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Sample records for open chest dogs

  1. Demonstration of free radical generation in the "stunned" myocardium in the conscious dog and identification of major differences between conscious and open-chest dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X Y; McCay, P B; Zughaib, M; Jeroudi, M O; Triana, J F; Bolli, R

    1993-01-01

    Conscious dogs undergoing a 15-min coronary occlusion were given alpha-phenyl N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) and the local coronary venous plasma was analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. A prolonged myocardial release of PBN radical adducts was observed, which exhibited a burst in the initial minutes of reflow (peaking at 3 min) and then abated but continued for 1-3 h after reperfusion. Computer simulation revealed the presence of at least two PBN adducts (aN = 15.2 G and a beta H = 6.0 G; aN = 14.6 G and a beta H = 3.0 G), both consistent with the trapping of secondary carbon-centered radicals. No appreciable PBN adduct production was observed when collateral flow exceeded 30-40% of nonischemic flow, indicating that a flow reduction of at least 60% is necessary to trigger free radical reactions. There was a direct relationship between the magnitude of PBN adduct production and the severity of contractile dysfunction (r = 0.77), suggesting that the radicals generated upon reperfusion play a causal role in the subsequent stunning. The total release of PBN adducts after 3 h of reperfusion following a 15-min coronary occlusion was found to be approximately five times greater in open-chest compared with conscious dogs; at the same time, the recovery of wall thickening was markedly less in open-chest dogs. This study represents the first application of spin trapping to a conscious animal model of myocardial ischemia. The results demonstrate (a) that free radicals are generated in the stunned myocardium in the absence of the artificial or abnormal conditions associated with previously used models (isolated hearts, open-chest preparations), and (b) that both the severity of postischemic dysfunction and the magnitude of the attendant free radical production are greatly exaggerated in the open-chest dog, implying that previous conclusions derived from this model may not be applicable to conscious animals or to humans. This investigation also provides a

  2. Kinetics of rubidium-82 after coronary occlusion and reperfusion. Assessment of patency and viability in open-chested dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, R A

    1985-01-01

    Currently available noninvasive techniques are unable to rapidly assess artery patency and tissue viability during acute myocardial infarction. In prior studies, rubidium-82 (Rb-82), a short-lived positron emitter obtained from a generator, was validated as an indicator of flow with a model that included the rate constants for transfer into and out of the cell. Accordingly, in the current study, 20 open-chested dogs with experimental infarction were studied serially at base line, after coronary occlusion, and at reperfusion. Time-activity curves acquired with beta probes on the epicardial surface were used to measure flow and net transfer of rubidium. Flow decreased to 0.41 +/- 0.08 ml/min per gram during occlusion and increased to 2.73 +/- 0.56 ml/min per gram in potentially viable ischemic tissue, whereas flows were 0.32 +/- 0.08 during occlusion (P less than 0.05 vs. viable) and 1.58 ml/min per gram (P less than 0.002 vs. viable) in irreversibly injured tissue. The transfer rate constant for Rb-82, kT, at base line was +1.22 +/- 0.60 X 10(-3) s-1 and did not change significantly during occlusion in viable vs. nonviable samples (+1.41 +/- 1.27 vs. +0.93 +/- 1.51 X 10(-3) s-1, respectively), except that 4 out of 11 nonviable tissue samples had negative kTs. At reperfusion, viable myocardial samples were all positive (+1.26 +/- 1.58 X 10(-3) s-1), whereas all irreversibly injured tissues had a negative kT, indicating leakage of tracer (-1.50 +/- 1.10 X 10(-3) s-1, P less than 0.001). This study suggests that Rb-82 time-activity curves can be useful to determine patency of an infarct related artery and potential viability after reperfusion during myocardial infarction. Images PMID:3988934

  3. Closed-chest myocardial ischaemia in dog.

    PubMed

    Birkui, P J; Georgiopoulos, G; Riche, M C; Perrault, M; Puisieux, F; Merland, J J; Saumont, R

    1981-01-01

    Myocardial ischaemia in dog was induced with releasable material in the distal segment of the anterior descending branch of the left coronary artery. Three releasable materials were tested: gel foam, wax microspheres (120-200 micron) and latex balloons, using different methods of introduction. The left carotid route was selected for introduction of a preformed catheter. The gel foam and wax microspheres caused transitory ischaemia, which was proximal for the foam and distal for the microspheres. The balloons made it possible to standardize the ischaemia as its localization and duration could be selected. This material therefore provided a model for stable chronic ischaemia. Nine dogs were observed by means of precordial mapping (36 electrodes) during the phase following ischaemia or for a period of 4 weeks. The results of these experiments are analysed and correlated with histological results for the post-mortem phase.

  4. Chest wall reconstruction with two types of biodegradable polymer prostheses in dogs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiong; Tang, Hua; Xu, Zhifei; Zhao, Xuewei; Sun, Yaochang; Gong, Zhiyun; Duan, Liang

    2008-10-01

    Currently, the choice of chest wall prosthesis remains a challenging problem for thoracic and reconstructive surgeons. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of newly developed biodegradable prostheses. Two types of chest wall prostheses made from degradable polymer, collagen coated polydioxanone (CCP) mesh and chitin fiber reinforced polycaprolactone (CFRP) strut, were developed and studied. Adult mongrel dogs were subjected to extensive resection and reconstruction of anterior-lateral chest wall, CCP mesh was used in six dogs, the combination of CCP mesh and CFRP strut was used in four dogs, and polypropylene (PP) mesh in two dogs, as contrast. With good integration with tissue, CCP meshes maintained strength in the chest wall for more than 8 weeks and were completely resorbed within 24 weeks, and satisfactory short-term and long-term chest wall stabilization was achieved. The combined use of CCP mesh with CFRP strut provided a firmer chest wall in the early postoperative course. A mild wound infection developed in one animal with CCP mesh but resolved without sequelae, and no added complications were observed with the additional use of CFRP strut. Our experimental study shows that the CCP mesh and CFRP prosthesis were favorable for chest wall repair. The advantages of biodegradable copolymer give them promise as an excellent addition to the available reconstructive techniques currently in use.

  5. A comparison of prolonged manual and mechanical external chest compression after cardiac arrest in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wik, L; Bircher, N G; Safar, P

    1996-10-01

    The effects of manual and a new mechanical chest compression device (Heartsaver 2000) during prolonged CPR with respect to haemodynamics and outcome were tested in a prospective, randomized, controlled experimental trial during ventricular fibrillation in 12 dogs of 9-13 kg body weight after 1 min of cardiac arrest. During the first 10 min of CPR the dogs were resuscitated according to the Basic Life Support (BLS) algorithm, followed by 20 min of Advanced Life Support (ALS) algorithm. After 30 min of CPR both manual and mechanical CPR groups were resuscitated following a standardized ALS protocol. During CPR, coronary perfusion pressure and end tidal CO2 were greater with mechanical CPR. All animals were successfully resuscitated and neurological deficit scores were not different. The CPR trauma score was less in the mechanical group. Mechanical external chest compression provided better haemodynamics than the manual technique, though outcome did not differ. Both optimally performed manual and mechanical techniques produce flow sufficient to maintain organ viability for 30 min of CPR after a 1 min arrest interval.

  6. Music: an intervention for pain during chest tube removal after open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Broscious, S K

    1999-11-01

    Pain associated with chest tube removal is a major problem for patients who undergo open heart surgery. Because this pain is short-lived, timing the administration of pharmacological agents for pain relief is difficult and is therefore done inconsistently. To examine the effect of music as an intervention for pain relief during chest tube removal after open heart surgery. In an experimental design, 156 subjects (mean age, 66 years; 69% men) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: control, white noise, or music. All subjects preselected the type of music they preferred hearing. Ten minutes before the chest tube was removed, the patient's heart rate and blood pressure were measured, the patient rated pain intensity by using a numeric rating scale, and the prerecorded audiotape of music was begun. The patients rated their pain again immediately after chest tube removal and 15 minutes later. Physiological variables were assessed every 5 minutes until 15 minutes after the chest tubes were removed. Self-reported pain intensity, physiological responses, and narcotic intake after chest tube removal did not differ significantly among the 3 groups. Although the findings were not statistically significant, most subjects enjoyed listening to the music, and therefore the use of music as an adjuvant to other therapies may be an appropriate nursing intervention.

  7. [Natural history of experimental pulmonary atelectasis in dogs with closed chest].

    PubMed

    Maxwell, R; López, R; Furuya, M E; Ramírez, J C; Beltrán, U; Sandoval, J; Lupi Herrera, E

    1988-01-01

    In order to establish an animal model of pulmonary vasoconstriction we followed the time course of intrapulmonary shunt (Qs/Qt) in a canine model of lobar atelectasis with closed chest. Ten mongrel dogs were studied. Bronchial occlusion of the right lower lobe (RLL) was performed by inflating the balloon of a Foley catheter placed through a rigid bronchoscopy. Analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. (15 minutes) After occlusion Qs/Qt reached its maximum increasing from 8.2 +/- 3.6 to 29.7 +/- 11.7% (p less than 0.05) and PaO2 decreased from 357 +/- 49 to 100 +/- 43 mm Hg (p less than 0.05). Afterwards, there was a progressive decline of Qs/QT accompanied by an also progressive increase in PaO2. At the end of the experiment (3 hrs post atelectasis) Qs/Qt was 11.2 +/- 4.9 and PaO2 251 +/- 124 mm Hg (p less than 0.05). Pulmonary vascular resistance increased post atelectasis from 439 +/- 168 to 598 +/- 256 d.s.cm-5 (p less than 0.05). Complete atelectasis of the RLL was confirmed postmortem. As the changes in Qs/Qt and PaO2 did not parallel the change in cardiac output we conclude that the mechanism of decrease in Qs/Qt was hypoxic vasoconstriction.

  8. Open chest cardiac massage offers no benefit over closed chest compressions in patients with traumatic cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Matthew J; Bonds, Brandon W; Chang, Luke; Yang, Shiming; Hu, Peter; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Brenner, Megan L; Scalea, Thomas M; Stein, Deborah M

    2016-11-01

    Open chest cardiac massage (OCCM) is a commonly performed procedure after traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA). OCCM has been reported to be superior to closed chest compressions (CCC) in animal models and in non-TCA. The purpose of this study is to prospectively compare OCCM versus CCC in TCA using end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), the criterion standard for determining the effectiveness of chest compressions and detection of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), as the surrogate for cardiac output and marker for adequacy of resuscitation. This prospective observational study enrolled patients over a 9-month period directly presenting to a level 1 trauma center after TCA. Continuous high-resolution ETCO2 measurements were collected every 6 seconds for periods of CCC and OCCM, respectively. Patients receiving CCC only were compared with patients receiving CCC followed by OCCM. Student's t tests were used to compare ETCO2 within and between groups. Thirty-three patients were enrolled (16 OCCM, 17 CCC-only). Mean time of CCC before OCCM was 66 seconds. Within the OCCM group, final, peak, mean, and median ETCO2 levels significantly increased when comparing the initial CCC period to the OCCM interval. Using a time-matched comparison, significant increases were observed in the final and peak but not mean and median values when comparing the first minute of CCC to the remaining time in the CCC-only group. However, when periods of OCCM were compared with equivalent periods of CCC-only, there were no differences in the initial, final, peak, mean, or median ETCO2 values. Correspondingly, no difference in rates of ROSC was observed between groups (OCCM 23.5% vs. CCC 38.9%; p = 0.53). Although we could not control for confounders, we found no significant improvement in ETCO2 or ROSC with OCCM. With newer endovascular techniques for aortic occlusion, thoracotomy solely for performing OCCM provides no benefit over CCC. Therapeutic study, level III.

  9. Meet TOM - the world's first open chest paediatric/adult manikin.

    PubMed

    Dix, Ann

    2016-07-20

    Aged 15, TOM is a model patient. He has suffered more than his fair share of life-threatening events and never complains. But then TOM is not your average sick teenager - he is the world's first open chest paediatric/adult manikin.

  10. One-lung versus two-lung ventilation in the closed-chest anesthetized dog: a comparison of cardiopulmonary parameters.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, S L; Duke, T; Walsh, P J; Remedios, A M; Walker, D; Ferguson, J G

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate cardiopulmonary effects of one-lung ventilation (OLV) versus two-lung ventilation (TLV) in closed-chest anesthetized dogs. Controlled, randomized experiment. Fourteen, 2- to 7-year-old adult dogs, weighing 23 +/- 6 kg. The dogs were anesthetized with acepromazine, morphine, thiopental, and halothane in oxygen, ventilated, and paralyzed with vecuronium. Tidal volume was 10 mL/kg. Respiratory rate was set to maintain end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) at 40 +/- 2 mm Hg before instrumentation then not changed. The left bronchus of 7 dogs was obstructed with a Univent bronchial blocker (Fuji Systems Corp, Tokyo, Japan). Blood gas analysis and hemodynamic measurements were taken at predetermined intervals for 1 hour in the TLV group and at baseline and following bronchial obstruction in the OLV group. Shunt fraction was not significantly different between groups, but in OLV shunt increased from baseline at 5 minutes. Arterial oxygen (PaO2) decreased after baseline in OLV compared with TLV. Arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) increased with OLV and decreased with TLV. In OLV, systemic vascular resistance was variable and decreased compared with TLV. Cardiac index increased over time in both groups but was not affected by treatment. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and diastolic arterial pressure increased with OLV compared with TLV but did not change over time. This study shows that OLV statistically decreases oxygen tension and transiently increases shunt fraction, but with 100% O2 it appears to be a feasible procedure with minimal cardiopulmonary side effects in healthy dogs. OLV is a feasible procedure in anesthetized dogs to better facilitate thoracic procedures such as bronchopleural fistula repair and thoracoscopy.

  11. Gun Shot Wound to the Chest of a Military Working Dog

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    the Emergency Department at Balad, Iraq on a NATO litter, intubated, anesthetized and stabilized with IV fluids. History of military working...exaggerated effect in dogs. Ibuprofen is okay as an antipyretic, though only about a third of the human dose is required for a dog of comparable weight...rad.usuhs.mil/amsus.html References 1 English TL: The Quiet Americans: A History of

  12. Proportion of and risk factors for open fractures of the appendicular skeleton in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Millard, Ralph P; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the proportion of and risk factors for open fractures of the appendicular skeleton in dogs and cats that were a result of acute trauma. Cross-sectional and case-control study. 84,629 dogs and 26,675 cats. Dogs and cats examined at Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital from January 1993 through February 2013 were identified; the proportion of open fractures was estimated from the medical records. Additionally, all incident cases of open (77 dogs and 33 cats) and closed (469 dogs and 80 cats) fractures between January 1993 and February 2013 and a random sample of nonfracture patients (722 dogs and 330 cats) in 2010 were used to assess risk factors for open appendicular fractures. Proportion of open fractures for the 20-year period was 0.09% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07% to 0.11%) in dogs and 0.12% (95% CI, 0.09% to 0.17%) in cats. Seventy-seven of 546 (14.1%) and 33 of 113 (29.2%) traumatic fractures were classified as open in dogs and cats, respectively. Comminuted fractures were more likely than other configurations to be open in dogs (OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.9 to 12.2) and cats (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.0 to 12.0). Vehicle-related trauma was a significant risk factor for open fractures in dogs (OR, 13.8; 95% CI, 3.1 to 61.8). The proportion of incident open fractures in dogs and cats was low. Age, body weight, affected bone or bone segment, fracture configuration, and method of trauma were associated with an open fracture.

  13. Thoracoscopic versus open partial pericardectomy in dogs: comparison of postoperative pain and morbidity.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P J; Remedios, A M; Ferguson, J F; Walker, D D; Cantwell, S; Duke, T

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate postoperative pain and morbidity in dogs undergoing open thoracotomy and partial pericardectomy versus thoracoscopic pericardectomy. Research study in normal dogs. Fourteen mixed breed healthy dogs. Seven dogs had a partial pericardectomy through a standard left lateral thoracotomy at the fifth intercostal space. The remaining seven dogs underwent selective lung ventilation and thoracoscopic partial pericardectomy. Surgery sites in both groups were bandaged and each dog received a single postoperative dose of morphine (0.2 mg/kg, intramuscularly [i.m.]). Postoperative pain was evaluated using a standard pain score table at 1, 5, 9, 17, 29, and 53 hours after surgery. Dogs receiving a pain score of six or greater received an additional dose of morphine. At each observation point, blood samples were taken to measure blood glucose and plasma cortisol concentrations. Pain scores, blood glucose, and plasma cortisol concentrations were compared between the two groups using two-way ANOVA. Blood glucose concentrations, plasma cortisol concentrations, and pain scores were significantly different between the two groups, with the thoracotomy dogs having higher values at 1, 5, and 9 hours postoperatively. Three of the open thoracotomy dogs required additional analgesia after the initial dose of morphine. In addition, two dogs that underwent open thoracotomy were lame in the left forelimb and two others developed dehiscence of their wounds. Thoracoscopic partial pericardectomy has several advantages over open partial pericardectomy including decreased postoperative pain, fewer wound complications, and more rapid return to function.

  14. Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping.

    PubMed

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John J; Vlachos, Pavlos P; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-12-29

    Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats.

  15. Spectral characteristics of airway opening and chest wall tidal flows in spontaneously breathing preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Habib, Robert H; Pyon, Kee H; Courtney, Sherry E; Aghai, Zubair H

    2003-05-01

    We compared the harmonic content of tidal flows measured simultaneously at the mouth and chest wall in spontaneously breathing very low birth weight infants (n = 16, 1,114 +/- 230 g, gestation age: 28 +/- 2 wk). Airway opening flows were measured via face mask-pneumotachograph (P-tach), whereas chest wall flows were derived from respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) excursions. Next, for each, we computed two spectral shape indexes: 1) harmonic distortion (k(d); k(d,P-tach) and k(d,RIP), respectively) defines the extent to which flows deviated from a single sine wave, and 2) the exponent of the power law (s; s(P-tach) and s(RIP), respectively), describing the spectral energy vs. frequency. P-tach and RIP flow spectra exhibited similar power law functional forms consistently in all infants. Also, mouth [s(P-tach) = 3.73 +/- 0.23% (95% confidence interval), k(d,P-tach) = 38.8 +/- 4.6%] and chest wall (s(RIP) = 3.51 +/- 0.30%, k(d,RIP) = 42.8 +/- 4.8%) indexes were similar and highly correlated (s(RIP) = 1.17 x s(P-tach) + 0.85; r(2) = 0.81; k(d,RIP) = 0.90 x k(d,P-tach) + 8.0; r(2) = 0.76). The corresponding time to peak tidal expiratory flow-to-expiratory time ratio (0.62 +/- 0.08) was higher than reported in older infants. The obtained s and k(d) values are similar to those reported in older and/or larger chronic lung disease infants, yet appreciably lower than for 1-mo-old healthy infants of closer age and/or size; this indicated increased complexity of tidal flows in very low birth weight babies. Importantly, we found equivalent flow spectral data from mouth and chest wall tidal flows. The latter are desirable because they avoid face mask artificial effects, including leaks around it, they do not interfere with ventilatory support delivery, and they may facilitate longer measurements that are useful in control of breathing assessment.

  16. Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping

    PubMed Central

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-01-01

    Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog’s tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue’s interaction with the air–fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats. PMID:26668382

  17. Peakbagging in the open cluster NGC 6819: Opening a treasure chest or Pandora's box?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handberg, R.; Miglio, A.; Brogaard, K.; Bossini, D.; Elsworth, Y. P.

    2016-09-01

    Here we report on an extensive peakbagging effort on the evolved red giant stars of the open cluster NGC 6819. This consists of around 50 stars spanning all the way up the red giant branch (RGB) and down to and including the red clump (RC). These stars represent a unique sample because of their common distance, metallicity and age. By employing sophisticated pre-processing of the time series and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques, we have extracted individual frequencies, heights, and line widths for hundreds of individual oscillation modes in the sample of stars. We show that average asteroseismic parameters derived from these can be used to distinguish the stellar evolutionary state between RGB and RC stars without having to measure the often difficult dipole modes. Furthermore, we show how the fitting of some of these dipole modes can improve the detectability of acoustic glitches arising from the helium II ionization zone and how this can potentially be used to constrain the helium content in the cluster. We also discuss some of the difficulties facing similar studies in the future, where it seems that detailed studies of star clusters are facing some difficult times ahead.

  18. How dogs lap: open pumping driven by acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-11-01

    Dogs drink by lapping because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck fluids into the mouth. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from a bath, which is then swallowed, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured the kinematics of lapping from nineteen dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments with an accelerating rod help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results suggest that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, and that dogs curl the tongue ventrally (backwards) and time their bite on the column to increase fluid intake per lap. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that though they both lap with the same frequency scaling with respect to body mass and have similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: a high-acceleration regime for dogs and a low-acceleration regime for cats.

  19. Radiology corner. Answer to last month's radiology case and image: gun shot wound to the chest of a military working dog.

    PubMed

    Galer, Meghan; Magid, Donna; Folio, Les

    2009-06-01

    This Military Working Dog (MWD) was shot in the chest during combat operations in Iraq. Military Working Dogs are critical to the safety and well-being of deployed troops in combat operations and, as such, they are triaged and treated in our combat hospitals just like any other soldier; their speciation is not a factor in their triage status. This case familiarizes military physicians with the basic canine anatomy, positioning, and radiological technique they should be aware of before deploying. We also strive to raise awareness of the vital roles that these MWDs play for our forces, counterany concerns that may arise over the issue of treating these dogs in human facilities, and leave the reader feeling better prepared to handle the situation should they ever find themselves poised to save one of our four-legged warriors.

  20. Comparison of postoperative complications in healthy dogs undergoing open and closed orchidectomy.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, K H; Henderson, E R; Toscano, M; Chanoit, G P

    2014-10-01

    To compare closed and open orchidectomy in dogs and the associated complications. A randomised controlled blinded prospective clinical study of 73 cases was undertaken involving the recording of all complications during and in the 10 days following orchidectomy of dogs fulfilling the standardised inclusion criteria. The active variable was the surgical technique of either open or closed orchidectomy. Dogs undergoing open orchidectomy experienced significantly more complication events than the dogs undergoing closed orchidectomy [24 of 34 (70%) versus 18 of 39 (46%), P = 0 · 04]. Dogs undergoing open orchidectomy were statistically more likely to develop scrotal complications (21 of 34, 61%) compared with dogs undergoing closed orchidectomy (13 of 39, 33%; P = 0 · 02). Open orchidectomy is associated with a higher overall complication rate in the first 10 days after surgery than closed orchidectomy. Open orchidectomy is also associated with increased scrotal complications including swelling, bruising and pain compared with closed orchidectomy. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  1. Dogs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients Infants and Young Children Publications & Materials Announcements Dogs Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Overview Diseases ... and to prevent infectious diseases. Tips for preventing dog-associated diseases Before choosing a dog Certain types ...

  2. Open field activity and human interaction as a function of age and breed in dogs.

    PubMed

    Head, E; Callahan, H; Cummings, B J; Cotman, C W; Ruehl, W W; Muggenberg, B A; Milgram, N W

    1997-11-01

    Open field (OF) activity was studied in kennel reared purebred beagles from two separate colonies (2-13 years in age) and pound source mixed breed dogs (9 months to 10 years in age). Dogs were observed for 10 min sessions and records were taken of: locomotion, urination, sniffing, grooming, rearing, vocalizing, jumping frequencies and inactivity (16). Since dogs are uniquely social towards people, we also measured human interaction (HI), which recorded the same behaviors as during OF when a person was present in the room. Measures of exploratory behavior decreased as a function of age in pound source dogs in the OF test, but not in beagles from either colony. No breed differences were found between the young dogs. In the HI test, age effects were found in beagles but not pound source dogs. OF activity correlated with tests of cognitive function, but differences were found between the three groups. These findings indicate that OF activity is age-sensitive in dogs, but that breed and test conditions are also essential factors.

  3. Chest closure without drainage after open patent ductus arteriosus ligation in Ugandan children: A non blinded randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kebba, Naomi; Mwambu, Tom; Oketcho, Michael; Izudi, Jonathan; Obuku, Ekwaro A

    2016-09-29

    There is clinical equipoise regarding post-operative management of patients with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) without insertion of a chest drain. This study evaluated post operative outcomes of chest closure with or without a drain following Patent Ductus Arteriosus ligation among childen at Uganda Heart Instritute (UHI). This was an open label randomized controlled trial of 62 children 12 years of age and below diagnosed with patent ductus arteriosus at Mulago National Teaching and Referral Hospital, Uganda. Participants were randomized in the ratio of 1:1 with surgical ligation of patent ductus arteriosus to either thoracotomy closure with a chest tube or without a chest tube. All participants received standard care and were monitored hourly for 24 hours then until hospital discharge. The combined primary endpoint consisted of significant pleural space accumulation of fluid or air, higher oxygen need or infection of the surgical site. Analysis was conducted by multivariable logistic regression analysis at 5 % significance level. We enrolled 62 participants, 46 (74 %) of whom were females. Their median age was 12 months (IQR: 8-36). Participants in the no-drain arm significantly had less post-operative complications compared to the drain arm (Unadjusted odds ratio [uOR]: 0.21, 95 % CI: 0.06-0.73, p = 0.015). This "protective effect" remained without statistical significance in the multivariable regression model (Adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 0.07, 95 % CI: 0.00-2.50, p = 0.144). Children aged below 6 years with patent ductus arterious can safely and effectively have thoracotomy closure without using a drain in uncomplicated surgical ligation of the PDA. Chest drain was associated with post-operative complications. The trial was registered in the Pan African Clinical Trials registry on 1st/July/2012, retrospectively registered. Identifier number PACTR201207000395469 .

  4. Chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Budassi, S A

    1978-09-01

    For any patient with obvious or suspected chest trauma, one must first assure an adequate airway and adequate ventilation. One should never hesitate to administer oxygen to a victim with a chest injury. The nurse should be concerned with adequate circulation--this may mean the administration of intravenous fluids, specifically volume expanders, via large-bore cannulae. Any obvious open chest wound should be sealed, and any fractures should be splinted. These patients should be rapidly transported to the nearest Emergency Department capable of handling this type of injury. The majority of patients who arrive in the Emergency Department following blunt or penetrating trauma should be considered to be in critical condition until proven otherwise. On presentation, it is essential to recognize those signs, symptoms, and laboratory values that identify the patient's condition as life-threatening. Simple recognition of these signs and symptoms and early appropriate intervention may alter an otherwise fatal outcome.

  5. Echocardiographic guidance and monitoring of left atrial appendage closure with AtriClip during open-chest cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Contri, Rachele; Clivio, Sara; Torre, Tiziano; Cassina, Tiziano

    2017-09-12

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) closure prevents thromboembolic risk and avoids lifelong anticoagulation due to atrial fibrillation (AF). Nowadays, AtriClip, a modern epicardial device approved in June 2010, allows external and safe closure of LAA in patients undergoing cardiac surgery during other open-chest cardiac surgical procedures. Such a surgical approach and its epicardial deployment differentiates LAA closure with AtriClip from percutaneous closure techniques such as Watchman (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA), Lariat (SentreHEART Inc., Redwood City, CA, USA), and Amplatzer Amulet (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) device procedures. AtriClip positioning must consider perioperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) to confirm LAA anatomical features, to explore the links with neighboring structures, and finally to assess its successful closure. We report a sequence of images to document the role of intraoperative TEE during an elective aortic valve replacement and LAA external closure with AtriClip. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Treatment of a periorbital cyst in a dog by creation of a permanent drainage opening.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, S; Driesen, A; Malberg, S; Kramer, M; Thiel, C

    2015-01-01

    An inflammatory periorbital cyst with secondary pressure atrophy of the maxilla was treated by surgical creation of a drainage opening to the nasal cavity in a 4-year-old Yorkshire Terrier. Following treatment, clinical signs resolved and computed tomography 5 weeks after surgery confirmed the permanence of the drainage opening. Eight months later, the dog showed no clinical abnormalities. Therefore, the procedure described in this report may offer a suitable treatment option in cases where the cyst's size or localization prevents complete excision.

  7. Cardiac lymphoscintigraphy following closed-chest catheter injection of radiolabeled colloid into the myocardium of dogs: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.D.; Kopiwoda, S.Y.; Swan, A.; Castronovo, F.P.; Strauss, H.W.

    1982-10-01

    A catheter technique for injection of radiolabeled colloids into the myocardium was developed and tested in a series of 15 dogs. A multipurpose angiographic catheter was modified to permit an inner core of PE-50 polyethylene tubing, tipped with a 23-gage needle, to pass through the lumen for intra-myocardial injection of radiocolloids. For injection of the left ventricle, the catheter is introduced through the femoral artery: for the right ventricle, the femoral vein. The catheter advanced under fluoroscopy until the desired surface for injection is reached. The inner core is then extended to lodge the needle in the endocardium. A mixture of Renografin (to confirm the endocardial injection site) and radiolabeled colloid was injected in 13 animals. Ten minutes after injection, scintigraphy was begun and continued for up to 6 hr. In three dogs the procedure was repeated 3 or 4 times. From two to five nodes were visible in all animals, irrespective of whether the right or left ventricular myocardium was injected. In two animals the injection was given intravenously, and no nodes were seen. These data suggest that cardiac lymphatic drainage can be studied with a catheter injection method.

  8. Electrophysiological effects of bepridil and its quaternary derivative CERM 11888 in closed chest anaesthetized dogs: a comparison with verapamil and diltiazem.

    PubMed

    Leboeuf, J; Lamar, J C; Massingham, R; Ponsonnaille, J

    1989-12-01

    1. The electrophysiological effects of bepridil, its quaternary derivative, CERM 11888 (methylpyrrolidinium bromide) (both 2.5 mg kg-1 i.v.) and those of verapamil and diltiazem (0.2 mg kg-1 i.v.) were studied in closed chest anaesthetized dogs at doses used in clinical studies. 2. The four drugs caused a bradycardia with the following order of potency: bepridil greater than CERM 11888 greater than diltiazem greater than verapamil. 3. All the compounds slowed conduction in the AV node, increased the refractory period (RP) and decreased Wenckebach rates with the following order: verapamil much greater than diltiazem greater than bepridil greater than CERM 11888. 4. Verapamil and diltiazem did not affect conduction or the RP in atria while bepridil weakly slowed the former and markedly increased the latter. CERM 11888 caused a lengthening of RP but this was a delayed effect. 5. In the ventricle, bepridil and CERM 11888 caused a small increase in the QRS and a more pronounced increase in the RP. Both compounds increased QTc but did not modify HV. Verapamil and diltiazem had no significant effects at the ventricular level. 6. Our results confirm that the main sites of action of calcium antagonists are the SA and AV nodes. Bepridil has a broader spectrum of activity and also acts at the atrial and ventricular levels. A comparison of the effects of bepridil with those of its quaternary derivative suggests the involvement of an intracellular action in the electrophysiological effects of bepridil.

  9. Electrophysiological effects of bepridil and its quaternary derivative CERM 11888 in closed chest anaesthetized dogs: a comparison with verapamil and diltiazem.

    PubMed Central

    Leboeuf, J.; Lamar, J. C.; Massingham, R.; Ponsonnaille, J.

    1989-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological effects of bepridil, its quaternary derivative, CERM 11888 (methylpyrrolidinium bromide) (both 2.5 mg kg-1 i.v.) and those of verapamil and diltiazem (0.2 mg kg-1 i.v.) were studied in closed chest anaesthetized dogs at doses used in clinical studies. 2. The four drugs caused a bradycardia with the following order of potency: bepridil greater than CERM 11888 greater than diltiazem greater than verapamil. 3. All the compounds slowed conduction in the AV node, increased the refractory period (RP) and decreased Wenckebach rates with the following order: verapamil much greater than diltiazem greater than bepridil greater than CERM 11888. 4. Verapamil and diltiazem did not affect conduction or the RP in atria while bepridil weakly slowed the former and markedly increased the latter. CERM 11888 caused a lengthening of RP but this was a delayed effect. 5. In the ventricle, bepridil and CERM 11888 caused a small increase in the QRS and a more pronounced increase in the RP. Both compounds increased QTc but did not modify HV. Verapamil and diltiazem had no significant effects at the ventricular level. 6. Our results confirm that the main sites of action of calcium antagonists are the SA and AV nodes. Bepridil has a broader spectrum of activity and also acts at the atrial and ventricular levels. A comparison of the effects of bepridil with those of its quaternary derivative suggests the involvement of an intracellular action in the electrophysiological effects of bepridil. PMID:2611495

  10. Prolonged Outbreak of Mycobacterium chimaera Infection After Open-Chest Heart Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sax, Hugo; Bloemberg, Guido; Hasse, Barbara; Sommerstein, Rami; Kohler, Philipp; Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Falk, Volkmar; Kuster, Stefan P; Böttger, Erik C; Weber, Rainer

    2015-07-01

    Invasive Mycobacterium chimaera infections were diagnosed in 2012 in 2 heart surgery patients on extracorporeal circulation. We launched an outbreak investigation to identify the source and extent of the potential outbreak and to implement preventive measures. We collected water samples from operating theaters, intensive care units, and wards, including air samples from operating theaters. Mycobacterium chimaera strains were characterized by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). Case detection was performed based on archived histopathology samples and M. chimaera isolates since 2006, and the patient population at risk was prospectively surveyed. We identified 6 male patients aged between 49 and 64 years with prosthetic valve endocarditis or vascular graft infection due to M. chimaera, which became clinically manifest with a latency of between 1.5 and 3.6 years after surgery. Mycobacterium chimaera was isolated from cardiac tissue specimens, blood cultures, or other biopsy specimens. We were able also to culture M. chimaera from water circuits of heater-cooler units connected to the cardiopulmonary bypass, and air samples collected when the units were in use. RAPD-PCR demonstrated identical patterns among M. chimaera strains from heater-cooler unit water circuits and air samples, and strains in 2 patient clusters. The epidemiological and microbiological features of this prolonged outbreak provided evidence for the airborne transmission of M. chimaera from contaminated heater-cooler unit water tanks to patients during open-heart surgery. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Effect of high-frequency oscillation on blood flow to an atelectatic lung in closed-chest dogs.

    PubMed

    Hall, S M; Strawn, W B; Levitzky, M G

    1984-05-01

    Seven dogs with electromagnetic flow probes implanted on their main (QT) and left (QL) pulmonary arteries, had catheters placed in their left atria and pulmonary artery, and were ventilated via Carlen's double-lumen endotracheal tubes. The effect of high-frequency oscillation (HFO) on the redistribution of pulmonary blood flow away from unilaterally atelectatic lungs was determined. During bilateral ventilation with 100% O2, using either a Harvard respirator (PPV) or an Emerson airway vibrator (HFO), the fraction of cardiac output perfusing the left lung (QL/QT) was 0.45 +/- .01 and 0.43 +/- .01, respectively, whereas PaO2 was 465 +/- 40 and 334 +/- 34 torr, respectively. With left lung atelectasis during right lung ventilation with PPV at 10 to 15 cycle/min, QL/QT fell to 0.37 +/- .01 and PaO2 was 56 +/- 5 torr. During HFO at 100 cycle/min, QL/QT fell to 0.32 +/- .02 whereas PaO2 rose to 102 +/- 23 torr. Mean transpulmonary pressure was 10.0 +/- 1.5 torr with PPV and 7.3 +/- 1.2 torr during HFO; intrapleural pressures were -3.2 +/- 1.6 and -5.7 +/- 1.4 mm Hg, respectively. Thus, the diversion of blood away from unilaterally atelectatic lungs was better maintained during HFO.

  12. Anesthetic management of an off-pump open-heart surgery in a dog.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Eva; Beaulieu, Kim; Holmberg, David L

    2009-07-01

    A 9 year-old, 40 kg, female spayed Bouvier des Flandres was anesthetized for surgical removal of an intra-cardiac mass. Pre-anesthetic work-up included thoracic radiographs, which revealed moderate pleural effusion, and cardiac ultrasound, which identified a mass attached to the wall of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT). The mass caused dynamic obstruction of the RVOT during systole. The dog was pre-medicated with intravenous (IV) hydromorphone (0.05 mg kg(-1)). Following pre-oxygenation, anesthesia was induced with ketamine (3.75 mg kg(-1), IV) and diazepam (0.18 mg kg(-1), IV). Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen, an intravenous constant rate infusion (CRI) of fentanyl (10-30 microg kg(-1) hour(-1)) and a CRI of lidocaine (50-200 microg kg(-1) minute(-1)). A right lateral thoracotomy was performed. The heart was stopped transiently with a cold cardioplegic solution for 7.83 minutes to allow the removal of the mass through an open-heart procedure. No cardiopulmonary bypass was used. The heart was successfully restarted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation with internal cardiac massage and internal defibrillation. The dog recovered uneventfully from anesthesia without any apparent neurological sequelae. Post-operative analgesia consisted of intercostal nerve blocks with bupivacaine, CRIs of fentanyl (2-5 microg kg(-1) hour(-1)) and lidocaine (40 microg kg(-1) minute(-1)) and with oral meloxicam (0.1 mg kg(-1)). Five days following surgery, the dog was discharged from the hospital. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the mass identified an ectopic thyroid carcinoma. This case showed the feasibility of whole body hypothermia and using a cold cardioplegic solution to induce cardiac arrest for a short open-heart procedure.

  13. Comparison between two portal laparoscopy and open surgery for ovariectomy in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Shariati, Elnaz; Bakhtiari, Jalal; Khalaj, Alireza; Niasari-Naslaji, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Ovariectomy (OVE) is a routine surgical procedure for neutering in small animal practice. Laparoscopy is a new surgical technique which contains advantages such as less trauma, smaller incision and excellent visualization than traditional open surgery. The present study was conducted to examine the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic procedure through two portal comparing with the conventional open surgery for OVE in healthy female bitches (n=16). Dogs were divided in two equal groups. In laparoscopic group, two 5 and 10 mm portals were inserted; First in the umbilicus for introducing the camera and the second, caudal to the umbilicus for inserting the forceps. Laparoscopic procedure involved grasping and tacking the ovary to the abdominal wall, followed by electrocautery, resection and removal of the ovary. In open surgery, routine OVE was conducted through an incision from umbilicus to caudal midline. Mean operative time, total length of scar, blood loss, clinical and blood parameters and all intra and post-operative complications were recorded in both groups. Mean operative time, total length of scar, blood loss and post-operative adhesions were significantly less in laparoscopic group compared with open surgery. In conclusion, laparoscopic OVE is an acceptable procedure due to more advantages in comparison with traditional OVE. PMID:25568722

  14. Effect of Wearing a Telemetry Jacket on Behavioral and Physiologic Parameters of Dogs in the Open-Field Test.

    PubMed

    Fish, Richard E; Foster, Melanie L; Gruen, Margaret E; Sherman, Barbara L; Dorman, Davidc C

    2017-07-01

    Safety pharmacology studies in dogs often integrate behavioral assessments made using video recording with physiologic measurements collected by telemetry. However, whether merely wearing the telemetry vest affects canine behavior and other parameters has not been evaluated. This pilot study assessed the effect of a telemetry vest on behavioral and physiologic responses to an environmental stressor, the sounds of a thunderstorm, in Labrador retrievers. Dogs were assigned to one of 2 experimental groups (Vest and No-Vest, n = 8 dogs per group) by using a matched pairs design, with a previously determined, sound-associated anxiety score as the blocking variable. Dogs were individually retested with the same standardized sound stimulus (thunderstorm) in an open-field arena, and their behavioral responses were video recorded. Video analysis of locomotor activity and anxiety-related behavior and manual determination of heart rate and body temperature were performed; results were compared between groups. Vest wearing did not affect total locomotor activity or rectal body temperature but significantly decreased heart rate by 8% and overall mean anxiety score by 34% during open-field test sessions. Our results suggest that the use of telemetry vests in dogs influences the measurement of physiologic parameters and behaviors that are assessed in safety pharmacology studies.

  15. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.H.M.

    1982-01-01

    This review of chest radiology reexamines normal findings on plain chest radiographs, and presents a new plain film view for detecting metastases in the lungs, and describes new findings on acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Various chest radiologic procedures are examined. (KRM)

  16. Duration, complications, stress, and pain of open ovariohysterectomy versus a simple method of laparoscopic-assisted ovariohysterectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Chad M; Cox, Ray E; Hailey, Jim J

    2005-09-15

    To describe a simple method of laparoscopic-assisted ovariohysterectomy (LAOHE) and compare duration of surgery, complications, measures of surgical stress, and postoperative pain with open ovariohysterectomy (OHE) in dogs. Randomized, prospective clinical trial. 20 healthy sexually intact female dogs weighing >10 kg (22 lb). Dogs were randomly allocated to receive conventional OHE or LAOHE. Intraoperative complications, anesthetic complications, total anesthesia time, and total surgery time were recorded. Serum cortisol and glucose concentrations, temperature, heart rate, and respiratory rate were measured preoperatively and 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours postoperatively. Pain scores were assigned by a nonblinded observer at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours postoperatively. Duration of surgery, pain scores, objective measures of surgical stress, anesthetic complications, and surgical complications were compared between OHE and LAOHE. Age, weight, PCV, and duration of surgery did not differ between treatment groups. Nine of 10 dogs in the OHE group required additional pain medication on the basis of pain scores, whereas none of the dogs in the LAOHE group did. Blood glucose concentrations were significantly increased from preoperative concentrations in the OHE group at 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours postoperatively and at 1 hour postoperatively in the LAOHE group. Cortisol concentrations were significantly increased at 1 and 2 hours postoperatively in the OHE group. LAOHE caused less pain and surgical stress than OHE and may be more appropriate for an outpatient setting.

  17. Canine theriogenology for dog enthusiasts: teaching methodology and outcomes in a massive open online course (MOOC).

    PubMed

    Root Kustritz, Margaret V

    2014-01-01

    A massive open online course (MOOC) in canine theriogenology was offered for dog owners and breeders and for veterinary professionals as a partnership between the University of Minnesota and Coursera. The six-week course was composed of short video lectures, multiple-choice quizzes with instant feedback to assess understanding, weekly case studies with peer evaluation to promote integration of course materials, and discussion forums to promote participant interaction. Peak enrollment was 8,796 students. The grading policy for completion was strict and was upheld; completion rate for all participants was 7.5%. About 12% of participants achieved a grade of over 90% in the course, with those who had any deficiency mostly missing one quiz or assignment. Ninety-nine individuals were enrolled in a for-cost, credentialed pathway, and 50% of those individuals completed all required course components. Pre- and postcourse surveys were used to demonstrate that learning objectives were met by the participants and to identify that lack of time to commit to study was the biggest impediment to completion. Positive aspects of the course were active engagement by participants from all over the world and the ability of this university and instructor to reach those learners. Negative aspects concerned technical support and negative feedback from some participants who were unable to meet course requirements for reasons beyond the control of the instructor.

  18. Acoustic evidence of airway opening during recruitment in excised dog lungs.

    PubMed

    Hantos, Z; Tolnai, J; Asztalos, T; Peták, F; Adamicza, A; Alencar, A M; Majumdar, A; Suki, B

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the mechanism of recruitment and the lower knee of the pressure-volume curve in the normal lung are primarily determined by airway reopenings via avalanches rather than simple alveolar recruitments. In isolated dog lung lobes, the pressure-volume loops were measured, and crackle sounds were recorded intrabronchially during both the first inflation from the collapsed state to total lobe capacity and a second inflation without prior degassing. The inflation flow contained transients that were accompanied by a series of crackles. Discrete volume increments were estimated from the flow transients, and the energy levels of the corresponding crackles were calculated from the sound recordings. Crackles were concentrated in the early phase of inflation, with the cumulative energy exceeding 90% of its final value by the lower knee of the pressure-volume curve. The values of volume increments were correlated with crackle energy during the flow transient for both the first and the second inflations (r(2) = 0.29-0.73 and 0.68-0.82, respectively). Because the distribution of volume increments followed a power law, the correlation between crackle energy and discrete volume increments suggests that an avalanche-like airway opening process governs the recruitment of collapsed normal lungs.

  19. Safety and Feasibility of Open Chest Epicardial Mapping and Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia During the Period of Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mehul; Rojas, Francia; Shabari, Farshad Raissi; Simpson, Leo; Cohn, William; Frazier, O H; Mallidi, Hari; Cheng, Jie; Mathuria, Nilesh

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing catheter ablation for ventricular tachycardia (VT) may require epicardial mapping. In patients with end-stage heart failure, hybrid surgical epicardial mapping and ablation during the period of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation may be considered in select patients to reduce post-LVAD ventricular tachycardia. From March 2009 to October 2012, 5 patients (4 men and 1 woman, age range 52-73 years) underwent open chest electrophysiology study and epicardial mapping for recurrent ventricular tachycardia while the heart was exposed during the period of LVAD implantation. Epicardial mapping was considered if patients had recurrent VT despite failed prior endocardial ablation and/or electrocardiogram (EKG) features of an epicardial exit. Activation and/or a substrate mapping approach were employed during all procedures. Three of 5 patients (60%) had acute procedural success. In all patients, VT was either eliminated or significantly reduced with epicardial ablation. One patient had mediastinal bleeding delaying sternal closure. During a follow-up period of 363 ± 368 days, 4 patients died due to nonarrhythmic causes. Open-chest hybrid epicardial mapping and ablation for recurrent VT is feasible and can be considered in select patients during the period of LVAD implantation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Long-term outcome of transendoscopic oesophageal mass ablation in dogs with Spirocerca lupi-associated oesophageal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shipov, A; Kelmer, G; Lavy, E; Milgram, J; Aroch, I; Segev, G

    2015-10-10

    Oesophageal sarcoma is a potential sequel of Spirocerca lupi infection. Oesophageal mass excision can be performed by open chest surgery. The objectives of this observational study were to evaluate the feasibility, short-term morbidity and long-term outcome of transendoscopic oesophageal mass ablation in dogs with spirocercosis-associated oesophageal neoplasia. A 9 mm video-endoscope and laser or electrocauterisation were used to debulk the oesophageal mass. Long-term follow-up was done by telephonic interviews. Fifteen dogs were included. The median tumour size was 5 cm (range 3.5-9). The median procedure time was 75 minutes (range 35-165) and was deemed successful in 12/15 dogs (80 per cent). Recovery was uneventful in all dogs. Immediate complications included oesophageal damage (two dogs) oesophageal perforation (one dog) and a focal thermal damage (one dog). The median hospitalisation time of all dogs was less than one day, with all but two discharged on the procedure day. The median survival time, available in nine dogs that were followed, was 202 days (range 51-691). Four of these dogs (44 per cent) survived more than six months, of which three survived more than one year. In conclusion, transendoscopic oesophageal mass ablation might be considered an alternative, palliative procedure for open-chest oesophageal surgery. It has comparable long-term survival, lower morbidity, short hospitalisation time and relatively low cost. British Veterinary Association.

  1. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a fever or a cough that produces yellow-green phlegm. You have chest pain that is severe and does not go away. You are having problems swallowing. Chest pain lasts longer than 3 to 5 days. What to Expect at Your Office Visit ...

  2. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability.

  3. Dogs, cats, parasites, and humans in Brazil: opening the black box

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dogs and cats in Brazil serve as primary hosts for a considerable number of parasites, which may affect their health and wellbeing. These may include endoparasites (e.g., protozoa, cestodes, trematodes, and nematodes) and ectoparasites (i.e., fleas, lice, mites, and ticks). While some dog and cat parasites are highly host-specific (e.g., Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Felicola subrostratus for cats, and Angiostrongylus vasorum and Trichodectes canis for dogs), others may easily switch to other hosts, including humans. In fact, several dog and cat parasites (e.g., Toxoplasma gondii, Dipylidium caninum, Ancylostoma caninum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara canis) are important not only from a veterinary perspective but also from a medical standpoint. In addition, some of them (e.g., Lynxacarus radovskyi on cats and Rangelia vitalii in dogs) are little known to most veterinary practitioners working in Brazil. This article is a compendium on dog and cat parasites in Brazil and a call for a One Health approach towards a better management of some of these parasites, which may potentially affect humans. Practical aspects related to the diagnosis, treatment, and control of parasitic diseases of dogs and cats in Brazil are discussed. PMID:24423244

  4. Dogs, cats, parasites, and humans in Brazil: opening the black box.

    PubMed

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2014-01-14

    Dogs and cats in Brazil serve as primary hosts for a considerable number of parasites, which may affect their health and wellbeing. These may include endoparasites (e.g., protozoa, cestodes, trematodes, and nematodes) and ectoparasites (i.e., fleas, lice, mites, and ticks). While some dog and cat parasites are highly host-specific (e.g., Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Felicola subrostratus for cats, and Angiostrongylus vasorum and Trichodectes canis for dogs), others may easily switch to other hosts, including humans. In fact, several dog and cat parasites (e.g., Toxoplasma gondii, Dipylidium caninum, Ancylostoma caninum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara canis) are important not only from a veterinary perspective but also from a medical standpoint. In addition, some of them (e.g., Lynxacarus radovskyi on cats and Rangelia vitalii in dogs) are little known to most veterinary practitioners working in Brazil. This article is a compendium on dog and cat parasites in Brazil and a call for a One Health approach towards a better management of some of these parasites, which may potentially affect humans. Practical aspects related to the diagnosis, treatment, and control of parasitic diseases of dogs and cats in Brazil are discussed.

  5. Comparison of a 5-mm and 10-mm vessel sealing device in an open ovariectomy model in dogs.

    PubMed

    Devriendt, N; Van Goethem, B; Van Brantegem, L; De Ridder, M; Kitshoff, A; Or, M; de Rooster, H

    2017-04-29

    The objectives of this study were to compare (1) the extent of thermal damage and (2) the time between the 5-mm LigaSure V (LS5) and 10-mm LigaSure Atlas (LS10) vessel sealing devices (VSD) when performing open ovariectomy in dogs. A prospective, randomised, clinical trial was performed in 40 client-owned sexually entire female dogs. In each dog, one ovary was randomly assigned to be surgically removed using LS5 and the contralateral using LS10. The depth of thermal spread, measured on histopathological preparations, was significantly larger for LS10 (LS10 1.35±0.23 mm v LS5 0.82±0.10 mm; P<0.001). Mean ovariectomy time was significantly faster when using LS10 (LS5 2.58±1.32 minutes v LS10 2.07±1.27 minutes; P=0.008). Bodyweight was positively correlated with the time required for ovariectomy using LS5 (P=0.004), but no such correlation was present for LS10 (P=0.611). In conclusion, during open ovariectomy using VSD, LS10 causes significantly more thermal spread but surgical time is shorter compared with LS5. When using LS5, the ovariectomy time increases with increasing bodyweight. British Veterinary Association.

  6. Open and closed chest extrathoracic cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass and extracorporeal life support: methods, indications, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Field, M L; Al‐Alao, B; Mediratta, N; Sosnowski, A

    2006-01-01

    Extrathoracic cannulation to establish cardiopulmonary bypass has been widely applied in recent years and includes: (a) repeat surgery, (b) minimally invasive surgery, and (c) cases with diseased vessels such as porcelain, aneurysmal, and dissecting aorta. In addition, the success and relative ease of peripheral cannulation, among other technological advances, has permitted the development of closed chest extracorporeal life support, in the form of cardiopulmonary support and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. With this development have come applications for cardiopulmonary bypass based support outside the traditional cardiac theatre setting, including emergency circulatory support for patients in cardiogenic shock and respiratory support for patients with severely impaired gas exchange. This review summarises the approach to extrathoracic cannulation for the generalist. PMID:16679471

  7. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes Chest pain can also be caused by: Panic attack. If you have periods of intense fear accompanied ... fear of dying, you may be experiencing a panic attack. Shingles. Caused by a reactivation of the chickenpox ...

  8. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very ... limitations of Chest Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the ...

  9. Nurse and patient factors that influence nursing time in chest tube management early after open heart surgery: A descriptive, correlational study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Myra; Idzior, Laura; Bena, James F; Albert, Nancy M

    2017-04-27

    Determine nurse characteristics and patient factors that affect nurses' time in managing chest tubes in the first 24-hours of critical-care stay. Prospective, descriptive. Cardiovascular critical-care nurses and post-operative heart surgery patients with chest tubes were enrolled from a single center in Ohio. Nurses completed case report forms about themselves, comfort and time in managing chest tubes, chest tube placement and management factors. Analysis included correlational and comparative statistics; Bonferroni corrections were applied, as appropriate. Of 29 nurses, 86.2% were very comfortable managing chest tubes and oozing/non-secure dressings, but only 41.4% were very comfortable managing clogged chest tubes. Of 364 patients, mean age was 63.1 (±12.3) years and 36% had previous heart surgery. Total minutes of chest tube management was higher with≥3 chest tubes, tube size <28 French, and when both mediastinal and pleural tubes were present (all p<0.001). In the first 4-hours, time spent on chest tubes was higher when patients had previous cardiac surgeries (p≤0.002), heart failure (p<0.001), preoperative anticoagulant medications (p=0.031) and reoperation for postoperative bleeding/tamponade (p=0.005). Time to manage chest tubes can be anticipated by patient characteristics. Nurse comfort with chest tube-related tasks affected time spent on chest tube management. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Comparison of the ability of veterinary medical students to perform laparoscopic versus conventional open ovariectomy on live dogs.

    PubMed

    Levi, Ohad; Kass, Philip H; Lee, Lyon Y; Cantrell, Valerie M; Clark, David E; Griffon, Dominique J

    2015-12-01

    To compare the feasibility of training veterinary medicine students to perform laparoscopic versus conventional open ovariectomy in live dogs. Randomized prospective parallel-group experiment. 25 students completing the second year of their veterinary curriculum. Students were randomly assigned to 2 groups to receive 14 hours of specific training in either open ovariectomy (n = 13) or laparoscopic ovariectomy (12). Confidence, basic surgical skills, and basic laparoscopic skills were evaluated before and after training, prior to live surgical procedures. Scores related to basic surgical skills were high in both groups and did not improve with either training program. Before live animal surgeries, student confidence and basic laparoscopic skills improved after training in laparoscopic ovariectomy and were higher than after training in open ovariectomy. Surgery time was higher for the students who received training in laparoscopic ovariectomy (129 minutes; range, 84 to 143 minutes), compared with students who received training in open ovariectomy (80 minutes; range, 62 to 117 minutes). On a 55-point scoring system, ovariectomy scores were similar between students who received training in open ovariectomy (34.5; range, 16.5 to 45) and students who received training in laparoscopic ovariectomy (34.5; range, 25 to 44.5). The training programs were effective in improving student confidence and skills in laparoscopic ovariectomy. Results of this study suggested that veterinary medical students, with assistance from an instructor, may be taught to perform laparoscopic ovariectomies with performance equivalent to that for students performing open ovariectomies.

