor equation (which we present in a particularly compact form) and by minimizing an effective black hole potential. Finally, we make an argument for the existence of multicenter attractors and conjecture that if such solutions exist they may provide a resolution to the existence of apparently unstable non-BPS ''attractors''.

  6. BPS Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime and Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao; Wu, Jun-Bao; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2015-12-01

    We give evidence that spacelike BPS Wilson loops do not exist in Minkowski spacetime. We show that spacelike Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime cannot preserve any supersymmetries, in d = 4 N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory, d = 3 N = 2 super Chern-Simons-matter theory, and d = 3 N = 6 Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena theory. We not only show this using infinite straight lines and circles as examples, but also we give proofs for general curves. We attribute this to the conflicts of the reality conditions of the spinors. However, spacelike Wilson loops do exist in Euclidean space. There are both BPS Wilson loops along infinite straight lines and circular BPS Wilson loops. This is because the reality conditions of the spinors are lost after Wick rotation. The result is reasonable in view of the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  7. Intravesical liposome drug delivery and IC/BPS.

    PubMed

    Janicki, Joseph J; Gruber, Michele A; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-10-01

    Intravesical therapy has previously shown to be effective in delaying or preventing recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. This local route of drug administration is now demonstrating promise in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) with the benefit of minimal systemic side effects. Liposomes (LPs) are lipid vesicles composed of phospholipid bilayers surrounding an aqueous core. They can incorporate drug molecules, both hydrophobic and hydrophilic, and vastly improve cellular uptake of these drug molecules via endocytosis. Intravesical LPs have therapeutic effects on IC/BPS patients, mainly due to their ability to form a protective lipid film on the urothelial surface and repair the damaged urothelium. This review considers the current status of intravesical LPs and LP mediated drug delivery for the treatment of IC/BPS.

  8. Intravesical liposome drug delivery and IC/BPS

    PubMed Central

    Janicki, Joseph J.; Gruber, Michele A.

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical therapy has previously shown to be effective in delaying or preventing recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. This local route of drug administration is now demonstrating promise in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) with the benefit of minimal systemic side effects. Liposomes (LPs) are lipid vesicles composed of phospholipid bilayers surrounding an aqueous core. They can incorporate drug molecules, both hydrophobic and hydrophilic, and vastly improve cellular uptake of these drug molecules via endocytosis. Intravesical LPs have therapeutic effects on IC/BPS patients, mainly due to their ability to form a protective lipid film on the urothelial surface and repair the damaged urothelium. This review considers the current status of intravesical LPs and LP mediated drug delivery for the treatment of IC/BPS. PMID:26816855

  9. BPS amplitudes, helicity supertraces and membranes in M-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wit, B. d.; Lüst, D.

    2000-03-01

    We study BPS dominated loop amplitudes in M-theory on T2. For this purpose we generalize the concept of helicity supertraces to nine spacetime dimensions. These traces distinguish between various massive supermultiplets and appear as coefficients in their one-loop contributions to n-graviton scattering amplitudes. This can be used to show that only ultrashort BPS multiplets contribute to the R4 term in the effective action, which was first computed by Green, Gutperle and Vanhove. There are two inequivalent ultrashort BPS multiplets which describe the Kaluza-Klein states and the wrapped membranes that cover the torus a number of times. From the perspective of the type-II strings they correspond to momentum and winding states and D0 or D1 branes.

  10. Asymptotic dynamics of monopole walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R.

    2015-08-01

    We determine the asymptotic dynamics of the U(N) doubly periodic BPS monopole in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory, called a monopole wall, by exploring its Higgs curve using the Newton polytope and amoeba. In particular, we show that the monopole wall splits into subwalls when any of its moduli become large. The long-distance gauge and Higgs field interactions of these subwalls are Abelian, allowing us to derive an asymptotic metric for the monopole wall moduli space.

  11. Pea Border Cell Maturation and Release Involve Complex Cell Wall Structural Dynamics1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The adhesion of plant cells is vital for support and protection of the plant body and is maintained by a variety of molecular associations between cell wall components. In some specialized cases, though, plant cells are programmed to detach, and root cap-derived border cells are examples of this. Border cells (in some species known as border-like cells) provide an expendable barrier between roots and the environment. Their maturation and release is an important but poorly characterized cell separation event. To gain a deeper insight into the complex cellular dynamics underlying this process, we undertook a systematic, detailed analysis of pea (Pisum sativum) root tip cell walls. Our study included immunocarbohydrate microarray profiling, monosaccharide composition determination, Fourier-transformed infrared microspectroscopy, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR of cell wall biosynthetic genes, analysis of hydrolytic activities, transmission electron microscopy, and immunolocalization of cell wall components. Using this integrated glycobiology approach, we identified multiple novel modes of cell wall structural and compositional rearrangement during root cap growth and the release of border cells. Our findings provide a new level of detail about border cell maturation and enable us to develop a model of the separation process. We propose that loss of adhesion by the dissolution of homogalacturonan in the middle lamellae is augmented by an active biophysical process of cell curvature driven by the polarized distribution of xyloglucan and extensin epitopes. PMID:28400496

  12. Secretory COPII Protein SEC31B Is Required for Pollen Wall Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bingchun; Shi, Haidan; Wang, Wanlei; Liu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Hui; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yinghui; Yang, Meidi; Li, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The pollen wall protects pollen grains from abiotic and biotic stresses. During pollen wall development, tapetal cells play a vital role by secreting proteins, signals, and pollen wall material to ensure microspore development. But the regulatory mechanism underlying the secretory pathway of the tapetum is largely unknown. Here, we characterize the essential role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) COPII protein SECRETORY31B (SEC31B) in pollen wall development and the secretory activity of tapetal cells. The sporophyte-controlled atsec31b mutant exhibits severe pollen and seed abortion. Transmission electron microscopy observation indicates that pollen exine formation in the atsec31b mutant is disrupted significantly. AtSEC31B is a functional COPII protein revealed by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit site localization, interaction with AtSEC13A, and retarded ER-Golgi protein trafficking in the atsec31b mutant. A genetic tapetum-specific rescue assay indicates that AtSEC31B functions primarily in the tapetum. Moreover, deletion of AtSEC31B interrupted the formation of the ER-derived tapetosome and altered the location of the ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTER9 protein in the tapetum. Therefore, this work demonstrates that AtSEC31B plays a vital role in pollen wall development by regulating the secretory pathway of the tapetal cells. PMID:27634427

  13. Refinement and evaluation of crack-opening-area analyses for circumferential through-wall cracks in pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Wilkowski, G.; Choi, Y.H. |; Moberg, F.; Brickstad, B. |

    1995-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet impingement shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. These leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of a through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses, which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section 11. This study was requested by the NRC to review, evaluate, and refine current analytical models for crack-opening-area analyses of pipes with circumferential through-wall cracks. Twenty-five pipe experiments were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the predictive models. Several practical aspects of crack-opening such as; crack-face pressure, off-center cracks, restraint of pressure-induced bending, cracks in thickness transition regions, weld residual stresses, crack-morphology models, and thermal-hydraulic analysis, were also investigated. 140 refs., 105 figs., 41 tabs.

  14. Full-scale shear wall tests for force transfer around openings

    Treesearch

    Tom Skaggs; Borjen Yeh; Frank Lam; Douglas Rammer; James Wacker

    2010-01-01

    Wood structural panel sheathed shear walls and diaphragms are the primary lateral-load resisting elements in wood-frame construction. The historical performance of light-frame structures in North America are very good due, in part, to model building codes that are designed to preserve life safety, as well as the inherent redundancy of wood-frame construction using wood...

  15. Modelling Force Transfer Around Openings of Full-Scale Shear Walls

    Treesearch

    Tom Skaggs; Borjen Yeh; Frank Lam; Minghao Li; Doug Rammer; James Wacker

    2011-01-01

    Wood structural panel (WSP) sheathed shear walls and diaphragms are the primary lateralload-resisting elements in wood-frame construction. The historical performance of lightframe structures in North America has been very good due, in part, to model building codes that are designed to preserve life safety. These model building codes have spawned continual improvement...

  16. Role of Glycosyltransferases in Pollen Wall Primexine Formation and Exine Patterning1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenhua L.; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2017-01-01

    The pollen cell wall is important for protection of male sperm from physical stresses and consists of an inner gametophyte-derived intine layer and a sporophyte-derived exine layer. The polymeric constituents of the robust exine are termed sporopollenin. The mechanisms by which sporopollenin is anchored onto microspores and polymerized in specific patterns are unknown, but the primexine, a transient cell wall matrix formed on the surface of microspores at the late tetrad stage, is hypothesized to play a key role. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) spongy (spg) and uneven pattern of exine (upex) mutants exhibit defective and irregular exine patterns. SPG2 (synonymous with IRREGULAR XYLEM9-LIKE [IRX9L]) encodes a family GT43 glycosyltransferase involved in xylan backbone biosynthesis, while UPEX1 encodes a family GT31 glycosyltransferase likely involved in galactosylation of arabinogalactan proteins. Imaging of developing irx9l microspores showed that the earliest detectable defect was in primexine formation. Furthermore, wild-type microspores contained primexine-localized epitopes indicative of the presence of xylan, but these were absent in irx9l. These data, together with the spg phenotype of a mutant in IRX14L, which also plays a role in xylan backbone elongation, indicate the presence of xylan in pollen wall primexine, which plays a role in exine patterning on the microspore surface. We observed an aberrant primexine and irregular patterns of incipient sporopollenin deposition in upex1, suggesting that primexine-localized arabinogalactan proteins could play roles in sporopollenin adhesion and patterning early in microspore wall development. Our data provide new insights into the biochemical and functional properties of the primexine component of the microspore cell wall. PMID:27495941

  17. On derivation of BPS equations of vortices in K-generalized Abelian-Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmaja, A. N.

    2017-07-01

    A new self-dual equation, or BPS equations, of vortices in the K-generalized Abelian-Higgs Model was derived by exploiting the identity equation of the scalar kinetic terms [1]. Here we develop a method for obtaining these BPS equations by assuming the BPS energy EBPS can be written as an integral over total derivative of energy function Q, which is a function of the effective fields, as such we can define a BPS Lagrangian ℒBPS ∝ -Q'(r), where r is an effective coordinate. Matching this BPS Lagrangian with the corresponding effective Lagrangian, we can extract the resulting BPS equations. We show there are two ways to get the BPS equations of vortices in the K-generalized Abelian-Higgs Model using our method.

  18. Moss Chloroplasts Are Surrounded by a Peptidoglycan Wall Containing D-Amino Acids[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Takayuki; Tanidokoro, Koji; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Sato, Momo; Tadano, Shinji; Ishikawa, Hayato; Takio, Susumu; Takechi, Katsuaki; Takano, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that the plastids in green plants lost peptidoglycan (i.e., a bacterial cell wall-containing d-amino acids) during their evolution from an endosymbiotic cyanobacterium. Although wall-like structures could not be detected in the plastids of green plants, the moss Physcomitrella patens has the genes required to generate peptidoglycan (Mur genes), and knocking out these genes causes defects in chloroplast division. Here, we generated P. patens knockout lines (∆Pp-ddl) for a homolog of the bacterial peptidoglycan-synthetic gene encoding d-Ala:d-Ala ligase. ∆Pp-ddl had a macrochloroplast phenotype, similar to other Mur knockout lines. The addition of d-Ala-d-Ala (DA-DA) to the medium suppressed the appearance of giant chloroplasts in ∆Pp-ddl, but the addition of l-Ala-l-Ala (LA-LA), DA-LA, LA-DA, or d-Ala did not. Recently, a metabolic method for labeling bacterial peptidoglycan was established using ethynyl-DA-DA (EDA-DA) and click chemistry to attach an azide-modified fluorophore to the ethynyl group. The ∆Pp-ddl line complemented with EDA-DA showed that moss chloroplasts are completely surrounded by peptidoglycan. Our findings strongly suggest that the moss plastids have a peptidoglycan wall containing d-amino acids. By contrast, no plastid phenotypes were observed in the T-DNA tagged ddl mutant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27325639

  19. Static and free-vibrational response of semi-circular graphite-epoxy frames with thin-walled open sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. Scott; Johnson, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional static and free vibrational response of two graphite-epoxy, thin-walled, open section frames. The frames are semi-circular with a radius of three feet, and one specimen has an I cross section and the other has a channel cross section. The flexibility influence coefficients were measured in static tests for loads applied at midspan with the ends of the specimens clamped. Natural frequencies and modes were determined from vibrational tests for free and clamped end conditions. The experimental data is used to evaluate a new finite element which was developed specifically for the analysis of curved, thin-walled structures. The formulation of the element is based on a Vlasov-type, thin-walled, curved beam theory. The predictions from the finite element program generally correlated well with the experimental data for the symmetric I-specimen. Discrepancies in some of the data were found to be due to flexibility in the clamped end conditions. With respect to the data for the channel specimen, the correlation was less satisfactory. The finite element analysis predicted the out-of-plane response of the channel specimen reasonably well, but large discrepancies occurred between the predicted in-plane response and the experimental data. The analysis predicted a much more compliant in-plane response than was observed in the experiments.

  20. Intraoperative use of fluorescent imaging with indocyanine green changes management of abdominal wall flaps during open ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jonathan; May, Audriene; Ryan, Heidi; Tsuda, Shawn

    2015-07-01

    Wound complications including infection and necrosis remain common during complex open ventral hernia repair. Advancements or enhancements in imaging technology may abate some of these issues but requires more investigation. Laser-assisted fluorescent imaging with indocyanine green (Spy Elite, LifeCell Corporation, Branchburg, NJ) allows visualization and quantification of perfusion, facilitating management of poorly perfused tissue. Ten patients, who underwent large or massive ventral or incisional hernia repair with biologic graft reinforcement and either perforator-sparing components separation or primary open repair, underwent intraoperative laser-assisted fluorescent imaging with indocyanine green from August 2012 to August 2013. The cases were reviewed by an independent data collector with primary outcomes of postoperative skin infection and/or abdominal wall necrosis. Three (30%) patients had adequate perfusion, while seven (70%) patients had inadequate skin perfusion and necessitated excision of additional tissue. Of the patients whose ischemic tissue was removed, four (57%) patients had an infection and no patients developed necrosis postoperatively. Of the patients who had no removal of additional skin, one (33%) patient developed an infection and one (33%) patients developed skin necrosis. The intraoperative use of laser-assisted fluorescent imaging with indocyanine green may change management of abdominal wall flaps, even in perforator-sparing operations. Our study series is small and cannot suggest statistical significance in the potential benefit of intraoperative imaging, but shows that up to 70% of patients may require change in management due to poorly perfused tissue flaps.

  1. Primary Metabolism during Biosynthesis of Secondary Wall Polymers of Protoxylem Vessel Elements1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Morisaki, Keiko; Sawada, Yuji; Sano, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kurata, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Shiro; Matsuda, Mami; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-01-01

    Xylem vessels, the water-conducting cells in vascular plants, undergo characteristic secondary wall deposition and programmed cell death. These processes are regulated by the VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN (VND) transcription factors. Here, to identify changes in metabolism that occur during protoxylem vessel element differentiation, we subjected tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 suspension culture cells carrying an inducible VND7 system to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based wide-target metabolome analysis and transcriptome analysis. Time-course data for 128 metabolites showed dynamic changes in metabolites related to amino acid biosynthesis. The concentration of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, an important intermediate of the glycolysis pathway, immediately decreased in the initial stages of cell differentiation. As cell differentiation progressed, specific amino acids accumulated, including the shikimate-related amino acids and the translocatable nitrogen-rich amino acid arginine. Transcriptome data indicated that cell differentiation involved the active up-regulation of genes encoding the enzymes catalyzing fructose 6-phosphate biosynthesis from glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate biosynthesis from oxaloacetate, and phenylalanine biosynthesis, which includes shikimate pathway enzymes. Concomitantly, active changes in the amount of fructose 6-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate were detected during cell differentiation. Taken together, our results show that protoxylem vessel element differentiation is associated with changes in primary metabolism, which could facilitate the production of polysaccharides and lignin monomers and, thus, promote the formation of the secondary cell wall. Also, these metabolic shifts correlate with the active transcriptional regulation of specific enzyme genes. Therefore, our observations indicate that primary metabolism is actively regulated during protoxylem vessel element differentiation to alter the cell’s metabolic

  2. A Distinct Pathway for Polar Exocytosis in Plant Cell Wall Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Zhuang, Xiaohong; Wang, Xiangfeng; Law, Angus Ho Yin; Zhao, Teng; Du, Shengwang; Loy, Michael M.T.; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Post-Golgi protein sorting and trafficking to the plasma membrane (PM) is generally believed to occur via the trans-Golgi network (TGN). In this study using Nicotiana tabacum pectin methylesterase (NtPPME1) as a marker, we have identified a TGN-independent polar exocytosis pathway that mediates cell wall formation during cell expansion and cytokinesis. Confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Golgi-derived secretory vesicles (GDSVs) labeled by NtPPME1-GFP are distinct from those organelles belonging to the conventional post-Golgi exocytosis pathway. In addition, pharmaceutical treatments, superresolution imaging, and dynamic studies suggest that NtPPME1 follows a polar exocytic process from Golgi-GDSV-PM/cell plate (CP), which is distinct from the conventional Golgi-TGN-PM/CP secretion pathway. Further studies show that ROP1 regulates this specific polar exocytic pathway. Taken together, we have demonstrated an alternative TGN-independent Golgi-to-PM polar exocytic route, which mediates secretion of NtPPME1 for cell wall formation during cell expansion and cytokinesis and is ROP1-dependent. PMID:27531442

  3. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY: an expert-driven knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Pawson, Adam J.; Sharman, Joanna L.; Benson, Helen E.; Faccenda, Elena; Alexander, Stephen P.H.; Buneman, O. Peter; Davenport, Anthony P.; McGrath, John C.; Peters, John A.; Southan, Christopher; Spedding, Michael; Yu, Wenyuan; Harmar, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology/British Pharmacological Society (IUPHAR/BPS) Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) is a new open access resource providing pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and pathophysiological data on the targets of approved and experimental drugs. Created under the auspices of the IUPHAR and the BPS, the portal provides concise, peer-reviewed overviews of the key properties of a wide range of established and potential drug targets, with in-depth information for a subset of important targets. The resource is the result of curation and integration of data from the IUPHAR Database (IUPHAR-DB) and the published BPS ‘Guide to Receptors and Channels’ (GRAC) compendium. The data are derived from a global network of expert contributors, and the information is extensively linked to relevant databases, including ChEMBL, DrugBank, Ensembl, PubChem, UniProt and PubMed. Each of the ∼6000 small molecule and peptide ligands is annotated with manually curated 2D chemical structures or amino acid sequences, nomenclature and database links. Future expansion of the resource will complete the coverage of all the targets of currently approved drugs and future candidate targets, alongside educational resources to guide scientists and students in pharmacological principles and techniques. PMID:24234439

  4. National Outcomes for Open Ventral Hernia Repair Techniques in Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ross, Samuel W; Oommen, Bindhu; Huntington, Ciara; Walters, Amanda L; Lincourt, Amy E; Kercher, Kent W; Augenstein, Vedra A; Heniford, B Todd

    2015-08-01

    Modern adjuncts to complex, open ventral hernia repair often include component separation (CS) and/or panniculectomy (PAN). This study examines nationwide data to determine how these techniques impact postoperative complications. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried from 2005 to 2013 for inpatient, elective open ventral hernia repairs (OVHR). Cases were grouped by the need for and type of concomitant advancement flaps: OVHR alone (OVHRA), OVHR with CS, OVHR with panniculectomy (PAN), or both CS and PAN (BOTH). Multivariate regression to control for confounding factors was conducted. There were 58,845 OVHR: 51,494 OVHRA, 5,357 CS, 1,617 PAN, and 377 BOTH. Wound complications (OVHRA 8.2%, CS 12.8%, PAN 14.4%, BOTH 17.5%), general complications (15.2%, 24.9%, 25.2%, 31.6%), and major complications (6.9%, 11.4%, 7.2%, 13.5%) were different between groups (P < 0.0001). There was no difference in mortality. Multivariate regression showed CS had higher odds of wound [odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-2.0], general (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.3-1.8), and major complications (OR 2.1, 95%, CI: 1.8-2.4), and longer length of stay by 2.3 days. PAN had higher odds of wound (OR 1.5, 95%, CI: 1.3-1.8) and general complications (OR 1.7, 95%CI: 1.5-2.0). Both CS and PAN had higher odds of wound (OR 2.2, 95%, CI: 1.5-3.2), general (OR 2.5, 95%, CI: 1.8-3.4), and major complications (OR 2.2, 95%CI: 1.4-3.4), and two days longer length of stay. In conclusion, patients undergoing OVHR that require CS or PAN have a higher independent risk of complications, which increases when the procedures are combined.

  5. Reduced Wall Acetylation Proteins Play Vital and Distinct Roles in Cell Wall O-Acetylation in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Gille, Sascha; Harholt, Jesper; Chong, Sun-Li; Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.; Tenkanen, Maija; Cheng, Kun; Pauly, Markus; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2013-01-01

    The Reduced Wall Acetylation (RWA) proteins are involved in cell wall acetylation in plants. Previously, we described a single mutant, rwa2, which has about 20% lower level of O-acetylation in leaf cell walls and no obvious growth or developmental phenotype. In this study, we generated double, triple, and quadruple loss-of-function mutants of all four members of the RWA family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In contrast to rwa2, the triple and quadruple rwa mutants display severe growth phenotypes revealing the importance of wall acetylation for plant growth and development. The quadruple rwa mutant can be completely complemented with the RWA2 protein expressed under 35S promoter, indicating the functional redundancy of the RWA proteins. Nevertheless, the degree of acetylation of xylan, (gluco)mannan, and xyloglucan as well as overall cell wall acetylation is affected differently in different combinations of triple mutants, suggesting their diversity in substrate preference. The overall degree of wall acetylation in the rwa quadruple mutant was reduced by 63% compared with the wild type, and histochemical analysis of the rwa quadruple mutant stem indicates defects in cell differentiation of cell types with secondary cell walls. PMID:24019426

  6. Domain Walls, Black Holes and Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect

    Shmakova, Marina

    2001-07-25

    Supersymmetric solutions, such as BPS domain walls or black holes, in four- and five-dimensional supergravity theories with eight supercharges can be described by effective quantum mechanics with a potential term. We show how properties of the latter theory can help us to learn about the physics of supersymmetric vacua and BPS solutions in these supergravity theories. The general approach is illustrated in a number of specific examples where scalar fields of matter multiplets take values in symmetric coset spaces.

  7. BPS states in the duality web of the Omega deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellerman, Simeon; Orlando, Domenico; Reffert, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    In this note, we study different limits of an Ω-deformed (2, 0) six-dimensional gauge theory realized in an M-theory fluxtrap background. Via a chain of dualities, we connect the Ω-deformed sym to a new four-dimensional gauge theory which we refer to as the reciprocal gauge theory. This theory has several properties in common with Liouville field theory, such as its gauge coupling b 2 = ɛ 2/ ɛ 1, and its behavior under S-duality. Finally, we realize the bps states on the sym side of the agt correspondence and follow them along the chain of dualities. In the fluxtrap frame, we are dealing with two distinct types of states localized in different radial positions, while in the reciprocal frame, we find single states carrying both charges localized in one place which appear to be perturbatively stable. Our microscopic picture of the small- b limit exhibits semiclassically bps bound states, which are not visible at the level of the partition function.

  8. Ultrastructure of the Epidermal Cell Wall and Cuticle of Tomato Fruit (Solanum lycopersicum L.) during Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Segado, Patricia; Domínguez, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The epidermis plays a pivotal role in plant development and interaction with the environment. However, it is still poorly understood, especially its outer epidermal wall: a singular wall covered by a cuticle. Changes in the cuticle and cell wall structures are important to fully understand their functions. In this work, an ultrastructure and immunocytochemical approach was taken to identify changes in the cuticle and the main components of the epidermal cell wall during tomato fruit development. A thin and uniform procuticle was already present before fruit set. During cell division, the inner side of the procuticle showed a globular structure with vesicle-like particles in the cell wall close to the cuticle. Transition between cell division and elongation was accompanied by a dramatic increase in cuticle thickness, which represented more than half of the outer epidermal wall, and the lamellate arrangement of the non-cutinized cell wall. Changes in this non-cutinized outer wall during development showed specific features not shared with other cell walls. The coordinated nature of the changes observed in the cuticle and the epidermal cell wall indicate a deep interaction between these two supramolecular structures. Hence, the cuticle should be interpreted within the context of the outer epidermal wall. PMID:26668335

  9. Effect of bioactive peptides (BPs) on the development of Pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei Boone, 1931)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangjun; Yu, Ermeng; Li, Zhifei; Yu, Deguang; Wang, Haiying; Gong, Wangbao

    2016-06-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of replacing fish meal (FM) with bioactive peptides (BPs) in diet of white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei). The changes in growth performance, body composition, non-specific immunity, and water quality were examined after the shrimp were fed four diets, in which 0% (control), 33.3%, 66.7% and 100% of FM was replaced by BPs, respectively. The groups were designated as Con, 1/3BPs, 2/3BPs, and 3/3BPs. A total of 720 shrimp with an initial body weight of 1.46 ± 0.78 g were fed the experimental diets for 56 days. The results revealed that: 1) the weight gain rate (WGR) in 1/3BPs, 2/3BPs, and 3/3BPs was significantly higher than that in Con ( P < 0.05), while no significant difference was found on survival rate and feed conversion ratio (FCR); 2) the whole-body crude protein (CP) and crude lipids (CL) were significantly different among groups, while there was no significant difference between crude ash and phosphorus contents; 3) the levels of acid phosphatase (ACP), lysozyme (LZM), superoxide dismutase (SOD), phenol oxidase (PO) and bactericidal activity increased significantly with the inclusion of BPs; 4) in terms of water quality, no significant difference was found in pH and dissolved oxygen among diets during the whole experimental period. Moreover, even though nitrite and ammonium levels tended to increase with time, there was no significant difference among groups. The results indicated that BPs is an applicable alternative of protein source, which can substitute FM in the diets of L. vannamei; it is able to effectively promote growth performance and improve immunity. Moreover, BPs in the diets had no negative impact on water quality.

  10. Effects of rat sex differences and lighting on locomotor exploration of a circular open field with free-standing central corners and without peripheral walls.

    PubMed

    Alstott, Jeff; Timberlake, William

    2009-01-23

    A typical open field consists of a square enclosure, bounded by four straight walls joined by identical corners. For decades behavioral researchers have used the open center and more sheltered perimeter of such fields to examine the effects of drugs, sex differences, and illumination on the behavioral expression of fear and anxiety. The present study "reversed" the relative security of the center and periphery of a circular field to re-examine the functional relation of open field behavior to experience, sex differences and lighting. Across six daily exposures, males in both the light and dark rapidly increased their preference for the center. Females in the light developed a similar pattern, though more slowly; females in the dark continued to spend the great majority of their time in the open periphery, including the edge of the field. The behavior of all groups, but especially the dark females, strongly supports the continued importance of environmental assessment in open field behavior.

  11. BPS states in N = 2 supersymmetric G2 and F4 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl Laamara, R.; Mellal, O.; Saidi, E. H.

    2017-07-01

    In BPS quiver theory of N = 2 supersymmetric pure gauge models with gauge invariance G, primitive BPS quivers Q0G are of two types: Q0ADE and Q0BCFG. In this study, we first show that Q0ADE have outer-automorphism symmetries inherited from the outer-automorphisms of the Dynkin diagrams of ADE Lie algebras. Then, we extend the usual folding operation of Dynkin diagrams ADE → BCFG to obtain the two following things: (i) relate Q0BCFG quivers and their mutations to the Q0ADE ones and their mutations; and (ii) link the BPS chambers of the N = 2ADE theories with the corresponding BCFG ones. As an illustration of this construction, we derive the BPS and anti-BPS states of the strong chambers QstgG2 and QstgF4 of the 4d N = 2 pure G2 and F4 gauge models.

  12. BPS spectra of N = 2 SO7 and SP4 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl Laamara, R.; Mellal, O.; Saidi, E. H.

    2017-01-01

    Extending the folding method of ADE Dynkin diagrams of Lie algebras to BPS quivers of 4d N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theory with ADE type gauge invariance, we study the BPS spectra for gauge symmetries with non-simply laced Lie algebras. Focussing on the 4d N = 2 SO7 and SP4 models, we derive the BPS states of the strong chambers of these theories. We find that for both gauge groups Gnsl = SO7 and SP4 ≃ SO (5) , the number of BPS states of the strongly coupled chamber is 2 dim ⁡Gnsl versus 2 dim ⁡Gsl - 2 rankGsl for the cousin gauge symmetries Gsl = SO8 and SU4 ≃ SO (6) . The relationship between the Gsl and Gnsl types of BPS quiver mutations is derived. Other features are also studied.

  13. Topological BPS charges in 10- and 11-dimensional supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callister, Andrew K.; Smith, Douglas J.

    2008-09-01

    We consider the supersymmetry algebras of the maximal supergravities in 10 and 11 dimensions. We construct expressions from which the topological charge structure of the algebras can be determined in supersymmetric curved backgrounds. These are interpreted as the topological charges of the 1/2-BPS states that are found in the theories. We consider charges for all the M-, NS- and D-branes as well as the Kaluza-Klein monopoles. We also show that the dimensional reduction relations between the 11-dimensional and IIA charges, and T-duality relations of the IIA and IIB charges, match those found for the branes themselves. Finally we consider the massive versions of the IIA and 11-dimensional theories and find that the expressions for the charges, with a slight modification, are still valid in those instances.

  14. Non-BPS multi-bubble microstate geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Bossard, Guillaume; Katmadas, Stefanos; Turton, David

    2016-02-01

    We construct the first smooth horizonless supergravity solutions that have two topologically-nontrivial three-cycles supported by flux, and that have the same mass and charges as a non-extremal D1-D5-P black hole. Our configurations are solutions to six-dimensional ungauged supergravity coupled to a tensor multiplet, and uplift to solutions of Type IIB supergravity. The solutions represent multi-center generalizations of the non-BPS solutions of Jejjala, Madden, Ross, and Titchener, which have over-rotating angular momenta. By adding an additional Gibbons-Hawking center, we succeed in lowering one of the two angular momenta below the cosmic censorship bound, and bringing the other very close to this bound. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to construct multi-center horizonless solutions corresponding to non-extremal black holes, and offer the prospect of ultimately establishing that finite-temperature black holes have nontrivial structure at the horizon.

  15. Doubly-fluctuating BPS solutions in six dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, Benjamin E.; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2013-10-01

    We analyze the BPS solutions of minimal supergravity coupled to an anti-self-dual tensor multiplet in six dimensions and find solutions that fluctuate non-trivially as a function of two variables. We consider families of solutions coming from KKM monopoles fibered over Gibbons-Hawking metrics or, equivalently, non-trivial T 2 fibrations over an base. We find smooth microstate geometries that depend upon many functions of one variable, but each such function depends upon a different direction inside the T 2 so that the complete solution depends non-trivially upon the whole T 2. We comment on the implications of our results for the construction of a general superstratum.

  16. Do all BPS black hole microstates carry zero angular momentum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Abhishek; Garavuso, Richard S.; Mondal, Swapnamay; Sen, Ashoke

    2016-04-01

    From the analysis of the near horizon geometry and supersymmetry algebra it has been argued that all the microstates of single centered BPS black holes with four unbroken supersymmetries carry zero angular momentum in the region of the moduli space where the black hole description is valid. A stronger form of the conjecture would be that the result holds for any sufficiently generic point in the moduli space. In this paper we set out to test this conjecture for a class of black hole microstates in type II string theory on T 6, represented by four stacks of D-branes wrapped on various cycles of T 6. For this system the above conjecture translates to the statement that the moduli space of classical vacua must be a collection of points. Explicit analysis of systems carrying a low number of D-branes supports this conjecture.

  17. Quantum Holonomies from Spectral Networks and Framed BPS States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabella, Maxime

    2017-04-01

    We propose a method for determining the spins of BPS states supported on line defects in 4d N=2 theories of class S. Via the 2d-4d correspondence, this translates to the construction of quantum holonomies on a punctured Riemann surface C. Our approach combines the technology of spectral networks, which decomposes flat {GL(K,C)-connections on C in terms of flat abelian connections on a K-fold cover of C, and the skein algebra in the 3-manifold C × [0,1]}, which expresses the representation theory of the quantum group U q ( gl K ). With any path on C, the quantum holonomy associates a positive Laurent polynomial in the quantized Fock-Goncharov coordinates of higher Teichmüller space. This confirms various positivity conjectures in physics and mathematics.

  18. A 4800 bps CELP vocoder with an improved excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassanein, Hisham; Brindamour, Andre; Bryden, Karen

    1990-01-01

    The Stochastic or Code Excited Linear Predictive Coder (CELP) is among the promising candidates for producing good quality speech at low bit rates. However, the speech quality produced suffers from perceived roughness. Many researchers have used pole-zero postfilters to mask the roughness at the output of the synthesis filter. Although the postfilters are effective in masking the noise at low bit rates, they produce spectral distortions. It is proposed that speech can be improved by introducing two modifications to the fixed stochastic codebook. In the first modification, the stochastic codebook is used only when the long term correlations are low. Otherwise, a pulse like codebook is selected. In the second modification, the selected codebook output is weighted using an adaptive spectral shaping procedure. These two modifications were incorporated in a 4800 bps CELP coder and have resulted in a perceptually improved vocoded speech.

  19. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  20. Depletion of cellular iron by bps and ascorbate: effect on toxicity of adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Nyayapati, S; Afshan, G; Lornitzo, F; Byrnes, R W; Petering, D H

    1996-01-01

    A new method was developed that reduces the intracellular iron content of cells grown in serum-containing culture without involving the significant uptake of iron-chelating agents into cells. Negatively charged bathophenanthrolinedisulfonate (BPS), together with ascorbate, caused cells to lose much of their cellular iron without causing much depression in HL-60 or H9c2 (2-1) cell proliferation over a 48-h period. When added to serum supplemented RPMI-1640 culture media, BPS and ascorbate efficiently reduced and competed for iron in Fe(III) transferrin to form Fe(II)(BPS)3. The reaction also occurred with purified human iron-transferrin. When cells were incubated with growth medium containing serum that had been treated with BPS and ascorbate for 24 h, little or no BPS2- or Fe(II)(BPS)(4-)3 entered the cells, according to direct measurements and in agreement with the highly unfavorable 1-octanol/water partition coefficients for these molecules. However, iron was mobilized out of both cell types. After 24 h incubation of cells in this medium, there was no change in the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase, or in the concentration of glutathione. Glutathione peroxidase was elevated 9%. Using HL-60 and H9c2 (2-1) cells made iron deficient with BPS and ascorbate, HL-60 cells grown in defined-growth media in the absence of iron-pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone, or Euglena gracilis cells maintained in a defined medium that was rigorously depleted of iron, it was shown that the cytotoxicity of adriamycin is markedly dependent on the presence of iron in each type of cell. Similar results were obtained when HL-60 cells were grown in RPMI-1640 culture medium and serum that had been incubated for 24 h in BPS and ascorbate and then chromatographed over a Bio-Rad desalting column to remove small molecules including BPS, ascorbate, and Fe(II)(BPS)3.

  1. Synthesis and enhanced field-emission of thin-walled, open-ended, and well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Tongxiang; Lv, Ruitao; Kang, Feiyu; Hu, Qiang; Gu, Jialin; Wang, Kunlin; Wu, Dehai

    2010-03-31

    Thin-walled, open-ended, and well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the quartz slides were synthesized by using acetonitrile as carbon sources. As-obtained products possess large thin-walled index (TWI, defined as the ratio of inner diameter and wall thickness of a CNT). The effect of temperature on the growth of CNTs using acetonitrile as the carbon source was also investigated. It is found that the diameter, the TWI of CNTs increase and the Fe encapsulation in CNTs decreases as the growth temperature rises in the range of 780-860°C. When the growth temperature is kept at 860°C, CNTs with TWI = 6.2 can be obtained. It was found that the filed-emission properties became better as CNT growth temperatures increased from 780 to 860°C. The lowest turn-on and threshold field was 0.27 and 0.49 V/μm, respectively. And the best field-enhancement factors reached 1.09 × 105, which is significantly improved about an order of magnitude compared with previous reports. In this study, about 30 × 50 mm2 free-standing film of thin-walled open-ended well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes was also prepared. The free-standing film can be transferred easily to other substrates, which would promote their applications in different fields.

  2. Synthesis and Enhanced Field-Emission of Thin-Walled, Open-Ended, and Well-Aligned N-Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Thin-walled, open-ended, and well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the quartz slides were synthesized by using acetonitrile as carbon sources. As-obtained products possess large thin-walled index (TWI, defined as the ratio of inner diameter and wall thickness of a CNT). The effect of temperature on the growth of CNTs using acetonitrile as the carbon source was also investigated. It is found that the diameter, the TWI of CNTs increase and the Fe encapsulation in CNTs decreases as the growth temperature rises in the range of 780–860°C. When the growth temperature is kept at 860°C, CNTs with TWI = 6.2 can be obtained. It was found that the filed-emission properties became better as CNT growth temperatures increased from 780 to 860°C. The lowest turn-on and threshold field was 0.27 and 0.49 V/μm, respectively. And the best field-enhancement factors reached 1.09 × 105, which is significantly improved about an order of magnitude compared with previous reports. In this study, about 30 × 50 mm2 free-standing film of thin-walled open-ended well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes was also prepared. The free-standing film can be transferred easily to other substrates, which would promote their applications in different fields. PMID:20672122

  3. Higher detection sensitivity of anxiolytic effects of diazepam by ledge-free open arm with opaque walled closed arm elevated plus maze in male rats.

