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Sample records for open gln spin

  1. Open Rotor Spin Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    An open rotor, also known as a high-speed propeller, is tested in a wind tunnel. The propeller moves much more quickly than a standard propeller, and the blades of the propeller are shaped differen...

  2. Cytosolic Glutamine Synthetase Gln1;2 Is the Main Isozyme Contributing to GS1 Activity and Can Be Up-Regulated to Relieve Ammonium Toxicity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic GS1 (Gln synthetase) is central for ammonium assimilation in plants. High ammonium treatment enhanced the expression of the GS1 isogene Gln-1;2 encoding a low-affinity high-capacity GS1 protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) shoots. Under the same conditions, the expression of the high-affinity low-capacity isoform Gln-1;1 was reduced. The expression of Gln-1;3 did not respond to ammonium treatment while Gln-1;4 and Gln-1;5 isogenes in all cases were expressed at a very low level. Gln-2 was highly expressed in shoots but only at a very low level in roots. To investigate the specific functions of the two isogenes Gln-1;1 and Gln-1;2 in shoots for ammonium detoxification, single and double knock-out mutants were grown under standard N supply or with high ammonium provision. Phenotypes of the single mutant gln1;1 were similar to the wild type, while growth of the gln1;2 single mutant and the gln1;1:gln1;2 double mutant was significantly impaired irrespective of N regime. GS1 activity was significantly reduced in both gln1;2 and gln1;1:gln1;2. Along with this, the ammonium content increased while that of Gln decreased, showing that Gln-1;2 was essential for ammonium assimilation and amino acid synthesis. We conclude that Gln-1;2 is the main isozyme contributing to shoot GS1 activity in vegetative growth stages and can be up-regulated to relieve ammonium toxicity. This reveals, to our knowledge, a novel shoot function of Gln-1;2 in Arabidopsis shoots. PMID:27231101

  3. Higher spins and open strings: Quartic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Dimitri

    2011-02-15

    We analyze quartic gauge-invariant interactions of massless higher spin fields by using vertex operators constructed in our previous works and computing their 4-point amplitudes in superstring theory. The kinematic part of the quartic interactions of the higher spins is determined by the matter structure of their vertex operators; the nonlocality of the interactions is the consequence of the specific ghost structure of these operators. We compute explicitly the 4-point amplitude describing the complete gauge-invariant 1-1-3-3 quartic interaction (two massless spin 3 particles interacting with two photons) and comment on more general 1-1-s-s cases, particularly pointing out the structure of 1-1-5-5 coupling.

  4. Spin degeneracy and conductance fluctuations in open quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Folk, J A; Patel, S R; Birnbaum, K M; Marcus, C M; Duruöz, C I; Harris, J S

    2001-03-05

    The dependence of conductance fluctuations on parallel magnetic field is used as a probe of spin degeneracy in open GaAs quantum dots. The variance of fluctuations at high parallel field is reduced from the low-field variance (with broken time-reversal symmetry) by factors ranging from roughly 2 in a 1 microm (2) dot to greater than 4 in 8 microm (2) dots. The factor of 2 is expected for Zeeman splitting of spin-degenerate channels. A possible explanation for the larger suppression based on field-dependent spin-orbit scattering is proposed.

  5. The perils of spinning class: an open ankle fracture following a spinning exercise session.

    PubMed

    Butler, Daniel P; Henry, Francis P; Ghali, Shadi

    2013-12-01

    Spinning is an increasingly popular form of cycle-based exercise. The workouts are often of high-intensity and participants are intermittently encouraged to achieve a high crank-set-cadence rate. We report a unique case of an open ankle fracture requiring free flap coverage, which highlights the potential perils of spinning class. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Q-operators for the open Heisenberg spin chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassek, Rouven; Szécsényi, István M.

    2015-12-01

    We construct Q-operators for the open spin-1/2 XXX Heisenberg spin chain with diagonal boundary matrices. The Q-operators are defined as traces over an infinite-dimensional auxiliary space involving novel types of reflection operators derived from the boundary Yang-Baxter equation. We argue that the Q-operators defined in this way are polynomials in the spectral parameter and show that they commute with transfer matrix. Finally, we prove that the Q-operators satisfy Baxter's TQ-equation and derive the explicit form of their eigenvalues in terms of the Bethe roots.