  11. Chest Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Balmes, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The Council on Scientific Affairs of the California Medical Association presents the following inventory of items of progress in chest diseases. Each item, in the judgment of a panel of knowledgeable physicians, has recently become reasonably firmly established, both as to scientific fact and important clinical significance. The items are presented in simple epitome, and an authoritative reference, both to the item itself and to the subject as a whole, is generally given for those who may be unfamiliar with a particular item. The purpose is to assist busy practitioners, students, researchers, or scholars to stay abreast of these items of progress in chest diseases that have recently achieved a substantial degree of authoritative acceptance, whether in their own field of special interest or another. The items of progress listed below were selected by the Advisory Panel to the Section on Chest Diseases of the California Medical Association, and the summaries were prepared under its direction. PMID:1441468

  12. Comparison of acute phase protein and hemodynamic variables in dogs undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic vs. open pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hai-Feng; Ren, Qing-Ming; Wang, Zhi-Bo; Li, Xin; Jiang, Sheng; Zhang, Jian-Tao; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2017-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is feasible and safe in humans and animal models. The aim of the present study was to compare the surgical outcome using VATS with that of the standard transthoracic approach for pneumonectomy in dogs, to determine the acute-phase reaction in VATS pneumonectomy, and to analyze the difference between VATS and the standard transthoracic approach. A total of 14 dogs were divided into two groups (n=7); one group underwent VATS and the other group underwent a transthoracic pneumonectomy. Pre-, intra- and post-operative physiologic parameters were monitored, in addition to the blood cell count and serum acute-phase protein (APP) concentrations. The APP and hemodynamic changes between the two approaches were analyzed. Mean surgical time in the VATS group (176.7 min) was significantly longer compared with the open group (132.4 min). All APP concentrations were significantly increased at day 1 postoperation and gradually decreased to preoperative concentrations. The serum concentration of C-reactive protein on day 3 and the white blood cell count on day 1 were significantly higher following surgery in the open group compared with the VATS group (P<0.05). No differences were observed in the physiological parameters between the two groups. Although VATS took longer, animals experienced smaller incision and less stress. Therefore, the VATS approach was satisfactory for total pneumonectomy. PMID:28565853

  13. Evaluation of augmented pulse pressure variation using the Valsalva manoeuvre as a predictor of fluid responsiveness under open-chest conditions: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Min, Jeong Jin; Kim, Tae Kyong; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Park, Jiyeon; Cho, Hyun Sung; Kim, Wook Sung; Lee, Young Tak

    2017-05-01

    Pulse pressure variation (PPV) is a well known dynamic preload indicator of fluid responsiveness. However, its usefulness in open-chest conditions remains controversial. We evaluated whether augmented PPV during a Valsalva manoeuvre can predict fluid responsiveness after sternotomy. A prospective, observational study. Single-centre trial, study period from October 2014 to June 2015. Forty-nine adult patients who underwent off-pump coronary arterial bypass grafting. After midline sternotomy, haemodynamic parameters were measured before and after volume expansion (6 ml kg of crystalloids). PPV was calculated both automatically (PPVauto) and manually (PPVmanual). For PPV augmentation, we performed Valsalva manoeuvres with manual holding of the rebreathing bag and constant airway pressure of 30 cmH2O for 10 s before fluid loading and calculated PPV during the Valsalva manoeuvre (PPVVM). The predictive ability of PPVVM for fluid responsiveness using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis. Responders were identified when an increase in cardiac index of at least 12% occurred after fluid loading. Twenty-one patients were responders and 28 were nonresponders. PPVVM successfully predicted fluid responsiveness with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.88 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.75 to 0.95; sensitivity 91%, specificity 79%, P < 0.0001] and a threshold value of 55%. Baseline PPVauto and PPVmanual also predicted fluid responsiveness [AUC 0.75 (0.62 to 0.88); sensitivity 79%, specificity 75%; and 0.76 (0.61 to 0.87]; sensitivity 71%, specificity 71%, respectively). However, only PPVVM showed a significant AUC-difference from that of central venous pressure (P = 0.008) and correlated with the change of cardiac index induced by volume expansion (r = 0.6, P < 0.001). Augmented PPV using a Valsalva manoeuvre can be used as a clinically reliable predictor of fluid responsiveness under open-chest condition. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT

  14. Hemodynamic Changes in Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery and Anterior Interventricular Vein during Right Ventricular Apical Pacing: A Doppler Ultrasound Study in Open Chest Beagles

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Long, Bin; Shen, Jie; Su, Li; Yin, Lixue

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of right ventricular apical pacing (RVAP) on hemodynamics in left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and anterior interventricular vein (AIV) contrast to baseline condition in open chest beagles using Doppler ultrasound imaging. Methods In 6 anesthetized open chest beagles, the spectral Doppler waveforms of the middle segmental LAD and the AIV were acquired with a 5 MHz linear array transducer at baseline condition and during RVAP. The aortic pressure-time curves were recorded synchronously. The Doppler hemodynamic parameters of the LAD and AIV at both states were derived and compared. Results The spectral Doppler waveforms of the LAD had a principal diastolic positive wave (Dp), which heelled by a momentary negative wave and a positive wave during early systole at baseline condition. During RVAP, an additional negative wave appeared in the LAD at late systole. The duration of the Dp shortened (227.83±12.16 ms vs 188.50±8.97 ms, P<0.001), and the acceleration of the Dp decreased (11.85±2.22 m/s2 vs 3.54±0.42 m/s2, P<0.001). The spectral Doppler waveforms of the AIV only had a principal positive wave (Sp) at baseline condition, but an additional diastolic negative wave appeared during RVAP. The duration of the Sp shortened (242.99±7.98 ms vs 215.38±15.44 ms, P<0.001), and the acceleration of the Sp decreased (9.61±1.93 m/s2 vs 1.01±0.11 m/s2, P<0.001). Conclusions Obvious hemodynamic changes in the LAD and AIV during RVAP were observed, and these abnormal flow patterns in epicardial coronary arteries and vena coronaria may be sensitive and important hints of the disturbed cardiac electrical and mechanical activity sequences. PMID:23825640

  15. Failure of papyerine hydrocholoride and doxycycline hyclate as antipruritis agents in pruritic dogs: Results of an open clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Danny W.; Cayatte, Suzanne M.

    1993-01-01

    Papaverine hydrochloride (150 to 300 mg/dog every 12 hours) and doxycycline hyclate (3 mg/kg every 12 hours) were both administered orally as individual agents to 13 dogs with pruritus of allergic or idiopathic origin. No dog improved. Depression, anorexia, and vomiting were seen in one dog treated with papaverine hydrochloride. Under the conditions of the study, papaverine and doxycycline were not useful antipruritic agents for the dog. PMID:17424184

  16. Assessment of fracture healing after minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis or open reduction and internal fixation of coexisting radius and ulna fractures in dogs via ultrasonography and radiography.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Antonio; Risselada, Marije; Winter, Matthew D

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate fracture healing after minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) or open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of coexisting radius and ulna fractures in dogs via ultrasonography and radiography. Prospective cohort study. 16 dogs with radius-ulna fractures that underwent MIPO (n = 9; 2 dogs were subsequently not included in the analyses because of incomplete follow-up information) or ORIF (7). Dogs in the 2 treatment groups were matched by age, body weight, and configuration of the fractures. Fracture healing was evaluated with ultrasonography, power Doppler ultrasonography, and radiography every 3 to 4 weeks until healing was complete; a semiquantitative score based on the number of Doppler signals was used to characterize neovascularization, and subjective B-mode ultrasonographic and radiographic scores were assigned to classify healing. Fractures in dogs that underwent MIPO healed in significantly less time than did fractures in dogs that underwent ORIF (mean ± SD; 30 ± 10.5 days and 64 ± 10.1 days, respectively). Radiography revealed that fractures in dogs that underwent MIPO healed with significantly more callus formation than did fractures in dogs that underwent ORIF. Although Doppler ultrasonography revealed abundant vascularization in fractures that were healing following MIPO, no significant difference in neovascularization scores was found between groups. For dogs with radius-ulna fractures, data indicated that bridging osteosynthesis combined with a minimally invasive approach contributed to rapid healing after MIPO. The MIPO technique may offer some clinical advantage over ORIF, given that complete radius-ulna fracture healing was achieved in a shorter time with MIPO.

  17. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  18. Team-Based Learning Improves Staff Nurses' Knowledge of Open- and Closed-Chest Cardiac Surgical Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    McRae, Marion E; Chan, Alice; Lee, Ai Jin; Hulett, Renee; Coleman, Bernice

    There are few reports of the use of 1-session team-based learning (TBL) in hospital settings and none to teach cardiac surgical resuscitation (CSR). The aim of this study was to investigate whether 1-session TBL is an effective method to increase nursing knowledge of CSR. The participating subjects viewed a PowerPoint presentation about CSR prior to the learning session. Participants completed a 16-item individual readiness assessment test. Immediately after, participants in groups of 3 completed the same 16-item test as a team using the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique form. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their concerns with CSR, which were analyzed with a grounded theory approach. The sample consisted of 60 subjects (54 completing all phases). Team-based learning significantly increased scores from 36.93 (SD, 8.49) to 50.89 (SD, 5.29), t53 = -13.05, P < .001. There was a significant increase in scores (t46 = 2.13, P = .04) among the noncohesive groups from baseline (52.88 [SD, 3.29]) versus the cohesive groups (50.38 [SD, 4.73]). The qualitative data indicated that the subjects had worries/concerns and lack of self-confidence around CSR. Team-based learning is a feasible method to use for single-session education where team building is also required. Noncohesive groups may benefit from TBL, from discussing divergent viewpoints to reach a consensus. Additional studies are needed to compare preferences for TBL with other teaching methods.

  19. In vivo swine myocardial tissue characterization and monitoring during open chest surgery by time-resolved diffuse near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Lorenzo; Contini, Davide; Farina, Andrea; Torricelli, Alessandro; Pifferi, Antonio; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Ascari, Luca; Potì, Luca; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; L'Abbate, Antonio; Puzzuoli, Stefano

    2011-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of death in industrialized countries. Worldwide, a large number of patients suffering from cardiac diseases are treated by surgery. Despite the advances achieved in the last decades with myocardial protection, surgical failure can still occur. This is due at least in part to the imperfect control of the metabolic status of the heart in the various phases of surgical intervention. At present, this is indirectly controlled by the electrocardiogram and the echographic monitoring of cardiac mechanics as direct measurements are lacking. Diffuse optical technologies have recently emerged as promising tools for the characterization of biological tissues like breast, muscles and bone, and for the monitoring of important metabolic parameters such as blood oxygenation, volume and flow. As a matter of fact, their utility has been demonstrated in a variety of applications for functional imaging of the brain, optical mammography and monitoring of muscle metabolism. However, due to technological and practical difficulties, their potential for cardiac monitoring has not yet been exploited. In this work we show the feasibility of the in-vivo determination of absorption and scattering spectra of the cardiac muscle in the 600-1100 nm range, and of monitoring myocardial tissue hemodynamics by time domain near-infrared spectroscopy at 690 nm and 830 nm. Both measurements have been performed on the exposed beating heart during open chest surgery in pigs, an experimental model closely mimicking the clinical cardio-surgical setting.

  20. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  1. Chest X Ray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test that ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are working ...

  2. Chest Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... inside of the chest cavity. Chest injuries and disorders include Heart diseases Lung diseases and collapsed lung Pleural disorders Esophagus disorders Broken ribs Thoracic aortic aneurysms Disorders ...

  3. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  4. The superiority of paracostal endoscopic-assisted gastropexy over open incisional and belt loop gastropexy in dogs: a comparison of three prophylactic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, A.; Mahmoodifard, M.; Razavifard, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic gastropexy is a procedure that prevents the occurrence of a life threatening condition known as gastric dilation and volvulus (GDV) in dogs. The objective of this study was to compare incisional, belt loop and minimally invasive endoscopically assisted gastropexy by evaluating different parameters such as surgical time, length of scar and score of pain in dogs. Twenty-one healthy, mixed-breed adult dogs weighting 14.3 ± 2.6 kg were randomly divided into three groups. Three gastropexy techniques applied in the following order: incisional (group I), belt loop (group B), and endoscopically assisted gastropexy (group E). Surgical time, anesthetic time, length of surgical incision and score of pain 3 h after surgery were recorded for all dogs. Two weeks after the surgery, positive-contrast gastrography was used to evaluate stomach position and total gastric emptying time. Ultrasonography was also used to evaluate the gastropexy two months after the surgery. Adhesion was confirmed two months after the surgery between the stomach wall at the pyloric antrum and the right side of the body wall in all dogs by ultrasound. The mean surgical time, length of surgical incision and score of pain were significantly lower in group E compared to group I and B (P<0.05). No significant differences were found in total gastric emptying time and gastropexy thickness post-operatively (P>0.05). Due to advantages observed in the current study, the endoscopically assisted technique seems to be a suitable alternative to open incisional and belt loop gastropexies for performing prophylactic gastropexy, especially when performed by skilled surgeons. PMID:27822237

  5. Open reduction and stabilisation of coxofemoral joint luxation in dogs and cats, using a stainless steel rope inserted via a ventral approach to the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, T; Niiyama, M; Taniyama, H

    1996-12-01

    Open reduction and stabilisation of coxofemoral joint luxation was made via a ventral approach to the hip joint in dogs and cats, using a transarticular stainless steel rope. A feature of the procedure is transarticular penetration of the rope from the pelvic cavity to the femoral neck by guidance with a guide wire which was previously inserted from the femoral neck into the pelvic cavity and by detection of the guide wire in the pelvic cavity by use of forceps connected to an alarm-ohmmeter. Forty-seven animals (37 dogs and 10 cats) with acute and simple coxofemoral luxation were treated and postoperatively maintained in cage rest without external fixation. Most of the animals regained an almost normal gait within several days.

  6. Effects of chronic gap junction conduction-enhancing antiarrhythmic peptide GAP-134 administration on experimental atrial fibrillation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Gabriel; Leong-Poi, Howard; Mangat, Iqwal; Moe, Gordon W; Hu, Xudong; So, Petsy Pui-Sze; Tarulli, Emidio; Ramadeen, Andrew; Rossman, Eric I; Hennan, James K; Dorian, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal intercellular communication caused by connexin dysfunction may contribute to atrial fibrillation (AF). The present study assessed the effect of the gap junction conduction-enhancing antiarrhythmic peptide GAP-134 on AF inducibility and maintenance in a dog model of atrial cardiomyopathy. Twenty-four dogs subject to simultaneous atrioventricular pacing (220 bpm for 14 days) were randomly assigned to placebo treatment (PACED-CTRL; 12 dogs) or oral GAP-134 (2.9 mg/kg BID; PACED-GAP-134; 12 dogs) starting on day 0. UNPACED-CTRL (4 dogs) and UNPACED-GAP-134 (4 dogs) served as additional control groups. Change in left atrial (LA) systolic area from baseline to 14 days was calculated using transoesophageal echocardiography. At 14 days, animals underwent an open-chest electrophysiological study. PACED-CTRL dogs (versus UNPACED-CTRL) had a shorter estimated LA wavelength (8.0+/-1.4 versus 24.4+/-2.5 cm, P<0.05) and a greater AF vulnerability (mean AF duration, 1588+/-329 versus 25+/-34 seconds, P<0.05). Oral GAP-134 had no effect on AF vulnerability in UNPACED dogs. Compared with PACED-CTRL dogs, PACED-GAP-134 dogs had a longer estimated LA wavelength (10.2+/-2.8 versus 8.0+/-1.4 cm, respectively, P<0.05). Oral GAP-134 did not significantly reduce AF inducibility or maintenance in the entire group of 24 PACED dogs; in a subgroup of dogs (n=11) with less than 100% increase in LA systolic area, oral GAP-134 reduced AF induction from 100% to 40% and mean AF duration from 1737+/-120 to 615+/-280 seconds (P<0.05). Oral GAP-134 reduces pacing-induced decrease in LA wavelength and appears to attenuate AF vulnerability in dogs with less atrial mechanical remodeling. Gap junction modulation may affect AF in some circumstances.

  7. Comparison of cardiopulmonary responses during sedation with epidural and local anesthesia for laparoscopic-assisted jejunostomy feeding tube placement with cardiopulmonary responses during general anesthesia for laparoscopic-assisted or open surgical jejunostomy feeding tube placement in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Saundra A; Brisson, Brigitte A; Sinclair, Melissa D; Sears, William C

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate the use of laparoscopic-assisted jejunostomy feeding tube (J-tube) placement in healthy dogs under sedation with epidural and local anesthesia and compare cardiopulmonary responses during this epidural anesthetic protocol with cardiopulmonary responses during general anesthesia for laparoscopic-assisted or open surgical J-tube placement. 15 healthy mixed-breed dogs. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive open surgical J-tube placement under general anesthesia (n = 5 dogs; group 1), laparoscopic-assisted J-tube placement under general anesthesia (5; group 2), or laparoscopic-assisted J-tube placement under sedation with epidural and local anesthesia (5; group 3). Cardiopulmonary responses were measured at baseline (time 0), every 5 minutes during the procedure (times 5 to 30 minutes), and after the procedure (after desufflation [groups 2 and 3] or at the start of abdominal closure [group 1]). Stroke volume, cardiac index, and O(2) delivery were calculated. All group 3 dogs tolerated laparoscopic-assisted J-tube placement under sedation with epidural and local anesthesia. Comparison of cardiovascular parameters revealed a significantly higher cardiac index, mean arterial pressure, and O(2) delivery in group 3 dogs, compared with group 1 and 2 dogs. Minimal differences in hemodynamic parameters were found between groups undergoing laparoscopic-assisted and open surgical J-tube placement under general anesthesia (ie, groups 1 and 2); these differences were not considered to be clinically important in healthy research dogs. Sedation with epidural and local anesthesia provided satisfactory conditions for laparoscopic-assisted J-tube placement in healthy dogs; this anesthetic protocol caused less cardiopulmonary depression than general anesthesia and may represent a better choice for J-tube placement in critically ill patients.

  8. Application of hyaluronic acid in the healing of non-experimental open wounds: A pilot study on 12 wounds in 10 client-owned dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Roberta; Boracchi, Patrizia; Romussi, Stefano; Ravasio, Giuliano; Stefanello, Damiano

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Veterinarians have frequently to deal with wounds to the skin, subcutis, and underlying muscle. The aim was to explore the application of hyaluronic acid (HA)-containing dressing on open skin wounds in dogs. The progress of healing was assessed by wound area reduction and two scoring scales applied in human medicine. Materials and Methods: Ten client-owned dogs with 12 cutaneous open wounds healed by the second intention were included. All wounds were treated using available in commerce HA-containing wound dressing from admission to complete re-epithelialization. At every clinical examination, wound area and scale scoring assessments were performed. Results: After debridement, an increased wound size was obtained while an improvement was determined by both grading systems. The median numbers of return to the clinic for bandage change were 5 times. The median time to complete wound healing was 34.5 days. The mean wound area at day 7, 14, 21, and 28 were, respectively, 90.4%, 47.7%, 22.4%, and 14.8% of the original size (for linear measurement) and 95.5%, 54.4%, 23.10%, and 14.8% of the original size (for software measurement). Regarding wound healing assessment tools, the agreement between two operators was considered high for both scales. Conclusions: HA-containing dressing may be a possible wound treatment for cutaneous open wounds in dogs. The assessment of wound quality using scale scoring system could be useful especially in the 1st week and to direct clinical decision-making process. PMID:27047026

  9. Relationship between the extent of the hypoperfused zone of the myocardium and the occurrence of ventricular fibrillation. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, T.; Ribeiro, L.G.; Cheung, W.M.; Faria, D.B.; Petranto, M.; Maroko, P.R.

    1983-06-01

    Ventricular fibrillation and subsequent death frequently occur so soon after coronary artery occlusion that infarct size cannot be determined; thus the systematic study of their relationship is impossible. Recently, however, a technique has been developed that permits the assessment, in vivo, of the extent of the myocardial hypoperfused zone (HZ). Accordingly, in 55 open-chest dogs, /sup 99/mTc-labeled (8 mCi) albumin microspheres (15 microns in diameter) were injected into the left atrium 1 minute after coronary artery occlusion. The zone of hypoperfusion was analyzed in 28 dogs that had ventricular fibrillation (group A) and 27 dogs that had no ventricular fibrillation (group B). In group B, the HZ was 26.3 +/- 1.7% of the left ventricle vs 31.6 +/- 1.3% of the left ventricle in group A (p less than 0.05), showing that ventricular fibrillation occurred in dogs with larger zones of hypoperfusion.

  10. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  11. Effects of transient increased afterload during experimentally induced acute myocardial infarction in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hammerman, H; Kloner, R A; Alker, K J; Schoen, F J; Braunwald, E

    1985-02-15

    Alterations in afterload may occur during acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but it is unknown whether such alterations cause long-term changes in the left ventricular topography or alter healing of the AMI. AMI was produced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in open-chest dogs. Eight dogs were randomized to a methoxamine group with an infusion dose of 30 micrograms/kg/min starting 1 hour after ligation for 4 hours to increase systemic systolic pressure by 40 to 50 mm Hg, and 8 were randomized to a saline control group (n = 8). Seven days later the dogs were killed and the hearts examined. The ratio of infarct wall thickness to noninfarct wall thickness was 1.13 +/- 0.03 (mean +/- standard error of the mean) in control dogs and was 0.98 +/- 0.03 in the dogs treated with methoxamine (p less than 0.005). An expansion index was determined as previously reported and expansion was considered to have occurred if this index exceeded 1.09. The expansion index was 0.98 +/- 0.06 in the control group and 1.18 +/- 0.07 in the methoxamine group (p less than 0.05). Histologic analysis suggested a lag in the healing rate in the methoxamine-treated dogs. Thus, early, brief increases in afterload cause infarct expansion and thinning and appears to slow the early healing phase of AMI in dogs.

  12. Blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Adegboye, V O; Ladipo, J K; Brimmo, I A; Adebo, A O

    2002-12-01

    A retrospective study was conducted at the cardiothoracic surgical unit of the University College Hospital, Ibadan on all consecutive, blunt chest injury patients treated between May 1975 and April 1999. The period of study was divided into 2 periods: May 1975-April 1987, May 1987-April 1999. The aim was to determine the pattern of injury, the management and complications of the injury among the treated. Blunt chest trauma patients were 69% (1331 patients) of all chest injury patients (1928 patients) treated. Mean age for the 2 periods was 38.3 +/- 15 years and 56.4 +/- 6.2 years, the male:female ratio was 4:1 and 2:1 respectively. The incidence of blunt chest trauma tripled in the second period. Blunt chest trauma was classified as involving bony chest wall or without the involvement of bony chest wall. Majority of the blunt chest injuries were minor chest wall injuries (68%, 905 patients), 7.6% (101 patients) had major but stable chest wall injuries, 10.8% (144 patients) had flail chest injuries. Thoracic injuries without fractures of bony chest wall occurred in 181 patients (13.6%). Seven hundred and eighty-seven patients (59.1%) had associated extra-thoracic injuries, in 426 patients (54.1%) two or more extra-thoracic systems were involved. While orthopaedic injury was the most frequent extra-thoracic injury (69.5%) associated with blunt chest trauma, craniospinal injury (31.9%) was more common injury among the patients with severe or life threatening chest trauma. The most common extra-thoracic operation was laparotomy (221 patients). Nine hundred and seventy patients (72.9%) had either closed thoracostomy drainage or clinical observation, 361 patients (27.1%) had major thoracic surgical intervention (emergent in 134 patients, late in 227 patients). Most of the severe lung contusion that needed ventilatory care (85 patients) featured among patients with bony chest wall injury, 15 were without chest wall injury. Majority of patients 63.2% (835 patients) had no

  13. Evaluation of short-term outcome after lung lobectomy for resection of primary lung tumors via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery or open thoracotomy in medium- to large-breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Philipp D; Hunt, Geraldine B; Steffey, Michele A; Culp, William T N; Mayhew, Kelli N; Fuller, Mark; Johnson, Lynelle R; Pascoe, Peter J

    2013-09-01

    To describe clinicopathologic features of dogs that underwent lung lobectomy for resection of primary lung tumors via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) or open thoracotomy (OT) and to compare short-term outcomes for dogs following these procedures. Retrospective cohort study. 46 medium- to large-breed dogs with primary lung tumors. Medical records of dogs that underwent a lung lobectomy via VATS (n = 22) or OT (24) for resection of primary lung tumors between 2004 and 2012 were reviewed. Dogs were included if they weighed > 10 kg (22 lb) and resection of a primary lung tumor was confirmed histologically. Tumor volumes were calculated from preoperative CT scans where available. Surgical time, completeness of excision, time in the ICU, indwelling thoracic drain time, postoperative and total hospitalization time, incidence of major complications, and short-term survival rate were evaluated. VATS was performed with a 3-port (n = 12) or 4-port (10) technique and 1-lung ventilation (22). In 2 of 22 (9%) dogs, VATS was converted to OT. All dogs survived to discharge from the hospital. There were no significant differences between the VATS and OT groups with regard to most variables. Surgery time was significantly longer for VATS than for OT (median, 120 vs 95 minutes, respectively). In medium- to large-breed dogs, short-term outcomes for dogs that underwent VATS for lung lobectomy were comparable to those of dogs that underwent OT. Further studies are required to evaluate the effects of surgical approach on indices of postoperative pain and long-term outcomes.

  14. Open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation of fractures involving the distal aspect of the radius and ulna in miniature- and toy-breed dogs: 102 cases (2008-2015).

    PubMed

    De Arburn Parent, Rebecca; Benamou, Jérôme; Gatineau, Matthieu; Clerfond, Pierre; Planté, Jérôme

    2017-06-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine outcomes and complication rates of open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation of fractures involving the distal aspect of the radius and ulna in miniature- and toy-breed dogs. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 102 miniature- and toy-breed dogs (105 fractures) weighing ≤ 7 kg (15.4 lb) that had undergone open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation of a fracture involving the distal aspect of the radius and ulna from 2008 through 2015. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed and information extracted regarding dog and fracture characteristics, surgical variables, and follow-up examination data (including postoperative complications). Postoperative radiographs were examined for distal fragment size, implant placement, apposition, alignment, and healing stage. A long-term follow-up questionnaire was completed by telephone interview with dog owners at least 6 months after surgery. RESULTS Mean length of the distal bone fragment in all fractures was 19.2 mm, with a mean distal-to-total radial length ratio of 0.21. At last follow-up examination (typically 6 weeks after surgery), 97 (95%) dogs had no signs of lameness; minor lameness was identified in 5 (5%) dogs. Complications developed in 26 (25%) fractures (23 [22%] minor and 3 [3%] major complications). Sixty-eight of 71 (96%) owners rated the overall and long-term outcome as excellent and 3 (4%) as good; 68 of 71 (96%) dogs reportedly had no signs of residual lameness. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation for the treatment of radius-ulna fractures in miniature- and toy-breed dogs provided an excellent outcome with a low complication rate.

  15. Optimal design of small-diameter silicone chest drain devices.

    PubMed

    Chung, Juhyun; Li, John K-J

    2006-03-01

    To overcome the complications due to the use of noncompliant large diameter conventional chest drain devices, a flexible small diameter chest drain device was designed and simulated based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. It was clearly shown that the pressure drop and velocity increase of the most distal drainage holes, which are located near the suction end, are dominant over other drainage holes. A conventional chest drain device with circular side holes showed higher mass flow rate due to larger cross sectional area. It also showed less dependency on the side hole placement compared to open channel, closed cavity chest drain with rectangular side holes. When all holes are opened the conventional chest drain showed 6% increase in flow rate while the open channel, closed cavity drain device showed 47% increase in flow rate reflecting a better design performance. These results provide an insight into the CFD-based optimal design of chest drain devices for potential applications in clinical intraoperative procedures.

  16. Development of a Chest Wall Protector Effective in Preventing Sudden Cardiac Death by Chest Wall Impact (Commotio Cordis)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kartik; Mandleywala, Swati N.; Gannon, Michael P.; Estes, Nathan Anthony Mark; Weinstock, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Commotio cordis, sudden death with chest impact, occurs clinically despite chest wall protectors worn in sports. In an experimental model of commotio cordis, commercially available chest wall protectors failed to prevent ventricular fibrillation (VF). The goal of the current investigation was to develop a chest wall protector effective in the prevention of commotio cordis. Design: In the Tufts experimental model of commotio cordis the ability of chest protectors to prevent VF was assessed. Impacts were delivered with a 40-mph lacrosse ball, timed to the vulnerable period for VF. Intervention: A chest wall protector or no chest wall protector (control) was randomly assigned to be placed over the chest. Four iterative series of 2 to 4 different chest wall material combinations were assessed. Materials included 3 different foams (Accelleron [Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA], closed cell high density foam; Airilon [Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA], closed cell low density soft foam; and an open cell memory foam) that were adhered to a layer of TriDur (Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA), a flexible elastomeric coated aramid that was bonded to a semirigid polypropylene polymer (ImpacShield, Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA). Main Outcome Measure: Induction of VF by chest wall impact was the primary outcome. Results: Of 80 impacts without chest protectors, 43 (54%) resulted in VF. Ventricular fibrillation with chest protectors ranged from a high of 60% to a low of 5%. Of 12 chest protectors assessed, only 3 significantly lowered the risk of VF compared with impacts without chest protectors. These 3 chest protectors were combinations of Accelleron, Airilon, TriDur, and ImpacShield of different thicknesses. Protection increased linearly with the thicker combinations. Conclusions: Effective protection against VF with chest wall protection can be achieved in an experimental model of commotio cordis. Clinical Relevance: Chest protector designs

  17. Chest Wall Trauma.

    PubMed

    Majercik, Sarah; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2017-05-01

    Chest wall trauma is common, and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality of trauma patients. Early identification of major chest wall and concomitant intrathoracic injuries is critical. Generalized management of multiple rib fractures and flail chest consists of adequate pain control (including locoregional modalities); management of pulmonary dysfunction by invasive and noninvasive means; and, in some cases, surgical fixation. Multiple studies have shown that patients with flail chest have substantial benefit (decreased ventilator and intensive care unit days, improved pulmonary function, and improved long-term functional outcome) when they undergo surgery compared with nonoperative management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Chest pain in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Raiola, G; Galati, M C; De Sanctis, V; Salerno, D; Arcuri, V M; Mussari, A

    2002-12-01

    In children and in adolescents, chest pain is relatively common and self-limiting. The close association between chest pain, cardiopathies and sudden death is the cause of intense anxiety in boys and their parents and even doctors. The most frequent causes of chest pain, the diagnosis and the eventual treatment are examined. Finally, the causes of chest pain due to drug abuse (in particular cocaine) and to CO poisoning are also examined. Good knowledge of the problem, an accurate anamnesis and a careful objective exam are useful to choose the most suitable treatment.

  19. Does Subjective Rating Reflect Behavioural Coding? Personality in 2 Month-Old Dog Puppies: An Open-Field Test and Adjective-Based Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Passalacqua, Chiara; Beghelli, Valentina; Capra, Alexa; Normando, Simona; Pelosi, Annalisa; Valsecchi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have recently investigated personality traits in non-human species, with the dog gaining popularity as a subject species for research in this area. Recent research has shown the consistency of personality traits across both context and time for adult dogs, both when using questionnaire based methods of investigation and behavioural analyses of the dogs’ behaviour. However, only a few studies have assessed the correspondence between these two methods, with results varying considerably across studies. Furthermore, most studies have focused on adult dogs, despite the fact that an understanding of personality traits in young puppies may be important for research focusing on the genetic basis of personality traits. In the current study, we sought to evaluate the correspondence between a questionnaire based method and the in depth analyses of the behaviour of 2-month old puppies in an open-field test in which a number of both social and non-social stimuli were presented to the subjects. We further evaluated consistency of traits over time by re-testing a subset of puppies. The correspondence between methods was high and test- retest consistency (for the main trait) was also good using both evaluation methods. Results showed clear factors referring to the two main personality traits ‘extroversion,’ (i.e. the enthusiastic, exuberant approach to the stimuli) and ‘neuroticism,’ (i.e. the more cautious and fearful approach to the stimuli), potentially similar to the shyness-boldness dimension found in previous studies. Furthermore, both methods identified an ‘amicability’ dimension, expressing the positive interactions the pups directed at the humans stranger, and a ‘reservedness’ dimension which identified pups who largely chose not to interact with the stimuli, and were defined as quiet and not nosey in the questionnaire. PMID:26977588

  20. [Hydraulic conductivity of visceral pleura in dogs].

    PubMed

    Ashino, Y; Tanita, T; Ono, S; Funada, J; Koike, K; Fujimura, S

    1993-07-01

    We measured the hydraulic conductivity of the visceral pleura in seven mongrel dogs in situ. The left chest was opened at the seventh intercostal space. A hemispherical capsule, filled with physiological saline, was attached to the visceral pleura of the left lower lobe by the negative pressure in the plate, using a vacuum pump. Transpleural fluid flow (V) was measured at different intracapsular pressures (delta P). The hydraulic conductivity was calculated from the relation between fluid flow and intracapsular pressure, i.e., the slope of the linear regression line. The hydraulic conductivity was 1.49 +/- 0.68 (mean +/- SD) nL.min-1 x cmH2O-2. Our values were smaller than those of former reports obtained in vivo. It is suggested that the dynamics mechanisms of plural effusion may be clarified by studies using our method.

  1. Do dogs (Canis familiaris) show contagious yawning?

    PubMed

    Harr, Aimee L; Gilbert, Valerie R; Phillips, Kimberley A

    2009-11-01

    We report an experimental investigation into whether domesticated dogs display contagious yawning. Fifteen dogs were shown video clips of (1) humans and (2) dogs displaying yawns and open-mouth expressions (not yawns) to investigate whether dogs showed contagious yawning to either of these social stimuli. Only one dog performed significantly more yawns during or shortly after viewing yawning videos than to the open-mouth videos, and most of these yawns occurred to the human videos. No dogs showed significantly more yawning to the open-mouth videos (human or dog). The percentage of dogs showing contagious yawning was less than chimpanzees and humans showing this behavior, and considerably less than a recently published report investigating this behavior in dogs (Joly-Mascheroni et al. in Biol Lett 4:446-448, 2008).

  2. [Dog bites].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland 10'000 people are bitten by a dog annualy. Dog bites are notifiable incidents. Defensive and offensive aggression of dogs (why does a dog bite?), history, signs, treatment and prevention are discussed. Finally a short psychogram of dog owner and victim emphasizes the role of avoiding any escalation.

  3. Antioxidant enzymes attenuate myocardial stunning in the conscious dog

    SciTech Connect

    Triana, J.F.; Unisa, A.; Bolli, R. )

    1990-02-26

    Several studies have shown that postischemic myocardial dysfunction (myocardial stunning) is attenuated by antioxidants, implying a pathogenetic role of oxy-radicals in this phenomenon. However, since all these studies have been performed in open-chest preparations, artifacts due to anesthesia, trauma, and other nonphysiologic conditions cannot be excluded. Accordingly, chronically instrumented dogs underwent a 15-minute occlusion (o) of the left anterior descending artery followed by reperfusion. Dogs received i.v. either saline or superoxide dismutase (SOD) plus catalase (CAT) (16,000 U/kg and 55,000 U/kg, respectively, over 1 hour starting 15 minutes before O). Regional myocardial function was assessed as systolic wall thickening (WTh) using a pulsed Doppler probe. WTh after reperfusion was significantly greater in treated dogs, and this difference could not be ascribed to differences in collateral flow or hemodynamics. The authors conclude that SOD plus catalase attenuate myocardial stunning in the conscious dog, indicating that oxy-radicals play a pathogenetic role in this phenomenon under physiologic conditions.

  4. Epidural administration of morphine facilitates time of appearance of first gastric interdigestive migrating complex in dogs with paralytic ileus after open abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakayoshi, Tomoko; Kawasaki, Naruo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Yasui, Yutaka; Nakada, Koji; Ishibashi, Yoshio; Hanyu, Nobuyoshi; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2007-05-01

    Morphine is known to delay gastric emptying and intestinal transit, although epidural morphine is believed to decrease postoperative complications. However, these findings are still controversial and based only on clinical observations. We investigated the effects of epidural morphine administration on gut motility by measuring interdigestive migrating complex after open surgery in dogs. Twenty-eight beagles were divided into four groups (n = 7 each) to receive epidural saline (control group), epidural morphine, epidural ropivacaine, or low-dose continuous intravenous morphine. Strain gauge force transducers were sutured under open operation to the serosal surface of the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum to monitor gut motility. Time of appearance of first interdigestive migrating complex from the stomach propagated to the distal intestine was significantly shorter in the group that received epidural morphine compared with the other three groups. These results suggest that epidural administration of morphine may facilitate recovery from paralytic ileus after open abdominal surgery, perhaps through its effects on the central nervous system.

  5. Can an old dog learn (and want to experience) new tricks? Cognitive training increases openness to experience in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua J.; Hill, Patrick L.; Payne, Brennan R.; Roberts, Brent W.; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A. L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether an intervention aimed to increase cognitive ability in older adults also changes the personality trait of openness to experience. Older adults completed a 16-week program in inductive reasoning training supplemented by weekly crossword and Sudoku puzzles. Changes in openness to experience were modeled across four assessments over 30 weeks using latent growth curve models. Results indicate that participants in the intervention condition increased in the trait of openness compared to a waitlist control group. The study is one of the first to demonstrate that personality traits can change through non-psychopharmocological interventions. PMID:22251379

  6. Can an old dog learn (and want to experience) new tricks? Cognitive training increases openness to experience in older adults.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Joshua J; Hill, Patrick L; Payne, Brennan R; Roberts, Brent W; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L

    2012-06-01

    The present study investigated whether an intervention aimed to increase cognitive ability in older adults also changes the personality trait of openness to experience. Older adults completed a 16-week program in inductive reasoning training supplemented by weekly crossword and Sudoku puzzles. Changes in openness to experience were modeled across four assessments over 30 weeks using latent growth curve models. Results indicate that participants in the intervention condition increased in the trait of openness compared with a waitlist control group. The study is one of the first to demonstrate that personality traits can change through nonpsychopharmocological interventions.

  7. Chest Pain: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition. Seek emergency medical assistance immediately. Pneumonia with pleurisy Frequent signs and symptoms of pneumonia are chest ... a breath or coughing. This condition is called pleurisy. One sign of pleurisy is that the pain ...

  8. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... inside the scanner. For some diagnoses, a contrast dye, often iodine-based, may be injected into a ... your arm before the imaging test. This contrast dye highlights areas inside your chest and creates clearer ...

  9. Chest tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics Chest Injuries and Disorders Collapsed Lung Critical Care Lung Diseases Pleural Disorders A.D.A. ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  10. Comparison of the effect of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener YM934 with that of nitroglycerin on impaired coronary circulation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shoji; Ohtsuka, Sadanori; Ishikawa, Kimito; Masuda, Noriyuki; Uchida, Wataru; Yamaguchi, Iwao

    2005-05-01

    We compared the effect of an ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener, YM934, with that of nitroglycerin (NTG) on impaired coronary circulation in dogs. Coronary stenosis was produced in 7 dogs by placing a hydraulic occluder around the proximal left circumflex coronary (LCx) artery and abolishing reactive hyperemia to compromise the LCx flow. The following parameters were measured: the aortic pressure, LCx flow velocity, LCx vessel diameter, LCx peripheral pressure, and segment length in the LCx area. Subsequently, we occluded the LCx artery for 15 seconds and measured the recovery-interval (time required for the segment shortening to return to the preocclusion value). The measurements were recorded under three study conditions: (1) at baseline without LCx stenosis; (2) with LCx stenosis under NTG infusion (3 microg/Kg/min); and (3) with LCx stenosis after intravenous administration of YM934 (0.3 microg/kg). The heart rate and aortic pressure were similar under the three study conditions. Mean LCx flow velocity and segment shortening did not significantly change either. However, LCx peripheral pressure decreased after the induction of stenosis (P < 0.05) and showed no response to either NTG or YM934. YM934 administration significantly increased LCx flow in the presence of LCx stenosis, (P < 0.05), whereas NTG infusion did not. YM934 significantly shortened the recovery-interval of the segment shortening after 15-sec LCx occlusion (P < 0.05), whereas NTG did not. These findings suggest that YM934 improves coronary blood flow and prevents myocardial ischemic damage in severely impaired coronary circulation.

  11. Thoracic Trauma: Which Chest Tube When and Where?

    PubMed

    Molnar, Tamas F

    2017-02-01

    Clinical suspicion of hemo/pneumothorax: when in doubt, drain the chest. Stable chest trauma with hemo/pneumothorax: drain and wait. Unstable patient with dislocated trachea must be approached with drain in hand and scalpel ready. Massive hemo/pneumothorax may be controlled by drainage alone. The surgeon should not hesitate to open the chest if too much blood drains over a short period. The chest drainage procedure does not end with the last stitch; the second half of the match is still ahead. The drained patient is in need of physiotherapy and proper pain relief with an extended pleural space: control the suction system.

  12. [Chest injuries (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Elert, O; Satter, P

    1979-04-01

    The mortality rate of chest injuries sustained during work or in road accidents stands now at 15-20%. The considerable force of the impact in road accidents is, in 60-80% of the cases, responsible for chest injuries which involve not only the chest wall but also the lungs. The extent and course of the lung damage must be assessed by repeated X-ray examinations, blood gas analyses and clinical observations. The decision to intubate and apply artificial ventilation should be made at an early stage. Fracture of a single rib needs only pain killers. If a rib is broken in several places or if several ribs are fractured instability of the chest wall is apt to develop in 15-20% of the cases. It manifests itself in paradoxical breathing and ensuing increase in the dead space. These cases require prompt "internal pneumatic splinting" in the form of positive pressure respiration and intubation. In recent years surgical stabilization of the chest wall has regained favour. Plate osteosynthesis, screw-less rib plates, self-gripping steel plates and steel splints are being used (Brunner, Hofmeister, Koncz). Primary osteosynthetic stabilization of the chest wall is indicated only if artificial ventilation has proved inadequate and there are other reasons for performing a thoracotomy. In these circumstances surgical intervention ensures that prolonged artificial ventilation and its attendent risks and complications and the demands made on the nursing staff are reduced to a minimum.

  13. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  14. [Chest pain evaluation project].

    PubMed

    Filippo, Ottani; Nicola, Binetti; Casagranda, Ivo; Cassin, Matteo; Cavazza, Mario; Grifoni, Stefano; Lenzi, Tiziano; Lorenzoni, Roberto; Sbrojavacca, Rodolfo; Tanzi, Pietro; Vergara, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of acute chest pain remains challenging, despite many insights and innovations over the past two decades. The percentage of patients presenting at the emergency department with acute chest pain who are subsequently admitted to the hospital appears to be increasing. Patients with acute coronary syndromes who are inadvertently discharged from the emergency department have an adverse short-term prognosis. However, the admission of a patient with chest pain who is at low risk for acute coronary syndrome can lead to unnecessary tests and procedures, with their burden of costs and complications. Therefore, with increasing economic pressures on health care, physicians and administrators are interested in improving the efficiency of care for patients with acute chest pain. Since the emergency department organization (i.e. the availability of an intensive observational area) and integration of care and treatment between emergency physicians and cardiologists greatly differ over the national territory, the purpose of the present position paper is two-fold: first, to review the evidence-based efficacy and utility of various diagnostic tools, and, second, to delineate the basic critical pathways (describing key steps for care and treatment) that need to be implemented in order to standardize and expedite the evaluation of chest pain patients, making their diagnosis and treatment as uniform as possible across the country.

  15. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  16. Restrictive chest wall disorders.

    PubMed

    Donath, Joseph; Miller, Albert

    2009-06-01

    Hypoventilation can be caused by diseases of the chest wall. Any anatomical or functional abnormality of the bony thorax increases dead space ventilation and the work of breathing, whether congenital or acquired, acute or chronic, and whether its cause is infectious, traumatic, environmental, iatrogenic, or unknown. In this article, we discuss these heterogeneous disorders from the viewpoint of the practicing nonpediatric pulmonary physician, only briefly touching on surgical, pediatric, rheumatologic, and other nonpulmonary ramifications. Emphasis is on the most common and the best researched forms of chest wall restriction, including kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, flail chest, and ankylosing spondylitis. Other diseases such as osteoporosis with its less well known pulmonary effects, and some rarely seen entities, are briefly discussed.

  17. An open, self-controlled study on the efficacy of topical indoxacarb for eliminating fleas and clinical signs of flea-allergy dermatitis in client-owned dogs in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Fisara, Petr; Sargent, Roger M; Shipstone, Michael; von Berky, Andrew; von Berky, Janet

    2014-06-01

    Canine flea-allergy dermatitis (FAD), a hypersensitivity response to antigenic material in the saliva of feeding fleas, occurs worldwide and remains a common presentation in companion animal veterinary practice despite widespread availability of effective systemic and topical flea-control products. To evaluate the clinical response in dogs with FAD treated topically with indoxacarb, a novel oxadiazine insecticide. Twenty-five client-owned dogs in Queensland, Australia diagnosed with pre-existing FAD on the basis of clinical signs, flea-antigen intradermal and serological tests. An open-label, noncontrolled study, in which all dogs were treated with topical indoxacarb at 4 week intervals, three times over 12 weeks. Twenty-four dogs completed the study. Complete resolution of clinical signs of FAD was observed in 21 cases (87.5%), with nearly complete resolution or marked improvement in the remaining three cases. Mean clinical scores (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index-03) were reduced by 93.3% at week 12. Mean owner-assessed pruritus scores were reduced by 88% by week 12. Mean flea counts reduced by 98.7 and 100% in weeks 8 and 12, respectively. Topical indoxacarb treatment applied every 4 weeks for 12 weeks, without concomitant antipruritic or ectoparasiticide therapy, completely alleviated flea infestations in all dogs and associated clinical signs of FAD in a high proportion of this population of dogs in a challenging flea-infestation environment. © 2014 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the ESVD and the ACVD.

  18. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Anal Cancer Facet Joint Block Video: Lung Cancer Screening Video: Upper GI Tract X-ray Video: ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  19. Angina - when you have chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain; ACS - chest pain; Heart attack - chest pain; Myocardial infarction - chest pain; MI - chest pain ... AHA guideline for the management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction: executive summary: a report of the American College ...

  20. Which Disposable Chest Electrode?

    PubMed Central

    Hubner, P. J. B.

    1969-01-01

    Chest electrodes are preferred to limb electrodes for cardiac monitoring, as limb movements are not restricted and produce less interference of the E.C.G. trace. Eight types of disposable chest electrodes were investigated to compare their performance, skin reactions, cost, ease of application, size, and skin–electrode impedance. Elema-Schonander electrodes were found to be the most efficient and the most expensive. In their application care was required to avoid severe skin reactions. Dracard electrodes were simple to attach, worked well without severe skin reactions, and were cheap. They are recommended for routine use. Smith and Nephew electrodes, a type of “multipoint electrodes” which do not require electrode jelly, frequently produced severe skin reactions, making them unsuitable for monitoring for periods exceeding 12 hours. PMID:5801347

  1. Automatic imitation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Range, Friederike; Huber, Ludwig; Heyes, Cecilia

    2011-01-22

    After preliminary training to open a sliding door using their head and their paw, dogs were given a discrimination task in which they were rewarded with food for opening the door using the same method (head or paw) as demonstrated by their owner (compatible group), or for opening the door using the alternative method (incompatible group). The incompatible group, which had to counterimitate to receive food reward, required more trials to reach a fixed criterion of discrimination performance (85% correct) than the compatible group. This suggests that, like humans, dogs are subject to 'automatic imitation'; they cannot inhibit online the tendency to imitate head use and/or paw use. In a subsequent transfer test, where all dogs were required to imitate their owners' head and paw use for food reward, the incompatible group made a greater proportion of incorrect, counterimitative responses than the compatible group. These results are consistent with the associative sequence learning model, which suggests that the development of imitation depends on sensorimotor experience and phylogenetically general mechanisms of associative learning. More specifically, they suggest that the imitative behaviour of dogs is shaped more by their developmental interactions with humans than by their evolutionary history of domestication.

  2. Automatic imitation in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Range, Friederike; Huber, Ludwig; Heyes, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    After preliminary training to open a sliding door using their head and their paw, dogs were given a discrimination task in which they were rewarded with food for opening the door using the same method (head or paw) as demonstrated by their owner (compatible group), or for opening the door using the alternative method (incompatible group). The incompatible group, which had to counterimitate to receive food reward, required more trials to reach a fixed criterion of discrimination performance (85% correct) than the compatible group. This suggests that, like humans, dogs are subject to ‘automatic imitation’; they cannot inhibit online the tendency to imitate head use and/or paw use. In a subsequent transfer test, where all dogs were required to imitate their owners' head and paw use for food reward, the incompatible group made a greater proportion of incorrect, counterimitative responses than the compatible group. These results are consistent with the associative sequence learning model, which suggests that the development of imitation depends on sensorimotor experience and phylogenetically general mechanisms of associative learning. More specifically, they suggest that the imitative behaviour of dogs is shaped more by their developmental interactions with humans than by their evolutionary history of domestication. PMID:20667875

  3. Influence of a Diester Glucocorticoid Spray on the Cortisol Level and the CCR4+ CD4+ Lymphocytes in Dogs with Atopic Dermatitis: Open Study

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Masato; Ishimaru, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of 0.00584% hydrocortisone aceponate spray (HCA; Cortavance Virbac SA, Carros, France) on blood serum cortisol levels and peripheral blood CCR4+ CD4+ T-lymphocyte levels in dogs with atopic dermatitis. Patients were randomly divided into group I (N = 8) and group II (N = 8). The dogs in group I were sprayed with HCA on the affected skin once a day for three weeks. The dogs in group II were treated once a day for 3 days followed by no treatment for 4 days for a total of three weeks. For the dogs in group I and group II the CADESI-03 scores before and after use of HCA showed significant reduction (P < 0.01). The postcortisol level after the use of HCA in group I showed 36.0% decrease and showed significant suppression (P < 0.01). By comparison, the use of HCA on group II did not show decrease in postcortisol levels. There was a tendency of suppression for hypothalamus—pituitary gland—adrenal gland system, but it was not serious influence. In addition, there was no influence on peripheral blood CCR4+ CD4+ lymphocytes percentage in dogs in group I after treatment with HCA. PMID:26464935

  4. [History of chest percussion].

    PubMed

    Chrobák, L

    2001-01-01

    Although percussion of the abdomen was already known to the Greek physician Galenos (2nd century A. D.) who used it to distinguish between ascites and meteorism, the Viennese physician Leopold Auenbrugger (1722-1809) started to use, the percussion of the chest as a diagnostic tool. In 1761 he published his experience in a treatise called "New Method for Detecting Hidden Ailments of the Chest by Percussion of the Thorax" (Inventum novum ex percussione thoracis hummani ut signo abstruso interni pectoris morbos detergendi). However, this method was introduced into practice only 50 years later by Jean Nicolas Corvisart, who translated Auenbrugger's book in 1808 into French. The famous Vinnese internist of Czech origin Joseph Skoda (1805-1881) set the teaching about percussion and auscultation on a firm physical basis. Skoda confronted the physical findings with dissection materials in close cooperation with the renowned Vinnese pathologist Karl Rokitansky (1804-1878), who was born in Hradec Králové. The Medical School in Prague became famous for its excellent command of methods based on physical examination and surpassed even the Viennese School.

  5. Interaction of Anti-G Measures and Chest Wall Mechanics in Determining Gas Exchange.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    transition between a relatively non-compliant upper rib cage and the more compliant lower chest wall. Lupi -Herrera et al. (1976) exposed dogs to...Patterson, Jr. Elevation gradient of intrathoracic pressure. J. Appl. Physiol. 16: 465-468, 1961. 17. Lupi -Herrera, E., C. Prefaut, A.E. Grassino and N.R

  6. [Affective behavioural responses by dogs to tactile human-dog interactions].

    PubMed

    Kuhne, Franziska; Hössler, Johanna C; Struwe, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The communication of dogs is based on complex, subtle body postures and facial expressions. Some social interaction between dogs includes physical contact. Humans generally use both verbal and tactile signals to communicate with dogs. Hence, interaction between humans and dogs might lead to conflicts because the behavioural responses of dogs to human-dog interaction may be misinterpreted and wrongly assessed. The behavioural responses of dogs to tactile human-dog interactions and human gestures are the focus of this study. The participating dogs (n = 47) were privately owned pets.They were of varying breed and gender.The test consisted of nine randomised test sequences (e. g. petting the dog's head or chest). A test sequence was performed for a period of 30 seconds. The inter-trial interval was set at 60 seconds and the test-retest interval was set at 10 minutes. The frequency and duration of the dogs'behavioural responses were recorded using INTERACT. To examine the behavioural responses of the dogs, a two-way analysis of variance within the linear mixed models procedure of IBM SPSS Statistics 19 was conducted. A significant influence of the test-sequenc order on the dogs' behaviour could be analysed for appeasement gestures (F8,137 = 2.42; p = 0.018), redirected behaviour (F8,161 = 6.31; p = 0.012) and socio-positive behaviour (F8,148 = 6.28; p = 0.012). The behavioural responses of the dogs, which were considered as displacement activities (F8,109 = 2.5; p = 0.014) differed significantly among the test sequences. The response of the dogs, measured as gestures of appeasement, redirected behaviours, and displacement activities, was most obvious during petting around the head and near the paws.The results of this study conspicuously indicate that dogs respond to tactile human-dog interactions with gestures of appeasement and displacement activities. Redirected behaviours, socio-positive behaviours as well displacement activities are behavioural responses which dogs

  7. [Musculoskeletal-related chest pain].

    PubMed

    Sturm, C; Witte, T

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 10-50% of chest pains are caused by musculoskeletal disorders. The association is twice as frequent in primary care as in emergency admissions. This article provides an overview of the most important musculoskeletal causes of chest pain and on the diagnostics and therapy. A selective search and analysis of the literature related to the topic of musculoskeletal causes of chest pain were carried out. Non-inflammatory diseases, such as costochondritis and fibromyalgia are frequent causes of chest pain. Inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus are much less common but are more severe conditions and therefore have to be diagnosed and treated. The diagnostics and treatment often necessitate interdisciplinary approaches. Chest pain caused by musculoskeletal diseases always represents a diagnosis by exclusion of other severe diseases of the heart, lungs and stomach. Physiotherapeutic and physical treatment measures are particularly important, including manual therapy, transcutaneous electrical stimulation and stabilization exercises, especially for functional myofascial disorders.

  8. Use of CPR in hemorrhagic shock, a dog model.

    PubMed

    Jeffcoach, David R; Gallegos, Juan J; Jesty, Sophy A; Coan, Patricia N; Chen, Jason; Heidel, Robert Eric; Daley, Brian J

    2016-07-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was designed for sudden cardiac events usually triggered by thrombotic phenomena. Despite this, it is routinely used in trauma resuscitations as per the American Heart guidelines. There is no data supporting the use of chest compressions in hemorrhagic shock. An evidence-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) protocol has been developed for dogs. We sought to determine the effects and outcomes of chest compressions in hemorrhagic shock in a canine model. Eighteen dogs were randomized to three treatment groups-chest compressions only after hemorrhagic shock (CPR), CPR with fluid resuscitation after hemorrhagic shock (CPR + FLU), and fluid resuscitation alone after hemorrhagic shock (FLU). Under anesthesia, dogs were hemorrhaged until pulse was lost; they were maintained pulseless for 30 minutes and then resuscitated over 20 minutes. Vital signs and laboratory values were recorded at determined intervals. Echocardiography was performed throughout the study. Upon termination of the study, kidney, liver, heart, and brain tissue histology was evaluated for end organ damage. Statistical significance was p < 0.05 with a Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Blood loss and mean time to loss of pulse were similar between the groups. Dogs in the CPR group had significantly lower mean arterial pressure and higher pulse at all points compared to CPR + FLU and FLU (p < 0.05). Ejection fraction was lower in the CPR group at 5 and 10 minutes compared to the other groups (p < 0.05). Vital signs and laboratory results between CPR + FLU and FLU were equivalent. Two of six dogs in the CPR group died, while no dogs died in the CPR + FLU or FLU groups. Dogs in the CPR group were found to have more episodes of end organ damage. There was no benefit to chest compressions in the hypovolemic animals. Chest compressions in addition to fluid did not reverse signs of shock better than fluid alone. Further research is needed to define if there is a

  9. Traumatic mitral valve avulsion from the annulus fibrosis producing acute left heart failure in a dog.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lisa M; Keirstead, Natalie D; Snyder, Patti S

    2004-09-01

    Traumatic detachment of the mitral valve from the annulus fibrosis occurred in a dog following blunt chest trauma. Euthanasia was elected approximately 7 months posttrauma due to refractory, chronic left heart failure. This is the first reported case of traumatic mitral valve rupture in a dog.

  10. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries.

  11. Morphologic and functional effects of piroxicam on myocardial scar formation after coronary occlusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hammerman, H; Alker, K J; Schoen, F J; Kloner, R A

    1984-02-01

    To determine whether piroxicam, a widely used, long-acting anti-inflammatory agent, causes scar thinning after acute myocardial infarction (MI), MI was produced in 16 anesthetized, open-chest dogs by ligation of the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. The dogs were randomized into 2 groups and treated in a blinded fashion, 8 with piroxicam, 1 mg/kg i.v. at 15 minutes and at 3 hours after ligation (Group 1) and 8 with saline solution (Group 2). Two-dimensional echocardiograms were performed 7 days and 6 weeks after ligation. At 6 weeks, the dogs were killed and the hearts examined. Scar thickness was 7.1 +/- 0.3 mm in control dogs and 5.2 +/- 0.4 mm in piroxicam-treated dogs (p less than 0.01). The ratio of scar thickness to noninfarcted wall thickness was 0.87 +/- 0.03 (mean +/- standard error of the mean) in the control group, and was significantly lower (0.62 +/- 0.04) in the piroxicam-treated group (p less than 0.001). Regional function, expressed as the percent change in the area of the left ventricular cavity (% delta A) from short-axis 2-dimensional echocardiograms, was 42 +/- 3% 7 days after occlusion in the control group and was not significantly different in the treated group (34 +/- 5%). At the end of 6 weeks % delta A had improved in the piroxicam-treated group to 44 +/- 3% (p less than 0.05 compared with the value after 7 days), and was similar to % delta A of the control group at 6 weeks (43 +/- 3%). Thus, clinical doses of piroxicam administered early after MI caused moderate scar thinning, which was not associated with impairment of regional left ventricular function 6 weeks later.

  12. Monitoring Military Dogs by Biotelemetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    wire. The wire was crimped into the washer for positive fixation. The coupling joint was then potted with dental acryli’ý LO increase strength and to...transducer into the posterior thoracic aorta. The chest was opened with a routine left lateral intercostal thoracotomy incision and the aorta was isolated

  13. Effect of simvastatin and antioxidant vitamins on atrial fibrillation promotion by atrial-tachycardia remodeling in dogs.