    PubMed

    Horii, Yasuyuki; Kawaguchi, Maiko

    2015-11-01

    The elevated plus maze (EPM) is an established method for testing animal anxiety. However, EPM apparatuses and their features can differ among laboratories, most notably in the presence/absence of ledges on the open arm and/or the transparency/opaqueness of walls on the closed arm. The combined effects of these variable arm features on EPM behavior are not yet fully understood. In the present study, we prepared four types of EPM apparatus - open arms with (0.5 cm) or without (0 cm) ledges×closed arms with transparent or opaque walls - and compared the maze-exploration behavior of male Sprague-Dawley rats. We found that the presence of open arm ledges significantly increased the incidence of open arm exploration. Furthermore, time spent in the distal segment of the open arm was shortest in the apparatus that had open arms with no ledges and opaque closed arms (No-Ledges/Opaque), and was longest in the apparatus that had open arms with ledges and transparent closed arms (Ledges/Transparent). Additionally, the No-Ledges/Opaque apparatus could detect the effect of 0.5mg/kg diazepam, an anxiolytic drug, whereas the Ledges/Transparent apparatus could not. These results indicate that arm structure (features of both open and closed arms) significantly influences maze-exploratory behavior in rats, and that No-Ledges/Opaque apparatuses have higher detection sensitivity for anxiolytic effects of diazepam than that of Ledges/Transparent apparatuses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Bordetella pertussis Bps Polysaccharide Enhances Lung Colonization by Conferring Protection from Complement-mediated Killing

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Tridib; Johnson, John B.; Kock, Nancy D.; Parks, Griffith D.; Deora, Rajendar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bordetella pertussis is a human-restricted Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes whooping cough or pertussis. Pertussis is the leading vaccine preventable disease that is resurging in the USA and other parts of the developed world. There is an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which B. pertussis evades killing and clearance by the complement system, a first line of host innate immune defense. The present study examined the role of the Bps polysaccharide to resist complement activity in vitro and in the mouse respiratory tract. The isogenic bps mutant strain containing a large non polar in-frame deletion of the bpsA-D locus was more sensitive to serum and complement mediated killing than the WT strain. As determined by western blotting, flow cytometry and electron microscopic studies, the heightened sensitivity of the mutant strain was due to enhanced deposition of complement proteins and the formation of membrane attack complex, the end product of complement activation. Bps was sufficient to confer complement resistance as evidenced by a Bps-expressing E. coli being protected by serum killing. Additionally, western blotting and flow cytometry assays revealed that Bps inhibited the deposition of complement proteins independent of other B. pertussis factors. The bps mutant strain colonized the lungs of complement-deficient mice at higher levels than that observed in C57Bl/6 mice. These results reveal a previously unknown interaction between Bps and the complement system in controlling B. pertussis colonization of the respiratory tract. These findings also make Bps a potential target for the prevention and therapy of whooping cough. PMID:24438122

  5. Novel BPS Wilson loops in three-dimensional quiver Chern-Simons-matter theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao; Wu, Jun-Bao; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2016-02-01

    We show that generic three-dimensional N = 2 quiver super Chern-Simons-matter theories admit Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) Drukker-Trancanelli (DT) type Wilson loops. We investigate both Wilson loops along timelike infinite straight lines in Minkowski spacetime and circular Wilson loops in Euclidean space. In Aharnoy-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena theory, we find that generic BPS DT type Wilson loops preserve the same number of supersymmetries as Gaiotto-Yin type Wilson loops. There are several free parameters for generic BPS DT type Wilson loops in the construction, and supersymmetry enhancement for Wilson loops happens for special values of the parameters.

  6. BPS algebras, genus zero and the heterotic Monster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquette, Natalie M.; Persson, Daniel; Volpato, Roberto

    2017-10-01

    In this note, we expand on some technical issues raised in (Paquette et al 2016 Commun. Number Theory Phys. 10 433–526) by the authors, as well as providing a friendly introduction to and summary of our previous work. We construct a set of heterotic string compactifications to 0  +  1 dimensions intimately related to the Monstrous moonshine module of Frenkel, Lepowsky, and Meurman (and orbifolds thereof). Using this model, we review our physical interpretation of the genus zero property of Monstrous moonshine. Furthermore, we show that the space of (second-quantized) BPS-states forms a module over the Monstrous Lie algebras mg —some of the first and most prominent examples of Generalized Kac–Moody algebras—constructed by Borcherds and Carnahan. In particular, we clarify the structure of the module present in the second-quantized string theory. We also sketch a proof of our methods in the language of vertex operator algebras, for the interested mathematician.

  7. BPS black holes, the Hesse potential, and the topological string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, G. L.; de Wit, B.; Mahapatra, S.

    2010-06-01

    The Hesse potential is constructed for a class of four-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric effective actions with S- and T-duality by performing the relevant Legendre transform by iteration. It is a function of fields that transform under duality according to an arithmetic subgroup of the classical dualities reflecting the monodromies of the underlying string compactification. These transformations are not subject to corrections, unlike the transformations of the fields that appear in the effective action which are affected by the presence of higher-derivative couplings. The class of actions that are considered includes those of the FHSV and the STU model. We also consider heterotic N = 4 supersymmetric compactifications. The Hesse potential, which is equal to the free energy function for BPS black holes, is manifestly duality invariant. Generically it can be expanded in terms of powers of the modulus that represents the inverse topological string coupling constant, g s , and its complex conjugate. The terms depending holomorphically on g s are expected to correspond to the topological string partition function and this expectation is explicitly verified in two cases. Terms proportional to mixed powers of g s and bar{g}s are in principle present.

  8. Modification of existed prosthesis into a flexible wall hollow bulb obturator by permanent silicone soft liner for a hemimaxillectomy patient with restricted mouth opening.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Kumar, Narendra; Gupta, Nidhi; Sikka, Rohan

    2015-07-01

    A patient of hemimaxillectomy with restricted mouth opening, wearing a hard acrylic bulb obturator encountered difficulty in insertion and removal of the prosthesis. The prosthesis was converted into a open hollow bulb obturator with flexible walls with permanent silicone soft liner for easy insertion and removal. Patients having acquired maxillary defects due to surgical resection of the maxilla often suffer with difficulty in mastication, swallowing, nasal regurgitation, speech disturbances and poor esthetics. Different types of obturator with various bulb designs most commonly fabricated from acrylic resins together with "acrylic resin plate and/or" metal framework are used to improve the quality of life of these patients by restoring the function. But restricted mouth opening in some of these patients makes it difficult to place and remove the prosthesis with hard acrylic bulb. Fabrication of flexible open hollow bulb and relining of remaining obturator with resilient permanent silicone soft liner makes easy insertion and removal of the prosthesis and also improve the retention by intimate contact of soft liner with the tissues. Permanent silicone soft liner open hollow bulb obturator is a novel way for the functional rehabilitation of a hemimaxillectomy patient suffering with restricted mouth opening. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pectin Metabolism and Assembly in the Cell Wall of the Charophyte Green Alga Penium margaritaceum1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.; Sørensen, Iben; Popper, Zoë A.; Ochs, Julie; Andreas, Amanda; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Pielach, Anna; Sacks, Carly; Brechka, Hannah; Ruisi-Besares, Pia; Willats, William G.T.; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.

    2014-01-01

    The pectin polymer homogalacturonan (HG) is a major component of land plant cell walls and is especially abundant in the middle lamella. Current models suggest that HG is deposited into the wall as a highly methylesterified polymer, demethylesterified by pectin methylesterase enzymes and cross-linked by calcium ions to form a gel. However, this idea is based largely on indirect evidence and in vitro studies. We took advantage of the wall architecture of the unicellular alga Penium margaritaceum, which forms an elaborate calcium cross-linked HG-rich lattice on its cell surface, to test this model and other aspects of pectin dynamics. Studies of live cells and microscopic imaging of wall domains confirmed that the degree of methylesterification and sufficient levels of calcium are critical for lattice formation in vivo. Pectinase treatments of live cells and immunological studies suggested the presence of another class of pectin polymer, rhamnogalacturonan I, and indicated its colocalization and structural association with HG. Carbohydrate microarray analysis of the walls of P. margaritaceum, Physcomitrella patens, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) further suggested the conservation of pectin organization and interpolymer associations in the walls of green plants. The individual constituent HG polymers also have a similar size and branched structure to those of embryophytes. The HG-rich lattice of P. margaritaceum, a member of the charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants, was shown to be important for cell adhesion. Therefore, the calcium-HG gel at the cell surface may represent an early evolutionary innovation that paved the way for an adhesive middle lamella in multicellular land plants. PMID:24652345

  10. Defective Pollen Wall 2 (DPW2) Encodes an Acyl Transferase Required for Rice Pollen Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianxin; Rautengarten, Carsten; Yang, Li; Uzair, Muhammad; Zhu, Lu; Luo, Qian; An, Gynheung; Waßmann, Fritz

    2017-01-01

    Aliphatic and aromatic lipids are both essential structural components of the plant cuticle, an important interface between the plant and environment. Although cross links between aromatic and aliphatic or other moieties are known to be associated with the formation of leaf cutin and root and seed suberin, the contribution of aromatic lipids to the biosynthesis of anther cuticles and pollen walls remains elusive. In this study, we characterized the rice (Oryza sativa) male sterile mutant, defective pollen wall 2 (dpw2), which showed an abnormal anther cuticle, a defective pollen wall, and complete male sterility. Compared with the wild type, dpw2 anthers have increased amounts of cutin and waxes and decreased levels of lipidic and phenolic compounds. DPW2 encodes a cytoplasmically localized BAHD acyltransferase. In vitro assays demonstrated that recombinant DPW2 specifically transfers hydroxycinnamic acid moieties, using ω-hydroxy fatty acids as acyl acceptors and hydroxycinnamoyl-CoAs as acyl donors. Thus, The cytoplasmic hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:ω-hydroxy fatty acid transferase DPW2 plays a fundamental role in male reproduction via the biosynthesis of key components of the anther cuticle and pollen wall. PMID:27246096

  11. ABORTED MICROSPORES Acts as a Master Regulator of Pollen Wall Formation in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Ding, Zhiwen; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Shi, Jianxin; Liang, Wanqi; Yuan, Zheng; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle; Schreiber, Lukas; Wilson, Zoe A.; Zhang, Dabing

    2014-01-01

    Mature pollen is covered by durable cell walls, principally composed of sporopollenin, an evolutionary conserved, highly resilient, but not fully characterized, biopolymer of aliphatic and aromatic components. Here, we report that ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS) acts as a master regulator coordinating pollen wall development and sporopollenin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome-wide coexpression analysis revealed 98 candidate genes with specific expression in the anther and 70 that showed reduced expression in ams. Among these 70 members, we showed that AMS can directly regulate 23 genes implicated in callose dissociation, fatty acids elongation, formation of phenolic compounds, and lipidic transport putatively involved in sporopollenin precursor synthesis. Consistently, ams mutants showed defective microspore release, a lack of sporopollenin deposition, and a dramatic reduction in total phenolic compounds and cutin monomers. The functional importance of the AMS pathway was further demonstrated by the observation of impaired pollen wall architecture in plant lines with reduced expression of several AMS targets: the abundant pollen coat protein extracellular lipases (EXL5 and EXL6), and CYP98A8 and CYP98A9, which are enzymes required for the production of phenolic precursors. These findings demonstrate the central role of AMS in coordinating sporopollenin biosynthesis and the secretion of materials for pollen wall patterning. PMID:24781116

  12. Resume and Report of Visitations to Schools Employing the Open-Space Concept of School Construction ("Schools-Without-Walls").

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Robert

    Four schools were visited in an attempt to assess the merits of combining several classrooms in a large space as a method of school construction. Interviews with students and teachers as well as personal impressions form the basis for evaluation. Satisfactory results were found for schools-without-walls, school carpeting, acoustic control, team…

  13. Effect of botulinum toxin type A in lateral abdominal wall muscles thickness and length of patients with midline incisional hernia secondary to open abdomen management.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Hurtado, T R; Nuño-Guzmán, C M; Miranda-Díaz, A G; Troyo-Sanromán, R; Navarro-Ibarra, R; Bravo-Cuéllar, L

    2014-10-01

    Abdominal wall hernia secondary to open abdomen management represents a surgical challenge. The hernia worsens due to lateral muscle retraction. Our objective was to evaluate if Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTA) application in lateral abdominal wall muscles modifies its thickness and length. A clinical trial of male trauma patients with hernia secondary to open abdomen management was performed from January 2009 to July 2011. Thickness and length of lateral abdominal muscles were measured by a basal Computed Tomography and 1 month after BTA application. A dosage of 250 units of BTA was applied at five points at each side between the external and internal oblique muscles under ultrasonographic guidance. Statistical analysis for differences between basal and after BTA application measures was performed by a paired Student's t test (significance: p < 0.05). Seventeen male patients with a mean age of 35 years were included. There were muscle measure modifications in all the patients. Left muscle thickness: mean reduction of 1 ± 0.55 cm (p < 0.001). Right muscle thickness: mean reduction of 1.00 ± 0.49 cm (p < 0.001). Left muscle length: mean increase of 2.44 ± 1.22 cm (p < 0.001). Right muscle length: mean increase of 2.59 ± 1.38 cm (p < 0.001). No complications secondary to BTA or recurrences at mean follow-up of 49 months were observed. BTA application in lateral abdominal muscles decreases its thickness and increases its length in abdominal wall hernia patients secondary to open abdomen management.

  14. Effect of open-label infusion of an apoA-I-containing particle (CER-001) on RCT and artery wall thickness in patients with FHA.

    PubMed

    Kootte, Ruud S; Smits, Loek P; van der Valk, Fleur M; Dasseux, Jean-Louis; Keyserling, Constance H; Barbaras, Ronald; Paolini, John F; Santos, Raul D; van Dijk, Theo H; Dallinga-van Thie, Geesje M; Nederveen, Aart J; Mulder, Willem J M; Hovingh, G Kees; Kastelein, John J P; Groen, Albert K; Stroes, Erik S

    2015-03-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) contributes to the anti-atherogenic effects of HDL. Patients with the orphan disease, familial hypoalphalipoproteinemia (FHA), are characterized by decreased tissue cholesterol removal and an increased atherogenic burden. We performed an open-label uncontrolled proof-of-concept study to evaluate the effect of infusions with a human apoA-I-containing HDL-mimetic particle (CER-001) on RCT and the arterial vessel wall in FHA. Subjects received 20 infusions of CER-001 (8 mg/kg) during 6 months. Efficacy was assessed by measuring (apo)lipoproteins, plasma-mediated cellular cholesterol efflux, fecal sterol excretion (FSE), and carotid artery wall dimension by MRI and artery wall inflammation by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans. We included seven FHA patients: HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c), 13.8 [1.8-29.1] mg/dl; apoA-I, 28.7 [7.9-59.1] mg/dl. Following nine infusions in 1 month, apoA-I and HDL-c increased directly after infusion by 27.0 and 16.1 mg/dl (P = 0.018). CER-001 induced a 44% relative increase (P = 0.018) in in vitro cellular cholesterol efflux with a trend toward increased FSE (P = 0.068). After nine infusions of CER-001, carotid mean vessel wall area decreased compared with baseline from 25.0 to 22.8 mm(2) (P = 0.043) and target-to-background ratio from 2.04 to 1.81 (P = 0.046). In FHA-subjects, CER-001 stimulates cholesterol mobilization and reduces artery wall dimension and inflammation, supporting further evaluation of CER-001 in FHA patients. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Effect of open-label infusion of an apoA-I-containing particle (CER-001) on RCT and artery wall thickness in patients with FHA[S

    PubMed Central

    Kootte, Ruud S.; Smits, Loek P.; van der Valk, Fleur M.; Dasseux, Jean-Louis; Keyserling, Constance H.; Barbaras, Ronald; Paolini, John F.; Santos, Raul D.; van Dijk, Theo H.; Dallinga-van Thie, Geesje M.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kastelein, John J. P.; Groen, Albert K.; Stroes, Erik S.

    2015-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) contributes to the anti-atherogenic effects of HDL. Patients with the orphan disease, familial hypoalphalipoproteinemia (FHA), are characterized by decreased tissue cholesterol removal and an increased atherogenic burden. We performed an open-label uncontrolled proof-of-concept study to evaluate the effect of infusions with a human apoA-I-containing HDL-mimetic particle (CER-001) on RCT and the arterial vessel wall in FHA. Subjects received 20 infusions of CER-001 (8 mg/kg) during 6 months. Efficacy was assessed by measuring (apo)lipoproteins, plasma-mediated cellular cholesterol efflux, fecal sterol excretion (FSE), and carotid artery wall dimension by MRI and artery wall inflammation by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans. We included seven FHA patients: HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c), 13.8 [1.8–29.1] mg/dl; apoA-I, 28.7 [7.9–59.1] mg/dl. Following nine infusions in 1 month, apoA-I and HDL-c increased directly after infusion by 27.0 and 16.1 mg/dl (P = 0.018). CER-001 induced a 44% relative increase (P = 0.018) in in vitro cellular cholesterol efflux with a trend toward increased FSE (P = 0.068). After nine infusions of CER-001, carotid mean vessel wall area decreased compared with baseline from 25.0 to 22.8 mm2 (P = 0.043) and target-to-background ratio from 2.04 to 1.81 (P = 0.046). In FHA-subjects, CER-001 stimulates cholesterol mobilization and reduces artery wall dimension and inflammation, supporting further evaluation of CER-001 in FHA patients. PMID:25561459

  16. Various computational conditions of oscillatory natural convection of zero Prandtl number fluid in an open boat heated and cooled from opposing vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kazuto . Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science); Ozoe, Hiroyuki . Inst. of Advanced Material Study)

    1993-03-01

    The finite-difference computational scheme is developed for two-dimensional oscillatory natural convection of zero Prandtl number fluid in an open boat heated and cooled from opposing vertical walls. Various computational conditions are tested, such as the initial condition, time step length, finite-difference width, and finite-difference scheme. Instantaneous contour maps and velocity vectors in oscillatory states are presented in a series of maps to represent the fluctuating characteristics of two-dimensional roll cells. The physical conditions are for a boat with aspect ratio A = 3[minus]5 at Pr = 0 and Gr = 14,000-40,000.

  17. N = 8 BPS black holes preserving 1/8 supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, M.; Frè, P.; Trigiante, M.

    1999-05-01

    In the context of N = 8 supergravity we consider BPS black holes that preserve 1/8 supersymmetry. It was shown in a previous paper that, modulo U-duality transformations of E7(7), the most general solution of this type can be reduced to a black hole of the STU model. In this paper we analyse this solution in detail, considering in particular its embedding in one of the possible special Kähler manifolds compatible with the consistent truncations to N = 2 supergravity, this manifold being the moduli space of the T6/icons/Journals/Common/BbbZ" ALT="BbbZ" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>3 orbifold, that is SU(3,3)/SU(3) × U(3). This construction requires a crucial use of the solvable Lie algebra formalism. Once the group-theoretical analysis is done, starting from a static, spherically symmetric ansatz, we find an exact solution for all the scalars (both dilaton- and axion-like) and for gauge fields, together with their already known charge-dependent fixed values, which yield a U-duality-invariant entropy. We also give a complete translation dictionary between the solvable Lie algebra and the special Kähler formalisms in order to allow a more immediate comparison with other papers on similar issues. Although the explicit solution is given in a simplified case where the equations turn out to be more manageable, it encodes all the features of the more general one, namely it has non-vanishing entropy and the scalar fields have a non-trivial radial dependence.

  18. Effect of local estrogen therapy (LET) on urinary and sexual symptoms in premenopausal women with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS).

    PubMed

    Gardella, Barbara; Iacobone, Anna Daniela; Porru, Daniele; Musacchi, Valentina; Dominoni, Mattia; Tinelli, Carmine; Spinillo, Arsenio; Nappi, Rossella E

    2015-10-01

    The association between vulvodynia and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), a chronic, debilitating disease of unknown etiology, may involve sex hormone-dependent mechanisms regulating vulvo-vaginal health. We aimed to prospectively investigate the effects of 12 weeks of local estrogen therapy (LET) on urinary/bladder and sexual symptoms in premenopausal women with IC/BPS. Thirty-four women (mean age: 36.1 ± 8.4) diagnosed with IC/BPS were treated vulvo-vaginally three-times/week with estriol 0.5 mg cream and tested by validated questionnaires (ICSI/ICPI, pain urgency frequency [PUF], female sexual function index [FSFI]) and by cotton swab testing, vaginal health index (VHI) and maturation index (MI) before and after treatment. Vulvodynia was present in 94.1% of IC/BPS women. A significant positive effect of LET was evident on urinary and sexual function (p < 0.001, for both) following 12 weeks, as well as an improvement of the VHI (p < 0.001) and the MI (p < 0.04). The results of this open study indicate that 12 weeks of local estriol cream at vaginal and vestibular level may ameliorate urinary/bladder pain symptoms, as well as may improve domains of sexual function. The association between vulvar pain and bladder pain could, therefore, be related to a vaginal environment carrying signs of hypoestrogenism, but further studies are needed to clarify this issue.

  19. Putrescine Alleviates Iron Deficiency via NO-Dependent Reutilization of Root Cell-Wall Fe in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Wang, Bin; Song, Wen Feng; Zheng, Shao Jian; Shen, Ren Fang

    2016-01-01

    Plants challenged with abiotic stress show enhanced polyamines levels. Here, we show that the polyamine putrescine (Put) plays an important role to alleviate Fe deficiency. The adc2-1 mutant, which is defective in Put biosynthesis, was hypersensitive to Fe deficiency compared with wild type (Col-1 of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]). Exogenous Put decreased the Fe bound to root cell wall, especially to hemicellulose, and increased root and shoot soluble Fe content, thus alleviating the Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis. Intriguingly, exogenous Put induced the accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) under both Fe-sufficient (+Fe) and Fe-deficient (-Fe) conditions, although the ferric-chelate reductase (FCR) activity and the expression of genes related to Fe uptake were induced only under -Fe treatment. The alleviation of Fe deficiency by Put was diminished in the hemicellulose-level decreased mutant-xth31 and in the noa1 and nia1nia2 mutants, in which the endogenous NO levels are reduced, indicating that both NO and hemicellulose are involved in Put-mediated alleviation of Fe deficiency. However, the FCR activity and the expression of genes related to Fe uptake were still up-regulated under -Fe+Put treatment compared with -Fe treatment in xth31, and Put-induced cell wall Fe remobilization was abolished in noa1 and nia1nia2, indicating that Put-regulated cell wall Fe reutilization is dependent on NO. From our results, we conclude that Put is involved in the remobilization of Fe from root cell wall hemicellulose in a process dependent on NO accumulation under Fe-deficient condition in Arabidopsis. PMID:26578707

  20. The flow fields involved in hydrodynamic imaging by blind Mexican cave fish (Astyanax fasciatus). Part I: open water and heading towards a wall.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Shane P; Norris, Stuart E; Cameron, Stuart M; Mallinson, Gordon D; Montgomery, John C

    2010-11-15

    Blind Mexican cave fish (Astyanax fasciatus) sense the presence of nearby objects by sensing changes in the water flow around their body. The information available to the fish using this hydrodynamic imaging ability depends on the properties of the flow field it generates while gliding and how this flow field is altered by the presence of objects. Here, we used particle image velocimetry to measure the flow fields around gliding blind cave fish as they moved through open water and when heading towards a wall. These measurements, combined with computational fluid dynamics models, were used to estimate the stimulus to the lateral line system of the fish. Our results showed that there was a high-pressure region around the nose of the fish, low-pressure regions corresponding to accelerated flow around the widest part of the body and a thick laminar boundary layer down the body. When approaching a wall head-on, the changes in the stimulus to the lateral line were confined to approximately the first 20% of the body. Assuming that the fish are sensitive to a certain relative change in lateral line stimuli, it was found that swimming at higher Reynolds numbers slightly decreased the distance at which the fish could detect a wall when approaching head-on, which is the opposite to what has previously been expected. However, when the effects of environmental noise are considered, swimming at higher speed may improve the signal to noise ratio of the stimulus to the lateral line.

  1. Characterization of a laboratory-generated variant of BPS beta-lactamase from Burkholderia pseudomallei that hydrolyses ceftazidime.

    PubMed

    Ho, P L; Cheung, Terence K M; Yam, W C; Yuen, K Y

    2002-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei produces an Ambler class A beta-lactamase, known as BPS-1. The beta-lactamase gene from a laboratory-derived, ceftazidime-resistant strain of B. pseudomallei (LH-1-2) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The beta-lactamase, named BPS-1m, had an identical isoelectric focusing point (pI 7.7) to that of BPS-1, but differed in having a stronger hydrolytic activity against ceftazidime. Susceptibility testing showed that BPS-1m when expressed in E. coli conferred resistance to ceftazidime (MIC >or= 32 mg/L). The amino acid sequence of BPS-1m differed from that of BPS-1 by a Pro-to-Ser change at position 167 in the omega loop.

  2. Wall crossing, quivers and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganagic, Mina; Schaeffer, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    We study the spectrum of BPS D-branes on a Calabi-Yau manifold using the 0 + 1 dimensional quiver gauge theory that describes the dynamics of the branes at low energies. We argue that Seiberg dualities of the quiver correspond to crossing the "walls of the second kind" of Kontsevich and Soibelman. There is a large class of examples where the BPS degeneracies of quivers corresponding to one D6 brane bound to arbitrary numbers of D4, D2 and D0 branes are counted by melting crystal configurations. The shape of the crystal is determined by the Calabi-Yau geometry and the background B-field, and its microscopic structure by the quiver Q. We prove that the BPS degeneracies computed from Q and Q' are related by the Kontsevich-Soibelman formula. We also show that, in the limit of infinite B-field, the combinatorics of crystals becomes that of the topological vertex, thus re-deriving the Gromov-Witten/Donaldson-Thomas correspondence.

  3. Evolution and functional diversity of the Calcium Binding Proteins (CaBPs)

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Lee P.; McCue, Hannah V.; Burgoyne, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) exhibits a remarkable ability to process, store, and transfer information. Key to these activities is the use of highly regulated and unique patterns of calcium signals encoded by calcium channels and decoded by families of specific calcium-sensing proteins. The largest family of eukaryotic calcium sensors is those related to the small EF-hand containing protein calmodulin (CaM). In order to maximize the usefulness of calcium as a signaling species and to permit the evolution and fine tuning of the mammalian CNS, families of related proteins have arisen that exhibit characteristic calcium binding properties and tissue-, cellular-, and sub-cellular distribution profiles. The Calcium Binding Proteins (CaBPs) represent one such family of vertebrate specific CaM like proteins that have emerged in recent years as important regulators of essential neuronal target proteins. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that the CaBPs consist of two subfamilies and that the ancestral members of these are CaBP1 and CaBP8. The CaBPs have distinct intracellular localizations based on different targeting mechanisms including a novel type-II transmembrane domain in CaBPs 7 and 8 (otherwise known as calneuron II and calneuron I, respectively). Recent work has led to the identification of new target interactions and possible functions for the CaBPs suggesting that they have multiple physiological roles with relevance for the normal functioning of the CNS. PMID:22375103

  4. Static BPS black holes in AdS4 with general dyonic charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halmagyi, Nick

    2015-03-01

    We complete the study of static BPS, asymptotically AdS4 black holes within =2 FI-gauged supergravity and where the scalar manifold is a symmetric very special Kähler manifold. We find the analytic form for the general solution to the BPS equations, the horizon appears as a double root of a particular quartic polynomial whereas in previous work this quartic polynomial further factored into a pair of double roots. A new and distinguishing feature of our solutions is that the phase of the supersymmetry parameter varies throughout the black hole. The general solution has 2 n v independent parameters; there are two algebraic constraints on 2 n v + 2 charges, matching our previous analysis on BPS solutions of the form AdS2 × Σ g . As a consequence we have proved that every BPS geometry of this form can arise as the horizon geometry of a BPS AdS4 black hole. When specialized to the STU-model our solutions uplift to M-theory and describe a stack of M2-branes wrapped on a Riemman surface in a Calabi-Yau fivefold with internal angular momentum.

  5. Effect of beraprost sodium (BPS) in a new rat partial unilateral ureteral obstruction model.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Masahiko; Machida, Noboru; Ida, Nobutaka; Satoh, Nahoko; Kurumatani, Hajimu; Yamane, Yoshihisa

    2009-01-01

    Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) is a representative model for investigating the common mechanism of decreasing renal function in chronic renal failure. In this study, we present a new partial UUO model in adult rats and evaluated the effect of beraprost sodium (BPS: stable prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)) analog). We could make reproductive and uniform partial UUO by ligating the left ureter together with a 0.5 mm diameter stainless steel wire with nylon thread, and withdrawing the stainless wire. One week later, the ureteral obstruction was released. After 3 weeks from the release of UUO, all animals of control group, without BPS administration, developed basophilic degeneration of tubular epithelium, tubular dilatation and interstitial fibrosis. The areas of tubular degeneration and fibrosis were significantly reduced in the BPS group, orally administered BPS 300 microg/kg twice a day from the next day of the release of obstruction, than in control group. In conclusion, we can established the adult rat partial UUO-release model and revealed that BPS can inhibit renal tubular damage and tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

  6. Non-BPS D-brane solutions in six dimensional orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Y.

    2000-08-01

    Starting with the non-BPS D0-brane solution of IIB/(-1)FLI4 constructed recently by Eyras and Panda we construct via T-duality the non-BPS D2-brane and D1-brane solutions of IIB/(-1)FLI4 and IIA/(-1)FLI4 predicted by Sen. The D2-brane couples magnetically to the vector field of the NS5B-brane living in the twisted sector of the Type IIB orbifold, whereas the D1-brane couples (electrically and magnetically) to the self-dual 2-form potential of the NS5A-brane that is present in the twisted sector of the Type IIA orbifold construction. Finally we discuss the eleven dimensional interpretation of these branes as originating from a non-BPS M1-brane solution of M-theory orientifolded by ΩρI5.

  7. Exactly stable non-BPS spinors in heterotic string theory on tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jihye

    2013-01-01

    Considering SO(32) heterotic string theory compactified on T d with d ≤ 4, stability of non-supersymmetric states is studied. A non-supersymmetric state with robust stability is constructed, and its exact stability is proven in a large region of moduli space against all the possible decay mechanisms allowed by charge conservation. Using various T -duality transform matrices of [1], we translate various selection rules about conserved charges into simpler problems resembling partition and parity of integers. For heterotic string on T 4, we give a complete list of BPS atoms with elementary excitations, and we study BPS and non-BPS molecules with various binding energies. Using string-string duality, the results are interpreted in terms of Dirichlet-branes in type IIA string theory compactified on an orbifold limit of a K3 surface.

  8. Protected couplings and BPS dyons in half-maximal supersymmetric string vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossard, Guillaume; Cosnier-Horeau, Charles; Pioline, Boris

    2017-02-01

    We analyze four- and six-derivative couplings in the low energy effective action of D = 3 string vacua with half-maximal supersymmetry. In analogy with an earlier proposal for the (∇Φ) 4 coupling, we propose that the ∇2(∇Φ) 4 coupling is given exactly by a manifestly U-duality invariant genus-two modular integral. In the limit where a circle in the internal torus decompactifies, the ∇2(∇Φ) 4 coupling reduces to the ∇2F4 and R2F2 couplings in D = 4, along with an infinite series of corrections of order e-R, from four-dimensional 1/4-BPS dyons whose worldline winds around the circle. Each of these contributions is weighted by a Fourier coefficient of a meromorphic Siegel modular form, explaining and extending standard results for the BPS index of 1/4-BPS dyons.

  9. Higher dimensional curved domain walls on Kähler surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Fiki T.; Gunara, Bobby E.; Radjabaycolle, Flinn C.; Wijaya, Rio N.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we study some aspects of curved BPS-like domain walls in higher dimensional gravity theory coupled to scalars where the scalars span a complex Kähler surface with scalar potential turned on. Assuming that a fake superpotential has a special form which depends on Kähler potential and a holomorphic function, we prove that BPS-like equations have a local unique solution. Then, we analyze the vacuum structure of the theory including their stability using dynamical system and their existence in ultraviolet-infrared regions using renormalization group flow.

  10. An extremization principle for the entropy of rotating BPS black holes in AdS5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Morteza; Hristov, Kiril; Zaffaroni, Alberto

    2017-07-01

    We show that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of a class of BPS electrically charged rotating black holes in AdS5 × S 5 can be obtained by a simple extremization principle. We expect that this extremization corresponds to the attractor mechanism for BPS rotating black holes in five-dimensional gauged supergravity, which is still unknown. The expression to be extremized has a suggestive resemblance to anomaly polynomials and the supersymmetric Casimir energy recently studied for N=4 super Yang-Mills.

  11. Rotational-vibrational coupling in the BPS Skyrme model of baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2013-11-01

    We calculate the rotational-vibrational spectrum in the BPS Skyrme model for the hedgehog skyrmion with baryon number one. The resulting excitation energies for the nucleon and delta Roper resonances are slightly above their experimental values. Together with the fact that in the standard Skyrme model these excitation energies are significantly lower than the experimental ones, this provides strong evidence for the conjecture that the inclusion of the BPS Skyrme model is required for a successful quantitative description of physical properties of baryons and nuclei.

  12. Bubbling AdS and droplet descriptions of BPS geometries in IIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Cremonini, Sera; Lin, Hai; Vaman, Diana; Liu, James T.; Donos, Aristomenis; Lin, Feng-Li; Wen, Wen-Yu

    2007-10-01

    This paper focuses on supergravity duals of BPS states in Script N = 4 super Yang-Mills. In order to describe these duals, we begin with a sequence of breathing mode reductions of IIB supergravity: first on S3, then S3 × S1, and finally on S3 × S1 × CP1. We then follow with a complete supersymmetry analysis, yielding 1/8, 1/4 and 1/2 BPS configurations, respectively (where in the last step we take the Hopf fibration of S3). The 1/8 BPS geometries, which have an S3 isometry and are time-fibered over a six-dimensional base, are determined by solving a non-linear equation for the Kähler metric on the base. Similarly, the 1/4 BPS configurations have an S3 × S1 isometry and a four-dimensional base, whose Kähler metric obeys another non-linear, Monge-Ampère type equation. Despite the non-linearity of the problem, we develop a universal bubbling AdS description of these geometries by focusing on the boundary conditions which ensure their regularity. In the 1/8 BPS case, we find that the S3 cycle shrinks to zero size on a five-dimensional locus inside the six-dimensional base. Enforcing regularity of the full solution requires that the interior of a smooth, generally disconnected five-dimensional surface be removed from the base. The AdS5 × S5 ground state corresponds to excising the interior of an S5, while the 1/8 BPS excitations correspond to deformations (including topology change) of the S5 and/or the excision of additional droplets from the base. In the case of 1/4 BPS configurations, by enforcing regularity conditions, we identify three-dimensional surfaces inside the four-dimensional base which separate the regions where the S3 shrinks to zero size from those where the S1 shrinks. We discuss a large class of examples to show the emergence of a universal bubbling AdS picture for all 1/2, 1/4 and 1/8 BPS geometries.

  13. Transparent and Self-Supporting Graphene Films with Wrinkled- Graphene-Wall-Assembled Opening Polyhedron Building Blocks for High Performance Flexible/Transparent Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Huang, Xuankai; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Yunyong; Wang, Chengxin

    2017-03-22

    Improving mass loading while maintaining high transparency and large surface area in one self-supporting graphene film is still a challenge. Unfortunately, all of these factors are absolutely essential for enhancing the energy storage performance of transparent supercapacitors for practical applications. To solve the above bottleneck problem, we produce a novel self-supporting flexible and transparent graphene film (STF-GF) with wrinkled-wall-assembled opened-hollow polyhedron building units. Taking advantage of the microscopic morphology, the STF-GF exhibits improved mass loading with high transmittance (70.2% at 550 nm), a large surface area (1105.6 m(2)/g), and good electrochemical performance: high energy (552.3 μWh/cm(3)), power densities (561.9 mW/cm(3)), a superlong cycle life, and good cycling stability (the capacitance retention is ∼94.8% after 20,000 cycles).

  14. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes bonding on silica-hydride surfaces for open-tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Lian

    2010-01-29

    Prepared multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) materials, including untreated MWNT, HNO(3)-treated MWNT and HNO(3)-HCl-treated MWNT were covalently attached onto a silica-hydride-modified capillary by hydrosilation, using the abundant double bonds between the pentagon carbons in the MWNT structure. These MWNT-incorporated capillaries were characterized by SEM, ATR-IR and electroosmotic flow (EOF) measurements in phosphate buffers with a pH range of 3.7-9.3 and in the mixtures of acetonitrile modifier. The untreated capillary was assumed to carry some carboxylate groups formed on the non-acid-treated MWNTs, as it had higher EOF values than the hydride capillary. As the MWNTs were treated with HNO(3) and HCl solutions, the capillaries had increasingly higher EOF values. To examine the existence of an electrochromatography mechanism in the modified capillaries, a mixture of nucleosides and thymine was probed to check the velocity factor and retention factor. In addition to the pi-pi interaction between the probe solutes and the MWNT immobilized stationary phases; a reversed-phase mechanism could contribute to the chromatographic retention. For acidic tetracyclines, increasing the loadability of MWNTs resulted in a high retention factor and improved the separation resolution. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings

    SciTech Connect

    Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu

    2009-07-15

    Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillaries as porous layer open tubular columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kazarian, Artaches A; Sanz Rodriguez, Estrella; Deverell, Jeremy A; McCord, James; Muddiman, David C; Paull, Brett

    2016-01-28

    Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillary columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and liquid chromatographic separations is presented. Columns contained 126 internal parallel 4 μm channels, each containing a wall bonded porous monolithic type polystyrene-divinylbenzene layer in open tubular column format (PLOT). Modification longitudinal homogeneity was monitored using scanning contactless conductivity detection and scanning electron microscopy. The multichannel open tubular capillary column showed channel diameter and polymer layer consistency of 4.2 ± 0.1 μm and 0.26 ± 0.02 μm respectively, and modification of 100% of the parallel channels with the monolithic polymer. The modified multi-channel capillaries were applied to the in-capillary micro-extraction of water samples. 500 μL of water samples containing single μg L(-1) levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons were extracted at a flow rate of 10 μL min(-1), and eluted in 50 μL of acetonitrile for analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection. HPLC LODs were 0.08, 0.02 and 0.05 μg L(-1) for acenaphthene, anthracene and pyrene, respectively, with extraction recoveries of between 77 and 103%. The modified capillaries were also investigated briefly for direct application to liquid chromatographic separations, with the retention and elution of a standard protein (cytochrome c) under isocratic conditions demonstrated, proving chromatographic potential of the new column format, with run-to-run retention time reproducibility of below 1%.

  17. Cell Wall Invertase Promotes Fruit Set under Heat Stress by Suppressing ROS-Independent Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Reduced cell wall invertase (CWIN) activity has been shown to be associated with poor seed and fruit set under abiotic stress. Here, we examined whether genetically increasing native CWIN activity would sustain fruit set under long-term moderate heat stress (LMHS), an important factor limiting crop production, by using transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) with its CWIN inhibitor gene silenced and focusing on ovaries and fruits at 2 d before and after pollination, respectively. We found that the increase of CWIN activity suppressed LMHS-induced programmed cell death in fruits. Surprisingly, measurement of the contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde and the activities of a cohort of antioxidant enzymes revealed that the CWIN-mediated inhibition on programmed cell death is exerted in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner. Elevation of CWIN activity sustained Suc import into fruits and increased activities of hexokinase and fructokinase in the ovaries in response to LMHS. Compared to the wild type, the CWIN-elevated transgenic plants exhibited higher transcript levels of heat shock protein genes Hsp90 and Hsp100 in ovaries and HspII17.6 in fruits under LMHS, which corresponded to a lower transcript level of a negative auxin responsive factor IAA9 but a higher expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene ToFZY6 in fruits at 2 d after pollination. Collectively, the data indicate that CWIN enhances fruit set under LMHS through suppression of programmed cell death in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner that could involve enhanced Suc import and catabolism, HSP expression, and auxin response and biosynthesis. PMID:27462084

  18. Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study First Follow-up (BPS:96/98) Field Test Report. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Daniel J.; Wine, Jennifer S.; Heuer, Ruth E.; Whitmore, Roy W.; Kelly, Janice E.; Doherty, John M.; Simpson, Joe B.; Marti, Norma

    This report describes the methods and procedures used for the field test of the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study First Followup 1996-98 (BPS:96/98). Students in this survey were first interviewed during 1995 as part of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study 1996 field test. The BPS:96/98 full-scale student sample includes…

  19. Domain walls in supersymmetric QCD: The taming of the zoo

    SciTech Connect

    Binosi, Daniele; ter Veldhuis, Tonnis

    2001-04-15

    We provide a unified picture of the domain wall spectrum in supersymmetric QCD with N{sub c} colors and N{sub f} flavors of quarks in the (anti) fundamental representation. Within the framework of the Veneziano-Yankielowicz-Taylor effective Lagrangian, we consider domain walls connecting chiral symmetry breaking vacua, and we take the quark masses to be degenerate. For N{sub f}/N{sub c}<1/2, there is one BPS saturated domain wall for any value of the quark mass m. For 1/2{<=}N{sub f}/N{sub c}<1 there are two critical masses m{sub *} and m{sub **} which depend on the number of colors and flavors only through the ratio N{sub f}/N{sub c}. If mBPS walls; if m{sub *}BPS wall; and if m>m{sub **}, there is no domain wall. We numerically determine m{sub *} and m{sub **} as a function of N{sub f}/N{sub c}, and we find that m{sub **} approaches a constant value in the limit that this ratio goes to 1.

  20. Air Force Armament Laboratory (AFATL) battery power supply (BPS) operations and maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, J. R.; Lippert, J. R.; Herald, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    The successful operation of the AFATL BPS system is discussed in terms of its proven reliable performance record, flexibility to adapt to different test configurations, and relatively inexpensive operating maintenance costs per test. The BPS consists of 13,728 batteries, interconnecting buswork, and a power conditioning inductor. The system is subdivided into six modules, each divided into six gangs with its own gang switch, each gang containing 24 battery strings. Each module has its own main bus pair, with the negative bus common and the positive bus switched. The operational and performance history of the AFATL BPS has proven that this battery system is effective as a prime power supply for hypervelocity launcher research. Turn-around time between tests has generally been less than that required for the test article. The power capabilities of the BPS can easily be expanded to the design point of a 200 MJ energy store. This can be done by adding more modules of batteries and reconfiguring the inductor with its existing three auxiliary turns in series.

  1. Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study Second Follow-up (BPS:90/94) Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Daniel J.; And Others

    This document provides a summary and evaluation of the methodological procedures and results of the full-scale implementation of the Beginning Postsecondary Student Longitudinal Study Second Follow-up, 1990-94 (BPS:90/94). The study was conducted for the National Center for Education Statistics by Research Triangle Institute with the assistance of…

  2. Bilingual Pupil Services (B.P.S.) 1988-89. OREA Evaluation Section Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; Barrera, Marbella

    The Bilingual Pupil Services (BPS) had two complementary objectives: (1) to provide supplementary services to students of limited English proficiency (LEP) by giving them instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL) and bilingual reading and mathematics; and (2) to provide in-service training to paraprofessionals who were enrolled in programs…

  3. BPS Maxwell-Chern Vortices in a Lorentz-Violating Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M.; Hora, E. Da; Neves, A. B. F.

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Higgs BPS vortices in a Lorentz-violating CPT-odd context. The Lorentz violation induces profiles with a conical behavior at the origin. For some combination of the coefficients for Lorentz violation there always exists a sufficiently large winding number for which the magnetic field flips its sign.

  4. Construction and classification of novel BPS Wilson loops in quiver Chern-Simons-matter theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao; Wu, Jun-Bao; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we construct and classify novel Drukker-Trancanelli (DT) type BPS Wilson loops along infinite straight lines and circles in N = 2 , 3 quiver superconformal Chern-Simons-matter theories, Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena (ABJM) theory, and N = 4 orbifold ABJM theory. Generally we have four classes of Wilson loops, and all of them preserve the same supersymmetries as the BPS Gaiotto-Yin (GY) type Wilson loops. There are several free complex parameters in the DT type BPS Wilson loops, and for two classes of Wilson loops in ABJM theory and N = 4 orbifold ABJM theory there are supersymmetry enhancements at special values of the parameters. We check that the differences of the DT type and GY type Wilson loops are Q-exact with Q being some supercharges preserved by both the DT type and GY type Wilson loops. The results would be useful to calculate vacuum expectation values of the DT type Wilson loops in matrix models if they are still BPS quantum mechanically.

  5. Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study: 1996-2001 (BPS: 1996/2001) Methodology Report. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wine, Jennifer S.; Heuer, Ruth E.; Wheeless, Sara C.; Francis, Talbric L.; Franklin, Jeff W.; Dudley, Kristin M.

    This report describes the methods and procedures used for the full-scale data collection effort of the Beginning Postsecondary Students Second Follow-up Student 1996-2001 (BPS:1996/2001). These students, who started their postsecondary education in the 1995-1996 academic year, were first interviewed during 1996, and subsequently interviewed in…

  6. BPS states in the Ω-background and torus knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulycheva, K.; Gorsky, A.

    2014-04-01

    We clarify some issues concerning the central charges saturated by the extended objects in the SUSY U(1) 4 d gauge theory in the Ω-background. The configuration involving the monopole localized at the domain wall is considered in some details. At the rational ratio the trajectory of the monopole provides the torus ( p,q) knot in the squashed three-sphere. Using the relation between the integrable systems of Calogero type at the rational couplings and the torus knots we interpret this configuration in terms of the auxiliary 2 d quiver theory or 3 d theory with nontrivial boundary conditions. This realization can be considered as the AGT-like representation of the torus knot invariants.

  7. Polyacrylamide grafted on multi-walled carbon nanotubes for open-tubular capillary electrochromatography: comparison with silica hydride and polyacrylate phase matrices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Lian; Hsieh, Kai-Hsin

    2010-12-01

    A new nanoparticle-bound polymer stationary phase was prepared by in situ polymerization of methacrylamide (MAA), bis-acrylamide crosslinker, and carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (multi-walled CNTs; MWNTs), using the abundant double bonds in the cyclopentadienyl rings in MWNT structure, on a silanized capillary. Each intermediate capillary between the synthesis steps was characterized by SEM, by ATR-IR, and by EOF measurements varying the pH, concentration, and volumetric ratios of ACN in running buffers. The resulting EOF profile was comparable to those of two other capillaries with different phase matrices, silica hydride and polybutyl methacrylate (BMA) phases. With the complex functionality of MWNTs on the hydrophilic polyacrylamide network, the MAA-CNT capillary was capable of separating diverse samples with a wide range of polarity and dissociation properties using open-tubular CEC. Besides optimizing CEC conditions, the migration times of samples were analyzed with respect to velocity and retention factors to evaluate electrophoretic and chromatographic contributions to the CEC mechanism. The migration rates of benzoic acids were determined by the electrophoretic mobilities of the various phenolate ions, while phenolic aldehydes and ketones were additionally influenced by chromatographic interactions, such as π-π, electrostatic effects, hydrogen bonding, and hydrophobic interactions. The retention factors were greater for flavonoids, which are polyphenolic, than for simple phenols, but were smaller than those obtained from the hydrophobic BMA-CNT column. A complete well-resolved separation of the cationic forms of tetracyclines was acheived either by electrophoresis or by chromatography in the MAA-CNT capillary, but not in the BMA-CNT and silica hydride-CNT capillaries.

  8. The Bordetella Bps Polysaccharide Is Required for Biofilm Formation and Enhances Survival in the Lower Respiratory Tract of Swine.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Brockmeier, Susan L; Sukumar, Neelima; Paharik, Alexandra E; Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R; Kehrli, Marcus E; Loving, Crystal L; Shore, Sarah M; Deora, Rajendar

    2017-08-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is pervasive in swine populations and plays multiple roles in respiratory disease. Additionally, B. bronchiseptica is capable of establishing long-term or chronic infections in swine. Bacterial biofilms are increasingly recognized as important contributors to chronic bacterial infections. Recently the polysaccharide locus bpsABCD has been demonstrated to serve a critical role in the development of mature biofilms formed by the sequenced laboratory strain of B. bronchiseptica We hypothesized that swine isolates would also have the ability to form mature biofilms and the bpsABCD locus would serve a key role in this process. A mutant containing an in-frame deletion of the bpsABCD structural genes was constructed in a wild-type swine isolate and found to be negative for poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG)-like material by immunoblot assay. Further, the bpsABCD locus was found to be required for the development and maintenance of the three-dimensional structures under continuous-flow conditions. To investigate the contribution of the bpsABCD locus to the pathogenesis of B. bronchiseptica in swine, the KM22Δbps mutant was compared to the wild-type swine isolate for the ability to colonize and cause disease in pigs. The bpsABCD locus was found to not be required for persistence in the upper respiratory tract of swine. Additionally, the bpsABCD locus did not affect the development of anti-Bordetella humoral immunity, did not contribute to disease severity, and did not mediate protection from complement-mediated killing. However, the bpsABCD locus was found to enhance survival in the lower respiratory tract of swine. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Non-BPS attractors in 5 d and 6 d extended supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianopoli, L.; Ferrara, S.; Marrani, A.; Trigiante, M.

    2008-05-01

    We connect the attractor equations of a certain class of N=2, d=5 supergravities with their (1,0), d=6 counterparts, by relating the moduli space of non-BPS d=5 black hole/black string attractors to the moduli space of extremal dyonic black string d=6 non-BPS attractors. For d=5 real special symmetric spaces and for N=4,6,8 theories, we explicitly compute the flat directions of the black object potential corresponding to vanishing eigenvalues of its Hessian matrix. In the case N=4, we study the relation to the (2,0), d=6 theory. We finally describe the embedding of the N=2, d=5 magic models in N=8, d=5 supergravity as well as the interconnection among the corresponding charge orbits.

  10. Magnetic flux inversion in charged BPS vortices in a Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Higgs framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M.; da Hora, E.; Miller, C.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate for the first time the existence of electrically charged BPS vortices in a Maxwell-Higgs model supplemented with a parity-odd Lorentz-violating (LV) structure belonging to the CPT-even gauge sector of the standard model extension and a fourth order potential (in the absence of the Chern-Simons term). The modified first order BPS equations provide charged vortex configurations endowed with some interesting features: localized and controllable spatial thickness, integer flux quantization, electric field inversion and localized magnetic flux reversion. This model could possibly be applied on condensed matter systems which support charged vortices carrying integer quantized magnetic flux, endowed with localized flipping of the magnetic flux.

  11. 1/4-BPS M-theory bubbles with SO(3) × SO(4) symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyojoong; Kiu Kim, Kyung; Kim, Nakwoo

    2007-08-01

    In this paper we generalize the work of Lin, Lunin and Maldacena on the classification of 1/2-BPS M-theory solutions to a specific class of 1/4-BPS configurations. We are interested in the solutions of 11 dimensional supergravity with SO(3) × SO(4) symmetry, and it is shown that such solutions are constructed over a one-parameter familiy of 4 dimensional almost Calabi-Yau spaces. Through analytic continuations we can obtain M-theory solutions having AdS2 × S3 or AdS3 × S2 factors. It is shown that our result is equivalent to the AdS solutions which have been recently reported as the near-horizon geometry of M2 or M5-branes wrapped on 2 or 4-cycles in Calabi-Yau threefolds. We also discuss the hierarchy of M-theory bubbles with different number of supersymmetries.

  12. The Hodge-Elliptic Genus, Spinning BPS States, and Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachru, Shamit; Tripathy, Arnav

    2017-10-01

    We perform a refined count of BPS states in the compactification of M-theory on {K3 × T^2}, keeping track of the information provided by both the {SU(2)_L} and {SU(2)_R} angular momenta in the SO(4) little group. Mathematically, this four variable counting function may be expressed via the motivic Donaldson-Thomas counts of {K3 × T^2}, simultaneously refining Katz, Klemm, and Pandharipande's motivic stable pairs counts on K3 and Oberdieck-Pandharipande's Gromov-Witten counts on {K3 × T^2}. This provides the first full answer for motivic curve counts of a compact Calabi-Yau threefold. Along the way, we develop a Hodge-elliptic genus for Calabi-Yau manifolds—a new counting function for BPS states that interpolates between the Hodge polynomial and the elliptic genus of a Calabi-Yau.

  13. Description of 1/4 BPS configurations in minimal type IIB supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2007-01-15

    In this paper we present an effort to extend the LLM construction of 1/2 BPS states in minimal IIB supergravity to configurations that preserve 1/4 of the total number of supersymmetries. Following the same techniques we reduce the problem to that of a single scalar which satisfies a nonlinear equation. In particular, the scalar is identified to be the Kahler potential with which a four dimensional base space is equipped.

  14. Description of 1/4 BPS configurations in minimal typeIIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present an effort to extend the LLM construction of 1/2 BPS states in minimal IIB supergravity to configurations that preserve 1/4 of the total number of supersymmetries. Following the same techniques we reduce the problem to that of a single scalar which satisfies a nonlinear equation. In particular, the scalar is identified to be the Kahler potential with which a four dimensional base space is equipped.

  15. Refined BPS invariants of 6d SCFTs from anomalies and modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jie; Huang, Min-xin; Kashani-Poor, Amir-Kian; Klemm, Albrecht

    2017-05-01

    F-theory compactifications on appropriate local elliptic Calabi-Yau manifolds engineer six dimensional superconformal field theories and their mass deformations. The partition function Ztop of the refined topological string on these geometries captures the particle BPS spectrum of this class of theories compactified on a circle. Organizing Ztop in terms of contributions Z β at base degree β of the elliptic fibration, we find that these, up to a multiplier system, are meromorphic Jacobi forms of weight zero with modular parameter the Kähler class of the elliptic fiber and elliptic parameters the couplings and mass parameters. The indices with regard to the multiple elliptic parameters are fixed by the refined holomorphic anomaly equations, which we show to be completely determined from knowledge of the chiral anomaly of the corresponding SCFT. We express Z β as a quotient of weak Jacobi forms, with a universal denominator inspired by its pole structure as suggested by the form of Ztop in terms of 5d BPS numbers. The numerator is determined by modularity up to a finite number of coefficients, which we prove to be fixed uniquely by imposing vanishing conditions on 5d BPS numbers as boundary conditions. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach with many examples, in particular solving the E-string and M-string theories including mass deformations, as well as theories constructed as chains of these. We make contact with previous work by showing that spurious singularities are cancelled when the partition function is written in the form advocated here. Finally, we use the BPS invariants of the E-string thus obtained to test a generalization of the Göttsche-Nakajima-Yoshioka K-theoretic blowup equation, as inspired by the Grassi-Hatsuda-Mariño conjecture, to generic local Calabi-Yau threefolds.

  16. Abdominal wall integrity after open abdomen: long-term results of vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM).

    PubMed

    Willms, A; Schaaf, S; Schwab, R; Richardsen, I; Bieler, D; Wagner, B; Güsgen, C

    2016-12-01

    The open abdomen has become a standard technique in the management of critically ill patients undergoing surgery for severe intra-abdominal conditions. Negative pressure and mesh-mediated fascial traction are commonly used and achieve low fistula rates and high fascial closure rates. In this study, long-term results of a standardised treatment approach are presented. Fifty-five patients who underwent OA management for different indications at our institution from 2006 to 2013 were enrolled. All patients were treated under a standardised algorithm that uses a combination of vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction. Structured follow-up assessments were offered to patients and included a medical history, a clinical examination and abdominal ultrasonography. The data obtained were statistically analysed. The fascial closure rate was 74 % in an intention-to-treat analysis and 89 % in a per-protocol analysis. The fistula rate was 1.8 %. Thirty-four patients attended follow-up. The median follow-up was 46 months (range 12-88 months). Incisional hernias developed in 35 %. Patients with hernias needed more operative procedures (10.3 vs 3.4, p = 0.03) than patients without hernia formation. A Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) of 31.1 was calculated. Patients with symptomatic hernias (NAS of 2-10) had a significantly lower mean POSAS score (p = 0.04). Vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM) seem to result in low complication rates and high fascial closure rates. Abdominal wall reconstruction, which is a challenging and complex procedure and causes considerable patient discomfort, can thus be avoided in the majority of cases. Available results are based on studies involving only a small number of cases. Multi-centre studies and registry-based data are therefore needed to validate these findings.

  17. Cellulose-Pectin Spatial Contacts Are Inherent to Never-Dried Arabidopsis Primary Cell Walls: Evidence from Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The structural role of pectins in plant primary cell walls is not yet well understood because of the complex and disordered nature of the cell wall polymers. We recently introduced multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize the spatial proximities of wall polysaccharides. The data showed extensive cross peaks between pectins and cellulose in the primary wall of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), indicating subnanometer contacts between the two polysaccharides. This result was unexpected because stable pectin-cellulose interactions are not predicted by in vitro binding assays and prevailing cell wall models. To investigate whether the spatial contacts that give rise to the cross peaks are artifacts of sample preparation, we now compare never-dried Arabidopsis primary walls with dehydrated and rehydrated samples. One-dimensional 13C spectra, two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation spectra, water-polysaccharide correlation spectra, and dynamics data all indicate that the structure, mobility, and intermolecular contacts of the polysaccharides are indistinguishable between never-dried and rehydrated walls. Moreover, a partially depectinated cell wall in which 40% of homogalacturonan is extracted retains cellulose-pectin cross peaks, indicating that the cellulose-pectin contacts are not due to molecular crowding. The cross peaks are observed both at −20°C and at ambient temperature, thus ruling out freezing as a cause of spatial contacts. These results indicate that rhamnogalacturonan I and a portion of homogalacturonan have significant interactions with cellulose microfibrils in the native primary wall. This pectin-cellulose association may be formed during wall biosynthesis and may involve pectin entrapment in or between cellulose microfibrils, which cannot be mimicked by in vitro binding assays. PMID:26036615

  18. Exploring the relation between 4D and 5D BPS solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrndt, Klaus; Lopes Cardoso, Gabriel; Mahapatra, Swapna

    2006-01-01

    Based on recent proposals linking four and five-dimensional BPS solutions, we discuss the explicit dictionary between general stationary 4D and 5D supersymmetric solutions in N=2 supergravity theories with cubic prepotentials. All these solutions are completely determined in terms of the same set of harmonic functions and the same set of attractor equations. As an example, we discuss black holes and black rings in Gödel-Taub-NUT spacetime. Then we consider corrections to the 4D solutions associated with more general prepotentials and comment on analogous corrections on the 5D side.

  19. Diagonal form factors and hexagon form factors II. Non-BPS light operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    We study the asymptotic volume dependence of the heavy-heavy-light three-point functions in the N=4 Super-Yang-Mills theory using the hexagon bootstrap approach, where the volume is the length of the heavy operator. We extend the analysis of our previous short letter [1] to the general case where the heavy operators can be in any rank one sector and the light operator being a generic non-BPS operator. We prove the conjecture of Bajnok, Janik and Wereszczynski [2] up to leading finite size corrections.

  20. A refined count of BPS states in the D1/D5 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Nathan

    2017-06-01

    We examine the low-lying quarter BPS spectrum of a 2d conformal field theory with target Sym N ( K3) at various points in the moduli space, and look at a more refined count than the ordinary elliptic genus. We compute growth of the spectrum at both the symmetric orbifold point, as well as at the supergravity point in the moduli space. Finally we do a decomposition of the spectra into \\mathcal{N}=4 characters and discuss possible relations to interesting symmetry groups. A similar analysis is done with T 4.

  1. BJP is linking its articles to the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, J C; Pawson, A J; Sharman, J L; Alexander, S P H

    2015-01-01

    Linked Editorials This Editorial is part of a series. To view the other Editorials in this series, visit: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12956/abstract; http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12954/abstract; http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12955/abstract and http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12856/abstract. Video To view the video on the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY, visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qhy3q33VtRI PMID:25965085

  2. Higher derivative corrections to BPS black hole attractors in 4d gauged supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristov, Kiril; Katmadas, Stefanos; Lodato, Ivano

    2016-05-01

    We analyze BPS black hole attractors in 4d gauged supergravity in the presence of higher derivative supersymmetric terms, including a Weyl-squared-type action, and determine the resulting corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. The near-horizon geometry AdS2×S2 (or other Riemann surface) preserves half of the supercharges in N = 2 supergravity with Fayet-Iliopoulos gauging. We derive a relation between the entropy and the black hole charges that suggests via AdS/CFT how subleading corrections contribute to the supersymmetric index in the dual microscopic picture.

  3. The protein BpsB is a poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine deacetylase required for biofilm formation in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Little, Dustin J; Milek, Sonja; Bamford, Natalie C; Ganguly, Tridib; DiFrancesco, Benjamin R; Nitz, Mark; Deora, Rajendar; Howell, P Lynne

    2015-09-11

    Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica are the causative agents of whooping cough in humans and a variety of respiratory diseases in animals, respectively. Bordetella species produce an exopolysaccharide, known as the Bordetella polysaccharide (Bps), which is encoded by the bpsABCD operon. Bps is required for Bordetella biofilm formation, colonization of the respiratory tract, and confers protection from complement-mediated killing. In this report, we have investigated the role of BpsB in the biosynthesis of Bps and biofilm formation by B. bronchiseptica. BpsB is a two-domain protein that localizes to the periplasm and outer membrane. BpsB displays metal- and length-dependent deacetylation on poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) oligomers, supporting previous immunogenic data that suggests Bps is a PNAG polymer. BpsB can use a variety of divalent metal cations for deacetylase activity and showed highest activity in the presence of Ni(2+) and Co(2+). The structure of the BpsB deacetylase domain is similar to the PNAG deacetylases PgaB and IcaB and contains the same circularly permuted family four carbohydrate esterase motifs. Unlike PgaB from Escherichia coli, BpsB is not required for polymer export and has unique structural differences that allow the N-terminal deacetylase domain to be active when purified in isolation from the C-terminal domain. Our enzymatic characterizations highlight the importance of conserved active site residues in PNAG deacetylation and demonstrate that the C-terminal domain is required for maximal deacetylation of longer PNAG oligomers. Furthermore, we show that BpsB is critical for the formation and complex architecture of B. bronchiseptica biofilms.

  4. The Protein BpsB Is a Poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine Deacetylase Required for Biofilm Formation in Bordetella bronchiseptica*

    PubMed Central

    Little, Dustin J.; Milek, Sonja; Bamford, Natalie C.; Ganguly, Tridib; DiFrancesco, Benjamin R.; Nitz, Mark; Deora, Rajendar; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica are the causative agents of whooping cough in humans and a variety of respiratory diseases in animals, respectively. Bordetella species produce an exopolysaccharide, known as the Bordetella polysaccharide (Bps), which is encoded by the bpsABCD operon. Bps is required for Bordetella biofilm formation, colonization of the respiratory tract, and confers protection from complement-mediated killing. In this report, we have investigated the role of BpsB in the biosynthesis of Bps and biofilm formation by B. bronchiseptica. BpsB is a two-domain protein that localizes to the periplasm and outer membrane. BpsB displays metal- and length-dependent deacetylation on poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) oligomers, supporting previous immunogenic data that suggests Bps is a PNAG polymer. BpsB can use a variety of divalent metal cations for deacetylase activity and showed highest activity in the presence of Ni2+ and Co2+. The structure of the BpsB deacetylase domain is similar to the PNAG deacetylases PgaB and IcaB and contains the same circularly permuted family four carbohydrate esterase motifs. Unlike PgaB from Escherichia coli, BpsB is not required for polymer export and has unique structural differences that allow the N-terminal deacetylase domain to be active when purified in isolation from the C-terminal domain. Our enzymatic characterizations highlight the importance of conserved active site residues in PNAG deacetylation and demonstrate that the C-terminal domain is required for maximal deacetylation of longer PNAG oligomers. Furthermore, we show that BpsB is critical for the formation and complex architecture of B. bronchiseptica biofilms. PMID:26203190

  5. Accumulation of N-Acetylglucosamine Oligomers in the Plant Cell Wall Affects Plant Architecture in a Dose-Dependent and Conditional Manner1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vanholme, Bartel; Vanholme, Ruben; Turumtay, Halbay; Goeminne, Geert; Cesarino, Igor; Goubet, Florence; Morreel, Kris; Rencoret, Jorge; Bulone, Vincent; Hooijmaijers, Cortwa; De Rycke, Riet; Gheysen, Godelieve; Ralph, John; De Block, Marc; Meulewaeter, Frank; Boerjan, Wout

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of short N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) oligosaccharides on the physiology of plants, N-ACETYLGLUCOSAMINYLTRANSFERASE (NodC) of Azorhizobium caulinodans was expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The corresponding enzyme catalyzes the polymerization of GlcNAc and, accordingly, β-1,4-GlcNAc oligomers accumulated in the plant. A phenotype characterized by difficulties in developing an inflorescence stem was visible when plants were grown for several weeks under short-day conditions before transfer to long-day conditions. In addition, a positive correlation between the oligomer concentration and the penetrance of the phenotype was demonstrated. Although NodC overexpression lines produced less cell wall compared with wild-type plants under nonpermissive conditions, no indications were found for changes in the amount of the major cell wall polymers. The effect on the cell wall was reflected at the transcriptome level. In addition to genes encoding cell wall-modifying enzymes, a whole set of genes encoding membrane-coupled receptor-like kinases were differentially expressed upon GlcNAc accumulation, many of which encoded proteins with an extracellular Domain of Unknown Function26. Although stress-related genes were also differentially expressed, the observed response differed from that of a classical chitin response. This is in line with the fact that the produced chitin oligomers were too small to activate the chitin receptor-mediated signal cascade. Based on our observations, we propose a model in which the oligosaccharides modify the architecture of the cell wall by acting as competitors in carbohydrate-carbohydrate or carbohydrate-protein interactions, thereby affecting noncovalent interactions in the cell wall or at the interface between the cell wall and the plasma membrane. PMID:24664205

  6. Exact half-BPS string-junction solutions in six-dimensional supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodaroli, Marco; D'Hoker, Eric; Guo, Yu; Gutperle, Michael

    2011-12-01

    We construct SO(2, 1) × SO(3)-invariant half-BPS solutions in six-dimensional (0,4) supergravity with m tensor multiplets. The space-time manifold of each one of these solutions consists of an AdS 2 × S 2 warped over a Riemann surface Σ with boundary. The most general local solution is parametrized by one real harmonic function, and m + 2 holomorphic functions which are subject to a quadratic constraint and a hermitian inequality, both of which are manifestly SO(2 , m) invariant. Imposing suitable conditions on these harmonic and holomorphic functions, we construct globally regular supergravity solutions with N distinct AdS 3 × S 3 asymptotic regions and contractible Σ. These solutions have an intricate moduli space, whose dimension equals 2( m + 1) N - m - 2 and matches the counting of three-form charge vectors and un-attracted scalars of the tensor multiplet. Exact explicit formulas for all supergravity fields are obtained in terms of the moduli. Our solutions give the near-horizon geometries for junctions of N self-dual strings in six dimensions, and are holographic duals to CFTs defined on N half-planes which share a common interface line. For m = 5, the solutions lift to quarter-BPS solutions for sixdimensional (4,4) supergravity.

  7. Differential Effects of Nitrogen Forms on Cell Wall Phosphorus Remobilization Are Mediated by Nitric Oxide, Pectin Content, and Phosphate Transporter Expression1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chun Quan; Zhu, Xiao Fang; Hu, An Yong; Wang, Chao; Dong, Xiao Ying; Shen, Ren-Fang

    2016-01-01

    NH4+ is a major source of inorganic nitrogen for rice (Oryza sativa), and NH4+ is known to stimulate the uptake of phosphorus (P). However, it is unclear whether NH4+ can also stimulate P remobilization when rice is grown under P-deficient conditions. In this study, we use the two rice cultivars ‘Nipponbare’ and ‘Kasalath’ that differ in their cell wall P reutilization, to demonstrate that NH4+ positively regulates the pectin content and activity of pectin methylesterase in root cell walls under −P conditions, thereby remobilizing more P from the cell wall and increasing soluble P in roots and shoots. Interestingly, our results show that more NO (nitric oxide) was produced in the rice root when NH4+ was applied as the sole nitrogen source compared with the NO3−. The effect of NO on the reutilization of P from the cell walls was further demonstrated through the application of the NO donor SNP (sodium nitroprusside) and c-PTIO (NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide). What’s more, the P-transporter gene OsPT2 is up-regulated under NH4+ supplementation and is therefore involved in the stimulated P remobilization. In conclusion, our data provide novel (to our knowledge) insight into the regulatory mechanism by which NH4+ stimulates Pi reutilization in cell walls of rice. PMID:27208223

  8. The Arabidopsis Class III Peroxidase AtPRX71 Negatively Regulates Growth under Physiological Conditions and in Response to Cell Wall Damage1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Raggi, Sara; Ranocha, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the cell wall has a major impact on plant growth and development, and alteration of cell wall structural components is often detrimental to biomass production. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these negative effects are largely unknown. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with altered pectin composition because of either the expression of the Aspergillus niger polygalacturonase II (AnPGII; 35S:AnPGII plants) or a mutation in the QUASIMODO2 (QUA2) gene that encodes a putative pectin methyltransferase (qua2-1 plants), display severe growth defects. Here, we show that expression of Arabidopsis PEROXIDASE71 (AtPRX71), encoding a class III peroxidase, strongly increases in 35S:AnPGII and qua2-1 plants as well as in response to treatments with the cellulose synthase inhibitor isoxaben, which also impairs cell wall integrity. Analysis of atprx71 loss-of-function mutants and plants overexpressing AtPRX71 indicates that this gene negatively influences Arabidopsis growth at different stages of development, likely limiting cell expansion. The atprx71-1 mutation partially suppresses the dwarf phenotype of qua2-1, suggesting that AtPRX71 contributes to the growth defects observed in plants undergoing cell wall damage. Furthermore, AtPRX71 seems to promote the production of reactive oxygen species in qua2-1 plants as well as plants treated with isoxaben. We propose that AtPRX71 contributes to strengthen cell walls, therefore restricting cell expansion, during normal growth and in response to cell wall damage. PMID:26468518

  9. Comparative radiographic analysis of changes in the abdominal wall musculature morphology after open posterior component separation or bridging laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Gayan S; Krpata, David M; Hicks, Caitlin W; Criss, Cory N; Gao, Yue; Rosen, Michael J; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2014-03-01

    Large ventral hernias are known to induce atrophic changes to the anterior abdominal wall musculature. We have shown that anterior component separation with external oblique (EO) release, with resultant reconstruction of the midline, results in hypertrophy of the rectus muscle (RM), internal oblique (IO), and transversus abdominis (TA). We aimed to compare and contrast the impact of posterior component separation with transversus abdominis release (TAR) and bridging laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) on the muscles of the abdominal wall. Preoperative and at least 6-month postoperative CT scans were analyzed for patients undergoing TAR with midline reconstruction and LVHR without midline reconstruction. A change in the measured area of each abdominal wall muscle was used as the determinant of hypertrophy or atrophy. The areas of the RM, EO, IO, and TA were measured at the L3 to L4 level through the axial plane. Twenty-five consecutive patients with pre- and postoperative images were analyzed in each group. In the TAR group, the RA, EO, and IO demonstrated significant increases in area. In the LVHR group, no muscles demonstrated any significant changes. Similar to anterior component separation, hernia repair with TAR results in hypertrophy of the rectus abdominis muscle. In addition, we found that TAR was associated with hypertrophy of both external and internal oblique muscles. Bridging repair during LVHR, on the other hand, did not result in any significant changes in any of the abdominal muscles. Our findings provide clear radiologic evidence that re-creation of the midline by means of the TAR leads to improved anatomy of the abdominal wall, in addition to positive compensatory changes of the lateral abdominal wall musculature. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 2004/09 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/09). Full-Scale Methodology Report. NCES 2012-246

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wine, Jennifer; Janson, Natasha; Wheeless, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This report describes and evaluates the methods and procedures used in the 2004/09 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/09). BPS:04/09 is the second and final follow-up interview for the cohort of first-time beginning postsecondary students identified in the 2004 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study. For the first time…

  11. DMSK: A practical 2400-bps receiver for the mobile satellite service: An MSAT-X Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.; Simon, M. K.; Sumida, J.

    1985-01-01

    The partical aspects of a 2400-bps differential detection minimum-shift-keying (DMSK) receiver are investigated. Fundamental issues relating to hardware precision, Doppler shift, fading, and frequency offset are examined, and it is concluded that the receiver's implementation at baseband is more advantageous both in cost and simplicity than its IF implementation. The DMSK receiver has been fabricated and tested under simulated mobile satellite environment conditions. The measured receiver performance in the presence of anomalies pertinent to the link is presented in this report. Furthermore, the receiver behavior in a band-limited channel (GMSK) is also investigated. The DMSK receiver performs substantially better than a coherent minimum-shift-keying (MSK) receiver in a heavily fading environment. The DMSK radio is simple and robust, and results in a lower error floor than its coherent counterpart. Moreover, this receiver is suitable for burst-type signals, and its recovery from deep fades is fast.

  12. A Strategy against the Osteonecrosis of the Jaw Associated with Nitrogen-Containing Bisphosphonates (N-BPs): Attempts to Replace N-BPs with the Non-N-BP Etidronate.

    PubMed

    Oizumi, Takefumi; Yamaguchi, Kouji; Sato, Koichiro; Takahashi, Masato; Yoshimura, Gen; Otsuru, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Itoi, Eiji; Sugawara, Shunji; Takahashi, Tetsu; Endo, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonate (BP)-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) can occur when enhanced bone-resorptive diseases are treated with nitrogen-containing BPs (N-BPs). Having previously found, in mice, that the non-N-BP etidronate can (i) reduce the inflammatory/necrotic effects of N-BPs by inhibiting their intracellular entry and (ii) antagonize the binding of N-BPs to bone hydroxyapatite, we hypothesized that etidronate-replacement therapy (Eti-RT) might be useful for patients with, or at risk of, BRONJ. In the present study we examined this hypothesis. In each of 25 patients receiving N-BP treatment, the N-BP was discontinued when BRONJ was suspected and/or diagnosed. After consultation with the physician-in-charge and with the patient's informed consent, Eti-RT was instituted in one group according to its standard oral prescription. We retrospectively compared this Eti-RT group (11 patients) with a non-Eti-RT group (14 patients). The Eti-RT group (6 oral N-BP patients and 5 intravenous N-BP patients) and the non-Eti-RT group (5 oral N-BP patients and 9 intravenous N-BP patients) were all stage 2-3 BRONJ. Both in oral and intravenous N-BP patients (particularly in the former patients), Eti-RT promoted or tended to promote the separation and removal of sequestra and thereby promoted the recovery of soft-tissues, allowing them to cover the exposed jawbone. These results suggest that Eti-RT may be an effective choice for BRONJ caused by either oral or intravenous N-BPs and for BRONJ prevention, while retaining a level of anti-bone-resorption. Eti-RT may also be effective at preventing BRONJ in N-BP-treated patients at risk of BRONJ. However, prospective trials are still required.