    PubMed

    Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Schram, Gernot; Lavoie, Joel; Nattel, Stanley

    2004-10-19

    There is evidence for a role of oxidant stress and inflammation in atrial fibrillation (AF). Statins have both antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. We compared the effects of simvastatin with those of antioxidant vitamins on AF promotion by atrial tachycardia in dogs. We studied dogs subjected to atrial tachypacing (ATP) at 400 bpm in the absence and presence of treatment with simvastatin, vitamin C, and combined vitamins C and E. Serial closed-chest electrophysiological studies were performed in each dog at baseline and 2, 4, and 7 days after tachypacing onset. Atrioventricular block was performed to control ventricular rate. Mean duration of induced AF was increased from 42+/-18 to 1079+/-341 seconds at terminal open-chest study after tachypacing alone (P<0.01), and atrial effective refractory period (ERP) at a cycle length of 300 ms was decreased from 117+/-5 to 76+/-6 ms (P<0.01). Tachypacing-induced ERP shortening and AF promotion were unaffected by vitamin C or vitamins C and E; however, simvastatin suppressed tachypacing-induced remodeling effects significantly, with AF duration and ERP averaging 41+/-15 seconds and 103+/-4 ms, respectively, after tachypacing with simvastatin therapy. Tachypacing downregulated L-type Ca2+-channel alpha-subunit expression (Western blot), an effect that was unaltered by antioxidant vitamins but greatly attenuated by simvastatin. Simvastatin attenuates AF promotion by atrial tachycardia in dogs, an effect not shared by antioxidant vitamins, and constitutes a potentially interesting new pharmacological approach to preventing the consequences of atrial tachycardia remodeling.

  14. Chest drainage systems in use

    PubMed Central

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  15. Protective effect of coronary sinus obstruction from primary ischemia-induced ventricular fibrillation in the dog.

    PubMed

    Kralios, A C; Anderson, F L; Kralios, F A

    1993-04-01

    We examined whether partial coronary sinus obstruction affects the latency of the early ventricular fibrillation (VF) of acute ischemia. During baseline trials 15 of 19 open-chest dogs fibrillated repeatedly and predictably within 2 to 5 minutes (251.6 +/- 64 seconds) after reversible, double coronary artery occlusion without developing profound hemodynamic deterioration. The effect of partial coronary sinus obstruction sufficient to increase coronary sinus pressure to 40 mm Hg could be adequately tested in 11 dogs. Coronary sinus obstruction consistently prevented VF in five dogs, significantly prolonged the VF latency in three (p < 0.01 to p < 0.001), and had no clear effect in another three. The overall effect was significant at the p < 0.01 level. VF latency prolongation/prevention was also positively correlated to the residual coronary sinus pressure at the time of VF (r = 0.76; p < 0.008), as well as the baseline VF latency (r = 0.75; (p < 0.008). The protective effect of coronary venous hypertension most likely reflects preservation of adequate extracellular fluid in the ischemic region after the perfusion arrest. This extracellular fluid may constitute a key component in the prevention of early ischemic arrhythmias by preserving interstitial hydraulic continuity and tissue homogeneity through enhanced dilution and diffusion of solutes.

  16. Pharmacology of Casimiroa edulis; II. Cardiovascular effects in the anesthesized dog.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; Magos, G A

    1991-06-01

    The cardiovascular effects of an aqueous extract of seeds of Casimiroa edulis were assessed in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. The extract produced marked hypotension which lasted more than two hours; it was accompanied by moderate and less persistent bradycardia. The histaminergic nature of these effects was investigated in animals pretreated with the specific antagonists diphenhydramine, cimetidine, or a combination of both agents. These experiments showed that both H1- and H2-receptors were involved in the hypotensive response, while the bradycardia was mediated solely through an H1-mechanism. In open-chest dogs instrumented for recording cardiac output (ascending aortic flow), left ventricular contractility (dp/dt), central venous pressure (superior vena cava), systemic blood pressure, heart rate, total peripheral resistance and stroke volume, the extract decreased blood pressure and peripheral resistance and increased cardiac output and stroke volume, without modifying the other parameters. It was concluded that the cardiovascular pattern of Casimiroa edulis in the dog is that of a peripheral arterial vasodilator and that it increases cardiac output by reducing left ventricular afterload.

  17. [A case of huge abscess extended from anterior neck to left lung and lateral chest wall].

    PubMed

    Ikeya, T; Tsuda, M; Hara, H; Koyama, S; Sugiyama, S; Misaki, T

    1997-11-01

    62-year-old woman admitted our hospital with pain of left upper extremity from the left chest and dysphasia. Chest X-ray showed the huge mass shadow in the left lung field. Diabetes mellitus and inflammatory reaction such as high fervor, leukocytosis, CRP and ESR accentuation were recognized. Conservative therapy was done at first, but mass shadow on X-ray increased, and swelling appeared from the neck to the left lateral chest wall. And the same site appeared like subcutaneous emphysema. Computed Tomography showed mass shadow which was enlarged and spread in lung parenchyma and left chest wall with bubble image. Incision and open drainage was performed for the left chest wall but origin bacteria was detected in neither anaerobic nor aerobic culture of pus. Inflammation and mass shadow of left upper lung field have decreased gradually. The patient discharged without bronchoalveolar fistula. Abscess extending from the neck or chest wall with diabetes mellitus is very rare.

  18. Understanding how dogs encourage and motivate walking: cross-sectional findings from RESIDE.

    PubMed

    Westgarth, C; Knuiman, M; Christian, H E

    2016-09-29

    Many people live with dogs but not all walk with them regularly. This study examines the demographic and behavioural factors that contribute towards owners reporting having a strong sense of encouragement and motivation to walk provided by their dogs, which we call 'the Lassie effect'. Data was collected from 629 dog owners participating in the RESIDE cross-sectional survey in Perth, Western Australia. Multivariable logistic regression analyses of factors associated with two separate outcome survey items 'Dog encouragement to walk' (how often dog encouraged me to go walking in last month) and 'Dog motivation to walk' (Having a dog makes me walk more). Owning a larger dog; having an increased level of attachment to dog; knowing dog enjoys going for a walk; believing walking keeps dog healthy; and having high social support from family to go walking, were positively associated with both outcomes 'dog encouragement to walk' and 'dog motivation to walk'. Conversely, reporting the presence of children at home; that the child is the main person who walks with the dog; and perceiving dog-specific barriers to walking with dog daily; were negatively associated with both outcomes. In addition, 'Dog motivation to walk' only was positively associated with a belief walking reduces barking, and negatively with owning a dog that is overweight or a dog that is too old/sick. Reporting that the spouse/partner is main person who walks with the dog was also negatively associated with 'dog motivation to walk', as was increased perceived access to public open spaces with dog-supportive features. There are both dog and owner factors that are associated with an owner's sense of encouragement, and motivation to walk the dog, which in turn has been found to be associated with dog waking behaviour. These factors may be targeted in future interventions to increase and maintain physical activity levels of both people and pets.

  19. On the mechanism of the coronary dilator effect of serotonin in the dog.

    PubMed

    Mena, M A; Vidrio, H

    1976-03-01

    In experiments designed to determine the nature of the coronary dilator effect of serotonin the influence of intracoronary administration of the amine on coronary perfusion pressure, heart rate and ventricular contractile force was assessed in anesthetized open-chest dogs in which the left coronary artery was perfused with blood at a constant rate. Serotonin elicited dose-related decreases in coronary perfusion pressure and increases in contractile force, and lowered heart rate slightly. The dilator response was antagonized by methysergide, slightly potentiated by practolol and unaffected by reserpine. The inotropic effect was partially antagonized by methysergide and completely blocked by practolol and reserpine. It is concluded that serotonin induces coronary dilatation by direct stimulation of specific receptors that this effect is independent of the cardiac stimulation produced by the amine, and the latter response is mediated through beta1-adrenoceptors activated by released norepinephrine.

  20. Dog Fights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2010-01-01

    Bringing service animals into schools raises serious questions about how to meet one student's special needs while ensuring the educational well-being of all. This article discusses how schools grapple with the practical and legal questions involved in allowing service dogs on campus. The author cites a case in 2009 called "Kalbfleisch v. Columbia…

  1. Dog Fights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2010-01-01

    Bringing service animals into schools raises serious questions about how to meet one student's special needs while ensuring the educational well-being of all. This article discusses how schools grapple with the practical and legal questions involved in allowing service dogs on campus. The author cites a case in 2009 called "Kalbfleisch v. Columbia…

  2. Heimlich valve for chest drainage.

    PubMed

    Heimlich, H J

    1983-01-01

    The Heimlich chest drainage valve was developed so that the process of draining the pleural cavity could be accomplished in a safe, relatively simple, and efficient manner. Replacing the cumbersome underwater drainage bottle system, the Heimlich valve connects to chest tubing and allows fluid and air to pass in one direction only. The valve, which functions in any position, need never be clamped, and regulated suction can be attached to it if necessary. The valve drains into a plastic bag that can be held at any level, allowing the patient undergoing chest drainage to be ambulatory simply by carrying the bag. The construction and function of the valve is easily understood by medical and nursing staffs. It is presterilized, stored in a sterile package, and readily utilized on emergency vehicles and in the operating room.

  3. [Chest ultrasonography in pleurapulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gallego Gómez, M P; García Benedito, P; Pereira Boo, D; Sánchez Pérez, M

    2014-01-01

    Although the initial diagnosis and follow-up of pleuropulmonary disease are normally done with plain chest films and the gold standard for chest disease is computed tomography, diverse studies have established the usefulness of chest ultrasonography in the diagnosis of different pleuropulmonary diseases like pleural effusion and lung consolidation, among others. In this article, we show the different ultrasonographic patterns for pleuropulmonary disease. The availability of ultrasonography in different areas (ICU, recovery areas) makes this technique especially important for critical patients because it obviates the need to transfer the patient. Moreover, ultrasonography is noninvasive and easy to repeat. On the other hand, it enables the direct visualization of pleuropulmonary disease that is necessary for interventional procedures. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. [Analysis of systematic environmental and genetic effects on body weight and body measurements in German shepherd dogs].

    PubMed

    Dammann, Melanie; Hamann, Henning; Stock, Kathrin Friederike; Distl, Ottmar

    2009-01-01

    In dog breeding permission for breeding is only given when the body measurements of the dog are within the lower and upper limits which are defined in the breed standard. Therefore, the objective of this study was to analyse the systematic and genetic effects on body weight and body measurements recorded at licensing in German shepherd dogs (GSD) over a period of 10 years. The data included withers and chest height, chest circumference and body weight from 36,028 breeding dogs born between 1992 and 2003. Birth year, month of birth and region were significant for the traits analysed. Age at breeding approval was significant for the body measurements withers height and chest height and only significant for male dogs for chest circumference. Inbreeding coefficient was significant as a nonlinear covariate for withers and chest height. The genetic parameters were estimated in linear animal models using residual maximum likelihood (REML) and the relationship matrix of 53,429 dogs. Uni- and bivariate analyses were performed for both sexes together and separately for males and females. Heritability estimates for both sexes together were 0.41 +/- 0.01 for withers height and 0.27 +/- 0.01 for body weight. For the other traits studied, heritability estimates were lower with values of 0.20 +/- 0.01 for chest height and 0.13 +/- 0.01 for chest circumference. In the separate analyses for male and female dogs, heritability estimates were higher for females. Additive genetic correlations were at 0.91 to 0.98 between corresponding traits in males and females. The high genetic correlations indicate that selection for conformation traits equally affects both sexes and does not increase sexual dimorphism in dogs.

  5. Evaluation of dog-appeasing pheromone as a potential treatment for dogs fearful of fireworks.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, G; Mills, D S

    2003-04-05

    Thirty dogs that showed signs of fear in response to fireworks participated in an open clinical trial to assess the potential value of dog-appeasing pheromone for the alleviation of their behavioural signs. The treatment was delivered continuously into the atmosphere of each dog's home with an electrically heated diffuser. At the baseline assessments, the owners identified the behavioural signs of fear that their dogs normally displayed in response to fireworks, rated their frequency and assessed the overall severity of their responses. These measures were repeated at the final assessment and the owners also rated the change in their dogs' responses. There were significant improvements in the owners' rating of nine of the 14 behavioural signs of fear that were examined, and in their ratings of the overall severity of the responses. The treatment was generally associated with a reduction in the intensity of fear but there were variations in the responses of individual dogs.

  6. Dog Bite Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Dog bite emergencies What do I do if I’ ... vaccination records. What do I do if my dog bites someone? Dog bites are scary for everyone ...

  7. Chest physiotherapy in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, A; Shivbalan, So; Thangavelu, S

    2005-06-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) in children is generally considered as a separate and specialized treatment modality that should be rendered only by a physiotherapist. Actually this is not difficult if one has a proper understanding of the basic concept and principle behind the maneuver. This article aims at making CPT simple, so that it could be incorporated in routine pediatric practice for managing respiratory ailments.

  8. Interpretations of the chest roentgenogram

    SciTech Connect

    Landay, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Sixteen brief chapters cover basic principles, techniques, and normal appearance of the lungs, hili, mediastinum, pleura, thoracic cage, and extrathoracic structures as seen in chest radiographs. Common pathologic findings are described and copiously illustrated. Four brief concluding chapters highlight findings in the neck, intensive care radiographs with special reference to tubes and catheters, clues to indicate site of disease, and a brief summary.

  9. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  10. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  11. Reconstruction of chest wall defects.

    PubMed

    Hasse, J

    1991-12-01

    A series of 61 consecutive procedures of chest wall resection and reconstruction in 58 patients during the period between August, 1986 and December, 1990 is reported. The ages ranged between 6-77 years. The chest wall resection was indicated for malignant affections in 54 cases. Among these, there were 24 patients with bronchial carcinoma invading the chest wall, 17 patients with primary or metastatic sarcoma, 11 patients with recurrent breast cancer and 3 with cancer metastases of varying origin. Pulmonary resection included pneumonectomy in 8 cases, lobectomy in 19, segmental and wedge resections in 26. In the majority of resections, the reconstruction was accomplished without implants. In cases with full thickness removal of the chest wall, the plane of the rib cage and/or the sternum was reconstructed using Vicryl mesh (n = 7), PTFE soft tissue patch (n = 11), marlex-mesh (n = 1), or methyl-methacrylate (n = 3). There was one case of hospital mortality, 6 weeks postoperatively, due to neurological failure from an independent preoperatively undiagnosed brain tumor. There were 4 reoperations: one early and one late (4 months) infection, one case of limited superficial necrosis of a flap and one with chronic lymphous drainage from a large myocutaneous flap. In no instance was primary postoperative ventilation therapy necessary. Mechanical ventilation was instituted only on day 8 in the patient who accounts for the mortality in this series. In the presence of primary infection, the greater omentum was used for the restoration of the integument.

  12. Sulfur dioxide-induced chronic bronchitis in beagle dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, S.A.; Wolff, R.K.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; Lundgren, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This study was done to produce a model of chronic bronchitis. Twelve beagle dogs were exposed to 500 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) for 2 h/d, 5d/wk for 21 wk and 4 dogs were sham-exposed to filtered ambient air for the same period. Exposure effects were evaluated by periodically examining the dogs using chest radiographs, pulmonary function, tracheal mucous clearance, and the cellular and soluble components of bronchopulmonary lavage fluids. Dogs were serially sacrificed after 13 and 21 wk of exposure and after 6 and 14 wk of recovery. Clinical signs produced in the SO/sub 2/-exposed dogs included mucoid nasal discharge, productive cough, moist rales on auscultation, tonsilitis, and conjunctivitis. Chest radiographs revealed mild peribronchiolar thickening. Histopathology, tracheal mucous clearance measurements, and lavage cytology were consistent with a diagnosis of chronic bronchitis. It is concluded that repeated exposure to 500 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 21 wk produced chronic bronchitis in the beagle dog. Complete recovery occurred within 5 wk following cessation of SO/sub 2/ exposure. 43 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Intervention Mapping to Develop a Print Resource for Dog-Walking Promotion in Canada.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Julia; Dwyer, John J M; Coe, Jason B

    2016-10-25

    Promoting dog walking among dog owners is consistent with One Health, which focuses on the mutual health benefits of the human-animal relationship for people and animals. In this study, we used intervention mapping (a framework to develop programs and resources for health promotion) to develop a clearer understanding of the determinants of dog walking to develop curricular and educational resources for promoting regular dog walking among dog owners. Twenty-six adult dog owners in Ontario participated in a semi-structured interview about dog walking in 2014. Thematic analysis entailing open, axial, and selective coding was conducted. Among the reasons why the participating dog owners walk their dog were the obligation to the dog, the motivation from the dog, self-efficacy, the dog's health, the owner's health, socialization, a well-behaved dog, and having a routine. The main barriers to dog walking were weather, lack of time, the dog's behavior while walking, and feeling unsafe. We compared interview results to findings in previous studies of dog walking to create a list of determinants of dog walking that we used to create a matrix of change objectives. Based on these results, we developed a print resource to promote regular dog walking among dog owners. The findings can be used by veterinary educators to inform course content that specifically educates veterinary students on the promotion of dog walking among dog owners and the benefits to both humans and animals. The study also offers veterinarians a further understanding upon which to initiate a conversation and develop educational resources for promoting regular dog walking among dog-owning clients.

  14. Management of Open Pneumothorax in Tactical Combat Casualty Care: TCCC Guidelines Change 13-02

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-09

    pneumothorax is: “All open and/ or sucking chest wounds should be treated by immedi- ately applying a vented chest seal to cover the defect. If a vented...chest seal did not.2 Background Current TCCC Guidelines call for an open pneumo- thorax ( sucking chest wound) to be treated with an oc- clusive chest...benefi- cial? Or, does it convert a sucking chest wound into a life-threatening tension pneumothorax? “Why do we treat a non-lethal condition (open

  15. House dust and storage mite contamination of dry dog food stored in open bags and sealed boxes in 10 domestic households.

    PubMed

    Gill, Christina; McEwan, Neil; McGarry, John; Nuttall, Tim

    2011-04-01

    Dry pet food is a potential source of exposure to house dust and storage mite allergens in canine atopic dermatitis. This study evaluated contamination of house dust and dry dog food stored in paper bags, sealable plastic bags and sealable plastic boxes in 10 households for 90 days using Acarex(®) tests for guanine, a Der p 1 ELISA and mite flotation. Acarex(®) tests were negative in all the food samples but positive in all the house dust samples. The Der p 1 levels and mite numbers significantly increased in food from paper bags (P = 0.0073 and P = 0.02, respectively), but not plastic bags or boxes. Mite numbers and Der p 1 levels were 10-1000 times higher in house dust than the corresponding food samples (P < 0.0001). There were significant correlations between Der p 1 in house dust and food from the paper (P < 0.0001) and plastic bags (P = 0.003), and mite numbers in house dust and food from the paper bags (P = 0.0007). Bedding and carpets were significantly associated with Der p 1 levels in house dust (P = 0.015 and P = 0.01, respectively), and food from the paper (both P = 0.02) and plastic bags (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively). Mites were identified in six of 10 paper bag, three of 10 plastic bag, one of 10 plastic box and nine of 10 house dust samples. These comprised Dermatophagoides (54%), Tyrophagus (10%; all from food) and unidentified mites (36%). Storage of food in sealable plastic boxes largely prevented contamination for 3 months. Exposure to mites and mite proteins in all the stored food, however, appeared to be trivial compared with house dust.

  16. Selecting shelter dogs for service dog training.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Emily

    2002-01-01

    Service dogs are an essential aid to persons with disabilities, providing independence, mobility, and improved self-esteem. Because of these proven benefits, the growing se of service dogs is creating a demand and supply crisis. One major cause is the 50% verage dropout rate for dogs selected for training. Weiss and Greenber (1997) re-cently found that a dog, successful on the most commonly used selection test items, was as likely to be either a poor or a good candidate for service work. The experiment presented here evaluated test items developed by the author in 15 years of experience with dogs. The test items were administered to 75 dogs from the Kansas Humane So-ciety. Once tested, the dogs received obedience and retrieval training. The experiment assessed each dog on behavior over 5 weeks of training versus performance on each selection test item. A subset of the selection items, combined in a regression analysis, accounted for 36.4% of the variance with R = 0.603. This research also revealed a reli-able test for dog aggression without risking injury to dog or tester. Items for testing in-cluded fear, motivation, and submission. Another set of selection items reliably pre-dicted the trait of "high energy" commonly described as "high strung." Future research should involve investigating the effectiveness of both cortisol levels and blood pressure in predicting traits to help strengthen the predictive value of the tool and then testing on dogs trained to be full service dogs.

  17. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Louise; Gates, Alison

    2015-12-21

    Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. This is an updated version of previously published reviews. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 02 June 2015. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical studies in which a form of chest physiotherapy (airway clearance technique) were taken for consideration in people with cystic fibrosis compared with either no physiotherapy treatment or spontaneous cough alone. Both authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included studies. There was heterogeneity in the published outcomes, with variable reporting which meant pooling of the data for meta-analysis was not possible. The searches identified 157 studies, of which eight cross-over studies (data from 96 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There were differences between studies in the way that interventions were delivered, with several of the intervention groups combining more than one treatment modality. One included study looked at autogenic drainage, six considered conventional chest physiotherapy, three considered oscillating positive expiratory pressure, seven considered positive expiratory pressure and one considered high pressure positive expiratory pressure. Of the eight studies, six were single-treatment studies and in two, the treatment intervention was performed over two consecutive days (once daily in one, twice daily in the other). This enormous heterogeneity in the treatment

  18. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Louise; Gates, Alison; van der Schans, Cees P

    2013-09-04

    Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 04 February 2013. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical studies in which a form of chest physiotherapy (airway clearance technique) were taken for consideration in people with cystic fibrosis compared with either no physiotherapy treatment or spontaneous cough alone. Both authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed study quality. There was heterogeneity in the published outcomes, with variable reporting which meant pooling of the data for meta-analysis was not possible. The searches identified 144 studies, of which eight cross-over studies (data from 96 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There were differences between studies in the way that interventions were delivered, with several of the intervention groups combining more than one treatment modality. One included study looked at autogenic drainage, six considered conventional chest physiotherapy, three considered oscillating positive expiratory pressure, seven considered positive expiratory pressure and one considered high pressure positive expiratory pressure. Of the eight studies, six were single-treatment studies and in two, the treatment intervention was performed over two consecutive days (once daily in one, twice daily in the other). This enormous heterogeneity in the treatment interventions prevented any meta-analyses from being performed.Four studies, involving

  19. Dog Owners' Interaction Styles: Their Components and Associations with Reactions of Pet Dogs to a Social Threat.

    PubMed

    Cimarelli, Giulia; Turcsán, Borbála; Bánlaki, Zsófia; Range, Friederike; Virányi, Zsófia

    2016-01-01

    The bond dogs develop with their owner received increased attention in the last years but no study aimed at characterizing the way in which owners interact with their dogs in their daily life and how this might influence dog behavior. In order to examine how dog owners interact with their dogs, we first analyzed the behavior of 220 dog owners in 8 different standardized situations involving the owner-dog dyad. We extracted 3 behavioral factors related to "Owner Warmth," "Owner Social Support," and "Owner Control." Further, we investigated whether owner personality, gender and age are associated with these three factors. Results indicated that older owners scored lower in "Owner Warmth" and in "Owner Social Support" and higher in "Owner Control" than younger owners. Furthermore, owners scoring high in "Owner Control" scored lower in the personality trait Openness and owners scoring high in "Owner Social Support" scored lower in the personality trait Conscientiousness. Finally, we also analyzed whether the dogs' reaction to an unfamiliar woman's threatening approach was associated with the owners' interaction styles. Results showed that dogs that searched for proximity of their owners during the threatening situation had owners scoring higher in "Owner Warmth," as compared to dogs that reacted more autonomously, approaching the unfamiliar experimenter. Analogies between dog-owner interaction styles and human parenting styles are discussed considering the implications of the present findings for human social psychology as well as the practical relevance for dog welfare and human safety.

  20. Management of Congenital Chest Wall Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Felix C.; Elliott, Steven T.; Sandler, Anthony D.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital chest wall deformities are considered to be anomalies in chest wall growth. These can be categorized as either rib cage overgrowth or deformities related to inadequate growth (aplasia or dysplasia). Rib cage overgrowth leads to depression of the sternum (pectus excavatum) or protuberance of the sternum (pectus carinatum) and accounts for greater than 90% of congenital chest wall deformities. The remaining deformities are a result of inadequate growth. Evolution in the management of congenital chest wall deformities has made significant progress over the past 25 years. This article will review chest wall deformities and the current management strategies of these interesting anomalies. PMID:22294949

  1. [Cardiac causes of chest pain].

    PubMed

    Wächter, C; Markus, B; Schieffer, B

    2017-01-01

    Because of the life-threatening character and a high prevalence in emergency rooms, cardiac causes are important differential diagnoses of acute chest pain with the need for rapid clarification. In this context the working diagnosis "acute coronary syndrome" (ACS) plays a major role. In a synopsis of the clinical presentation, medical history, electrocardiogram and analysis of cardiac biomarkers, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and unstable angina pectoris can be specified as entities of ACS. The treatment of ACS consists of an immediate anti-ischemic therapy, anti-thrombotic therapy and invasive coronary diagnostics with subsequent interventional or operative revascularization therapy. The timing of invasive management is essentially determined by the individual patient risk, with the exception of STEMI where interventional revascularization must be undertaken within 120 min of diagnosis. In this context the GRACE 2.0 and TIMI risk score have become established as reliable tools. Another rare but fatal cause of acute chest pain is aortic dissection. An abrupt onset of tearing and sharp chest pains, deficits in pulse as well as the presence of high-risk factors, such as advanced age, arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, known collagenosis and previous aortic or coronary artery procedures are highly indicative for aortic dissection and additional diagnostic imaging and the highly sensitive D‑dimer should be undertaken. Additionally, inflammatory diseases, such as pericarditis and myocarditis can be associated with chest pains and mimic the character of ACS and should also be considered in the differential diagnostics.

  2. [The management of chest injuries].

    PubMed

    Reshad, K; Hirata, T; Itoi, K; Takahashi, Y; Muro, K

    1989-10-01

    The mortality from chest injuries is so high due to severe physiologic imbalance that an immediate and accurate diagnosis of the injured organ and prompt treatment can salvage the patient from the strategy. This study comprises 1329 injured cases including 145 patients with crushed chests. The cause of injury was traffic accident in 537 cases (40.5%), fall or degradation in 332 cases (25%). There was a correlation between the cause of injury and age, as that traffic accident was a major one in young aged and fall in elders. Treatment against crushed patients included 150 surgical operations, 206 plaster bandages, 56 drainage of thoracic, peritoneal and cranial cavities. Thoracotomies performed in patients with flail chest (2), lung contusion (4), rupture of the bronchi and diaphragm (each 1) and for evacuation of clotted hemothorax in 3 patients. The prognosis of all these patients was good. Lastly we conclude that since the prognosis of injured patients depends on how fast the patient can be carried to the hospital and how quickly the physician or surgeon can evaluate the trauma and institute a prompt treatment, the education of the primary staff is the most important.

  3. Reclaiming identity through service to dogs in need.

    PubMed

    Alers, Elvin V; Simpson, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    Dog Tags is an animal-assisted therapy offered by the Washington Humane Society (WHS) in partnership with the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC). The program is open to all ranks of enlisted service members using WRNMMC services. Dog Tags is a 3-tiered certificate program allowing Soldiers, recovering at WRNMMC, to learn and apply progressively complex and challenging elements of canine positive reinforcement training to dogs awaiting adoption at the WHS. Although each tier is a self-contained and complete curriculum, subsequent tiers build on the skills and knowledge acquired in the previous one(s). Dog Tags Warrior/trainers work with fully-screened (health and temperament) shelter dogs to provide these dogs with mental stimulation, environmental enrichment, and socialization that are vital to their successful adoption and integration into new homes. The Soldiers also benefit because they develop new skills, build positive bonds with the dogs, and continue to serve their community.

  4. Chest wall reconstruction after extended resection

    PubMed Central

    Seder, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive chest wall resection and reconstruction is a challenging procedure that requires a multidisciplinary approach, including input from thoracic surgeons, plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and radiation oncologists. The primary goals of any chest wall reconstruction is to obliterate dead space, restore chest wall rigidity, preserve pulmonary mechanics, protect intrathoracic organs, provide soft tissue coverage, minimize deformity, and allow patients to receive adjuvant radiotherapy. Successful chest wall reconstruction requires the re-establishment of skeletal stability to prevent chest wall hernias, avoids thoracoplasty-like contraction of the operated side, protects underlying viscera, and maintain a cosmetically-acceptable appearance. After skeletal stability is established, full tissue coverage can be achieved using direct closure, skin grafts, local advancement flaps, pedicled myocutaneous flaps, or free flaps. This review examines the indications for chest wall reconstruction and describes techniques for establishment of chest wall rigidity and soft tissue coverage. PMID:27942408

  5. Historical analysis of Newfoundland dog fur colour genetics

    PubMed Central

    Bondeson, J.

    2015-01-01

    This article makes use of digitized historic newspapers to analyze Newfoundland dog fur colour genetics, and fur colour variations over time. The results indicate that contrary to the accepted view, the ‘Solid’ gene was introduced into the British population of Newfoundland dogs in the 1840s. Prior to that time, the dogs were white and black (Landseer) or white and brown, and thus spotted/spotted homozygotes. Due to ‘Solid’ being dominant over ‘spotted’, and selective breeding, today the majority of Newfoundland dogs are solid black. Whereas small white marks on the chest and/or paw appears to be a random event, the historical data supports the existence of an ‘Irish spotted’ fur colour pattern, with white head blaze, breast, paws and tail tip, in spotted/spotted homozygotes. PMID:26623371

  6. Spatial heterogeneity of local blood flow and metabolite content in dog hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Franzen, D.; Conway, R.S.; Zhang, H.; Sonnenblick, E.H.; Eng, C. )

    1988-02-01

    Spatial variation (heterogeneity) of myocardial blood flow was studied under basal conditions in relation to four biochemical markers: creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), ATP, and glycogen. A total of 508 individual 0.5-g samples from the left ventricular free wall was studied in 12 dogs. Myocardial blood flow was measured by radioactive microspheres injected via a pigtail catheter into the left ventricle during light sedation; following thoracotomy, a second set of microspheres was injected via a catheter into the left atrium. In 27-54 samples/heart, myocardial blood flow, CK, LDH, protein, ATP, and glycogen were determined, permitting a direct correspondence between local blood flow and metabolic markers in each sample and an assessment of the spatial heterogeneity of flow and metabolite content. The coefficient of variation, which defines the extent of spatial heterogeneity, averaged 20% for closed-chest flow measurement, 19% for open-chest flow measurement, 22% for CK, 17% for LDH, 15% for protein, 8% for ATP, and 18% for glycogen. The correlation between local blood flow and the studied metabolities can only explain a minor portion of the spatial heterogeneity of myocardial blood flow. Although a physiological link between blood flow and metabolite content for small regions of the heart is demonstrated, the true local variability of blood flow may be modulated predominantly by other factors.

  7. [Emoxipin in reperfusion of ischemic myocardium in dogs: effects on infarct size and plasma creatine kinase activity].

    PubMed

    Konorev, E A; Polumiskov, V Iu; Avilova, O A; Golikova, A P

    1990-09-01

    The effects of synthetic antioxidant emoxypine on infarct size and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity was studied on open-chest anesthetized dogs with 180-min myocardial ischemia followed by reperfusion. Emoxypine (10 and 40 mg/kg) was injected intravenously, beginning since 120th min of coronary artery occlusion. Emoxypine (10 mg/kg) resulted in infarct size limitation and reduction in plasma CK activity. An increase in dose of emoxypine to 40 mg/kg largely attenuated its protective effect on infarct size. CK activity during post-ischemic reperfusion was even higher in emoxypine (40 mg/kg) group compared with control. Augmented CK leakage from irreversibly injured myocardium to plasma under these experimental conditions may be owing to preservation of microvascular integrity and improving of drainage of infarcted tissue exerted by emoxypine.

  8. [The hemodynamic effect of thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade in the anesthetized adult mongrel dogs].

    PubMed

    Yamagami, H

    1994-03-01

    Hemodynamic alterations with the thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade were elucidated in the anesthetized open-chest dogs, under controlled ventilation with 100% oxygen and receiving fentanyl, pentobarbital and pancuronium administration, and the effect of blockade was assessed by increase in skin-surface temperature at the specific regions of the upper extremity. All dogs with thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade revealed the increased skin temperature in blocked extremities and decreased skin temperature in the contralateral side with simultaneous compensatory vasoconstriction ("Borrowing-Lending phenomenon"). Four groups were classified according to the side and range of blockade: A-group (right Th7.8 ganglion, N = 17), B-group (left-Th7.8 ganglion, N = 8), C-group (right Th2.3 ganglion, N = 13) and D-group (left-Th2.3 ganglion, N = 10). The hemodynamic variables after the middle thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade showed no remarkable changes but heart-rate, mean arterial blood pressure and cardiac output decreased significantly with the upper right-side thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade, and the inhibited circulatory state lasted twenty minutes after blockade. No significant skin temperature changes were observed after blockade among four groups. The results suggest that the patient after upper thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade should be cared with these circulatory changes in mind.

  9. Treatment of a perforating thoracic bite wound in a dog with negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Nolff, Mirja C; Pieper, Korbinian; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 4-year-old male Dachshund was examined following a bite attack that had occurred 5 days previously. The dog had acutely deteriorated despite IV antimicrobial treatment and fluid therapy. CLINICAL FINDINGS On initial examination, the patient was recumbent with signs of septic shock and a flail chest. Three penetrating wounds in the left thoracic wall with malodorous discharge were evident. The animal trauma triage score was 8 out of 18. Thoracic and abdominal radiography revealed displaced fractures of the left seventh, eighth, and ninth ribs and extensive subcutaneous emphysema. Additionally, a marked diffuse bronchointerstitial pattern, areas of alveolar pattern, and pneumothorax were present bilaterally. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Open surgical debridement with left lateral lung lobectomy and resection of portions of the left thoracic wall were performed. Extensive soft tissue loss precluded primary reconstruction. The defect was stabilized with a polypropylene mesh implant, and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) at -100 mm Hg was initiated. Microbial culture and susceptibility testing of tissue samples indicated the presence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. The NPWT dressing was changed 2, 5, and 7 days after surgery. Treatment was well tolerated, and the mesh was completely covered with granulation tissue 10 days after surgery. On follow-up 5, 7, 12, and 19 months after surgery, the dog was clinically normal with no apparent complications. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that NPWT may be a valuable adjunct when treating small animal patients with severe thoracic trauma.

  10. Riociguat for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: a long-term extension study (CHEST-2).

    PubMed

    Simonneau, Gérald; D'Armini, Andrea M; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Grimminger, Friedrich; Hoeper, Marius M; Jansa, Pavel; Kim, Nick H; Wang, Chen; Wilkins, Martin R; Fritsch, Arno; Davie, Neil; Colorado, Pablo; Mayer, Eckhard

    2015-05-01

    Riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator approved for the treatment of inoperable and persistent/recurrent chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). In the 16-week CHEST-1 study, riociguat showed a favourable benefit-risk profile and improved several clinically relevant end-points in patients with CTEPH. The CHEST-2 open-label extension evaluated the long-term safety and efficacy of riociguat. Eligible patients from CHEST-1 received riociguat individually adjusted up to a maximum dose of 2.5 mg three times daily. The primary objective was the safety and tolerability of riociguat; exploratory efficacy end-points included 6-min walking distance (6MWD) and World Health Organization (WHO) functional class (FC). Overall, 237 patients entered CHEST-2 and 211 (89%) were ongoing at this interim analysis (March 2013). The safety profile of riociguat in CHEST-2 was similar to CHEST-1, with no new safety signals. Improvements in 6MWD and WHO FC observed in CHEST-1 persisted for up to 1 year in CHEST-2. In the observed population at 1 year, mean±sd 6MWD had changed by +51±62 m (n=172) versus CHEST-1 baseline (n=237), and WHO FC had improved/stabilised/worsened in 47/50/3% of patients (n=176) versus CHEST-1 baseline (n=236). Long-term riociguat had a favourable benefit-risk profile and apparently showed sustained benefits in exercise and functional capacity for up to 1 year. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  11. Chest tomosynthesis: technical and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Ase Allansdotter; Vikgren, Jenny; Bath, Magnus

    2014-02-01

    The recent implementation of chest tomosynthesis is built on the availability of large, dose-efficient, high-resolution flat panel detectors, which enable the acquisition of the necessary number of projection radiographs to allow reconstruction of section images of the chest within one breath hold. A chest tomosynthesis examination obtains the increased diagnostic information provided by volumetric imaging at a radiation dose comparable to that of conventional chest radiography. There is evidence that the sensitivity of chest tomosynthesis may be at least three times higher than for conventional chest radiography for detection of pulmonary nodules. The sensitivity increases with increasing nodule size and attenuation and decreases for nodules with subpleural location. Differentiation between pleural and subpleural lesions is a known pitfall due to the limited depth resolution in chest tomosynthesis. Studies on different types of pathology report increased detectability in favor of chest tomosynthesis in comparison to chest radiography. The technique provides improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography and facilitates the exclusion of pulmonary lesions in a majority of patients, avoiding the need for computed tomography (CT). However, motion artifacts can be a cumbersome limitation and breathing during the tomosynthesis image acquisition may result in severe artifacts significantly affecting the detectability of pathology. In summary, chest tomosynthesis has been shown to be superior to chest conventional radiography for many tasks and to be able to replace CT in selected cases. In our experience chest tomosynthesis is an efficient problem solver in daily clinical work. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. [Chest modelling and automotive accidents].

    PubMed

    Trosseille, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Automobile development is increasingly based on mathematical modeling. Accurate models of the human body are now available and serve to develop new means of protection. These models used to consist of rigid, articulated bodies but are now made of several million finite elements. They are now capable of predicting some risks of injury. To develop these models, sophisticated tests were conducted on human cadavers. For example, chest modeling started with material characterization and led to complete validation in the automobile environment. Model personalization, based on medical imaging, will permit studies of the behavior and tolerances of the entire population.

  13. Flail chest and pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Renata; Calhoon, John H; Baisden, Clinton E

    2008-01-01

    Flail chest is most often accompanied by a significant underlying pulmonary parenchymal injury and can be a life-threatening thoracic injury. Its management is often complicated by the other injuries it is frequently associated with. Similarly, mortality and morbidity are dictated most often by the associated injuries and findings. Its treatment is complex and should first be one of pain management, judicious fluid resuscitation, and excellent pulmonary toilet. In those patients requiring mechanical ventilatory support, or who require ipsilateral thoracocotomy, rib stabilization may be considered depending on a host of potentially conflicting indications and contraindications. At the end of this section are listed the current major recommendations and their levels of evidence.

  14. Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

    2011-12-28

    A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi's sarcoma, Castleman's disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist.

  15. Noncardiac chest pain: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Schey, Ron; Villarreal, Autumn; Fass, Ronnie

    2007-04-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is very common, affecting up to 25% of the adult population in the United States. Treatment for NCCP has markedly evolved in the past decade and is presently focused on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and visceral hypersensitivity. Aggressive treatment with proton pump inhibitors has become the standard of care for GERD-related NCCP. Pain modulators such as tricyclics, trazodone, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are considered the mainstay of therapy for non-GERD-related NCCP Other therapeutic modalities such as botulinum toxin injections and hypnotherapy have demonstrated promise in small clinical trials.

  16. Horner's syndrome in dogs and cats: 49 cases (1980-1986).

    PubMed

    Morgan, R V; Zanotti, S W

    1989-04-15

    Medical records of 49 dogs and cats with Horner's syndrome were reviewed. Causes included head, neck, and chest trauma, chronic otitis, cranial thoracic mass, and injury attributable to cleaning of the external ear canal. Cause could not be delineated in 54.5% of the dogs. Numerous diagnostic tests and pharmacologic challenge exposure with epinephrine were used to localize the site of injury. Resolution of all clinical signs was observed in 36 animals and required a mean of 7.7 weeks.

  17. Oscillation of the lung by chest-wall vibration.

    PubMed

    Binks, A P; Bloch-Salisbury, E; Banzett, R B; Schwartzstein, R M

    2001-07-01

    Vibration of the thoracic surface has been shown to modify the drive to breathe and the sensation of dyspnea. It has been suggested that respiratory muscle afferents generate these effects. The possibility that the consequences of chest-wall vibration also involve intra-pulmonary afferents led us to investigate whether such vibration reaches the airways. Two vibratory stimuli were independently applied to four chest-wall sites and two control sites on eight healthy subjects. During separate breath holds, the vibrator was held on each site while subjects periodically opened and closed the pharynx. Airway pressure (P(AW)) was measured at the mouth. Spectral analysis of P(AW) showed pressure oscillations occurred at the same frequency as that of the vibrators when the pharynx was open; oscillation amplitude was vastly reduced when the pharynx was closed. Oscillation amplitude was also significantly larger during vibration at greater amplitude. These data demonstrate that vibration over the chest-wall vibrates the lung and could potentially excite intrapulmonary receptors.

  18. Hydatid disease of the chest

    PubMed Central

    Xanthakis, D.; Efthimiadis, M.; Papadakis, G.; Primikirios, N.; Chassapakis, G.; Roussaki, A.; Veranis, N.; Akrivakis, A.; Aligizakis, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Ninety-one cases of hydatid disease of the chest are reported. Eighty-eight were involving the lung, two the chest wall, and one the mediastinum. All the patients were treated surgically. Conservative operations (simple removal of the parasite and closure of the remaining cavity) were performed in 78 patients, 37 unruptured and 41 ruptured cysts. Late postoperative complications occurred in eleven. In 10 patients, recurrent haemoptysis was the main symptom due to residual cavity in four, bronchiectatic changes in two, and unknown aetiology in four. In one patient, recurrence of multiple cysts occurred in the affected lobe. Radical operations were carried out in 10 patients, including segmental resection in four and lobectomy in six. Conservative operations were performed in all cases of unruptured cysts, with the exception of a giant cyst in which resection was the operation of choice. For ruptured cysts with mild infection conservative operation was also performed. Resection was necessary only in patients with ruptured cysts with suppuration, bronchiectatic changes, and giant cysts replacing a whole lobe. There was no mortality. We believe that conservative operation is the treatment of choice for hydatid disease of the lung. Indications for resection are very limited. Images

  19. Chest wall hypoplasia--principles and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Oscar Henry

    2015-01-01

    The chest is a dynamic structure. For normal movement it relies on a coordinated movement of the multiple bones, joints and muscles of the respiratory system. While muscle weakness can have clear impact on respiration by decreasing respiratory motion, so can conditions that cause chest wall hypoplasia and produce an immobile chest wall. These conditions, such as Jarcho-Levin and Jeune syndrome, present significantly different challenges than those faced with early onset scoliosis in which chest wall mechanics and thoracic volume may be much closer to normal. Because of this difference more aggressive approaches to clinical and surgical management are necessary.

  20. Relevant surgical anatomy of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Babu V; Rajesh, Pala B

    2010-11-01

    The chest wall, like other regional anatomy, is a remarkable fusion of form and function. Principal functions are the protection of internal viscera and an expandable cylinder facilitating variable gas flow into the lungs. Knowledge of the anatomy of the whole cylinder (ribs, sternum, vertebra, diaphragm, intercostal spaces, and extrathoracic muscles) is therefore not only important in the local environment of a specific chest wall resection but also in its relation to overall function. An understanding of chest wall kinematics might help define the loss of function after resection and the effects of various chest wall substitutes. Therefore, this article is not an exhaustive anatomic description but a focused summary and discussion.

  1. Service dogs, psychiatric hospitalization, and the ADA.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Russ S; Thomas, Kelly Jones; Leong, Stephanie L; Ragukonis, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A service dog is defined as "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability." Some psychiatric patients may depend on a service dog for day-to-day functioning. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) established certain rights and responsibilities for individuals with disabilities and health care providers. Psychiatric hospitalization of a patient with a service dog may pose a problem and involves balancing the requirement to provide safe and appropriate psychiatric care with the rights of individuals with disabilities. This Open Forum examines issues that arise in such circumstances, reviews the literature, and provides a foundation for the development of policies and procedures.

  2. Myocardial uptake and kinetic properties of technetium-99m-Q3 in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Gerson, M.C.; Millard, R.W.; McGoron, A.J.

    1994-10-01

    We postulated that {sup 99m}Tc-Q3, a cationic imaging agent, produces myocardial activity related to myocardial blood flow during myocardial ischemia and pharmacologic coronary artery vasodilation, and shows little or no myocardial redistribution over 4 hr after intravenous injection. In six Group 1 dogs, the chest was opened, the left circumflex coronary artery was acutely ligated, and dipyridamole (0.32, 0.56 or 0.84 mg/kg) was infused into the right atrium, followed by 10 mCi of {sup 99m}Tc-Q3. Myocardial blood flow was measured by radiolabeled microspheres. The animals were euthanized and 357 myocardial samples were assayed in a well counter for {sup 99m}Tc activity. One week later, radiolabeled microsphere activity was counted and myocardial blood flow calculated. In nine Group 2 dogs, a variable occluder was placed around the left circumflex coronary artery and an ischemic level of circumflex blood flow was maintained constant over 4 hr as measured by an ultrasonic flow meter. Dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg) was then infused into the right atrium followed by 10mCi of {sup 99m}Tc-Q3. Gamma camera images were acquired at 5, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 min following k{sup 99m}Tc-Q3 injection. Microsphere blood flow and endocardial biopsies (n - 6 dogs) were performed at 30, 60, 120 and 240 min following {sup 99m}TcQ3 injection. 31 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Demonstration of hydroxyl radical generation in stunned' myocardium of intact dogs using aromatic hydroxylation of phenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bolli, R.; Kaur, H.; Li, X.Y.; Triana, J.F.; Halliwell, B. Univ. of California, Davis King's College, London )

    1991-03-11

    Numerous studies have shown that postischemic myocardial dysfunction is attenuated by scavengers of hydroxyl ({sup {sm bullet}}OH) radicals and by iron chelators, suggesting an important pathogenetic role of {sup {sm bullet}}OH. However, the evidence provided by these studies is indirect. Since phenyl-alanine (PH) has been shown to react with {sup {sm bullet}}OH to form o-, m-, and p-tyrosines (TYR), the authors used aromatic hydroxylation of PH to detect {sup {sm bullet}}OH in stunned myocardium. Open-chest dogs underwent a 15-min coronary occlusion (O) followed by reperfusion (R). PH was infused i.v. starting 5 min pre-O and ending 10 min after R (n = 3) or starting at R and ending 10 min later (n = 8). TYR concentration in local coronary venous effluent plasma was measured using HPLC with electrochemical detection. No appreciable production of TYR was observed before or during O. After R, however, in all dogs there was a dramatic increase in myocardial production of o-, m-, and p-TYR which peaked at 1-3 min and ceased after 10 min. In 5 control dogs, infusion of PH without O/R did not result in any TYR production. These results provide evidence that the highly reactive {sup {sm bullet}}OH radical is produced after brief regional ischemia in the intact animal and indicate that PH may be a useful probe for measuring this species. The findings support the hypothesis that {sup {sm bullet}}OH contributes to myocardial stunning.'

  4. Airway and tissue mechanics during physiological breathing and bronchoconstriction in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lutchen, K R; Suki, B; Zhang, Q; Peták, F; Daróczy, B; Hantos, Z

    1994-07-01

    In five open-chest dogs and with four to five alveolar capsules we used an optimal ventilator waveform (OVW) to follow frequency and tidal volume (VT) dependence of lung, airway, and tissue resistance (R) and elastance (E) before and during constant infusion of histamine (16 micrograms.kg-1.min-1). OVW contains sufficient flow energy between 0.234 and 4.7 Hz, avoids nonlinear harmonic interactions, and simultaneously ventilates with physiological VT. Each OVW breath permits a smooth estimate of frequency dependence of R and E for the whole lung. A constant-phase model analysis provided estimates of purely viscous resistance (Rvis), which represents the sum of airway resistance (Raw) and any purely newtonian component of tissue resistance (Rti), and parameters G and H, which govern frequency dependence of Rti and tissue elastance (Eti), respectively. Tissue structural damping (eta) is calculated as G/H. This model was applied to the whole lung and tissue impedance as estimated from each capsule. We found a small but inconsequential purely newtonian component of Rti, even during constriction. Four dogs showed a peak response at approximately 4 min in lung Rvis coupled (in time) to initial increases in G, H, eta, and airway inhomogeneities. In two of these dogs the response was severe. Tissue properties estimated from whole lung impedance (G, H, and eta) were nearly identical to values estimated from unobstructed capsules throughout infusion. By using a technique independent of alveolar capsules, our results indicate that a major if not dominant response to a constrictive agonist occurs in lung tissues, resulting in a large increase in Rti and Eti. With severe constriction, significant increases occur in Raw and airway inhomogeneities as well. Finally, separation of airway and tissue properties using input impedance estimated from the frequency-rich OVW avoids use of alveolar capsules and may prove an effective tool for partitioning airway and tissue properties in

  5. Comparison of the cardiovascular effects of the novel 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist, SB 209509 (VML251), and sumatriptan in dogs.

    PubMed

    Parsons, A A; Parker, S G; Raval, P; Campbell, C A; Lewis, V A; Griffiths, R; Hunter, A J; Hamilton, T C; King, F D

    1997-07-01

    The systemic cardiovascular effects of a novel 5-hydroxtryptamine (5-HT)(1B/1D)-receptor agonist were investigated in the anaesthetised dog. SB 209509 (VML 251) was more potent than sumatriptan in producing increases in carotid vascular resistance after intravenous administration and was similar in potency to sumatriptan after sequential intraduodenal administration at 30-min intervals. In open-chest dogs, sequential intravenous administration of SB 209509 or sumatriptan produced marked increases in carotid vascular resistance without changing coronary vascular resistance. In contrast to sumatriptan, after administration of high doses of SB 209509 (>790 nmol/kg), a reduction in coronary vascular resistance was observed. After a single bolus intraduodenal dose of SB 209509 (260, 520, or 790 nmol/kg), increases in carotid vascular resistance could be detected over a 5-h period. Sumatriptan (i.d.), 2.4 micromol/kg but not 700 nmol/kg, produced a sustained effect similar to the effects of SB 209509 (790 nmol/kg). In all experiments, SB 209509 and sumatriptan had minimal effects on arterial blood pressure or heart rate but produced marked changes in carotid vascular resistance over the same concentration range. SB 209509 was rapidly absorbed after intraduodenal administration in conscious dogs and had good bioavailability. These data indicate that SB 209509 is a potent 5-HT(1B/1D)-receptor agonist that is rapidly absorbed from the duodenum. The effects of SB 209509 are long lasting and selective for the carotid vascular bed.

  6. Correlations between quality indexes of chest compression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng-ling; Yan, Li; Huang, Su-fang; Bai, Xiang-jun

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a kind of emergency treatment for cardiopulmonary arrest, and chest compression is the most important and necessary part of CPR. The American Heart Association published the new Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care in 2010 and demanded for better performance of chest compression practice, especially in compression depth and rate. The current study was to explore the relationship of quality indexes of chest compression and to identify the key points in chest compression training and practice. METHODS: Totally 219 healthcare workers accepted chest compression training by using Laerdal ACLS advanced life support resuscitation model. The quality indexes of chest compression, including compression hands placement, compression rate, compression depth, and chest wall recoil as well as self-reported fatigue time were monitored by the Laerdal Computer Skills and Reporting System. RESULTS: The quality of chest compression was related to the gender of the compressor. The indexes in males, including self-reported fatigue time, the accuracy of compression depth and the compression rate, the accuracy of compression rate, were higher than those in females. However, the accuracy of chest recoil was higher in females than in males. The quality indexes of chest compression were correlated with each other. The self-reported fatigue time was related to all the indexes except the compression rate. CONCLUSION: It is necessary to offer CPR training courses regularly. In clinical practice, it might be better to change the practitioner before fatigue, especially for females or weak practitioners. In training projects, more attention should be paid to the control of compression rate, in order to delay the fatigue, guarantee enough compression depth and improve the quality of chest compression. PMID:25215093

  7. Service dogs in the province of Quebec: sociodemographic profile of users and the dogs' impact on functional ability.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Claude; Gagnon, Dany; Routhier, François; Leblond, Jean; Boucher, Pascale; Blanchet, Marie; Martin-Lemoyne, Valérie

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) describe the sociodemographic profile of service dog users, their physical disabilities, main occupations, living environment, and use of technical aids in daily life and (2) evaluate the impact of service dogs on wheelchair travel and picking up objects. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected and various mobility tests were conducted in the service dog users' home environment (n = 199). The service dog users had injuries to the central or peripheral nervous system (55%), spinal cord (33%), or musculoskeletal or orthopedic system (12%). In the wheelchair travel on flat terrain test (n = 67), users travelled a longer distance in a shorter time, improving their average speed to 1.28 m/s with the service dog compared to 0.75 m/s without (p < 0.001). In a wheelchair propelling up a slope, 42% improved with the service dog (n = 60). Mounting a threshold/curb in a wheelchair, 41% improved with the service dog (n = 39). In a test where walkers and wheelchair users picked up three objects off the ground, 44% improved with the service dog (n = 164). Service dogs significantly improved wheelchair travel speed and distance on flat and ascending terrain, mounting a threshold/curb and picking up objects off the ground. Implications for Rehabilitation For people with motor impairments: Service dogs are most often used as a technical aid to pick up objects (96%), open doors (36%) and pull the wheelchair during travel (34%). Clients' performance in significant travel in a wheelchair (on flat terrain, on an upslope, mounting a threshold) improved with the service dog compared to their own performance without the dog. Clients' grasping performance (picking up three significant objects off the ground) improved with the service dog compared to their own performance without the dog.

  8. Circovirus in Dogs FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports Tools for K-12 Educators Circovirus in Dogs FAQ November 22, 2013 Update November 22, 2013: ... information. Canine circovirus infections have been documented in dogs with vomiting and diarrhea. The distribution of the ...

  9. Learning, memory and exploratory similarities in genetically identical cloned dogs

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chi Won; Kim, Geon A; Park, Won Jun; Park, Kwan Yong; Jeon, Jeong Min; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows generation of genetically identical animals using donor cells derived from animals with particular traits. To date, few studies have investigated whether or not these cloned dogs will show identical behavior patterns. To address this question, learning, memory and exploratory patterns were examined using six cloned dogs with identical nuclear genomes. The variance of total incorrect choice number in the Y-maze test among cloned dogs was significantly lower than that of the control dogs. There was also a significant decrease in variance in the level of exploratory activity in the open fields test compared to age-matched control dogs. These results indicate that cloned dogs show similar cognitive and exploratory patterns, suggesting that these behavioral phenotypes are related to the genotypes of the individuals. PMID:27030191

  10. Learning, memory and exploratory similarities in genetically identical cloned dogs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chi Won; Kim, Geon A; Park, Won Jun; Park, Kwan Yong; Jeon, Jeong Min; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-12-30

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows generation of genetically identical animals using donor cells derived from animals with particular traits. To date, few studies have investigated whether or not these cloned dogs will show identical behavior patterns. To address this question, learning, memory and exploratory patterns were examined using six cloned dogs with identical nuclear genomes. The variance of total incorrect choice number in the Y-maze test among cloned dogs was significantly lower than that of the control dogs. There was also a significant decrease in variance in the level of exploratory activity in the open fields test compared to age-matched control dogs. These results indicate that cloned dogs show similar cognitive and exploratory patterns, suggesting that these behavioral phenotypes are related to the genotypes of the individuals.

  11. Ankylosis and pseudoankylosis of the temporomandibular joint in 10 dogs (1993-2015).

    PubMed

    Strøm, Peter C; Arzi, Boaz; Cissell, Derek D; Verstraete, Frank J M

    2016-09-20

    To describe the clinical features and results of treatment of true ankylosis and pseudoankylosis of the temporomandibular joint in dogs. This study was a retrospective case series. Ten client-owned dogs that were presented for inability to open the mouth or a severely decreased range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were included. Information on the surgical procedures performed and the perioperative complications were documented. Three-dimensional printing of the skull was performed in four dogs. Two dogs were diagnosed with temporomandibular joint ankylosis and seven dogs with pseudoankylosis. One dog had evidence of combined temporomandibular joint ankylosis and pseudoankylosis. Of the seven dogs with pseudoankylosis, six had an osseous fusion involving the zygomatic arch and mandible. Surgical treatment was performed in nine dogs and a revision surgery was needed in one dog. Follow-up ranged from five months to eight years (mean: 48.6 months). Eight out of nine dogs that were treated surgically regained the ability to open their mouth, but six dogs never regained a fully normal temporomandibular joint range of motion. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis and pseudoankylosis are uncommon in the dog. Surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint ankylosis or pseudoankylosis in dogs is a successful option and carries a prognosis dependent on patient-specific abnormalities. Computed tomography complemented with three-dimensional printing is valuable for understanding the extent of abnormalities and for preoperative planning.