  13. On domain decomposition preconditioner of BPS type for finite element discretizations of 3D elliptic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. G.

    2012-09-01

    BPS is a well known an efficient and rather general domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioner, suggested in the famous series of papers Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz (1986-1989). Since then, it has been serving as the origin for the whole family of domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioners-solvers as for h so hp discretizations of elliptic problems. For its original version, designed for h discretizations, the named authors proved the bound O(1 + log2 H/ h) for the relative condition number under some restricting conditions on the domain decomposition and finite element discretization. Here H/ h is the maximal relation of the characteristic size H of a decomposition subdomain to the mesh parameter h of its discretization. It was assumed that subdomains are images of the reference unite cube by trilinear mappings. Later similar bounds related to h discretizations were proved for more general domain decompositions, defined by means of coarse tetrahedral meshes. These results, accompanied by the development of some special tools of analysis aimed at such type of decompositions, were summarized in the book of Toselli and Widlund (2005). This paper is also confined to h discretizations. We further expand the range of admissible domain decompositions for constructing BPS preconditioners, in which decomposition subdomains can be convex polyhedrons, satisfying some conditions of shape regularity. We prove the bound for the relative condition number with the same dependence on H/ h as in the bound given above. Along the way to this result, we simplify the proof of the so called abstract bound for the relative condition number of the domain decomposition preconditioner. In the part, related to the analysis of the interface sub-problem preconditioning, our technical tools are generalization of those used by Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz.

  14. Clinical presentation and treatment of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) in India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic disease characterized by pelvic pain urgency and frequency. Patients with severe symptoms lead a very miserable life. North American, European and Asian guidelines have been recently promulgated but they differ on many important issues. There is no consensus on its name, definition, investigations and management. Indian guidelines have also been developed and they give more importance to the symptoms in relation to micturition. Though initially believed to be rare or non-existent in India the situation has changed. In Indian patients the presentation is more or less same as the rest of the world but a large percentage have obstructive symptoms and unusual urinary symptoms. Anal discomfort is also common. In India the commonest investigation in all cases of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is ultrasonography of kidney ureter and bladder with measurement of the post void residual urine volume. Cystoscopy is also done in all the cases to rule out presence of tuberculosis or carcinoma in situ. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is not considered to be a clinical disease as it is difficult to rule out all differential diagnosis only from history. Hunner’s lesion is very rare. Cystoscopy with hydro distension, oral therapy, intravesical therapy and surgical therapy form the back bone of management. It is difficult to know which treatment is best for a given patient. A staged protocol is followed and all the treatment modalities are applied to the patients in a sequential fashion—starting from the non-invasive to more invasive. Intravesical botox has not been found to be effective and there is no experience with interstim neuromodulation. PMID:26816851

  15. Clinical presentation and treatment of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) in India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nagendra Nath

    2015-10-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic disease characterized by pelvic pain urgency and frequency. Patients with severe symptoms lead a very miserable life. North American, European and Asian guidelines have been recently promulgated but they differ on many important issues. There is no consensus on its name, definition, investigations and management. Indian guidelines have also been developed and they give more importance to the symptoms in relation to micturition. Though initially believed to be rare or non-existent in India the situation has changed. In Indian patients the presentation is more or less same as the rest of the world but a large percentage have obstructive symptoms and unusual urinary symptoms. Anal discomfort is also common. In India the commonest investigation in all cases of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is ultrasonography of kidney ureter and bladder with measurement of the post void residual urine volume. Cystoscopy is also done in all the cases to rule out presence of tuberculosis or carcinoma in situ. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is not considered to be a clinical disease as it is difficult to rule out all differential diagnosis only from history. Hunner's lesion is very rare. Cystoscopy with hydro distension, oral therapy, intravesical therapy and surgical therapy form the back bone of management. It is difficult to know which treatment is best for a given patient. A staged protocol is followed and all the treatment modalities are applied to the patients in a sequential fashion-starting from the non-invasive to more invasive. Intravesical botox has not been found to be effective and there is no experience with interstim neuromodulation.

  16. The Role of the Plant-Specific ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 Protein in Arabidopsis Cell Wall Polysaccharide O-Acetylation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schultink, Alex; Naylor, Dan; Dama, Murali; Pauly, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A mutation in the ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 (AXY9) gene was found to be causative for the decreased xyloglucan acetylation phenotype of the axy9.1 mutant, which was identified in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants. The axy9.1 mutant also exhibits decreased O-acetylation of xylan, implying that the AXY9 protein has a broad role in polysaccharide acetylation. An axy9 insertional mutant exhibits severe growth defects and collapsed xylem, demonstrating the importance of wall polysaccharide O-acetylation for normal plant growth and development. Localization and topological experiments indicate that the active site of the AXY9 protein resides within the Golgi lumen. The AXY9 protein appears to be a component of the plant cell wall polysaccharide acetylation pathway, which also includes the REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION and TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins. The AXY9 protein is distinct from the TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins, reported to be polysaccharide acetyltransferases, but does share homology with them and other acetyltransferases, suggesting that the AXY9 protein may act to produce an acetylated intermediate that is part of the O-acetylation pathway. PMID:25681330

  17. Binding of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs) to the Trypanosoma cruzi farnesyl diphosphate synthase homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Oldfield, Eric; Amzel, L. Mario

    2010-11-15

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are a class of compounds that have been used extensively in the treatment of osteoporosis and malignancy-related hypercalcemia. Some of these compounds act through inhibition of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), a key enzyme in the synthesis of isoprenoids. Recently, nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs) used in bone resorption therapy have been shown to be active against Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease), suggesting that they may be used as anti-trypanosomal agents. The crystal structures of TcFPPS in complex with substrate (isopentenyl diphosphate, IPP) and five N-BP inhibitors show that the C-1 hydroxyl and the nitrogen-containing groups of the inhibitors alter the binding of IPP and the conformation of two TcFPPS residues, Tyr94 and Gln167. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments suggest that binding of the first N-BPs to the homodimeric TcFPPS changes the binding properties of the second site. This mechanism of binding of N-BPs to TcFPPS is different to that reported for the binding of the same compounds to human FPPS.

  18. The Bps polysaccharide of Bordetella pertussis promotes colonization and biofilm formation in the nose by functioning as an adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Conover, Matt S.; Sloan, Gina Parise; Love, Cheraton F.; Sukumar, Neelima; Deora, Rajendar

    2010-01-01

    Summary Many respiratory pathogens establish persistent infection or a carrier state in the human nasopharynx without overt disease symptoms but the presence of these in the lungs usually results in disease. Although the anatomy and microenvironments between nasopharynx and lungs are different, a virulence factor with an organ-specific function in the colonization of the nasopharynx is unknown. In contrast to the severity of pertussis and mortality in non vaccinated young children, Bordetella pertussis results in milder and prolonged cough in vaccinated adolescents and adults. Individuals harboring bacteria in the nasopharynx serve as reservoirs for intra-familial and nosocomial transmission. We show that the Bps polysaccharide of B. pertussis is critical for initial colonization of the mouse nose and the trachea but not of the lungs. Our data reveal a biofilm lifestyle for B. pertussis in the nose and the requirement of Bps in this developmental process. Bps functions as an adhesin by promoting adherence of B. pertussis and E. coli to human nasal but not to human lung epithelia. Patient serum specifically recognized Bps suggesting its expression during natural human infections. We describe the first bacterial factor that exhibits a differential role in colonization and adherence between the nasopharynx and the lungs. PMID:20633227

  19. 2004/06 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/06). Methodology Report. NCES 2008-184

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cominole, Melissa; Wheeless, Sara; Dudley, Kristin; Franklin, Jeff; Wine, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The "2004/06 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/06)" is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education to respond to the need for a national, comprehensive database concerning issues students may face in enrollment, persistence, progress, and attainment in postsecondary education and in consequent early rates of…

  20. Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study: First Follow-Up 1996-98 (BPS:96/98) Methodology Report. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wine, Jennifer S.; Whitmore, Roy W.; Heuer, Ruth E.; Biber, Melissa; Pratt, Daniel J.

    This report describes the methods and procedures used for the full-scale data collection effort of the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study First Follow-Up 1996-98 (BPS:96/98). These students, who started their postsecondary education during the 1995-96 academic year, were first interviewed during 1996 as part of the National…

  1. Wall turbulence without walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yoshinori; Jimenez, Javier

    2008-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are presented of isolated logarithmic layers without an underlying buffer zone. They are implemented by enforcing artificial boundary conditions within the logarithmic layer which are synthesized from values from the interior of the flow. As an example, simulations of a half-channel employing this technique are discussed. The results exhibit logarithmic mean velocity profiles, and velocity fluctuation intensities that are similar to those obtained by the full DNS of half or full channels. Those results strongly suggest that the formation of a logarithmic layer is not overly dependent on the presence of a near-wall region, and that such a flow can exist by itself. The technique enables us to perform conceptual experiments to clarify what is essential to the logarithmic layer. For example, preliminary results show that the logarithmic layer cannot be created only by a non-uniform shear, and requires a spatial gradient of the scales of the fluctuations. Somewhat surprisingly, some simulations result in Kármán constants fairly different from κ=0.4, providing clues to what determines κ in real wall turbulence.

  2. Bisphenol S (BPS) Alters Maternal Behavior and Brain in Mice Exposed During Pregnancy/Lactation and Their Daughters.

    PubMed

    Catanese, Mary C; Vandenberg, Laura N

    2017-03-01

    Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals have been shown to disrupt maternal behavior in rodents. We investigated the effects of an emerging xenoestrogen, bisphenol S (BPS), on maternal behavior and brain in CD-1 mice exposed during pregnancy and lactation (F0 generation) and in female offspring exposed during gestation and perinatal development (F1 generation). We observed different effects in F0 and F1 dams for a number of components of maternal behavior, including time on the nest, time spent on nest building, latency to retrieve pups, and latency to retrieve the entire litter. We also characterized expression of estrogen receptor α in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) and quantified tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive cells in the ventral tegmental area, 2 brain regions critical for maternal care. BPS-treated females in the F0 generation had a statistically significant increase in estrogen receptor α expression in the caudal subregion of the central MPOA in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, there were no statistically significant effects of BPS on the MPOA in F1 dams or the ventral tegmental area in either generation. This work demonstrates that BPS affects maternal behavior and brain with outcomes depending on generation, dose, and postpartum period. Many studies examining effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals view the mother as a means by which offspring can be exposed during critical periods of development. Here, we demonstrate that pregnancy and lactation are vulnerable periods for the mother. We also show that developmental BPS exposure alters maternal behavior later in adulthood. Both findings have potential public health implications. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  3. Comparison of the In Vivo Biotransformation of Two Emerging Estrogenic Contaminants, BP2 and BPS, in Zebrafish Embryos and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Le Fol, Vincent; Brion, François; Hillenweck, Anne; Perdu, Elisabeth; Bruel, Sandrine; Aït-Aïssa, Selim; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Zalko, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish embryo assays are increasingly used in the toxicological assessment of endocrine disruptors. Among other advantages, these models are 3R-compliant and are fit for screening purposes. Biotransformation processes are well-recognized as a critical factor influencing toxic response, but major gaps of knowledge exist regarding the characterization of functional metabolic capacities expressed in zebrafish. Comparative metabolic studies between embryos and adults are even scarcer. Using 3H-labeled chemicals, we examined the fate of two estrogenic emerging contaminants, benzophenone-2 (BP2) and bisphenol S (BPS), in 4-day embryos and adult zebrafish. BPS and BP2 were exclusively metabolized through phase II pathways, with no major qualitative difference between larvae and adults except the occurrence of a BP2-di-glucuronide in adults. Quantitatively, the biotransformation of both molecules was more extensive in adults. For BPS, glucuronidation was the predominant pathway in adults and larvae. For BP2, glucuronidation was the major pathway in larvae, but sulfation predominated in adults, with ca. 40% conversion of parent BP2 and an extensive release of several conjugates into water. Further larvae/adults quantitative differences were demonstrated for both molecules, with higher residue concentrations measured in larvae. The study contributes novel data regarding the metabolism of BPS and BP2 in a fish model and shows that phase II conjugation pathways are already functional in 4-dpf-old zebrafish. Comparative analysis of BP2 and BPS metabolic profiles in zebrafish larvae and adults further supports the use of zebrafish embryo as a relevant model in which toxicity and estrogenic activity can be assessed, while taking into account the absorption and fate of tested substances. PMID:28346357

  4. Applications of a sulfonated-polymer wall-modified open-tubular fused-silica capillary in capillary zone electrophoretic separations.

    PubMed

    Minnoor, E; Liu, Y; Pietrzyk, D J

    2000-07-07

    A fused-silica capillary that is wall-modified via chemically bonding a sulfonated polymer to the capillary wall has a uniform negative charge density on its surface and produces an electroosmotic flow (EOF) greater than 4 x 10(-4) cm2 V(-1) s(-1) The EOF is nearly independent of buffer pH over the pH range of 2 to 10 and is lower than the EOF obtained for the bare fused-silica capillary at the more basic pH but is higher at the more acidic buffer pH. Optimization of buffer pH can be based on analyte pKa values to improve the overall quality of the capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) separation of complex mixtures of weak acid and base analytes. Because of the high EOF in an acidic buffer, the capillary is useful for the separation of weak organic bases which are in their cation forms in the acidic buffer. EOF for the sulfonic acid bonded phase capillary can be adjusted via buffer additives such as organic solvent, tetraalkylammonium salts, multivalent cations and alkylsulfonic acids. The advantages of utilizing buffer pH and the EOF buffer modifiers to enhance migration time, selectivity, and resolution in CZE separations with this capillary are illustrated using a series of test analyte mixtures of inorganic anions, carboxylic acids, alkylsulfonic acids, benzenesulfonic acids, sulfas, pyridines, anilines or small-chain peptides.

  5. The Cell Wall Arabinose-Deficient Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant murus5 Encodes a Defective Allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE21[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dugard, Christopher K.; Olek, Anna T.; Cooper, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional marker-based mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to determine that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low cell wall arabinose mutant murus5 (mur5) encodes a defective allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2 (RGP2). Marker analysis of 13 F2 confirmed mutant progeny from a recombinant mapping population gave a rough map position on the upper arm of chromosome 5, and deep sequencing of DNA from these 13 lines gave five candidate genes with G→A (C→T) transitions predicted to result in amino acid changes. Of these five, only insertional mutant alleles of RGP2, a gene that encodes a UDP-arabinose mutase that interconverts UDP-arabinopyranose and UDP-arabinofuranose, exhibited the low cell wall arabinose phenotype. The identities of mur5 and two SALK insertional alleles were confirmed by allelism tests and overexpression of wild-type RGP2 complementary DNA placed under the control of the 35S promoter in the three alleles. The mur5 mutation results in the conversion of cysteine-257 to tyrosine-257 within a conserved hydrophobic cluster predicted to be distal to the active site and essential for protein stability and possible heterodimerization with other isoforms of RGP. PMID:27217494

  6. The Apical Actin Fringe Contributes to Localized Cell Wall Deposition and Polarized Growth in the Lily Pollen Tube1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rounds, Caleb M.; Hepler, Peter K.; Winship, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    In lily (Lilium formosanum) pollen tubes, pectin, a major component of the cell wall, is delivered through regulated exocytosis. The targeted transport and secretion of the pectin-containing vesicles may be controlled by the cortical actin fringe at the pollen tube apex. Here, we address the role of the actin fringe using three different inhibitors of growth: brefeldin A, latrunculin B, and potassium cyanide. Brefeldin A blocks membrane trafficking and inhibits exocytosis in pollen tubes; it also leads to the degradation of the actin fringe and the formation of an aggregate of filamentous actin at the base of the clear zone. Latrunculin B, which depolymerizes filamentous actin, markedly slows growth but allows focused pectin deposition to continue. Of note, the locus of deposition shifts frequently and correlates with changes in the direction of growth. Finally, potassium cyanide, an electron transport chain inhibitor, briefly stops growth while causing the actin fringe to completely disappear. Pectin deposition continues but lacks focus, instead being delivered in a wide arc across the pollen tube tip. These data support a model in which the actin fringe contributes to the focused secretion of pectin to the apical cell wall and, thus, to the polarized growth of the pollen tube. PMID:25037212

  7. Determining the Subcellular Location of Synthesis and Assembly of the Cell Wall Polysaccharide (1,3; 1,4)-β-d-Glucan in Grasses[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah M.; Ho, Yin Ying; Lampugnani, Edwin R.; Van de Meene, Allison M.L.; Bain, Melissa P.; Bacic, Antony; Doblin, Monika S.

    2015-01-01

    The current dogma for cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis is that cellulose (and callose) is synthesized at the plasma membrane (PM), whereas matrix phase polysaccharides are assembled in the Golgi apparatus. We provide evidence that (1,3;1,4)-β-d-glucan (mixed-linkage glucan [MLG]) does not conform to this paradigm. We show in various grass (Poaceae) species that MLG-specific antibody labeling is present in the wall but absent over Golgi, suggesting it is assembled at the PM. Antibodies to the MLG synthases, cellulose synthase-like F6 (CSLF6) and CSLH1, located CSLF6 to the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, secretory vesicles, and the PM and CSLH1 to the same locations apart from the PM. This pattern was recreated upon expression of VENUS-tagged barley (Hordeum vulgare) CSLF6 and CSLH1 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and, consistent with our biochemical analyses of native grass tissues, shown to be catalytically active with CSLF6 and CSLH1 in PM-enriched and PM-depleted membrane fractions, respectively. These data support a PM location for the synthesis of MLG by CSLF6, the predominant enzymatically active isoform. A model is proposed to guide future experimental approaches to dissect the molecular mechanism(s) of MLG assembly. PMID:25770111

  8. The Target of β-Expansin EXPB1 in Maize Cell Walls from Binding and Solid-State NMR Studies1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuo; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    The wall-loosening actions of β-expansins are known primarily from studies of EXPB1 extracted from maize (Zea mays) pollen. EXPB1 selectively loosens cell walls (CWs) of grasses, but its specific binding target is unknown. We characterized EXPB1 binding to sequentially extracted maize CWs, finding that the protein primarily binds glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX), the major matrix polysaccharide in grass CWs. This binding is strongly reduced by salts, indicating that it is predominantly electrostatic in nature. For direct molecular evidence of EXPB1 binding, we conducted solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), which is sensitive to distances between unpaired electrons and nuclei. By mixing 13C-enriched maize CWs with EXPB1 functionalized with a Mn2+ tag, we measured Mn2+-induced PRE. Strong 1H and 13C PREs were observed for the carboxyls of GAX, followed by more moderate PREs for carboxyl groups in homogalacturonan and rhamnogalacturonan-I, indicating that EXPB1 preferentially binds GAX. In contrast, no PRE was observed for cellulose, indicating very weak interaction of EXPB1 with cellulose. Dynamics experiments show that EXPB1 changes GAX mobility in a complex manner: the rigid fraction of GAX became more rigid upon EXPB1 binding while the dynamic fraction became more mobile. Combining these data with previous results, we propose that EXPB1 loosens grass CWs by disrupting noncovalent junctions between highly substituted GAX and GAX of low substitution, which binds cellulose. This study provides molecular evidence of β-expansin’s target in grass CWs and demonstrates a new strategy for investigating ligand binding for proteins that are difficult to express heterologously. PMID:27729469

  9. Supersymmetry in open superstring field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, Theodore

    2017-05-01

    We realize the 16 unbroken supersymmetries on a BPS D-brane as invariances of the action of the corresponding open superstring field theory. We work in the small Hilbert space approach, where a symmetry of the action translates into a symmetry of the associated cyclic A ∞ structure. We compute the supersymmetry algebra, being careful to disentangle the components which produce a translation, a gauge transformation, and a symmetry transformation which vanishes on-shell. Via the minimal model theorem, we illustrate how supersymmetry of the action implies supersymmetry of the tree level open string scattering amplitudes.

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Platelet-Rich Fibrin Biomaterial and Open Flap Debridement in the Treatment of Two and Three Wall Intrabony Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ajwani, Himanshu; Shetty, Sharath; Gopalakrishnan, Dharmarajan; Kathariya, Rahul; Kulloli, Anita; Dolas, R S; Pradeep, A R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Platelet-rich concentrates are the most widely used regenerative biomaterials. Stimulation and acceleration of soft and hard tissue healing are due to local and continuous delivery of growth factors and proteins, mimicking the needs of the physiological wound healing and reparative tissue processes. This article aims to evaluate the clinical efficacy of open flap debridement (OFD) with or without platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) in the treatment of intrabony defects. Materials and Methods: Twenty subjects with forty intrabony defects were treated with either autologous PRF with open-flap debridement (test, n = 20) or open-flap debridement alone (control, n = 20). Soft tissue parameters included: Plaque index, sulcus bleeding index, probing depth, relative attachment level and gingival marginal level (GML). The hard tissue parameters included-distances from: Cement enamel junction to the base of the defect (CEJ-BOD): Alveolar crest to the base of the defect (AC-BOD): And CEJ to AC. The parameters were recorded at baseline and at 9 months postoperatively calculated using standardized radiographs by image-analysis software. Results: Statistically significant (0.005*) intragroup improvements were seen with all the hard and soft parameters in both test and control groups, except for GML. Statistically significant improvements were seen with the mean defect fill (CEJ-BOD and AC-BOD) (P = 0.003*) when intergroup comparisons were made. Conclusions: Adjunctive use of PRF with OFD significantly improves defect fill when compared to OFD alone. PRF has consistently been showing regenerative potential; it is simple, easy and inexpensive biomaterial compared with bone grafts. PMID:25954068

  11. BPS-like bound and thermodynamics of the charged BTZ black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Monni, Cristina

    2009-07-01

    The charged Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole is plagued by several pathologies: (a) Divergent boundary terms are present in the action; hence, we have a divergent black-hole mass. (b) Once a finite, renormalized, mass M is defined, black-hole states exist for arbitrarily negative values of M. (c) There is no upper bound on the charge Q. We show that these pathological features are an artifact of the renormalization procedure. They can be completely removed by using an alternative renormalization scheme leading to a different definition M0 of the black-hole mass, which is the total energy inside the horizon. The new mass satisfies a BPS-like bound M0≥(π)/(2)Q2, and the heat capacity of the hole is positive. We also discuss the black-hole thermodynamics that arises when M0 is interpreted as the internal energy of the system. We show, using three independent approaches (black-hole thermodynamics, Einstein equations, and Euclidean action formulation), that M0 satisfies the first law if a term describing the mechanical work done by the electrostatic pressure is introduced.

  12. Topological charged BPS vortices in Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Higgs electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, R.; Lazar, G.

    2014-09-01

    We have performed a complete study of BPS vortex solutions in the Abelian sector of the standard model extension (SME). Specifically, we have coupled the SME electromagnetism with a Higgs field which is supplemented with a Lorentz-violating CPT-even term. We have verified that Lorentz violation (LV) belonging to the Higgs sector allows us to interpolate between some well-known models like Maxwell-Higgs, Chern-Simons-Higgs, and Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Higgs. We can also observe that the electrical charged density distribution is non-null in both CPT-even and CPT-odd models; however, the total electric charge in the CPT-even case is null, whereas in the CPT-odd one it is proportional to the quantized magnetic flux. The following general results can be established in relation to the LV introduced in the Higgs sector: it changes the vortex ansatz and the gauge field boundary conditions. A direct consequence is that the magnetic flux, besides being proportional to the winding number, also depends explicitly on the Lorentz-violation belonging to the Higgs sector.

  13. BPS Z{sub N} string tensions, sine law and Casimir scaling, and integrable field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Kneipp, Marco A. C.

    2007-12-15

    We consider a Yang-Mills-Higgs theory with spontaneous symmetry breaking of the gauge group G{yields}U(1){sup r}{yields}C{sub G}, with C{sub G} being the center of G. We study two vacua solutions of the theory which produce this symmetry breaking. We show that for one of these vacua, the theory in the Coulomb phase has the mass spectrum of particles and monopoles which is exactly the same as the mass spectrum of particles and solitons of two-dimensional affine Toda field theory, for suitable coupling constants. That result holds also for N=4 super Yang-Mills theories. On the other hand, in the Higgs phase, we show that for each of the two vacua the ratio of the tensions of the BPS Z{sub N} strings satisfy either the Casimir scaling or the sine law scaling for G=SU(N). These results are extended to other gauge groups: for the Casimir scaling, the ratios of the tensions are equal to the ratios of the quadratic Casimir constant of specific representations; for the sine law scaling, the tensions are proportional to the components of the left Perron-Frobenius eigenvector of Cartan matrix K{sub ij} and the ratios of tensions are equal to the ratios of the soliton masses of affine Toda field theories.

  14. Transcriptome Profiling of the Green Alga Spirogyra pratensis (Charophyta) Suggests an Ancestral Role for Ethylene in Cell Wall Metabolism, Photosynthesis, and Abiotic Stress Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that ethylene regulates a diverse set of developmental and stress-related processes in angiosperms, yet its roles in early-diverging embryophytes and algae are poorly understood. Recently, it was shown that ethylene functions as a hormone in the charophyte green alga Spirogyra pratensis. Since land plants evolved from charophytes, this implies conservation of ethylene as a hormone in green plants for at least 450 million years. However, the physiological role of ethylene in charophyte algae has remained unknown. To gain insight into ethylene responses in Spirogyra, we used mRNA sequencing to measure changes in gene expression over time in Spirogyra filaments in response to an ethylene treatment. Our analyses show that at the transcriptional level, ethylene predominantly regulates three processes in Spirogyra: (1) modification of the cell wall matrix by expansins and xyloglucan endotransglucosylases/hydrolases, (2) down-regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis and photosynthesis, and (3) activation of abiotic stress responses. We confirmed that the photosynthetic capacity and chlorophyll content were reduced by an ethylene treatment and that several abiotic stress conditions could stimulate cell elongation in an ethylene-dependent manner. We also found that the Spirogyra transcriptome harbors only 10 ethylene-responsive transcription factor (ERF) homologs, several of which are regulated by ethylene. These results provide an initial understanding of the hormonal responses induced by ethylene in Spirogyra and help to reconstruct the role of ethylene in ancestral charophytes prior to the origin of land plants. PMID:27489312

  15. RNA-Seq Links the Transcription Factors AINTEGUMENTA and AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6 to Cell Wall Remodeling and Plant Defense Pathways1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bequette, Carlton J.; Fu, Zheng Qing; Loraine, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) and AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6 (AIL6) are two related transcription factors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that have partially overlapping roles in several aspects of flower development, including floral organ initiation, identity specification, growth, and patterning. To better understand the biological processes regulated by these two transcription factors, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) on ant ail6 double mutants. We identified thousands of genes that are differentially expressed in the double mutant compared with the wild type. Analyses of these genes suggest that ANT and AIL6 regulate floral organ initiation and growth through modifications to the cell wall polysaccharide pectin. We found reduced levels of demethylesterified homogalacturonan and altered patterns of auxin accumulation in early stages of ant ail6 flower development. The RNA-Seq experiment also revealed cross-regulation of AIL gene expression at the transcriptional level. The presence of a number of overrepresented Gene Ontology terms related to plant defense in the set of genes differentially expressed in ant ail6 suggest that ANT and AIL6 also regulate plant defense pathways. Furthermore, we found that ant ail6 plants have elevated levels of two defense hormones: salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, and show increased resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. These results suggest that ANT and AIL6 regulate biological pathways that are critical for both development and defense. PMID:27208279

  16. Bursch poses next to BPS installed in a slot on Endeavour's middeck for return on STS-111 UF-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-07

    STS111-E-5026 (7 June 2002) --- Astronaut Daniel W. Bursch, who has been aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for the past six months, wastes little time in going to work on board the Space Shuttle Endeavour following linkup of the shuttle and station on June 7, 2002. Bursch, who will return home aboard Endeavour in a few days, is pictured at the Biomass Production System (BPS) on Endeavour's mid deck.

  17. In vitro and in vivo estrogenic activity of BPA, BPF and BPS in zebrafish-specific assays.

    PubMed

    Le Fol, Vincent; Aït-Aïssa, Selim; Sonavane, Manoj; Porcher, Jean-Marc; Balaguer, Patrick; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Zalko, Daniel; Brion, François

    2017-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used chemical that has been extensively studied as an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC). Other bisphenols sharing close structural features with BPA, are increasingly being used as alternatives, increasing the need to assess associated hazards to the endocrine system. In the present study, the estrogenic activity of BPA, bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol F (BPF) was assessed by using a combination of zebrafish-specific mechanism-based in vitro and in vivo assays. The three bisphenols were found to efficiently transactivate all zebrafish estrogen receptor (zfER) subtypes in zebrafish hepatic reporter cell lines (ZELH-zfERs). BPA was selective for zfERα while BPS and BPF were slightly more potent on zfERβ subtypes. We further documented the estrogenic effect in vivo by quantifying the expression of brain aromatase using a transgenic cyp19a1b-GFP zebrafish embryo assay. All three bisphenols induced GFP in a concentration-dependent manner. BPS only partially induced brain aromatase at the highest tested concentrations (>30µM) while BPA and BPF strongly induced GFP, in an ER-dependent manner, at 1-10µM. Furthermore, we show that BPF strongly induced vitellogenin synthesis in adult male zebrafish. Overall, this study demonstrates the estrogenic activity of BPA, BPF and BPS in different cell- and tissue-contexts and at different stages of development. Differences between in vitro and in vivo responses are discussed in light of selective ER activation and the fate of the compounds in the models. This study confirms the relevance of combining cellular and whole-organism bioassays in a unique model species for the hazard assessment of candidate EDCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diet and its role in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) and comorbid conditions.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Justin I; Shorter, Barbara; Moldwin, Robert M

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Nearly 90% of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) report sensitivities to a wide variety of dietary comestibles. Current questionnaire-based literature suggests that citrus fruits, tomatoes, vitamin C, artificial sweeteners, coffee, tea, carbonated and alcoholic beverages, and spicy foods tend to exacerbate symptoms, while calcium glycerophosphate and sodium bicarbonate tend to improve symptoms. At present we recommend employing a controlled method to determine dietary sensitivities, such as an elimination diet, in order to identify sensitivities while at the same time maintain optimal nutritional intake. We review current literature with regard to diet's effect upon IC/BPS and common comorbidities (irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, neuropathic pain, vulvodynia, and headache) with a focus upon questionnaire-based investigations. We discuss the pathologic mechanisms that may link diet and IC/BPS related-pain, concentrating upon specific comestibles such as acidic foods, foods high in potassium, caffeine, and alcohol. Up to 90% of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) report sensitivities to a wide variety of comestibles.   Pathological mechanisms suggested to be responsible for the relationship between dietary intake and symptom exacerbation include peripheral and/or central neural upregulation, bladder epithelial dysfunction, and organ 'cross-talk', amongst others.   Current questionnaire-based data suggests that citrus fruits, tomatoes, vitamin C, artificial sweeteners, coffee, tea, carbonated and alcoholic beverages, and spicy foods tend to exacerbate symptoms, while calcium glycerophosphate and sodium bicarbonate tend to improve symptoms. Specific comestible sensitivities varied between patients and may have been influenced by comorbid conditions. This suggests that a controlled method to determine dietary

  19. A comparative study of the anti-allergic effects of disodium baicalein 6-phosphate (BPS) and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG).

    PubMed

    Koda, A; Watanabe, S; Yanagihara, Y; Nagai, H; Sakamoto, K

    1977-02-01

    A comparative study was carried out on the effects of a soluble derivative of baicalein, disodium baicalein 6-phosphate (BPS) and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on the immediate type allergic reactions. BPS not only inhibited reaginic antibody-mediated reactions including antigen-induced mediator release from monkey lung, homologous PCA in rats, and reaginic antibody-mediated degranulation of mast cell, but also non-reaginic antibody-mediated reactions such as mediator release from guinea pig lung sensitized with ovalbumin and that from human lung caused by anti-IgE. The agent, however, did not affect the mediator release from lung of rats sensitized with dinitrophynylated ascaris extract plus Bordetella pertussis. On the other hand, DSCG showed characteristic properties as an inhibitor of reaginic antibody-mediated reaction. It is thus assumed that the functional site of reaginic antibody is well fixed with DSCG at a definite distance between the two-chromone-nuclei while that of IgG is readily fixed with the two molecules of baicalein or BPS.

  20. Bisphenol A and other bisphenol analogues including BPS and BPF in surface water samples from Japan, China, Korea and India.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Eriko; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Taniyasu, Sachi; Lam, James; Lam, Paul K S; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Jeong, Yunsun; Kannan, Pranav; Achyuthan, Hema; Munuswamy, Natesan; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-12-01

    Concentrations of eight bisphenol analogues (BPs) including BPA, BPS, and BPF were determined in surface waters collected from select rivers in Japan, Korea, China, and India. BPA was found at a concentration in the range of several tens to several hundreds of nanograms per liter in most of the rivers surveyed and some of the highest concentrations (54-1950 ng/L) were found in rivers in Chennai, India. Concentrations of BPF were one to two orders of magnitude higher than those of BPA in river and sea waters collected from Japan, Korea and China, which suggested that BPF is a major contaminant in surface waters in several Southeast Asian countries. BPF concentrations as high as 2850 ng/L were found in the Tamagawa River in Japan. The flux of BPs through riverine discharges into Tokyo Bay was calculated to be approximately 5.5 t per year. Based on the flux estimates and the mass of BPF found in water column and sediment in Tokyo Bay, it was found that BPF degrades faster than BPA in the environment. Elevated concentrations of BPF found in surface waters suggest the need for further studies to determine the fate and toxicity of this compound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. GmEXPB2, a Cell Wall β-Expansin, Affects Soybean Nodulation through Modifying Root Architecture and Promoting Nodule Formation and Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinxin; Zhao, Jing; Tan, Zhiyuan; Liao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Nodulation is an essential process for biological nitrogen (N2) fixation in legumes, but its regulation remains poorly understood. Here, a β-expansin gene, GmEXPB2, was found to be critical for soybean (Glycine max) nodulation. GmEXPB2 was preferentially expressed at the early stage of nodule development. β-Glucuronidase staining further showed that GmEXPB2 was mainly localized to the nodule vascular trace and nodule vascular bundles, as well as nodule cortical and parenchyma cells, suggesting that GmEXPB2 might be involved in cell wall modification and extension during nodule formation and development. Overexpression of GmEXPB2 dramatically modified soybean root architecture, increasing the size and number of cortical cells in the root meristematic and elongation zones and expanding root hair density and size of the root hair zone. Confocal microscopy with green fluorescent protein-labeled rhizobium USDA110 cells showed that the infection events were significantly enhanced in the GmEXPB2-overexpressing lines. Moreover, nodule primordium development was earlier in overexpressing lines compared with wild-type plants. Thereby, overexpression of GmEXPB2 in either transgenic soybean hairy roots or whole plants resulted in increased nodule number, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity and thus elevated plant N and phosphorus content as well as biomass. In contrast, suppression of GmEXPB2 in soybean transgenic composite plants led to smaller infected cells and thus reduced number of big nodules, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity, thereby inhibiting soybean growth. Taken together, we conclude that GmEXPB2 critically affects soybean nodulation through modifying root architecture and promoting nodule formation and development and subsequently impacts biological N2 fixation and growth of soybean. PMID:26432877

  2. Comparison of objectively measured motor behavior with ratings of the motor behavior domain of the Bern Psychopathology Scale (BPS) in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bracht, Tobias; Heidemeyer, Kristine; Koschorke, Philipp; Horn, Helge; Razavi, Nadja; Wopfner, Alexander; Strik, Werner; Walther, Sebastian

    2012-07-30

    Motor symptoms in schizophrenia occur frequently and are relevant to diagnosis and antipsychotic therapy. To date motor symptoms are difficult to assess and their pathobiology is a widely unresolved issue. The Bern Psychopathology Scale for the assessment of system-specific psychotic symptoms (BPS) was designed to identify homogenous patient groups by focusing on three domains: language, affectivity and motor behavior. The present study aimed to validate the motor behavior domain of the BPS using wrist actigraphy. In total, 106 patients were rated with the BPS and underwent 24 h continuous actigraphy recording. The ratings of the global severity of the motor behavior domain (GSM) as well as the quantitative and the subjective items of the motor behavior domain of the BPS were significantly associated with actigraphic variables. In contrast, the qualitative items of the motor domain failed to show an association with actigraphy. Likewise, scores of the language and the affectivity domains were not related to actigraphic measures. In conclusion, we provided substantial external validity for global, quantitative and subjective ratings of the BPS motor behavior domain. Thus, the BPS is suitable to assess the dimension of quantitative motor behavior in the schizophrenia spectrum.