  12. Electrical velocimetry for noninvasive cardiac output and stroke volume variation measurements in dogs undergoing cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kazumasu; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Mutoh, Tomoko; Kawashima, Ryuta; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2017-01-01

    To compare electrical velocimetry (EV) noninvasive measures of cardiac output (CO) and stroke volume variation (SVV) in dogs undergoing cardiovascular surgery with those obtained with the conventional thermodilution technique using a pulmonary artery catheter. Prospective experimental trial. Seven adult Beagle dogs with a median weight of 13.6 kg. Simultaneous, coupled cardiac index (CI; CO indexed to body surface area) measurements by EV (CIEV) and the reference pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution method (CIPAC) were obtained in seven sevoflurane-anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated dogs undergoing experimental open-chest cardiovascular surgery for isolated right ventricular failure. Relationships between SVV or central venous pressure (CVP) and stroke volume (SV) were analysed to estimate fluid responsiveness. Haemodynamic data were recorded intraoperatively and before and after fluid challenge. Bland-Altman analysis of 332 matched sets of CI data revealed an overall bias and precision of - 0.22 ± 0.52 L minute(-1) m(-2) for CIEV and CIPAC (percentage error: 30.4%). Trend analysis showed a concordance of 88% for CIEV. SVV showed a significant positive correlation (r(2) = 0.442, p < 0.0001) with SV changes to a volume loading of 200 mL, but CVP did not (r(2) = 0.0002, p = 0.94). Better prediction of SV responsiveness (rise of SV index of ≥ 10%) was observed for SVV (0.74 ± 0.09; p = 0.014) with a significant area under the receiver operating characteristic curve in comparison with CVP (0.53 ± 0.98; p = 0.78), with a cut-off value of 14.5% (60% specificity and 83% sensitivity). In dogs undergoing cardiovascular surgery, EV provided accurate CO measurements compared with CIPAC, although its trending ability was poor. Further, SVV by EV, but not CVP, reliably predicted fluid responsiveness during mechanical ventilation in dogs. Copyright © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia

  13. Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi’s sarcoma, Castleman’s disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist. PMID:22224176

  14. Dietary hyperthyroidism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Köhler, B; Stengel, C; Neiger, R

    2012-03-01

    Evaluation of dogs with elevated plasma thyroxine concentration fed raw food before and after changing the diet. Between 2006 and 2011 all dogs presented with an elevated plasma thyroxine concentration and a dietary history of feeding raw food were included. Thyroxine (reference interval: 19·3 to 51·5 nmol/L) and in many cases also thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations (reference interval: <0·30 ng/mL) were measured initially and after changing the diet. Twelve dogs were presented with a median age of five years. The median plasma thyroxine concentration was 156·1 (range of 79·7 to 391·9) nmol/L; in six dogs, thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration was measured and was <0·03 ng/mL in five dogs and 0·05 ng/mL in one dog. Six dogs showed clinical signs such as weight loss, aggressiveness, tachycardia, panting and restlessness while six dogs had no clinical signs. After changing the diet eight dogs were examined: thyroxine concentration normalised in all dogs and clinical signs resolved. Dietary hyperthyroidism can be seen in dogs on a raw meat diet or fed fresh or dried gullets. Increased plasma thyroxine concentration in a dog, either with or without signs of hyperthyroidism, should prompt the veterinarian to obtain a thorough dietary history. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  15. Coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Fahad; Tai, Javed Majid; Bokhari, Saira

    2014-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma may result in cardiac injuries ranging from simple arrhythmias to fatal cardiac rupture. Coronary artery dissection culminating in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is rare after blunt chest trauma. Here we report a case of a 37-year-old man who had an AMI secondary to coronary dissection resulting from blunt chest trauma after involvement in a physical fight. PMID:25246456

  16. [Wooden chests for the midwife's equipment].

    PubMed

    Carlén-Nilsson, C

    1993-01-01

    In the museum of medical history in Lund there are several wooden chests containing partly identical instruments apparently belonging to a midwife. The instruments dated from before 1900, e.g. lancets and horn cups for blood-letting, a pewter enema syringe, a wooden stethoscope, a "tobacco pipe" and glass bottles. The use of the tobacco pipe was first puzzling, but it appeared to be a breast reliver. What do we know about the date of the chests? One chest has belonged to Kjersti Nilsdotter, a midwife educated in Lund 1872-1873. Her certificate was in the chest. From Ronnie Hunt, Minnesota we have got information about another chest of the same type. That belonged to Nelly Gustafsson, a midwife educated in Lund probably about 1870. She emigrated to USA and was a practising midwife in Lindstrom, Minnesota from about 1900.

  17. Chest Pain in a Young Basketball Player

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catherine Y; Record, Janet D; Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Ziegelstein, Roy C

    2006-01-01

    A 32-year-old man was elbowed in the chest while fighting for a rebound in a recreational basketball game. He fell to the ground and his chest ached from the blow. Four days later he developed more severe chest pressure with dyspnea and came to the hospital. His chest wall was tender and his pulse slow, but the remainder of his physical examination was normal. Electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia, first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block, and occasional isorhythmic AV dissociation, but no ischemic ST-T changes. Cardiac troponin I rose to 1.74 ng/mL (normal <0.50). The patient therefore underwent coronary angiography, showing spiral dissection of the right coronary artery with extensive thrombus filling the distal portion of the vessel. Stenting was unsuccessful in restoring flow. This case highlights the potential dangers of blunt chest trauma in recreational sports and shows how angiography can distinguish myocardial contusion from coronary artery dissection. PMID:16808733

  18. [Chest trauma: a report of 596 cases].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H

    1992-02-01

    The study presented 596 cases with chest injuries, experienced for 4 years in our trauma and critical care center. Cases with chest injuries account for approximately 40% of all traumatized patients. Cases dead on arrival (DOA) show more significant frequency (87% of all traumatized DOA patients). To grasp the significance and the severity of chest injuries, we designed a new classification by the site where abnormality exists; 1) the chest wall, 2) the pleural cavity, 3) the airway, 4) the mediastinum, 5) the intrapericardial space, and 6) cardiac function. An application of the classification may clearly identify the initial direction for the treatment of chest injuries, including some examination which should be given priority. It is also suspected that a more exact decision making should be possible by an utilization of the classification.

  19. Barriers and motivators for owners walking their dog: results from qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Cutt, Hayley E; Giles-Corti, Billie; Wood, Lisa J; Knuiman, Matthew W; Burke, Valerie

    2008-08-01

    This qualitative research explored the relationship between dog ownership and dog-related, social environmental and physical environmental factors associated with walking with a dog. Seven focus groups with dog owners (n=51) were conducted. A pre-determined discussion guide was used and transcripts were analysed as group data, using content analysis to identify common themes. Many of the physical environmental barriers and facilitators that influenced dog owners to walk were similar to those found in the literature for general walking. However, a number of key motivators for walking, specific to dog owners, were identified. Dog owners reported that their dog was a strong source of motivation, companionship and social support that encouraged them to walk with their dog. The availability and accessibility of public open space (POS) for dogs and the provision of dog-related infrastructure within POS were also important environmental factors that affected whether owners walked with their dog. Results from this qualitative study were used to develop the Dogs and Physical Activity (DAPA) tool which is now being used to measure the walking behaviour of dog owners.

  20. Ventilation in dogs on cardiopulmonary bypass with and without lungs.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoeft, P; de Francquen, P; Gelin, M; Van Stratum, M; Joris, M; Servais, N; Jank, K; Grevisse, P; Demeester, M; Smets, P

    1979-12-01

    In 13 anesthetized or awake dogs, on cardiopulmonary bypass, we varied PaO2 and PaCO2 while continuously monitoring ventilatory responses and mechanics, to assess the dog's ability to maintain eupneic ventilation for any chemical drive. In a second group of 13 dogs on cardiopulmonary bypass we repeated the tests after removal of both lungs, to assess the importance of pulmonary feedback and mechanics. The VE/PO2 plot formed two hyperbolas, asymptotic to 39 Torr PO2 with lungs, and to 27 without; both intercepted zero ventilation near 200 Torr. Hyperoxic apnea occurred at, or below, PCO2 30 +/- 7 Torr under barbiturate and 20 +/- 4 Torr under morphine. Steady-state low PCO2 (10 Torr) turned off hypoxic drives as low as 20 Torr PO2. Empty-chest dogs had a low respiratory frequency (18 vs. 40), and near zero dynamic elastance; ventilatory work per minute and airway resistance were the same with and without lungs. Chest wall ventilatory responses are grossly independent of the presence of absence of lungs.

  1. Focal intestinal lipogranulomatous lymphangitis in 10 dogs.

    PubMed

    Lecoindre, A; Lecoindre, P; Cadoré, J L; Chevallier, M; Guerret, S; Derré, G; Mcdonough, S P; Simpson, K W

    2016-09-01

    To describe the clinical and pathological features of canine focal lipogranulomatous lymphangitis, to evaluate its underlying infectious cause and to compare it with human Crohn's disease. Retrospective review of case records with a histopathological diagnosis of focal lipogranulomatous lymphangitis. Bacterial and fungal colonisation was evaluated using fluorescence in situ hybridisation and histochemical staining, respectively. A comparison with Crohn's disease was performed by a human pathologist. Ten dogs were evaluated. The historical complaints were predominantly chronic diarrhoea (10/10) and vomiting (5/10). The biochemical abnormalities included hypoalbuminaemia (6/10) and hypocobalaminaemia (4/6). Abdominal sonography revealed a thickened distal ileum±ileocolic junction. Colonoscopy showed a swollen caecal ostium and oedematous caecum in 7/10 dogs. A stenotic ileo-colic opening prevented endoscopic intubation in all dogs. Histology from the resected lesions revealed granulomatous inflammation involving the muscularis and serosa. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated invasive bacteria in 2/10 dogs. Post-resection, all dogs received metronidazole and tapering immunosuppressive doses of prednisolone. Remission (median 17 months) was achieved in 8/10 dogs. Focal lipogranulomatous lymphangitis is a rare and severe form of canine inflammatory bowel disease with preferential localisation to the ileum and the ileocolic junction. An underlying infectious aetiology was not identified. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  2. Dogs catch human yawns.

    PubMed

    Joly-Mascheroni, Ramiro M; Senju, Atsushi; Shepherd, Alex J

    2008-10-23

    This study is the first to demonstrate that human yawns are possibly contagious to domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). Twenty-nine dogs observed a human yawning or making control mouth movements. Twenty-one dogs yawned when they observed a human yawning, but control mouth movements did not elicit yawning from any of them. The presence of contagious yawning in dogs suggests that this phenomenon is not specific to primate species and may indicate that dogs possess the capacity for a rudimentary form of empathy. Since yawning is known to modulate the levels of arousal, yawn contagion may help coordinate dog-human interaction and communication. Understanding the mechanism as well as the function of contagious yawning between humans and dogs requires more detailed investigation.

  3. Effect of shape and size of lung and chest wall on stresses in the lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vawter, D. L.; Matthews, F. L.; West, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    To understand better the effect of shape and size of lung and chest wall on the distribution of stresses, strains, and surface pressures, we analyzed a theoretical model using the technique of finite elements. First we investigated the effects of changing the chest wall shape during expansion, and second we studied lungs of a variety of inherent shapes and sizes. We found that, in general, the distributions of alveolar size, mechanical stresses, and surface pressures in the lungs were dominated by the weight of the lung and that changing the shape of the lung or chest wall had relatively little effect. Only at high states of expansion where the lung was very stiff did changing the shape of the chest wall cause substantial changes. Altering the inherent shape of the lung generally had little effect but the topographical differences in stresses and surface pressures were approximately proportional to lung height. The results are generally consistent with those found in the dog by Hoppin et al (1969).

  4. [Chest pains in the dental environment].

    PubMed

    Garfunkel, A; Galili, D; Findler, M; Zusman, S P; Malamed, S F; Elad, S; Kaufman, E

    2002-01-01

    Chest pain does not necessarily indicate cardiac disease. The most common causes of acute chest pain encountered in dental situations include hyperventilation, pulmonary embolism, angina pectoris and myocardial infarction. Stress and fear often cause rapid breathing or hyperventilation. This usually occurs in young adults and although the hyperventilating patient often complains of chest pain, this is rarely a manifestation of cardiac disease. Pulmonary embolism usually indicates the occlusion of a pulmonary artery causing severe chest pain. The primary clinical manifestation of angina pectoris is chest pain. Although most instances of anginal pain are easily terminated, the dentist must always consider the possibility that the supposed anginal attack is actually a sign of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). AMI is a clinical syndrome caused by a deficient coronary arterial blood supply to a region of myocardium that results in cellular death. There is a high incidence of mortality among AMI with death often occurring within 2 hours of the onset of signs and symptoms. The initial clinical manifestations of all types of chest pain can be similar. Therefore the dentist must develop proficiency in constituting a differential diagnosis and an efficient management protocol. As in most medical situations prevention is the most powerful tool. However, if chest pains do occur, measures such as airway management, oxygen supplementation, coronary artery dilation, analgesis and in extreme cases, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and evacuation to the emergency room, may be necessary.

  5. A new alternative for bony chest wall reconstruction using biomaterial artificial rib and pleura: animal experiment and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan-jun; Wang, Wu-ping; Li, Wei-yang; Hao, Chong-li; Li, Zhe; Wu, Qiu-liang; Wu, Rao-pan; Rong, Tie-hua

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate a new method for chest wall reconstruction using porcine-derived artificial rib and pleura in an animal experiment. Further, the clinical application was performed in five patients with large defects in the chest wall as a preliminary observation. In animal experiments, a full-thickness chest wall defect of 7 cm × 8 cm was created in 12 adult mongrel dogs. Six dogs underwent reconstruction with porcine-derived artificial ribs and pleura (test group), and six with methylmethacrylate and double polyester mesh in the form of traditional Marlex sandwich technique (control group). At follow-up of each for 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, a general performance assessment and thoracic radiography were performed. Gross and histopathological examinations were carried out following humane euthanasia at the time of last follow-up. In clinical application, five patients with wide tumor resection in the chest wall underwent reconstruction with porcine-derived artificial ribs and pleura as well. In animal experiment, no perioperative death or hyperpyrexia occurred and no difference in either infection or dyspnea was noted between the two groups. Postoperative radiography revealed good thoracic integrity with no evidence of collapse, deformation, or abnormal movement in the test group. In the control group, similar results were observed, except that two dogs had abnormal movement in the chest wall associated with respiration. Severe adhesions between the 'sandwich' complex and the host tissues were identified in the control group, but by contrast, only mild adhesions were noted in the test group. The non-degradable polyester mesh induced fibrous proliferation and rejection, whereas the artificial pleura was absorbed with mild fibrous hyperplasia after 12 months. In clinical application, no thoracic deformity, chronic pain, or respiratory discomfort were observed at 1 or 12 postoperative months. Porcine-derived ribs and pleura can be employed safely to create an

  6. Dogs recognize dog and human emotions.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Natalia; Guo, Kun; Wilkinson, Anna; Savalli, Carine; Otta, Emma; Mills, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The perception of emotional expressions allows animals to evaluate the social intentions and motivations of each other. This usually takes place within species; however, in the case of domestic dogs, it might be advantageous to recognize the emotions of humans as well as other dogs. In this sense, the combination of visual and auditory cues to categorize others' emotions facilitates the information processing and indicates high-level cognitive representations. Using a cross-modal preferential looking paradigm, we presented dogs with either human or dog faces with different emotional valences (happy/playful versus angry/aggressive) paired with a single vocalization from the same individual with either a positive or negative valence or Brownian noise. Dogs looked significantly longer at the face whose expression was congruent to the valence of vocalization, for both conspecifics and heterospecifics, an ability previously known only in humans. These results demonstrate that dogs can extract and integrate bimodal sensory emotional information, and discriminate between positive and negative emotions from both humans and dogs. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. An open, self-controlled study on the efficacy of topical indoxacarb for eliminating fleas and clinical signs of flea-allergy dermatitis in client-owned dogs in Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Fisara, Petr; Sargent, Roger M; Shipstone, Michael; von Berky, Andrew; von Berky, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Background Canine flea-allergy dermatitis (FAD), a hypersensitivity response to antigenic material in the saliva of feeding fleas, occurs worldwide and remains a common presentation in companion animal veterinary practice despite widespread availability of effective systemic and topical flea-control products. Hypothesis/Objectives To evaluate the clinical response in dogs with FAD treated topically with indoxacarb, a novel oxadiazine insecticide. Animals Twenty-five client-owned dogs in Queensland, Australia diagnosed with pre-existing FAD on the basis of clinical signs, flea-antigen intradermal and serological tests. Methods An open-label, noncontrolled study, in which all dogs were treated with topical indoxacarb at 4 week intervals, three times over 12 weeks. Results Twenty-four dogs completed the study. Complete resolution of clinical signs of FAD was observed in 21 cases (87.5%), with nearly complete resolution or marked improvement in the remaining three cases. Mean clinical scores (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index-03) were reduced by 93.3% at week 12. Mean owner-assessed pruritus scores were reduced by 88% by week 12. Mean flea counts reduced by 98.7 and 100% in weeks 8 and 12, respectively. Conclusions and clinical importance Topical indoxacarb treatment applied every 4 weeks for 12 weeks, without concomitant antipruritic or ectoparasiticide therapy, completely alleviated flea infestations in all dogs and associated clinical signs of FAD in a high proportion of this population of dogs in a challenging flea-infestation environment. Résumé Contexte La dermatite par allergie aux piqures de puces (FAD), une hypersensibilité aux antigènes salivaires des puces, est décrite dans le monde entier et reste une présentation fréquente en médicine vétérinaire des animaux de compagnie malgré une large gamme d'antiparasitaires topiques et systémiques efficaces disponibles. Hypothèses/Objectifs Estimer la réponse clinique des chiens

  8. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Newman, Beverley; Krane, Elliot J; Gawande, Rakhee; Holmes, Tyson H; Robinson, Terry E

    2014-02-01

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  9. Chest radiographs after removal of chest drains in neonates: clinical benefit or common practice?

    PubMed Central

    van den Boom, J; Battin, M

    2007-01-01

    Background Chest drain insertion is a common procedure in neonatal care. Routine radiography after removal of chest drains increases radiation exposure, handling and cost, but there are few data proving clinical benefit. Objectives To review current practice and determine the yield of routinely obtained chest radiographs (CXR). Methods A retrospective chart review of all infants undergoing removal of chest tubes in a single tertiary neonatal unit in New Zealand between January 1998 and July 2004 was performed. Results In total, 119 infants were identified, from the database, to have a chest drainage performed. In 19 cases, the procedure was needle aspiration or the drain was removed outside of our unit, hence these were excluded. The remaining 100 patients with 110 episodes of chest drain removal after 174 chest tube insertions were analysed. In asymptomatic infants, routine radiography showed some reaccumulation of air in nine of 35 cases of pneumothorax or of fluid in two of the five cases of pleural effusion, but chest tube reinsertion was not required. In the 12 clinically symptomatic infants, chest tubes were reinserted in five cases (four reaccumulations of pneumothorax and one pleural effusion), and one infant had symptomatic right upper lobe collapse. In the remaining infants, there were no abnormalities on CXR accounting for deterioration. Conclusions Given the low yield for routine radiography after chest drain removal, we suggest that close observation is likely to detect clinically relevant recurrence of pneumothorax. PMID:16769712

  10. Bark in the park: a review of domestic dogs in parks.

    PubMed

    Weston, Michael A; Fitzsimons, James A; Wescott, Geoffrey; Miller, Kelly K; Ekanayake, Kasun B; Schneider, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The presence of domestic dogs Canis familiaris in public open spaces is increasingly controversial. In our review of the literature, we located 133 publications of various types (papers, reports etc.) that examine some aspect of dogs in parks and open spaces (50 % focussed solely on dogs). There has been an exponential growth in the cumulative number of articles (R (2) = 0.96; 82 % published since 1997); almost all pertain to temperate latitudes (97 %) and most to the northern hemisphere (62 %). Most articles focus on impacts on wildlife (51 %), zoonotic diseases (17 %), and people's perceptions regarding dogs (12 %). Articles mostly describe problems associated with dogs, while reports of low compliance with dog regulations are common. We outline six major findings regarding dogs in parks: (1) there is a paucity of information on dogs in parks, particularly in relation to their interactions with wildlife and regarding their management; (2) published studies are mainly restricted to a handful of locations in developed countries; (3) sectors of societies hold different views over the desirability of dogs in parks; (4) the benefits and risks of dogs to humans and park values are poorly documented and known; (5) dogs represent a notable disease risk in some but not all countries; and (6) coastal parks are over-represented in the literature in terms of potential negative impacts. Park managers globally require better information to achieve conservation outcomes from dog management in parks.

  11. Bark in the Park: A Review of Domestic Dogs in Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Michael A.; Fitzsimons, James A.; Wescott, Geoffrey; Miller, Kelly K.; Ekanayake, Kasun B.; Schneider, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The presence of domestic dogs Canis familiaris in public open spaces is increasingly controversial. In our review of the literature, we located 133 publications of various types (papers, reports etc.) that examine some aspect of dogs in parks and open spaces (50 % focussed solely on dogs). There has been an exponential growth in the cumulative number of articles ( R 2 = 0.96; 82 % published since 1997); almost all pertain to temperate latitudes (97 %) and most to the northern hemisphere (62 %). Most articles focus on impacts on wildlife (51 %), zoonotic diseases (17 %), and people's perceptions regarding dogs (12 %). Articles mostly describe problems associated with dogs, while reports of low compliance with dog regulations are common. We outline six major findings regarding dogs in parks: (1) there is a paucity of information on dogs in parks, particularly in relation to their interactions with wildlife and regarding their management; (2) published studies are mainly restricted to a handful of locations in developed countries; (3) sectors of societies hold different views over the desirability of dogs in parks; (4) the benefits and risks of dogs to humans and park values are poorly documented and known; (5) dogs represent a notable disease risk in some but not all countries; and (6) coastal parks are over-represented in the literature in terms of potential negative impacts. Park managers globally require better information to achieve conservation outcomes from dog management in parks.

  12. Impacts to the chest of PMHSs - Influence of impact location and load distribution on chest response.

    PubMed

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Svensson, Mats Y; Davidsson, Johan; Gutsche, Andreas; Tomasch, Ernst; Darok, Mario; Ravnik, Dean

    2016-02-01

    The chest response of the human body has been studied for several load conditions, but is not well known in the case of steering wheel rim-to-chest impact in heavy goods vehicle frontal collisions. The aim of this study was to determine the response of the human chest in a set of simulated steering wheel impacts. PMHS tests were carried out and analysed. The steering wheel load pattern was represented by a rigid pendulum with a straight bar-shaped front. A crash test dummy chest calibration pendulum was utilised for comparison. In this study, a set of rigid bar impacts were directed at various heights of the chest, spanning approximately 120mm around the fourth intercostal space. The impact energy was set below a level estimated to cause rib fracture. The analysed results consist of responses, evaluated with respect to differences in the impacting shape and impact heights on compression and viscous criteria chest injury responses. The results showed that the bar impacts consistently produced lesser scaled chest compressions than the hub; the Middle bar responses were around 90% of the hub responses. A superior bar impact provided lesser chest compression; the average response was 86% of the Middle bar response. For inferior bar impacts, the chest compression response was 116% of the chest compression in the middle. The damping properties of the chest caused the compression to decrease in the high speed bar impacts to 88% of that in low speed impacts. From the analysis it could be concluded that the bar impact shape provides lower chest criteria responses compared to the hub. Further, the bar responses are dependent on the impact location of the chest. Inertial and viscous effects of the upper body affect the responses. The results can be used to assess the responses of human substitutes such as anthropomorphic test devices and finite element human body models, which will benefit the development process of heavy goods vehicle safety systems. Copyright © 2015

  13. [Lateral chest X-rays. Radiographic anatomy].

    PubMed

    García Villafañe, C; Pedrosa, C S

    2014-01-01

    Lateral chest views constitute an essential part of chest X-ray examinations, so it is fundamental to know the anatomy on these images and to be able to detect the variations manifested on these images in different diseases. The aim of this article is to review the normal anatomy and main normal variants seen on lateral chest views. For teaching purposes, we divide the thorax into different spaces and analyze each in an orderly way, especially emphasizing the anatomic details that are most helpful for locating lesions that have already been detected in the posteroanterior view or for detecting lesions that can be missed in the posteroanterior view.

  14. Initial defibrillation versus initial chest compression in a 4-minute ventricular fibrillation canine model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Long; Zhong, Jing-Quan; Tao, Wen; Hou, Xue-Mei; Meng, Xiang-Lin; Zhang, Yun

    2009-07-01

    Previous laboratory and clinical studies have demonstrated that chest compression preceding defibrillation in prolonged ventricular fibrillation (VF) increases the likelihood of successful cardiac resuscitation. The lower limit of VF duration when preshock chest compression provides no benefit has not been specifically studied. We aimed to study the effect of order of defibrillation and chest compression on defibrillation and cardiac resuscitation in a 4-minute VF canine model of cardiac arrest. Prospective, randomized animal study. Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research and Department of Cardiology, QiLu Hospital. Twenty-four domestic dogs. VF was induced in anesthetized and ventilated canines. After 4 minutes of untreated VF, animals were randomly assigned to receive shock first or chest compression first. Animals in the shock-first group received an immediate single countershock of 360 J for <10 seconds, then 200 immediate compressions before pulse check or rhythm reanalysis. The ratio of compression to ventilation was 30:2. Interruptions to deliver rescue breaths were eliminated in this study. Animals in the chest compression-first group received 200 chest compressions before a single countershock; the other interventions were the same as for the shock-first group. End points were restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), defined as spontaneous systolic arterial pressure >50 mm Hg, when epinephrine (0.02 mg/kg intravenously) was given, and resuscitation, defined as maintaining systolic arterial pressure >50 mm Hg at the 24-hour study end point. In the shock-first group, all animals achieved ROSC, and ten of 12 survived at the 24-hour study end point. In the chest compression-first group, 11 of 12 animals achieved ROSC, and nine of 12 survived at the 24-hour study end point. In this 4-minute VF canine model of cardiac arrest, the order of initial defibrillation or initial chest compression does not affect cardiac resuscitation.

  15. Wolves are better imitators of conspecifics than dogs.

    PubMed

    Range, Friederike; Virányi, Zsófia

    2014-01-01

    Domestication is thought to have influenced the cognitive abilities of dogs underlying their communication with humans, but little is known about its effect on their interactions with conspecifics. Since domestication hypotheses offer limited predictions in regard to wolf-wolf compared to dog-dog interactions, we extend the cooperative breeding hypothesis suggesting that the dependency of wolves on close cooperation with conspecifics, including breeding but also territory defense and hunting, has created selection pressures on motivational and cognitive processes enhancing their propensity to pay close attention to conspecifics' actions. During domestication, dogs' dependency on conspecifics has been relaxed, leading to reduced motivational and cognitive abilities to interact with conspecifics. Here we show that 6-month-old wolves outperform same aged dogs in a two-action-imitation task following a conspecific demonstration. While the wolves readily opened the apparatus after a demonstration, the dogs failed to solve the problem. This difference could not be explained by differential motivation, better physical insight of wolves, differential developmental pathways of wolves and dogs or a higher dependency of dogs from humans. Our results are best explained by the hypothesis that higher cooperativeness may come together with a higher propensity to pay close attention to detailed actions of others and offer an alternative perspective to domestication by emphasizing the cooperativeness of wolves as a potential source of dog-human cooperation.

  16. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P < .001) and positive smoking history (P = .001) were associated with increased likelihood of a recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in

  17. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with vasopressin in a dog.

    PubMed

    Schmittinger, Christian A; Astner, Sandra; Astner, Leonhard; Kössler, Josef; Wenzel, Volker

    2005-03-01

    That endogenous vasopressin levels in successfully resuscitated human patients were significantly higher than in patients who died pointed to the possible benefit of administering vasopressin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Several CPR studies in pigs showed that vasopressin improved blood flow to vital organs, cerebral oxygen delivery, resuscitability and neurological outcome when compared with epinephrine. In a small clinical study, vasopressin significantly improved short-term survival when compared with epinephrine indicating its potential as an alternative pressor to epinephrine during CPR in human beings. As there was little clinical data available at that time, its recommended use was limited to adult human beings with shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation. In this report, we present the case of a dog in which the successful management of intraoperative asystolic cardiac arrest involved vasopressin. Unexpected cardiac arrest occurred during anaesthesia for the surgical removal of multiple mammary adenocarcinomata in a 11-year-old Yorkshire terrier. Despite an ASA physical status assignation of III, the dog was successfully resuscitated with external chest compressions, intermittent positive pressure ventilation and vasopressin (2 doses of 0.8 IU kg(-1)) and was discharged 3 days later without signs of neurological injury. We believe vasopressin contributed to restoring spontaneous circulation. It may prove increasingly useful in perioperative resuscitation in dogs.

  18. Pityriasis rubra pilaris on the chest (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This person has pityriasis rubra pilaris on the chest, an uncommon skin condition characterized by salmon-colored patches with scaling (palmoplantar keratoderma). A characteristic sign of pityriasis rubra pilaris is plugging ...

  19. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  20. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  1. Chest ultrasound findings in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Agostinis, Paolo; Copetti, Roberto; Lapini, Laura; Badona Monteiro, Geraldo; N'Deque, Augusto; Baritussio, Aldo

    2017-10-01

    In resource-limited countries, the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is based on clinical findings, chest radiography and the demonstration of acid-fast bacilli in sputum. Few data are available on the use of ultrasound (US) to diagnose pulmonary TB. Chest US was performed in patients with lung TB from a rural African setting, to look for signs of the disease and to clarify the role US may have in the diagnosis of pulmonary TB. Sixty adult patients diagnosed with lung TB underwent chest US. All patients had abnormal findings. The most frequent was a subpleural nodule (SUN), which was mostly multiple and also found in radiologically normal areas. Other findings were lung consolidations, cavitations, miliary patterns made of miniature SUNs, and pleural and pericardial effusions. Chest US is a complementary tool in evaluating patients with suspected lung TB in resource-limited settings where the disease has high prevalence.

  2. Disease Precautions for Dog Walkers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools for K-12 Educators Disease Precautions for Dog Walkers CC by Tomwsulcer Whether you’re walking ... routes or durations may need to be altered. Dog bites Always be careful when walking a dog ...

  3. Fluoroscopic chest tube insertion and patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Disher, A. C.; Miller, T. Q.

    1992-01-01

    Catheters and chest tubes may be placed under fluoroscopic control to reduce pleural effusions. This procedure has been adopted as a routine procedure at the UCLA School of Medicine in Los Angeles, California to improve patient care. This technique was modified for the placement of large chest tubes, which can be placed by a radiologist without multiple attempts or complications. Our experience with 2234 patients who underwent this procedure between 1977 and 1990 is described. PMID:1404463

  4. Outcomes of surgery for chest wall sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Joe B

    2010-11-01

    Chest wall resection requires wide local excision, negative margins, and adequate reconstruction. Outcomes are generally good to excellent with wide local excision and negative margins. Mortality is nearly 0% to 1% with mild morbidity. Multispecialty surgical teams may be required for more complex situations. Early diagnosis of chest wall sarcomas, confirmation by an experienced sarcoma pathologist, and multidisciplinary discussion before treatment initiation, are all required for optimal and successful therapy.

  5. Dog Owners' Interaction Styles: Their Components and Associations with Reactions of Pet Dogs to a Social Threat

    PubMed Central

    Cimarelli, Giulia; Turcsán, Borbála; Bánlaki, Zsófia; Range, Friederike; Virányi, Zsófia

    2016-01-01

    The bond dogs develop with their owner received increased attention in the last years but no study aimed at characterizing the way in which owners interact with their dogs in their daily life and how this might influence dog behavior. In order to examine how dog owners interact with their dogs, we first analyzed the behavior of 220 dog owners in 8 different standardized situations involving the owner-dog dyad. We extracted 3 behavioral factors related to “Owner Warmth,” “Owner Social Support,” and “Owner Control.” Further, we investigated whether owner personality, gender and age are associated with these three factors. Results indicated that older owners scored lower in “Owner Warmth” and in “Owner Social Support” and higher in “Owner Control” than younger owners. Furthermore, owners scoring high in “Owner Control” scored lower in the personality trait Openness and owners scoring high in “Owner Social Support” scored lower in the personality trait Conscientiousness. Finally, we also analyzed whether the dogs' reaction to an unfamiliar woman's threatening approach was associated with the owners' interaction styles. Results showed that dogs that searched for proximity of their owners during the threatening situation had owners scoring higher in “Owner Warmth,” as compared to dogs that reacted more autonomously, approaching the unfamiliar experimenter. Analogies between dog-owner interaction styles and human parenting styles are discussed considering the implications of the present findings for human social psychology as well as the practical relevance for dog welfare and human safety. PMID:28066298

  6. [Alimentary thyrotoxcicosis in two dogs].

    PubMed

    Kempker, Karsten; Güssow, Arne; Cook, Andrea M; Rick, Markus; Neiger, Reto

    2017-06-20

    Two dogs with increased thyroxin concentrations compatible with hyperthyroidism were referred for further examinations. One dog displayed clinical signs of hyperthyroidism. Based on history, clinical examination, laboratory evaluation and scintigraphy an alimentary thyrotoxicosis was identified. It was caused by feeding a BARF diet containing thyroidal tissue in one dog and by conventional dog food in the other patient. After changing the diet the clinical signs resolved in the affected dog. A control examination revealed thyroxin concentrations within the reference range in both dogs.

  7. Tularaemia in Norwegian dogs.

    PubMed

    Nordstoga, Anne; Handeland, Kjell; Johansen, Tone Bjordal; Iversen, Lena; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Mattsson, Roland; Wik-Larssen, Kjersti; Afset, Jan Egil; Næverdal, Rune; Lund, Arve

    2014-10-10

    We describe tularaemia in a Norwegian dog caused by Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica. A Hamilton Hound and his owner developed tulaeremia after hunting an infected mountain hare (Lepus timidus). The dog showed signs of lethargy, anorexia and fever during a period two to four days after hunting and thereafter fully recovered. Its antibody titers increased 32-fold from one to three weeks post exposure. Thereafter, the titer declined and leveled off at moderate positive values up to one year after exposure (end of study). This is believed to be the first case report of clinical F. tularensis subspecies holarctica infection in a European dog. In 2011, enormous numbers of Norway lemmings (Lemmus lemmus) occurred in Finnmark, the northernmost county of Norway and many dogs caught and swallowed lemmings. Some of these dogs developed non-specific signs of disease and the owners consulted a veterinary surgeon, who suspected tularaemia. In order to investigate this hypothesis, serum samples from 33 dogs were examined for antibodies to F. tularensis. The dogs were allocated into three groups: Dogs from Finnmark that became sick (Group 1) or remained healthy following contact with lemmings (Group 2), and healthy control dogs from Oslo without known contact with lemmings (Group 3). All the serum samples were analyzed with a tube agglutination assay. Among dogs exposed to lemmings, 10/11 and 3/12 were antibody positive in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively, whereas none of the control dogs (n=10) were positive for antibodies against F. tularensis. These results strongly indicate that the non-specific disease seen in the dogs in Finnmark was linked to F. tularensis infection acquired through contact with lemmings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Service dogs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-05

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning veterans in need of service dogs. Under this final rule, VA will provide to veterans with visual, hearing, or mobility impairments benefits to support the use of a service dog as part of the management of such impairments. The benefits include assistance with veterinary care, travel benefits associated with obtaining and training a dog, and the provision, maintenance, and replacement of hardware required for the dog to perform the tasks necessary to assist such veterans.

  9. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  10. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  11. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  12. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  13. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  14. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST...

  15. Survey radiography and computerized tomography imaging of the thorax in female dogs with mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accurate early diagnosis of lung metastases is important for establishing therapeutic measures. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare survey thoracic radiographs and computerized tomography (CT) scans to specifically identify lung metastases in female dogs with mammary tumors. Methods Twenty-one female dogs, weighing 3 to 34 kg and aged from 5 years to 14 years and 10 months, with mammary tumors were studied. In all dogs before the imaging examinations, fine-needle aspiration cytology of the mammary tumors was performed to confirm the diagnosis. Three-view thoracic radiographs were accomplished: right lateral, left lateral and ventrodorsal views. Sequential transverse images of the thorax were acquired on a spiral Scanner, before and after intravenous bolus injection of nonionic iodine contrast. Soft-tissue and lung windows were applied. All the mammary tumors were surgically removed and examined histologically. Results The correlation between the cytological and histological results regarding presence of malignancy was observed in only 17 cases. In radiographic examinations, no dog displayed signs of lung metastases or thorax chest lesions. CT detected lung metastasis in two cases, while small areas of lung atelectasis located peripherally were found in 28.57% of the dogs. Conclusion In this study population, spiral CT showed higher sensitivity than chest radiographies to detect lung metastasis; this indicates that CT should be performed on all female dogs with malignant mammary tumors. PMID:20214816

  16. Closed cervix is associated with more severe illness in dogs with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Jitpean, Supranee; Ambrosen, Aime; Emanuelson, Ulf; Hagman, Ragnvi

    2017-01-05

    Pyometra, a life-threatening bacterial infection of the uterus, is classified as open or closed depending on the functional patency of the cervix i.e. presence or absence of vaginal discharge. In closed cervix pyometra, pus and bacterial products accumulate in the uterus, which is thought to induce a more severe illness. The aim of this study was to investigate whether disease severity or outcome differed in dogs with open or closed cervix pyometra. Prospectively collected data from 111 female dogs diagnosed with pyometra at the University Animal Hospital, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, intermittently during 2005-2012 was analyzed. Seventy-two dogs (65%) had open cervix, whereas 39 dogs (35%) had closed cervix. Differences between the two groups were explored by Wilcoxon Two Sample Test for continuous variables and Chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. P < 0.05 was considered significant. In dogs with open cervix the median age was 9.0 years and the median weight 26.0 kg. In dogs with closed cervix the median age was 9.6 years and the median weight 25.0 kg, with no significant differences between the groups (p = 0.69 and 0.24, respectively). Five dogs (4.5%) died, all with open cervix, and 16 dogs (14%) had complications. The general physical condition was moderately or severely depressed in 30% (21/71) of dogs with open cervix (severely depressed in 4 dogs, moderately depressed in 17 dogs) and in 56% (22/39) of dogs with closed cervix (severely depressed in 3 dogs, moderately depressed in 19 dogs). The general physical condition was mildly depressed in 41 dogs with open cervix and 16 dogs with closed cervix, whereas it was normal in nine dogs with open cervix and one dog with closed cervix. None of the included dogs had very severely depressed general physical condition or were non-responsive. Leukocytosis, neutrophilia, monocytosis and moderately to severely depressed general condition was more commonly

  17. Cardiovascular selectivity of adenosine receptor agonists in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Gerencer, R. Z.; Finegan, B. A.; Clanachan, A. S.

    1992-01-01

    1. In order to determine the relevance of adenosine (Ado) receptor classification obtained from in vitro methods to the cardiovascular actions of Ado agonists in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA, 400 fold A1-selective), 5'-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA, A1 approximately A2) and 2-phenylaminoadenosine (PAA, 5 fold A2-selective) were compared in open-chest, fentanyl-pentobarbitone anaesthetized dogs. 2. Graded doses of CHA (10 to 1000 micrograms kg-1), NECA (0.5 to 100 micrograms kg-1) or PAA (0.1 to 20 micrograms kg-1) were administered intravenously and changes in haemodynamics and myocardial contractility were assessed 10 min following each dose. The effects of graded infusions of AMP (200 to 1000 micrograms kg-1 min-1) were also evaluated. 3. AMP and each of the Ado analogues (NECA > PAA > CHA) increased the systemic vascular conductance index (SVCI) in a dose-dependent manner and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). At doses causing similar increases in SVCI, these agonists caused (i) similar reflex increases in heart rate (HR) and cardiac index (CI) and decreases in AV conduction interval (AVi) and (ii) similar increases in coronary vascular conductance (CVC). 4. After cardiac autonomic blockade with atropine (0.2 mg kg-1) and propranolol (1 mg kg-1), AMP, CHA and PAA still increased SVCI and CVC and decreased MAP. CHA and PAA had no marked effects on HR, CI or AVi. As in the absence of cardiac autonomic blockade, equieffective vasodilator doses of CHA and PAA had identical effects on CVC, CI and AVi.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1467827

  18. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the 28 dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to disease-matched dogs not treated with rcG-CSF. In addition, the mean duration of hospitalization was reduced (P = 0.01) in rcG-CSF treated dogs compared to untreated dogs. However, survival times were decreased in dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to untreated dogs. These results suggest that treatment with rcG-CSF was effective in stimulating neutrophil recovery and shortening the duration of hospitalization in dogs with parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  19. High detection rate of dog circovirus in diarrheal dogs.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Han-Siang; Lin, Ting-Han; Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Lee-Shuan; Chung, Cheng-Shu; Chiou, Ming-Tang; Lin, Chao-Nan

    2016-06-17

    Diarrhea is one of the most common clinical symptoms reported in companion animal clinics. Dog circovirus (DogCV) is a new mammalian circovirus that is considered to be a cause of alimentary syndromes such as diarrhea, vomiting and hemorrhagic enteritis. DogCV has previously only been identified in the United States, Italy, Germany (GeneBank accession number: KF887949) and China (GeneBank accession number: KT946839). Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of DogCV in Taiwan and to explore the correlation between diarrhea and DogCV infection. Clinical specimens were collected between 2012 and 2014 from 207 dogs suffering from diarrhea and 160 healthy dogs. In this study, we developed a sensitive and specific SYBR Green-based real-time PCR assays to detected DogCV in naturally infected animals. Of the analyzed fecal samples from diarrheal dogs and health dogs, 58 (28.0 %) and 19 (11.9 %), respectively, were DogCV positive. The difference in DogCV prevalence was highly significant (P = 0.0002755) in diarrheal dogs. This is the first study to reveal that DogCV is currently circulating in domestic dogs in Taiwan and to demonstrate its high detection rate in dogs with diarrhea.

  20. Chest physiotherapy for pneumonia in children.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Gabriela S S; Fregonezi, Guilherme A F; Dias, Fernando A L; Ribeiro, Cibele T D; Guerra, Ricardo O; Freitas, Diana A; Parreira, Veronica F; Mendonca, Karla M P P

    2013-09-20

    Pneumonia is an inflammatory lung disease and it is the greatest cause of deaths in children younger than five years of age worldwide. Chest physiotherapy is widely used in the treatment of pneumonia because it can help to eliminate inflammatory exudates and tracheobronchial secretions, remove airway obstructions, reduce airway resistance, enhance gas exchange and reduce the work of breathing. Thus, chest physiotherapy may contribute to patient recovery as an adjuvant treatment even though its indication remains controversial. To assess the effectiveness of chest physiotherapy in relation to time until clinical resolution in children (from birth up to 18 years old) of either gender with any type of pneumonia. We searched CENTRAL 2013, Issue 4; MEDLINE (1946 to May week 4, 2013); EMBASE (1974 to May 2013); CINAHL (1981 to May 2013); LILACS (1982 to May 2013); Web of Science (1950 to May 2013); and PEDro (1950 to May 2013).We consulted the ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP registers to identify planned, ongoing and unpublished trials. We consulted the reference lists of relevant articles found by the electronic searches for additional studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared chest physiotherapy of any type with no chest physiotherapy in children with pneumonia. Two review authors independently selected the studies to be included in the review, assessed trial quality and extracted data. Three RCTs involving 255 inpatient children are included in the review. They addressed conventional chest physiotherapy, positive expiratory pressure and continuous positive airway pressure. The following outcomes were measured: duration of hospital stay, time to clinical resolution (observing the following parameters: fever, chest indrawing, nasal flaring, tachypnoea and peripheral oxygen saturation levels), change in adventitious sounds, change in chest X-ray and duration of cough in days. Two of the included studies found a significant improvement in

  1. Pulmonary nodule size evaluation with chest tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Åse A; Fagman, Erika; Vikgren, Jenny; Fisichella, Valeria A; Boijsen, Marianne; Flinck, Agneta; Kheddache, Susanne; Svalkvist, Angelica; Båth, Magnus

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate intra- and interobserver variability, as well as agreement for nodule size measurements on chest tomosynthesis and computed tomographic (CT) images. The Regional Ethical Review Board approved this study, and all participants gave written informed consent. Thirty-six segmented nodules in 20 patients were included in the study. Eight observers measured the left-to-right, inferior-to-superior, and longest nodule diameters on chest tomosynthesis and CT images. Intra- and interobserver repeatability, as well as agreement between measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images, were assessed as recommended by Bland and Altman. The difference between the mean manual and the segmented diameter was -2.2 and -2.3 mm for left-to-right and -2.6 and -2.2 mm for the inferior-to-superior diameter for measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images, respectively. Intraobserver 95% limits of agreement (LOA) for the longest diameter ranged from a lower limit of -1.1 mm and an upper limit of 1.0 mm to -1.8 and 1.8 mm for chest tomosynthesis and from -0.6 and 0.9 mm to -3.1 and 2.2 mm for axial CT. Interobserver 95% LOA ranged from -1.3 and 1.5 mm to -2.0 and 2.1 mm for chest tomosynthesis and from -1.8 and 1.1 mm to -2.2 and 3.1 mm for axial CT. The 95% LOA concerning the mean of the observers' measurements of the longest diameter at chest tomosynthesis and axial CT were ±2.1 mm (mean measurement error, 0 mm). For the different observers, the 95% LOA between the modalities ranged from -2.2 and 1.6 mm to -3.2 and 2.8 mm. Measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images are comparable, because there is no evident bias between the modalities and the repeatability is similar. The LOA between measurements for the two modalities raise concern if measurements from chest tomosynthesis and CT were to be used interchangeably. © RSNA, 2012.

  2. Chest physiotherapy for pneumonia in adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Yuping, Yan; Yin, Xiangli; Wang, Bin Y; Wu, Taixiang; Liu, Guan J; Dong, Bi Rong

    2010-02-17

    Despite conflicting evidence, chest physiotherapy has been widely used as an adjunctive treatment for adults with pneumonia. To assess the effectiveness and safety of chest physiotherapy for pneumonia in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2009, issue 3); MEDLINE (1966 to August 2009); EMBASE (1974 to August 2009); CBM (1978 to August 2009); the National Research Register (August 2009) and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) (1929 to August 2009). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of chest physiotherapy for treating pneumonia in adults. Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and appraised trial quality. Primary outcomes were mortality and cure rate. We used risk ratios (RR) and mean difference (MD) for individual trial results in the data analysis. We performed meta-analysis and measured all outcomes with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Six RCTs (434 participants) appraised four types of chest physiotherapy (conventional chest physiotherapy; osteopathic manipulative treatment (which includes paraspinal inhibition, rib raising and myofascial release); active cycle of breathing techniques (which include active breathing control, thoracic expansion exercises and forced expiration techniques); and positive expiratory pressure).None of the physiotherapies (versus no physiotherapy or placebo) improved mortality rates of adults with pneumonia.Conventional chest physiotherapy (versus no physiotherapy), active cycle of breathing techniques (versus no physiotherapy) and osteopathic manipulative treatment (versus placebo) did not increase the cure rate or chest X-ray improvement rate.Osteopathic manipulative treatment (versus placebo) and positive expiratory pressure (versus no physiotherapy) reduced mean duration of hospital stay by 2.0 days (mean difference (MD) -2.0 days, 95% CI -3.5 to -0.6) and 1.4 days (MD -1.4 days, 95% CI -2.8 to -0

  3. Chest physiotherapy for pneumonia in adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Yan, Yuping; Yin, Xiangli; Wang, Bin Y; Wu, Taixiang; Liu, Guan J; Dong, Bi Rong

    2013-02-28

    Despite conflicting evidence, chest physiotherapy has been widely used as an adjunctive treatment for adults with pneumonia. To assess the effectiveness and safety of chest physiotherapy for pneumonia in adults. We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1966 to November week 2, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) (1929 to November 2012), CINAHL (2009 to November 2012) and CBM (1978 to November 2012). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of chest physiotherapy for treating pneumonia in adults. Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and appraised trial quality. Primary outcomes were mortality and cure rate. We used risk ratios (RR) and mean difference (MD) for individual trial results in the data analysis. We performed meta-analysis and measured all outcomes with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Six RCTs (434 participants) appraised four types of chest physiotherapy (conventional chest physiotherapy; osteopathic manipulative treatment (which includes paraspinal inhibition, rib raising and myofascial release); active cycle of breathing techniques (which include active breathing control, thoracic expansion exercises and forced expiration techniques); and positive expiratory pressure).None of the physiotherapies (versus no physiotherapy or placebo) improved mortality rates of adults with pneumonia.Conventional chest physiotherapy (versus no physiotherapy), active cycle of breathing techniques (versus no physiotherapy) and osteopathic manipulative treatment (versus placebo) did not increase the cure rate or chest X-ray improvement rate.Osteopathic manipulative treatment (versus placebo) and positive expiratory pressure (versus no physiotherapy) reduced the mean duration of hospital stay by 2.0 days (mean difference (MD) -2.0 days, 95% CI -3.5 to -0.6) and 1.4 days (MD -1.4 days, 95% CI -2.8 to -0.0), respectively. Conventional chest physiotherapy and active cycle of breathing

  4. Do Dogs Know Bifurcations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minton, Roland; Pennings, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    When a dog (in this case, Tim Pennings' dog Elvis) is in the water and a ball is thrown downshore, it must choose to swim directly to the ball or first swim to shore. The mathematical analysis of this problem leads to the computation of bifurcation points at which the optimal strategy changes.

  5. Do Dogs Know Bifurcations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minton, Roland; Pennings, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    When a dog (in this case, Tim Pennings' dog Elvis) is in the water and a ball is thrown downshore, it must choose to swim directly to the ball or first swim to shore. The mathematical analysis of this problem leads to the computation of bifurcation points at which the optimal strategy changes.

  6. Wolves Are Better Imitators of Conspecifics than Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Range, Friederike; Virányi, Zsófia

    2014-01-01

    Domestication is thought to have influenced the cognitive abilities of dogs underlying their communication with humans, but little is known about its effect on their interactions with conspecifics. Since domestication hypotheses offer limited predictions in regard to wolf-wolf compared to dog-dog interactions, we extend the cooperative breeding hypothesis suggesting that the dependency of wolves on close cooperation with conspecifics, including breeding but also territory defense and hunting, has created selection pressures on motivational and cognitive processes enhancing their propensity to pay close attention to conspecifics’ actions. During domestication, dogs’ dependency on conspecifics has been relaxed, leading to reduced motivational and cognitive abilities to interact with conspecifics. Here we show that 6-month-old wolves outperform same aged dogs in a two-action-imitation task following a conspecific demonstration. While the wolves readily opened the apparatus after a demonstration, the dogs failed to solve the problem. This difference could not be explained by differential motivation, better physical insight of wolves, differential developmental pathways of wolves and dogs or a higher dependency of dogs from humans. Our results are best explained by the hypothesis that higher cooperativeness may come together with a higher propensity to pay close attention to detailed actions of others and offer an alternative perspective to domestication by emphasizing the cooperativeness of wolves as a potential source of dog-human cooperation. PMID:24489744

  7. Colon in the Chest: An Incidental Dextrocardia

    PubMed Central

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek; Shehab, Abdullah; Elnour, Asim A.; Al Nuaimi, Saif K.; Baghdady, Shazly

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diaphragmatic injury is an uncommon traumatic injury (<1%). Although most diaphragmatic injuries can be obvious (eg, herniation of abdominal contents on chest radiograph), some injuries may be subtle and imaging studies can be nondiagnostic in many situations. Patients with diaphragmatic hernia either traumatic or nontraumatic may initially have no symptoms or signs to suggest an injury to the diaphragm. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old woman diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome –associated dominant constipation, presented with shortness of breath, cough, expectoration, tachycardia, and chest pain. Dextrocardia was an incidental finding, diagnosed by electrocardiography, chest radiograph, and CT chest. Parts of the colon, small intestine, and stomach were within the thorax in the left side due to left diaphragmatic hernia of a nontraumatic cause. Acquired incidental dextrocardia was the main problem due to displacement of the heart to contralateral side by the GI (gastrointestinal) viscera (left diaphragmatic hernia). The patient was prepared for the laparoscopic surgical repair, using a polyethylene mesh 20 cm to close the defect, and the patient recovered with accepted general condition. However, 5 days postoperative, the patient passed away suddenly due to unexplained cardiac arrest. Intrathoracic herniation of abdominal viscera should be considered in patients presented with sudden chest pain concomitant with a history of increased intra-abdominal pressure. PMID:25674744

  8. Satisfaction of Search in Chest Radiography 2015.

    PubMed

    Berbaum, Kevin S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Schartz, Kevin M; Caldwell, Robert T; Madsen, Mark T; Hur, Seung; Laroia, Archana T; Thompson, Brad H; Mullan, Brian F; Franken, Edmund A

    2015-11-01

    Two decades have passed since the publication of laboratory studies of satisfaction of search (SOS) in chest radiography. Those studies were performed using film. The current investigation tests for SOS effects in computed radiography of the chest. Sixty-four chest computed radiographs half demonstrating various "test" abnormalities were read twice by 20 radiologists, once with and once without the addition of a simulated pulmonary nodule. Receiver-operating characteristic detection accuracy and decision thresholds were analyzed to study the effects of adding the nodule on detecting the test abnormalities. Results of previous studies were reanalyzed using similar modern techniques. In the present study, adding nodules did not influence detection accuracy for the other abnormalities (P = .93), but did induce a reluctance to report them (P < .001). Adding nodules did not affect inspection time (P = .58) so the reluctance to report was not associated with reduced search. Reanalysis revealed a similar decision threshold shift that had not been recognized in the early studies of SOS in chest radiography (P < .01) in addition to reduced detection accuracy (P < .01). The nature of SOS in chest radiography has changed, but it is not clear why. SOS may be changing as a function of changes in radiology education and practice. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Coss-Adame, Enrique; Rao, Satish S C

    2015-11-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies.

  10. [Diagnosis and management of esophageal chest pain].

    PubMed

    Hong, Su Jin

    2010-04-01

    Esophageal pain that manifests as heartburn or chest pain, is a prevalent problem. Esophageal chest pain is most often caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but can also result from inflammatory processes, infections involving the esophagus, and contractions of the esophageal muscle. The mechanisms and pathways of esophageal chest pain are poorly understood. Vagal and spinal afferent pathways carry sensory information from the esophagus. Recently, esophageal hypersensitivity is identified as an important factor in the development of esophageal pain. A number of techniques are available to evaluate esophageal chest pain such as endoscopy and/or proton-pump inhibitor trial, esophageal manometry, a combined impedance-pH study, and esophageal ultrasound imaging. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have the huge success in the treatment of GERD. Other drugs such as imipramine, trazadone, sertraline, tricyclics, and theophylline have been introduced for the control of esophageal chest pain in partial responders to PPI and the patients with esophageal hypersensitivity. Novel drugs which act on different targets are anticipated to treat esophageal pain in the future.

  11. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Brandon C; Overbey, Douglas M; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Burlew, Clay C; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2016-12-01

    Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Retrospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients with rib fractures at a level I trauma center that had both a CXR and a CT chest. The CT finding of ≥ 3 additional fractures in patients with ≤ 3 rib fractures on CXR was considered clinically meaningful. Student's t-test and chi-square analysis were used for comparison. We identified 499 patients with rib fractures: 93 (18.6%) had CXR only, 7 (1.4%) had chest CT only, and 399 (79.9%) had both CXR and chest CT. Among these 399 patients, a total of 1,969 rib fractures were identified: 1,467 (74.5%) were missed by CXR. The median number of additional fractures identified by CT was 3 (range, 4 - 15). Of 212 (53.1%) patients with a clinically meaningful increase in the number of fractures, 68 patients underwent one or more clinical interventions: 36 SICU admissions, 20 pain catheter placements, 23 epidural placements, and 3 SSRF. Additionally, 70 patients had a chest tube placed for retained hemothorax or occult pneumothorax. Overall, 138 patients (34.5%) had a change in clinical management based upon CT chest. The chest X-ray missed ~75% of rib fractures seen on chest CT. Although patients with a clinical meaningful increase in the number of rib fractures were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, there was no associated improvement in pulmonary outcomes.

  12. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Brandon C.; Overbey, Douglas M.; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T.; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Burlew, Clay C.; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E.; Pieracci, Fredric M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Methods Retrospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients with rib fractures at a level I trauma center that had both a CXR and a CT chest. The CT finding of ≥ 3 additional fractures in patients with ≤ 3 rib fractures on CXR was considered clinically meaningful. Student’s t-test and chi-square analysis were used for comparison. Results We identified 499 patients with rib fractures: 93 (18.6%) had CXR only, 7 (1.4%) had chest CT only, and 399 (79.9%) had both CXR and chest CT. Among these 399 patients, a total of 1,969 rib fractures were identified: 1,467 (74.5%) were missed by CXR. The median number of additional fractures identified by CT was 3 (range, 4 - 15). Of 212 (53.1%) patients with a clinically meaningful increase in the number of fractures, 68 patients underwent one or more clinical interventions: 36 SICU admissions, 20 pain catheter placements, 23 epidural placements, and 3 SSRF. Additionally, 70 patients had a chest tube placed for retained hemothorax or occult pneumothorax. Overall, 138 patients (34.5%) had a change in clinical management based upon CT chest. Conclusions The chest X-ray missed ~75% of rib fractures seen on chest CT. Although patients with a clinical meaningful increase in the number of rib fractures were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, there was no associated improvement in pulmonary outcomes. PMID:28144607

  13. Operative Stabilization of Flail Chest Injuries Reduces Mortality to that of Stable Chest Wall Injuries.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Niloofar; Mah, Jeffrey M; Schemitsch, Emil H; Nauth, Aaron; Vicente, Milena; McKee, Michael D

    2017-08-29

    To determine the prevalence, management and outcomes of patients with flail chest injuries, compared to patients without flail chest injuries (single rib fractures and multiple rib fractures without a flail segment). Retrospective cohort study SETTING:: Ontario, Canada PARTICIPANTS:: Ontario residents over the age of 16 who had been admitted to hospital with a chest wall injury from 2004 to 2015 were identified using administrative health care databases. Outcomes included treatment modalities such as rate of surgical repair, days on mechanical ventilation, days in the intensive care unit (ICU), days in hospital, rate of chest tube placement; and rates of complication, including pneumonia, tracheostomy, readmission, and death. In total 117,204 patients with fractures of the chest wall were identified. Of the entire cohort, 1.5% of had a flail chest injury, 41% had multiple rib fractures and 58% had single rib fractures. Flail chest patients had significantly worst outcomes compared to multiple rib fracture patients in all categories (p<0.0001). Similarly, multiple rib fracture patients had significantly worst outcomes compared to single rib fracture patients (p<0.0001). Only 4.5% of flail chest patients were treated surgically, however the number increased from 1% prior to 2010 to 10% after 2010 (p<0.0001). After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with flail chest injuries treated surgically had a reduced risk of early mortality compared to those treated non-operatively (OR 0.16, p=0.019). Surgical stabilization of flail chest has increased significantly in recent years. The results of this study provide preliminary evidence that the increasing rate of surgical intervention may be warranted by reducing mortality. Level III.

  14. Chest wall thickness measurements: The alternative approach extended for {sup 241}Am

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.H.; Burns, L.C.

    1997-02-01

    The Human Monitoring Laboratory has extended the technique of determining the chest wall thickness of an individual using information from the spectrum produced by internally deposited radionuclides. The technique has been investigated both theoretically and practically using germanium detectors and the Lawrence Livermore Torso Phantom. The phantom was used with a lung set containing homogeneously distributed {sup 241}Am. Chest wall thicknesses were varied by using a series of muscle equivalent overlay plates that gave a range of 1.6 cm to 3.9 cm thickness. It was found that a 3-cm chest wall thickness can be estimated to within 18%. Using a spectral addition technique 1 kBq was estimated to be the {open_quotes}practical{close_quotes} lower limit of activity for this method. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. [A worm infection in the skin of a dog. First autochthonous Dirofilaria repens infection ofa dog in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Overgaauw, P A M; van Dijk, E P

    2009-11-15

    The history of an 18-month-old English bulldog with a painful lump in the skin on its thigh is described. After opening the nodule a few Dirofilaria repens nematodes were found. Oval-shaped transparent eggs with moving larvae were seen microscopically. The dog was treated with milbemycin and made a complete recovery. The dog had never been abroad, but 6 months earlier in early May had been on a campsite in the middle of the Netherlands where many mosquitoes were present. This is the first described case of an autochthonous D. repens infection of a dog in the Netherlands.

  16. Effect of inhaled nitric oxide on pulmonary hemodynamics after acute lung injury in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Romand, J.A.; Pinsky, M.R.; Firestone, L.; Zar, H.A.; Lancaster, J.R. Jr. )

    1994-03-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and mismatch in ventilation-to-perfusion ratio characterize acute lung injury (ALI). Pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) decreases when nitric oxide (NO) is inhaled during hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV); thus NO inhalation may reduce PVR and improve gas exchange in ALI. The authors studied the hemodynamic and gas exchange effects of NO inhalation during HPV and then ALI in eight anesthetized open-chest mechanically ventilated dogs. Right atrial pressure, Ppa, and left ventricular and arterial pressures were measured, and cardiac output was estimated by an aortic flow probe. Shunt and dead space were also estimated. The effect of 5-min exposures to 0, 17, 28, 47, and 0 ppm inhaled NO was recorded during hyperoxia, hypoxia, and oleic acid-induced ALI. During ALI, partial [beta]-adrenergic blockage (propanolol, 0.15 mg/kg iv) was induced and 74 ppm NO was inhaled. Nitrosylhemoglobin (NO-Hb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) levels were measured. During hyperoxia, NO inhalation had no measurable effects. Hypoxia increased Ppa and calculated PVR, both of which decreased with 17 ppm NO. ALI decreased arterial Po[sub 2] and increased airway pressure, shunt, and dead space ventilation. Ppa and PVR were greater during ALI than during hyperoxia. NO inhalation had no measurable effect during ALI before or after [beta]-adrenergic blockage. MetHb remained low, and NO-Hb was unmeasurable. Bolus infusion of nitroglycerin (15 [mu]g) induced an immediate decrease in Ppa and PVR during ALI. Short-term NO inhalation does not affect PVR or gas exchange in dogs with oleic acid-induced ALI, nor does it increase NO-Hb or MetHb. In contrast, NO can diminish hypoxia-induced elevations in pulmonary vascular tone. These data suggest that NO inhalation selectively dilates the pulmonary circulation and specifically reduces HPV but not oleic acid-induced increases in pulmonary vasomotor tone. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Prephonatory chest wall posturing in stutterers.

    PubMed

    Baken, R J; McManus, D A; Cavallo, S A

    1983-09-01

    The possibility that prephonatory chest wall posturing is abnormal in stutterers was explored by observing rib cage and abdominal hemicircumference changes during the interval between the presentation of a stimulus and the production of/alpha/by a group of stutterers (N = 5). It was found that the patterns of chest wall adjustment for phonation were qualitatively identical in the stutterers and in a comparable group of normal men studied previously. There was, however, a significant difference in the way in which lung volume changed during the execution of the chest wall adjustment. This was considered to be indicative of delayed glottal closure among the stutterers rather than representative of a primary ventilatory disturbance.

  18. Treatment of Morbidity with Atypical Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cott, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    The appropriate management of atypical chest pain requires an integration of medical and behavioural treatments. Unnecessary medicalization can increase morbidity. A sensitivity to the behavioural factors contributing to symptoms and disability may reduce both. The purpose of this paper is to provide physicians with a cognitive-behavioural perspective of the nature of morbidity and disability associated with chronic chest discomfort; some strategies for detecting heretofore unsuspected disability associated with chronic chest pain and related discomfort in patients with organic findings (both cardiac and non-cardiac), as well those with no identifiable disease process or organic cause; and some simple behavioural and cognitive-behavioural therapeutic techniques for treating and preventing such problems. PMID:21263912

  19. [Chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Morales, Olga Lucía; Valencia, María de la Luz; Gómez, Carolina; Pérez, María del Pilar; Sanín, Emilio; Vásquez, Luz Marina

    2010-01-01

    Chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma is an extremely rare benign tumor. Approximately 80 cases have been reported in the literature. Most tumors are manifested at birth with a painless palpable mass of the chest wall, usually unilateral. Respiratory symptoms result from extrinsic compression of the pulmonary parenchyma, and the severity of the symptoms will depend on the size and location of the lesion. Imaging features are characteristic, but definitive diagnosis is histological. Herein, a case is described of a four month old infant with diagnosis of chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma, manifested at birth. Different treatment options are described, including expectations from tumor management, the possibility of spontaneous regression, and the morbidity associated with the surgical option.

  20. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest.

    PubMed

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O; Albret, Rikke; Krag, Christen

    2012-05-29

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC®) resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient's need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation.

  1. Validation of quantitation of regional myocardial blood flow in vivo with /sup 11/C-labeled human albumin microspheres and positron emission tomography. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.A.; Shea, M.J.; De Landsheere, C.M.; Turton, D.; Brady, F.; Deanfield, J.E.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1984-10-01

    Use of radiolabeled microspheres is a standard method to measure regional myocardial perfusion in animals. Human albumin microspheres have been given safely to patients, but positron-emitting /sup 67/Ga-labeled human albumin microspheres are characterized by an unstable radiolabel. A new labeling procedure that covalently binds /sup 11/C to human albumin microspheres via /sup 11/CH/sub 3/I was developed. Seven open-chest and two closed-chest dogs were studied. Reference and /sup 11/C-labeled human albumin microspheres (2 to 25 mCi) were both injected into the left atrium. Positron tomographic images were obtained of the myocardial distribution of the /sup 11/C-labeled microspheres. Timed arterial withdrawal was used for both reference gamma-labeled microspheres and /sup 11/C-labeled human albumin microspheres. Regional myocardial perfusion calculated by this technique correlated well with values obtained with reference microspheres over a range of 0.2 to 3.5 ml/min/g. Thus, /sup 11/C human albumin microspheres are stable radiochemically and can be used as a quantitative measure of regional myocardial perfusion.

  2. Innovative approach to laparoscopic adrenalectomy for treatment of unilateral adrenal gland tumors in dogs.

    PubMed

    Naan, Elaine C; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Dupré, Gilles P; Galac, Sara; Radlinsky, MaryAnn G

    2013-08-01

    To report a technique for, and short-term outcome of unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy in dogs positioned in sternal recumbency without abdominal support. Experimental and prospective clinical study. Healthy dogs (n = 5) and dogs with unilateral adrenal gland tumor (n = 9). Anesthetized dogs were positioned in sternal recumbency with 2 cushions placed under the dog to elevate the chest and pelvic area so that the abdomen was not in contact with the surgical table allowing gravitational displacement of the abdominal viscera. Three 5-mm portals were located in the paralumbar fossa. Adrenal glands were carefully dissected and surrounding tissues sealed and cut using a vessel-sealing device. A retrieval bag or part of a surgical glove finger was used to remove the adrenal gland from the abdomen. Surgical time and complications were recorded, and short-term outcome assessed. Adrenal glands in normal dogs and unilateral adrenal tumors (8 left, 1 right) not involving the caudal vena cava in affected dogs were successfully removed laparoscopically. There were no major intraoperative complications. Of the dogs with adrenal tumors, 1 dog died within 24 hours of surgery from unrelated causes. Eight dogs recovered within 1 day and were discharged within 72 hours. Surgical times ranged from 42 to 117 minutes and were significantly shorter than those reported previously. Positioning anesthetized dogs in sternal recumbency with the abdomen suspended to facilitate gravitational displacement of the abdominal viscera improves access to, and visibility of, the adrenal gland for laparoscopic removal. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  3. Evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain.

    PubMed

    Ayloo, Amba; Cvengros, Teresa; Marella, Srimannarayana

    2013-12-01

    This article summarizes the evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal causes of chest pain. Conditions such as costochondritis, rib pain caused by stress fractures, slipping rib syndrome, chest wall muscle injuries, fibromyalgia, and herpes zoster are discussed, with emphasis on evaluation and treatment of these and other disorders. Many of these conditions can be diagnosed by the primary care clinician in the office by history and physical examination. Treatment is also discussed, including description of manual therapy and exercises as needed for some of the conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chest discomfort associated with liposomal amphotericin B: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M D; Drew, R H; Perfect, J R

    1998-01-01

    Liposomal formulations of amphotericin B are designed to maintain therapeutic efficacy of amphotericin B deoxycholate while reducing its associated toxicities. In three patients chest discomfort occurred during planned 1-hour infusions of liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) 3 mg/kg/day during an open-label trial. The first patient experienced chest tightness and difficulty breathing and the second had dyspnea and acute hypoxia, both within 10 minutes of the start of the infusion. The third patient complained of chest pain 5 minutes after the start of two infusions. All symptoms resolved on terminating therapy. Two patients were later rechallenged with slower infusions and tolerated the drug well. A review of the English-language literature revealed only two other case reports of infusion-related chest or pulmonary reactions with the drug, although similar reactions were noted in several reports of clinical trials. Further review of the literature revealed reports of chest and pulmonary adverse events with other liposomal formulations of amphotericin B, liposomal daunorubicin, liposomal doxorubicin, and liposomes. The pathophysiology of such reactions remains unclear, and premedication with diphenhydramine did not completely prevent this reaction in one of our patients. We recommend infusing liposomal amphotericin B over at least 2 hours with careful monitoring for adverse reactions.

  5. Lung cancer detection with digital chest tomosynthesis: first round results from the SOS observational study.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, Luca; Viti, Andrea; Tavella, Chiara; Priotto, Roberto; Ghirardo, Donatella; Grosso, Maurizio; Terzi, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Baseline results of the Studio OSservazionale (SOS), observational study, a single-arm observational study of digital chest tomosynthesis for lung cancer detection in an at-risk population demonstrated a detection rate of lung cancer comparable to that of studies that used low dose CT scan (LDCT). We present the results of the first round. Totally 1,703 out of 1,843 (92%) subjects who had a baseline digital chest tomosynthesis underwent a first round reevaluation after 1 year. At first round chest digital tomosynthesis, 13 (0.7%) subjects had an indeterminate nodule larger than 5 mm and underwent low-dose CT scan for nodule confirmation. PET/CT study was obtained in 10 (0.5%) subjects and 2 subjects had a low-dose CT follow up. Surgery, either video-assisted thoracoscopic or open surgery for indeterminate pulmonary nodules was performed in 10 (0.2%) subjects. A lung cancer was diagnosed and resected in five patients. The lung cancer detection rate at first round was 0.3% (5/1,703). The detection rate of lung cancer at first round for tomosynthesis is comparable to rates reported for CT. In addition, results of first round digital chest tomosynthesis confirm chest tomosynthesis as a possible first-line lung cancer-screening tool.

  6. Chest CT examinations in patients presenting with acute chest pain: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Sebastiaan; Kroft, Lucia J; Hidalgo, Alberto L; Leta, Ruben; de Roos, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Acute chest pain (ACP) is one of the most common presenting symptoms at the emergency department. The differential diagnosis is vast. To exclude life-threatening causes, radiologists encounter an increasing amount of thoracic computed tomography (CT) examinations including CT angiography of the heart and great vessels. The dual- and triple-rule CT examinations are currently implemented in clinical practice. We retrospectively identified chest CT examinations in the setting of acute chest pain in our hospitals and collected a variety of common and uncommon cases. In this pictorial essay, we present the most educative cases from patients who presented with acute chest pain in the emergency department of our hospitals and for whom a thoracic CT was ordered. When aortic emergencies, acute coronary syndrome, and pulmonary embolism are excluded, these cases may help the radiologist to suggest alternative diagnoses in the diagnostic challenge of acute chest pain. Teaching Points • The number of chest CT examinations for ACP is increasing.• Chest CT examinations may help suggesting alternative diagnosis in ACP.• Radiologists should be aware of the differential diagnosis of ACP.

  7. [Detection of pleural plaques on chest X-ray film by chest physicians].

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Tatsuji; Matsumoto, Aki; Saito, Hitoshi; Narato, Ritsuko; Shingu, Akiko; Sugisaki, Midori; Nakamura, Seiichi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Nomura, Koichiro

    2010-04-01

    With increasing awareness about health damage due to asbestos exposure, the number of people presenting with non-occupational exposure has increased remarkably. Consequently, chest physicians in general hospitals must read the chest X-ray films of patients with asbestos exposure. Can non-specialized chest physicians, who may have little experience of occupational medicine, diagnose pleural plaques accurately? The study subjects were 44 consecutive patients who were admitted to our hospital, under the Japanese medical health check system for workers employed in dangerous work. Their chest X-ray films were checked by 4 chest physicians, who were independently informed that the patients had a high suspicion of asbestos exposure. The detection rate of chest Xray for pleural plaques was compared with computed tomography (CT) results as the gold standard. The sensitivity was 0.818 and the specificity was 0.393. The sensitivity of the presence of pleural plaques was lower in anterior and posterior sites, and on the pleura adjacent to the mediastinum, pericardium and vertebral (0.429, 0.348, 0.217), while specificity was lower on lateral sites (0.610). Chest physicians in general hospitals must be trained in the manifestation of asbestos-related diseases.

  8. High-Frequency Ventilation in Dogs with Three Gases of Different Densities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-15

    plethysmograph. After stabilizing the dog with CMV with a frequency (f) of 8 bpm and a tidal volume (VT) of about 300 ml, blood gases were obtained. The...37oC. The dogs were maintained at the same temperature. The plethysmograph was opened for each blood sampling and the sample was taken directly from the...if the technique could be used in deep sea diving. II. Several series of dog experiments were performed to test in the laboratory the feasibility and

  9. BigDog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Playter, R.; Buehler, M.; Raibert, M.

    2006-05-01

    BigDog's goal is to be the world's most advanced quadruped robot for outdoor applications. BigDog is aimed at the mission of a mechanical mule - a category with few competitors to date: power autonomous quadrupeds capable of carrying significant payloads, operating outdoors, with static and dynamic mobility, and fully integrated sensing. BigDog is about 1 m tall, 1 m long and 0.3 m wide, and weighs about 90 kg. BigDog has demonstrated walking and trotting gaits, as well as standing up and sitting down. Since its creation in the fall of 2004, BigDog has logged tens of hours of walking, climbing and running time. It has walked up and down 25 & 35 degree inclines and trotted at speeds up to 1.8 m/s. BigDog has walked at 0.7 m/s over loose rock beds and carried over 50 kg of payload. We are currently working to expand BigDog's rough terrain mobility through the creation of robust locomotion strategies and terrain sensing capabilities.

  10. Glomerular Lipidosis in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Kohnken, Rebecca A; Amerman, Hayley; Brown, Cathy A; Furrow, Eva; Lees, George E; Cianciolo, Rachel E

    2017-09-01

    Glomerular lipidosis (GL) is characterized by dilated glomerular capillary loops containing lipid-laden cells (foam cells). Previously, GL was considered to be an incidental finding because affected dogs were typically not azotemic. However, the International Renal Interest Society staging system for canine chronic kidney disease has increased the awareness of other clinical parameters (eg, proteinuria and hypertension) that should be included in the assessment of renal function. As such, the aim of this study was to determine clinical abnormalities and concurrent renal lesions in dogs with GL. GL was identified in renal biopsies from 46 dogs evaluated by the International Veterinary Renal Pathology Service. GL was the sole diagnosis in 5 of 46 cases (11%), all of which were proteinuric. All 5 dogs had at least 1 additional clinicopathologic abnormality consistent with renal disease, including hypertension (4), azotemia (3), and/or hypoalbuminemia (2). The remaining 41 dogs had GL in combination with other glomerular lesions, the most common being focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (16, 35%), lesions consistent with juvenile nephropathy (8, 17%), and glomerular amyloidosis (5, 11%). Overall, dogs with severe GL were younger than were those with mild GL ( P < .001). The percentage of glomeruli affected by GL differed by concurrent diagnoses ( P = .034), with the highest percentage of affected glomeruli in dogs with GL alone or those with concurrent juvenile nephropathy. These findings suggest that GL should be a recognized histologic phenotype of glomerular injury associated with clinical renal dysfunction and/or juvenile nephropathies.

  11. A triceps musculocutaneous flap for chest-wall defects

    SciTech Connect

    Hartrampf, C.R. Jr.; Elliott, L.F.; Feldman, S. )

    1990-09-01

    A posterior upper arm flap based on the profunda brachii vessels has been described to cover soft-tissue defects in the upper anterolateral chest. In our series, the posterior upper arm skin is elevated with the long head of the triceps muscle to cover seven chest-wall defects resulting from indolent postradiation open wounds following partial TRAM flap failure (n = 2), soft-tissue deficiencies following partial TRAM flap loss (n = 3), and primarily as an ancillary flap in TRAM flap breast reconstruction (n = 2). This flap also may be used to supply well-vascularized tissue in the regions of the shoulder, axilla, and posterolateral back. A prerequisite for this operation is redundant tissue of the upper arm often present in middle-aged women and in patients with lymphedema following mastectomy. In our series of seven patients, all donor sites were closed primarily, and there was no subjective functional deficit following transfer of the long head of the triceps muscle.

  12. Dogs Discriminate Identical Twins

    PubMed Central

    Pinc, Ludvík; Bartoš, Luděk; Reslová, Alice; Kotrba, Radim

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown variation among experimental attempts to establish whether human monozygotic twins that are genetically identical also have identical individual scents. In none of the cases were the dogs able to distinguish all the individual scents of monozygotic twins living in the same environment if the scents were presented to them separately. Ten specially trained police German Shepherd dogs of three Czech Republic Police Regional Headquarters were used for scent identification in our study. The dogs were supposed to match scents of two monozygotic pairs (5 and 7 years old) and two dizygotic twin pairs (8 and 13 years old). Scents were collected on cotton squares stored in glass jars. Dog handlers were blind to the experiment details. In each trial (line-up), one scent was used as a starting scent and the dog was then sent to determine if any of the 7 presented glass jars contained a matching scent. Scents of children of similar ages were used as distractors. In the matching procedure, the dogs matched correctly the scent of one twin with the other, as well as two scents collected from every single identical and non-identical twin to prove their efficacy and likewise, the presence of the matching twin scent in any given glass jar. All dogs in all trials distinguished correctly the scents of identical as well as non-identical twins. All dogs similarly matched positively two scents collected from the same individuals. Our findings indicated that specially trained German Shepherd dogs are able to distinguish individual scents of identical twins despite the fact that they live in the same environment, eat the same food and even if the scents are not presented to them simultaneously. PMID:21698282

  13. Single Incision, Laparoscopic-Assisted Ovariohysterectomy for Mucometra and Pyometra in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Mandy L; Case, J Brad; Singh, Ameet; Ellison, Gary W; Monnet, Eric

    2015-07-01

    To describe a single-incision, laparoscopic-assisted technique for ovariohysterectomy and its application for treatment of mucometra and pyometra in dogs. Prospective case series. Seven dogs. Dogs were included if they had an open or closed pyometra or mucometra and an approximate uterine body diameter of less than 5 cm based on ultrasound or abdominal radiographs. Each dog underwent a laparoscopic-assisted ovariohysterectomy through a single-incision laparoscopic port. The procedure was performed in 6 dogs with pyometra and 1 dog with mucometra. Conversion to an open procedure was necessary in 1 dog with uterine rupture. A 2nd port was necessary in 1 dog to exteriorize the uterine body. Median uterine body diameter was 2.2 cm (range 2-3.9). The median surgical time was 85 minutes (range 40-110). Six of 7 dogs were released from the hospital at 1 day postoperative. Follow up ranged from 7 to 421 days and no complications were reported. A single-incision, laparoscopic-assisted technique for pyometra was feasible in dogs, given restricted case selection and experience with single-incision laparoscopy. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. Aortic pressure reduction redistributes transmural blood flow in dog left ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Smolich, J.J.; Weissberg, P.L.; Broughton, A.; Korner, P.I. )

    1988-02-01

    The authors studied the effect of graded aortic blood pressure reduction on left ventricular (LV) blood flow in anesthetized, autonomically blocked, open-chest dogs at constant heart rate and mean left atrial pressure. Aortic diastolic pressure (ADP) was lowered from rest to 90, 75, and 60 mmHg with an arteriovenous fistula. Global and regional LV blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres. Mean LV blood flow fell stepwise from 145 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} at rest to 116 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} at ADP of 60 mmHg, whereas the endocardial-to-epicardial flow ratio decreased from 1.20 to 084. The transmural redistribution of LV blood flow was not accompanied by increases in LV oxygen extraction, depression of LV contractility, LV dilatation or LV electrical dysfunction and also occurred in the presence of considerable coronary vasodilator flow reserve. Electrical evidence of subendocardial ischemia appeared at ADP of 32 mmHg and an endocardial-to-epicardial flow ratio of 0.41 in a subgroup of animals. They conclude that the redistribution of LV flow during moderate aortic pressure reduction was an appropriate physiological adjustment to uneven transmural alterations in regional LV wall stress and that it preceded a more pronounced redistribution evident with myocardial ischemia.

  15. Myocardial perfusion with rubidium-82. II. Effects of metaolic and pharmacologic interventions. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.A.; Mullani, N.A.; Marani, S.K.; Fisher,D.J.; Gould, K.L.; O'Brien, H.A. Jr.

    1983-10-01

    In order to validate a new method for quantifying coronary blood flow, a bolus of rubidium-82 (Rb-82) was injected intravenously into 28 open-chested dogs under a wide range of flow and physiologic conditions, using beta probes to monitor myocardial radioactivity. Extraction fraction and perfusion were measured using a functional model that separates the data into the free and trapped myocardial rubidium. Extraction and uptake of rubidium were lower during acidosis than during alkalosis and were unchanged by glucose-insulin, digoxin, or propranolol. Myocardial flow, as indicated by rubidium, correlated linearly with simultaneous measurements of flow by microspheres in the same sample volume over a wide range of flow (r = 0.97, n = 106, range 0.02 to 7.75 ml/min/g). Regional myocardial blood flow can be accurately determined using generator-produced Rb-82. Studies using current state-of-the-art, fast positron-emission tomographic cameras are required to determine the utility of this approach in man.

  16. Correlation of hetorogeneous blood flow and uptake of a di-methyl-branched IODO fatty acid in the normal and ischemic dog heart

    SciTech Connect

    Sloof, G.W.; Visser, F.C.; Comans, E.F.I. |

    1995-05-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) is heterogeneously distributed in normal and ischemic myocardium (myoc). Methylated iodinated fatty acids, like 15-(p-I-125-iodophenyl)-3,3-dimethylpentadecanoic acid (DMIPPA) can be used to study fatty acid metabolism with SPECT. We studied the relationship between DMIPPA uptake and MBF. In 10 open-chest dogs, ischemica was induced in the LAD coronary artery by an extra-corporal bypass system. MBF was measured with Sc-46 labeled microspheres. Fourty min. after DMIPPA iv. (34{plus_minus}4 MBq), hearts were excised and left ventricles were cut into 120 pieces, weighed and radioactivities counted. MBF and DMIPPA uptake were determined by counting in normal and ischemic myoc. Heterogeneity is expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV) and agreement as the CV of the DMIPPA uptake to MBF ratio. A control study, normal flow in LAD, in 4 dogs revealed no differences in MBF or DMIPPA uptake between the cannulated versus native perfused myoc. We conclude the DMIPPA detects ischemia, in which it shows a different relation with MBF compared to normal myoc. DMIPPA is less heterogeneously distributed than MBF and agreement between MFB and DMIPPA uptake decreases during ischemia.

  17. Quiescent Volcano-Chest Wall Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Elroy; Martis, John J S; Kumar, B Vinod; D'Cunha, Rithesh J; Vijin, V

    2017-08-01

    Chest wall hemangiomas are rare tumors that may originate within the soft tissue or from the ribs. Intramuscular hemangioma is infrequent, representing less than 1 % of all hemangiomas, and the localization in the chest wall is even less frequent. They are typically cutaneous in location, large, and poorly circumscribed and can be locally destructive. We present a case of a 34-year-old lady presented with firm lump 3 × 3 cm in left upper and inner quadrant of left breast well defined borders, non-pulsatile and restricted mobility. Sono-mammogram was suggestive of ill-defined lesion at 10 o'clock position. CT chest was conclusive of chest wall hemangioma. The patient underwent excision of the lump. HPE was suggestive of cavernous hemangioma. Cavernous hemangioma typically manifest at birth or before the age of 30 years. CT is more sensitive than plain radiography in detecting phleboliths, which are present in approximately 30 % of cavernous hemangiomas. Surgical excision would be treatment of choice. In this case, the site of the lesion was in the breast clinically mimicking that of a fibroadenoma which warrants hemangioma as a differential diagnosis.

  18. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be involved as well. Case Report: We describe a case of invasive salmonellosis caused by Salmonella typhimurium involving the chest wall in a 73-year-old man. The patient had suffered from gastroenteritis followed by left basal pneumonia with pleural effusion 7 weeks before. The CT scan of the chest wall showed a pericostal abscess with shirt-stud morphology near the left last cartilaginous arch. The abscess was surgically drained and patient was cured after a 40-day ciprofloxacin treatment. Conclusions: A review of the literature on extra-intestinal non-typhoid salmonellosis shows that pleuropulmonary and soft-tissue infections are uncommon. We argue that non-typhoid Salmonella might be considered as a possible cause of chest wall abscess in individuals with recent history of gastroenteritis complicated by pneumonia and pleural effusion. PMID:24298305

  19. Coccidioidomycosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows the affects of a fungal infection, coccidioidomycosis. In the middle of the left lung (seen on the ... defined borders. Other diseases that may explain these x-ray findings include lung abscesses, chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic ...

  20. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  1. Hypoventilation: neuromuscular and chest wall disorders.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R S

    1992-09-01

    Patients with neuromuscular and chest wall disorders are vulnerable at night when alterations in ventilatory mechanics and control associated with their disease are imposed on the changes in mechanics and control associated with sleep. The physiologic and clinical consequences of these events may be reversed by nocturnal mechanical ventilatory support.

  2. The Interdisciplinary Management of Acute Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Raphael R; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Söllner, Wolfgang; Frieling, Thomas; Müller, Christian; Christ, Michael

    2015-11-06

    Acute chest pain of non-traumatic origin is a common reason for presentation to physician's offices and emergency rooms. Coronary heart disease is the cause in up to 25% of cases. Because acute chest pain, depending on its etiology, may be associated with a high risk of death, rapid, goal-oriented management is mandatory. This review is based on pertinent articles and guidelines retrieved by a selective search in PubMed. History-taking, physical examination, and a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) are the first steps in the differential diagnostic process and generally allow the identification of features signifying a high risk of lifethreatening illness. If the ECG reveals ST-segment elevation, cardiac catheterization is indicated. The timedependent measurement of highly sensitive troponin values is a reliable test for the diagnosis or exclusion of acute myocardial infarction. A wide variety of other potential causes (e.g., vascular, musculoskeletal, gastroenterologic, or psychosomatic) must be identified from the history if they are to be treated appropriately. Elderly patients need special attention. Acute chest pain is a major diagnostic challenge for the physician. Common errors are traceable to non-recognition of important causes and to an inadequate diagnostic work-up. Future studies should be designed to help optimize the interdisciplinary management of patients with chest pain.

  3. [Utility of digital thoracotomy in chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Vélez, Sebastián E; Sarquis, Guillermo

    2006-01-01

    toracostomy in thoracic trauma is a good opportunity for the digital exploration of pleural cavity. To evaluate the utility of digital exploration during chest tube insertion in thoracic trauma. Hospital de Urgencias. Córdoba. patients with blunt and penetrating chest trauma by stab wound, who need chest tube insertion and treated by only one surgeon, were evaluated from July 10 to December 31st 2000. Previously to the thoracostomy with 24 french tube in 5th intercostal space, at the affected side, a digital exploration of pleural cavity was done, attempting to find intrathoracic injuries. in a six months period, 36 thoracostomy tubes were placed, due thoracic trauma (11 blunt trauma and 25 penetrating, by stab wound). Three patients had positive findings in the digital exploration, which forced to do another diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. digital thoracotomy is not considered a formal procedure, but as a part of a technique, in which, the previous exploration with the finger before chest tube insertion, allows to reach a diagnosis of the pleural space situation, to confirm suspicions, to modify a conduct, and to avoid greater morbidity to patients.

  4. When to Remove a Chest Tube.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Nuria M; Jiménez, Marcelo F; Varela, Gonzalo

    2017-02-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge about the pleural physiology after lung resection, most practices around chest tube removal are dictated by personal preferences and experience. This article discusses recently published data on the topic and suggests opportunities for further investigation and future improvements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Unsupervised segmentation of lungs from chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Payel; Antani, Sameer K.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes our preliminary investigations for deriving and characterizing coarse-level textural regions present in the lung field on chest radiographs using unsupervised grow-cut (UGC), a cellular automaton based unsupervised segmentation technique. The segmentation has been performed on a publicly available data set of chest radiographs. The algorithm is useful for this application because it automatically converges to a natural segmentation of the image from random seed points using low-level image features such as pixel intensity values and texture features. Our goal is to develop a portable screening system for early detection of lung diseases for use in remote areas in developing countries. This involves developing automated algorithms for screening x-rays as normal/abnormal with a high degree of sensitivity, and identifying lung disease patterns on chest x-rays. Automatically deriving and quantitatively characterizing abnormal regions present in the lung field is the first step toward this goal. Therefore, region-based features such as geometrical and pixel-value measurements were derived from the segmented lung fields. In the future, feature selection and classification will be performed to identify pathological conditions such as pulmonary tuberculosis on chest radiographs. Shape-based features will also be incorporated to account for occlusions of the lung field and by other anatomical structures such as the heart and diaphragm.

  6. When dogs look back: inhibition of independent problem-solving behaviour in domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) compared with wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Udell, Monique A R

    2015-09-01

    Domestic dogs have been recognized for their social sensitivity and aptitude in human-guided tasks. For example, prior studies have demonstrated that dogs look to humans when confronted with an unsolvable task; an action often interpreted as soliciting necessary help. Conversely, wolves persist on such tasks. While dogs' 'looking back' behaviour has been used as an example of socio-cognitive advancement, an alternative explanation is that pet dogs show less persistence on independent tasks more generally. In this study, pet dogs, shelter dogs and wolves were given up to three opportunities to open a solvable puzzle box: when subjects were with a neutral human caretaker, alone and when encouraged by the human. Wolves were more persistent and more successful on this task than dogs, with 80% average success rate for wolves versus a 5% average success rate for dogs in both the human-in and alone conditions. Dogs showed increased contact with the puzzle box during the encouragement condition, but only a moderate increase in problem-solving success. Social sensitivity appears to play an important role in pet and shelter dogs' willingness to engage in problem-solving behaviour, which could suggest generalized dependence on, or deference to, human action.

  7. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  8. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids. A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6–18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors. Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P < 0.001) between the before-surgery score and the after-surgery score from both doctors and patients, indicating that both doctors and patients were satisfied with the treatment effect. Our preliminary clinical result indicates that good clinical results could be achieved by choosing the proper method in this algorithm for Chinese patients with chest wall keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  9. Dog and owner demographic characteristics and dog personality trait associations.

    PubMed

    Kubinyi, Eniko; Turcsán, Borbála; Miklósi, Adám

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between four personality traits (calmness, trainability, dog sociability and boldness) of dogs (Canis familiaris) and dog and owner demographics on a large sample size with 14,004 individuals. German speaking dog owners could characterize their dog by filling out a form on the Internet. There were five demographic variables for dogs and nine for owners. Two statistical methods were used for investigating the associations between personality and demographic traits: the more traditional general linear methods and regression trees that are ideal for analyzing non-linear relationships in the structure of the data. The results showed that calmness is influenced primarily by the dog's age, the neutered status, the number of different types of professional training courses (e.g. obedience, agility) the dog had experienced and the age of acquisition. The least calm dogs were less than 2.5 years old, neutered and acquired after the first 12 weeks of age, while the calmest dogs were older than 6.9 years. Trainability was affected primarily by the training experiences, the dog's age, and the purpose of keeping the dog. The least trainable dogs had not received professional training at all and were older than 3 years. The most trainable dogs were those who participated in three or more types of professional training. Sociability toward conspecifics was mainly determined by the age, sex, training experience and time spent together. The least sociable dogs were older than 4.8 years and the owners spent less than 3h with the dog daily. The most sociable dogs were less than 1.5 years old. Males were less sociable toward their conspecifics than females. Boldness was affected by the sex and age of the dog and the age of acquisition. The least bold were females acquired after the age of 1 year or bred by the owner. The boldest dogs were males, acquired before the age of 12 weeks, and were younger than 2 years old. Other variables

  10. [Chest Wall Reconstruction Using Titanium Plates Sandwiched Between Sheets after Resection of Chest Wall Chondrosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Endoh, Makoto; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Jun; Watarai, Hikaru; Hamada, Akira; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Ai; Nakahashi, Kenta; Sugawara, Masato; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2016-07-01

    Extensive chest wall resection carries the risk of difficult reconstruction and surgical complications. We report our experience on chest wall reconstruction using titanium plates for a wide thoracic defect after tumor resection. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma of the 6th rib on the right. He needed extensive chest wall resection because of skip lesions on 4th rib noted on operative inspection, leaving a defect measuring 33 × 20 cm. Reconstruction using 5 transverse titanium plates sandwiched between an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene patch and a polypropylene mesh sheet stabilized the chest wall. This reconstruction allowed successful separation from ventilatory support after operation. The postoperative course was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day 20. The advantages of this form of reconstruction over conventional prostheses are rigidity, and stability and usability.

  11. Automatic screening for tuberculosis in chest radiographs: a survey.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Stefan; Karargyris, Alexandros; Candemir, Sema; Siegelman, Jenifer; Folio, Les; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George

    2013-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health threat. An estimated one-third of the world's population has a history of TB infection, and millions of new infections are occurring every year. The advent of new powerful hardware and software techniques has triggered attempts to develop computer-aided diagnostic systems for TB detection in support of inexpensive mass screening in developing countries. In this paper, we describe the medical background of TB detection in chest X-rays and present a survey of the recent approaches using computer-aided detection. After a thorough research of the computer science literature for such systems or related methods, we were able to identify 16 papers, including our own, written between 1996 and early 2013. These papers show that TB screening is a challenging task and an open research problem. We report on the progress to date and describe experimental screening systems that have been developed.

  12. Dog Bite Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    IF YOU are bitten • If your own dog bit you, confine it immediately and call your veterinarian to check your dog’s vaccination records. Consult with your veterinarian about your dog’s aggressive ...

  13. How dogs drink water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, Jake; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2014-11-01

    Animals with incomplete cheeks (i.e. dogs and cats) need to move fluid against gravity into the body by means other than suction. They do this by lapping fluid with their tongue. When a dog drinks, it curls its tongue posteriorly while plunging it into the fluid and then quickly withdraws its tongue back into the mouth. During this fast retraction fluid sticks to the ventral part of the curled tongue and is drawn into the mouth due to inertia. We show several variations of this drinking behavior among many dog breeds, specifically, the relationship between tongue dynamics and geometry, lapping frequency, and dog weight. We also compare the results with the physical experiment of a rounded rod impact onto a fluid surface. Supported by NSF PoLS #1205642.

  14. Jealousy in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Christine R.; Prouvost, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that jealousy is unique to humans, partially because of the complex cognitions often involved in this emotion. However, from a functional perspective, one might expect that an emotion that evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers might exist in other social species, particularly one as cognitively sophisticated as the dog. The current experiment adapted a paradigm from human infant studies to examine jealousy in domestic dogs. We found that dogs exhibited significantly more jealous behaviors (e.g., snapping, getting between the owner and object, pushing/touching the object/owner) when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog as compared to nonsocial objects. These results lend support to the hypothesis that jealousy has some “primordial” form that exists in human infants and in at least one other social species besides humans. PMID:25054800

  15. Jealousy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Harris, Christine R; Prouvost, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that jealousy is unique to humans, partially because of the complex cognitions often involved in this emotion. However, from a functional perspective, one might expect that an emotion that evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers might exist in other social species, particularly one as cognitively sophisticated as the dog. The current experiment adapted a paradigm from human infant studies to examine jealousy in domestic dogs. We found that dogs exhibited significantly more jealous behaviors (e.g., snapping, getting between the owner and object, pushing/touching the object/owner) when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog as compared to nonsocial objects. These results lend support to the hypothesis that jealousy has some "primordial" form that exists in human infants and in at least one other social species besides humans.

  16. Quality assessment of digital X-ray chest images using an anthropomorphic chest phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodovatov, A. V.; Kamishanskaya, I. G.; Drozdov, A. A.; Bernhardsson, C.

    2017-02-01

    The current study is focused on determining the optimal tube voltage for the conventional X-ray digital chest screening examinations, using a visual grading analysis method. Chest images of an anthropomorphic phantom were acquired in posterior-anterior projection on four digital X-ray units with different detector types. X-ray images obtained with an anthropomorphic phantom were accepted by the radiologists as corresponding to a normal human anatomy, hence allowing using phantoms in image quality trials without limitations.

  17. CNE article: pain after lung transplant: high-frequency chest wall oscillation vs chest physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Esguerra-Gonzalez, Angeli; Ilagan-Honorio, Monina; Fraschilla, Stephanie; Kehoe, Priscilla; Lee, Ai Jin; Marcarian, Taline; Mayol-Ngo, Kristina; Miller, Pamela S; Onga, Jay; Rodman, Betty; Ross, David; Sommer, Susan; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Toyama, Joy; Villamor, Filma; Weigt, S Samuel; Gawlinski, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Background Chest physiotherapy and high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) are routinely used after lung transplant to facilitate removal of secretions. To date, no studies have been done to investigate which therapy is more comfortable and preferred by lung transplant recipients. Patients who have less pain may mobilize secretions, heal, and recover faster. Objectives To compare effects of HFCWO versus chest physiotherapy on pain and preference in lung transplant recipients. Methods In a 2-group experimental, repeated-measures design, 45 lung transplant recipients (27 single lung, 18 bilateral) were randomized to chest physiotherapy (10 AM, 2 PM) followed by HFCWO (6 PM, 10 PM; group 1, n=22) or vice versa (group 2, n=23) on postoperative day 3. A verbal numeric rating scale was used to measure pain before and after treatment. At the end of the treatment sequence, a 4-item patient survey was administered to assess treatment preference, pain, and effectiveness. Data were analyzed with χ(2) and t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results A significant interaction was found between mean difference in pain scores from before to after treatment and treatment method; pain scores decreased more when HFCWO was done at 10 AM and 6 PM (P =.04). Bilateral transplant recipients showed a significant preference for HFCWO over chest physiotherapy (11 [85%] vs 2 [15%], P=.01). However, single lung recipients showed no significant difference in preference between the 2 treatments (11 [42%] vs 14 [54%]). Conclusions HFCWO seems to provide greater decreases in pain scores than does chest physiotherapy. Bilateral lung transplant recipients preferred HFCWO to chest physiotherapy. HFCWO may be an effective, feasible alternative to chest physiotherapy. (American Journal of Critical Care. 2013;22:115-125).

  18. Companion Angels on a Leash: Welcoming Service Dogs into Classroom Communities for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Kathleen I.; Sholtis, Stephanie D.

    2016-01-01

    Love, affection, acceptance, and companionship to children, these are just some of the benefits of a service dog for children. Yet there is much that these remarkable animals can do. From opening doors for children with cerebral palsy to warning a child with diabetes of low blood sugar, the abilities of a properly trained service dog are wide and…

  19. Companion Angels on a Leash: Welcoming Service Dogs into Classroom Communities for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Kathleen I.; Sholtis, Stephanie D.

    2016-01-01

    Love, affection, acceptance, and companionship to children, these are just some of the benefits of a service dog for children. Yet there is much that these remarkable animals can do. From opening doors for children with cerebral palsy to warning a child with diabetes of low blood sugar, the abilities of a properly trained service dog are wide and…

  20. Tube thoracostomy; chest tube implantation and follow up

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Porpodis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an urgent medical situation that requires urgent treatment. We can divide this entity based on the etiology to primary and secondary. Chest tube implantation can be performed either in the upper chest wall or lower. Both thoracic surgeons and pulmonary physicians can place a chest tube with minimal invasive techniques. In our current work, we will demonstrate chest tube implantation to locations, methodology and tools. PMID:25337405

  1. DoGSD: the dog and wolf genome SNP database.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bing; Zhao, Wen-Ming; Tang, Bi-Xia; Wang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Zhang; Yang, He-Chuan; Liu, Yan-Hu; Zhu, Jun-Wei; Irwin, David M; Wang, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The rapid advancement of next-generation sequencing technology has generated a deluge of genomic data from domesticated dogs and their wild ancestor, grey wolves, which have simultaneously broadened our understanding of domestication and diseases that are shared by humans and dogs. To address the scarcity of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data provided by authorized databases and to make SNP data more easily/friendly usable and available, we propose DoGSD (http://dogsd.big.ac.cn), the first canidae-specific database which focuses on whole genome SNP data from domesticated dogs and grey wolves. The DoGSD is a web-based, open-access resource comprising ∼ 19 million high-quality whole-genome SNPs. In addition to the dbSNP data set (build 139), DoGSD incorporates a comprehensive collection of SNPs from two newly sequenced samples (1 wolf and 1 dog) and collected SNPs from three latest dog/wolf genetic studies (7 wolves and 68 dogs), which were taken together for analysis with the population genetic statistics, Fst. In addition, DoGSD integrates some closely related information including SNP annotation, summary lists of SNPs located in genes, synonymous and non-synonymous SNPs, sampling location and breed information. All these features make DoGSD a useful resource for in-depth analysis in dog-/wolf-related studies.

  2. What did domestication do to dogs? A new account of dogs' sensitivity to human actions.

    PubMed

    Udell, Monique A R; Dorey, Nicole R; Wynne, Clive D L

    2010-05-01

    Over the last two decades increasing evidence for an acute sensitivity to human gestures and attentional states in domestic dogs has led to a burgeoning of research into the social cognition of this highly familiar yet previously under-studied animal. Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) have been shown to be more successful than their closest relative (and wild progenitor) the wolf, and than man's closest relative, the chimpanzee, on tests of sensitivity to human social cues, such as following points to a container holding hidden food. The "Domestication Hypothesis" asserts that during domestication dogs evolved an inherent sensitivity to human gestures that their non-domesticated counterparts do not share. According to this view, sensitivity to human cues is present in dogs at an early age and shows little evidence of acquisition during ontogeny. A closer look at the findings of research on canine domestication, socialization, and conditioning, brings the assumptions of this hypothesis into question. We propose the Two Stage Hypothesis, according to which the sensitivity of an individual animal to human actions depends on acceptance of humans as social companions, and conditioning to follow human limbs. This offers a more parsimonious explanation for the domestic dog's sensitivity to human gestures, without requiring the use of additional mechanisms. We outline how tests of this new hypothesis open directions for future study that offer promise of a deeper understanding of mankind's oldest companion.

  3. Hybrid vigour in dogs?

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Frank W; Arnott, Elizabeth R; McGreevy, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    Evidence from other species justifies the hypotheses that useful hybrid vigour occurs in dogs and that it can be exploited for improved health, welfare and fitness for purpose. Unfortunately, most of the relevant published canine studies do not provide estimates of actual hybrid vigour because of inadequate specification of the parentage of mixed-bred dogs. To our knowledge, only three published studies have shed any light on actual hybrid vigour in dogs. There are two reports of actual hybrid vigour between Labrador and Golden retrievers, the first ranging from +2.5% to -6.0% for components of a standardised applied-stimulus behavioural test, and the second being at least +12.4% for chance of graduating as a guide dog. The third study provides a minimum estimate of negative actual hybrid vigour: crossbreds between Labrador retrievers and poodles had a higher prevalence of multifocal retinal dysplasia than the average prevalence in their purebred parent breeds. The lack of estimates of actual hybrid vigour can be overcome by including the exact nature of the cross (e.g. F1, F2 or backcross) and their purebred parental breeds in the specification of mixed-bred dogs. Even if only F1 crossbreds can be categorised, this change would enable researchers to conduct substantial investigations to determine whether hybrid vigour has any utility for dog breeding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fungal rhinitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ostrzeszewicz, M; Sapierzyński, R

    2015-01-01

    Fungal rhinitis and sinusitis in dogs are quite common reasons of chronic nasal discharge and rhinoscopy in such cases is commonly suggested. Forty three dogs were examined using rhinoscopy because of the presence of chronic airway symptoms. Clinical examination, routine hematology and serum biochemistry profiles, nasal and frontal sinus radiographs were made in all animals. Additionally, computed tomography in one dog was performed. Samples for histopathology were taken from 9 patients during rhinoscopy, additionally, from 8 of these patients samples for cytopathology were collected by blind nasal swab technique. In 9 of 43 dogs (20,5%), all males aged 1 to 13 years, examinations led to a diagnosis of fungal rhinitis. In 2 cases a diagnosis of fungal rhinitis was obtained based solely on cytopathology, while in 7 cases - mycosis of nasal mucosa was confirmed by histopathology. The present study revealed that cytopathological examination of nasal swabs has a low diagnostic value in the case of nasal infections in dogs. Although, in some dogs cytopathology, together with other widely available diagnostic techniques was sufficient to reliably diagnose fungal rhinitis, histopathology of samples collected during rhinoscopy is still the gold standard in such cases.

  5. [Prevalence of Dog circovirus in healthy and diarrhoeic dogs].

    PubMed

    Gentil, Michaela; Gruber, Achim D; Müller, Elisabeth

    2017-04-19

    In 2012, a Dog circovirus (DogCV) was discovered in the USA, which was followed by further descriptions of the virus in the USA, Italy and Germany. The present study is the first to examine the prevalence of DogCV in faeces of dogs from Germany and other European countries. Faecal samples from 184 dogs with diarrhoea and from 82 clinically healthy dogs (control group) were analysed for the presence of DogCV by PCR. Furthermore, the detection of parvovirus, coronavirus, Giardia and Cryptosporidium was performed in all samples. In the group of dogs with diarrhoea the prevalence of DogCV was 20.1% (37/184), in the healthy control group it was 7.3% (6/82). Therefore, the virus could be detected significantly more frequently in dogs with diarrhoea. The detection frequency of DogCV is comparable with those of the other tested pathogens. In approximately 50% of the DogCV-positive dogs, infections with other enteropathogenic organisms were diagnosed. The role of co-infection in the pathogenesis of the disease remains unclear, but there appears to be an association between co-infection and disease severity. Evidence of DogCV in clinically healthy dogs appears important for the epidemiology and raises questions about its pathogenicity. Further studies are needed to clarify questions regarding the pathogenesis, causal relevance and possible interference by other diarrhoeal pathogens. Nevertheless, the results of this study are an important indication that DogCV should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs with diarrhoea.

  6. Evaluation of storage mite contamination of commercial dry dog food.

    PubMed

    Brazis, Pilar; Serra, Montserrat; Sellés, Alex; Dethioux, Fabienne; Biourge, Vincent; Puigdemont, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Storage mites may be considered important allergens in dogs with atopic dermatitis. High sensitization rates to Tyrophagus, Acarus, and Lepidoglyphus species have been reported in atopic dogs, and dry pet food has been suggested as a potential source of storage mite exposure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate commercial dry dog food for contamination with storage mites, and how storage time and conditions could influence the risk of contamination. Ten different premium commercial dry dog foods formulated for skin disorders were selected. Food bags were opened and stored for 6 weeks under two different environmental conditions. At different time points, samples from each bag were collected and analysed by microscopy, guanine test, storage mite-specific traps, and a modified flotation technique. On opening, two storage mites identified as Acarus siro were isolated from one of the 10 bags by flotation technique, indicating that storage mites can be present in packaged dry dog food bags. After 5 weeks of storage under environmental conditions optimal for mite growth (23.2 +/- 2.1 degrees C and 71 +/- 5.6% of relative humidity), mites were detected by microscopic observation in nine of the 10 diets. When mites were identified by the flotation technique, Tyrophagus spp. were found to be the most common contaminating species. These results show that dry dog food can be a suitable substrate for storage mite reproduction, and that environmental and storage conditions may influence food contamination and mite development.

  7. [Exaggerated breed characteristics in dogs].

    PubMed

    Wilting, M M; Endenburg, N

    2012-01-01

    Dutch dog owners seem to be aware of bad dog breeding practices with regard to exaggerated breed characteristics that are detrimental to the dog's welfare. Yet they do not always look for these features when buying a dog. Most dog owners think that veterinarians could have an important role in preventing these exaggerated physical traits, by providing information about these traits and taking action in their capacity as veterinarian. Articles 36 and 55 of the Dutch GWWD (animal health and welfare law) provide opportunities to act against the breeding of dogs with exaggerated genetic traits.

  8. Familial anthropophobia in pointer dogs?

    PubMed

    Dykman, R A; Murphree, O D; Reese, W G

    1979-08-01

    This article assesses a dog model in terms of a proposed cross-species definition of phobia, the model referring to a strain of unstable dogs that has been produced by selection and inbreeding. The unstable dogs are contrasted with a strain of stable dogs. New findings are presented on approach and activity behavior toward three stimulus objects (man, another dog, and a sheet-covered chair) in a naturalistic setting. The fear response of unstable dogs to objects other than man habituates gradually, whereas the fear response to the sight of man is far more enduring, suggesting a relatively specific fear of man.

  9. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification...-rays as described in Appendix A. (b) A chest X-ray to establish the existence of pneumoconiosis...

  10. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification...-rays as described in Appendix A. (b) A chest X-ray to establish the existence of pneumoconiosis...

  11. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification...-rays as described in Appendix A. (b) A chest X-ray to establish the existence of pneumoconiosis shall...

  12. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  13. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  14. 46 CFR 194.10-20 - Magazine chest construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Magazine chest construction. 194.10-20 Section 194.10-20..., USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Magazines § 194.10-20 Magazine chest construction. (a) Magazine chests shall be of watertight metal construction with flush interior. The body...

  15. 46 CFR 194.10-20 - Magazine chest construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Magazine chest construction. 194.10-20 Section 194.10-20..., USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Magazines § 194.10-20 Magazine chest construction. (a) Magazine chests shall be of watertight metal construction with flush interior. The body...

  16. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  17. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  18. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  19. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  20. 46 CFR 194.10-20 - Magazine chest construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Magazine chest construction. 194.10-20 Section 194.10-20..., USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Magazines § 194.10-20 Magazine chest construction. (a) Magazine chests shall be of watertight metal construction with flush interior. The body...

  1. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  2. 46 CFR 194.10-20 - Magazine chest construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Magazine chest construction. 194.10-20 Section 194.10-20..., USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Magazines § 194.10-20 Magazine chest construction. (a) Magazine chests shall be of watertight metal construction with flush interior. The body...

  3. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  4. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  5. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  6. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  7. 46 CFR 194.10-20 - Magazine chest construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Magazine chest construction. 194.10-20 Section 194.10-20..., USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Magazines § 194.10-20 Magazine chest construction. (a) Magazine chests shall be of watertight metal construction with flush interior. The body...

  8. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  9. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  10. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  11. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  12. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  13. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters at...

  14. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP...

  15. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND...