  3. Wall-Crossing, Free Fermions and Crystal Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We describe wall-crossing for local, toric Calabi-Yau manifolds without compact four-cycles, in terms of free fermions, vertex operators, and crystal melting. Firstly, to each such manifold we associate two states in the free fermion Hilbert space. The overlap of these states reproduces the BPS partition function corresponding to the non-commutative Donaldson-Thomas invariants, given by the modulus square of the topological string partition function. Secondly, we introduce the wall-crossing operators which represent crossing the walls of marginal stability associated to changes of the B-field through each two-cycle in the manifold. BPS partition functions in non-trivial chambers are given by the expectation values of these operators. Thirdly, we discuss crystal interpretation of such correlators for this whole class of manifolds. We describe evolution of these crystals upon a change of the moduli, and find crystal interpretation of the flop transition and the DT/PT transition. The crystals which we find generalize and unify various other Calabi-Yau crystal models which appeared in literature in recent years.

  4. Wonderful Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  5. Black hole information in string theory: Non-BPS microstates and superstrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, Benjamin E.

    In this thesis we explore two novel directions in the quest for 3-charge "black hole microstate geometries", which are smooth, horizon-free supergravity solutions in 5 or more dimensions that correspond to the microstates of black holes. First we find two infinite families of smooth non-BPS microstates using the "floating brane ansatz" method in 5 dimensions, based on a class of Kahler metrics studied by LeBrun. The first set of solutions is based on the LeBrun-Burns subclass, which turn out to have a trivial flux, leading to trivial bubble equations. The second set of solutions is based on the more general LeBrun metrics, which have non-trivial flux, and we find non-trivial bubble equations. In both cases, solutions are asymptotic to warped, rotating AdS2 x S 3. Second, we realize two important steps toward the construction of superstrata, which are 3-charge, 2-dipole-charge smooth supergravity solutions that fluctuate as an arbitrary function of two variables. In one case, we find solutions that depend on functions of two variables; however they lack the necessary KKM charge to make them smooth. In the second case, we construct smooth solutions with KKM charge turned on, but in a restricted class that allows them only to depend on arbitrary functions of one variable. Nevertheless, we show that this one variable can be oriented in an arbitrary way inside a 2-torus, and many sources with different orientations inside the T2 can be combined via superposition.

  6. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs)

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Ragnarsson, Lotten; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies. PMID:27304486

  7. Evaluation of the scale dependent dynamic SGS model in the open source code caffa3d.MBRi in wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Martin; Usera, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    The Scale Dependent Dynamic Model (SDDM) has been widely validated in large-eddy simulations using pseudo-spectral codes [1][2][3]. The scale dependency, particularly the potential law, has been proved also in a priori studies [4][5]. To the authors' knowledge there have been only few attempts to use the SDDM in finite difference (FD) and finite volume (FV) codes [6][7], finding some improvements with the dynamic procedures (scale independent or scale dependent approach), but not showing the behavior of the scale-dependence parameter when using the SDDM. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the SDDM in the open source code caffa3d.MBRi, an updated version of the code presented in [8]. caffa3d.MBRi is a FV code, second-order accurate, parallelized with MPI, in which the domain is divided in unstructured blocks of structured grids. To accomplish this, 2 cases are considered: flow between flat plates and flow over a rough surface with the presence of a model wind turbine, taking for this case the experimental data presented in [9]. In both cases the standard Smagorinsky Model (SM), the Scale Independent Dynamic Model (SIDM) and the SDDM are tested. As presented in [6][7] slight improvements are obtained with the SDDM. Nevertheless, the behavior of the scale-dependence parameter supports the generalization of the dynamic procedure proposed in the SDDM, particularly taking into account that no explicit filter is used (the implicit filter is unknown). [1] F. Porté-Agel, C. Meneveau, M.B. Parlange. "A scale-dependent dynamic model for large-eddy simulation: application to a neutral atmospheric boundary layer". Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2000, 415, 261-284. [2] E. Bou-Zeid, C. Meneveau, M. Parlante. "A scale-dependent Lagrangian dynamic model for large eddy simulation of complex turbulent flows". Physics of Fluids, 2005, 17, 025105 (18p). [3] R. Stoll, F. Porté-Agel. "Dynamic subgrid-scale models for momentum and scalar fluxes in large-eddy simulations of

  8. Comparative study of the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation during negative pressure wound therapy in laparostomy using the V.A.C. abdominal dressing and the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin; Hlebowicz, Joanna; Ingemansson, Richard

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to compare the changes in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation, using the established V.A.C. abdominal dressing (VAC dressing) and a new abdominal dressing, the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system (ABThera dressing), in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Midline incisions were made in 12 pigs that were subjected to treatment with NPWT using the VAC or ABThera dressing. The microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall was measured before and after the application of topical negative pressures of −50, −75 and −125mmHg using laser Doppler velocimetry. Wound contraction and fluid evacuation were also measured. Baseline blood flow was defined as 100% in all settings. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 64·6±6·7% (P <0·05) after the application of −50mmHg using the VAC dressing, and to 65·3±9·6% (P <0·05) after the application of −50mmHg using the ABThera dressing. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 39·6±6·7% (P <0·05) after the application of −125mmHg using VAC and to 40·5±6·2% (P <0·05) after the application of −125mmHg using ABThera. No significant difference in reduction in blood flow could be observed between the two groups. The ABThera system afforded significantly better fluid evacuation from the wound, better drainage of the abdomen and better wound contraction than the VAC dressing.

  9. Plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Höfte, Herman; Voxeur, Aline

    2017-09-11

    Plants are able to generate large leaf surfaces that act as two-dimensional solar panels with a minimum investment in building material, thanks to a hydrostatic skeleton. This requires high intracellular pressures (up to 1 MPa), which depend on the presence of strong cell walls. The walls of growing cells (also called primary walls), are remarkably able to reconcile extreme tensile strength (up to 100 MPa) with the extensibility necessary for growth. All walled organisms are confronted with this dilemma - the need to balance strength and extensibility - and bacteria, fungi and plants have evolved independent solutions to cope. In this Primer, we discuss how plant cells have solved this problem, allowing them to support often very large increases in volume and to develop a broad variety of shapes (Figure 1A,B,D). This shape variation reflects the targeted deposition of wall material combined with local variations in cell-wall extensibility, processes that remain incompletely understood. Once the cell has reached its final size, it can lay down secondary wall layers, the composition and architecture of which are optimized to exert specific functions in different cell types (Figure 1E-G). Such functions include: providing mechanical support, for instance, for fibre cells in tree trunks or grass internodes; impermeabilising and strengthening vascular tissue to resist the negative pressure of the transpiration stream; increasing the surface area of the plasma membrane to facilitate solute exchange between cells (Figure 1C); or allowing important elastic deformation, for instance, to support the opening and closing of stomates. Specialized secondary walls, such as those constituting seed mucilage, are stored in a dehydrated form in seedcoat epidermis cells and show rapid swelling upon hydration of the seed. Other walls, in particular in reserve tissues, can accommodate large amounts of storage polysaccharides, which can be easily mobilized as a carbon source. Here we

  10. Pain Measurement in Mechanically Ventilated Patients After Cardiac Surgery: Comparison of the Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS) and the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT).

    PubMed

    Rijkenberg, Saskia; Stilma, Willemke; Bosman, Robert J; van der Meer, Nardo J; van der Voort, Peter H J

    2017-08-01

    The Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS) and Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) are behavioral pain assessment tools for sedated and unconscious critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to compare the reliability, internal consistency, and discriminant validation of the BPS and the CPOT simultaneously in mechanically ventilated patients after cardiac surgery. A prospective, observational cohort study. A 20-bed closed-format intensive care unit with mixed medical, surgical, and cardiac surgery patients in a teaching hospital in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The study comprised 72 consecutive intubated and mechanically ventilated patients after cardiac surgery who were not able to self-report pain. Two nurses assessed the BPS and CPOT simultaneously and independently at the following 4 moments: rest, a nonpainful procedure (oral care), rest, and a painful procedure (turning). Both scores showed a significant increase of 2 points between rest and turning. The median BPS score of nurse 1 showed a significant increase of 1 point between rest and the nonpainful procedure (oral care), whereas both median CPOT scores did not change. The interrater reliability of the BPS and CPOT showed fair-to-good agreement of 0.74 overall. During the periods of rest 1 and rest 2, values ranged from 0.24 to 0.46. Cronbach's alpha values for the BPS were 0.62 (nurse 1) and 0.59 (nurse 2) compared with 0.65 and 0.58, respectively, for the CPOT. The BPS and CPOT are reliable and valid pain assessment tools in a daily clinical setting. However, the discriminant validation of both scores seems less satisfactory in sedated or agitated patients and this topic requires further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  12. All three-loop four-point correlators of half-BPS operators in planar N = 4 SYM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicherin, Dmitry; Drummond, James; Heslop, Paul; Sokatchev, Emery

    2016-08-01

    We obtain the planar correlation function of four half-BPS operators of arbitrary weights, up to three loops. Our method exploits only elementary properties of the integrand of the planar correlator, such as its symmetries and singularity structure. This allows us to write down a general ansatz for the integrand. The coefficients in the ansatz are fixed by means of a powerful light-cone OPE relation between correlators with different weights. Our result is formulated in terms of a limited number of functions built from known one-, two- and three-loop conformal integrals. These results are useful for checking recent integrability predictions for the OPE structure constants.

  13. Observational Evidence for the "Hot Wall" Effect in Small Magnetic Flux Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikurda, K.; Beck, C.

    2006-08-01

    Introduction: When lacking polarimetric observations, the Bright Points (BPs) visible in the G-band at 430 nm are commonly used as tracers for magnetic fields. Methods: Observations presented in this paper were taken on October 11, 2005 at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope and involved the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP) at 1.5 micron, the Telecentric Etalon Solar Spectrometer (TESOS) in the Fe I spectral line at 557.6 nm, and a speckle setup in G-band. The area scanned by TIP was 75''x33'' and covered a pore surrounded by network. The TIP spectra were inverted with the SIR (Stokes Inversion based on Response functions) code to retrieve the magnetic field vector. Results: We find that G-band BPs are not cospatial with the central part of the flux concentrations. Even at the small heliocentric angle of 12 degree, the BPs appear projected on the limb side walls of the granules (Fig. 1), whereas the fields are concentrated in the intergranular lanes. Discussion: Our findings indicate that the G-band Bright Points are a result of the "hot wall effect". The downward shift of the optical depth scale in the presence of magnetic fields allows to see deeper and hotter layers, where CH dissociates, in the granules next to the field concentrations. Thus, information drawn from the observations of BPs cannot be used to conclude on the actual variation of the magnetic field structure, as only the outer parts of the flux concentrations are seen in the BPs. Figure 1. Non-cospatiality of BPs and field concentrations. Top row, left to right: line-core intensity, LOS velocity (range =+/- 1 km/s), magnetic flux , polarity, LOS velocity from the inversion (range =+/- 1.5 km/s), field azimuth. Bottom row, left to right: polarization degree, G-band intensity, continuum intensity at 1.5 micron, BP mask, field strength, field inclination. The white arrow in the G-band image denotes the limb direction, the cross marks the center of the 6.7 x 6.7 Mm field-of-view shown.

  14. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  15. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  16. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2016: towards curated quantitative interactions between 1300 protein targets and 6000 ligands.

    PubMed

    Southan, Christopher; Sharman, Joanna L; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Alexander, Stephen P H; Buneman, O Peter; Davenport, Anthony P; McGrath, John C; Peters, John A; Spedding, Michael; Catterall, William A; Fabbro, Doriano; Davies, Jamie A

    2016-01-04

    The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) provides expert-curated molecular interactions between successful and potential drugs and their targets in the human genome. Developed by the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), this resource, and its earlier incarnation as IUPHAR-DB, is described in our 2014 publication. This update incorporates changes over the intervening seven database releases. The unique model of content capture is based on established and new target class subcommittees collaborating with in-house curators. Most information comes from journal articles, but we now also index kinase cross-screening panels. Targets are specified by UniProtKB IDs. Small molecules are defined by PubChem Compound Identifiers (CIDs); ligand capture also includes peptides and clinical antibodies. We have extended the capture of ligands and targets linked via published quantitative binding data (e.g. Ki, IC50 or Kd). The resulting pharmacological relationship network now defines a data-supported druggable genome encompassing 7% of human proteins. The database also provides an expanded substrate for the biennially published compendium, the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY. This article covers content increase, entity analysis, revised curation strategies, new website features and expanded download options. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Uncharged compactlike and fractional Lorentz-violating BPS vortices in the CPT-even sector of the standard model extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C.; Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M., Jr.; da Hora, E.

    2012-09-01

    We have investigated and verified the existence of stable uncharged Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfeld (BPS) vortices in the framework of an Abelian Maxwell-Higgs model supplemented with CPT-even and Lorentz-violating (LV) terms belonging to the gauge and Higgs sectors of the standard model extension. The analysis is performed in two situations: first, by considering the Lorentz violation only in the gauge sector, and then in both gauge and Higgs sectors. In the first case, it is observed that the model supports vortices somehow equivalent to the ones appearing in a dielectric medium. The Lorentz violation controls the radial extension (core of the solution) and the magnetic field amplitude of the Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen vortices, yielding compactlike defects in an alternative and simpler way than that of k-field models. At the end, we consider the Lorentz-violating terms in the gauge and Higgs sectors. It is shown that the full model also supports compactlike uncharged BPS vortices in a modified vacuum, but this time there are two LV parameters controlling the defect structure. Moreover, an interesting novelty is introduced by the LV-Higgs sector: fractional vortex solutions.

  18. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2016: towards curated quantitative interactions between 1300 protein targets and 6000 ligands

    PubMed Central

    Southan, Christopher; Sharman, Joanna L.; Benson, Helen E.; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J.; Alexander, Stephen P. H.; Buneman, O. Peter; Davenport, Anthony P.; McGrath, John C.; Peters, John A.; Spedding, Michael; Catterall, William A.; Fabbro, Doriano; Davies, Jamie A.

    2016-01-01

    The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) provides expert-curated molecular interactions between successful and potential drugs and their targets in the human genome. Developed by the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), this resource, and its earlier incarnation as IUPHAR-DB, is described in our 2014 publication. This update incorporates changes over the intervening seven database releases. The unique model of content capture is based on established and new target class subcommittees collaborating with in-house curators. Most information comes from journal articles, but we now also index kinase cross-screening panels. Targets are specified by UniProtKB IDs. Small molecules are defined by PubChem Compound Identifiers (CIDs); ligand capture also includes peptides and clinical antibodies. We have extended the capture of ligands and targets linked via published quantitative binding data (e.g. Ki, IC50 or Kd). The resulting pharmacological relationship network now defines a data-supported druggable genome encompassing 7% of human proteins. The database also provides an expanded substrate for the biennially published compendium, the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY. This article covers content increase, entity analysis, revised curation strategies, new website features and expanded download options. PMID:26464438

  19. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  20. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  1. Wall Covering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The attractive wall covering shown below is one of 132 styles in the Mirror Magic II line offered by The General Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. The material is metallized plastic fabric, a spinoff from space programs. Wall coverings are one of many consumer applications of aluminized plastic film technology developed for NASA by a firm later bought by King-Seeley Thermos Company, Winchester, Massachusetts, which now produces the material. The original NASA use was in the Echo 1 passive communications satellite, a "space baloon" made of aluminized mylar; the high reflectivity of the metallized coating enabled relay of communications signals from one Earth station to another by "bouncing" them off the satellite. The reflectivity feature also made the material an extremely efficient insulator and it was subsequently widely used in the Apollo program for such purposes as temperature control of spacecraft components and insulation of tanks for fuels that must be maintained at very low temperatures. I Used as a wall covering, the aluminized material offers extra insulation, reflects light and I resists cracking. In addition to General Tire, King-Seeley also supplies wall covering material to Columbus Coated Fabrics Division of Borden, Incorporated, Columbus, Ohio, among others.

  2. 48. GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTHWEST, FIRST FLOOR ROOM, EAST WALL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTHWEST, FIRST FLOOR ROOM, EAST WALL, WITH SECRET DOOR TO BOXED STAIRWAY TO ROOM ABOVE OPEN IN PANELLED WALL - Montpelier, Montpelier Drive & State Route 197, Laurel, Prince George's County, MD

  3. Intravascular ultrasound assessment of the effect of laser energy on the arterial wall during the treatment of femoro-popliteal lesions: a CliRpath excimer laser system to enlarge lumen openings (CELLO) registry study.

    PubMed

    Kuku, Kayode O; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Koifman, Edward; Kajita, Alexandre H; Desale, Sameer; Azizi, Viana; Melaku, Gebremedhin; Bui, Anh; Meirovich, Yael F; Beyene, Solomon; Dheendsa, Aaphtaab; Schneider, Blaine; Waksman, Ron

    2017-09-26

    The CliRpath Excimer Laser System to Enlarge Lumen Openings (CELLO) registry included patients treated with modified excimer laser catheters for the endovascular treatment of peripheral artery disease affecting the superficial femoral artery (SFA) and proximal popliteal artery. The aim of this study was to assess, via intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) the dissections in the vessel wall following treatment with the laser catheters. IVUS grayscale images from the CELLO registry were systematically reviewed for dissections in the treated vessel segments by two investigators. Images from 33 patients; 66 pullbacks (1867 IVUS frames in 2 phases), were successfully matched frame-to-frame to evaluate identical segments of the treated vessels in the two phases; post-2 mm Turbo-Elite laser pilot channel creation and post Turbo-Booster laser atherectomy. Dissections were categorized as; (1) intimal, (2) medial, (3) intramural hematoma, and (4) adventitial according to the ACC Clinical Expert Consensus Document classification of dissections. An average of 57 frames was evaluated per pullback, giving a total of 3734 frames (1867 matched for pre-ablation (post channel creation) and post-ablation phases). Treatments with the modified Excimer laser catheters resulted in a significant increase in lumen area of 5.5 ± 3.2-mm(2) (95% CI 4.3-6.8, p < 0.0001) and reduction in plaque plus media volume of -10.6 ± 36.0 mm(3) (95% CI -25.8 to 4.6, p = 0.1619) whilst giving rise to mainly intramural hematoma formations post Turbo-Booster laser treatment in 55% of frames assessed and 24% medial dissections with less than 1% adventitial disruption. The Excimer laser based Turbo-Booster treatment of peripheral artery lesions resulted in significant plaque debulking and increased lumen diameter with negligible degree of adventitial layer injury.

  4. Wall Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    Doppler velocimeter, computer experiments, and pulsed-laser velocimetry. External influences to be studied are imposed flow oscillations , wavy walls...imposed flow oscillations Studies of the effect of imposed small amplitude flow oscillations have shown no effect on the time mean flow. Work was...undertaken to see if imposed large amplitude oscillations can affect drag. The system used was water flow through a two inch pipe. The flow oscillations

  5. Endocrine Activity of Bisphenol S (BPS) Using In Vitro Estrogenic/Anti-Androgenic Transcriptional Activation Assays and the In Vivo Uterotrophic Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is gradually being phased out of many consumer products and processes leading to potential increases in human and environmental exposures to relatively understudied replacement compounds, including Bisphenol S (BPS). Research from our lab has shown that BPA and...

  6. Endocrine Activity of Bisphenol S (BPS) Using In Vitro Estrogenic/Anti-Androgenic Transcriptional Activation Assays and the In Vivo Uterotrophic Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is gradually being phased out of many consumer products and processes leading to potential increases in human and environmental exposures to relatively understudied replacement compounds, including Bisphenol S (BPS). Research from our lab has shown that BPA and...

  7. The Most General BPS Black Hole from Type II String Theory on a Six-Torus the Macroscopic-Microscopic Correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, M.; Trigiante, M.

    2002-12-01

    BPS black hole solutions in supergravity have been playing an important role in probing non-perturbative superstring dualities. The largest of these dualities is the conjectured U-duality, implemented by a discrete group of transformations U(Z), which represents the ultimate connection between all known superstring theories realized on various backgrounds. This picture suggests the existence of a unique fundamental quantum theory underlying the superstring theories, of which U-duality is an exact symmetry. In [1] this U-duality was conjectured to be encoded in the largest global symmetry group of the the field equations and Bianchi identities in the low-energy effective supergravity theory, which is described at classical level by a continuous semisimple Lie group U. The degree of supersymmetry preserved by BPS black holes in supergravity protects their physical quantities to a certain extent from quantum corrections so that they can be thought to correspond to solutions of superstring theory. Since moreover the BPS condition is U-duality invariant, these solutions naturally span an orbit of the U-duality group, which is a continuous collection of solutions at classical supergravity level and a discrete set at the superstring level. Supergravity represents the framework in which these orbits can be studied in most detail . A fruitful strategy therefore in order to study the microscopic features of BPS black holes in relation to their U-duality invariant properties would be to keep track in a precise mathematical fashion of the microscopic description of BPS black holes at this low-energy level and moreover to focus on the most general BPS black hole in a certain orbit modulo U-duality transformations, namely the generating solution. This is the main philosophy motivating the research project carried out in [3,4,5] where a macroscopic (supergravity) starting point was adopted for a systematic microscopic analysis of

  8. The important role of physicians in addressing the psychological aspects of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS): A qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kanter, Gregory; Volpe, Katherine A; Dunivan, Gena C; Cichowski, Sara B; Jeppson, Peter C; Rogers, Rebecca G; Komesu, Yuko M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a poorly understood source of chronic pain causing significant morbidity, with variable treatment success. Despite the need to understand patient perspectives in chronic pain, there is a paucity of qualitative data for IC/BPS. We aimed to acquire information regarding patient experience with IC/BPS symptoms and with their medical care to elicit suggestions to improve patient satisfaction with that care. Methods Fifteen women with IC/PBS participated in a total of four focus groups. Sessions were recorded, transcribed, and information was de-identified. Focus groups were conducted until thematic saturation was reached. All transcripts were coded and analyzed by a minimum of 3 independent physician reviewers. Investigators identified emergent themes and concepts using grounded theory methodology. Results Participant’s mean age was 52.6 years with an average IC/BPS duration of 6.3 years. Thematic saturation was reached after 4 focus groups. We identified three emergent patient experience concepts; IC/PBS is debilitating, the disease course is unpredictable and unrelenting, and patients experience significant isolation. Importantly, suicidal ideation was expressed in each group. Patients voiced strong preference for physicians who provided education regarding the condition, an array of treatment options, presented organized treatment plans and offered optimism and hope regarding treatment outcomes. Conclusions Our study presents novel findings of the importance of patient-physician interaction in IC/BPS and reinforces the tremendous disability and burden of this disease, which frequently manifests in suicidal ideation. Patients preferred organized treatment plans with diverse choices, and providers who offered hope in dealing with their condition. PMID:27581769

  9. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  10. Ultrasonic Digital Communication System for a Steel Wall Multipath Channel: Methods and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Timothy L.

    2005-12-01

    As of the development of this thesis, no commercially available products have been identified for the digital communication of instrumented data across a thick ({approx} 6 n.) steel wall using ultrasound. The specific goal of the current research is to investigate the application of methods for digital communication of instrumented data (i.e., temperature, voltage, etc.) across the wall of a steel pressure vessel. The acoustic transmission of data using ultrasonic transducers prevents the need to breach the wall of such a pressure vessel which could ultimately affect its safety or lifespan, or void the homogeneity of an experiment under test. Actual digital communication paradigms are introduced and implemented for the successful dissemination of data across such a wall utilizing solely an acoustic ultrasonic link. The first, dubbed the ''single-hop'' configuration, can communicate bursts of digital data one-way across the wall using the Differential Binary Phase-Shift Keying (DBPSK) modulation technique as fast as 500 bps. The second, dubbed the ''double-hop'' configuration, transmits a carrier into the vessel, modulates it, and retransmits it externally. Using a pulsed carrier with Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM), this technique can communicate digital data as fast as 500 bps. Using a CW carrier, Least Mean-Squared (LMS) adaptive interference suppression, and DBPSK, this method can communicate data as fast as 5 kbps. A third technique, dubbed the ''reflected-power'' configuration, communicates digital data by modulating a pulsed carrier by varying the acoustic impedance at the internal transducer-wall interface. The paradigms of the latter two configurations are believed to be unique. All modulation methods are based on the premise that the wall cannot be breached in any way and can therefore be viably implemented with power delivered wirelessly through the acoustic channel using ultrasound. Methods, results, and considerations for future research are discussed

  11. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Gregory P.; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R.

    2013-11-01

    How much heat can be transported between impermeable fixed-temperature walls by incompressible flows with a given amount of kinetic energy or enstrophy? What do the optimal velocity fields look like? We employ variational calculus to address these questions in the context of steady 2D flows. The resulting nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations are solved numerically, and in some cases analytically, to find the maximum possible Nusselt number Nu as a function of the Péclect number Pe , a measure of the flow's energy or enstrophy. We find that in the fixed-energy problem Nu ~ Pe , while in the fixed-enstrophy problem Nu ~ Pe 10 / 17 . In both cases, the optimal flow consists of an array of convection cells with aspect ratio Γ (Pe) . Interpreting our results in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra for relevant buoyancy-driven problems, we find Nu <= 1 + 0 . 035 Ra and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 2 for porous medium convection (which occurs with fixed energy), and Nu <= 1 + 0 . 115 Ra 5 / 12 and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 4 for Rayleigh-Bénard convection (which occurs with fixed enstrophy and for free-slip walls). This work was supported by NSF awards PHY-0855335, DMS-0927587, and PHY-1205219 (CRD) and DMS-0928098 (GPC). Much of this work was completed at the 2012 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) Program at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  12. The Open University Opens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunstall, Jeremy, Ed.

    Conceived by the British Labor Government in the 1960's the Open University was viewed as a way to extend higher education to Britain's working class, but enrollment figures in classes that represent traditional academic disciplines show that the student population is predominantly middle class. Bringing education into the home presents numerous…

  13. The Berlin Wall: A Simulation for the Social Studies Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, William B., III

    2010-01-01

    November 9, 2009, marked the twentieth anniversary of the opening of the Berlin Wall. The Wall, a symbol of the Cold War, separated the German people for 28 years (1961-1989), keeping those on the East side isolated. Although the construction and dismantling of the Berlin Wall is a significant part of history, the topic is little covered in the…

  14. The Berlin Wall: A Simulation for the Social Studies Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, William B., III

    2010-01-01

    November 9, 2009, marked the twentieth anniversary of the opening of the Berlin Wall. The Wall, a symbol of the Cold War, separated the German people for 28 years (1961-1989), keeping those on the East side isolated. Although the construction and dismantling of the Berlin Wall is a significant part of history, the topic is little covered in the…

  15. VIEW TO THE NORTH TOWARD THE WING WALL AND CONCRETESLAB ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO THE NORTH TOWARD THE WING WALL AND CONCRETE-SLAB CHANNEL WALL ON THE WEST SIDE OF THE NORTH END OF THE BRIDGE. NOTE THE SMALL CULVERT OPENING BEHIND SAGEBRUSH NEAR THE END OF THE WING WALL. 37 - Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, Cajon Subdivision, Structure No. 61.5X, between Cajon Summit and Keenbrook, Devore, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. Remarks on non-BPS string amplitudes and their all order α' contact interactions in IIB, IIA

    DOE PAGES

    Hatefi, Ehsan

    2017-03-06

    Here, we explore the entire form of S-Matrix elements of a potential Cn–1 Ramond-Ramond (RR) form field, a tachyon and two transverse scalar fields on both world volume and transverse directions of type IIB and IIA superstring theories. Apart from VC–2VΦ0VΦ0VT0 the other scattering amplitude, namely VC–1VΦ–1VΦ0VT0 is also revealed. We then start to compare all singularity structures of symmetric and asymmetric analysis, generating all infinite singularity structures as well as all order α' contact interactions on the whole directions. This leads to deriving various new contact terms and several new restricted Bianchi identities in both type IIB and IIA.more » It is also shown that just some of the new couplings of type IIB (IIA) string theory can be re-verified in an Effective Field Theory (EFT) by pull-back of branes. To construct the rest of S-matrix elements one needs to first derive restricted world volume (or bulk) Bianchi identities and then discover new EFT couplings in both type IIB and IIA. Finally the presence of commutator of scalar fields inside the exponential of Wess-Zumino action for non-BPS branes has been confirmed as well.« less

  17. On 1/4 BPS ((F, D1), (NS5, D5)) bound states of type IIB string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qiang; Lu, J. X.; Roy, Shibaji

    2017-08-01

    We construct two new SL(2, ℤ) invariant vacua of type IIB string theory which are bound states of ( p, q) strings with ( m, n) 5-branes, written as ((F, D1), (NS5, D5)) and preserve 1/4 of the full space-time supersymmetries. For the first case, the strings live inside the 5-brane world-volume and in the second case the strings are perpendicular to the 5-brane world-volume. In the first case, naively one would expect an attractive interaction between the strings and the 5-branes due to attractive force between F and D5 and also between D1 and NS5. We find that 1/4 BPS bound state exists only when the vacuum moduli satisfy certain condition which is found to be consistent with the no-force condition between the branes. No such complication arises for the second case. The tension formulae and the various other descendant states which can be obtained by the application of T-duality for both these bound states are discussed.

  18. Destabilizing the interplay between miR-1275 and IGF2BPs by Tamarix articulata and quercetin in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shaalan, Yasmin M; Handoussa, H; Youness, R A; Assal, R A; El-Khatib, A H; Linscheid, M W; El Tayebi, H M; Abdelaziz, A I

    2017-08-18

    Insulin-like growth factor-2 binding proteins (IGF2BPs) are oncogenic RNA-binding proteins, highly up-regulated in HCC, and were recently validated as direct targets of the tumour suppressor miR-1275. It is worth noting that around 47% of FDA approved anticancer drugs are derived from plants. Modulation by miRNAs and their cellular signalling cascades could constitute new pathways by which these phytochemicals exert their effects. This study aimed to investigate the potential use of Tamarix articulata, quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in HCC and how these phytochemicals could epigenetically modulate the IGF axis using their impact on miR-1275. T. articulata ethyl acetate fraction significantly reduced the viability of Huh-7 cells compared to control cells. Treatment with T. articulata ethyl acetate fraction, quercetin and EGCG significantly enhanced miR-1275, while suppressed IGF2BP1 and IGF2BP3 mRNA expression levels. In summary, T. articulata, quercetin and EGCG have important implications for HCC molecular-targeted therapy through destabilizing the interplay between miR-1275 and the IGF axis.

  19. Remarks on non-BPS string amplitudes and their all order α' contact interactions in IIB, IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatefi, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    We explore the entire form of S-Matrix elements of a potential C n-1 Ramond-Ramond (RR) form field, a tachyon and two transverse scalar fields on both world volume and transverse directions of type IIB and IIA superstring theories. Apart from < {V}_{C^{-2}}{V}_{φ^0}{V}_{φ^0}{V}_{T^0}\\rangle the other scattering amplitude, namely < {V}_{C^{-1}}{V}_{φ^{-1}}{V}_{φ^0}{V}_{T^0}\\rangle is also revealed. We then start to compare all singularity structures of symmetric and asymmetric analysis, generating all infinite singularity structures as well as all order α' contact interactions on the whole directions. This leads to deriving various new contact terms and several new restricted Bianchi identities in both type IIB and IIA. It is also shown that just some of the new couplings of type IIB (IIA) string theory can be re-verified in an Effective Field Theory (EFT) by pull-back of branes. To construct the rest of S-matrix elements one needs to first derive restricted world volume (or bulk) Bianchi identities and then discover new EFT couplings in both type IIB and IIA. Finally the presence of commutator of scalar fields inside the exponential of Wess-Zumino action for non-BPS branes has been confirmed as well.

  20. On WZ and RR couplings of BPS branes and their all order α‧ corrections in IIB, IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatefi, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    We compute all three and four point couplings of BPS Dp-branes for all different nonzero p-values on the entire world volume and transverse directions. We start finding out all four point function supersymmetric Wess-Zumino (WZ) actions of one closed string Ramond-Ramond (RR) field with two fermions, either with the same (IIB) or different chirality (IIA) as well as their all order α‧ corrections. The closed form of S-matrices of two closed string RR in both IIB, IIA, including their all order α‧ corrections have also been addressed. Our results confirm that, not only the structures of α‧ corrections but also their coefficients of IIB are quite different from their IIA ones. The S-matrix of an RR and two gauge (scalar) fields and their all order corrections in antisymmetric picture of RR have been carried out as well. Various remarks on the restricted Bianchi identities as well as all order α‧ corrections to all different supersymmetric WZ couplings in both type IIA and IIB superstring theory are also released. Lastly, different singularity structures as well as all order contact terms for all non-vanishing traces in type II have also been constructed.

  1. 12. INTERIOR OF FRONT BEDROOM SHOWING ELECTRICAL WALL HEATER ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR OF FRONT BEDROOM SHOWING ELECTRICAL WALL HEATER ON BACK WALL, OPEN FIVE-PANELED DOOR TO LIVING ROOM AT PHOTO LEFT, AND OPEN SOLID DOOR TO BATHROOM AT PHOTO CENTER. VIEW TO WEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  2. Fundamental string solutions in open string field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Michishita, Yoji

    2006-02-15

    In Witten's open cubic bosonic string field theory and Berkovits' superstring field theory we investigate solutions of the equations of motion with appropriate source terms, which correspond to Callan-Maldacena solution in Born-Infeld theory representing fundamental strings ending on the D-branes. The solutions are given in order by order manner, and we show some full order properties in the sense of {alpha}{sup '} expansion. In superstring case we show that the solution is 1/2 BPS in full order.

  3. Bursch and Chang-Diaz install the BPS in a slot on Endeavour's middeck for return on STS-111 UF-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-07

    STS111-E-5023 (7 June 2002) --- Astronaut Daniel W. Bursch (left), who has been aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for the past six months, wastes little time in going to work on board the Space Shuttle Endeavour following linkup of the shuttle and station on June 7, 2002. Bursch, who will return home aboard Endeavour in a few days, shares a task with astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz at the Biomass Production System (BPS) on Endeavour's mid deck.

  4. Correlation between biofilm production, antibiotic susceptibility and exopolysaccharide composition in Burkholderia pseudomallei bpsI, ppk, and rpoS mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Mongkolrob, Rungrawee; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2015-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a fatal tropical infectious disease, which has been reported to have a high rate of recurrence, even when an intensive dose of antibiotics is used. Biofilm formation is believed to be one of the possible causes of relapse because of its ability to increase drug resistance. EPS in biofilms have been reported to be related to the limitation of antibiotic penetration in B. pseudomallei. However, the mechanisms by which biofilms restrict the diffusion of antibiotics remain unclear. The present study presents a correlation between exopolysaccharide production in biofilm matrix and antibiotic resistance in B. pseudomallei using bpsI, ppk, and rpoS mutant strains. CLSM revealed a reduction in exopolysaccharide production and disabled micro-colony formation in B. pseudomallei mutants, which paralleled the antibiotic resistance. Different ratios of carbohydrate contents in the exopolysaccharides of the mutants were detected, although they have the same components, including glucose, galactose, mannose, and rhamnose, with the exception being that no detectable rhamnose peak was observed in the bpsI mutant. These results indicate that the correlation between these phenomena in the B. pseudomallei biofilm at least results from the exopolysaccharide, which may be under the regulation of bpsI, ppk, or rpoS genes.

  5. A sensitive single-enzyme assay system using the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase BpsA for measurement of L-glutamine in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alistair S; Robins, Katherine J; Ackerley, David F

    2017-01-31

    The ability to rapidly, economically and accurately measure L-glutamine concentrations in biological samples is important for many areas of research, medicine or industry, however there is room for improvement on existing methods. We describe here how the enzyme BpsA, a single-module non-ribosomal peptide synthetase able to convert L-glutamine into the blue pigment indigoidine, can be used to accurately measure L-glutamine in biological samples. Although indigoidine has low solubility in aqueous solutions, meaning direct measurements of indigoidine synthesis do not reliably yield linear standard curves, we demonstrate that resolubilisation of the reaction end-products in DMSO overcomes this issue and that spontaneous reduction to colourless leuco-indigoidine occurs too slowly to interfere with assay accuracy. Our protocol is amenable to a 96-well microtitre format and can be used to measure L-glutamine in common bacterial and mammalian culture media, urine, and deproteinated plasma. We show that active BpsA can be prepared in high yield by expressing it in the apo-form to avoid the toxicity of indigoidine to Escherichia coli host cells, then activating it to the holo-form in cell lysates prior to purification; and that BpsA has a lengthy shelf-life, retaining >95% activity when stored at either -20 °C or 4 °C for 24 weeks.

  6. A sensitive single-enzyme assay system using the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase BpsA for measurement of L-glutamine in biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alistair S.; Robins, Katherine J.; Ackerley, David F.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to rapidly, economically and accurately measure L-glutamine concentrations in biological samples is important for many areas of research, medicine or industry, however there is room for improvement on existing methods. We describe here how the enzyme BpsA, a single-module non-ribosomal peptide synthetase able to convert L-glutamine into the blue pigment indigoidine, can be used to accurately measure L-glutamine in biological samples. Although indigoidine has low solubility in aqueous solutions, meaning direct measurements of indigoidine synthesis do not reliably yield linear standard curves, we demonstrate that resolubilisation of the reaction end-products in DMSO overcomes this issue and that spontaneous reduction to colourless leuco-indigoidine occurs too slowly to interfere with assay accuracy. Our protocol is amenable to a 96-well microtitre format and can be used to measure L-glutamine in common bacterial and mammalian culture media, urine, and deproteinated plasma. We show that active BpsA can be prepared in high yield by expressing it in the apo-form to avoid the toxicity of indigoidine to Escherichia coli host cells, then activating it to the holo-form in cell lysates prior to purification; and that BpsA has a lengthy shelf-life, retaining >95% activity when stored at either −20 °C or 4 °C for 24 weeks. PMID:28139746

  7. Reinforcing masonry walls with composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jai, John Chia-Han

    1999-10-01

    In this investigation, a procedure is developed for determining the effectiveness of composite materials in retrofitting masonry buildings to reduce seismic damage. The reinforcement considered is a thin layer of fiber-reinforced composite applied to the wall in a wallpaper-like fashion. Models were developed which predicts the behavior of masonry walls reinforced in such a fashion and subjected to static, in-plane normal and shear loads. Solid walls, as well as walls with openings (such as windows and doors), were considered. The models estimate the load-deflection characteristic of the wall, the load set at which the wall fails, and the deflection of the wall at the instant of failure. The models were verified by tests performed with walls constructed of clay bricks and mortar, and with walls made of wood bricks. In these tests, the load versus deflection, the failure load, and the failure deflection were measured. Reasonable agreements were found between the values calculated by the models and the data. Parametric studies were also performed. The results of these studies indicate that composite reinforcement applied in a wallpaper-like fashion may increase substantially the load carrying capacities of masonry walls.

  8. Indirect localization of a magnetic domain wall mediated by quasi walls

    PubMed Central

    Lacour, D.; Montaigne, F.; Rougemaille, N.; Belkhou, R.; Raabe, J.; Hehn, M.

    2015-01-01

    The manipulation of magnetic domain walls in thin films and nanostructures opens new opportunities for fundamental and applied research. But controlling reliably the position of a moving domain wall still remains challenging. So far, most of the studies aimed at understanding the physics of pinning and depinning processes in the magnetic layer in which the wall moves (active layer). In these studies, the role of other magnetic layers in the stack has been often ignored. Here, we report an indirect localization process of 180° domain walls that occurs in magnetic tunnel junctions, commonly used in spintronics. Combining Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, magnetic configurations in both layers are resolved. When nucleating a 180° domain wall in the active layer, a quasi wall is created in the reference layer, atop the wall. The wall and its quasi wall must then be moved or positioned together, as a unique object. As a mutual effect, a localized change of the magnetic properties in the reference layer induces a localized quasi wall in the active layer. The two types of quasi walls are shown to be responsible for an indirect localization process of the 180° domain wall in the active layer. PMID:26011004

  9. Indirect localization of a magnetic domain wall mediated by quasi walls.

    PubMed

    Lacour, D; Montaigne, F; Rougemaille, N; Belkhou, R; Raabe, J; Hehn, M

    2015-05-26

    The manipulation of magnetic domain walls in thin films and nanostructures opens new opportunities for fundamental and applied research. But controlling reliably the position of a moving domain wall still remains challenging. So far, most of the studies aimed at understanding the physics of pinning and depinning processes in the magnetic layer in which the wall moves (active layer). In these studies, the role of other magnetic layers in the stack has been often ignored. Here, we report an indirect localization process of 180° domain walls that occurs in magnetic tunnel junctions, commonly used in spintronics. Combining Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, magnetic configurations in both layers are resolved. When nucleating a 180° domain wall in the active layer, a quasi wall is created in the reference layer, atop the wall. The wall and its quasi wall must then be moved or positioned together, as a unique object. As a mutual effect, a localized change of the magnetic properties in the reference layer induces a localized quasi wall in the active layer. The two types of quasi walls are shown to be responsible for an indirect localization process of the 180° domain wall in the active layer.

  10. Indirect control of antiferromagnetic domain walls with spin current.

    PubMed

    Wieser, R; Vedmedenko, E Y; Wiesendanger, R

    2011-02-11

    The indirect controlled displacement of an antiferromagnetic domain wall by a spin current is studied by Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert spin dynamics. The antiferromagnetic domain wall can be shifted both by a spin-polarized tunnel current of a scanning tunneling microscope or by a current driven ferromagnetic domain wall in an exchange coupled antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic layer system. The indirect control of antiferromagnetic domain walls opens up a new and promising direction for future spin device applications based on antiferromagnetic materials.

  11. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is

  12. Exact eigenfunctions and the open topological string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariño, Marcos; Zakany, Szabolcs

    2017-08-01

    Mirror curves to toric Calabi-Yau threefolds can be quantized and lead to trace class operators on the real line. The eigenvalues of these operators are encoded in the BPS invariants of the underlying threefold, but much less is known about their eigenfunctions. In this paper, we first develop methods in spectral theory to compute these eigenfunctions. We also provide an integral matrix representation which allows them to be studied in a ’t Hooft limit, where they are described by standard topological open string amplitudes. Based on these results, we propose a conjecture for the exact eigenfunctions, which involves both the WKB wavefunction and the standard topological string wavefunction. This conjecture can be made completely explicit in the maximally supersymmetric, or self-dual case, which we work out in detail for local \

  13. Periodicals Price Survey 2008: Embracing Openness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Orsdel, Lee C.; Born, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Evidence for open access as an emergent, global state of mind is everywhere. The "New York Times" went "open" last September, and the "Wall Street Journal" is slated to follow. Increasingly, scholarly communities are breaking with tradition and calling for the open sharing of research, software, and data. Amongst these global initiatives is the…

  14. Periodicals Price Survey 2008: Embracing Openness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Orsdel, Lee C.; Born, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Evidence for open access as an emergent, global state of mind is everywhere. The "New York Times" went "open" last September, and the "Wall Street Journal" is slated to follow. Increasingly, scholarly communities are breaking with tradition and calling for the open sharing of research, software, and data. Amongst these global initiatives is the…

  15. Wall surveyor project report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-02-22

    A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

  16. If walls could talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The plant cell wall is very complex, both in structure and function. The wall components and the mechanical properties of the wall have been implicated in conveying information that is important for morphogenesis. Proteoglycans, fragments of polysaccharides and the structural integrity of the wall may relay signals that influence cellular differentiation and growth control. Furthering our knowledge of cell wall structure and function is likely to have a profound impact on our understanding of how plant cells communicate with the extracellular environment.

  17. If walls could talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The plant cell wall is very complex, both in structure and function. The wall components and the mechanical properties of the wall have been implicated in conveying information that is important for morphogenesis. Proteoglycans, fragments of polysaccharides and the structural integrity of the wall may relay signals that influence cellular differentiation and growth control. Furthering our knowledge of cell wall structure and function is likely to have a profound impact on our understanding of how plant cells communicate with the extracellular environment.

  18. The Stability of Fake Flat Domain Walls on Kähler Manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, F. T.; Wijaya, R. N.; Gunara, B. E.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of flat fake domain walls solution of fake N = 1 supergravity in d + 1 dimensions with Kahler surface as the sigma model. We start with Lagrangian for N = 1 fake supergravity which is coupling between gravity and complex scalar in d + 1 dimensions with scalar potential turned on. Then, as in supergravity theory, we demand that the scalar fields span the Kahler manifold. The equations of motion for fields can be reduced into first order equations by defining the superpotential and the resulting equations are called the projection equation and the fake BPS equation. Finally, we discuss about the stability of flat fake domain walls by investigating the critical points of the superpotential and the scalar potential.

  19. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  20. Open forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Some experiments on turbulent free shear layers in pressure gradients are discussed. Topics covered in the discussion include: (1) two dimensional vortex structures, (2) the effect of channel walls, and (3) the case of a mixing layer in pressure gradient.

  1. Open Content in Open Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansa, Sarah Whitcher; Kansa, Eric C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the challenges and rewards of sharing research content through a discussion of Open Context, a new open access data publication system for field sciences and museum collections. Open Context is the first data repository of its kind, allowing self-publication of research data, community commentary through tagging, and clear…

  2. How "Open" is Open Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moisey, Susan D.

    1984-01-01

    The roots of the open learning system approach to education are explored and the relationship between its goals and the succeeding models/methodologies are examined in the context of open and closed systems theories. An open systems orientation to learning system development is recommended. (MSE)

  3. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  4. The Lamportian cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  5. Side wall cooling for nozzle segments for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle vane segment includes outer and inner band portions with a vane extending therebetween and defining first and second cavities separated by an impingement plate for flowing cooling medium for impingement cooling of nozzle side walls. The side wall of each nozzle segment has an undercut region. The impingement plate has an inturned flange with a plurality of openings. Cooling inserts or receptacles having an open end are received in the openings and the base and side walls of the receptacles have apertures for receiving cooling medium from the first cavity and directing the cooling medium for impingement cooling of the side wall of the nozzle segment and a portion of the nozzle wall.

  6. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-06-19

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

  7. A prospective, controlled evaluation of the abdominal reapproximation anchor abdominal wall closure system in combination with VAC therapy compared with VAC alone in the management of an open abdomen.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristin L; Hamilton, David A; Davenport, Daniel L; Bernard, Andrew C; Kearney, Paul A; Chang, Phillip K

    2014-06-01

    Dramatic increases in damage control and decompressive laparotomies and a significant increase in patients with open abdominal cavities have resulted in numerous techniques to facilitate fascial closure. We hypothesized addition of the abdominal reapproximation anchor system (ABRA) to the KCI Abdominal Wound Vac™ (VAC) or KCI ABThera™ would increase successful primary closure rates and reduce operative costs. Fourteen patients with open abdomens were prospectively randomized into a control group using VAC alone (control) or a study group using VAC plus ABRA (VAC-ABRA). All patients underwent regular VAC changes; patients receiving VAC-ABRA also underwent concomitant daily elastomer adjustment of the ABRA system. Primary end points included abdominal closure, number of operating room (OR) visits, and OR time use. Eight patients were included in the VAC-ABRA group and six patients in the control group. Primary closure rates between groups were not statistically different; however, the number of trips to the OR and OR time use were different. Despite higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores, larger starting wound size, and higher rates of abdominal compartment syndrome, closure rates in the VAC-ABRA group were similar to VAC alone. Importantly, however, fewer OR trips and less OR time were required for the VAC-ABRA group.

  8. Great wall...and lesser wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    What nature has covered up, humans have again exposed. Using images from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), researchers have found remnants of two generations of the Great Wall of China buried beneath desert sands, 700 km west of Beijing. Erosion and wind storms had shielded parts of both walls from view, but the foundation now has been laid bare by remote sensors.

  9. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  10. Wall contraction in Bloch wall films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartran, D. S.; Bourne, H. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The phenomenon of wall contraction characterized by a peak in the velocity-field relationship and a region of negative differential mobility is observed in uniaxial magnetic thin films of various magnetic properties by careful interrupted-pulse experiments. The observed results agree quite well with the theory for bulk samples when the extensive flux closure of thin film walls is accounted for by a suitable empirical scaling factor.

  11. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  12. 3. Ice Plant interior, west section, looking north. Crib wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Ice Plant interior, west section, looking north. Crib wall of stacked 4' X 6' 's in foreground. Opening leads to refrigeration equipment area. Freezer room to the rear. - Curtis Wharf, Ice Plant, O & Second Streets, Anacortes, Skagit County, WA

  13. 13. FRIST FLOOR, SOUTHEAST ROOM, SOUTHWEST WALL, HEARTH WITH KETTLES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. FRIST FLOOR, SOUTHEAST ROOM, SOUTHWEST WALL, HEARTH WITH KETTLES USED FOR RENDERING LARD (LEFT) AND MAKING APPLE BUTTER (RIGHT) WITH SCALE - Open Gate Farm, House, Ridge Road, 1 mile East of Elephant Road, Perkasie, Bucks County, PA

  14. 12. FRIST FLOOR, SOUTHEAST ROOM, SOUTHWEST WALL, HEARTH WITH KETTLES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. FRIST FLOOR, SOUTHEAST ROOM, SOUTHWEST WALL, HEARTH WITH KETTLES USED FOR RENDERING LARD (LEFT) AND MAKING APPLE BUTTER (RIGHT) - Open Gate Farm, House, Ridge Road, 1 mile East of Elephant Road, Perkasie, Bucks County, PA

  15. 95. TOWER STAIRHALL, SOUTH WALL, DIRECTLY WEST OF WINDOW, DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. TOWER STAIRHALL, SOUTH WALL, DIRECTLY WEST OF WINDOW, DETAIL OF COMPOSITION MOLDED DRAPES OF BELLFLOWERS ON OPEN PILASTER (DONE DURING 1897-98 RESTORATION) - Independence Hall Complex, Independence Hall, 500 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. 16. INTERIOR OF ROOM 105 LOOKING TOWARD SOUTHEAST WALL. EXPOSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR OF ROOM 105 LOOKING TOWARD SOUTHEAST WALL. EXPOSED POST EXISTS IN MIDDLE OF ROOM. A SMALL OPENING HAS BEEN CUT INTO THE UPPER PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST WALL THROUGH TO THE ADJOINING ROOM (106). GYPSUM BOARD ON WALLS WITH WOOD TRIM, FLUORESCENT LIGHTING, AND VINYL COMPOSITION TILE ON FLOORS ARE ALL LATER ADDITIONS. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. 6. OPEN HEARTH NO. 4 TRESTLE. THE ARCH WITH THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OPEN HEARTH NO. 4 TRESTLE. THE ARCH WITH THE GATE IS KNOWN AS THE HOLE IN THE WALL BY FORMER STEELWORKERS. FOR YEARS THE HOLE IN THE WALL PROVIDED ACCESS TO THE INTERIOR OF THE MILL AND TO THE PAYMASTER'S OFFICE. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Open Hearth Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  18. 65. INTERIOR OF 1902 GENERATOR HOUSE. BASEMENT WALL OF 1901 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. INTERIOR OF 1902 GENERATOR HOUSE. BASEMENT WALL OF 1901 STEAM ENGINE HOUSE VISIBLE AT REAR. BASEMENT WALL OF 1873 WING AT RIGHT. OPENINGS MADE FOR MECHANICALLY TRANSMITTING POWER FROM STEAM ENGINES TO GENERATORS HAVE BEEN BRICKED UP. - Boston Manufacturing Company, 144-190 Moody Street, Waltham, Middlesex County, MA

  19. Cleopatra's Bedroom oblique with picture tube wall along walkway. Structure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cleopatra's Bedroom oblique with picture tube wall along walkway. Structure is made solely of amber colored bottles. Roof supported by telephone poles. Areas of bottle wall above window opening collapsed in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Camera facing northeast. - Grandma Prisbrey's Bottle Village, 4595 Cochran Street, Simi Valley, Ventura County, CA

  20. Beyond Walls: A Strategic Plan for James White Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews Univ., Berrien Springs, MI. James White Library.

    The strategic plan for the James White Library of Andrews University uses the phrase "beyond walls," rather than the catchphrase "library without walls," to acknowledge that printed matter is here to stay but that the paradigm in which it operates is open to innovation and exploration. The fundamental changes taking place in…

  1. 7. Detail view of mill wall ruins looking E showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail view of mill wall ruins looking E showing arched openings for Jamaican Train and archeological excavations at base of wall. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Mill (Ruins), 2.65 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  2. DETAIL VIEW OF LOCK WALL RECESS AT THE DOWNSTREAM END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF LOCK WALL RECESS AT THE DOWNSTREAM END OF LOCK 70. THE RECESS,TYPICAL OF BOTH WALLS IN ALL OF THE LOCKS, PROVIDED SPACE FOR OPEN LOCK GATES TO ALLOW UNIMPEDED PASSAGE OF LOCK TRAFFIC. - New York State Barge Canal, Lockport Locks, Richmond Avenue, Lockport, Niagara County, NY

  3. INTERIOR VIEW, WEST WALL OF NORTHWEST ATTIC CHAMBER. THIS SPACIOUS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, WEST WALL OF NORTHWEST ATTIC CHAMBER. THIS SPACIOUS ROOM INCLUDED A ROOF MONITOR FOR LIGHT AND VENTILATION AND A FIREPLACE FOR HEAT. THE WALL OPENING AND DOOR ON EITHER SIDE OF THE FIREPLACE GIVE ONTO A LARGE UNFINISHED SPACE LOCATED OVER THE HOUSE’S WEST WING - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  5. Wildlife openings

    Treesearch

    William M. Healy

    1989-01-01

    Openings provide important feeding areas for forest wildlife because herbaceous vegetation grows much more abundantly in the open than beneath a forest canopy. Herbage (grasses and forbs) is generally more nutritious and digestible than woody plant growth. Herbage is important in the diet of deer, especially in late winter and early spring. Voles and rabbits use...

  6. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  7. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  8. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  9. A Generalized Wall Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lumley, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    The asymptotic solutions, described by Tennekes and Lumley (1972), for surface flows in a channel, pipe or boundary layer at large Reynolds numbers are revisited. These solutions can be extended to more complex flows such as the flows with various pressure gradients, zero wall stress and rough surfaces, etc. In computational fluid dynamics (CFD), these solutions can be used as the boundary conditions to bridge the near-wall region of turbulent flows so that there is no need to have the fine grids near the wall unless the near-wall flow structures are required to resolve. These solutions are referred to as the wall functions. Furthermore, a generalized and unified law of the wall which is valid for whole surface layer (including viscous sublayer, buffer layer and inertial sublayer) is analytically constructed. The generalized law of the wall shows that the effect of both adverse and favorable pressure gradients on the surface flow is very significant. Such as unified wall function will be useful not only in deriving analytic expressions for surface flow properties but also bringing a great convenience for CFD methods to place accurate boundary conditions at any location away from the wall. The extended wall functions introduced in this paper can be used for complex flows with acceleration, deceleration, separation, recirculation and rough surfaces.

  10. Metallic Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan Michael (Inventor); Hofer, Richard Robert (Inventor); Mikellides, Ioannis G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A Hall thruster apparatus having walls constructed from a conductive material, such as graphite, and having magnetic shielding of the walls from the ionized plasma has been demonstrated to operate with nearly the same efficiency as a conventional non-magnetically shielded design using insulators as wall components. The new design is believed to provide the potential of higher power and uniform operation over the operating life of a thruster device.

  11. Phantom domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, P. P.; Ferreira, V. M. C.; Menezes, J.; Sousa, L.

    2017-08-01

    We consider a model with two real scalar fields which admits phantom domain wall solutions. We investigate the structure and evolution of these phantom domain walls in an expanding homogeneous and isotropic universe. In particular, we show that the increase of the tension of the domain walls with cosmic time, associated to the evolution of the phantom scalar field, is responsible for an additional damping term in their equations of motion. We describe the macroscopic dynamics of phantom domain walls, showing that extended phantom defects whose tension varies on a cosmological time scale cannot be the dark energy.

  12. Individual and mixture endocrine activity of BPS and BPC using in vitro estrogenic/anti-androgenic transcriptional activation assays and the in vivo uterotrophic assay- RAP 2.2-SSWR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is gradually being phased out of many consumer products and processes leading to potential increases in human and environmental exposures to relatively understudied replacement compounds, including Bisphenol S (BPS) and Bisphenol C (BPC).Research from our lab ha...

  13. Individual and mixture endocrine activity of BPS and BPC using in vitro estrogenic/anti-androgenic transcriptional activation assays and the in vivo uterotrophic assay- RAP 2.2-SSWR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is gradually being phased out of many consumer products and processes leading to potential increases in human and environmental exposures to relatively understudied replacement compounds, including Bisphenol S (BPS) and Bisphenol C (BPC).Research from our lab ha...

  14. 2012/14 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study: (BPS:12/14). Supporting Statement Part A. Request for OMB Review. OMB #1850-0631 v.8. Revised May 28, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), within the U.S. Department of Education (ED), Institute of Education Sciences, is requesting clearance for data collection materials and procedures for the full-scale collection of the 2012/14 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:12/14) first follow-up, including the student…

  15. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  16. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, Scott D.; Farrington, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  17. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  18. Interactive Word Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Narvaez, Rose

    2013-01-01

    It is common to see word walls displaying the vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds and are a classroom strategy used to reinforce reading and language arts instruction. Research shows a strong relationship between student word knowledge and academic achievement (Stahl and Fairbanks 1986). As a…

  19. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  20. Wall Construction; Carpentry: 901892.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The curriculum guide outlines a course designed to provide instruction in floor and wall layout, and in the diverse methods and construction of walls. Upon completion of this course the students should have acquired a knowledge of construction plans and structural foundations in addition to a basic knowledge of mathematics. The course consists of…

  1. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  2. 'Stucco' Walls-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial 'clodding' or cementation of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across and makes up half of the projected 'Stucco Walls' image.

  3. Interactive Word Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Narvaez, Rose

    2013-01-01

    It is common to see word walls displaying the vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds and are a classroom strategy used to reinforce reading and language arts instruction. Research shows a strong relationship between student word knowledge and academic achievement (Stahl and Fairbanks 1986). As a…

  4. 11. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING BACK WALL ELECTRICAL HEATER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING BACK WALL ELECTRICAL HEATER, OPEN FIVE-PANELED DOOR TO BACK BEDROOM AT PHOTO RIGHT, AND OPEN DOOR TO KITCHEN AT PHOTO CENTER. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  5. INTERIOR DETAIL, SOUTHEAST CABINET NORTH WALL. THE DOORS TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR DETAIL, SOUTHEAST CABINET NORTH WALL. THE DOORS TO THE LEFT OF THE CHIMNEY MASS OPEN ONTO CLOSETS. ON THE RIGHT, THERE ARE TWO CLOSETS WITH JIB DOORS WITHIN THE CHIMNEY MASS. THE OPEN DOOR CONNECTS WITH THE DRAWING ROOM - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. SIP Shear Walls: Cyclic Performance of High-Aspect-Ratio Segments and Perforated Walls

    Treesearch

    Vladimir Kochkin; Douglas R. Rammer; Kevin Kauffman; Thomas Wiliamson; Robert J. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Increasing stringency of energy codes and the growing market demand for more energy efficient buildings gives structural insulated panel (SIP) construction an opportunity to increase its use in commercial and residential buildings. However, shear wall aspect ratio limitations and lack of knowledge on how to design SIPs with window and door openings are barriers to the...

  7. 22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING WEST FROM THE SAME POINT AS VIEW NO. 21. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  8. MIR wall surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    1998-08-01

    This report addresses the problem of determining the layer thickness of a wall probed with a monostatic, hand-held implementation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR). Our goal is to locate the layers of the wall, and measure its overall thickness. The physical constraints require the device to be held fixed or swept rapidly over the wall. Thus an insufficient amount of backscattered data are collected to use diffraction tomographic [3] techniques to form images. The problem is therefore one of determining the wall layers from a set of time series reflection data. We develop two channel signal processing algorithms to determine the location of the layers of a wall, using as inputs the time series returned from the wall and the incident pulse. We study the problem using a finite difference time domain (FDTD) computer code to simulate the electromagnetic propagation within and scattering from a wall probed with five pulses. We use the results to develop and test signal processing procedures for locating the individual layers. We study two classes of algorithms: a deconvolution approach to determine a layered impulse response, and a correlation approach. After testing the algorithms on the FDTD results, we down-select to a suitable method.

  9. Open Education and the Open Science Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Openness as a complex code word for a variety of digital trends and movements has emerged as an alternative mode of "social production" based on the growing and overlapping complexities of open source, open access, open archiving, open publishing, and open science. This paper argues that the openness movement with its reinforcing structure of…

  10. Open Education and the Open Science Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Openness as a complex code word for a variety of digital trends and movements has emerged as an alternative mode of "social production" based on the growing and overlapping complexities of open source, open access, open archiving, open publishing, and open science. This paper argues that the openness movement with its reinforcing structure of…

  11. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Schumacher, Ray F.; Wicks, George G.

    2010-02-23

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  12. Magnetic vortices as localized mesoscopic domain wall pinning sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, R. L.; Sampaio, L. C.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the controllable pinning of domain walls in a stripe with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by magnetostatic coupling to a magnetic vortex in disks located above the stripe. Pinning mechanisms and depinning fields, studied by means of micromagnetic simulations, are reported. An asymmetric magnetization reversal process is observed and explained in terms of two main contributions to the domain wall pinning: coupling between the in-plane and out-of-plane components of its stray field and the vortex. The in-plane coupling is symmetric with respect to the wall sense of motion while the out-of-plane coupling leads to the observed asymmetry in the hysteresis loops. The energy landscape of the domain wall derived from the micromagnetic simulations supports these findings. This novel pinning strategy, which can be realized by current nanofabrication techniques, opens up new possibilities for the non-destructive control of domain wall mobility in domain wall based spintronic devices.

  13. Ferric ions accumulate in the walls of metabolically inactivating Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and are reductively mobilized during reactivation.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Joshua D; Park, Jinkyu; McCormick, Sean P; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A

    2016-07-13

    Mössbauer and EPR spectra of fermenting yeast cells before and after cell wall (CW) digestion revealed that CWs accumulated iron as cells transitioned from exponential to post-exponential growth. Most CW iron was mononuclear nonheme high-spin (NHHS) Fe(III), some was diamagnetic and some was superparamagnetic. A significant portion of CW Fe was removable by EDTA. Simulations using an ordinary-differential-equations-based model suggested that cells accumulate Fe as they become metabolically inactive. When dormant Fe-loaded cells were metabolically reactivated in Fe-deficient bathophenanthroline disulfonate (BPS)-treated medium, they grew using Fe that had been mobilized from their CWs AND using trace amounts of Fe in the Fe-deficient medium. When grown in Fe-deficient medium, Fe-starved cells contained the lowest cellular Fe concentrations reported for a eukaryotic cell. During metabolic reactivation of Fe-loaded dormant cells, Fe(III) ions in the CWs of these cells were mobilized by reduction to Fe(II), followed by release from the CW and reimport into the cell. BPS short-circuited this process by chelating mobilized and released Fe(II) ions before reimport; the resulting Fe(II)(BPS)3 complex adsorbed on the cell surface. NHHS Fe(II) ions appeared transiently during mobilization, suggesting that these ions were intermediates in this process. In the presence of chelators and at high pH, metabolically inactive cells leached CW Fe; this phenomenon probably differs from metabolic mobilization. The iron regulon, as reported by Fet3p levels, was not expressed during post-exponential conditions; Fet3p was maximally expressed in exponentially growing cells. Decreased expression of the iron regulon and metabolic decline combine to promote CW Fe accumulation.

  14. Wall conditioning on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Pitts, Richard A.

    2011-08-01

    Like all tokamaks, ITER will require wall conditioning systems and strategies for successful operation from the point of view of plasma-facing surface preparation. Unlike today's devices however, ITER will have to manage large quantities of tritium fuel, imposing on wall conditioning a major responsibility for tritium inventory control. It will also feature the largest plasma-facing beryllium surface ever used in a tokamak and its high duty cycle and long pulse are expected to lead to the rapid formation of deposited layers in which tritium can accumulate. This paper summarises the currently planned ITER wall conditioning systems and describes the strategy for their use throughout exploitation of the device.

  15. Open Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Annette; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Adult adoptees are increasingly challenging the practice of sealing their birth records. The authors examine the historical roots of adoptive practices in this country and suggest that the time has come for open adoption to gain acceptance as an alternative. (Author)

  16. Opening remarks

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, S.G.

    1994-09-01

    Included in this paper are the opening remarks of S.G. Hildebrand, from Environmental Science Division, ORNL, to a conference on water resources and water resource issues. Wetlands are the focus of this talk, with an emphasis on conservation and land use to conserve wetland functions and values.

  17. Opening Remarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldin, Daniel S.

    2005-01-01

    In these opening remarks to a symposium reflecting on forty years of U.S. Human Spaceflight, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, reviews the impact that Alan Shepard had on him personally, to NASA, and to the whole idea of manned spaceflight. Mr Goldin cites Shepard as an example of the past and future of manned spaceflight.

  18. Opening Address

    Treesearch

    John T. Shannon

    2001-01-01

    I am glad to be here today to help open the symposium on Arkansas' forests. It is gratifying to see so many forestry leaders in attendance. I am particulary pleased to welcome my brother, State Forester from Oklahoma, Roger Davis; and representatives of the State Foresters from Tennessee and Louisiana.

  19. Moving wall, continuous flow electronphoresis apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates generally to electrophoresis devices and more particularly to a moving wall, continuous flow device in which an electrophoresis chamber is angularly positionable with respect to the direction of moving belt walls. A frame with an electrophoresis chamber is rotatably supported between two synchronously driven belt walls. This allows the chamber to be angularly positionable with respect to the direction of belt travel, which compensates for electroosmotic flow within the electrophoresis chamber. Injection of a buffer solution via an opening and a homogenous sample stream via another opening is performed at the end of a chamber, and collection of buffer and the fractionated species particles is done by a conventional collection array at an opposite end of the chamber. Belts are driven at a rate which exactly matches the flow of buffer and sample through the chamber, which entrains the buffer to behave as a rigid electrophoretic medium, eliminating flow distortions (Poiseuille effect). Additionally, belt material for each belt is stored at one end of the device and is taken up by drive wheels at an opposite end. The novelty of this invention particularly lies in the electrophoresis chamber being angularly positionable between two moving belt walls in order to compensate for electroosmotic flow. Additionally, new belt material is continuously exposed within the chamber, minimizing flow distortion due to contamination of the belt material by the sample.

  20. Abdominal wall endometriomas.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu; Tsai, Eing Mei; Long, Cheng Yu; Chen, Yung Hung; Kay, Nari

    2009-03-01

    Abdominal wall endometriosis is rare, with an incidence of 0.03-0.47% following cesarean delivery. The study reviewed abdominal wall endometriomas during an 8-year period in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Kaohsiung Municipal Hsiao-Kang Hospital. Of 166 patients with endometriosis treated surgically in the hospital during an 8-year period, 20 (12%) had abdominal wall endometriomas. The mean interval between the prior operation and the appearance of the first symptoms was 39.3 months. Preoperative diagnosis was correct in 14 patients (70%). Abdominal wall endometrioma is more common than generally assumed in patients visiting the hospital. In patients with a palpable subcutaneous mass near surgical scars associated with cyclic or constant pain, a thorough history and physical examination are sufficient to establish the presence of endometriomas. A surgical-wide excision with clear margins is the single treatment of choice.

  1. [Nursing care wall planning].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Nursing care wall planners are not a tool for assessing workload, but a means of providing coherence and individualised monitoring of care. Its application is focused not only on team organisation, but also on the patient's needs.

  2. Coke oven wall pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book presents papers on coke oven wall pressures. Topics include How to Extend the Lifetime of Tall, High Performance Coke Ovens, Control of Operation and Equipment Prevents Coke Oven Damage, and Forensic Study of Fairfield Coke Battery 2.

  3. Double wall vacuum tubing and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Stahl, Charles R.; Gibson, Michael A.; Knudsen, Christian W.

    1989-01-01

    An evacuated double wall tubing is shown together with a method for the manufacture of such tubing which includes providing a first pipe of predetermined larger diameter and a second pipe having an O.D. substantially smaller than the I.D. of the first pipe. An evacuation opening is then in the first pipe. The second pipe is inserted inside the first pipe with an annular space therebetween. The pipes are welded together at one end. A stretching tool is secured to the other end of the second pipe after welding. The second pipe is then prestressed mechanically with the stretching tool an amount sufficient to prevent substantial buckling of the second pipe under normal operating conditions of the double wall pipe. The other ends of the first pipe and the prestressed second pipe are welded together, preferably by explosion welding, without the introduction of mechanical spacers between the pipes. The annulus between the pipes is evacuated through the evacuation opening, and the evacuation opening is finally sealed. The first pipe is preferably of steel and the second pipe is preferably of titanium. The pipes may be of a size and wall thickness sufficient for the double wall pipe to be structurally load bearing or may be of a size and wall thickness insufficient for the double wall pipe to be structurally load bearing, and the double wall pipe positioned with a sliding fit inside a third pipe of a load-bearing size.

  4. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  5. Opening education.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marshall S

    2009-01-02

    Spurred by the publication of Massachusetts Institute of Technology OpenCourseWare in 2002, the open educational resources (OER) movement, which has rapidly expanded and captured the imagination and energy of millions of creators and users throughout the world, now faces many opportunities and substantial challenges as it moves to become an integral part of the world's educational environment. The confluence of the Web and a spirit of sharing intellectual property have fueled a worldwide movement to make knowledge and education materials open to all for use. OER are content (courses, books, lesson plans, articles, etc.), tools (virtual laboratories, simulations, and games), and software that support learning and educational practice. OER are free on the Web, and most have licenses that allow copyright holders to retain ownership while providing specified rights for use in original and modified forms. At the least, OER have helped to level the distribution of knowledge across the world. A second promise of OER is to help transform educational practices. This article explores the history of and promises and challenges for OER.

  6. Opening the Dutch Open Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.; de Wijn, A. G.; Sütterlin, P.; Bettonvil, F. C. M.; Hammerschlag, R. H.

    2002-10-01

    We hope to "open the DOT" to the international solar physics community as a facility for high-resolution tomography of the solar atmosphere. Our aim is to do so combining peer-review time allocation with service-mode operation in a "hands-on-telescope" education program bringing students to La Palma to assist in the observing and processing. The largest step needed is considerable speedup of the DOT speckle processing.

  7. Ultimate Cost of Building Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Clayford T.; Gross, James G.

    The need for economic analysis of building walls is discussed, and the factors influencing the ultimate cost of exterior walls are studied. The present worth method is used to analyze three types of exterior non-loadbearing panel or curtain walls. Anticipated costs are expressed in terms of their present value per square foot of wall area. The…

  8. Open University

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  9. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Moore, Guy D.

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can "run away," that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ~ 1014. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ~ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  10. Quasi BPS Wilson loops, localization of loop equation by homology and exact beta function in the large-N limit of SU(N) Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochicchio, M.

    2009-05-01

    We localize the loop equation of large-N YM theory in the anti-self-dual variables on a critical equation for an effective action by means of homological methods as opposed to the cohomological localization of equivariantly closed forms in local field theory. Our localization occurs for some special simple quasi BPS Wilson loops, that have no perimeter divergence and no cusp anomaly for backtracking cusps, in a partial Eguchi-Kawai reduction from four to two dimensions of the non-commutative theory in the limit of infinite non-commutativity and in a lattice regularization in which the anti-self-dual integration variables live at the points of the lattice, thus implying an embedding of parabolic Higgs bundles in the YM functional integral. We find that the beta function of the effective action is saturated by the non-commutative anti-self-dual vortices of the Eguchi-Kawai reduction. An exact canonical beta function of Novikov-Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov type, that reproduces the universal first and second perturbative coefficients follows by the localization on vortices. Finally we argue that a scheme can be found in which the canonical coupling coincides with the physical charge between static quark sources in the large-N limit and we compare our theoretical calculation with some numerical lattice result.

  11. South interior wall, view to the East from near the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South interior wall, view to the East from near the center of the building. At present there is open storage above the fluorescent lights. Behind the interior half wall, modern office occupy the area formerly used as a machine shop (See drawing copy NV-35-B-5) - Bureau of Mines Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Original Building, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  12. Personal Display Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Shalf, John; Bethel, E. Wes; Siegerist, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    The LBNL Visualization Group has created a tiled display wall design that uses components that are readily available from a local hardware store and/or multiple online vendors, and requires minimal tools and skill to assemble. The result is a low-cost, easy to assemble tiled display device that is readily accessible to visualization researchers and domain scientists alike. The LBNL Personal Display (PD) Wall differentiates itself from other LCD-matrix displays because its design minimizes cost and complexity while retaining the functionality of its more expensive tiled display brethren. The PD-Wall occupies the same amount of desktop area as a large flatscreen LCD display panel. LBNL will be publishing and distributing simple plans so that any laboratory or user site can construct their own copies of this device.

  13. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  14. Thermal treatment wall

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  15. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  16. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  17. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: kitajima@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m ≅ 10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f ≅ 10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV . Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  18. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-388, 11 June 2003

    Many craters and troughs at polar and middle latitudes on Mars have gullies carved in their walls. These gullies may have formed by running water; others have suggested alternative, exotic fluids such as liquid or gaseous carbon dioxide. This view of martian gullies was acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). The image shows gullies in the wall of an old meteor impact crater near 39.0oS, 200.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  19. Gullied Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-371, 25 May 2003

    Gullies are common in some regions on middle- and polar-latitude slopes, such as crater walls. This March 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies on the north wall of a crater in the Atlantis Chaos region near 34.3oS, 178.0oW. The gullies might have formed by flow of a fluid--perhaps liquid water--sometime in the geologically recent martian past. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  20. Chest Wall Trauma.

    PubMed

    Majercik, Sarah; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2017-05-01

    Chest wall trauma is common, and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality of trauma patients. Early identification of major chest wall and concomitant intrathoracic injuries is critical. Generalized management of multiple rib fractures and flail chest consists of adequate pain control (including locoregional modalities); management of pulmonary dysfunction by invasive and noninvasive means; and, in some cases, surgical fixation. Multiple studies have shown that patients with flail chest have substantial benefit (decreased ventilator and intensive care unit days, improved pulmonary function, and improved long-term functional outcome) when they undergo surgery compared with nonoperative management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-388, 11 June 2003

    Many craters and troughs at polar and middle latitudes on Mars have gullies carved in their walls. These gullies may have formed by running water; others have suggested alternative, exotic fluids such as liquid or gaseous carbon dioxide. This view of martian gullies was acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). The image shows gullies in the wall of an old meteor impact crater near 39.0oS, 200.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  2. Gullied Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-371, 25 May 2003

    Gullies are common in some regions on middle- and polar-latitude slopes, such as crater walls. This March 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies on the north wall of a crater in the Atlantis Chaos region near 34.3oS, 178.0oW. The gullies might have formed by flow of a fluid--perhaps liquid water--sometime in the geologically recent martian past. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  3. Runaway dilatonic domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Johnson, Matthew C.; Larfors, Magdalena

    2010-02-15

    We explore the stability of domain wall and bubble solutions in theories with compact extra dimensions. The energy density stored inside of the wall can destabilize the volume modulus of a compactification, leading to solutions containing either a timelike singularity or a region where space decompactifies, depending on the metric ansatz. We determine the structure of such solutions both analytically and using numerical simulations, and analyze how they arise in compactifications of Einstein-Maxwell theory and type IIB string theory. The existence of instabilities has important implications for the formation of networks of topological defects and the population of vacua during eternal inflation.