  16. Vertical Mandibular Range of Motion in Anesthetized Dogs and Cats

    PubMed Central

    Gracis, Margherita; Zini, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The main movement of the temporomandibular joint of dogs and cats is in vertical dimensions (opening and closing the mouth). An objective evaluation of the vertical mandibular range of motion (vmROM) may favor early diagnosis of a number of conditions affecting the joint mobility. vmROM, corresponding to the maximum interincisal opening, was measured in 260 dogs and 127 cats anesthetized between June 2011 and April 2015 because of oral or maxillofacial problems and procedures. Animals with a known history of or having current diseases considered to hamper mandibular extension were excluded from the study. Dogs were divided into four subgroups, based on body weight: subgroup 1 (≤5.0 kg, 51 dogs), subgroup 2 (5.1–10.0 kg, 56 dogs), subgroup 3 (10.1–25 kg, 66 dogs), and subgroup 4 (>25.1 kg, 87 dogs). The mean vmROM of all dogs was 107 ± 30 mm (median 109, range 40–180); in subgroup 1 was 67 ± 15 mm (median 67, range 40–100), in subgroup 2 was 93 ± 15 mm (median 93, range 53–128), in subgroup 3 was 115 ± 19 mm (median 116, range 59–154), and in subgroup 4 was 134 ± 19 mm (median 135, range 93–180). The mean vmROM of the cats was 62 ± 8 mm (median 63, range 41–84). Correlations between vmROM, age, sex, and body weight were evaluated. In dogs, vmROM did not correlate with age, and in cats a weak positive correlation was found. vmROM and body weight were positively correlated in both populations, except dog subgroup 2. Overall, mean vmROM and body weight were significantly higher in male than in female, both in dogs and in cats. However, vmROM did not differ between sexes in any of the canine subgroups, and only in subgroup 4 male dogs were significantly heavier than females. Evaluation of vmROM should be incorporated into every diagnostic examination as it may be valuable in showing changes over time for every single patient. PMID:27446939

  17. Chest radiographic manifestations of scrub typhus

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, KPP; Mannam, PR; Rajendran, K; John, RA; Ramasami, P

    2016-01-01

    Background and Rationale: Respiratory system involvement in scrub typhus is seen in 20–72% of patients. In endemic areas, good understanding and familiarity with the various radiologic findings of scrub typhus are essential in identifying pulmonary complications. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to a tertiary care center with scrub typhus between October 2012 and September 2013 and had a chest X ray done were included in the analysis. Details and radiographic findings were noted and factors associated with abnormal X-rays were analyzed. Results: The study cohort contained 398 patients. Common presenting complaints included fever (100%), generalized myalgia (83%), headache (65%), dyspnea (54%), cough (24.3%), and altered sensorium (14%). Almost half of the patients (49.4%) had normal chest radiographs. Common radiological pulmonary abnormalities included pleural effusion (14.6%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (14%), airspace opacity (10.5%), reticulonodular opacities (10.3%), peribronchial thickening (5.8%), and pulmonary edema (2%). Cardiomegaly was noted in 3.5% of patients. Breathlessness, presence of an eschar, platelet counts of <20,000 cells/cumm, and total serum bilirubin >2 mg/dL had the highest odds of having an abnormal chest radiograph. Patients with an abnormal chest X-ray had a higher requirement of noninvasive ventilation (odds ratio [OR]: 13.98; 95% confidence interval CI: 5.89–33.16), invasive ventilation (OR: 18.07; 95% CI: 6.42–50.88), inotropes (OR: 8.76; 95% CI: 4.35–17.62), higher involvement of other organ systems, longer duration of hospital stay (3.18 ± 3 vs. 7.27 ± 5.58 days; P < 0.001), and higher mortality (OR: 4.63; 95% CI: 1.54–13.85). Conclusion: Almost half of the patients with scrub typhus have abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiography should be included as part of basic evaluation at presentation in patients with scrub typhus, especially in those with breathlessness, eschar, jaundice, and severe

  18. Perineal hernia repair in dogs.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J J

    1984-05-01

    Old male Collies, Pekingese , Boxers and Boston Terriers are predisposed to perineal hernia. Recurrence is often related to poor surgical technic in the initial repair. With the anesthetized dog in sternal recumbency and the tail tied forward, a curvilinear skin incision is made over the hernia, from the tail base to the midline, ventral to the anus. The hernial sac is opened and its contents reduced. Five stainless-steel sutures are preplaced in the muscles and ligaments of the perineal diaphragm and tied from top to bottom. In cases of failure of the ventral aspect of the repair, the internal obturator muscle can be elevated from the ischial table and used to cover the ventral aspect of the hernia. Postoperative complications are related to infection, self-trauma and straining.

  19. Dog Ownership, Dog Walking, and Children's and Parents' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Jo; Timperio, Anna; Chu, Binh; Veitch, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine cross-sectional associations of dog ownership, dog walking, and physical activity (PA) among children and their parents. Objective measures of PA were obtained for children ages 5-6 and 10-12 years from 19 primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. Parents self-reported their PA, dog ownership, and frequency of dog…

  20. Dog Ownership, Dog Walking, and Children's and Parents' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Jo; Timperio, Anna; Chu, Binh; Veitch, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine cross-sectional associations of dog ownership, dog walking, and physical activity (PA) among children and their parents. Objective measures of PA were obtained for children ages 5-6 and 10-12 years from 19 primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. Parents self-reported their PA, dog ownership, and frequency of dog…

  1. [Dowel pinning for metacarpal and metatarsal fractures in dogs].

    PubMed

    Kornmayer, Matthias; Matis, Ulrike

    2017-06-20

    To evaluate a dowel pinning technique for metacarpal and metatarsal fractures in dogs. Medical records of 13 dogs with complete clinical and radiographic follow-up examinations after a median observation time of 5 months were evaluated retrospectively. Assessment included fracture data, number of stabilized bones versus number of fractured bones and parameters of internal fixation including postoperative axial alignment and position of implants assessed on serial radiographs. Complications during the healing period and the final radiographic and functional outcome were analysed in relation to the details of fracture fixation. Most dogs in this study (mean age: 2.9 years, mean weight: 9.9 kg) had fractures of three or four bones, and fractures were closed in all but one dog. All fractures involved the metacarpal/metatarsal body, and all but five were transverse. The size of Kirschner wires used for dowel pinning ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 mm, and the length in relation to bone length ranged from 39 to 91%. Axial alignment of internal fixation was and remained anatomically correct and the dowel pins remained in place in all but one dog. This dog had open metatarsal fractures and dowel pinning was contraindicated. Additionally, the Kirschner wires perforated the cortex of the proximal segments, which resulted in implant migration, malunion and residual lameness. The other dogs achieved complete functional union even though seven of 13 dogs developed radiographic signs of synostosis. Although the number of dogs in this study was small, dowel pinning was shown to be technically straightforward, inexpensive and effective for surgical repair of canine metacarpal and metatarsal bone fractures. Further studies should focus on the need for and duration of additional external coaptation.

  2. Functional MRI of the Olfactory System in Conscious Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hao; Pustovyy, Oleg M.; Waggoner, Paul; Beyers, Ronald J.; Schumacher, John; Wildey, Chester; Barrett, Jay; Morrison, Edward; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S.; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J.; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2014-01-01

    We depend upon the olfactory abilities of dogs for critical tasks such as detecting bombs, landmines, other hazardous chemicals and illicit substances. Hence, a mechanistic understanding of the olfactory system in dogs is of great scientific interest. Previous studies explored this aspect at the cellular and behavior levels; however, the cognitive-level neural substrates linking them have never been explored. This is critical given the fact that behavior is driven by filtered sensory representations in higher order cognitive areas rather than the raw odor maps of the olfactory bulb. Since sedated dogs cannot sniff, we investigated this using functional magnetic resonance imaging of conscious dogs. We addressed the technical challenges of head motion using a two pronged strategy of behavioral training to keep dogs' head as still as possible and a single camera optical head motion tracking system to account for residual jerky movements. We built a custom computer-controlled odorant delivery system which was synchronized with image acquisition, allowing the investigation of brain regions activated by odors. The olfactory bulb and piriform lobes were commonly activated in both awake and anesthetized dogs, while the frontal cortex was activated mainly in conscious dogs. Comparison of responses to low and high odor intensity showed differences in either the strength or spatial extent of activation in the olfactory bulb, piriform lobes, cerebellum, and frontal cortex. Our results demonstrate the viability of the proposed method for functional imaging of the olfactory system in conscious dogs. This could potentially open up a new field of research in detector dog technology. PMID:24466054

  3. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use. PMID:26941971

  4. Proportionality between chest wall resistance and elastance.

    PubMed

    Barnas, G M; Stamenović, D; Fredberg, J J

    1991-02-01

    Fredberg and Stamenovic (J. Appl. Physiol. 67: 2408-2419, 1989) demonstrated a relatively robust phenomenological relationship between resistance (R) and elastance (E) of lung tissue during external forcing. The relationship can be expressed as omega R = eta E, where omega = 2 pi times forcing frequency and eta is hysteresivity; they found eta to be remarkably invariant under a wide range of circumstances. From data gathered in previous experiments, we have tested the adequacy and utility of this phenomenological description for the chest wall (eta w) and its major compartments, the rib cage (eta rc), diaphragm-abdomen (eta d-a), and belly wall (eta bw+). For forcing frequencies and tidal volumes within the normal range of breathing, we found that eta w remained in a relatively narrow range (0.27-0.37) and that neither eta w nor the compartmental eta's changed much with frequency or tidal volume. Compared with eta w, eta rc tended to be slightly low, whereas eta d-a tended to be slightly higher than eta w. However, at higher frequencies (greater than 1 Hz) all eta's increased appreciably with frequency. During various static nonrespiratory maneuvers involving use of respiratory muscles, eta w increased up to twofold. We conclude that in the normal ranges of breathing frequency and tidal volume 1) elastic and dissipative processes within the chest wall appear to be coupled, 2) eta's of the various component parts of the chest wall are well matched, 3) respiratory muscle contraction increases the ratio of cyclic dissipative losses to energy storage, and 4) R of the relaxed chest wall can be estimated from E.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Dosimetry for tangential chest wall irradiation.

    PubMed

    Fessenden, P; Palos, B B; Karzmark, C J

    1978-08-01

    The skin-sparing effect of megavoltage photons is lost to a varying extent when tangential beams are used to irradiate the chest wall. The skin dose for this technique, with and without a bolus, was investigated for 4- and 6-MV photons using film, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and an ionization chamber. Metal/tissue interface effects were observed when a flexible brass fabric material was used as a bolus.

  6. Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Disease Treating Cushing's Disease Your 9-year old dog has been drinking a lot more lately and ...

  7. Surface Chest Motion Decomposition for Cardiovascular Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, Ghufran; Veluvolu, Kalyana C.

    2014-01-01

    Surface chest motion can be easily monitored with a wide variety of sensors such as pressure belts, fiber Bragg gratings and inertial sensors, etc. The current applications of these sensors are mainly restricted to respiratory motion monitoring/analysis due to the technical challenges involved in separation of the cardiac motion from the dominant respiratory motion. The contribution of heart to the surface chest motion is relatively very small as compared to the respiratory motion. Further, the heart motion spectrally overlaps with the respiratory harmonics and their separation becomes even more challenging. In this paper, we approach this source separation problem with independent component analysis (ICA) framework. ICA with reference (ICA-R) yields only desired component with improved separation, but the method is highly sensitive to the reference generation. Several reference generation approaches are developed to solve the problem. Experimental validation of these proposed approaches is performed with chest displacement data and ECG obtained from healthy subjects under normal breathing and post-exercise conditions. The extracted component morphologically matches well with the collected ECG. Results show that the proposed methods perform better than conventional band pass filtering. PMID:24865183

  8. Electrochemotherapy of chest wall breast cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sersa, Gregor; Cufer, Tanja; Paulin, Snezna Marija; Cemazar, Maja; Snoj, Marko

    2012-08-01

    Chest wall breast cancer recurrence after mastectomy is a disease difficult to treat. Its incidence varies between 5% and 30% in different subset of patients. When possible, radical surgical therapy represents the main treatment approach, however when the disease progresses and/or treatments are not successful, ulceration, bleeding, lymphedema and psychological distress of progressive disease significantly decrease the quality of the remaining life of a patient. When surgical excision of chest wall recurrence is not possible, other local treatments such as radiotherapy, radiotherapy with hyperthermia, topical chemotherapy and electrochemotherapy might be taken into account. Electrochemotherapy provides safe, efficient and non-invasive locoregional treatment approach for chest wall breast cancer recurrence. Several clinical studies have demonstrated high efficacy and a good safety profile of electrochemotherapy applied in single or multiple consecutive sessions, till clinical response was reached. Electrochemotherapy can be performed either with cisplatin injected intratumorally or with bleomycin given intratumorally or intravenously. Furthermore, it can be effectively used in heavily pre-treated areas, after surgery, radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. These are the advantages that might demand its use especially in patients with pre-treated extensive disease and in frail elderly patients. With development of the technology electrochemotherapy could even be suggested as a primary local therapy in patients not suitable for surgical removal of the primary tumor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface Chest Motion Decomposition for Cardiovascular Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiq, Ghufran; Veluvolu, Kalyana C.

    2014-05-01

    Surface chest motion can be easily monitored with a wide variety of sensors such as pressure belts, fiber Bragg gratings and inertial sensors, etc. The current applications of these sensors are mainly restricted to respiratory motion monitoring/analysis due to the technical challenges involved in separation of the cardiac motion from the dominant respiratory motion. The contribution of heart to the surface chest motion is relatively very small as compared to the respiratory motion. Further, the heart motion spectrally overlaps with the respiratory harmonics and their separation becomes even more challenging. In this paper, we approach this source separation problem with independent component analysis (ICA) framework. ICA with reference (ICA-R) yields only desired component with improved separation, but the method is highly sensitive to the reference generation. Several reference generation approaches are developed to solve the problem. Experimental validation of these proposed approaches is performed with chest displacement data and ECG obtained from healthy subjects under normal breathing and post-exercise conditions. The extracted component morphologically matches well with the collected ECG. Results show that the proposed methods perform better than conventional band pass filtering.

  10. Chest pain: coronary CT in the ER

    PubMed Central

    Maffei, Erica; Seitun, Sara; Guaricci, Andrea I

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac CT has developed into a robust clinical tool during the past 15 years. Of the fields in which the potential of cardiac CT has raised more interest is chest pain in acute settings. In fact, the possibility to exclude with high reliability obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients at low-to-intermediate risk is of great interest both from the clinical standpoint and from the management standpoint. Several other modalities, with or without imaging, have been used during the past decades in the settings of new onset chest pain or in acute chest pain for both diagnostic and prognostic assessment of CAD. Each one has advantages and disadvantages. Most imaging modalities also focus on inducible ischaemia to guide referral to invasive coronary angiography. The advent of cardiac CT has introduced a new practice diagnostic paradigm, being the most accurate non-invasive method for identification and exclusion of CAD. Furthermore, the detection of subclinical CAD and plaque imaging offer the opportunity to improve risk stratification. Moreover, recent advances of the latest generation CT scanners allow combining both anatomical and functional imaging by stress myocardial perfusion. The role of cardiac CT in acute settings is already important and will become progressively more important in the coming years. PMID:26866681

  11. Chest Pain Associated with Moderator Band Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Kaszala, Karoly; Osman, Mohammed N.; Lucke, John; Carrillo, Roger

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was evaluated for chronic chest pain that had been present for 8 years after placement of a dual-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator to treat inducible ventricular tachycardia. Previous coronary angiography had revealed nonobstructive coronary artery disease and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.45 to 0.50, consistent with mild idiopathic nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Evaluation with chest radiography and transthoracic echocardiography showed the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead to be embedded within the right ventricle at the moderator band, which had mild calcification. Treatment included extraction of the dual-coil lead and placement of a new single-coil right ventricular lead at the mid septum. The patient had complete relief of symptoms after the procedure. This case shows that chest pain can be associated with the placement of a right ventricular implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead in the moderator band and that symptomatic relief can occur after percutaneous lead extraction and the implantation of a new right ventricular lead to the mid septal region. PMID:25425994

  12. Chest Tomosynthesis: Technical Principles and Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, James T.; McAdams, H. Page

    2009-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a radiographic technique that can produce an arbitrary number of section images of a patient from a single pass of the x-ray tube. It utilizes a conventional x-ray tube, a flat-panel detector, a computer-controlled tube mover, and special reconstruction algorithms to produce section images. While it does not have the depth resolution of computed tomography (CT), tomosynthesis provides some of the tomographic benefits of CT but at lower cost and radiation dose than CT. Compared to conventional chest radiography, chest tomosynthesis results in improved visibility of normal structures such as vessels, airway and spine. By reducing visual clutter from overlying normal anatomy, it also enhances detection of small lung nodules. This review article outlines the components of a tomosynthesis system, discusses results regarding improved lung nodule detection from the recent literature, and presents examples of nodule detection from a clinical trial in human subjects. Possible implementation strategies for use in clinical chest imaging are discussed. PMID:19616909

  13. Fetal tissue engineering: chest wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julie R; Terada, Shinichi; Hannouche, Didier; Ochoa, Erin R; Vacanti, Joseph P; Fauza, Dario O

    2003-08-01

    This study was aimed at applying fetal tissue engineering to chest wall reconstruction. Fetal lambs underwent harvest of elastic and hyaline cartilage specimens. Once expanded in vitro, fetal chondrocytes were seeded onto synthetic scaffolds, which then were placed in a bioreactor. After birth, fetal cartilage constructs (n = 10) were implanted in autologous fashion into the ribs of all lambs (n = 6) along with identical, but acellular scaffolds, as controls (n = 6). Engineered and acellular specimens were harvested for analysis at 4 to 12 weeks postimplantation. Standard histology and matrix-specific staining were performed both before implantation and after harvest on all constructs. Regardless of the source of chondrocytes, all fetal constructs resembled hyaline cartilage, both grossly and histologically, in vitro. In vivo, engineered implants retained hyaline characteristics for up to 10 weeks after implantation but remodeled into fibrocartilage by 12 weeks postoperatively. Mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates surrounding residual PGA/PLLA polymer fibers were noted in all specimens but most prominently in the acellular controls. Engineered fetal cartilage can provide structural replacement for at least up to 10 weeks after autologous, postnatal implantation in the chest wall. Fetal tissue engineering may prove useful for the treatment of severe congenital chest wall defects at birth.

  14. Coronary Occlusion Secondary to Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lijoi, Antonio; Tallone, Mariano; Parodi, Enrico; Dottori, Vincenzo; Passerone, Gian Carlo; Della Rovere, Francesco; De Gaetano, Giuseppe

    1992-01-01

    There have been only 58 angiographically documented reports of transmural myocardial infarction due to closed-chest trauma. None of these cases has been treated by percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. We report the case of a 40-year-old man who developed an anterior-wall myocardial infarction secondary to blunt chest trauma suffered in an automobile accident. Angiographic study performed 2 months after the injury revealed an isolated total obstruction of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The patient was judged a good candidate for balloon angioplasty, but total reocclusion occurred within 24 hours of the procedure and a 2nd attempt did not restore patency. Surgical revascularization was performed a week later. A year after his injury, the patient remains asymptomatic and is back at work. Despite the failure of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in its 1st application to coronary artery repair after blunt chest trauma, we believe it to be the treatment of choice in young patients and in single-vessel disease. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1992;19:291-3) Images PMID:15227457

  15. Dog bite injuries among American Indian and Alaska Native children.

    PubMed

    Bjork, Adam; Holman, Robert C; Callinan, Laura S; Hennessy, Thomas W; Cheek, James E; McQuiston, Jennifer H

    2013-06-01

    To examine dog bites among American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) children visiting Indian Health Service and tribal health facilities. We retrospectively analyzed hospitalizations and outpatient visits with a diagnosis of dog bite between 2001 and 2008 in AI/AN children aged <20 years. Rates of dog bite hospitalizations and outpatient visits were estimated by age group, sex, region, and number and location of open wounds using Indian Health Service data. Analyses of hospitalizations for the general US population aged<20 years used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The average annual dog bite hospitalization rate was higher among AI/AN children in Alaska (6.1/100,000 population) and the Southwest region (5.3/100,000) compared with the general US child population (3.1/100,000; 95% CI, 2.9-3.3/100,000). The average annual outpatient visit rate in AI/AN children was highest in the Alaska (596.4/100,000), Southwest (540.0/100,000), and Northern Plains West (537.6/100,000) regions. The hospitalization rate was highest in both AI/AN and US males aged<5 years, and outpatient visit rates were highest in AI/AN males aged 5-9 years. Open wounds diagnoses were most commonly seen on the head, neck, and face in hospitalized children (45.5% of open wounds in AI/AN children, 59.3% in US children; SE, 1.0%) and on the leg in AI/AN outpatients (35.6%). Dog bites represent a significant public health threat in AI/AN children in the Alaska, the Southwest, and Northern Plains West regions of the US. Enhanced animal control and education efforts should reduce dog bite injuries and associated problems with pets and stray dogs, such as emerging infectious diseases. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  16. Panic Disorder and Chest Pain: Mechanisms, Morbidity, and Management.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Jeff C.; Pollack, Mark H.; Stern, Theodore A.

    2002-04-01

    Approximately one quarter of patients who present to physicians for treatment of chest pain have panic disorder. Panic disorder frequently goes unrecognized and untreated among patients with chest pain, leading to frequent return visits and substantial morbidity. Panic attacks may lead to chest pain through a variety of mechanisms, both cardiac and noncardiac in nature, and multiple processes may cause chest pain in the same patient. Panic disorder is associated with elevated rates of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and, possibly, sudden cardiac death. Furthermore, patients with panic disorder and chest pain have high rates of functional disability and medical service utilization. Fortunately, panic disorder is treatable; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy all effectively reduce symptoms. Preliminary studies have also found that treatment of patients who have panic disorder and chest pain with benzodiazepines results in reduction of chest pain as well as relief of anxiety.

  17. Disease control through fertility control: Secondary benefits of animal birth control in Indian street dogs.

    PubMed

    Yoak, Andrew J; Reece, John F; Gehrt, Stanley D; Hamilton, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    We sought to (1) survey sexually intact street dogs for a wide range of diseases in three cities in Rajasthan, India and (2) evaluate links between the health of non-treated dogs and both the presence and duration of animal birth control (ABC) programs. ABC regimes sterilize and vaccinate stray dogs in an attempt to control their population and the spread of rabies. They are commonly suggested to improve the health of those dogs they serve, but here we provide evidence that these benefits also extend to untreated dogs in the community. Viral and bacterial disease seroprevalences were assessed in 240 sexually intact street dogs from Jaipur, Jodhpur, and Sawai Madhopur cities in October and September 2011. Those individuals and 50 additional dogs were assessed for the presence of ticks, fleas, fight wounds, and given body condition scores. Dogs in cities with an ABC program had with significantly (p<0.05) higher overall body condition scores, lower prevalence of open wounds likely caused by fighting, flea infestations, infectious canine hepatitis, Ehrlichia canis, Leptospira interrogans serovars, and canine distemper virus antibodies. However, those same dogs in cities with ABC programs had significantly higher prevalence of Brown Dog Tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) infestations. Canine parvovirus and Brucella canis prevalences were not significantly different between cities. This study is the first to demonstrate the health benefits of ABC on non-vaccinated diseases and non-treated individuals. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Stereotactic radiosurgery and fracture fixation in 6 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Covey, Jennifer L; Farese, James P; Bacon, Nicholas J; Schallberger, Sandra P; Amsellem, Pierre; Cavanaugh, Ryan P; Milner, Rowan J

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate clinical outcome of dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma (OSA) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and subsequent internal fixation of a pathologic fracture. Retrospective case series. Dogs with spontaneous-occurring appendicular OSA (n = 6). Medical records (May 2002-January 2008) of dogs that had SRS for appendicular OSA were reviewed. Dogs were included if they had a pathologic fracture either before or after SRS and were treated with internal fixation. Signalment, history, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, diagnostic imaging findings, biopsy results, surgical complications, number of surgeries, adjuvant therapy, development of metastatic disease and cause of death were recorded. Six dogs met the inclusion criteria. Two dogs had a pathologic fracture at admission and 4 dogs developed a fracture after SRS with a mean ± SD time to fracture development of 6.25 ± 1.65 months. The first 3 fractures were repaired using an open approach and the latter three using minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis (MIPO). Infection occurred in 5 dogs and implant failure in 3. Limb function was subjectively assessed as good in all dogs when the implants were stable and infections were subclinical. Survival times ranged from 364-897 days; 1 dog was lost to follow-up. Fracture repair using internal fixation should be considered a viable limb-sparing alternative for pathologic fractures that have been treated with SRS. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  19. Dogs, zoonoses and immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R A; Pugh, R N

    2002-06-01

    Dogs are the source of a wide range of zoonotic infections that pose a significant threat to human health. This is particularly the case for immunocompromised people, although there are few robust studies that determine immunosuppression as a risk factor for transmission of zoonoses from dogs to humans. An increasing proportion of human society is immunodeficient, principally through the advent of HIV infection and through more people, particularly the expanding elderly group, being subjected to immunosuppressive agents. This is happening at a time when more such people are capitalizing on the acknowledged benefits of dog ownership, making for a potentially dangerous mix. Enteric pathogens (for example, Salmonella, Campylobacter and Cryptosporidium species, that may be canine derived) are a frequent risk to the health of immunocompromised persons. Veterinarians and physicians can be criticised for not communicating with each other, and for not providing adequate risk assessment to pet owners. There is scope for voluntary groups to provide information and support for the immunosuppressed who wish to keep their dogs. Key recommendations are to maintain a clean personal environment and intact mucocutaneous barriers. Public health professionals could help rectify the current communications gap between veterinary and medical staff and so facilitate in the appropriate management of dog-owning immunocompromised people.

  20. Dog saliva – an important source of dog allergens

    PubMed Central

    Polovic, N; Wadén, K; Binnmyr, J; Hamsten, C; Grönneberg, R; Palmberg, C; Milcic-Matic, N; Bergman, T; Grönlund, H; van Hage, M; Crameri, Reto

    2013-01-01

    Background Allergy to dog (Canis familiaris) is a worldwide common cause of asthma and allergic rhinitis. However, dander extract in routine diagnostics is not an optimal predictor of IgE-mediated dog allergy. Our objective was to evaluate saliva as an allergen source for improved diagnostics of allergy to dog. Methods IgE-binding proteins in dog saliva and dander extract were analysed by immunoblot and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using pooled or individual sera from dog-allergic patients (n = 13). Sera from 59 patients IgE positive to dander and 55 patients IgE negative to dander but with symptoms to dog were analysed for IgE against saliva and dander by ELISA. Basophil stimulation with dog saliva and dander extract was measured by flow cytometry among three dog-allergic patients. Additionally, IgE-binding protein profiles of saliva from different breeds were investigated by immunoblot. Results Greater number and diversity of IgE-binding proteins was found in saliva compared to dander extract and varied among dog breeds. In saliva, Can f 1, 2, 3 and 6 were identified but also four new saliva allergen candidates. The majority of the 59 dog dander–positive sera (n = 44) were IgE positive to dog saliva. Among patients IgE negative to dander, but with symptoms to dog, 20% were IgE positive to saliva. The biological activity of saliva was confirmed by basophil degranulation. Conclusions Dog saliva is an allergen source for improved diagnostics of dog allergy. The IgE-binding protein profile of saliva from different dogs varies. PMID:23464525

  1. A pilot study of pulmonary rehabilitation and chest physiotherapy versus chest physiotherapy alone in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Mandal, P; Sidhu, M K; Kope, L; Pollock, W; Stevenson, L M; Pentland, J L; Turnbull, K; Mac Quarrie, S; Hill, A T

    2012-12-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation in addition to regular chest physiotherapy in non cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Thirty patients with clinically significant bronchiectasis and limited exercise tolerance were randomized into either the control group receiving chest physiotherapy (8 weeks) or into the intervention group, receiving pulmonary rehabilitation in addition to chest physiotherapy (8 weeks). Both groups were encouraged to maintain their exercise program and or chest physiotherapy, following completion of the study. End of training (8 weeks) No improvement in control group. In the intervention group, incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) improved by 56.7 m (p = 0.03), endurance walk test (EWT) by 193.3 m (p = 0.01), Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) improved by 2.6 units (p < 0.001) and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) by 8 units (p < 0.001). At 20 weeks (12 weeks post end of training) No improvement in control group. In the intervention group, ISWT improved by 80 m (p = 0.04) and EWT by 247.5 m (p = 0.003). LCQ improved by 4.4 units (p < 0.001) and SGRQ by 4 units (p < 0.001). Pulmonary rehabilitation in addition to regular chest physiotherapy, improves exercise tolerance and health related quality of life in non cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and the benefit was sustained at 12 weeks post end of pulmonary rehabilitation. Clinical trials regn no. NCT00868075. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of chest X-ray before discharge in asymptomatic children after cardiac surgery--prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Daniel; Knirsch, Walter; Niesse, Oliver; Schraner, Thomas; Dave, Hitendu; Kretschmar, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    In many paediatric cardiac units chest radiographs are performed routinely before discharge after cardiac surgery. These radiographs contribute to radiation exposure. To evaluate the diagnostic impact of routine chest X-rays before discharge in children undergoing open heart surgery and to analyze certain risk factors predicting pathologic findings. This was a prospective (6 months) single-centre observational clinical study. One hundred twenty-eight consecutive children undergoing heart surgery underwent biplane chest X-ray at a mean of 13 days after surgery. Pathologic findings on chest X-rays were defined as infiltrate, atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, or signs of fluid overload. One hundred nine asymptomatic children were included in the final analysis. Risk factors, such as age, corrective versus palliative surgery, reoperation, sternotomy versus lateral thoracotomy, and relevant pulmonary events during postoperative paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) stay, were analysed. In only 5.5 % (6 of 109) of these asymptomatic patients were pathologic findings on routine chest X-ray before discharge found. In only three of these cases (50 %), subsequent noninvasive medical intervention (increasing diuretics) was needed. All six patients had relevant pulmonary events during their PICU stay. Risk factor analysis showed only pulmonary complications during PICU stay to be significantly associated (p = 0.005) with pathologic X-ray findings. Routine chest radiographs before discharge after cardiac surgery can be omitted in asymptomatic children with an uneventful and straightforward perioperative course. Chest radiographs before discharge are warrantable if pulmonary complications did occur during their PICU stay, as this is a risk factor for pathologic findings in chest X-rays before discharge.

  3. 77 FR 54368 - Service Dogs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... effects of mental health illnesses, while providing benefits for service dogs that mitigate the effects of... benefits for a dog to mitigate the effects of a mental illness that are not related to visual, hearing, or... determine that these dogs provide a medical benefit to veterans with mental illness. Until such a...

  4. Bartonella quintana Endocarditis in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rolain, Jean-Marc; Maggi, Ricardo; Sontakke, Sushama; Keene, Bruce; Hunter, Stuart; Lepidi, Hubert; Breitschwerdt, Kyle T.; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Raoult, Didier

    2006-01-01

    We provide the first evidence that Bartonella quintana can infect dogs and cause typical signs of endocarditis. Using PCR and sequencing, we identified B. quintana in the blood of a dog from the United States with aortic valve endocarditis and probably also in the mitral valve of a dog from New Zealand with endocarditis. PMID:17326937

  5. Outcome After Pneumonectomy in 17 Dogs and 10 Cats: A Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology Case Series.

    PubMed

    Wavreille, Vincent; Boston, S E; Souza, C; Ham, K; Chanoit, G; Rossetti, D; Takacs, J; Milner, R

    2016-08-01

    To report the signalment, presenting clinical signs, surgical complications, histologic diagnosis, postoperative complications, and outcome of dogs and cats undergoing pneumonectomy. Retrospective case series; multicenter study. Client-owned dogs (n=17) and cats (n=10). Signalment, clinical signs, side affected, surgical data, preoperative diagnostic tests (including complete blood count, serum biochemistry, cytologic diagnosis, chest radiographs, and computed tomography), histologic diagnosis, surgical complications, adjunctive therapy, and date and cause of death were collected from records of dogs and cats that underwent pneumonectomy. Survival estimates and complication were assessed. Seventeen animals had a left-sided pneumonectomy performed (12 dogs, 5 cats) and 10 animals had a right-sided pneumonectomy (5 dogs, 5 cats). Fourteen animals were diagnosed with neoplasia (52%). The overall incidence of complications for dogs and cats were 76 and 80%, respectively, with major complications in 41 and 50%, respectively. Respiratory complications (persistent pleural effusion, oxygen dependence, persistent increased respiratory rate, or coughing) were the most frequent complications. No animals died or were euthanatized intraoperative or within the first 24 hours postoperative. One dog (6%) and 2 cats (20%) died, or were euthanatized in the first 2 weeks postoperative. Based on this case series, right and left pneumonectomy can be performed with low perioperative mortality in dogs and cats, with some animals experiencing prolonged survival. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    PubMed

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs' abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human's goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs' behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs' behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs' neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human's vocal communication and the presence of the

  7. Should PEEP Titration Be Based on Chest Mechanics in Patients With ARDS?

    PubMed

    Kallet, Richard H

    2016-06-01

    Functional residual capacity (FRC) is essentially the alveolar volume and a determinant of both oxygenation and respiratory system compliance (CRS). ARDS decreases FRC, and sufficient PEEP restores FRC; thus, assessments of PEEP by its impact on oxygenation and CRS are intimately linked. PEEP also can ameliorate or aggravate ventilator-induced lung injury. Therefore, it can be argued that PEEP should be titrated primarily by its impact on CRS The pro position argues that the heterogeneous nature of lung injury and its unique presentation in individual patients results in an uncoupling between oxygenation and CRS Therefore, relying upon oxygenation alone may enhance lung injury and mortality risk, particularly in those with severe ARDS. The con argument is that the preponderance of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that a relatively narrow range of PEEP is required to manage all but the most severe cases of ARDS. In addition, pathological alterations in chest wall compliance confuse the interpretation of chest mechanics. Moreover, ambiguities and technical limitations in advanced techniques, such as esophageal manometry and pressure-volume curves, add a layer of complexity that renders its broader application in all ARDS patients both impractical and unnecessary. Whether sophisticated monitoring of chest mechanics in severe ARDS might improve outcomes further is open to question and should be studied further. However, it is highly improbable that we will ever discover a PEEP strategy that optimizes all aspects of cardiorespiratory function and chest mechanics for individual patients suffering from ARDS. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  8. Novel Split Chest Tube Improves Post-Surgical Thoracic Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Cherry, Brandon H; Gurji, Hunaid A; White, Daniel W; Newton, J Tyler; Scott, Gary F; Hoxha, Besim; Gourlay, Terence; Mallet, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Objective Conventional, separate mediastinal and pleural tubes are often inefficient at draining thoracic effusions. Description We developed a Y-shaped chest tube with split ends that divide within the thoracic cavity, permitting separate intrathoracic placement and requiring a single exit port. In this study, thoracic drainage by the split drain vs. that of separate drains was tested. Methods After sternotomy, pericardiotomy, and left pleurotomy, pigs were fitted with separate chest drains (n=10) or a split tube prototype (n=9) with internal openings positioned in the mediastinum and in the costo-diaphragmatic recess. Separate series of experiments were conducted to test drainage of D5W or 0.58 M sucrose, an aqueous solution with viscosity approximating that of plasma. One litre of fluid was infused into the thorax, and suction was applied at −20 cm H2O for 30 min. Results When D5W was infused, the split drain left a residual volume of 53 ± 99 ml (mean value ± SD) vs. 148 ± 120 for the separate drain (P=0.007), representing a drainage efficiency (i.e. drained vol/[drained + residual vol]) of 95 ± 10% vs. 86 ± 12% for the separate drains (P = 0.011). In the second series, the split drain evacuated more 0.58 M sucrose in the first minute (967 ± 129 ml) than the separate drains (680 ± 192 ml, P<0.001). By 30 min, the split drain evacuated a similar volume of sucrose vs. the conventional drain (1089 ± 72 vs. 1056 ± 78 ml; P = 0.5). Residual volume tended to be lower (25 ± 10 vs. 62 ± 72 ml; P = 0.128) and drainage efficiency tended to be higher (98 ± 1 vs. 95 ± 6%; P = 0.111) with the split drain vs. conventional separate drains. Conclusion The split chest tube drained the thoracic cavity at least as effectively as conventional separate tubes. This new device could potentially alleviate postoperative complications. PMID:25478289

  9. Arthrodesis tarsocrural or tarsometatarsal in 2 dogs using circular external skeletal fixator

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Sheila C.; Volpi, Reinaldo S.; Hette, Khadije; Teixeira Neto, Francisco J.; Vulcano, Luiz C.

    2006-01-01

    An external fixation technique, using a circular fixator, to obtain arthrodesis was evaluated in 2 dogs with infected open lesions and soft tissue damage. In both cases, articular cartilage was curetted, and devitalized bone and necrotic soft tissue were removed. No bone graft was used. The wounds were maintained open and the dogs received postoperative antibiotic therapy. The arthrodesis site was compressed progressively as needed. Infection was eradicated and bony union was obtained in both dogs. It was concluded that the use of a circular fixator is an effective method to achieve arthrodesis. PMID:17017656

  10. Directionality of dog vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frommolt, Karl-Heinz; Gebler, Alban

    2004-07-01

    The directionality patterns of sound emission in domestic dogs were measured in an anechoic environment using a microphone array. Mainly long-distance signals from four dogs were investigated. The radiation pattern of the signals differed clearly from an omnidirectional one with average differences in sound-pressure level between the frontal and rear position of 3-7 dB depending from the individual. Frequency dependence of directionality was shown for the range from 250 to 3200 Hz. The results indicate that when studying acoustic communication in mammals, more attention should be paid to the directionality pattern of sound emission.

  11. Cardiopulmonary function and morphologic changes in beagle dogs after multiple lung lavages

    SciTech Connect

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Mauderly, J.L.; Halliwell, W.H.; Slauson, D.O.

    1980-03-01

    This study evaluated the long-term biomedical risks of multiple, massive saline lung lavage using dogs. Risks were assessed using clinical examinations of cardiopulmonary function, thoracic radiographs, auscultation of the chest, body temperature, and hematologic values. Thirty-six dogs given 10 lavages over a 49-day period had no gross lesions at time of necropsy 7 days after the last lavage. Six dogs, followed with clinical examinations after each of 10 lung lavages, had no detectable effects from the lavage except for elevated body temperature and bronchial breathing at 24 hr after some procedures. No gross lesions were found at sacrifice 28 days after the last lavage. The only histologic lesions found were those also found in unlavaged control dogs. Six dogs that were lavaged 10 or more times had normal pulmonary function values for 4 yr after the last lung lavage. No chronic sequelae were found in healthy beagle dogs given 10 or more lung lavages suggesting a minimal long-term risk associated with these procedures.

  12. 26. INSIDE THE 'DOG HOUSE' AT THE REAR END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. INSIDE THE 'DOG HOUSE' AT THE REAR END OF THE WALKING BEAM. HERE ARE HOUSED THE HOIST ENGINE, WHICH CONTROLS MOVEMENT OF THE BEAM; AND THE ENGINES THAT CONTROL THE OPENING AND CLOSING AND SWIVEL OF THE GRAB BUCKET. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  13. Cholecystocutaneous fistula containing multiple gallstones in a dog.

    PubMed

    Fabbi, Martina; Volta, Antonella; Quintavalla, Fausto; Zubin, Elena; Manfredi, Sabrina; Martini, Filippo M; Mantovani, Luciana; Tribaudino, Mario; Gnudi, Giacomo

    2014-12-01

    A 7-year-old dog was presented with a history of an open lesion on the right thoracic wall, discharging honey-like fluid and small stones. Ultrasonography and computed tomographic fistulography identified a cholecystocutaneous fistula; cholecystectomy was curative. Veterinarians should consider this disease in patients with long-term discharging lesions on the right thoracic or abdominal wall.

  14. Oncoplastic technique for the elimination of the lateral "dog ear" during mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Clough, Krishna B; Massey, Eleanore J D; Mahadev, G K; Kaufman, Gabriel J; Nos, Claude; Sarfati, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Following a mastectomy, both the cosmetic and functional results can be impaired by the presence of a lateral "dog ear." This is a particular problem in women with a large body habitus giving an increased amount of adipose tissue lateral to the breast. The standard approaches to this operation of horizontal or oblique incisions often results in an uncomfortable, unsightly lateral "dog ear". We describe a modification to the standard mastectomy incision that allows extensive excision of the lateral adipose tissue, re-draping the skin over the chest wall, thus eliminating the "dog ear." The mastectomy is performed through two oblique incisions originating in the axillary skin crease encompassing the nipple areolar complex, followed by extensive lateral fat excision. A distance of 2-3 cm is kept between the superior limit of the two incisions. At closure the lateral skin flap is advanced superiomedially on the chest wall without tension. This simple and reproducible technique improves cosmesis and patient satisfaction following modified radical mastectomy by eliminating the lateral "dog ear." © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A forensic and medical evaluation of dog bites in a province of Western Turkey.

    PubMed

    Karbeyaz, Kenan; Ayranci, Unal

    2014-03-01

    The aim was to evaluate the demographic data of dog-bite cases organized from criminal and forensic reports. This study evaluated 328 cases admitted to the Director of Forensic Medicine, Eskisehir, as a result of dog bites between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2010. It was found that those in the age-group of 0-18 were most frequently exposed to dog bites (48.5%). Injuries to the lower extremity, upper extremity, and chest/abdomen/back were more frequent in men (72.6%, 76.4%, and 66.1%, respectively), while injuries to the head/neck/face were more frequent in women (52.3%) (p < 0.01). While most of those wounded in the upper extremity, the head/neck/face, and the chest/abdomen/back were in the child age-group, most of those wounded in the lower extremity were in the adult age-group (p < 0.001). Teaching children, in particular, how to behave around dogs would be useful in reducing the incidence of bite.

  16. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Experimental parvovirus infection in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Potgieter, L N; Jones, J B; Patton, C S; Webb-Martin, T A

    1981-01-01

    Five eight week old dogs were inoculated orally and intranasally with cell culture origin canine parvovirus. Three dogs became depressed and anorectic and developed a mild (one dog) to severe diarrhea five days postinfection. The remaining dogs had subclinical infections but developed a lymphopenia followed by a transient lymphocytosis. The ill dogs developed mild (one dog) to severe neutropenia and a moderate lymphopenia. One died nine days postinfection. Recovery was associated with cessation of viral excretion and with lymphocytosis and antibody production. Two of three dogs challenged intragastrically developed mild clinical signs and a moderate panleukopenia four to eight days postinfection. The pathological changes of the experimental disease were very similar to that of spontaneous disease. Bone marrow changes included a severe granulocytic and mild erythroid depletion. The pathogenesis of canine parvovirus infection is discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:7340906

  18. Vanishing native American dog lineages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dogs were an important element in many native American cultures at the time Europeans arrived. Although previous ancient DNA studies revealed the existence of unique native American mitochondrial sequences, these have not been found in modern dogs, mainly purebred, studied so far. Results We identified many previously undescribed mitochondrial control region sequences in 400 dogs from rural and isolated areas as well as street dogs from across the Americas. However, sequences of native American origin proved to be exceedingly rare, and we estimate that the native population contributed only a minor fraction of the gene pool that constitutes the modern population. Conclusions The high number of previously unidentified haplotypes in our sample suggests that a lot of unsampled genetic variation exists in non-breed dogs. Our results also suggest that the arrival of European colonists to the Americas may have led to an extensive replacement of the native American dog population by the dogs of the invaders. PMID:21418639

  19. Chest CT Features of North American Paragonimiasis

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Travis S.; Lane, Michael A.; Weil, Gary J.; Bailey, Thomas C.; Bhalla, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to characterize the chest CT findings of North American paragonimiasis due to Paragonimus kellicotti in the largest (to our knowledge) case series reported to date and to compare the findings with those reported for paragonimiasis infections in other regions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective review was performed of chest CT examinations of eight patients with North American paragonimiasis treated at our institution between 2006 and 2010. Findings were characterized by site of involvement, including lungs and pleura, heart and pericardium, lymph nodes, and upper abdomen. RESULTS The most common chest CT findings in this case series were pleural effusions and internal mammary and cardiophrenic lymphadenopathy. Pulmonary parenchymal findings included peripheral lung nodules of 1–3.5 cm in size with surrounding ground-glass opacity; many nodules had a linear track to the pleural surface that may correspond to the worm’s burrow tunnel. Pericardial involvement (5/8 patients) and omental inflammation (5/7 patients), which are uncommon in Asian paragonimiasis, were common in this series. CONCLUSION Pleural and pulmonary features of North American paragonimiasis are generally similar to those reported from Asia. The presence of a track between a pulmonary nodule and the pleura may help distinguish paragonimiasis from mimickers, including chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, tuberculosis, fungal infection, or malignancy. Pericarditis, lymphadenopathy, and omental inflammation were more common in our series than in reports on paragonimiasis from other regions. These differences may be related to the infecting parasite species or to the fact that radiologic examinations in the present series were performed relatively early in the course of infection. PMID:22528896

  20. Segmentation of ribs in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Lin; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Ribs and clavicles in posterior-anterior (PA) digital chest radiographs often overlap with lung abnormalities such as nodules, and cause missing of these abnormalities, it is therefore necessary to remove or reduce the ribs in chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to develop a fully automated algorithm to segment ribs within lung area in digital radiography (DR) for removal of the ribs. The rib segmentation algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, a radiograph was pre-processed for contrast adjustment and noise removal; second, generalized Hough transform was employed to localize the lower boundary of the ribs. In the third step, a novel bilateral dynamic programming algorithm was used to accurately segment the upper and lower boundaries of ribs simultaneously. The width of the ribs and the smoothness of the rib boundaries were incorporated in the cost function of the bilateral dynamic programming for obtaining consistent results for the upper and lower boundaries. Our database consisted of 93 DR images, including, respectively, 23 and 70 images acquired with a DR system from Shanghai United-Imaging Healthcare Co. and from GE Healthcare Co. The rib localization algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 98.2% with 0.1 false positives per image. The accuracy of the detected ribs was further evaluated subjectively in 3 levels: "1", good; "2", acceptable; "3", poor. The percentages of good, acceptable, and poor segmentation results were 91.1%, 7.2%, and 1.7%, respectively. Our algorithm can obtain good segmentation results for ribs in chest radiography and would be useful for rib reduction in our future study.

  1. [Intensive care in chest trauma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kopp, K H; Blanig, I; Rabenschlag, R; Vogel, W

    1979-04-01

    A statistical analysis of the case material at the Intensive Care Unit, Freiburg, for the years 1975 and 1976 established that 40% and 39% respectively of patients with multiple injuries had also suffered a chest trauma and that the latter was the direct cause of respiratory insufficiency in 61% (1975) and 57% (1976) of patients in need of controlled respiration, i.e. respiratory insufficiency dominated the clinical and pathophysiological picture. The causes were: restricted respiratory movements due to pain, compression of the lungs or pathological changes in the injured lung, and they affected the normal gaseous exchange in a variety of ways. Alveolar hypoventilation with disturbance of ventilation-perfusion, increase in the functional shunt volume, rise in the functional dead space combined with reduced functional residual capacity and compliance result, if left uncorrected, in a drastic increase of resistance on the part of the pulmonary vessels and finally in, often fatal, hyoxaemia and hypercapnia. Regular estimations of the arterial blood gases in air and pure oxygen, of the arterio-alveolar difference in oxygen pressure, shunt volume, dead space and effective compliance of the chest wall and lungs are, therefore, essential. Treatment in an intensive care unit comprises the relief of any acute condition, such as tension pneumothorax, haemothorax, and general measures. Means to relieve pain in patients whose chest injuries are not sufficiently severe to require artificial ventilation are: intercostal blocking, acupuncture or peridural analgesia; efficient breathing exercises are important. The indications for artificial ventilation should be interpreted generously and the decision to perform it should be made at an early stage. The technique is determined by the type of pathological changes in the gaseous exchange and should aim at restoring normal conditions as far as possible.

  2. Image processing of digital chest ionograms.

    PubMed

    Yarwood, J R; Moores, B M

    1988-10-01

    A number of image-processing techniques have been applied to a digital ionographic chest image in order to evaluate their possible effects on this type of image. In order to quantify any effect, a simulated lesion was superimposed on the image at a variety of locations representing different types of structural detail. Visualization of these lesions was evaluated by a number of observers both pre- and post-processing operations. The operations employed included grey-scale transformations, histogram operations, edge-enhancement and smoothing functions. The resulting effects of these operations on the visualization of the simulated lesions are discussed.

  3. [Isolated chest trauma in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Yersin, Bertrand; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Pasquier, Mathieu; Zingg, Tobias

    2015-08-12

    In elderly patients, a blunt trauma of the chest is associated with a significant risk of complications and mortality. The number of ribs fractures (≥ 4), the presence of bilateral rib fractures, of a pulmonary contusion, of existent comorbidities or acute extra-thoracic traumatic lesions, and lastly the severity of thoracic pain, are indeed important risk factors of complications and mortality. Their presence may require hospitalization of the patient. When complications do occur, they are represented by alveolar hypoventilation, pulmonary atelectasia and broncho-pulmonary infections. When hospitalization is required, it may allow for the specific treatment of thoracic pain, including locoregional anesthesia techniques.

  4. Important considerations in chest wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Arash; Kovach, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    Chest wall reconstruction represents one of the most challenging tasks in plastic surgery. Over the past several decades, a more profound understanding of surgical anatomy and physiology along with tremendous advances in surgical technique have resulted in substantial improvements in postoperative outcomes. Conceptually, the reconstructive goals include dead space obliteration, restoration of skeletal stability with protection of intrathoracic structures, and stable soft tissue coverage. Ideally, these goals are achieved with minimal aesthetic deformity. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:913-922. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Acute Chest Pain: Emergency Evaluation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Walker, David M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Since cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders have significant morbidity and mortality, triage of patients who complain of chest pain is paramount. The less sophisticated the triage system, the more important the protocol should be to have these patients evaluated immediately. History and physical are still the most important diagnostic tools; information should be gathered from all available sources. Advanced cardiac life support training is most useful. Eight diagnostic classifications are described, together with the distinctions of onset, duration, location, radiation, precipitating and relieving factors, character and associated symptoms. The protocol for initial management is outlined, emphasizing coincident management wherever possible. Imagesp2005-a PMID:21286539

  6. Is your dog empathic? Developing a Dog Emotional Reactivity Survey.

    PubMed

    Szánthó, Flóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' seemingly empathic behaviour attracts general and scientific attention alike. Behaviour tests are usually not sufficiently realistic to evoke empathic-like behaviour; therefore we decided to ask owners about their experiences with their dogs in emotionally loaded situations. Owners from Hungary (N = 591) and from Germany (N = 2283) were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1-5 Likert scale with statements about the reactivity of their dogs to their emotions and to other dogs' behaviour. We created two scales with satisfactory internal reliability: reactivity to the owner's emotion and reactivity to other dogs' behaviour. Based on an owner-dog personality matching theory, we hypothesised that the owner's empathy, as measured by the subscale on the cooperativeness character factor of the human personality, will correlate with their dog's emotional reactivity in emotionally loaded situations. In addition we also examined how anthropomorphism, contagious yawning, attitude toward the dog are related to emotional reactivity in dogs as perceived by the owner. In addition we examined how owners rate dog pictures. We found that the scale scores were largely independent from demographic and environmental variables like breed, sex, age, age at acquiring, keeping practices, training experiences and owner's age. However, anthropomorphic and emotional attitude of the owners probably biased the responses. In the German sample more empathic owners reported to have more emotionally reactive dog, as expected by the personality matching theory. More empathic owners reported to have fewer problems with their dogs and they rated a puppy picture as more cute in both countries. 62% of owners from Hungary and 36% of owner from Germany agreed with the statement "My dog is more important for me than any human being". In Germany, more empathic owners agreed less with this statement and indicated that their dogs have a tendency for contagious yawning. Owners whose attitudes

  7. Homogeneous Canine Chest Phantom Construction: A Tool for Image Quality Optimization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Digital radiographic imaging is increasing in veterinary practice. The use of radiation demands responsibility to maintain high image quality. Low doses are necessary because workers are requested to restrain the animal. Optimizing digital systems is necessary to avoid unnecessary exposure, causing the phenomenon known as dose creep. Homogeneous phantoms are widely used to optimize image quality and dose. We developed an automatic computational methodology to classify and quantify tissues (i.e., lung tissue, adipose tissue, muscle tissue, and bone) in canine chest computed tomography exams. The thickness of each tissue was converted to simulator materials (i.e., Lucite, aluminum, and air). Dogs were separated into groups of 20 animals each according to weight. Mean weights were 6.5 ± 2.0 kg, 15.0 ± 5.0 kg, 32.0 ± 5.5 kg, and 50.0 ± 12.0 kg, for the small, medium, large, and giant groups, respectively. The one-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in all simulator material thicknesses (p < 0.05) quantified between groups. As a result, four phantoms were constructed for dorsoventral and lateral views. In conclusion, the present methodology allows the development of phantoms of the canine chest and possibly other body regions and/or animals. The proposed phantom is a practical tool that may be employed in future work to optimize veterinary X-ray procedures. PMID:27101001

  8. Homogeneous Canine Chest Phantom Construction: A Tool for Image Quality Optimization.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Ana Luiza Menegatti; Rosa, Maria Eugênia Dela; Giacomini, Guilherme; Bacchim Neto, Fernando Antonio; Yamashita, Seizo; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Duarte, Sergio Barbosa; Miranda, José Ricardo de Arruda; de Pina, Diana Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Digital radiographic imaging is increasing in veterinary practice. The use of radiation demands responsibility to maintain high image quality. Low doses are necessary because workers are requested to restrain the animal. Optimizing digital systems is necessary to avoid unnecessary exposure, causing the phenomenon known as dose creep. Homogeneous phantoms are widely used to optimize image quality and dose. We developed an automatic computational methodology to classify and quantify tissues (i.e., lung tissue, adipose tissue, muscle tissue, and bone) in canine chest computed tomography exams. The thickness of each tissue was converted to simulator materials (i.e., Lucite, aluminum, and air). Dogs were separated into groups of 20 animals each according to weight. Mean weights were 6.5 ± 2.0 kg, 15.0 ± 5.0 kg, 32.0 ± 5.5 kg, and 50.0 ± 12.0 kg, for the small, medium, large, and giant groups, respectively. The one-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in all simulator material thicknesses (p < 0.05) quantified between groups. As a result, four phantoms were constructed for dorsoventral and lateral views. In conclusion, the present methodology allows the development of phantoms of the canine chest and possibly other body regions and/or animals. The proposed phantom is a practical tool that may be employed in future work to optimize veterinary X-ray procedures.

  9. Cuttable plate fixation for small breed dogs with radius and ulna fractures: Retrospective study of 31 dogs.

    PubMed

    Watrous, Gwyneth K; Moens, Noel M M

    2017-04-01

    This retrospective study evaluated complication rates for radius and ulna fractures in small breed dogs in which 1.5 mm to 2.7 mm cuttable bone plates were used for internal fixation. The medical records of all cases from 2004 to 2011 that were presented to our clinic were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were: dogs with body weight < 9 kg, fracture of the radius and ulna with open reduction, and internal fixation utilizing a cuttable bone plate. Thirty-four fractures in 31 dogs met the inclusion criteria. Of 25 dogs that were available for follow-up, all achieved union, minor complications occurred in 9, and major complications occurred in 8. External coaptation was responsible for complications in 8 cases and the need for coaptation needs to be investigated. Excluding minor complications, 32% of patients required at least 1 additional surgery or additional hospitalization. All but 2 of the dogs returned to full function. The 1.5 mm straight plate was successfully used in all dogs with a body weight of 0.9 to 2.6 kg.

  10. Protothecosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Vince, Andrew R; Pinard, Chantale; Ogilvie, Adam T; Tan, Emmeline O; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G

    2014-10-01

    A case of a disseminated algal infection is reported in a young rough-coated collie dog with progressive neurologic deficits, blindness, and hemorrhagic diarrhea. Prototheca zopfii organisms were cultured from feces, urine, and blood. At necropsy, granulomas containing typical organisms were identified within the proximal colon, heart, kidneys, and eyes.

  11. Neosporosis in dogs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite of animals. Until 1988, it was misdiagnosed as Toxoplasma gondii. Since its first recognition in 1984 and the description of a new genus and species Neospora caninum in 1988, neosporosis has emerged as a serious disease of dogs and cattle worldwide. Additiona...

  12. Zen Hot Dog Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Substituted cycloalkanes with one branch illustrating each topic in an instructional unit can serve as summaries or reviews in courses of organic chemistry. The hungry Zen master told the hot dog vendor to make him one with everything. You can do the same for your students.

  13. Zen Hot Dog Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Dennis

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cycloalkanes with one branch illustrating each topic in an instructional unit can serve as summaries or reviews in courses of organic chemistry. The hungry Zen master told the hot dog vendor to make him one with everything. You can do the same for your students.

  14. Quality of chest compressions during continuous CPR; comparison between chest compression-only CPR and conventional CPR.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Chika; Iwami, Taku; Kawamura, Takashi; Ando, Masahiko; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Hiraide, Atsushi; Nonogi, Hiroshi

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed to compare the time-dependent deterioration of chest compressions between chest compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and conventional CPR. This study involved 106 and 107 participants randomly assigned to chest compression-only CPR training and conventional CPR training, respectively. Immediately after training, participants were asked to perform CPR for 2 min and the quality of their CPR skills were evaluated. The number of chest compressions in total and those with appropriate depth were counted every 20-s CPR period from the start of CPR. The primary outcome was the CPR quality index calculated as the proportion of chest compressions with appropriate depth among total chest compressions. The total number of chest compressions remained stable over time both in the chest compression-only and the conventional CPR groups. The CPR quality index, however, decreased from 86.6+/-25.0 to 58.2+/-36.9 in the chest compression-only CPR group from 0-20 s through 61-80 s. The reduction was greater than in the conventional CPR group (85.9+/-25.5 to 74.3+/-34.0). The difference in the CPR quality index reached statistical significance (p=0.003) at 61-80 s period. Chest compressions with appropriate depth decreased more rapidly during chest compression-only CPR than conventional CPR. We recommend that CPR providers change their roles every 1 min to maintain the quality of chest compressions during chest compression-only CPR. (UMIN-CTR C0000000321). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of free radical generation in the stunned' myocardium in the conscious dog using spin tripping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Zughayb, M.; Sekili, S.; Li, X.Y., Triana, J.F.; McCay, P.B.; Bolli, R. Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City )

    1991-03-11

    Recent studies have shown that free radicals (FR) are produced in stunned' myocardium. However, since these studies were performed in open-chest animals, artifacts due to anesthesia, trauma, and other unphysiologic conditions cannot be excluded. FR production in conscious models of myocardial ischemia has never been shown. Thus, conscious dogs undergoing a 15-min coronary occlusion (O) followed by reperfusion (R) received i.v. the spin trap alpha-phenyl N-tert-butyl nitron (PBN) starting 5 min pre-O and ending 10 min after R. Local coronary venous effluent plasma was analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Myocardial production of PBN adducts was calculated as coronary flow x venous-arterial difference in EPR signal intensity. A burst of PBN adduct production was observed in the first 5 min of R. Adduct production then abated but remained detectable for several hours after R. Coupling constants are consistent with a complex mixture of FR. In 5 control studies, infusion of PBN without ischemia was not associated with appreciable adduct production. These results demonstrate that reversible regional myocardial ischemia in the conscious animal is associated with free radical generation and further support the hypothesis that oxy-radicals contribute to stunning.