  4. View of main hoist wire rope drum and brakes, open ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of main hoist wire rope drum and brakes, open contact boards are in view at the far right wall - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Portal Gantry Crane No. 42, Pier 5, Farragut Avenue, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  5. Micro focusing of fast electrons with opened cone targets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Feng; Liu Xiaoxuan; Ding Wenjun; Du Fei; Li Yutong; Ma Jinglong; Liu Xiaolong; Chen Liming; Lu Xin; Dong Quanli; Wang Weimin; Wang Zhaohua; Wei Zhiyi; Liu Bicheng; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2012-01-15

    Using opened reentrant cone silicon targets, we have demonstrated the effect of micro focusing of fast electrons generated in intense laser-plasma interactions. When an intense femtosecond laser pulse is focused tightly onto one of the side walls of the cone, fast electron beam emitted along the side wall is observed. When a line focus spot, which is long enough to irradiate both of the side walls of the cone simultaneously, is used, two electron beams emitted along each side wall, respectively, are observed. The two beams should cross each other near the open tip of the cone, resulting in micro focusing. We use a two-dimensional Particle-In-Cell code to simulate the electron emission both in opened and closed cone targets. The simulation results of the opened cone targets are in agreement with the experimental observation while the results of the closed cone targets do not show the micro focusing effect.

  6. 178. PAINT SHOP, LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARD CENTER OF ROOM. OPENING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    178. PAINT SHOP, LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARD CENTER OF ROOM. OPENING IN BACKGROUND IS SLIDING WALL. - Gruber Wagon Works, Pennsylvania Route 183 & State Hill Road at Red Bridge Park, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  7. 29. Detail view of small triangular openings from opposite side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Detail view of small triangular openings from opposite side of wall. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  8. 17. INTERIOR OF ROOM 106 LOOKING NORTHWEST. OPENING IN UPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR OF ROOM 106 LOOKING NORTHWEST. OPENING IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF NORTHWEST WALL AND EXIT DOOR BOTH LEAD TO ROOM 105. THIS WALL HAS VERTICAL WOOD PANELING; OTHER WALLS ARE GYPSUM BOARD, ALL ARE PAINTED. CEILING IS GYPSUM BOARD AND FLOOR TREATMENT IS VINYL TILE. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  9. Magnetic Domain Wall Floating on a Spin Superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically investigate the transfer of angular momentum between a spin superfluid and a domain wall in an exchange coupled easy-axis and easy-plane magnetic insulator system. A domain wall in the easy-axis magnet absorbs spin angular momentum via disrupting the flow of a superfluid spin current in the easy-plane magnet. Focusing on an open geometry, where the spin current is injected electrically via a nonequilibrium spin accumulation, we derive analytical expressions for the resultant superfluid-mediated motion of the domain wall. The analytical results are supported by micromagnetic simulations. The proposed phenomenon extends the regime of magnon-driven domain-wall motion to the case where the magnons are condensed and exhibit superfluidity. Furthermore, by controlling the pinning of the domain wall, we propose a realization of a reconfigurable spin transistor. The long-distance dissipationless character of spin superfluids can thus be exploited for manipulating soliton-based memory and logic devices.

  10. Efficient Photovoltaic Current Generation at Ferroelectric Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Jan; Fu, Deyi; Yang, Seung-Yeul; Alarcón-Lladó, Esther; Wu, Junqiao; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Ager, Joel W., III

    2011-09-01

    We elucidate the mechanism of a newly observed photovoltaic effect which occurs in ferroelectrics with periodic domain structures. Under sufficiently strong illumination, domain walls function as nanoscale generators of the photovoltaic current. The steps in the electrostatic potential function to accumulate electrons and holes on opposite sides of the walls while locally reducing the concentration of the oppositely charged carriers. As a result, the recombination rate adjacent to the walls is reduced, leading to a net diffusion current. In open circuit, photovoltages for periodically ordered domain walls are additive and voltages much larger than the band gap can be generated. The internal quantum efficiency for individual domain walls can be surprisingly high, approaching 10% for above band-gap photons. Although we have found the effect in BiFeO3 films, it should occur in any system with a similar periodic potential.

  11. Use of reinforced soil wall to support steam generator transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Davie, J.R.; Wang, J.T. ); Gladstone, R.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Consumers Power Company had the two steam generators at its Palisades Nuclear Plant in Michigan replaced in November 1990. This replacement was accomplished through a 26-foot wide by 28-foot high opening cut into the wall of the containment building, about 45 feet above the original ground surface. Because this ground surface was at an approximately 3-H:1-V slope, leveling was required before replacement in order to provide access for the steam generators and adequate support for the heavy-duty gantry crane system used to transfer the generators. A 25-foot high reinforced soil wall was constructed to achieve the level surface. This paper describes the design and construction of the heavily loaded reinforced soil wall, including ground improvement measures required to obtain adequate wall stability. The performance of the wall under test loading will also be presented and discussed.

  12. Fusion Engineering Device (FED) first wall/shield design

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, P.H.; Fuller, G.; Cramer, B.; Davisson, J.; Haines, J.; Kirchner, J.

    1981-01-01

    The torus of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is comprised of the bulk shield and its associated spool lstructure and support system, the first wall water-cooled panel and armor systems, and the pumped limiter. The bulk shielding is provided by ten shield sectors that are installed in the spool structure in such a way as to permit extraction of the sectors through the openings between adjacent toroidal field coils with a direct radial movement. The first wall armor is installed on the inboard and top interior walls of these sectors, and the water-cooled panels are installed on the outboard interior walls and the pumped limiter in the bottom of the sectors. The overall design of the first wall and shield system is described in this paper.

  13. Closure of the open abdomen.

    PubMed

    Björck, Martin; D'Amours, Scott K; Hamilton, A E Ricardo

    2011-07-01

    The open abdomen is a valuable tool in the management of patients with intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. The longer an abdomen is left open, the greater the potential morbidity, however. From the very start, specific measures should be considered to increase the likelihood of definitive closure and prevent the development of visceral adhesions, lateralization, and/or loss of skin and fascia, ileus, fistulae, and malnutrition. Early definitive closure of all abdominal wall layers is the short-term goal of management once the need for the open abdomen has resolved. Several devices and strategies improve the chances for definitive closure. If a frozen abdomen develops, split-thickness skin grafting of a granulating open abdominal wound base is an alternative. Early coverage of the exposed viscera and acceptance of a large abdominal hernia permit earlier reversal of the catabolic state and lower the risk of fistula formation. When a stoma is required, sealing and separation can become problematic. If a fistula develops, a more complex situation prevails, requiring specific techniques to isolate its output and a longer-term strategy to restore intestinal continuity. Planning the closure of an open abdomen is a process that starts on the first day that the abdomen is opened. Multiple factors need to be addressed, optimized, and controlled to achieve the best outcome.

  14. 8. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING OPEN DOORWAY TO KITCHEN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING OPEN DOORWAY TO KITCHEN, 6-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT SASH WINDOWS ON FRONT WALL AT PHOTO LEFT, AND 6-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT SASH WINDOW ON BACK WALL AT EXTREME PHOTO RIGHT. VIEW TO EAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  15. 9. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING OPEN DOORWAY TO KITCHEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING OPEN DOORWAY TO KITCHEN AT PHOTO LEFT CENTER, AND 6-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT SASH WINDOW ON REAR WALL AT PHOTO RIGHT. FIREPLACE ORIGINALLY OCCUPIED SPACE TO THE EXTREME PHOTO RIGHT OF SASH WINDOW ON THE REAR WALL. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  16. Interior of southwest vault, opened southwest vault door, closed southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of southwest vault, opened southwest vault door, closed southeast vault door, and evidence of forced entry in north interior wall. View from west interior wall of southwest vault. Facing east. - Travis Air Force Base, Building No. 925, W Street, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  17. Wall mounted combined radiactive-convective electric space heater

    SciTech Connect

    Meiser, R.; Burkert, J.; Bendel, R.

    1987-07-21

    A space heating apparatus is described for mounting on a wall surface of a room to be heated, the apparatus comprising: a housing including a substantially flat rear wall adapted for mounting to the wall surface. A front wall adjacent the rear wall, the front wall and the real wall conjointly defining a space between through which the air passes. The front wall has a lower portion extending upwardly from the bottom of the housing a solid uninterrupted mid portion devoid of any openings and a portion extending upwardly; an inlet means at the lower end of the housing admits and directs the air into the space; air outlet means at the upper end of the housing where heated air leaves the space and passes from the housing: a solid, uninterrupted metal plate having a first flat side and a second flat side; an electrically insulating plastic layer formed only on the first flat side of the metal plate; the metal plate being mounted in the space so as to partition the space into two convecting channels and having an upper portion extending above the mid portion of the front wall; the plastic layer and the rear wall conjointly defining one of the convecting channels for communicating with a portion of the air outlet means and for conducting a portion of the incoming air admitted to the space; the second flat side and the front wall with the solid uninterrupted mid portion conjointly defining the other one of the convecting channels; resistance heating means embedded in and throughout the plastic layer for heating the air rising in both of the convecting channels and for radiating heat from the second flat side of the plate; and the remainder of the outlet means being formed in the upper portion of the front wall so as to be disposed laterally of the upper portion of the metal plate.

  18. Transanal open hemorrhoidopexy.

    PubMed

    Pakravan, F; Helmes, C; Baeten, C

    2009-03-01

    Despite all developments in the recent years, the choice of an adequate treatment for hemorrhoids remains a problem. The hemorrhoidopexy as described by Longo and the Doppler-guided hemorrhoidal artery ligation follow a concept different from the excision and destruction techniques from earlier years. In both techniques, the hemorrhoidal tissue is preserved, as it may be important for anal sensation and continence. The high costs of the circular stapler gun and the Doppler methods can probably be overcome by the proposed technique, a transanal open hemorrhoidopexy, while simultaneously preserving hemorrhoidal tissues. Between November 2006 and May 2007, 38 patients with third-degree hemorrhoids were treated with open transanal hemorrhoidopexy. All patients were positioned in the lithotomy position and operated under general anesthesia; the anal mucosa was stitched to the rectal wall with four Z-stitches after removal of a small rectal mucosa flap about 4 cm from the dentate line. The four stitches were circumferentially positioned at equal distances. Postoperatively, the patients followed a fiber-rich diet for one week. Most patients (n = 32, 84 percent) were without any complaint upon follow-up at one week. Six patients (16 percent) experienced pain and were treated with oral analgesics. One patient (3 percent) experienced minor bleeding that stopped spontaneously. After one month follow-up, 34 patients (89 percent) had no symptom complaints. Two patients (5 percent) experienced segmental prolapse and two patients (5 percent) had remaining pruritus. No patient needed another intervention. The proposed operation, transanal open hemorrhoidopexy, appears to be an effective technique. The procedure can be performed under direct vision and is very cost effective compared to the other hemorrhoidal tissue-sparing procedures.

  19. Cell wall chemistry

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell; Roger Pettersen; James S. Han; Jeffrey S. Rowell; Mandla A. Tshabalala

    2005-01-01

    In chemical terms, wood is best defined as a three-dimensional biopolymer composite composed of an interconnected network of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin with minor amounts of extractives and inorganics. The major chemical component of a living tree is water, but on a dryweight basis, all wood cell walls consist mainly of sugar-based polymers (carbohydrates,...

  20. Fly on the Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Dave; Korpan, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a peer observation program at the University of Victoria called the Lecture Club. The observers are not interactive during the class--they are the proverbial flies on the wall. The paper identifies the program as self-developmental, discussing the attributes of this learning-to-teach and peer-sharing…

  1. A Wall of Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Visitors to the campus of Orland High School (OHS) will never question that they have stepped into a world of the masses: kids, activity, personalities, busyness, and playfulness--a veritable cloud of mild bedlam. The wall of ceramic faces that greets a visitor in the school office is another reminder of the organized chaos that the teachers…

  2. A School without Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venuti, Len Tai

    1994-01-01

    During the summer, selected students of Hawaiian ancestry who have completed seventh or eighth grade participate in a boarding program with outdoor activities such as pulling taro, star gazing, and camping. The activities eliminate walls of doubt and fear and nurture self-confidence, creativity, personal growth, leadership, and cultural awareness.…

  3. Pressure wall patch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamsen, Joel E. (Inventor); Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A rigid patch body for placing over a damaged portion (hole) of an external wall of a pressurized vessel, such as a space vehicle or a habitat, is discussed. The rigid patch body allows an astronaut to make temporary repairs to the pressurized vessel from the exterior of the vessel, which enables more permanent repairs to be made from the interior of the vessel. The pressure wall patch of the present invention includes a floor surrounded by four side members. Each side member includes a threaded screw for anchoring the patch body to the external wall of the pressurized vessel and a recess in its lower surface for supporting an inflatable bladder for surrounding the damaged portion (hole) of the external wall to seal the area surrounding the damaged portion. This allows the vessel to be repressurized. The floor of the rigid patch body supports a source of gas that is connected to the gas supply valve and a gas supply gauge in communication with the gas supply valve and the inflatable bladder.

  4. A Wall of Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Visitors to the campus of Orland High School (OHS) will never question that they have stepped into a world of the masses: kids, activity, personalities, busyness, and playfulness--a veritable cloud of mild bedlam. The wall of ceramic faces that greets a visitor in the school office is another reminder of the organized chaos that the teachers…

  5. Wall turbulence control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Lindemann, A. Margrethe; Beeler, George B.; Mcginley, Catherine B.; Goodman, Wesley L.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of wall turbulence control devices which were experimentally investigated are discussed; these include devices for burst control, alteration of outer flow structures, large eddy substitution, increased heat transfer efficiency, and reduction of wall pressure fluctuations. Control of pre-burst flow was demonstrated with a single, traveling surface depression which is phase-locked to elements of the burst production process. Another approach to wall turbulence control is to interfere with the outer layer coherent structures. A device in the outer part of a boundary layer was shown to suppress turbulence and reduce drag by opposing both the mean and unsteady vorticity in the boundary layer. Large eddy substitution is a method in which streamline curvature is introduced into the boundary layer in the form of streamwise vortices. Riblets, which were already shown to reduce turbulent drag, were also shown to exhibit superior heat transfer characteristics. Heat transfer efficiency as measured by the Reynolds Analogy Factor was shown to be as much as 36 percent greater than a smooth flat plate in a turbulent boundary layer. Large Eddy Break-Up (LEBU) which are also known to reduce turbulent drag were shown to reduce turbulent wall pressure fluctuation.

  6. The Wall Coverings Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Students love nothing better than personalizing their space--desk, bedroom, or even their cars. This article describes a classroom challenge that gives students a chance to let their spirits soar with the invention of a new form of wall treatment. A trip to a big box store might prove to be most helpful for students to visualize their new product…

  7. The Wall Coverings Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Students love nothing better than personalizing their space--desk, bedroom, or even their cars. This article describes a classroom challenge that gives students a chance to let their spirits soar with the invention of a new form of wall treatment. A trip to a big box store might prove to be most helpful for students to visualize their new product…

  8. OpenER, a Dutch Initiative in Open Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuwer, Robert; Mulder, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Over the period 2006-2008, the Dutch Open Universiteit Nederland conducted an experiment in which Open Educational Resources (OER) were offered in an effort to bridge the gap between informal and formal learning and to establish a new style of entry portal to higher education with no barriers at all. OpenER received considerable attention both in…

  9. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  10. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  11. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, Lois; Mantha, Pallavi

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  12. 132. View of Great Wall of China retaining wall and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    132. View of Great Wall of China retaining wall and unnamed viaduct on Grandfather Mountain. Viaduct completed in 1987. Looking northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  13. Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation Sections - Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp NP-5-C, Barracks No. 5, CCC Camp Historic District at Chapin Mesa, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  14. 40. RETAINING WALL CONSTRUCTION SHOWING PORTION OF COMPLETED WALL. BACKFILLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. RETAINING WALL CONSTRUCTION SHOWING PORTION OF COMPLETED WALL. BACKFILLING BY POWER SHOVEL IN PROGRESS. ZION NP NEGATIVE NO. 1490. PHOTOGRAPHER: PARKER, NO DATE - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  15. DETAIL OF CROCKETT BARN WALL CONSTRUCTION, UPPER LEVEL. The wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF CROCKETT BARN WALL CONSTRUCTION, UPPER LEVEL. The wall construction of the Crockett barn includes a layer of diagonal sheathing that is exposed on the interior. - Crockett Farm, Barn, 1056 Fort Casey Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  16. Interior view of wall detail of southeast wall, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of wall detail of southeast wall, view towards the southeast, without scale - Fort McClellan Ammunition Storage Area, Building No. 4408, Second Avenue (Magazine Road), Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  17. 4. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL, SW CORNER, SHOWING RETAINING WALL, BRIDGE WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL, SW CORNER, SHOWING RETAINING WALL, BRIDGE WALL AND EROSION ON ROAD SURFACE. - Bridalveil Fall Bridge No. 3, Spanning Bridalveil Creek on carriage road, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  18. EAST WALL OF CRYSTALLIZER WING TO THE LEFT, END WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST WALL OF CRYSTALLIZER WING TO THE LEFT, END WALL OF CRUSHING MILL IN CENTER. GABLE END OF BOILING HOUSE IN LEFT BACKGROUND. VIEW FROM THE SOUTH - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  19. Interior view of north wall of Chapel. The wall panel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of north wall of Chapel. The wall panel is one of two carved with lists of those missing in nearby combat. - Flanders Field American Cemetery & Memorial, Chapel, Wortegemseweg 117, Waregem, West Flanders (Belgium)

  20. 1. SOUTHEAST REAR WALL AND NORTHEAST SIDE WALL OF CABINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTHEAST REAR WALL AND NORTHEAST SIDE WALL OF CABINS FORGEMAN'S HOUSE NO. 1 AT RIGHT - Mount Etna Iron Works, Forgeman's House No. 1, Legislative Route 07020 between junctions of T.R. 461 & 463, Williamsburg, Blair County, PA

  1. Openness initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  2. Wind tunnels with adapted walls for reducing wall interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganzer, U.

    1979-01-01

    The basic principle of adaptable wind tunnel walls is explained. First results of an investigation carried out at the Aero-Space Institute of Berlin Technical University are presented for two dimensional flexible walls and a NACA 0012 airfoil. With five examples exhibiting very different flow conditions it is demonstrated that it is possible to reduce wall interference and to avoid blockage at transonic speeds by wall adaptation.

  3. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  4. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  5. 25. NORTH TRAINING WALL, EAST SECTION, SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. NORTH TRAINING WALL, EAST SECTION, SIDE WALL CONSTRUCTION, LOOKING WEST FROM A POINT ABOUT 500 FEET FROM THE MIDDLE HARBOR PARK FISHING PIER. (Panoramic view 1 of 2). - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  6. Dielectric relaxation and charged domain walls in (K,Na)NbO3-based ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, A. A.; Alikin, D. O.; Turygin, A. P.; Abramov, A. S.; Hreščak, J.; Walker, J.; Rojac, T.; Bencan, A.; Malic, B.; Kholkin, A. L.; Shur, V. Ya.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of domain walls on the macroscopic properties of ferroelectric materials is a well known phenomenon. Commonly, such "extrinsic" contributions to dielectric permittivity are discussed in terms of domain wall displacements under external electric field. In this work, we report on a possible contribution of charged domain walls to low frequency (10-106 Hz) dielectric permittivity in K1-xNaxNbO3 ferroelectric ceramics. It is shown that the effective dielectric response increases with increasing domain wall density. The effect has been attributed to the Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars relaxation. The obtained results may open up possibilities for domain wall engineering in various ferroelectric materials.

  7. Flow Analyses of Liquid Metal First Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gang; Huang, Jinhua

    2003-06-01

    Liquid metal first wall is attractive in fusion reactor designs because of its high heat removal and self-refreshment capabilities. In liquid wall study, method of forming stable liquid flows on the front surface of blanket has to be found. In order to do this, free surface magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) effects and flow velocity distributions of liquid metal under gravity have been studied. In our study, liquid metal flows down along ducts half-opened to face the plasma. Net electromagnetic force forms from induced eddy current interacting with the confinement magnetic field (12T) in the liquid metal flow. For liquid metal lithium (about 4cm thick), distributions of velocity along the flow direction have been obtained by combined calculations of free surface flow and electromagnetic analysis. The results show that MHD baffle might be used to get stable in front of the blanket.

  8. Computer-controlled wall servicing robot

    SciTech Connect

    Lefkowitz, S.

    1995-03-01

    After four years of cooperative research, Pentek has unveiled a new robot with the capability to automatically deliver a variety of cleaning, painting, inspection, and surveillance devices to large vertical surfaces. The completely computer-controlled robot can position a working tool on a 50-foot tall by 50-foot wide vertical surface with a repeatability of 1/16 inch. The working end can literally {open_quotes}fly{close_quotes} across the face of a wall at speed of 60 per minute, and can handle working loads of 350 pounds. The robot was originally developed to decontaminate the walls of reactor fueling cavities at commercial nuclear power plants during fuel outages. If these cavities are left to dry after reactor refueling, contamination present in the residue could later become airborne and move throughout the containment building. Decontaminating the cavity during the refueling outage reduces the need for restrictive personal protective equipment during plant operations to limit the dose rates.

  9. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovini, L.

    1994-01-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen To quote Mr Jean Terrien: "Physics must be one step ahead of metrology". A long-serving Director of the BIPM, he said these words when visiting the IMGC in 1970 as a member of the scientific board of our Institute. At that time it was still an open question whether the IMGC should start research work on the absolute measurement of silicon lattice spacing. Mr Terrien underlined the revolutionary character of x-ray interferometry and, eventually, he caused the balance needle to lean towards the ... right direction. Mr Terrien correctly foresaw that, like Michelson's interferometer of 1880, x-ray interferometry could have a prominent place in today's science and technology. And while, in the first case, after more than a century we can see instruments based on electromagnetic wave interaction within every one's reach in laboratories and, sometimes, in workshops, in the second case, twenty-five years since the first development of an x-ray interferometer we can witness its role in nanometrology. Today and tomorrow we meet to discuss how to go beyond the sixth decimal place in the value of the Avogadro constant. We are aware that the quest for this achievement requires the cooperation of scientists with complementary capabilities. I am sure that the present workshop is a very good opportunity to present and discuss results and to improve and extend existing cooperation. The new adjustment of fundamental constants envisaged by the CODATA Task Group is redoubling scientists' efforts to produce competitive values of NA. The results of the measurements of the silicon lattice spacing in terms of an optical wavelength, which were available for the 1986 adjustment, combined with the determination of silicon molar volume, demonstrate how such an NA determination produces a consistent set of other constants and opens the way to a possible redefinition of the kilogram. We shall see in these two days how far we have progressed along this road. For us at the

  10. Great Wall of China

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-21

    This ASTER sub-image covers a 12 x 12 km area in northern Shanxi Province, China, and was acquired January 9, 2001. The low sun angle, and light snow cover highlight a section of the Great Wall, visible as a black line running diagonally through the image from lower left to upper right. The Great Wall is over 2000 years old and was built over a period of 1000 years. Stretching 4500 miles from Korea to the Gobi Desert it was first built to protect China from marauders from the north. This image is located at 40.2 degrees north latitude and 112.8 degrees east longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02669

  11. DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-10-18

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact pulsed power device where the pulse forming lines, switching, and vacuum wall are integrated into a single compact geometry. For this effort, we initiated a extensive compact pulsed power development program and have pursued the study of switching (gas, oil, laser induced surface flashover and photoconductive), dielectrics (ceramics and nanoparticle composites), pulse forming line topologies (asymmetric and symmetric Blumleins and zero integral pulse forming lines), and multilayered vacuum insulator (HGI) technology. Finally, we fabricated an accelerator cell for test on ETAII (a 5.5 MeV, 2 kA, 70 ns pulsewidth electron beam accelerator). We review our past results and report on the progress of accelerator cell testing.

  12. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  13. Restrictive chest wall disorders.

    PubMed

    Donath, Joseph; Miller, Albert

    2009-06-01

    Hypoventilation can be caused by diseases of the chest wall. Any anatomical or functional abnormality of the bony thorax increases dead space ventilation and the work of breathing, whether congenital or acquired, acute or chronic, and whether its cause is infectious, traumatic, environmental, iatrogenic, or unknown. In this article, we discuss these heterogeneous disorders from the viewpoint of the practicing nonpediatric pulmonary physician, only briefly touching on surgical, pediatric, rheumatologic, and other nonpulmonary ramifications. Emphasis is on the most common and the best researched forms of chest wall restriction, including kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, flail chest, and ankylosing spondylitis. Other diseases such as osteoporosis with its less well known pulmonary effects, and some rarely seen entities, are briefly discussed.

  14. Bumper wall for plasma device

    DOEpatents

    Coultas, Thomas A.

    1977-01-01

    Operation of a plasma device such as a reactor for controlled thermonuclear fusion is facilitated by an improved bumper wall enclosing the plasma to smooth the flow of energy from the plasma as the energy impinges upon the bumper wall. The bumper wall is flexible to withstand unequal and severe thermal shocks and it is readily replaced at less expense than the cost of replacing structural material in the first wall and blanket that surround it.

  15. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  16. Curtain Wall Creates Ventilation Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Curtain-wall structure proposed for removing methane and airborne coal dust from hydrojet-jaw mining machines. Channel between curtain wall and mine wall forms closed exhaust passage. Through it, gas and dust continuously removed so high concentrations of these explosive materials not build up.

  17. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  18. Curtain Wall Creates Ventilation Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Curtain-wall structure proposed for removing methane and airborne coal dust from hydrojet-jaw mining machines. Channel between curtain wall and mine wall forms closed exhaust passage. Through it, gas and dust continuously removed so high concentrations of these explosive materials not build up.

  19. Rijke tube with flexible walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandre, Shreyas; Nguyen, Bao-Nhat; Li, Marvin

    2011-11-01

    Sound is excited spontaneously in a Rijke tube because the small temperature perturbations in an acoustic field interact with heat transfer from a heat source in the tube. The air particles near the heat source undergo a thermodynamic cyle converting heat to mechanical energy, which is heard as the sound emanating from the Rijke tube. This principle of energy conversion is used in thermoacoustic engines, and the main objective of this study is to improve their performance. The acoustic oscillations in the Rijke tube regulate the thermodynamic cycle, just as in conventional engines the cycle is controlled by the motion of a piston and the action of inlet and exit valves. The acoustic regulation in the Rijke tube, however, does not allow arbitrary control of the cycle in thermodynamic phase space. In this presentation, we introduce a new way of overcoming this limitation, one by using Rijke tubes with flexible walls. We will discuss how this modification allows for more general thermodynamic cycles to be executed by the air particles in the tube. This possibility, when used in thermoacoustic engines, opens a channel for further improving the engine performance.

  20. MHD-flow in the slotted channels with conducting walls

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, I.; Kirillov, I.; Reed, C.

    1994-12-31

    The results of the MHD-flow experimental studies performed in the support of the {open_quotes}slotted channel{close_quotes} blanket concept are presented. The test sections were of the rectangular slotted geometry with the aspect ration b/a=10 (the longer side b is parallel to the applied magnetic field). Three test sections had different walls conductivity, two of them had equal conductivity of all four walls and the third one had a thick top wall (simulation of the blanket first wall) while the remaining three walls were made of a thin liner which was electrically insulated from its surrounding strongback ({open_quotes}Laminated{close_quotes} walls). The applied magnetic field in these experiments was from 0.6 to 2 T. The working fluids were In-Ga-Sn and NaK. Comparison of the pressure drop data for each channel with the analytical and numerical solutions showed the necessity to the further development of the theoretical methods, for different channels the difference between theoretical and test data was from 10 to 20%.

  1. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  2. Open Education Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bough, Max, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal provides 12 brief articles focused on open education. Topics explored include (1) open education and reading, (2) mainstreaming, (3) characteristics of an open teacher, (4) administration of an open concept school, (5) an existential methodology in the language arts, (6) social studies in open education, (7) open education in early…

  3. Open Standards, Open Source, and Open Innovation: Harnessing the Benefits of Openness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee for Economic Development, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Digitization of information and the Internet have profoundly expanded the capacity for openness. This report details the benefits of openness in three areas--open standards, open-source software, and open innovation--and examines the major issues in the debate over whether openness should be encouraged or not. The report explains each of these…

  4. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  5. 16. INTERIOR OF BEDROOM NUMBER TWO SHOWING OPEN PANEL DOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR OF BEDROOM NUMBER TWO SHOWING OPEN PANEL DOOR TO WALK-IN CLOSET AT PHOTO CENTER, OPEN PANEL DOOR FROM BEDROOM NUMBER ONE AT EXTREME PHOTO LEFT, AND 6-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT SASH WINDOW ON NORTH WALL AT PHOTO RIGHT. VIEW TO WEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  6. 8. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING OPEN DOORWAY TO KITCHEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING OPEN DOORWAY TO KITCHEN AT PHOTO RIGHT, 6-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT SASH WINDOWS ON FRONT (EAST) WALL AT PHOTO CENTER. ENTRY ROOM AND OPEN 1-LIGHT FRONT DOOR AT EXTREME PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  7. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NORTH ROOM. DOOR OPENING LEADS TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NORTH ROOM. DOOR OPENING LEADS TO STAIRWAY UP TO THE ABOVE-GROUND PORTION. NOTE THE SQUARE TUNNEL OPENING AT CENTER, AND THE CONDUIT SLEEVES AND PIPE PROTRUDING FROM THE NORTH WALL AT LEFT. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. 8. FIRST FLOOR, EAST ROOM, NORTHEAST WALL SHOWING DOORWAYS TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. FIRST FLOOR, EAST ROOM, NORTHEAST WALL SHOWING DOORWAYS TO BOXED WINDER STAIRWAYS, UP ON FAR RIGHT AND DOWN TO RIGHT OF FIREPLACE, WITH SHUTTERS OPEN - High Farm, House, Creek Road, 1 mile West of Easton Road, Pipersville, Bucks County, PA

  9. 6. View of mill wall ruins looking E showing arched ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View of mill wall ruins looking E showing arched openings where fuel was fed to fire Jamaican Train. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Mill (Ruins), 2.65 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  10. Detail, steps and walls, east corner, Burton Park Amphitheater, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, steps and walls, east corner, Burton Park Amphitheater, view to west (90mm lens). Open doorway to left of steps leads to stage wing area; steps lead to Club House grade level. - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  11. 8. VIEW OF STUDDING, EXTERIOR WALL FURRING AND LINTELS FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF STUDDING, EXTERIOR WALL FURRING AND LINTELS FOR NEW WINDOW OPENINGS. NORTH WING, FIRST FLOOR DURING REHABILITATION OF HOSPITAL BUILDING, 1938. PLEASE CREDIT: BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS, NATIONAL ARCHIVES - U. S. Naval Asylum, Laning Hall, Gray's Ferry Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  12. 16. Interior view, greenhouse, south wall taken from the ground. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Interior view, greenhouse, south wall taken from the ground. The original floor height is indicated by the joists on the left. The large opening on the right was formerly fitted with an exterior-fed iron stove used to heat the space on particularly cold days. - John Bartram House & Garden, Greenhouse, 54th Street & LIndbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. Radial vibrations of BPS skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Haberichter, M.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2016-11-01

    We study radial vibrations of spherically symmetric Skyrmions in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model. Concretely, we numerically solve the linearized field equations for small fluctuations in a Skyrmion background, both for linearly stable oscillations and for (unstable) resonances. This is complemented by numerical solutions of the full nonlinear system, which confirm all the results of the linear analysis. In all cases, the resulting fundamental excitation provides a rather accurate value for the Roper resonance, supporting the hypothesis that the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model already gives a reasonable approximate description of this resonance. Furthermore, for many potentials additional higher resonances appear, again in agreement with known experimental results.

  14. Interwall Friction and Sliding Behavior of Centimeters Long Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rufan; Ning, Zhiyuan; Xu, Ziwei; Zhang, Yingying; Xie, Huanhuan; Ding, Feng; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Qiang; Qian, Weizhong; Cui, Yi; Wei, Fei

    2016-02-10

    Here, we studied the interwall friction and sliding behaviors of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs). The interwall friction shows a linear dependence on the pullout velocity of the inner wall. The axial curvature in DWCNTs causes the significant increase of the interwall friction. The axial curvature also affects the sliding behavior of the inner wall. Compared with the axial curvature, the opening ends of DWCNTs play tiny roles in their interwall friction.

  15. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    6 April 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies in the wall of a large impact crater in Newton Basin near 41.9oS, 158.1oW. Such gullies may have formed by downslope movement of wet debris--i.e., water. Unfortunately, because the responsible fluid (if there was one) is no longer present today, only the geomorphology of the channels and debris aprons can be used to deduce that water might have been involved. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  16. The Chronicles Wall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-03

    A brass plaque engraved with the name of Bruce Hall of CBS News is among the list of "The Chroniclers," a roll of honor on the wall at the NASA News Center at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Hall, one of six new inductees in 2017, died after a lengthy illness on May 2, 2017. In this facility reporters from television, radio, print and online media outlets have monitored countless launches, landings and other space events in order to deliver the news to the world. The Chroniclers program recognizes retirees of the news and communications business who helped spread news of American space exploration from Kennedy Space Center for ten years or more.

  17. The Chronicles Wall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-03

    Brass plaques engraved with the names of "The Chroniclers" adorn the wall at the NASA News Center at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the foreground are rows of stations where reporters from television, radio, print and online media outlets have monitored countless launches, landings and other space events in order to deliver the news to the world. The Chroniclers program recognizes retirees of the news and communications business who helped spread news of American space exploration from Kennedy Space Center for ten years or more.

  18. The Chronicles Wall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-03

    Brass plaques engraved with the names of "The Chroniclers" create a roll of honor on the wall at the NASA News Center at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In this facility reporters from television, radio, print and online media outlets have monitored countless launches, landings and other space events in order to deliver the news to the world. The Chroniclers program recognizes retirees of the news and communications business who helped spread news of American space exploration from Kennedy Space Center for ten years or more.

  19. The Chronicles Wall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-03

    Brass plaques engraved with the names of Gatha Cottee of NASA Public Affairs, Walter Cronkite of CBS News and Bill Cummins of WEZY Radio are among the list of "The Chroniclers," a roll of honor on the wall at the NASA News Center at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In this facility reporters from television, radio, print and online media outlets have monitored countless launches, landings and other space events in order to deliver the news to the world. The Chroniclers program recognizes retirees of the news and communications business who helped spread news of American space exploration from Kennedy Space Center for ten years or more.

  20. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    6 April 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies in the wall of a large impact crater in Newton Basin near 41.9oS, 158.1oW. Such gullies may have formed by downslope movement of wet debris--i.e., water. Unfortunately, because the responsible fluid (if there was one) is no longer present today, only the geomorphology of the channels and debris aprons can be used to deduce that water might have been involved. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  1. Docking studies of benzylidene anabaseine interactions with α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and acetylcholine binding proteins (AChBPs): application to the design of related α7 selective ligands.

    PubMed

    Kombo, David C; Mazurov, Anatoly; Tallapragada, Kartik; Hammond, Philip S; Chewning, Joseph; Hauser, Terry A; Vasquez-Valdivieso, Montserrat; Yohannes, Daniel; Talley, Todd T; Taylor, Palmer; Caldwell, William S

    2011-11-01

    AChBPs isolated from Lymnaea stagnalis (Ls), Aplysia californica (Ac) and Bulinus truncatus (Bt) have been extensively used as structural prototypes to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie ligand-interactions with nAChRs [1]. Here, we describe docking studies on interactions of benzylidene anabaseine analogs with AChBPs and α7 nAChR. Results reveal that docking of these compounds using Glide software accurately reproduces experimentally-observed binding modes of DMXBA and of its active metabolite, in the binding pocket of Ac. In addition to the well-known nicotinic pharmacophore (positive charge, hydrogen-bond acceptor, and hydrophobic aromatic groups), a hydrogen-bond donor feature contributes to binding of these compounds to Ac, Bt, and the α7 nAChR. This is consistent with benzylidene anabaseine analogs with OH and NH(2) functional groups showing the highest binding affinity of these congeners, and the position of the ligand shown in previous X-ray crystallographic studies of ligand-Ac complexes. In the predicted ligand-Ls complex, by contrast, the ligand OH group acts as hydrogen-bond acceptor. We have applied our structural findings to optimizing the design of novel spirodiazepine and spiroimidazoline quinuclidine series. Binding and functional studies revealed that these hydrogen-bond donor containing compounds exhibit improved affinity and selectivity for the α7 nAChR subtype and demonstrate partial agonism. The gain in affinity is also due to conformational restriction, tighter hydrophobic enclosures, and stronger cation-π interactions. The use of AChBPs structure as a surrogate to predict binding affinity to α7 nAChR has also been investigated. On the whole, we found that molecular docking into Ls binding site generally scores better than when a α7 homology model, Bt or Ac crystal structure is used. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Tailoring the chirality of magnetic domain walls by interface engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Ma, Tianping; N'Diaye, Alpha T; Kwon, Heeyoung; Won, Changyeon; Wu, Yizheng; Schmid, Andreas K

    2013-01-01

    Contacting ferromagnetic films with normal metals changes how magnetic textures respond to electric currents, enabling surprisingly fast domain wall motions and spin texture-dependent propagation direction. These effects are attributed to domain wall chirality induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at interfaces, which suggests rich possibilities to influence domain wall dynamics if the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be adjusted. Chiral magnetism was seen in several film structures on appropriately chosen substrates where interfacial spin-orbit-coupling effects are strong. Here we use real-space imaging to visualize chiral domain walls in cobalt/nickel multilayers in contact with platinum and iridium. We show that the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be adjusted to stabilize either left-handed or right-handed Néel walls, or non-chiral Bloch walls by adjusting an interfacial spacer layer between the multilayers and the substrate. Our findings introduce domain wall chirality as a new degree of freedom, which may open up new opportunities for spintronics device designs.