  16. Parametric imaging of experimentally simulated Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome conduction abnormalities in dogs: a concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Weismueller, P.H.; Henze, E.; Adam, W.E.; Roth, J.; Bitter, F.; Stauch, M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to test the diagnostic potential of phase analysis of radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) for localizing accessory bundles in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, 24 experimental runs were performed in three open chest instrumented dogs. After a baseline study, WPW syndrome was simulated by stimulation at seven different sites around the base of the ventricles, and RNV's were obtained. Subsequent data processing including Fourier transformation allowed the localization of the site of the first inward motion of the ventricles by an isophasic wave display. In sinus rhythm, the septum contracted first. During ectopic premature ventricular stimulation by triggering the atrial signal, the phase scan was altered only when the stimulus was applied earlier than 20 ms before the expected QRS complex during sinus rhythm. During stimulation with fixed frequency, only the left lateral positions of the premature stimulation were detected by phase analysis with a sensitivity of 86%. Neither the antero- or posteroseptal nor the right ventricular premature contraction pattern could be exactly localized.

  17. Dichotomy between theory and practice in chest radiography and its impact on students.

    PubMed

    Botwe, Benard O; Arthur, Lawrence; Tenkorang, Michael K K; Anim-Sampong, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    It is important that theory is synchronous with clinical practices that students engage in. Lack of congruence between theory and practice presents serious problems to students. This study was therefore conducted to determine if there was a theory-practice gap in chest radiography during clinical rotations, and any associated causes and effects on radiography students. A descriptive survey design was used to conduct this study from 2 February to 27 July 2014. A semi-structured questionnaire consisting of open- and close-ended questions was used to purposively collect data from 26 radiography students in Ghana who had completed theory lessons in chest radiography and had either completed or were undertaking clinical rotations in chest radiography. Twenty-five (96%) respondents indicated the presence of theory-practice gap in chest radiography during clinical rotations, where differences between theory and clinical practice were observed. Lack of working materials 16 (62%), heavy workload 14 (54%), equipment breakdowns 14 (54%) and supervisory factors 11 (43%) were identified as the causes. Many students (81%) experienced diverse adverse effects such as confusion 10 (38%), poor performance during clinical examinations 6 (23%) and entire loss of interest in the professional training 1 (4%) of this dichotomy. Dichotomy between theory and practice found in chest radiography has diverse adverse effects on students. Regular feedback on the quality of clinical practice received by students should be encouraged to determine the existence of any gaps between theory and practice in order to promote effective clinical rotation programmes in radiography. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  18. Semi-automatic central-chest lymph-node definition from 3D MDCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Higgins, William E.

    2010-03-01

    Central-chest lymph nodes play a vital role in lung-cancer staging. The three-dimensional (3D) definition of lymph nodes from multidetector computed-tomography (MDCT) images, however, remains an open problem. This is because of the limitations in the MDCT imaging of soft-tissue structures and the complicated phenomena that influence the appearance of a lymph node in an MDCT image. In the past, we have made significant efforts toward developing (1) live-wire-based segmentation methods for defining 2D and 3D chest structures and (2) a computer-based system for automatic definition and interactive visualization of the Mountain central-chest lymph-node stations. Based on these works, we propose new single-click and single-section live-wire methods for segmenting central-chest lymph nodes. The single-click live wire only requires the user to select an object pixel on one 2D MDCT section and is designed for typical lymph nodes. The single-section live wire requires the user to process one selected 2D section using standard 2D live wire, but it is more robust. We applied these methods to the segmentation of 20 lymph nodes from two human MDCT chest scans (10 per scan) drawn from our ground-truth database. The single-click live wire segmented 75% of the selected nodes successfully and reproducibly, while the success rate for the single-section live wire was 85%. We are able to segment the remaining nodes, using our previously derived (but more interaction intense) 2D live-wire method incorporated in our lymph-node analysis system. Both proposed methods are reliable and applicable to a wide range of pulmonary lymph nodes.

  19. Usefulness of low dose chest CT for initial evaluation of blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Jung; Bista, Anjali Basnyat; Min, Young Gi; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Kyung Joo; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Sun, Joo Sung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to compare the diagnostic performance and inter-observer consistency between low dose chest CT (LDCT) and standard dose chest CT (SDCT) in the patients with blunt chest trauma. A total of 69 patients who met criteria indicative of blunt chest trauma (77% of male; age range, 16–85) were enrolled. All patients underwent LDCT without intravenous (IV) contrast and SDCT with IV contrast using parameters as following: LDCT, 40 mAs with automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) and 100 kVp (BMI <25, n = 51) or 120 kVp (BMI>25, n = 18); SDCT, 180 mAs with ATCM and 120 kVp. Transverse, coronal, sagittal images were reconstructed with 3-mm slice thickness without gap and provided for evaluation of 3 observers. Reference standard images (transverse, coronal, sagittal) were reconstructed using SDCT data with 1-mm slice thickness without gap. Reference standard was established by 2 experienced thoracic radiologists by consensus. Three observers independently evaluated each data set of LDCT and SDCT. Multiple-reader receiver operating characteristic analysis for comparing areas under the ROC curves demonstrated that there was no significant difference of diagnostic performance between LDCT and SDCT for the diagnosis of pulmonary injury, skeletal trauma, mediastinal injury, and chest wall injury (P > 0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficient was measured for inter-observer consistency and revealed that there was good inter-observer consistency in each examination of LDCT and SDCT for evaluation of blunt chest injury (0.8601–1.000). Aortic and upper abdominal injury could not be appropriately compared as LDCT was performed without using contrast materials and this was limitation of this study. The effective radiation dose of LDCT (average DLP = 1.52 mSv⋅mGy−1 cm−1) was significantly lower than those of SDCT (7.21 mSv mGy−1 cm−1). There is a great potential benefit to use of LDCT for initial evaluation of blunt chest trauma

  20. Computer Assisted Diagnosis of Chest Pain. Preliminary Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-27

    to date on the computer-based diagnostic program for chest pain. The disorders considered are: myocardial infarction, angina, pneumonia...ANXIOUS (87) DISTRESSED (88) Don’t attempt deep psychoanalysis here. If your patient is obviously reacting to great pain or other severe symptoms...NON-SPECIFIC CHEST PAIN - Non-specific chest pain (NONSCP) is intended to encompass those disorders which are not serious and not a cause for

  1. New cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines 2005: importance of uninterrupted chest compression.

    PubMed

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Gullo, Antonino; Tang, Wanchun; Weil, Max Harry

    2006-07-01

    The evidence supports quality controlled chest compression as the initial intervention after "sudden death" before attempted defibrillation, if the duration of cardiac arrest is more than 5 minutes. The new guidelines mandate lesser interruptions for ventilation, before and following electrical shocks, and single rather than multiple electrical shocks before resuming chest compression. The new guidelines refocus on uninterrupted chest compression after cardiac arrest of nonasphyxial cause and modifications in practices that reduce the need for interruptions.

  2. [Rib fractures after chest physiotherapy: a report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Chanelière, C; Moreux, N; Pracros, J-P; Bellon, G; Reix, P

    2006-11-01

    The 2000 French consensus conference for acute viral bronchiolitis management underlined the fundamental role of chest physiotherapy. According to Chalumeau and al., rib fractures were found out in 1/1000 children hospitalized for bronchiolitis or pneumonia. However, such complication of chest physiotherapy is exceptional. We report 2 cases with third to sixth lateral rib fractures after chest physiotherapy in infants with bronchiolitis. Despite the rarity of these complications, clinicians must keep in mind this etiology while facing rib fractures in infants.

  3. Computer Assisted Diagnosis of Chest Pain. Adjunctive Treatment Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-30

    public release; distribution unlimited SUMMARY PAGE THE PROBLEM To provide a manual of treatment protocols for use with the computer assisted...of chest pain project, a chest pain treatment manual has been formulated. It is anticipated that this manual will be used by the Independent...response to re-breathing techniques are diagnostic. The lung exam is normal. In psychoneurotic disorders, no physical etiology for chest pain is found

  4. Black-tailed prairie dogs and the structure of avian communities on the shortgrass plains.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gregory A; Lomolino, Mark V

    2004-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) influence avian community structure on the shortgrass prairie. We surveyed 36 prairie dog towns and 36 paired sites without prairie dogs during summer and fall of 1997, 1998, and 1999 in the Oklahoma Panhandle. Our surveys totaled 9,040 individual observations for 73 avian species. Significantly distinct avian communities were present on prairie dog towns when compared to sites within four different macrohabitats of the surrounding landscape: open rangeland, scrub/sandsage (Artemisia filifolia) habitats, Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) plots, and fallow crop fields. Relative densities of all bird species combined was higher on prairie dog towns versus paired sites in summer and fall. Mean species richness of birds was significantly higher on prairie dog towns than paired sites during summer, but there were no significant differences in fall. Open rangeland had the highest mean species richness in fall. Assemblages of avian communities differed significantly between prairie dog towns and the four macrohabitat types during summer. Burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia), killdeer (Charadrius vociferous), horned larks (Eremophila alpestris), and meadowlarks (Sturnella spp.) were positively and significantly associated with prairie dog towns during summer, while horned larks and ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis) were significantly associated with prairie dog towns during fall. Even in their current remnant state, black-tailed prairie dogs continue to play a significant role in the assembly of ecological communities across the Great Plains. Conservation of prairie dogs goes well beyond a single species, and is an important strategy for the preservation of the prairie ecosystem as a whole.

  5. Esophageal hypersensitivity in noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2016-09-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is an often-encountered clinical problem. Although many patients suffer from persistent or recurrent chest pain, treatment remains a challenge owing to its various possible etiologies. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common cause of NCCP. In GERD-related NCCP, proton pump inhibitor treatment appears to be effective. However, the pathophysiology remains to be fully elucidated in NCCP patients without GERD. Treatment for non-GERD-related NCCP has been aimed at esophageal motility disorders and visceral hypersensitivity. As there is growing evidence that esophageal visceral hypersensitivity plays a role in NCCP, pain modulators have become the mainstay of therapy in patients with non-GERD-related NCCP. However, there is an unmet need for the treatment of esophageal hypersensitivity in NCCP due to modest evidence for the benefit of pain modulators, including antidepressants, in non-GERD-related NCCP. Recent studies have demonstrated that esophageal mast cell infiltration and impaired mucosal integrity are related to visceral hypersensitivity in patients with NCCP. Thus, esophageal mast cell stabilization and restoration of esophageal mucosal integrity could be considered potential therapeutic targets in selected NCCP patients with hypersensitivity. However, further observations are necessary to shed light on esophageal hypersensitivity in NCCP.

  6. Increases in heart rate and serum cortisol concentrations in healthy dogs are positively correlated with an indoor waiting-room environment.

    PubMed

    Perego, Roberta; Proverbio, Daniela; Spada, Eva

    2014-03-01

    Few studies have investigated the effect of veterinary clinical procedures on the welfare of dogs, with specific emphasis on the veterinary practice environment. Clinicopathologic variables have also not been assessed in these potentially stressful situations. Similar to human clinical studies, the veterinary clinical waiting room could present a significant stress factor for dogs. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of waiting-room environment on serum cortisol and glucose alterations as well as heart rate in privately owned healthy dogs. The clinical trial included 24 healthy dogs that were divided into 2 groups: the clinical waiting-room group (A) and the control group (B) that waited outside in a garden. During the entire experiment, 18 dogs (9 dogs per group) were monitored with a human heart rate monitor fastened around the chest. After 20 minutes of waiting, blood samples were collected from all of the dogs (24 dogs) to determine serum cortisol concentration. Serum cortisol concentration and mean, maximum, and minimum heart rate were significantly higher in group A compared with group B, but there was no statistical difference in serum glucose concentrations between the 2 study groups. Results of this study suggest that the waiting room is a potentially stressful situation for dogs in clinical veterinary practice, when compared with a garden, based on the assessment of adrenal cortex function and heart rate evaluation. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  7. The cardiovascular effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane after premedication of healthy dogs undergoing elective surgery.

    PubMed

    Abed, Janan M; Pike, Fred S; Clare, Monica C; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    Sevoflurane and isoflurane are commonly used in veterinary anesthesia. The objective of this prospective, randomized, open-label clinical study was to compare the cardiovascular effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane via direct arterial blood pressure measurements and the lithium dilution cardiac output (LDCO) on premedicated healthy dogs undergoing elective tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). Nineteen client-owned dogs were included. All dogs were premedicated with hydromorphone (0.05 mg/kg IV and glycopyrrolate 0.01 mg/kg subcutaneously). Ten dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane and nine dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane. Eighteen dogs were instrumented with a dorsal pedal arterial catheter, and one dog had a femoral arterial catheter. All dogs had continuous, direct systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP), and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressure readings as well as heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), stroke volume variation (SVV), and pulse pressure variation (PPV) recorded q 5 min during the surgical procedure. There was no significant statistical difference in all parameters between the sevoflurane and isoflurane treatment groups. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane inhalant anesthetics appear to have similar hemodynamic effects when used as part of a multimodal anesthetic protocol in premedicated healthy dogs undergoing an elective surgical procedure.

  8. Digital tomosynthesis of the chest: current and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shinn-Huey S; Kicska, Greg A; Pipavath, Sudhakar N; Reddy, Gautham P

    2014-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) of the chest is a technique whose basic components are similar to those of digital radiography, but that also provides some of the benefits of computed tomography (CT). The major advantages of DTS over conventional chest radiography are improved visibility of the pulmonary parenchyma and depiction of abnormalities such as pulmonary nodules. Calcifications, vessels, airways, and chest wall abnormalities are also much more readily visualized at DTS than at chest radiography. DTS could potentially be combined with chest radiography to follow up known nodules, confirm or rule out suspected nodules seen at radiography, or evaluate individuals who are at high risk for lung cancer or pulmonary metastases. DTS generates coronal "slices" through the chest whose resolution is superior to that of coronal reconstructed CT images, but it is limited by its suboptimal depth resolution and susceptibility to motion; consequently, potential pitfalls in recognizing lesions adjacent to the pleura, diaphragm, central vessels, and mediastinum can occur. However, the radiation dose and projected cost of chest DTS are lower than those of standard chest CT. Besides pulmonary nodule detection, specific applications of DTS that are under investigation include evaluation of pulmonary tuberculous and nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, cystic fibrosis, interstitial lung disease, and asbestos-related thoracic diseases. A basic understanding of chest DTS and of the emerging applications of this technique can prove useful to the radiologist. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  9. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  10. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  11. Measuring chest circumference change during respiration with an electromagnetic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Padasdao, Bryson; Shahhaidar, Ehsaneh; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an off-the-shelf DC motor is modified into a chest belt and used to successfully measure circumference change on a mechanical chest model, while simultaneously harvesting significant power. Chest circumference change can provide information on tidal volume, which is vital in assessing lung function. The chest circumference change is calculated from the motor's voltage output. Calculated values are within 0.95mm of measured circumference changes, with a standard deviation of 0.37mm. The wearable motor can also harvest at least 29.4µW during normal breathing.

  12. The efficacy of X-rays after chest tube removal.

    PubMed

    Palesty, J A; McKelvey, A A; Dudrick, S J

    2000-01-01

    The insertion and subsequent removal of chest tubes are frequently performed procedures. We hypothesize that routine chest radiographs obtained after chest tube removal to confirm the absence of any post-procedure complications have little impact on clinical management. A 5-year retrospective study of 73 patients with tube thoracotomies was performed in a level II trauma center's intensive care unit. Patients were identified from billing records for chest tube placement. Medical records and official chest x-ray film reports, both before and after removal, were reviewed, and demographic data were collected. Of the 73 patients examined, only 8 had postprocedure reports that differed from the preprocedure reports. Two of these 8 patients required reinsertion of a chest tube to treat the recurrence of a significant pneumothorax. However, the decision to reinsert the chest tube was based on the patient's clinical appearance rather than on the x-ray findings. Chest radiography following the removal of chest tubes should not be a routinely performed procedure, but should preferably be based on the good clinical judgement and discrimination of the surgeon.

  13. Drug induced chest pain—rare but important

    PubMed Central

    Davey, P.; Lalloo, D.

    2000-01-01

    Pericarditis, usually viral in origin, is an infrequent cause of chest pain. Pericarditis due to drug allergy is even less frequent and is thus rarely considered in the differential diagnosis. A case is reported of a woman who presented with severe chest pain, caused by minocycline induced pericarditis. Such allergy may be more common than reported. It is suggested that drug induced pericarditis should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain.


Keywords: chest pain; pericarditis; minocycline; drug allergy PMID:10878205

  14. Chest injuries and the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimiaki; Kobayashi, Michio; Ishibashi, Satoru; Ueda, Shinsaku; Suzuki, Satoshi

    2013-03-01

    Chest injuries caused during a major earthquake remain unclear. We have described profiles of patients with chest injuries who were diagnosed and treated at the area that was most affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 3938 patients who were transferred to the Japanese Red Cross Ishinomaki Hospital during the first week after the earthquake (March 11-17). In total, 77 patients were declared dead on arrival at the hospital. Of the remaining 3861 patients, 42 (1.1%) sustained chest injuries. Diagnosis of the chest injury was based on results of physical examination, chest radiography, and computed tomography. Chest injury was diagnosed in 42 patients, including 22 men and 20 women (age range, 21-99 years). The most common cause of injury was tsunami (n=21), followed by falls (n=9), and traffic accidents (n=1), although this information was missing in 11 cases. The most common type of chest injury was superficial trauma such as laceration and contusion (n=37). Only 5 patients had rib fractures with intrathoracic damages such as pneumothorax (n=3), hemothorax (n=1), and aspiration (n=1). The number of patients with chest injury was surprisingly small. Most patients did not require hospitalization. The small number of survivors with serious chest injuries can most likely be explained by the tsunami caused by the earthquake. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical versus nonsurgical interventions for flail chest.

    PubMed

    Cataneo, Antonio José Maria; Cataneo, Daniele C; de Oliveira, Frederico H S; Arruda, Karine A; El Dib, Regina; de Oliveira Carvalho, Paulo Eduardo

    2015-07-29

    Thoracic trauma (TT) is common among people with multiple traumatic injuries. One of the injuries caused by TT is the loss of thoracic stability resulting from multiple fractures of the rib cage, otherwise known as flail chest (FC). A person with FC can be treated conservatively with orotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation (internal pneumatic stabilization) but may also undergo surgery to fix the costal fractures. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of surgical stabilization compared with clinical management for people with FC. We ran the search on the 12 May 2014. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE Classic and EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO), ISI WOS (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S, and CPSI-SSH), and clinical trials registers. We also screened reference lists and contacted experts. Randomized controlled trials of surgical versus nonsurgical treatment for people diagnosed with FC. Two review authors selected relevant trials, assessed their risk of bias, and extracted data. We included three studies that involved 123 people. The methods used for blinding the participants and researchers to the treatment group were not reported, but as the comparison is surgical treatment with medical treatment this bias is hard to avoid. There was no description of concealment of the randomization sequence in two studies.All three studies reported on mortality, and deaths occurred in two studies. There was no clear evidence of a difference in mortality between treatment groups (risk ratio (RR) 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13 to 2.42); however, the analysis was underpowered to detect a difference between groups. Out of the 123 people randomized and treated, six people died; the causes of death were pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, mediastinitis, and septic shock.Among people randomized to surgery, there were reductions in

  16. Segmentation of the central-chest lymph nodes in 3D MDCT images.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kongkuo; Higgins, William E

    2011-09-01

    Central-chest lymph nodes play a vital role in lung-cancer staging. The definition of lymph nodes from three-dimensional (3D) multidetector computed-tomography (MDCT) images, however, remains an open problem. We propose two methods for computer-based segmentation of the central-chest lymph nodes from a 3D MDCT scan: the single-section live wire and the single-click live wire. For the single-section live wire, the user first applies the standard live wire to a single two-dimensional (2D) section after which automated analysis completes the segmentation process. The single-click live wire is similar but is almost completely automatic. Ground-truth studies involving human 3D MDCT scans demonstrate the robustness, efficiency, and intra-observer and inter-observer reproducibility of the methods.

  17. Effect of Propolis on Experimental Cutaneous Wound Healing in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates clinically the effect of propolis paste on healing of cutaneous wound in dogs. Under general anesthesia and complete aseptic conditions, two full thickness skin wounds (3 cm diameter) were created in each side of the chest in five dogs, one dorsal and one ventral, with 10 cm between them. These wounds were randomly allocated into two groups, control group (10 wounds) and propolis group (10 wounds). Both groups were represented in each dog. The wounds were cleaned with normal saline solution and dressed with macrogol ointment in control group and propolis paste in propolis group, twice daily till complete wound healing. Measurement of the wound area (cm2) was monitored planimetrically at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days after injury. The data were analyzed statistically. The results revealed a significant reduction in the wound surface area in the propolis group after 14 and 21 days compared to control group. The wound reepithelization, contraction, and total wound healing were faster in propolis group than in control group during five weeks of study. In conclusion, propolis paste has a positive impact on cutaneous wound healing and it may be suggested for treating various types of wounds in animals. PMID:26783495

  18. Radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs versus other dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jihye; Keh, Seoyeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Junyoung; Yoon, Junghee

    2013-01-01

    Differential diagnoses for canine liver disease are commonly based on radiographic estimates of liver size, however little has been published on breed variations. Aims of this study were to describe normal radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs and to compare normal measurements for this breed with other dog breeds and Pekingese dogs with liver disease. Liver measurements were compared for clinically normal Pekingese (n = 61), normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic (n = 45), normal nonbrachycephalic (n = 71), and Pekingese breed dogs with liver disease (n = 22). For each dog, body weight, liver length, T11 vertebral length, thoracic depth, and thoracic width were measured on right lateral and ventrodorsal abdominal radiographs. Liver volume was calculated using a formula and ratios of liver length/T11 vertebral length and liver volume/body weight ratio were determined. Normal Pekingese dogs had a significantly smaller liver volume/body weight ratio (16.73 ± 5.67, P < 0.05) than normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic breed dogs (19.54 ± 5.03) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (18.72 ± 6.52). The liver length/T11 vertebral length ratio in normal Pekingese (4.64 ± 0.65) was significantly smaller than normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic breed dogs (5.16 ± 0.74) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (5.40 ± 0.74). Ratios of liver volume/body weight and liver length/T11 vertebral length in normal Pekingese were significantly different from Pekingese with liver diseases (P < 0.05). Findings supported our hypothesis that Pekingese dogs have a smaller normal radiographic liver size than other breeds. We recommend using 4.64× the length of the T11 vertebra as a radiographic criterion for normal liver length in Pekingese dogs. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  19. Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) coordinate their actions in a problem-solving task.

    PubMed

    Bräuer, Juliane; Bös, Milena; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Cooperative hunting is a cognitively challenging activity since individuals have to coordinate movements with a partner and at the same time react to the prey. Domestic dogs evolved from wolves, who engage in cooperative hunting regularly, but it is not clear whether dogs have kept their cooperative hunting skills. We presented pairs of dogs with a reward behind a fence with two openings in it. A sliding door operated by the experimenter could block one opening but not both simultaneously. The dogs needed to coordinate their actions, so that each was in front of a different opening, if one of them was to cross through and get food. All 24 dog pairs solved the problem. In study 1, we demonstrated that dogs understood how the apparatus worked. In study 2, we found that, although the performance of the pairs did not depend on the divisibility of the reward, pairs were quicker at coordinating their actions when both anticipated rewards. However, the dogs did not monitor one another, suggesting that their solutions were achieved by each individual attempting to maximize for itself.

  20. CPDX (Chest Pain Diagnostic Program) - A Decision Support System for the Management of Acute Chest Pain (User’s Manual)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-25

    breathlessness, palpitations, weakness, and response to re-breathing techniques are diagnostic. Chest Pain User’s Manual A-2 In psychoneurotic...fc.--*i3i ^5 L. - " -i--:** 3Ö3| CPDX - A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE CHEST PAIN USER’S MANUAL by Karen...Officer NavSubMedRschLab Summary Page PROBLEM: To provide a user’s manual for the Acute Chest Pain Diagnostic Program (CPDX) for use by a corpsman

  1. Comparison of chest compression quality between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method during CPR.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to grasp difference in quality of chest compression accuracy between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method. Participants were progressed 64 people except 6 absentees among 70 people who agreed to participation with completing the CPR curriculum. In the classification of group in participants, the modified chest compression method was called as smartphone group (33 people). The standardized chest compression method was called as traditional group (31 people). The common equipments in both groups were used Manikin for practice and Manikin for evaluation. In the meantime, the smartphone group for application was utilized Android and iOS Operating System (OS) of 2 smartphone products (G, i). The measurement period was conducted from September 25th to 26th, 2012. Data analysis was used SPSS WIN 12.0 program. As a result of research, the proper compression depth (mm) was shown the proper compression depth (p< 0.01) in traditional group (53.77 mm) compared to smartphone group (48.35 mm). Even the proper chest compression (%) was formed suitably (p< 0.05) in traditional group (73.96%) more than smartphone group (60.51%). As for the awareness of chest compression accuracy, the traditional group (3.83 points) had the higher awareness of chest compression accuracy (p< 0.001) than the smartphone group (2.32 points). In the questionnaire that was additionally carried out 1 question only in smartphone group, the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone had the high negative reason in rescuer for occurrence of hand back pain (48.5%) and unstable posture (21.2%).

  2. Xylitol and Your Dog: Danger, Paws Off

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Xylitol and Your Dog: Danger, Paws Off Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... back to top Why is Xylitol Dangerous to Dogs, but Not People? In both people and dogs, ...

  3. Effects of chest resistance exercise and chest expansion exercise on stroke patients’ respiratory function and trunk control ability

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gui bin; Park, Eun cho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of chest resistance and chest expansion exercises for improving respiratory function and trunk control ability in patients with stroke. [Subjects] Forty patients with stroke were randomly allocated into a chest resistance exercise group (CREG, n = 20) and a chest expansion exercise group (CEEG, n = 20). [Methods] CREG patients underwent chest resistance exercises, and diaphragmatic resistance exercises by way of the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation. CEEG patients underwent respiratory exercises with chest expansion in various positions. Both groups received 30 minutes of training per day, five times per week, for eight weeks. [Results] Both the CERG and CEEG groups showed significant changes in FVC, FEV1, and TIS after the intervention. TIS was significantly increased in the CREG compared to the CEEG after the intervention. [Conclusion] Both chest resistance and chest expansion exercises were effective for improving respiratory function and trunk control ability in stroke patients; however, chest resistance exercise is more efficient for increasing trunk control ability. PMID:26180292

  4. The effect of a chest imaging lecture on emergency department doctors' ability to interpret chest CT images: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Keijzers, Gerben; Sithirasenan, Vasugi

    2012-02-01

    To assess the chest computed tomography (CT) imaging interpreting skills of emergency department (ED) doctors and to study the effect of a CT chest imaging interpretation lecture on these skills. Sixty doctors in two EDs were randomized, using computerized randomization, to either attend a chest CT interpretation lecture or not to attend this lecture. Within 2 weeks of the lecture, the participants completed a questionnaire on demographic variables, anatomical knowledge, and diagnostic interpretation of 10 chest CT studies. Outcome measures included anatomical knowledge score, diagnosis score, and the combined overall score, all expressed as a percentage of correctly answered questions (0-100). Data on 58 doctors were analyzed, of which 27 were randomized to attend the lecture. The CT interpretation lecture did not have an effect on anatomy knowledge scores (72.9 vs. 70.2%), diagnosis scores (71.2 vs. 69.2%), or overall scores (71.4 vs. 69.5%). Twenty-nine percent of doctors stated that they had a systematic approach to chest CT interpretation. Overall self-perceived competency for interpreting CT imaging (brain, chest, abdomen) was low (between 3.2 and 5.2 on a 10-point Visual Analogue Scale). A single chest CT interpretation lecture did not improve chest CT interpretation by ED doctors. Less than one-third of doctors had a systematic approach to chest CT interpretation. A standardized systematic approach may improve interpretation skills.

  5. A 15-year-old boy with anterior chest pain, progressive dyspnea, and subcutaneous emphysema of the neck.

    PubMed

    Scichilone, Nicola; Buttacavoli, Maria; Camarda, Gaetana; Marchese, Margherita; Bellia, Maria; Spatafora, Mario

    2009-01-01

    We describe the case of an adolescent who was admitted to the hospital because of sudden occurrence of chest pain, dyspnea and subcutaneous emphysema. On admission, physical examination revealed subcutaneous crepitations in the superior part of the rib cage, and auscultation of the chest showed widespread wheezing. The radiological assessment confirmed the diagnosis of pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. A follow-up CT scan performed one week after the admission showed almost complete resolution of the radiological alterations. At the following visits, the patient was asymptomatic, but reported to have suffered from frequent episodes of rhinorrea, sneezing, nasal blockage, and sometimes, chest tightness, especially during exposure to pets and/or windy weather. Skin prick testing showed sensitivities to dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and farinae, grass pollen and dog dander. Spirometry documented significant improvement in lung function after short-acting bronchodilator, allowing for the diagnosis of asthma to be made. Although pneumomediastinum may be a complication of various respiratory diseases, including asthma, it has never been reported as the first presentation of underlying bronchial asthma. Herein, the physiopathological mechanisms, the diagnostic procedures and treatment of pneumomediastinum in asthma are discussed. We suggest that the diagnosis of asthma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pneumomediastinum in adolescence.

  6. Human-dog interactions in a guide-dog training program.

    PubMed

    Koda, N; Shimoju, S

    1999-06-01

    We analyzed dyadic interactions between 12 neutered dogs (6 females and 6 males) and 44 humans (20 women, 14 men, and 10 girls) who were unfamiliar with each other. We also examined the effect of sex differences in dogs and humans as well as age differences in humans on human-dog interactions in a guide-dog training program. Female dogs more actively regulated their distance from humans than male dogs. Dogs made contact with women more frequently than with men, and men made contact with dogs more frequently than women. Girls initiated interactions with dogs more frequently than women; girls formed reciprocal interactions with dogs less frequently than women.

  7. Cutaneous toxoplasmosis in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Aline Rodrigues; Cadieu, Jennifer; Kiupel, Matti; Lim, Ailam; Bolin, Steve R; Mansell, Joanne

    2012-05-01

    Cutaneous toxoplasmosis has been previously reported in human beings, rarely reported in cats, and reported in 1 dog with systemic toxoplasmosis. The present report describes 2 cases of cutaneous toxoplasmosis in 2 dogs treated with immunosuppressive therapy. One of the dogs developed generalized cutaneous pustules and pruritus, and the other dog only had a single subcutaneous nodule. Microscopically, skin biopsies showed moderate to severe pyogranulomatous and necrotizing dermatitis and panniculitis, with multifocal vasculitis and vascular thrombosis. Single or aggregates of protozoal tachyzoites were mostly intracytoplasmic and occasionally extracellular. The etiology was confirmed in both cases by immunohistochemistry and by polymerase chain reaction assays, which were followed by nucleic acid sequencing. Both patients were treated with clindamycin. The dog with generalized lesions developed pulmonary and neurological signs and was euthanized. The dog with a single nodule recovered completely with no remission of cutaneous lesions.

  8. The Open University Opens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunstall, Jeremy, Ed.

    Conceived by the British Labor Government in the 1960's the Open University was viewed as a way to extend higher education to Britain's working class, but enrollment figures in classes that represent traditional academic disciplines show that the student population is predominantly middle class. Bringing education into the home presents numerous…

  9. Effective dose to patients from chest examinations with tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Båth, Magnus; Svalkvist, Angelica; von Wrangel, Alexa; Rismyhr-Olsson, Heidi; Cederblad, Ake

    2010-01-01

    Chest tomosynthesis, which refers to the principle of collecting low-dose projections of the chest at different angles and using these projections to reconstruct section images of the chest, is an imaging technique recently introduced to health care. The main purpose of the present work was to determine the average effective dose to patients from clinical use of chest tomosynthesis. Exposure data for two chest radiography laboratories with tomosynthesis option (Definium 8000 with VolumeRAD option, GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK) were registered for 20 patients with a weight between 60 and 80 kg (average weight of 70.2 kg). The recorded data were used in the Monte Carlo program PCXMC 2.0 (STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland) to determine the average effective dose for each projection. The effective dose for the chest tomosynthesis examination, including a scout view and the tomosynthesis acquisition, was finally obtained by adding the effective doses from all projections. Using the weighting factors given in ICRP 103, the average effective dose for the examination was found to be 0.13 mSv, whereas the average effective dose for the conventional two-view chest radiography examination was 0.05 mSv. A conversion factor of 0.26 mSv Gy(-1) cm(-2) was found suitable for determining the effective dose from a VolumeRAD chest tomosynthesis examination from the total registered kerma-area product. In conclusion, the effective dose to a standard-sized patient (170 cm/70 kg) from a VolumeRAD chest tomosynthesis examination is ~2 % of an average chest CT and only two to three times the effective dose from the conventional two-view chest radiography examination.

  10. [Chest physiotherapy techniques - can they reduce hyperinflation].

    PubMed

    Perez Bogerd, S; Selleron, B; Hotton, R; Ferrali, O; Sergysels, R

    2009-12-01

    The authors review the literature concerning the possibilities of modifying the mechanical characteristics of the respiratory system with breathing retraining and other chest physiotherapy intervention. Breathing retraining techniques with prolonged and active expiration induce increased work of breathing and do not help diaphragmatic function. Only pursed lips breathing seems to produce some mechanical advantages. The seated and forward position with fixed arms may reduce dyspnea but this does not appear to be caused by a decrease in operating lung volumes. By contrast, the dorsal decubitus position may reduce hyperinflation, giving some mechanical advantage to the diaphragm but does not reduce dyspnea and is not a position spontaneously adopted by patients. General muscular training may reduce ventilatory demand, and by reducing respiratory frequency lead to a decrease in the end expiratory lung volume; therefore inducing improvement in exercise tolerance.

  11. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Smith, H Garth; Sargent, Larry A; Lundgrin, Daryl B

    2006-01-27

    Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma is a rare disease that usually presents with indurated yellow red nodules or plaques in the dermis or subdermal tissues. The pathogenesis of this disease is unknown and the limited number of cases has made long-term studies difficult. We report the case of a 61-year-old woman seen in our office for a 5 x 5-cm lesion of her chest wall. Biopsies established a diagnosis of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. The patient received 4 months of intralesional steroid injections without change in the lesion. The patient was also treated with colchicine for several months without improvement. Therefore, the lesion was surgically excised and the area was reconstructed with local advancement skin flaps. The patient has been followed for 2 years with no evidence of recurrence.

  12. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  13. Relevance of an incidental chest finding

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Télles, Arturo; Mendoza, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodule represents 0.2% of incidental findings in routine chest X-ray images. One of the main diagnoses includes lung cancer in which small-cell subtype has a poor survival rate. Recently, a new classification has been proposed including the very limited disease stage (VLD stage) or T1-T2N0M0 with better survival rate, specifically in those patients who are treated with surgery. However, current recommendations postulate that surgery remains controversial as a first-line treatment in this stage. We present the case of a 46-year-old female referred to our hospital with a preoperative diagnosis of a solitary pulmonary nodule. On initial approach, a biopsy revealed a small cell lung cancer. She received multimodal therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, and prophylactic cranial irradiation and is currently alive without recurrence on a 2-year follow-up. PMID:22345914

  14. Management of chest trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Juan A; Vazquez, Juan J

    2013-06-01

    Chest trauma in children is caused by high-energy blows, due in general to traffic accidents, that involve several other body regions. They occur mainly in the first decade of life and can be penetrating but are more often non-penetrating. Rib fractures and lung contusions, sometimes associated with pneumothorax or haemothorax, are the more usual injuries, but tracheobronchial rupture, cardiac, oesophageal or diaphragmatic injuries may also occur. These injuries are treated with supportive respiratory and haemodynamic measures, drainage of air or blood from the pleural space and, at times, surgical repair of the injured organ(s). Ruptures of the airway may be difficult to treat and occasionally require suture, anastomosis or resection. Oesophageal injuries can be treated conservatively with antibiotics, drainage and parenteral nutrition. Diaphragmatic tears should be repaired operatively. Overall mortality ranges from 6 to 20%. Mortality is high but this is mainly due to the associated presence of extra-thoracic trauma, and particularly to head injuries.

  15. An atypical cause of atypical chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Zaheen, Ahmad; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Gudgeon, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The present report describes a case involving a 57-year-old HIV-positive man who presented with acute retrosternal chest pain accompanied by 24 h of fever. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint was diagnosed based on magnetic resonance imaging findings in addition to Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. To the authors’ knowledge, the present case is only the 12th reported case of manubriosternal septic arthritis, and the first in an HIV-positive patient. Early diagnosis and treatment can circumvent the need for surgical intervention. Based on the present case report and review of the literature, the authors summarize the epidemiology, appropriate imaging and suggestions for antibiotic therapy for this rare presentation. PMID:25371686

  16. Pitfalls and variants in pediatric chest imaging.

    PubMed

    García Asensio, D; Fernández Martín, M

    2016-05-01

    Most pitfalls in the interpretation of pediatric chest imaging are closely related with the technique used and the characteristics of pediatric patients. To obtain a quality image that will enable the correct diagnosis, it is very important to use an appropriate technique. It is important to know how technical factors influence the image and to be aware of the possible artifacts that can result from poor patient cooperation. Moreover, radiologists need to be familiar with the normal anatomy in children, with the classic radiologic findings, and with the anatomic and developmental variants to avoid misinterpreting normal findings as pathological. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    PubMed Central

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs’ abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human’s goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs’ behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs’ behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs’ neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human’s vocal communication and the presence

  18. Is your dog empathic? Developing a Dog Emotional Reactivity Survey

    PubMed Central

    Szánthó, Flóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' seemingly empathic behaviour attracts general and scientific attention alike. Behaviour tests are usually not sufficiently realistic to evoke empathic-like behaviour; therefore we decided to ask owners about their experiences with their dogs in emotionally loaded situations. Owners from Hungary (N = 591) and from Germany (N = 2283) were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1–5 Likert scale with statements about the reactivity of their dogs to their emotions and to other dogs’ behaviour. We created two scales with satisfactory internal reliability: reactivity to the owner’s emotion and reactivity to other dogs’ behaviour. Based on an owner-dog personality matching theory, we hypothesised that the owner’s empathy, as measured by the subscale on the cooperativeness character factor of the human personality, will correlate with their dog’s emotional reactivity in emotionally loaded situations. In addition we also examined how anthropomorphism, contagious yawning, attitude toward the dog are related to emotional reactivity in dogs as perceived by the owner. In addition we examined how owners rate dog pictures. We found that the scale scores were largely independent from demographic and environmental variables like breed, sex, age, age at acquiring, keeping practices, training experiences and owner's age. However, anthropomorphic and emotional attitude of the owners probably biased the responses. In the German sample more empathic owners reported to have more emotionally reactive dog, as expected by the personality matching theory. More empathic owners reported to have fewer problems with their dogs and they rated a puppy picture as more cute in both countries. 62% of owners from Hungary and 36% of owner from Germany agreed with the statement “My dog is more important for me than any human being”. In Germany, more empathic owners agreed less with this statement and indicated that their dogs have a tendency for contagious yawning. Owners whose

  19. Chest compression rate measurement from smartphone video.

    PubMed

    Engan, Kjersti; Hinna, Thomas; Ryen, Tom; Birkenes, Tonje S; Myklebust, Helge

    2016-08-11

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a life threatening situation where the first person performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) most often is a bystander without medical training. Some existing smartphone apps can call the emergency number and provide for example global positioning system (GPS) location like Hjelp 113-GPS App by the Norwegian air ambulance. We propose to extend functionality of such apps by using the built in camera in a smartphone to capture video of the CPR performed, primarily to estimate the duration and rate of the chest compression executed, if any. All calculations are done in real time, and both the caller and the dispatcher will receive the compression rate feedback when detected. The proposed algorithm is based on finding a dynamic region of interest in the video frames, and thereafter evaluating the power spectral density by computing the fast fourier transform over sliding windows. The power of the dominating frequencies is compared to the power of the frequency area of interest. The system is tested on different persons, male and female, in different scenarios addressing target compression rates, background disturbances, compression with mouth-to-mouth ventilation, various background illuminations and phone placements. All tests were done on a recording Laerdal manikin, providing true compression rates for comparison. Overall, the algorithm is seen to be promising, and it manages a number of disturbances and light situations. For target rates at 110 cpm, as recommended during CPR, the mean error in compression rate (Standard dev. over tests in parentheses) is 3.6 (0.8) for short hair bystanders, and 8.7 (6.0) including medium and long haired bystanders. The presented method shows that it is feasible to detect the compression rate of chest compressions performed by a bystander by placing the smartphone close to the patient, and using the built-in camera combined with a video processing algorithm performed real-time on the device.

  20. Adapting to the human world: dogs' responsiveness to our social cues.

    PubMed

    Reid, Pamela J

    2009-03-01

    Dogs are more skilful than a host of other species at tasks which require they respond to human communicative gestures in order to locate hidden food. Four basic interpretations for this proficiency surface from distilling the research findings. One possibility is that dogs simply have more opportunity than other species to learn to be responsive to human social cues. A different analysis suggests that the domestication process provided an opening for dogs to apply general cognitive problem-solving skills to a novel social niche. Some researchers go beyond this account and propose that dogs' co-evolution with humans equipped them with a theory of mind for social exchanges. Finally, a more prudent approach suggests that sensitivity to the behaviours of both humans and conspecifics would be particularly advantageous for a social scavenger like the dog. A predisposition to attend to human actions allows for rapid early learning of the association between gestures and the availability of food.

  1. Transdiaphragmatic pericardiectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, M; Kitshoff, A; Devriendt, N; Or, M; Rubio-Guzman, A; de Rooster, H

    2017-01-28

    In patients with recurrent pericardial effusions, pericardiectomy is indicated. The purpose of this study was to describe a transdiaphragmatic approach for subtotal pericardiectomy in dogs and to evaluate its feasibility. In total, 20 canine cadavers weighing less than 10 kg (group S) and 20 weighing more than 20 kg (group L) were used. Within each group, half underwent a subphrenic pericardiectomy via an intercostal approach and half via a transdiaphragmatic approach. For each approach and within each weight group, the percentage of resected pericardium was calculated and compared. Additionally, a case series of nine consecutive client-owned dogs that underwent a transdiaphragmatic pericardiectomy for pericardial effusion was reported. Exposure of pericardium and associated phrenic nerves was excellent in cadavers and clinical patients. In group S, the percentage of resected pericardium was not significantly different between the two approaches. In group L, on the other hand, the percentage of resected pericardium was lower with the transdiaphragmatic approach compared with the intercostal approach (P=0.001). In the clinical patients, no intraoperative complications were encountered and no recurrence of pericardial effusion was seen. Subtotal pericardiectomy via a transdiaphragmatic approach is straightforward and a safe surgical procedure to obtain permanent pericardial drainage in small and large breed dogs. British Veterinary Association.

  2. Chronic pancreatitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watson, Penny

    2012-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis used to be considered uncommon in dogs, but recent pathological and clinical studies have confirmed that it is in fact a common and clinically significant disease. Clinical signs can vary from low-grade recurrent gastrointestinal signs to acute exacerbations that are indistinguishable from classical acute pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a significant cause of chronic pain in dogs, which must not be underestimated. It also results in progressive impairment of endocrine and exocrine function and the eventual development of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or both in some affected dogs at end stage. The etiology is unknown in most cases. Chronic pancreatitis shows an increased prevalence in certain breeds, and recent work in English Cocker Spaniels suggests it is part of a polysystemic immune-mediated disease in this breed. The histological and clinical appearance is different in different breeds, suggesting that etiologies may also be different. Diagnosis is challenging because the sensitivities of the available noninvasive tests are relatively low. However, with an increased index of suspicion, clinicians will recognize more cases that will allow them to institute supportive treatment to improve the quality of life of the patient.

  3. Dog Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parker, John C.

    1973-01-01

    Dog red blood cells (RBC) lack a ouabain-sensitive sodium pump, and yet they are capable of volume regulation in vivo. The present study was designed to find in vitro conditions under which dog RBC could transport sodium outward, against an electrochemical gradient. Cells were first loaded with sodium chloride and water by preincubation in hypertonic saline. They were then incubated at 37°C in media containing physiologic concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, glucose, and calcium. The cells returned to a normal salt and water content in 16–20 h. Without calcium in the medium the cells continued slowly to accumulate sodium. Removal of glucose caused rapid swelling and lysis, whether or not calcium was present. The net efflux of sodium showed a close relationship to medium calcium over a concentration range from 0 to 5 mM. Extrusion of salt and water was also demonstrated in fresh RBC (no hypertonic preincubation) when calcium levels in the media were sufficiently raised. The ion and water movements in these experiments were not influenced by ouabain or by removal of extracellular potassium. Magnesium could not substitute for calcium. It is concluded that dog RBC have an energy-dependent mechanism for extruding sodium chloride which requires external calcium and is quite distinct from the sodium-potassium exchange pump. PMID:4722565

  4. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Bronchitis (Chest Cold)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glossary For Patients Common Illnesses Bronchitis (Chest Cold) Common Cold & Runny Nose Ear Infection Influenza (Flu) Sinus Infection ( ... you cough. Acute bronchitis, often called a “chest cold,” is the most common type of bronchitis. The symptoms last less than ...

  5. Interpretation of the neonatal chest X-ray.

    PubMed

    Barnes, N; Pilling, D W

    1999-11-01

    Most neonatal X-rays are seen initially by a paediatrician without formal training in interpretation of chest X-rays. This article aims to help improve the information obtained from these X-rays which are often complex. Many factors affect accurate interpretation of the neonatal chest X-ray, including good quality radiographs, appropriate viewing conditions and thorough education.

  6. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture is a chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and ... visible in the middle of the chest. The x-ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, ...

  7. Sexual, Physical, Verbal/Emotional Abuse and Unexplained Chest Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslick, Guy D.; Koloski, Natasha A.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one third of patients with non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) report a history of abuse, however no data exists on the prevalence of abuse among people with unexplained chest pain in the general population. We aimed to determine if there is a relationship between childhood sexual, physical, emotional abuse and unexplained…

  8. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms. 37.50 Section 37.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest...

  9. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms. 37.50 Section 37.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest...

  10. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms. 37.50 Section 37.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest...

  11. Coping in Chest Pain Patients with and without Psychiatric Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitaliano, Peter P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined relations between psychiatric disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) in 77 patients with chest pain, and compared coping profiles of chest pain patients with and without psychiatric disorders and CHD. Psychiatric patients with no medical disease were also studied. Results are discussed in the context of illness behavior and…

  12. Tamponade Relief by Active Clearance of Chest Tubes.

    PubMed

    Vistarini, Nicola; Gabrysz-Forget, Fanny; Beaulieu, Yanick; Perrault, Louis P

    2016-03-01

    Chest tubes are used in every case of cardiac surgery to evacuate shed blood from around the heart and lungs. Chest tubes can become partially or totally occluded, leading to tamponade. The purpose of this article is to discuss a novel method of maintaining chest tube patency in the early recovery after cardiothoracic surgery. The PleuraFlow Active Clearance Technology is a system to prevent chest tube clogging that can be used to help routinely maintain chest tube patency at the bedside in the intensive care unit. A patient exhibited physiologic tamponade that was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. The chest tube was successfully reopened by actively clearing the chest tube using Active Clearance Technology, resulting in resolution of the tamponade. The present study reports the case of a patient with massive postoperative pericardial effusion with tamponade, successfully managed by active clearance chest tube. Further studies will help define the role for this technology in routine cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute posteroinferior wall myocardial infarction secondary to football chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, R; Badui, E; Castaño, R; Madrid, R

    1985-12-01

    Myocardial infarction secondary to nonpenetrating chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a sportsman who developed an acute transmural posteroinferior wall myocardial infarction due to chest trauma by a football. The angiographic study revealed total obstruction of the proximal right coronary artery.

  14. Sexual, Physical, Verbal/Emotional Abuse and Unexplained Chest Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslick, Guy D.; Koloski, Natasha A.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one third of patients with non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) report a history of abuse, however no data exists on the prevalence of abuse among people with unexplained chest pain in the general population. We aimed to determine if there is a relationship between childhood sexual, physical, emotional abuse and unexplained…

  15. Management of chest drainage tubes after lung surgery.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yukitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Since chest tubes have been routinely used to drain the pleural space, particularly after lung surgery, the management of chest tubes is considered to be essential for the thoracic surgeon. The pleural drainage system requires effective drainage, suction, and water-sealing. Another key point of chest tube management is that a water seal is considered to be superior to suction for most air leaks. Nowadays, the most common pleural drainage device attached to the chest tube is the three-bottle system. An electronic chest drainage system has been developed that is effective in standardizing the postoperative management of chest tubes. More liberal use of digital drainage devices in the postoperative management of the pleural space is warranted. The removal of chest tubes is a common procedure occurring almost daily in hospitals throughout the world. Extraction of the tube is usually done at the end of full inspiration or at the end of full expiration. The tube removal technique is not as important as how it is done and the preparation for the procedure. The management of chest tubes must be based on careful observation, the patient's characteristics, and the operative procedures that had been performed.

  16. Penetrating cardiac injuries in blunt chest wall trauma.

    PubMed

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Menezes, Ritesh G; Sirohi, Parmendra

    2012-08-01

    The present photocase illustrates the possible mechanism of direct cardiac injuries from broken sharp jagged fractured ends of ribs in blunt force trauma to the chest in run over traffic mishaps. We propose that the projecting fractured ends of the ribs penetrate the underlying thoracic organs due to the transient phenomenon of deformation of chest cavity under pressure in run over traffic mishaps.

  17. Use of chest sonography in acute-care radiology().

    PubMed

    De Luca, C; Valentino, M; Rimondi, M R; Branchini, M; Baleni, M Casadio; Barozzi, L

    2008-12-01

    Diagnosis of acute lung disease is a daily challenge for radiologists working in acute-care areas. It is generally based on the results of chest radiography performed under technically unfavorable conditions. Computed tomography (CT) is undoubtedly more accurate in these cases, but it cannot always be performed on critically ill patients who need continuous care.The use of thoracic ultrasonography (US) has recently been proposed for the study of acute lung disease. It can be carried out rapidly at the bedside and does not require any particularly sophisticated equipment. This report analyzes our experience with chest sonography as a supplement to chest radiography in an Emergency Radiology Unit. We performed chest sonography - as an adjunct to chest radiography - on 168 patients with acute chest pathology. Static and dynamic US signs were analyzed in light of radiographic findings and, when possible, CT. The use of chest US improved the authors' ability to provide confident diagnoses of acute disease of the chest and lungs.

  18. Olfactory esthesioneuroblastoma treated with orthovoltage radiotherapy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ueno, H; Kobayashi, Y; Yamada, K

    2007-07-01

    A 13-year-old neutered female mongrel dog presented with a 1-year history of stertorous respiration. On computed tomography examination, a mass was demonstrated in the nasal cavity. Open biopsy of the mass was performed and a diagnosis of olfactory esthesioneuroblastoma was made on histological examination. The dog was treated with orthovoltage x-ray radiation (total dose; 53 Gy given in 14 fractions over an 8 week period). Computed tomography after the twelfth irradiation revealed that tumour size had decreased. Although clinical signs were absent in the 4 months after irradiation, re-growth of the tumour was detected by radiographic evaluation and histological examination. The dog was again treated with orthovoltage x-ray radiation (total dose; 30 Gy given in three fractions over a 4-week period), however, tumour regrowth was again detected 3 months later. Clinical treatment of this tumour type has not been previously reported.

  19. Multidisciplinary Oncoplastic Approach Reduces Infection in Chest Wall Resection and Reconstruction for Malignant Chest Wall Tumors.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Haitham H; Malahias, Marco N; Balasubramanian, Balapathiran; Djearaman, Madava G; Naidu, Babu; Grainger, Melvin F; Kalkat, Maninder

    2016-07-01

    Management of complex thoracic defects post tumor extipiration is challenging because of the nature of pathology, the radical approach, and the insertion of prosthetic material required for biomechanical stability. Wound complications pose a significant problem that can have detrimental effect on patient outcome. The authors outline an institutional experience of a multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic approach to improve outcomes. Prospectively collected data from 71 consecutive patients treated with chest wall resection and reconstruction were analyzed (2009-2015). The demographic data, comorbidities, operative details, and outcomes with special focus on wound infection were recorded. All patients were managed in a multidisciplinary approach to optimize perioperative surgical planning. Pathology included sarcoma (78%), locally advanced breast cancer (15%), and desmoids (6%), with age ranging from 17 to 82 years (median, 42 years) and preponderance of female patients (n = 44). Chest wall defects were located anterior and anterolateral (77.5%), posterior (8.4%), and apical axillary (10%) with skeletal defect size ranging from 56 to 600 cm(2) (mean, 154 cm(2)). Bony reconstruction was performed using polyprolene mesh, methyl methacrylate prosthesis, and titanium plates. Soft tissue reconstructions depended on size, location, and flap availability and were achieved using regional, distant, and free tissue flaps. The postoperative follow-up ranged from 5 to 70 months (median, 32 months). All flaps survived with good functional and aesthetic outcome, whereas 2 patients experienced surgical site infection (2.8%). Multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic maximizes outcome for patients with large resection of chest wall tumors with reduction in surgical site infection and wound complications particularly in association with rigid skeletal chest wall reconstruction.

  20. Multidisciplinary Oncoplastic Approach Reduces Infection in Chest Wall Resection and Reconstruction for Malignant Chest Wall Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malahias, Marco N.; Balasubramanian, Balapathiran; Djearaman, Madava G.; Naidu, Babu; Grainger, Melvin F.; Kalkat, Maninder

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of complex thoracic defects post tumor extipiration is challenging because of the nature of pathology, the radical approach, and the insertion of prosthetic material required for biomechanical stability. Wound complications pose a significant problem that can have detrimental effect on patient outcome. The authors outline an institutional experience of a multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic approach to improve outcomes. Methods: Prospectively collected data from 71 consecutive patients treated with chest wall resection and reconstruction were analyzed (2009–2015). The demographic data, comorbidities, operative details, and outcomes with special focus on wound infection were recorded. All patients were managed in a multidisciplinary approach to optimize perioperative surgical planning. Results: Pathology included sarcoma (78%), locally advanced breast cancer (15%), and desmoids (6%), with age ranging from 17 to 82 years (median, 42 years) and preponderance of female patients (n = 44). Chest wall defects were located anterior and anterolateral (77.5%), posterior (8.4%), and apical axillary (10%) with skeletal defect size ranging from 56 to 600 cm2 (mean, 154 cm2). Bony reconstruction was performed using polyprolene mesh, methyl methacrylate prosthesis, and titanium plates. Soft tissue reconstructions depended on size, location, and flap availability and were achieved using regional, distant, and free tissue flaps. The postoperative follow-up ranged from 5 to 70 months (median, 32 months). All flaps survived with good functional and aesthetic outcome, whereas 2 patients experienced surgical site infection (2.8%). Conclusions: Multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic maximizes outcome for patients with large resection of chest wall tumors with reduction in surgical site infection and wound complications particularly in association with rigid skeletal chest wall reconstruction. PMID:27536488

  1. Diffuse optical tomography in the presence of a chest wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Han Y.; Busch, David R.; Pathak, Saurav; Moscatelli, Frank A.; Machida, Manabu; Schotland, John C.; Markel, Vadim A.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2013-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has been employed to derive spatial maps of physiologically important chromophores in the human breast, but the fidelity of these images is often compromised by boundary effects such as those due to the chest wall. We explore the image quality in fast, data-intensive analytic and algebraic linear DOT reconstructions of phantoms with subcentimeter target features and large absorptive regions mimicking the chest wall. Experiments demonstrate that the chest wall phantom can introduce severe image artifacts. We then show how these artifacts can be mitigated by exclusion of data affected by the chest wall. We also introduce and demonstrate a linear algebraic reconstruction method well suited for very large data sets in the presence of a chest wall.

  2. A rare cause of misdiagnosis in chest X-ray

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Mendoza, Carlos Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Chest X-ray is a usual tool for family physicians; however, unexpected findings in chest X-ray are a frequent challenge. We present a rare case of pulmonary hilar nodule misdiagnosis in a chest X-ray. An 84-year-old woman was sent with a diagnosis of a right pulmonary hilum nodule. She had a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; so in a chest X-ray, her family physician discovered a “nodule” in her right lung hilum. Her physical exam was not relevant. In our hospital, a thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan verified the mass in the right pulmonary hilum; nevertheless, in a coronal CT scan, the “hilum lump” was the tortuous descending aorta that created an angle. This case illustrates how anatomical changes associated with vascular aging may cause this exceptional pitfall in chest X-ray. PMID:28217605

  3. Chest wall reconstruction in a pediatric patient with ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Raja; Peralta, Mat; Perez, Ramiro; Rosenkranz, Eliot R; Panthaki, Zubin J

    2010-08-01

    Ectopia cordis is defined as a congenital malposition of the heart outside of the thoracic cavity. It is a rare condition, and complete ectopia cordis can be a fatal condition. Successful surgical reconstruction of this defect has been reported but is uncommon. The general approach to reconstructing the chest wall involves repositioning the heart and providing adequate coverage of the chest wall defect. We describe our experience with a patient who had complete thoracic ectopia cordis treated with staged chest wall reconstruction. The first stage involved temporary closure with synthetic material, and the second stage involved definitive reconstruction with autologous bone and cartilage grafts supported with plates. The patient has been active and without complaints since the second stage and is awaiting tracheal decannulation. There have been a few descriptions of how to approach chest wall reconstruction in patients with ectopia cordis. The 2 stage method described can be considered to repair the chest wall defect in complete thoracic ectopia cordis.

  4. Surgical Management of Lung Cancer Involving the Chest Wall.

    PubMed

    Lanuti, Michael

    2017-05-01

    The prevalence of chest wall invasion by non-small cell lung cancer is < 10% in published surgical series. The role of radiation or chemotherapy around the complete resection of lung cancer invading the chest wall, excluding the superior sulcus of the chest, is poorly defined. Survival of patients with lung cancer invading the chest wall is dependent on lymph node involvement and completeness of en-bloc resection. In some patients harboring T3N0 disease, 5-year survival in excess of 50% can be achieved. Offering en-bloc resection of lung cancer invading chest wall to patients with T3N1 or T3N2 disease is controversial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diffuse optical tomography in the presence of a chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David R.; Pathak, Saurav; Moscatelli, Frank A.; Machida, Manabu; Schotland, John C.; Markel, Vadim A.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has been employed to derive spatial maps of physiologically important chromophores in the human breast, but the fidelity of these images is often compromised by boundary effects such as those due to the chest wall. We explore the image quality in fast, data-intensive analytic and algebraic linear DOT reconstructions of phantoms with subcentimeter target features and large absorptive regions mimicking the chest wall. Experiments demonstrate that the chest wall phantom can introduce severe image artifacts. We then show how these artifacts can be mitigated by exclusion of data affected by the chest wall. We also introduce and demonstrate a linear algebraic reconstruction method well suited for very large data sets in the presence of a chest wall. PMID:23392384

  6. Collection Development "Dog Care & Training": The Well-Behaved Dog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpi, Kristine M.; Sherman, Barbara L.

    2008-01-01

    Dogs are indeed people's best friends. A majority of owners report that their dog is a "member of the family," and that acceptable canine behavior and optimal care are high priorities for them. The human-animal bond, the close connection between people and their pets, is forged by positive interactions, but unacceptable canine behaviors that…

  7. Collection Development "Dog Care & Training": The Well-Behaved Dog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpi, Kristine M.; Sherman, Barbara L.

    2008-01-01

    Dogs are indeed people's best friends. A majority of owners report that their dog is a "member of the family," and that acceptable canine behavior and optimal care are high priorities for them. The human-animal bond, the close connection between people and their pets, is forged by positive interactions, but unacceptable canine behaviors that…

  8. Does training make you smarter? The effects of training on dogs' performance (Canis familiaris) in a problem solving task.

    PubMed

    Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Valsecchi, Paola; Petak, Irena; Accorsi, Pier Attilio; Previde, Emanuela Prato

    2008-07-01

    This study investigates the influence of training experiences on dogs' performance in a problem solving task, namely opening a box to obtain food. One hundred and eighteen dogs allocated to two different groups according to their training experience (no/basic training vs high level training) were tested. In each group the dogs saw the researcher manipulating either the paw-pad or the lid, prior to being allowed free access to the apparatus. No effect of the locus of manipulation was observed. However, there was a strong effect of training on the dogs' performance regardless of manipulation condition. Compared to untrained dogs, highly trained dogs were more successful in opening the box and spent significantly more time interacting with the apparatus; whereas untrained dogs spent significantly more time looking back at their owners and the researcher. These results indicate that high levels of training improve dogs' problem solving ability, with dogs appearing to be more proactive in the their interaction with novel objects.

  9. The role of postoperative chest radiography in pediatric tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J S; Sulek, M; de Jong, A; Friedman, E M

    2001-07-30

    A postoperative chest radiograph has traditionally been obtained after tracheotomies to evaluate for the presence of a pneumothorax and to assess tube position. Several recent studies in adults have questioned the usefulness of routine postoperative chest radiography in uncomplicated cases, but the role of post-operative chest radiography in pediatric patients has not been previously reviewed. We performed this study to examine the clinical utility of post-tracheotomy chest radiography in pediatric patients and determine if this routine practice impacts patient management enough to merit continued usage. A retrospective review was performed of 200 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent tracheotomies by the otolaryngology service in a tertiary care pediatric hospital from January 1994 to June 1999. All patients received postoperative chest radiographs. Five of 200 patients had a new postoperative radiographic finding, with three requiring interventions. Two patients required chest tube placement for pneumothorax, and one patient required tracheostomy tube change for repositioning. Fifty-one patients, including both pneumothoraces, exhibited clinical signs of pneumothorax (decreased breath sounds or oxygen saturation) in the immediate postoperative period. Chest X-ray ruled out a pneumothorax in the remaining 49 patients. The majority of these 51 patients were less than 2 years old (94%, P=0.002) or weighed less than 17 kg (89%, P=0.004). Postoperative chest X-rays yielded clinically relevant information in 168 patients that fell into one or more of four high risk categories: age less than 2, weight less than 17 kg, emergent procedures, or concomitant central line placement. Avoiding chest X-rays in the remaining 32 patients would have resulted in potential savings of $5000, which does not reflect the actuarial cost of a missed complication. Since the majority of our patients (84%) fell into a high-risk category, we feel it would be prudent to continue

  10. Insulin/glucose infusion successfully resuscitates bupivacaine-induced sudden-onset circulatory collapse in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Kook-Hyun; Kim, Chong-Soo; Yang, Solmon; Uugangerel, Teserendorj; Kim, Chong-Min; Kang, Byeong-Chul

    2013-05-01

    In previous studies, insulin reversed the cardiac toxicity gradually induced by a continuous infusion of bupivacaine. In this randomized controlled study, we intended to simulate a more relevant clinical situation by injecting bupivacaine rapidly as a bolus to induce sudden-onset circulatory collapse in dogs. We then evaluated the insulin effect. Bupivacaine (10 mg.kg(-1) iv) was rapidly administered intravenously to 12 dogs. At the onset of circulatory collapse (defined as a mean arterial pressure [MAP] of 30 mmHg), external chest compression was initiated. Insulin (2 U.kg(-1) iv) was given to the insulin-glucose (IG) group (n = 6) and the same volume of 0.9% saline was given to the control (C) group (n = 6). The primary outcome was successful resuscitation defined as both MAP ≥ 60 mmHg and sinus rhythm on an electrocardiogram that lasted ≥ 60 sec. Hemodynamic and blood variables were measured, including cardiac output and electrocardiogram intervals. All IG dogs were successfully resuscitated within 15 (3) min, whereas none of the control dogs were resuscitated (P = 0.002). After circulatory collapse, the average MAP was higher in group IG than in group C (P = 0.006). Insulin effectively reversed the sudden-onset circulatory collapse in dogs caused by an intravenous bolus injection of bupivacaine.

  11. Effects of the novel antimigraine agent, frovatriptan, on coronary and cardiac function in dogs.

    PubMed

    Parsons, A A; Valocik, R; Koster, P; Raval, P; Gagnon, R; Tilford, N; Feuerstein, G

    1998-12-01

    The effects of frovatriptan (VML 251/SB-209509) on coronary artery function were investigated in isolated coronary arteries from beagle dogs. Low concentrations of frovatriptan produced contraction with -logEC50 7.55 +/- 0.08 (n = 11). The maximal observed contraction attained was 56 +/- 7% of the control 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 10 microM) response. At high concentrations of frovatriptan (>6 microM), reversal of sumatriptan (10 microM)-induced contractions was noted. In arteries precontracted with the thromboxane mimetic, U46619, frovatriptan produced a bell-shaped concentration-response relation with a maximal response at 600 nM. Concentrations of frovatriptan >2 microM produced marked reversal of tone, with full relaxation of precontracted tissues at 200 microM. In anesthetized, open-chest mongrel dogs, intravenous (n = 5) or intracoronary (n = 5) artery administration of frovatriptan (0.0001-1 mg/kg) had no consistent effect on left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, left end-systolic pressure, cardiac contractility, aortic blood flow, systemic peripheral resistance, coronary blood flow, coronary vascular resistance, mean arterial blood pressure, or heart rate when compared with vehicle (n = 3). Intravenous sumatriptan produced minor effects on blood pressure and heart rate. Intracoronary artery administration of sumatriptan (0.0003 mg/kg) produced an increase in systemic peripheral resistance to 120.5 +/- 8.2% compared with vehicle (97.8 +/- 5.4%; p < 0.05). This dose of sumatriptan also produced a significant increase in coronary blood flow and decrease in coronary vascular resistance. Intravenous administration of sumatriptan produced a dose-related reduction in left ventricular diastolic pressure with a reduction to 58.3 +/- 8.3% and 41.7 +/- 25% of control values observed at 0.3 and 1 mg/kg, respectively; however, administration of sumatriptan by an intracoronary route had no effect. In a model of myocardial infarction, comparable doses of sumatriptan

  12. Rapid mimicry and emotional contagion in domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Palagi, Elisabetta; Nicotra, Velia; Cordoni, Giada

    2015-12-01

    Emotional contagion is a basic form of empathy that makes individuals able to experience others' emotions. In human and non-human primates, emotional contagion can be linked to facial mimicry, an automatic and fast response (less than 1 s) in which individuals involuntary mimic others' expressions. Here, we tested whether body (play bow, PBOW) and facial (relaxed open-mouth, ROM) rapid mimicry is present in domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) during dyadic intraspecific play. During their free playful interactions, dogs showed a stronger and rapid mimicry response (less than 1 s) after perceiving PBOW and ROM (two signals typical of play in dogs) than after perceiving JUMP and BITE (two play patterns resembling PBOW and ROM in motor performance). Playful sessions punctuated by rapid mimicry lasted longer that those sessions punctuated only by signals. Moreover, the distribution of rapid mimicry was strongly affected by the familiarity linking the subjects involved: the stronger the social bonding, the higher the level of rapid mimicry. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the presence of rapid mimicry in dogs, the involvement of mimicry in sharing playful motivation and the social modulation of the phenomenon. All these findings concur in supporting the idea that a possible linkage between rapid mimicry and emotional contagion (a building-block of empathy) exists in dogs.

  13. Rapid mimicry and emotional contagion in domestic dogs

    PubMed Central

    Palagi, Elisabetta; Nicotra, Velia; Cordoni, Giada

    2015-01-01

    Emotional contagion is a basic form of empathy that makes individuals able to experience others’ emotions. In human and non-human primates, emotional contagion can be linked to facial mimicry, an automatic and fast response (less than 1 s) in which individuals involuntary mimic others’ expressions. Here, we tested whether body (play bow, PBOW) and facial (relaxed open-mouth, ROM) rapid mimicry is present in domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) during dyadic intraspecific play. During their free playful interactions, dogs showed a stronger and rapid mimicry response (less than 1 s) after perceiving PBOW and ROM (two signals typical of play in dogs) than after perceiving JUMP and BITE (two play patterns resembling PBOW and ROM in motor performance). Playful sessions punctuated by rapid mimicry lasted longer that those sessions punctuated only by signals. Moreover, the distribution of rapid mimicry was strongly affected by the familiarity linking the subjects involved: the stronger the social bonding, the higher the level of rapid mimicry. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the presence of rapid mimicry in dogs, the involvement of mimicry in sharing playful motivation and the social modulation of the phenomenon. All these findings concur in supporting the idea that a possible linkage between rapid mimicry and emotional contagion (a building-block of empathy) exists in dogs. PMID:27019737

  14. Pre-operative stress in dogs - a preliminary investigation of behavior and heart rate variability in healthy hospitalized dogs.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, Misse A-M; Valros, Anna E; Hakaoja, Elisa; Raekallio, Marja R; Vainio, Outi M

    2005-05-01

    To assess pre-operative behavioral and physiological characteristics of healthy dogs hospitalized for elective surgery. Open clinical observational study. Forty-one bitches hospitalized for elective ovariohysterectomy. While undisturbed in a hospital cage, the behavior of the dog was recorded using a video camera and recorder. From the video recordings, various behavioral variables were registered. Simultaneous measurements were made on heart rates and heart rate variability (HRV) by use of an ambulatory electrocardiogram. In addition, the dog's response to human approach was noted. Different behavioral patterns were found in the dogs studied. Thirteen individuals were regarded as highly active, and were seen to bark or howl, manipulate the environment or attempt to flee vigorously. In 13 dogs (passive dogs) none of these activities occurred. Panting and displacement behaviors, such as snout licking, were observed in nearly all the animals monitored. In general, heart rates were higher and HRV lower with the most active individuals; however, the presence of physiological arousal could not be excluded in two animals with passive behaviors. To some extent, the behavior of the dog while undisturbed in the cage was reflected in the responses to a person entering the cage. The different individual responses detected in this study raise an important question concerning their role and existence throughout the entire peri-operative period, especially during the post-anesthetic recovery phase when behavioral characteristics are commonly used to assess patient welfare. The results also emphasize the need for further investigations to explore the effects of pre-operative stressors on canine surgical patients, and the factors contributing to them.

  15. Percussion of the chest re-visited: a comparison of the diagnostic value of ausculatory and conventional chest percussion.

    PubMed

    Bourke, S; Nunes, D; Stafford, F; Hurley, G; Graham, I

    1989-04-01

    Percussion of the chest is thought to be insensitive in detecting small or deeply situated chest lesions. A newer technique, ausculatory percussion, has been reported as having a far higher sensitivity. In a controlled blind study the diagnostic value of conventional chest percussion compared with ausculatory percussion was defined using the chest x-ray as a gold standard. The prevalence of disease in 100 lung fields was 26%. The majority of lesions were not detected by either technique resulting in very low sensitivities of 15.4% for conventional percussion and 19.2% for ausculatory percussion. A positive result with ausculatory percussion was twice as likely to be false as true (positive predictive value 31.2%). The technique did not add to the diagnostic value of conventional percussion. Both techniques have major limitations. Patients with suspected lung disease still require chest x-ray examination if percussion is normal.

  16. Enteropathogens identified in dogs entering a Florida animal shelter with normal feces or diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Tupler, Tiffany; Levy, Julie K; Sabshin, Stephanie J; Tucker, Sylvia J; Greiner, Ellis C; Leutenegger, Christian M

    2012-08-01

    To determine the frequency of enteropathogens in dogs entering an animal shelter with normal feces or diarrhea. Cross-sectional study. 100 dogs evaluated at an open-admission municipal animal shelter in Florida. Fecal samples were collected within 24 hours after admission from 50 dogs with normal feces and 50 dogs with diarrhea. Feces were tested by fecal flotation, antigen testing, PCR assay, and electron microscopy for selected enteropathogens. 13 enteropathogens were identified. Dogs with diarrhea were significantly more likely to be infected with ≥ 1 enteropathogens (96%) than were dogs with normal feces (78%). Only Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin A gene was significantly more common in dogs with diarrhea (64%) than in dogs with normal feces (40%). Other enteropathogens identified in dogs with and without diarrhea included hookworms (58% and 48%, respectively), Giardia spp (22% and 16%, respectively), canine enteric coronavirus (2% and 18%, respectively), whipworms (12% and 8%, respectively), Cryptosporidium spp (12% and 2%, respectively), ascarids (8% and 8%, respectively), Salmonella spp (2% and 6%, respectively), Cystoisospora spp (2% and 4%, respectively), canine distemper virus (8% and 0%, respectively), Dipylidium caninum (2% and 2%, respectively), canine parvovirus (2% and 2%, respectively), and rotavirus (2% and 0%, respectively). Dogs entered the shelter with a variety of enteropathogens, many of which are pathogenic or zoonotic. Most infections were not associated with diarrhea or any specific dog characteristics, making it difficult to predict the risk of infection for individual animals. Guidelines for preventive measures and empirical treatments that are logistically and financially feasible for use in shelters should be developed for control of the most common and important enteropathogens.

  17. A comparative LM and SEM study of the structure of the mucosal glands of the gallbladder in two species of canids: the dog and the Chinese raccoon dog.

    PubMed

    Jackowiak, H; Godynicki, Sz

    2006-05-01

    The studies were performed on the mucosa of the body of the gallbladder in the dog and Chinese raccoon dog, species belonging to the Canidae family. The mucosal glands in both species mostly have the form of alveolar or short tubular secretory units without excretory ducts and are situated in the middle part at the bottom of the crypts surrounded by folds of the mucosa. Sporadically we observed the mucous intraepithelial glands. The results of the light and scanning electron microscopic observations indicate interspecies differences in the density, type and size of secretory units and also their openings. In the raccoon dog the number of secretory units is 30 times greater than in the dog and the units are predominantly simple glands with small openings. In the dog mostly 2 or 3 secretory units with common wide openings were observed. The SEM images of the NaOH macerated mucosa of the gallbladders showed a connective tissue framework around the glands composed of flat lamina with an irregular pattern of fine collagen fibres and numerous fenestrations. The collagen network around the openings of the glands is more compact and provides mechanical support for the glands of the gallbladder.

  18. Clinical study on VATS combined mechanical ventilation treatment of ARDS secondary to severe chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical effects of microinvasive video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) combined with mechanical ventilation in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to severe chest trauma. A total of 62 patients with ARDS secondary to severe chest trauma were divided into the observation and control groups. The patients in the observation groups were treated with VATS combined with early mechanical ventilation while patients in the control group were treated using routine open thoracotomy combined with early mechanical ventilation. Compared to the controls, the survival rate of the observation group was significantly higher. The average operation time of the observation group was significantly shorter than that of the control group, and the incidence of complications in the perioperative period of the observation group was significantly lower than that of the control group (p<0.05). The average application time of the observation group was significantly shorter than that of the control group, and the incidence of ventilator-associated complications was significantly lower than that of the control group (p<0.05). In conclusion, a reasonable understanding of the indications and contraindications of VATS, combined with early mechanical treatment significantly improved the success rate of the treatment of ARDS patients secondary to severe chest trauma and reduced the complications. PMID:27446317

  19. Homing in on Hot Dogs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-29

    This image is a portion of the all-sky survey from NASA WISE. It highlights the first of about 1,000 hot DOGs found by the mission magenta circle. Hot DOGs are hot dust-obscured galaxies and are among the most powerful galaxies known.

  20. Dog Mathematics: Exploring Base-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.; Yanik, H. Bahadir; Lee, Mi Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Using a dog's paw as a basis for numerical representation, sixth grade students explored how to count and regroup using the dog's four digital pads. Teachers can connect these base-4 explorations to the conceptual meaning of place value and regrouping using base-10.

  1. Pancreatic torsion in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Brabson, Tamera L.; Maki, Lynn C.; Newell, Susan M.; Ralphs, S. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old male intact Cane Corso mastiff dog was presented for a recent history of vomiting, abdominal pain, and lethargy. A diagnosis of pancreatic torsion was made during abdominal exploratory surgery and was confirmed with histopathology. The dog underwent partial pancreatectomy and recovered with no complications. PMID:25969579

  2. Dog Mathematics: Exploring Base-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.; Yanik, H. Bahadir; Lee, Mi Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Using a dog's paw as a basis for numerical representation, sixth grade students explored how to count and regroup using the dog's four digital pads. Teachers can connect these base-4 explorations to the conceptual meaning of place value and regrouping using base-10.

  3. Are dogs just like us?

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael

    2015-08-31

    Dogs have evolved to become the animal species most integrated with human society. Surprisingly, the origins and mechanisms of the remarkable co-evolution are still obscure and provide fuel for debates. Brain imaging studies showing up similarities and recent results implicating the hormone oxytocin also suggest that it makes sense to compare the social mind of dogs to our own. Michael Gross reports.

  4. Closantel intoxication in a dog.

    PubMed

    McEntee, K; Grauwels, M; Clercx, C; Henroteaux, M

    1995-06-01

    A case of overdosage with closantel, a salicynalide derivative, in a dog is described. The dog received 6 times the recommended dosage. Closantel induced optic neuritis, retinal degeneration, partial deafness, hepatotoxicosis and myopathy. Only the blindness was irreversible. The therapy included albumin administration to reduce the acute toxicity of closantel.

  5. Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy for Removal of Unilateral Noninvasive Pheochromocytomas in 10 Dogs.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Kathryn A; Mayhew, Philipp D; Steffey, Michele A; Culp, William T N; Fuller, Mark C; Della Maggiore, Ann; Nelson, Richard W

    2016-11-01

    To report the surgical technique and outcome of dogs undergoing laparoscopic adrenalectomy for removal of unilateral noninvasive pheochromocytoma. Retrospective case series. Dogs with unilateral noninvasive adrenal tumors (n=10). Medical records of dogs that underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy for histologically confirmed pheochromocytoma were reviewed. Dogs were positioned in lateral recumbency with the table tilted up to create a semi-sternal position. Three or 4 ports were used and dissection of the mass proceeded using a combination of laparoscopic instrumentation, bipolar vessel-sealing devices, and in some cases monopolar electrosurgical probes. Conversion rate, complications, surgical time, hospitalization time, and long-term follow-up were recorded. The procedure was completed without the need for conversion in 9 of 10 dogs. In 1 dog, hemorrhage obscured the visual field and conversion to an open approach was elected. In 5 cases, a 3-port approach was used, and in 5 cases, a 4th port was placed. Median surgical time was 105 minutes (range, 65-250). Intraoperative complications included 1 splenic laceration. Postoperatively, 1 dog developed gastric dilatation-volvulus. All dogs were discharged from the hospital. Median follow-up time was 16.0 months (range, 6.9-38.0). With careful case selection, laparoscopic adrenalectomy for resection of pheochromocytoma was feasible and could be performed efficiently by experienced laparoscopic surgeons. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Effect of service dogs on manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Geoffroy; Tousignant, Michel; Routhier, François; Corriveau, Hélène; Champagne, Noël

    2013-01-01

    Service dogs help people with mobility impairments. They are trained to perform a variety of tasks, such as opening doors, retrieving the telephone, picking up objects, and pulling manual wheelchairs (MWCs). More specifically, using the traction provided by the service dog has physical benefits because MWC users can operate their MWCs with less effort. The objective of this study was to document the effect of a service dog on MWC mobility and user shoulder pain, social participation, and quality of life. Eleven MWC users with spinal cord injury were assessed before and after training with a service dog and 7 mo later. Based on a standardized protocol, all study participants learned how to use the service dog safely and how to move around efficiently in different environments and under different conditions. Results showed that using a service dog increased the distance covered by the MWC users and also significantly decreased shoulder pain and intensity of effort. Using the service dog also produced slight but significant improvements in MWC user skills and social participation and may indicate a trend for improvement in quality of life. More extensive research is needed to precisely identify the effect of service dogs on the long-term management of MWC use.

  7. [Brachycephaly in dog and cat: a "human induced" obstruction of the upper airways].

    PubMed

    Oechtering, G U; Schlüter, C; Lippert, J P

    2010-07-01

    Selective breeding for exaggerated features caused in many brachycephalic dog and cat breeds virtually a loss of the nose, with serious anatomical and functional consequences. In addition to respiratory and olfactory tasks, in dogs the nose is of vital importance for thermoregulation. As obligatory nose breathers, dogs suffer far more than humans when their nasal ventilation is restricted. An open discussion in the broad public has to motivate authorities and kennel clubs to recognize extreme brachycephalic breeding as seriously affecting animal health and welfare.

  8. Do Dog Behavioral Characteristics Predict the Quality of the Relationship between Dogs and Their Owners?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Christy L; Chen, Pan; Serpell, James A; Jacobson, Kristen C

    This paper explores whether dog behavioral characteristics predict the quality of the relationship between dogs and their owners (i.e., owner attachment to dog), and whether relations between dog behavior and owner attachment are moderated by demographic characteristics. In this study, N = 92 children and N = 60 adults from 60 dog-owning families completed questionnaires about their attachment to their pet dog, their level of responsibility for that dog, and their general attitudes toward pets. They also rated their dogs on observable behavioral characteristics. Individuals who held positive attitudes about pets and who provided much of their dog's care reported stronger attachments to their dogs. The strength of owners' attachments to their dogs was associated with dog trainability and separation problems. Relationships between owner attachment and both dog excitability and attention-seeking behavior were further moderated by demographic characteristics: for Caucasians but not for non-Caucasians, dog excitability was negatively associated with owner attachment to dog; and for adults, dog attention-seeking behavior was positively associated with owner attachment, but children tended to be highly attached to their dogs, regardless of their dogs' attention-seeking behaviors. This study demonstrates that certain dog behavioral traits are indeed associated with the strength of owners' attachments to their dogs.

  9. Rhodococcus equi Infections in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Bryan, L K; Clark, S D; Díaz-Delgado, J; Lawhon, S D; Edwards, J F

    2017-01-01

    Five cases of Rhodococcus equi infection in dogs were identified from 2003 to 2014. Three of the dogs had severe, internal lesions attributable to R. equi that have not been previously described: endophthalmitis, endocarditis, and suppurative pleuropneumonia. Isolates from 4 of the dogs were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction for Rhodococcus virulence-associated plasmid (vap) genes. One isolate was vapA-positive, 2 lacked a virulence plasmid, and 1 carried the novel vapN-associated plasmid (pVAPN) recently characterized in bovine isolates. The pVAPN plasmid has not been described in isolates cultured from companion animals. Four of the dogs either were receiving immunosuppressive drugs or had endocrinopathies. R. equi has the potential to cause significant infections in dogs, and immunocompromised animals should be considered at risk for infection.

  10. Retrobulbar chondrosarcoma in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Ralić, M.; Vasić, J.; Jovanović, M.; Cameron, B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a review of a dog, with a retrobulbar chondrosarcoma, which was admitted for surgery for visible changes in his eye during inspection. Orbital neoplasia in dogs may be primary and secondary. Sixty percent of orbital neoplasia in dogs are primary, ninety percent of which are malignant. Retrobulbar neoplasms are rare and in their early stage represent a diagnostic challenge. Chondrosarcoma of the skull is a slow-progressing malignant disease which occurs locally, aggressive with invasion into the surrounding tissues. Dogs with chondrosarcoma of the skull have life expectancy between 210 and 580 days - in our case it was 180 days - after the first alterations on the eye of the dog occurred. PMID:26623338

  11. A service dog in group.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Brian; Collins, Emily

    2015-04-01

    Service dogs are sanctioned by the Americans with Disabilities Act as having protected rights allowing them to assist owners with disabilities. These dogs are appearing with increasing frequency in healthcare settings, and it is important for healthcare providers to understand the rules and regulations given to service animals and owners. We discuss processes that transpired when a service dog was brought into a psychodynamic psychotherapy group. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the unintended consequences of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 2010 as it concerns service dogs and the impact on the group process. Problems resulting from the introduction of service dogs into therapy groups should be anticipated and explicitly discussed in the course of the group's transactions.

  12. Use of a laryngeal mask airway in a brachycephalic dog with masticatory myositis and trismus

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Frances; Iff, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    An 8-month old, male, neutered bulldog was presented for investigation of a 2-day history of trismus. Endotracheal intubation was impossible as the dog was only able to open his mouth approximately 2 cm. A laryngeal mask airway was blindly inserted after induction of general anesthesia to maintain the patient on inhalational anesthesia and improve respiration for computed tomography and muscle biopsy. The dog recovered from anesthesia uneventfully. PMID:22942446

  13. Use of a laryngeal mask airway in a brachycephalic dog with masticatory myositis and trismus.

    PubMed

    Reed, Frances; Iff, Isabelle

    2012-03-01

    An 8-month old, male, neutered bulldog was presented for investigation of a 2-day history of trismus. Endotracheal intubation was impossible as the dog was only able to open his mouth approximately 2 cm. A laryngeal mask airway was blindly inserted after induction of general anesthesia to maintain the patient on inhalational anesthesia and improve respiration for computed tomography and muscle biopsy. The dog recovered from anesthesia uneventfully.

  14. Methamphetamine intoxication in a dog: case report.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zengyang; Zhang, Xu

    2014-06-24

    Methamphetamine abuse has undergone a dramatic worldwide increase, and represents a significant and global issue for public health. Incidents of methamphetamine intoxication and death in humans are relatively commonplace. Because of its increasing illicit availability, together with legitimate use in human medicine, accidental or intentional exposure to methamphetamine in dogs is becoming a more likely scenario. A 3-year-old, 3.7 kg intact female Miniature Poodle who had been intentionally fed an unknown amount of a crystalline-like substance developed extreme agitation, seizures, tachycardia, hyperthermia, hypertension, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), bloody diarrhea, and dilated pupils. Blood work revealed leukocytosis, erythropenia, lymphocytosis, thrombocytopenia, coagulation abnormalities, but all to a mild extent, together with mild elevation in both alanine aminotranferease (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALKP), and a mild decreased in glucose. Radiologic diagnosis revealed generalized, severe distension of the stomach and small intestinal tract with air. Immunochromatographic screening tests and gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis confirmed methamphetamine intoxication and revealed concentrations of methamphetamine in blood and urine of 0.32 μg/mL and 2.35 μg/mL respectively. The dog demonstrated progressive improvement after supportive care, with the high fever resolved over the initial 24 hours of hospitalization, and agitation was successfully controlled beyond 48 hours after initial hospitalization. Hemostatic abnormalities were progressive improved after heparin therapy and supportive care. By the sixth day of hospitalization the dog was clinically well, and all laboratory data had returned to normal with the exception of a mild elevateion of ALKP. To the authors' knowledge, this is the second case report of methamphetamine intoxication in dogs presented in veterinary practice in open literature so far. Although rare

  15. Measurement of chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Lv, Hao; Jiao, Teng; Lu, Guohua; Li, Sheng; Li, Zhao; Liu, Miao; Jing, Xijing; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of chest wall displacement is an important approach for measuring mechanics of chest wall, which has considerable significance for assessing respiratory system and diagnosing pulmonary diseases. However, existing optical methods for measuring chest wall displacement are inconvenient for some specific patients such as the female patients and the patients with bandaged chest. In this letter, we proposed a method for measuring chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave and established corresponding mathematic model and set up a terahertz measurement system. The main advantages of this method are that it can measure the chest wall displacement of the subjects without taking off clothes or arranging any markers. To validate this method and assess the performance of the terahertz system, in vitro, the displacement of a water module driven by a linear guide rail was measured by the terahertz system and compared with the actual displacement of the water module. The results showed that the waveforms measured with two methods have a good agreement, and the relative error is less than 5% and sufficiently good for measurement demands. In vivo, the synchronous experiment was performed on five human volunteers with the terahertz system and a respiratory belt transducer. The results demonstrate that this method has good performance and promising prospects for measuring chest wall displacement.

  16. Use of the omentum in chest-wall reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, R.J.; Vasconez, L.O. )

    1989-10-01

    Increased use of the omentum in chest-wall reconstruction has paralleled the refinement of anatomic knowledge and the development of safe mobilization techniques. Important anatomic points are the omental attachments to surrounding structures, the major blood supply from the left and right gastroepiploic vessels, and the collateral circulation via the gastroepiploic arch and Barkow's marginal artery. Mobilization of the omentum to the thorax involves division of its attachments to the transverse colon and separation from the greater curvature to fabricate a bipedicled flap. Most anterior chest wounds and virtually all mediastinal wounds can be covered with the omentum based on both sets of gastroepiploic vessels. The arc of transposition is increased when the omentum is based on a single pedicle, allowing coverage of virtually all chest-wall defects. The final method of increasing flap length involves division of the gastroepiploic arch and reliance on Barkow's marginal artery as collateral circulation to maintain flap viability. With regard to chest-wall reconstruction, we have included the omentum in the armamentarium of flaps used to cover mediastinal wounds. The omentum is our flap of choice for the reconstruction of most radiation injuries of the chest wall. The omentum may also be used to provide protection to visceral anastomoses, vascular conduits, and damaged structures in the chest, as well as to cover defects secondary to tumor excision or trauma. In brief, the omentum has proved to be a most dependable and versatile flap, particularly applicable to chest-wall reconstruction.

  17. [Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the chest wall in a nonagenarian].

    PubMed

    Kodama, K; Igase, M; Kazatani, Y; Matsuzaki, K; Murakami, E; Kokubu, T

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the chest wall observed in a 94-year-old woman. She noticed appetite loss and general edema a week before admission. The patient was diagnosed as having congestive heart failure due to valvular heart disease on the basis of echocardiographic findings and became symptom-free by treatment with vasodilators and diuretics. However, chest roentgenogram disclosed a extrapleural mass in the left mid-lateral chest. About 2 months after admission, she experienced left lateral chest pain for the first time. The chest CT scan revealed a 5 x 5 x 2 cm mass, adjacent to the lateral-posterior chest wall and projecting into the thoracic cavity and rib osteolysis. Gallium-67 citrate scintigram showed abnormal isotope accumulation in the left middle chest. Biopsy was not done. The therapeutic approach was mainly pain relief, and no tumor resection, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy was performed. The mass increased in size, and increasingly extended into the thoracic cavity on follow-up CT scans. Furthermore, marked invasion of the tumor to subcutis and subscapula was found. She died of cachexia and respiratory failure 34 weeks after admission. Histologic examination revealed malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

  18. Pleuritic Chest Pain: Sorting Through the Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Reamy, Brian V; Williams, Pamela M; Odom, Michael Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Pleuritic chest pain is characterized by sudden and intense sharp, stabbing, or burning pain in the chest when inhaling and exhaling. Pulmonary embolism is the most common serious cause, found in 5% to 21% of patients who present to an emergency department with pleuritic chest pain. A validated clinical decision rule for pulmonary embolism should be employed to guide the use of additional tests such as d-dimer assays, ventilation-perfusion scans, or computed tomography angiography. Myocardial infarction, pericarditis, aortic dissection, pneumonia, and pneumothorax are other serious causes that should be ruled out using history and physical examination, electrocardiography, troponin assays, and chest radiography before another diagnosis is made. Validated clinical decision rules are available to help exclude coronary artery disease. Viruses are common causative agents of pleuritic chest pain. Coxsackieviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus are likely pathogens. Treatment is guided by the underlying diagnosis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are appropriate for pain management in those with virally triggered or nonspecific pleuritic chest pain. In patients with persistent symptoms, persons who smoke, and those older than 50 years with pneumonia, it is important to document radiographic resolution with repeat chest radiography six weeks after initial treatment.

  19. Reference values of M-mode echocardiographic parameters and indices in conscious Labrador Retriever dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gugjoo, M. B.; Hoque, M.; Saxena, A. C.; Shamsuz Zama, M. M.; Dey, S.

    2014-01-01

    Breed-wise standard echocardiographic values in dogs have been reported as there is variation in body and chest conformation which limits the application of data of one breed for other breed. Labrador Retrievers being originated from hunting dogs, might have different echocardiographic values from standard normal range of other dog breeds. So, the present study was aimed to determine the M-mode echocardiographic reference ranges in Labrador Retriever dogs and to evaluate the effect of body weight and gender on these parameters. The data obtained were also compared with that of the other dog breeds. Conscious clinically healthy Labrador Retriever dogs (n=24) of both sexes were made the subject of the study. All the measurements were made from a right parasternal long axis left ventricular outflow tract view and the parameters measured were: left ventricular dimensions, left ventricular function, left ventricular volumes, left atrial and aortic root diameter and mitral valve parameters. Data obtained were also compared with that available for other dog breeds. Significant correlation (P<0.05) with body weight was obtained for some of the left ventricular, atrial and mitral valve parameters, being strong for LAD, AOD, LVIDd, LVIDs, IVSd and IVSs (r>0.5); moderate for LVPWd, LVPWs, EPSS, EF Slope and SV (r=0.3 to 0.5); weak for EDV and ESV (r<0.3). Non-significant effect of gender was seen on all the echocardiographic parameters. However, some of the parameters had a significant breed effect. It is expected that the obtained data will be valuable for the progress of studies on small animal cardiology. PMID:27175128

  20. Diagnostic validity of hand gestures in chest pain of coronary origin.

    PubMed

    Montero-Pérez, F J; Quero-Espinosa, F de Borja; Clemente-Millán, M J; Castro-Giménez, J A; de Burgos-Marín, J; Romero-Moreno, M Á

    To determine the frequency of 3 hand gestures by patients with chest pain and determine the diagnostic validity of the gestures in acute coronary syndrome. A prospective study was conducted on 383 adult patients treated for chest pain in an emergency department. We observed certain hand gestures, previously referred to in the medical literature as characteristic of coronary pain (gesture 1: a clenched fist held over the sternal area or Levine's sign; gesture 2: open hand located over the same area; gesture 3: both hands placed in the centre of the chest), as well as other gestures. We analysed their association with the coronary origin of the pain. We confirmed the coronary origin of the pain in 164 (43%) patients (ACS group). The other 219 patients (57%) did not have a coronary origin for the pain (nonACS group). Eighty-nine percent of the patients identified their pain with one of the 3 classical gestures. The most frequent gesture was number 2, both overall (59%) and by group (60% ACS group; 57.5% nonACS group). There was no significant association between the type of gesture and the final diagnosis (P=.172). The greater specificity corresponded to Levine's sign (90%), followed by other gestures (86%) and gesture 3 (81%). Although 89% of the patients expressed their chest pain with one of the 3 manual gestures classically associated with coronary pain, none achieved sufficient diagnostic accuracy to be used as indicative of this type of pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  1. Role of Quantitative Wall Motion Analysis in Patients with Acute Chest Pain at Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Park, Jin-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Background Evaluation of acute chest pain in emergency department (ED), using limited resource and time, is still very difficult despite recent development of many diagnostic tools. In this study, we tried to determine the applicability of new semi-automated cardiac function analysis tool, velocity vector imaging (VVI), in the evaluation of the patients with acute chest pain in ED. Methods We prospectively enrolled 48 patients, who visited ED with acute chest pain, and store images to analyze VVI from July 2005 to July 2007. Results In 677 of 768 segments (88%), the analysis by VVI was feasible among 48 patients. Peak systolic radial velocity (Vpeak) and strain significantly decreased according to visual regional wall motion abnormality (Vpeak, 3.50 ± 1.34 cm/s for normal vs. 3.46 ± 1.52 cm/s for hypokinesia, 2.51 ± 1.26 for akinesia, p < 0.01; peak systolic radial strain -31.74 ± 9.15% fornormal, -24.33 ± 6.28% for hypokinesia, -20.30 ± 7.78% for akinesia, p < 0.01). However, the velocity vectors at the time of mitral valve opening (MVO) were directed outward in the visually normal myocardium, inward velocity vectors were revealed in the visually akinetic area (VMVO, -0.85 ± 1.65 cm/s for normal vs. 0.10 ± 1.46 cm/s for akinesia, p < 0.001). At coronary angiography, VMVO clearly increased in the ischemic area (VMVO, -0.88+1.56 cm/s for normal vs. 0.70 + 2.04 cm/s for ischemic area, p < 0.01). Conclusion Regional wall motion assessment using VVI showed could be used to detect significant ischemia in the patient with acute chest pain at ED. PMID:28400932

  2. 38 CFR 17.148 - Service dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Service dogs. 17.148..., Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.148 Service dogs. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: Service dogs are guide or service dogs prescribed for a disabled veteran under this section. (b) Clinical...

  3. 38 CFR 17.148 - Service dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Service dogs. 17.148..., Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.148 Service dogs. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: Service dogs are guide or service dogs prescribed for a disabled veteran under this section. (b) Clinical...

  4. Hypoadrenocorticism in a kindred of Pomeranian dogs.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Erin T; Hammond, Tara N; Mahony, Orla M

    2015-01-01

    Three adult Pomeranian dogs, full siblings from 2 litters, were diagnosed with primary hypoadrenocorticism following onset of hypoadrenal crisis. Review of the family history revealed the dogs' maternal grandmother also had hypoadrenocorticism. All 4 dogs were pedigree-certified by the American Kennel Club. An inherited basis for hypoadrenocorticism is proposed in these Pomeranian dogs.

  5. When You Meet a Dog Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrey, Pauline

    1994-01-01

    Tips are offered for use in an encounter with a dog guide and its blind owner. Tips include approaching the person from the right side, not taking hold of the dog guide's harness, not offering food to the dog guide, and not petting the dog guide without the owner's permission. (JDD)

  6. Rotary slot dog

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Smauley, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A clamp or dog is disclosed which preferably comprises a slotted stepped cylindrical body which is inserted into a hole in a workpiece and then fastened to a base or fixture using a screw which is inserted through the slot. The stepped configuration provides an annular clamping surface which securely clamps the workpiece against the base or fixture. The slotted cylindrical configuration permits adjustment of the workpiece and retaining clamp in any direction, i.e., over 360.degree., relative to the mounting position of the screw in the base or fixture.

  7. Public Perceptions of Service Dogs, Emotional Support Dogs, and Therapy Dogs.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina; Hellyer, Peter; Cheung, Louana; Kogan, Lori

    2017-06-15

    As service dogs, emotional support dogs, and therapy dogs have become more prevalent in the USA, so too has the controversy surrounding their legitimacy. Yet, there is a lack of objective data regarding the public's understanding of the role played by each of these types of animals, as well as their perceptions regarding the legitimacy of their integration. An anonymous, online survey was distributed to examine the perceptions of US adults who do not own any type of assistance animal. A total of 505 individuals responded to the online survey, yielding 284 usable responses. Results suggest widespread misconceptions about definitions, rules, regulations, and rights associated with each type of assistance dog. In general, service dogs are more likely to be perceived as helping with a legitimate need, and their access to public spaces is viewed favorably. While there are some concerns about the legitimacy and necessary access rights for emotional support dogs, members of the public correctly identified the roles and rights of therapy dogs. Despite the media's focus on abuses and false representation of these dogs, most participants reported feeling the majority of people are not taking advantage of the system.

  8. Public Perceptions of Service Dogs, Emotional Support Dogs, and Therapy Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina; Hellyer, Peter; Cheung, Louana; Kogan, Lori

    2017-01-01

    As service dogs, emotional support dogs, and therapy dogs have become more prevalent in the USA, so too has the controversy surrounding their legitimacy. Yet, there is a lack of objective data regarding the public’s understanding of the role played by each of these types of animals, as well as their perceptions regarding the legitimacy of their integration. An anonymous, online survey was distributed to examine the perceptions of US adults who do not own any type of assistance animal. A total of 505 individuals responded to the online survey, yielding 284 usable responses. Results suggest widespread misconceptions about definitions, rules, regulations, and rights associated with each type of assistance dog. In general, service dogs are more likely to be perceived as helping with a legitimate need, and their access to public spaces is viewed favorably. While there are some concerns about the legitimacy and necessary access rights for emotional support dogs, members of the public correctly identified the roles and rights of therapy dogs. Despite the media’s focus on abuses and false representation of these dogs, most participants reported feeling the majority of people are not taking advantage of the system. PMID:28617350

  9. Possible association of glaucoma with pectinate ligament dysplasia and narrowing of the iridocorneal angle in Shiba Inu dogs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kumiko; Sasaki, Nobuo; Matsunaga, Satoru; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Ogawa, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the shape of the pectinate ligament (PL) and to estimate the width of the iridocorneal angle (ICA) in glaucomatous and non-glaucomatous eye of Shiba Inu dogs in Japan. One hundred fourteen Shiba Inu dogs were presented to the Veterinary Medical Center at the University of Tokyo between June 1998 and June 2003. Among these, 46 dogs had glaucoma; the remaining 68 dogs were presented for routine vaccinations or heartworm testing and were used as a control population. Complete ophthalmic examination and gonioscopy were performed in all the dogs. PL and ICA were evaluated by gonioscopy and goniophotographs. Of the 46 dogs with glaucoma, 17 (37%) were affected bilaterally, and 29 (63%) were affected unilaterally. Of the 29 dogs with unilateral glaucoma, the ICA of the normotensive eye was slightly narrow in 2 eyes (7%), narrow in 12 eyes (41%), and closed in 15 eyes (52%). Among the normotensive control group, the ICA was open in 13 dogs (19%), slightly narrow in 29 (43%), narrow in 22 (32%), and closed in 4 (6%). In dogs with narrow and slightly narrow ICAs, the PLs were thickened, and in some cases, formed a solid sheet. The majority of dogs with glaucoma had changes in both ICA and PL. A narrow or slightly narrow ICA was also detected in the majority of normotensive control dogs. This study suggests that ICA narrowing and PL thickening is a common abnormality in Shiba Inu dogs in Japan and may predispose those dogs to glaucoma.

  10. Chest ultrasound in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Francesco; Brusasco, Claudia; Pelosi, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    This review discusses the role of chest ultrasound in diagnosis and management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the most recent technical progresses in this field. Clinically, suspected ARDS can be easily confirmed by lung ultrasonography through the recognition of a typical pattern characterized by B-lines, spared areas, pleural line thickening, and subpleural consolidations. A visual score based on number and thickness of B-lines permits a semiquantitative evaluation of the amount of extravascular lung water and lung density. Recently, a quantitative lung ultrasound method has been proposed. The heart may be also involved in ARDS either primarily or by the application of positive pressure ventilation. The incidence of acute cor pulmonale during ARDS is, even if under protective ventilation, not negligible. The use of echocardiography combined with lung ultrasound is important for early detection of cor pulmonale, identification of the best ventilator strategy to preserve heart-to-lung interaction, and prediction of weaning success. An ultrasound-integrated approach combining lung ultrasound and echocardiography should be recommended as a suitable technique to manage ARDS during diagnosis, mechanical ventilation setting, and weaning.

  11. Surgical management of the radiated chest wall

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P.G.; Pairolero, P.C.

    1986-04-01

    Fifty consecutive patients with radiation-related problems of the chest wall were treated between 1976 and 1984. There were 40 women and 10 men with an average age of 54 years (range 26 to 78 years). Twenty-three patients had radiation ulcers alone, 20 had recurrent cancer, and 7 had infected median sternotomy wounds. Thirty-six had skeletal resections and 44 had soft-tissue resections. The skeleton was reconstructed with Prolene mesh in 12 patients and with autogenous rib in 3. Sixty-three muscles were transposed in 43 patients. Twelve omental transpositions were performed (8 for primary treatment and 4 for salvage of a failed muscle flap). Hospitalization averaged 20.2 days. There was one operative death (at 29 days). Partial flap necrosis occurred in 10 patients. Mesh was removed in three patients. There were 14 late deaths, most from recurrent tumor. The remaining patients had well-healed wounds and a generally improved quality of life. We conclude that aggressive resection and reliable reconstruction are critical considerations in the surgical management of this perplexing clinical problem.

  12. Newer imaging methods in chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Wandtke, J C

    1990-01-01

    In recent years the application of computers to chest radiography has resulted in a wide variety of innovative research. Major research efforts have resulted in the development of new types of x-ray detectors, such as storage phosphor technology, for use with computers. Storage phosphor imaging is one of the most promising new techniques, and almost 100 systems have been installed worldwide. Radiologists are quickly evaluating the image quality provided by this new detector system, which has the potential to improve image quality. It has wide latitude and is coupled with a computer to perform image processing. Another promising technology, originally studied in the form of scan equalization radiography, is now commercially available in the form of advanced multiple-beam equalization radiography. This film technique uses computers to modulate the x-ray exposure to take maximum advantage of the imaging capabilities of radiographic film. Digital solid-state detectors have been studied in conjunction with computerized image enhancement systems. These currently show improvement in nodule detection and quantification of the calcium content of a lesion. Application of large image intensifiers to a digital image system is being studied, but there are currently limitations on spatial resolution.

  13. Chest conduction properties and ECG equalization.

    PubMed

    Delle Cave, G; Fabricatore, G; Nolfe, G; Petrosino, M; Pizzuti, G P

    2000-01-01

    In common practice of detecting and recording biomedical signals, it is often implicitly assumed that the propagation, through the whole circuit human body-electrodes recording devices, is frequency and voltage independent. As a consequence, clinicians are not aware that recorded signals do not correspond faithfully to the original electrical activity of organs under investigation. We have studied the transmission of electrical signals in human body at various voltages and frequencies to understand if and to which extent the most diffused stimulating and recording techniques used in medicine are affected by global body conduction properties. Our results show that, in order to obtain a more faithful detection of electrical activity produced or evoked by human organs (e.g. EGG, electromyography, etc.), it is convenient to 'equalize'' recorded signals. To this purpose, two equalization techniques are proposed, based, respectively, on a simple hardware filtering during acquisition, or FFT post-processing of the acquired signals. As an application, we have studied the transmission of electrical signal in human chest and have compared equalized high frequency ECG signals with raw (original) recordings.

  14. Prevention of infection in war chest injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Romanoff, H

    1975-01-01

    Infection is a major complication of military chest injuries. In a series of 142 wounded, infectious complications occurred in 7 (4.9%). Factors influencing the incidence of infection are evaluated. In this group of injuries, 81 patients were admitted soon after wounding. The intrathoracic damage was severe, due to penetration of metallic fragment. The hemothorax was treated by immediate intercostal drainage. Immediate thoracotomy was performed in 10 patients and late thoractomy in 15. One patient developed a lung abscess and 5 patients had infection following thoracotomy (7.4%). Another 61 wounded patients had been first managed in a forward hospital, including three with thoractomy for massive bleeding. Two, not in a forward hospital, had a bullet removed from the lung. Upon admission to this hospital, intercostal drains were inserted when needed and four patients underwent thoracotomy. Larger wounds were debrided in 24 patients. Late thoracotomy was perfromed in seven. Chronic empyema developed in one patient after pneumonectomy performed at the field hospital, resulting in a resuscitation or infection rate of less than 2%. Factors contributing to a low infection rate were: early drainage of hemothoraces and wide debridement of larger wounds with delayed closure and avoidance of thoracotomy as primary treatment. Resection of lung tissue was avoided. Thoraco-abdominal injuries were treated separately. The clotted hemothorax was immediately evacuated. Prolonged antibiotic therapy was usually indicated. PMID:1211991

  15. Penetrating chest wound of the foetus.

    PubMed

    Wandaogo, Albert; Tapsoba, Toussaint Wendlamita; Ouédraogo, Isso; Béré, Bernadette; Ouédraogo, S F; Bandré, E

    2016-01-01

    Traumas of the foetus caused by stabbings are rare but actually life-threatening for both the foetus and the mother. We report a case of penetrating chest wound on a baby taken from the obstetrics unit to the paediatric surgical department. His mother was assaulted by his father, a mentally sick person with no appropriate follow-up. The foetus did not show any sign of vital distress. Surgical exploration of the wound has revealed a section of the 10 th rib, a laceration of the pleura and a tearing of the diaphragm. A phrenorraphy and a pleural drainage were performed. The new-born and its mother were released from hospital after 5 days and the clinical control and X-ray checks 6 months later showed nothing abnormal. We insisted a medical, psychiatric follow-up be initiated for the father. As regards pregnant women with penetrating wounds, the mortality rate of the foetus is 80%. The odds are good for our newborn due to the mild injuries and good professional collaboration of the medical staff. Penetrating transuterine wounds of the foetus can be very serious. The health care needed should include many fields due to the mother and the foetus' lesions extreme polymorphism. In our case, it could have prevented by a good psychiatric followed up of the offender.

  16. Training room evaluation of chest pain in the adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Billups, D; Martin, D; Swain, R A

    1995-06-01

    A physician or athletic trainer will often be faced with an athlete complaining of chest pain during or after an event. Chest pain in children and adolescents is usually of a noncardiac origin; only 5% of cases are due to cardiac problems. With a properly documented history and physical evaluation, one can usually identify the etiology of the chest discomfort or at least rule out any serious difficulties. The various diagnostic possibilities include cardiac, musculoskeletal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and psychiatric causes of pain. We discuss several specific conditions, as well as the signs, symptoms, and basic management.

  17. [Adolescent with chest pain: the importance of clinical suspicion].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Andreia; Silva, Cármen; Mota, Teresa; Baptista, Maria João

    2013-06-01

    Introduction. Chest pain is a common complaint in children visiting the emergency department and is mostly associated with benign conditions. Although genuine cardiac causes are uncommon, potentially life threatening conditions such as the pulmonary embolism should be suspected by clinical symptoms such as dyspnoea, chest pain and syncope, either singly or in combination. The authors report a case of a pulmonary embolism with deep venous thrombosis following immobilization in a 15- year-old adolescent with limb fracture. This case illustrates the importance of considering pulmonary embolism in the differential diagnosis of a patient who presents at a paediatric emergency department with sudden onset of chest pain and dyspnoea.

  18. Primitive chest wall neuroectodermal tumor in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengcheng; Zou, Wei; Ma, Guodong; Pan, Yanqing

    2011-10-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall is presented. After four cycles of chemotherapy, a computed tomography scan of his chest showed a larger mass invading the left upper lobe of the lung. He underwent resection of the left chest wall from the left fourth to sixth ribs, including the tumor, combined with left upper lobectomy and lymph node dissection. A diagnosis of primitive neuroectodermal tumor was confirmed histopathologically and immunohistochemically. After surgery, four cycles of chemotherapy with ifosfamide and etoposide were given. One year after treatment, the patient is currently doing well without evidence of recurrence.

  19. Experience matters: Dogs (Canis familiaris) infer physical properties of objects from movement clues.

    PubMed

    Kuroshima, Hika; Nabeoka, Yukari; Hori, Yusuke; Chijiiwa, Hitomi; Fujita, Kazuo

    2017-03-01

    Reasoning about physical properties of objects such as heaviness by observing others' actions toward them is important and useful for adapting to the environment. In this study, we asked whether domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) can use a human's action to infer a physical property of target objects. In Experiment 1, dogs watched an experimenter opening two differently loaded swinging doors with different corresponding degrees of effort, and then were allowed to open one of the doors. Dogs chose randomly between the two doors. In Experiment 2, we gave new dogs the same test as in Experiment 1, but only after giving them experience of opening the doors by themselves, so that they already knew that the doors could be either light or heavy. In this test the dogs reliably chose the light door. These results indicate that dogs are able to infer physical characteristics of objects from the latters' movement caused by human action, but that this inferential reasoning requires direct own experience of the objects.

  20. The effects of chest expansion resistance exercise on chest expansion and maximal respiratory pressure in elderly with inspiratory muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Beom; Yang, Jin-Mo; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chest expansion resistance exercises (CERE) on chest expansion, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) in elderly people with inspiratory muscle weakness. [Subjects] Thirty elderly people with inspiratory muscle weakness (MIP < 80% of the predicted value) were randomly and equally assigned to a chest expansion resistance exercise (CERE) group, core conditioning exercise (CCE) group, and control group. [Methods] The intervention was applied to the CERE group and CCE group five times per week, 30 minutes each time, for six weeks. A tapeline was used to measure upper and lower chest expansion. MIP and MEP before and after the intervention were measured and compared. [Results] There was significant improvement in upper and lower chest expansion and MIP after the intervention in both the CERE group and the CCE group, whereas the control group did not show any significant difference. MEP did not significantly change in any of the three groups after the intervention. [Conclusion] The CERE group underwent greater changes than the CCE group, which proves that the CERE is more effective for improving elderly people’s chest expansion capacity and MIP in elderly people. Therefore, application of the CERE by therapists is recommended if the environment and conditions are appropriate for enhancement of chest expansion capacity and MIP in elderly people. PMID:25995570