  3. 17. INTERIOR OF BEDROOM NUMBER TWO SHOWING OPEN DOOR TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR OF BEDROOM NUMBER TWO SHOWING OPEN DOOR TO BATHROOM NUMBER ONE AT EXTREME PHOTO LEFT, OPEN PANEL DOOR TO THE WALK-IN CLOSET AT PHOTO CENTER LEFT, OPEN PANEL DOOR TO HALL AT PHOTO CENTER RIGHT, AND A 6-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT SASH WINDOW ON THE WEST WALL AT PHOTO RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Clubhouse Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  4. Wall Street's growing influence on plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Krieger, L M; Shaw, W W

    2000-04-01

    The advent of managed care has unleashed market forces on the health care system. One result of these new pressures is a shift from nonprofit to Wall Street-based financing. This report quantifies these trends by comparing health organizations' financial structures in the 1980s and now. The reasons behind this shift and the function of the stock market are examined. A review of Wall Street's key financial measures confirms that health care has shifted to the stock market as its principal means of financing. The stock market works by assigning a current price to a company's stock based on estimates for future earnings. Thus, companies desire predictability in their costs, revenues, and profits. Plastic surgeons can master this system by meeting the challenges imposed by Wall Street financing. Important steps include continuously measuring costs and outcomes of procedures, demanding cost data from hospitals and payers, using these data to improve costs and outcomes, and taking advantage of the system's openness to innovation and easier access to capital. As they seek to protect their role as medical decision makers under the new free-market system, plastic surgeons can benefit from understanding the mechanisms of the stock market.

  5. Open Source, Openness, and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, David

    2006-01-01

    In this article David Wiley provides an overview of how the general expansion of open source software has affected the world of education in particular. In doing so, Wiley not only addresses the development of open source software applications for teachers and administrators, he also discusses how the fundamental philosophy of the open source…

  6. Open Source, Openness, and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, David

    2006-01-01

    In this article David Wiley provides an overview of how the general expansion of open source software has affected the world of education in particular. In doing so, Wiley not only addresses the development of open source software applications for teachers and administrators, he also discusses how the fundamental philosophy of the open source…

  7. Sandia OpenSHMEM

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Brian W.; Smith, Stan; Dinan, James; Seager, Kayla; Grant, Ryan E.

    2016-03-15

    Sandia OpenSHMEM is an implementation of the OpenSHMEM Standard over the Portals 4 Networking API and the OpenFabrics Interface (OFI). Sandia OpenSHMEM is designed to be a low-overhead implementation of the OpenSHMEM standard which takes advantage of the many features of the Portals 4 specification.

  8. Open access, open education resources and open data in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Ivana Di; Mwoka, Meggie; Kwaga, Teddy; Rukundo, Priscilla Aceng; Ernest, Dennis Ssesanga; Osaheni, Louis Aikoriogie; John, Kasibante; Shafik, Kasirye; de Sousa, Agostinho Moreira

    2015-01-01

    As a follow up to OpenCon 2014, International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA) students organized a 3 day workshop Open Access, Open Education Resources and Open Data in Kampala from 15-18 December 2014. One of the aims of the workshop was to engage the Open Access movement in Uganda which encompasses the scientific community, librarians, academia, researchers and students. The IFMSA students held the workshop with the support of: Consortium for Uganda University Libraries (CUUL), The Right to Research Coalition, Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL), Makerere University, International Health Sciences University (IHSU), Pan African Medical Journal (PAMJ) and the Centre for Health Human Rights and Development (CEHURD). All these organizations are based or have offices in Kampala. The event culminated in a meeting with the Science and Technology Committee of Parliament of Uganda in order to receive the support of the Ugandan Members of Parliament and to make a concrete change for Open Access in the country.

  9. Structure of axionic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-01

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  10. Baryogenesis from unstable domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Menahem, Shahar; Cooper, Adrian R.

    1992-12-01

    There exists a class of cosmic strings that turn matter into antimatter (Alice strings). In a GUT where the unbroken gauge group contains charge conjugation (C), such strings form when a phase transition renders C a discrete symmetry. They become boundaries of domain walls at a later, C-breaking transition. These ``Alice walls'' are cosmologically harmless, but can play an important role in baryogenesis. We present a three-generation toy model with scalar baryons, where a quasi-static Alice wall (or a gas of such walls) temporarily gives rise to net baryogenesis of uniform sign everywhere in space. This becomes a permanent baryon excess if the wall shrinks away early enough. We comment on the possible relevance of a similar mechanism to baryogenesis in a realistic SO(10) unification model, where Alice walls would form at the scale of left-right symmetry breaking.

  11. Flow tube wall regenerator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decher, Reiner

    1990-07-01

    The performance of a regenerator processing a fluid in a reciprocating manner is described in terms of the fluid and the wall material characteristics as well as the geometry of the flow tubes through which the fluid is forced. It is shown that the effectiveness cannot exceed 50 percent and that it requires a wall material of low thermal heat capacity with good thermal contact between wall and fluid. Quantitative results are presented for a representative analysis model.

  12. Compound Walls For Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed compound-wall configuration enables construction of large high-vacuum chambers without having to use thick layers of expensive material to obtain necessary strength. Walls enclose chambers more than 1 m in diameter and several kilometers long. Compound wall made of strong outer layer of structural-steel culvert pipe welded to thin layer of high-quality, low-outgassing stainless steel.

  13. Crater Wall With Gullies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    8 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows gullies formed in the terraced wall of an impact crater on the floor of a larger crater near 39.1oS, 200.7oW. Gullies such as these are fairly common in craters and depressions at southern middle latitudes. They also occur in some areas at northern middle latitudes and in both polar regions. They may have formed by liquid water, or not--the Mars science community is still debating and discussing the issue. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  14. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  15. Oven wall panel construction

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1980-04-22

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  16. Crater Wall With Gullies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    8 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows gullies formed in the terraced wall of an impact crater on the floor of a larger crater near 39.1oS, 200.7oW. Gullies such as these are fairly common in craters and depressions at southern middle latitudes. They also occur in some areas at northern middle latitudes and in both polar regions. They may have formed by liquid water, or not--the Mars science community is still debating and discussing the issue. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  17. Arterial wall thermography.

    PubMed

    Diamantopoulos, Leonidas

    2003-06-01

    An atherosclerotic plaque is considered vulnerable when it is at higher risk of inducing acute cardiac events. The early detection and follow-up of the vulnerable plaque are crucial to prevent these events from happening. To date there are no proven techniques to detect such a plaque. Arterial wall thermography, tracing the heat signature of the activated macrophages, is a new and promising method in this direction. However, the difficulties of applying such a method in vivo should not be neglected. Current science proposes several potential thermographic methods. They can be generally categorized as noninvasive and invasive. Magnetic resonance thermometry (MRT) is the most important noninvasive method. It is novel, accurate, and reproducible, but is unfortunately hampered by resolution limitations due to the size and motion of the target vessels. The "infrared" and the "contact-sensor" are the most important invasive thermographic methods. Mainly due to the difficulties of infrared radiation in penetrating the flowing blood, the contact thermographic methods seem to be the most feasible at present. The superiority of thermal mapping of the arterial wall versus the localized temperature measurements is clear. The use of multiple thermal sensors arranged around the vessel's circumference and the application of motorized catheter pullback, not only ensure a large area of coverage, but also enable us to build thermal maps and vascular thermoanatomical reconstructions by using modern computer technology. It is expected that arterial thermography will undoubtedly initiate debate, mainly concerning the most appropriate therapy for the vulnerable plaque. Data collection and correct interpretation are expected to lead us into making wise decisions.

  18. An experimental investigation for external RC shear wall applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltakci, M. Y.; Ozturk, M.; Arslan, M. H.

    2010-09-01

    The strength and rigidity of most reinforced concrete (RC) buildings in Turkey, which are frequently hit by destructive earthquakes, is not at a sufficient level. Therefore, the result of earthquakes is a significant loss of life and property. The strengthening method most commonly preferred for these type of RC buildings is the application of RC infilled walls (shear walls) in the frame openings of the building. However, since the whole building has to be emptied and additional heavy costs arise during this type of strengthening, users prefer not to strengthen their buildings despite the heavy risk they are exposed to. Therefore, it is necessary to develop easier-to-apply and more effective methods for the rapid strengthening of housing and the heavily-used public buildings which cannot be emptied during the strengthening process (such as hospitals and schools). This study empirically analyses the different methods of a new system which can meet this need. In this new system, named "external shear wall application", RC shear walls are applied on the external surface of the building, along the frame plane rather than in the building. To this end, 7 test samples in 1/2 and 1/3 geometrical scale were designed to analyse the efficiency of the strengthening technique where the shear wall leans on the frame from outside of the building (external shear wall application) and of the strengthening technique where a specific space is left between the frame and the external shear wall by using a coupling beam to connect elements (application of external shear wall with coupling beam). Test results showed that the maximum lateral load capacity, initial rigidity and energy dissipation behaviours of the samples strengthened with external shear wall were much better than those of the bare frames.

  19. North wall, central part, showing partial partition wall at left. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North wall, central part, showing partial partition wall at left. This area is labeled “Pioneering Research” on drawing copy NV-35-B-5 (submitted with HABS No. NV-35-B) (series 2 of 4) - Bureau of Mines Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Original Building, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  20. 7. INTERIOR, MAIN GARAGE, SOUTHERN WALL, FROM CLOSE TO WALL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR, MAIN GARAGE, SOUTHERN WALL, FROM CLOSE TO WALL, LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING 'GAMEWELL' FIRE ALARM TAPE CONTROL SYSTEM (TECHNOLOGY CIRCA 1910) AT CENTER, AND ENTRY TO OFFICE AT FAR RIGHT. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Firehouse, East of Fourth Street, between A & B Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  1. 10. VIEW OF LAMINARFLOW FILTER WALL NEAR SOUTH WALL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF LAMINAR-FLOW FILTER WALL NEAR SOUTH WALL OF CLEAN ROOM (102). NOTE GROUNDING CABLES NEAR BASEBOARD IN LOWER RIGHT BACKGROUND. WHITE SQUARE IN FOREGROUND IS A FLOOR DRAIN COVERED WITH TAPE. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. 13. LONG WEST WALL (LEFT) AND SHORT SOUTH WALL (RIGHT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. LONG WEST WALL (LEFT) AND SHORT SOUTH WALL (RIGHT) OF AR-9, ALSO SHOWING MORE RECENT CONTROL ROOM BUILDING AT RIGHT. VIEW IS TO THE NORTHEAST. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base, Rammed Earth Aircraft Dispersal Revetments, Western Shore of Rogers Dry Lake, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, Laura; Wu, Y.; Zhu, L.; Brummer, E. C.; Saha, M.

    2016-05-31

    transcription factors from the rice gene network. Eight of fifteen (53%) of these have not previously been examined for this function. Some of these may represent novel grass-diverged cell wall regulators, while others are likely to have this function across angiosperms. A parallel effort of this project to expand knowledge of enzymes that have evolved to function in grass cell wall synthesis, revealed that a grass-diverged enzyme in rice, OsAT5, ferulates monolignols that are naturally incorporated into grass cell walls. This finding opens potential natural selection avenues for improving biomass composition for downstream processing by weak base pretreatment. Thus, this project has significantly expanded knowledge of cell wall synthesis and regulation in rice, information that can be used in reverse genetics and synthetic biology approaches to re-engineer cell walls for improved production of biofuel and high-value products. To lay the foundation for translating these results directly for switchgrass improvement, the project employed a comparative phylogenetic analysis of the major group of cell wall transcription factors that have been found to function in cell wall regulation, the R2R3 MYBs. This analysis concluded that known cell wall regulators are largely conserved across switchgrass, rice, maize, poplar, and Arabidopsis. This interpretation is also largely consistent with the gene network analysis described above, though both approaches provide evidence that some co-orthologs of Arabidopsis regulators have diminished or increased in importance based on gene expression patterns. Also, several clades containing dicot cell wall regulators have expanded, consistent with the evolution of new cell wall regulators. This latter result is supported by functional analysis of the R2R3 MYB protein SWAM1 in a collaboration between this project and the DOE-funded group of Dr. S. Hazen at the University of

  4. Transonic interference reduction by limited ventilation wall panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, John D.

    1986-01-01

    In two wind tunnels used for the two-dimensional airfoil tests, each wall above and below the model was modified by replacing small segments of the solid boundaries with perforated plates vented into sealed chambers. Perforated segments having approximately 40 percent open area were found to reduce the transonic wall interference to a negligible level, for a model chord-to-tunnel height ratio of 0.5. This report describes the physical arrangement and presents typical model pressure distributions to illustrate the effectiveness of the technique.

  5. Segmentation, statistical analysis, and modelling of the wall system in ceramic foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kampf, Jürgen; Schlachter, Anna-Lena; Redenbach, Claudia; Liebscher, André

    2015-01-15

    Closed walls in otherwise open foam structures may have a great impact on macroscopic properties of the materials. In this paper, we present two algorithms for the segmentation of such closed walls from micro-computed tomography images of the foam structure. The techniques are compared on simulated data and applied to tomographic images of ceramic filters. This allows for a detailed statistical analysis of the normal directions and sizes of the walls. Finally, we explain how the information derived from the segmented wall system can be included in a stochastic microstructure model for the foam.

  6. Vesicles between plasma membrane and cell wall prior to visible senescence of Iris and Dendrobium flowers.

    PubMed

    Kamdee, Channatika; Kirasak, Kanjana; Ketsa, Saichol; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2015-09-01

    Cut Iris flowers (Iris x hollandica, cv. Blue Magic) show visible senescence about two days after full opening. Epidermal cells of the outer tepals collapse due to programmed cell death (PCD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed irregular swelling of the cell walls, starting prior to cell collapse. Compared to cells in flowers that had just opened, wall thickness increased up to tenfold prior to cell death. Fibrils were visible in the swollen walls. After cell death very little of the cell wall remained. Prior to and during visible wall swelling, vesicles (paramural bodies) were observed between the plasma membrane and the cell walls. The vesicles were also found in groups and were accompanied by amorphous substance. They usually showed a single membrane, and had a variety of diameters and electron densities. Cut Dendrobium hybrid cv. Lucky Duan flowers exhibited visible senescence about 14 days after full flower opening. Paramural bodies were also found in Dendrobium tepal epidermis and mesophyll cells, related to wall swelling and degradation. Although alternative explanations are well possible, it is hypothesized that paramural bodies carry enzymes involved in cell wall breakdown. The literature has not yet reported such bodies in association with senescence/PCD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. A computational approach for inferring the cell wall properties that govern guard cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Woolfenden, Hugh C; Bourdais, Gildas; Kopischke, Michaela; Miedes, Eva; Molina, Antonio; Robatzek, Silke; Morris, Richard J

    2017-10-01

    Guard cells dynamically adjust their shape in order to regulate photosynthetic gas exchange, respiration rates and defend against pathogen entry. Cell shape changes are determined by the interplay of cell wall material properties and turgor pressure. To investigate this relationship between turgor pressure, cell wall properties and cell shape, we focused on kidney-shaped stomata and developed a biomechanical model of a guard cell pair. Treating the cell wall as a composite of the pectin-rich cell wall matrix embedded with cellulose microfibrils, we show that strong, circumferentially oriented fibres are critical for opening. We find that the opening dynamics are dictated by the mechanical stress response of the cell wall matrix, and as the turgor rises, the pectinaceous matrix stiffens. We validate these predictions with stomatal opening experiments in selected Arabidopsis cell wall mutants. Thus, using a computational framework that combines a 3D biomechanical model with parameter optimization, we demonstrate how to exploit subtle shape changes to infer cell wall material properties. Our findings reveal that proper stomatal dynamics are built on two key properties of the cell wall, namely anisotropy in the form of hoop reinforcement and strain stiffening. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  9. The "Brick Wall" Graphic Organizer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteson, Shirley M.

    2016-01-01

    A brick wall provides a fitting description of what happens when teachers try to teach a concept for which students are unprepared. When students are unsuccessful academically, their foundational knowledge may be missing, incomplete, or incorrect. As a result, students "hit a brick wall," and their academic progress stops because they do…

  10. Bacterial cell-wall recycling

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jarrod W.; Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria recycle a significant proportion of the peptidoglycan components of their cell walls during their growth and septation. In many—and quite possibly all—bacteria, the peptidoglycan fragments are recovered and recycled. While cell-wall recycling is beneficial for the recovery of resources, it also serves as a mechanism to detect cell-wall–targeting antibiotics and to regulate resistance mechanisms. In several Gram-negative pathogens, anhydro-MurNAc-peptide cell-wall fragments regulate AmpC β-lactamase induction. In some Gram-positive organisms, short peptides derived from the cell wall regulate the induction of both β-lactamase and β-lactam-resistant penicillin-binding proteins. The involvement of peptidoglycan recycling with resistance regulation suggests that inhibitors of the enzymes involved in the recycling might synergize with cell-wall-targeted antibiotics. Indeed, such inhibitors improve the potency of β-lactams in vitro against inducible AmpC β-lactamase-producing bacteria. We describe the key steps of cell-wall remodeling and recycling, the regulation of resistance mechanisms by cell-wall recycling, and recent advances toward the discovery of cell-wall recycling inhibitors. PMID:23163477

  11. The Wonders of Word Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Amy; Krogness, Allison

    2001-01-01

    Describes using a word wall, a visible display categorizing words alphabetically, enabling children in early childhood classrooms to discover new words and to practice and expand their language skills. Suggests that a word wall helps to create a secure learning environment, builds student confidence, and contributes to independent reading and…

  12. The Wonders of Word Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Amy; Krogness, Allison

    2001-01-01

    Describes using a word wall, a visible display categorizing words alphabetically, enabling children in early childhood classrooms to discover new words and to practice and expand their language skills. Suggests that a word wall helps to create a secure learning environment, builds student confidence, and contributes to independent reading and…

  13. The "Brick Wall" Graphic Organizer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteson, Shirley M.

    2016-01-01

    A brick wall provides a fitting description of what happens when teachers try to teach a concept for which students are unprepared. When students are unsuccessful academically, their foundational knowledge may be missing, incomplete, or incorrect. As a result, students "hit a brick wall," and their academic progress stops because they do…

  14. Great Wall of China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER sub-image covers a 12 x 12 km area in northern Shanxi Province, China, and was acquired January 9, 2001. The low sun angle, and light snow cover highlight a section of the Great Wall, visible as a black line running diagonally through the image from lower left to upper right. The Great Wall is over 2000 years old and was built over a period of 1000 years. Stretching 4500 miles from Korea to the Gobi Desert it was first built to protect China from marauders from the north.

    This image is located at 40.2 degrees north latitude and 112.8 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and

  15. Great Wall of China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER sub-image covers a 12 x 12 km area in northern Shanxi Province, China, and was acquired January 9, 2001. The low sun angle, and light snow cover highlight a section of the Great Wall, visible as a black line running diagonally through the image from lower left to upper right. The Great Wall is over 2000 years old and was built over a period of 1000 years. Stretching 4500 miles from Korea to the Gobi Desert it was first built to protect China from marauders from the north.

    This image is located at 40.2 degrees north latitude and 112.8 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and

  16. Mapping hidden wall structures by quantitative IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosina, Elisabetta; Grinzato, Ermanno G.; Robison, Elwin C.

    2002-03-01

    Knowledge of an historic monument can be substantially improved by locating hidden structures, openings and the wall bonding beneath the plaster. When restoring buildings, the physical connection between the walls must be known in order to predict the risk areas for structural weakness. IR Thermography produces remarkable results, especially by means of the quantitative approach. The temperature pattern detected by thermography and analyzed in space and time maps the hidden structure of the wall. Thick walls exposed to the weather represent a challenge in detecting hidden structures by means of thermography. Frequently output is very poor because testing conditions are not optimized. Hence, appropriate testing requires careful analysis of the wall system before and after taking the thermograms. Otherwise, false alarms render the images useless. This paper describes a general procedure applied to see the hidden wall structure. It works in three steps: a) a mathematical simulation of the real test by a dedicated software, implementing the 3D thermal problem; b) a transient thermographic test, delivering a suitable heating flux on the surface for the proper time; c) processing test data, including a thermogram sequence and air temperature analysis. Here, are reported tests achieved on a XV-XVIIth century Palace at Cremona (Italy; in the Westcott House in Springfield (OH).

  17. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. VIEW OF MACHINE SHOP STORAGE OPENINGS, NORTH END OF BARN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MACHINE SHOP STORAGE OPENINGS, NORTH END OF BARN, LOOKING SOUTH (This northern-most facade of the barn was originally a board and batten wall with two sliding doors. In the early decades of the twentieth century Frederick Edward Arnold moved the wall and doors; they now make up the north end of bay 3. This was done to ease machine storage) - Arnold Farm, Barn, 1948 Arnold Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  20. 42. Open house at the site, Saturday, October 3, 1992. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Open house at the site, Saturday, October 3, 1992. View north/northwest. Photograph shows the lock support floor joists on sleepers and the mortised crib walls. The 1 inch board at the base of the crib wall is the pre-super construction 'footprint' for alignment. - Wabash & Erie Canal, Lock No. 2, 8 miles east of Fort Wayne, adjacent to U.S. Route 24, New Haven, Allen County, IN

  1. Rough-Wall Channel Analysis Using Suboptimal Control Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, O.; Jimenez, J.; Tenpleton, J.

    2003-01-01

    The original aim of this work was to shed some light on the physics of turbulence over rough walls using large-eddy simulations and the suboptimal-control wall boundary conditions introduced by Nicoud et al. It was hoped that, if that algorithm was used to fit the mean velocity profile of the simulations to that of a rough-walled channel, instead of to a smooth one, the wall stresses introduced by the control algorithm would give some indication of what aspects of rough walls are most responsible for the modification of the flow in real turbulence. It was similarly expected that the structure of the resulting velocity fluctuations would share some of the characteristics of rough-walled flows, thus again suggesting what is intrinsic and what is accidental in the effect of geometric wall roughness. A secondary goal was to study the effect of 'unphysical' boundary conditions on the outside flow by observing how a relatively major change of the target velocity profile, and therefore presumably of the applied wall stresses, modifies properties such as the dominant length scales of the velocity fluctuations away from the wall. As will be seen below, this secondary goal grew more important during the course of the study, which was carried out during a short summer visit of the first two authors to the CTR. It became clear that there are open questions about the way in which the control algorithm models the boundary conditions, even for smooth walls, and that these questions make the physical interpretation of the results difficult. Considerable more work in that area seems to be needed before even relatively advanced large-eddy simulations, such as these, can be used to draw conclusions about the physics of wall-bounded turbulent flows. The numerical method is the same as in Nicoud et al. The modifications introduced in the original code are briefly described in section 2, but the original paper should be consulted for a full description of the algorithm. The results are

  2. Open for Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voyles, Bennett

    2007-01-01

    People know about the Sakai Project (open source course management system); they may even know about Kuali (open source financials). So, what is the next wave in open source software? This article discusses business intelligence (BI) systems. Though open source BI may still be only a rumor in most campus IT departments, some brave early adopters…

  3. Open space and imagination

    Treesearch

    G. Scott Place; Bruce Hronek

    2001-01-01

    Open space is a necessary tool in our park system for fostering creativity and allowing for relaxation. In addition, open space areas allow people to exercise, find self-worth, and to use their imagination. This manuscript addresses the issue of what is happening in open space provided in several park settings. Do residents use open space as a place where they can play...

  4. Open for Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voyles, Bennett

    2007-01-01

    People know about the Sakai Project (open source course management system); they may even know about Kuali (open source financials). So, what is the next wave in open source software? This article discusses business intelligence (BI) systems. Though open source BI may still be only a rumor in most campus IT departments, some brave early adopters…

  5. The Mobile bypass Signal Arrests Shoot Growth by Disrupting Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance, Cytokinin Signaling, and WUS Transcription Factor Expression1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, David L.; Adhikari, Emma; Fraser, Nisa

    2016-01-01

    The bypass1 (bps1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) produces a root-sourced compound (the bps signal) that moves to the shoot and is sufficient to arrest growth of a wild-type shoot; however, the mechanism of growth arrest is not understood. Here, we show that the earliest shoot defect arises during germination and is a failure of bps1 mutants to maintain their shoot apical meristem (SAM). This finding suggested that the bps signal might affect expression or function of SAM regulatory genes, and we found WUSCHEL (WUS) expression to be repressed in bps1 mutants. Repression appears to arise from the mobile bps signal, as the bps1 root was sufficient to rapidly down-regulate WUS expression in wild-type shoots. Normally, WUS is regulated by a balance between positive regulation by cytokinin (CK) and negative regulation by CLAVATA (CLV). In bps1, repression of WUS was independent of CLV, and, instead, the bps signal down-regulates CK responses. Cytokinin treatment of bps1 mutants restored both WUS expression and activity, but only in the rib meristem. How the bps signal down-regulates CK remains unknown, though the bps signal was sufficient to repress expression of one CK receptor (AHK4) and one response regulator (AHP6). Together, these data suggest that the bps signal pathway has the potential for long-distance regulation through modification of CK signaling and altering gene expression. PMID:27208247

  6. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  7. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  8. Denitrification Walls: Successes and Limitations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, L. A.; Barkle, G. F.; Burgess, C. P.; Vojvodic-Vukovic, M.

    2001-05-01

    There is a need to develop practical and inexpensive approaches for removing nitrate from ground water because of its potential adverse effect on receiving aquatic environments. Denitrification walls may be one such approach for removing nitrate from shallow groundwater. In January 1996, we constructed a denitrification wall by digging a trench that intercepted groundwater and mixed the excavated soil with sawdust before the mix was returned to the trench. Sawdust provides a source of energy for denitrifying bacteria, which convert nitrate in groundwater entering the wall to nitrogen gas. For the past 5 years, nitrate concentrations in groundwater entering this wall have ranged from 5 to 16 mg N L-1 but have always been reduced to less than 2 mg N L-1 in the wall indicating nearly complete removal of nitrate from the groundwater. We showed that this nitrate removal could be accounted for by denitrification rates which ranged from 0.6 to 18.1 mg N m-3 h-1. More recently we have encountered problems with denitrification walls constructed into coarsely textured soils (such as sands) where the addition of sawdust decreased hydraulic conductivity. As a consequence groundwater flowed under rather than through the wall. We are attempting to circumvent this problem using coarser grades of carbon amendments. Particulate carbon (such as sawdust) is likely to support lower rates of nitrate removal, but for longer, than soluble carbon sources because solid carbon sources degrade more slowly.

  9. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures.

    PubMed

    Boffano, Paolo; Roccia, Fabio; Gallesio, Cesare; Karagozoglu, K Hakki; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and such fractures. This study is based on 2 databases that have continuously recorded data of patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures between 2001 and 2010. On the whole, 447 patients (334 males, 113 females) with pure blow-out orbital wall fractures were included. The most frequently involved orbital site was the floor (359 fractures), followed by medial wall (41 fractures) and lateral wall (5 fractures). At presentation, 227 patients (50.7%) had evidence of diplopia. In particular, in most patients, a diplopia in all directions was referred (78 patients). Statistically significant associations were found between diplopia on eye elevation and orbital floor fractures (P < 0.05) and between horizontal diplopia and medial wall fractures (P < 0.000005). In patients under evaluation for orbital trauma, the observation of diplopia on eye elevation and horizontal diplopia at presentation could be useful clinical indicators orbital floor and medial wall fractures, respectively.

  10. [An example of multi-stage reconstruction of a full-thickness abdominal wall defect].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarzyk, Janusz; Elsaftawy, Ahmed; Jabłecki, Jerzy; Kaczmarzyk, Leszek

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal wall reconstruction is a highly complex procedure that may requires a multiple stages surgical operations. The aim of a such reconstruction is to close the abdominal wall defect and to create a support for the internal organs. It's a challenge for both general and reconstructive surgery. An incomplete thickness defects of the abdominal wall are so much easier to challenge than complete ones. Also the size of the primary defect determines the way and stages of the operation. Such defects can occur in necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall, after abdominal walls tumors removal, in traffic accidents or after "open abdomen" procedures (acute severe pancreatitis). In this paper the authors present a case of 62-yo patient which was operated because of large intestine perforation with various complications of which the most serious was the abdominal wall defect.

  11. Reduction of wind tunnel wall interference by controlled wall flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, S. (Editor); Joppa, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    An alternate method of testing was developed in which flow through the porous walls of the tunnel was actively controlled so as to approximate free air conditions in the neighborhood of the model during the test. The amount and distribution of the controlled flow through the walls is computed using a potential flow representation of the model based on the measured lift. Theoretical analysis is presented to prove the convergence of the method to free air conditions and to substantiate the general three-dimensional theory of operation when the normal flow distribution is continuous. A two-dimensional tunnel was constructed to evaluate the concept. Results show that substantial reduction of wall interference may be achieved with relatively low values of porosity of actively controlled walls.

  12. Open access, open education resources and open data in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, Ivana Di; Mwoka, Meggie; Kwaga, Teddy; Rukundo, Priscilla Aceng; Ernest, Dennis Ssesanga; Osaheni, Louis Aikoriogie; John, Kasibante; Shafik, Kasirye; de Sousa, Agostinho Moreira

    2015-01-01

    As a follow up to OpenCon 2014, International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations (IFMSA) students organized a 3 day workshop Open Access, Open Education Resources and Open Data in Kampala from 15-18 December 2014. One of the aims of the workshop was to engage the Open Access movement in Uganda which encompasses the scientific community, librarians, academia, researchers and students. The IFMSA students held the workshop with the support of: Consortium for Uganda University Libraries (CUUL), The Right to Research Coalition, Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL), Makerere University, International Health Sciences University (IHSU), Pan African Medical Journal (PAMJ) and the Centre for Health Human Rights and Development (CEHURD). All these organizations are based or have offices in Kampala. The event culminated in a meeting with the Science and Technology Committee of Parliament of Uganda in order to receive the support of the Ugandan Members of Parliament and to make a concrete change for Open Access in the country. PMID:26327966

  13. On the mechanics of thin-walled laminated composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Ever J.; Lopez-Anido, Roberto; Davalos, Julio F.

    1993-01-01

    A formal engineering approach of the mechanics of thin-walled laminated beams based on kinematic assumptions consistent with Timoshenko beam theory is presented. Thin-walled composite beams with open or closed cross section subjected to bending and axial load are considered. A variational formulation is employed to obtain a comprehensive description of the structural response. Beam stiffness coefficients, which account for the cross section geometry and for the material anisotropy, are obtained. An explicit expression for the static shear correction factor of thin-walled composite beams is derived from energy equivalence. A numerical example involving a laminated I-beam is used to used to demonstrate the capability of the model for predicting displacements and ply stresses.

  14. 27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL FRAMING ELEVATIONS." Specifications No. ENG-04353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 27 of 148; file no. 1320/78. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, Rev. B; date: 15 April 1957. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. OTVE combustor wall condition monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szemenyei, Brian; Nelson, Robert S.; Barkhoudarian, S.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonics, eddy current, and electromagnetic acoustic transduction (EMAT) technologies were evaluated to determine their capability of measuring wall thickness/wear of individual cooling channels in test specimens simulating conditions in the throat region of an OTVE combustion chamber liner. Quantitative results are presented for the eddy current technology, which was shown to measure up to the optimum 20-mil wall thickness with near single channel resolution. Additional results demonstrate the capability of the conventional ultrasonics and EMAT technologies to detect a thinning or cracked wall. Recommendations for additional eddy current and EMAT development tests are presented.

  16. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias.

  17. Development of a Chest Wall Protector Effective in Preventing Sudden Cardiac Death by Chest Wall Impact (Commotio Cordis)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kartik; Mandleywala, Swati N.; Gannon, Michael P.; Estes, Nathan Anthony Mark; Weinstock, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Commotio cordis, sudden death with chest impact, occurs clinically despite chest wall protectors worn in sports. In an experimental model of commotio cordis, commercially available chest wall protectors failed to prevent ventricular fibrillation (VF). The goal of the current investigation was to develop a chest wall protector effective in the prevention of commotio cordis. Design: In the Tufts experimental model of commotio cordis the ability of chest protectors to prevent VF was assessed. Impacts were delivered with a 40-mph lacrosse ball, timed to the vulnerable period for VF. Intervention: A chest wall protector or no chest wall protector (control) was randomly assigned to be placed over the chest. Four iterative series of 2 to 4 different chest wall material combinations were assessed. Materials included 3 different foams (Accelleron [Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA], closed cell high density foam; Airilon [Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA], closed cell low density soft foam; and an open cell memory foam) that were adhered to a layer of TriDur (Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA), a flexible elastomeric coated aramid that was bonded to a semirigid polypropylene polymer (ImpacShield, Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA). Main Outcome Measure: Induction of VF by chest wall impact was the primary outcome. Results: Of 80 impacts without chest protectors, 43 (54%) resulted in VF. Ventricular fibrillation with chest protectors ranged from a high of 60% to a low of 5%. Of 12 chest protectors assessed, only 3 significantly lowered the risk of VF compared with impacts without chest protectors. These 3 chest protectors were combinations of Accelleron, Airilon, TriDur, and ImpacShield of different thicknesses. Protection increased linearly with the thicker combinations. Conclusions: Effective protection against VF with chest wall protection can be achieved in an experimental model of commotio cordis. Clinical Relevance: Chest protector designs

  18. Penetration of the LCLS Injector Shield Wall at Sector 20

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D

    2010-12-10

    Penetrations through the LCLS injector shield wall are needed for the alignment of the accelerator, a diagnostic laser beam and utilities, and are shown in figure 1. The 1-inch diameter LCLS injector beam tube is blocked by the PPS stopper when the injector side of the wall is occupied. The two 3-inch diameter penetrations above and to the left of the beam tube are used by Precision Alignment and will be open only during installation of the injector beamline. Additional 3-inch diameter penetrations are for laser beams which will be used for electron beam diagnostics. These will not be plugged when the injector occupied. Other penetrations for the RF waveguide and other utilities are approximately 13-inch from the floor and as such are far from the line-of-sight of any radiation sources. The waveguide and utility penetrations pass only through the thicker wall as shown in the figure. The principal issue is with the two laser penetrations, since these will be open when the linac is operating and people are in the LCLS injector area. A principal concern is radiation streaming through the penetrations due to direct line-of sight of the PEP-2 lines. To answer this, fans of rays were traced through the 3-inch diameter laser penetrations as shown in Figures 2 and 3. Figure 2 gives the top view of the shield walls, the main linac and PEP-2 lines, and the ray-fans. The fans appear to originate between the walls since their angular envelope is defined by the greatest angle possible when rays are just on the 3-inch diameter at the inner most and outermost wall surfaces. The crossovers of all possible rays lie half way between these two surfaces. As the end-on view of Figure 3 clearly shows, there is no direct line-of-sight through the laser penetrations of the PEP-2 or linac beamlines.

  19. Theory of thin-walled rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldenveizer, A L

    1951-01-01

    Starting with the Love equations for bending of extensible shells, "principal stress states" are sought for a thin-walled rod of arbitrary but open cross section. Principal stress states exclude those local states arising from end conditions which damp out with distance from the ends. It is found that for rods of intermediate length, long enough to avoid local bending at a support, and short enough that elementary torsion and bending are not the most significant stress states, four principal states exist. Three of these states are associated with the planar distribution of axial stress and are equivalent to the engineering theory of extension and bending of solid sections. The fourth state resembles that which has been called in the literature "bending stress due to torsional", except that cross sections are permitted to bend and the shear along the center line of the cross section is permitted to differ from zero.

  20. An Exploration of Wall Retrofit Best Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Therese K; Petrie, Thomas; Kosny, Jan; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen; Hulvey, Kimberly D

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed to examine wall retrofit options including replacing the cladding, adding insulation under the cladding, and multiple sealing methods that can be used when installing replacement windows in well-built or loosely-built rough openings. These experiments included thermal measurements in a hot box and air-leakage measurements. The retrofit claddings considered included wood-lap siding, vinyl siding, and vinyl siding with an integrated and formed foam insulation. Retrofit insulations included expanded and extruded polystyrene and foil-faced polyisocyanurate in various thicknesses. Air sealing methods for replacement windows included traditional caulking, exterior trim variations, loose-fill fiberglass, low-expansion foam, self-expanding foam inserts, and specialty tape. Results were applied to a model to estimate whole-house energy impacts for multiple climates.