  7. Spin alignment of stars in old open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, Enrico; Lee, Yueh-Ning; García, Rafael A.; Hennebelle, Patrick; Mathur, Savita; Beck, Paul G.; Mathis, Stephane; Stello, Dennis; Bouvier, Jérôme

    2017-03-01

    Stellar clusters form by gravitational collapse of turbulent molecular clouds, with up to several thousand stars per cluster1. They are thought to be the birthplace of most stars and therefore play an important role in our understanding of star formation, a fundamental problem in astrophysics2,3. The initial conditions of the molecular cloud establish its dynamical history until the stellar cluster is born. However, the evolution of the cloud's angular momentum during cluster formation is not well understood4. Current observations have suggested that turbulence scrambles the angular momentum of the cluster-forming cloud, preventing spin alignment among stars within a cluster5. Here we use asteroseismology6-8 to measure the inclination angles of spin axes in 48 stars from the two old open clusters NGC 6791 and NGC 6819. The stars within each cluster show strong alignment. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of proto-cluster formation show that at least 50% of the initial proto-cluster kinetic energy has to be rotational in order to obtain strong stellar-spin alignment within a cluster. Our result indicates that the global angular momentum of the cluster-forming clouds was efficiently transferred to each star and that its imprint has survived several gigayears since the clusters formed.

  8. The form of spin orbitals for open-shell restricted Hartree-Fock reference functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayatilaka, Dylan; Lee, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    A new set of spin orbitals is proposed for single-reference correlation procedures based on an open-shell restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) reference function. The spatial parts of the new spin orbitals are from an open-shell RHF calculation. These spin orbitals form a complete, orthonormal set. The RHF single determinant based on these spin orbitals is an S sub 2 eigenfunction, but a linear combination of S sub z eigenfunctions. The advantage of these spin orbitals is that equations for perturbation theory or coupled-cluster theory are symmetric in the spin indices and hence the number of independent parameters to be determined is dramatically reduced.

  9. Spin asymmetric band gap opening in graphene by Fe adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Castillo, E.; Cargnoni, F.; Achilli, S.; Tantardini, G. F.; Trioni, M. I.

    2015-04-01

    The adsorption of Fe atom on graphene is studied by first-principles Density Functional Theory. The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties are analyzed at different coverages, all preserving C6v symmetry for the Fe adatom. We observed that binding energies, magnetic moments, and adsorption distances rapidly converge as the size of the supercell increases. Among the considered supercells, those constituted by 3n graphene unit cells show a very peculiar behavior: the adsorption of a Fe atom induces the opening of a spin-dependent gap in the band structure. In particular, the gap amounts to tenths of eV in the majority spin component, while in the minority one it has a width of about 1 eV for the 3 × 3 supercell and remains significant even at very low coverages (0.25 eV for θ ≃ 2%). The charge redistribution upon Fe adsorption has also been analyzed according to state of the art formalisms indicating an appreciable charge transfer from Fe to the graphene layer.

  10. PULSAR BINARY BIRTHRATES WITH SPIN-OPENING ANGLE CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Kim, Chunglee E-mail: ckim@astro.lu.s

    2010-05-20

    One ingredient in an empirical birthrate estimate for pulsar binaries is the fraction of sky subtended by the pulsar beam: the pulsar beaming fraction. This fraction depends on both the pulsar's opening angle and the misalignment angle between its spin and magnetic axes. The current estimates for pulsar binary birthrates are based on an average value of beaming fractions for only two pulsars, i.e., PSRs B1913+16 and B1534+12. In this paper, we revisit the observed pulsar binaries to examine the sensitivity of birthrate predictions to different assumptions regarding opening angle and alignment. Based on empirical estimates for the relative likelihood of different beam half-opening angles and misalignment angles between the pulsar rotation and magnetic axes, we calculate an effective beaming correction factor, f{sub b,eff}, whose reciprocal is equivalent to the average fraction of all randomly selected pulsars that point toward us. For those pulsars without any direct beam geometry constraints, we find that f{sub b,eff} is likely to be smaller than 6, a canonically adopted value when calculating birthrates of Galactic pulsar binaries. We calculate f{sub b,eff} for PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545, applying the currently available constraints for their beam geometry. As in previous estimates of the posterior probability density function P(R) for pulsar binary birthrates R, PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545 still significantly contribute to, if not dominate, the Galactic birthrate of tight pulsar-neutron star (NS) and pulsar-white dwarf (WD) binaries, respectively. Our median posterior present-day birthrate predictions for tight PSR-NS binaries, wide PSR-NS binaries, and tight PSR-WD binaries given a preferred pulsar population model and beaming geometry are 89 Myr{sup -1}, 0.5 Myr{sup -1}, and 34 Myr{sup -1}, respectively. For long-lived PSR-NS binaries, these estimates include a weak (x1.6) correction for slowly decaying star formation in the galactic disk. For pulsars

  11. Tremendous spin-splitting effects in open boron nitride nanotubes: application to nanoscale spintronic devices.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shaogang; Zhou, Gang; Duan, Wenhui; Wu, Jian; Gu, Bing-Lin

    2006-07-05

    Our calculations demonstrate that the intrinsic magnetism of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) can be induced by their open ends, and the resulting magnetic moment is sensitive to the chirality of BNNTs. It is found that BNNTs, a pure sp-electron system, present a tremendous spin-splitting larger than 1 eV and that B-rich-ended and N-rich-ended BNNTs exhibit "conjugate", spin-polarized, deep-gap states. Tremendous spin-splitting effects combined with considerable local spin-polarizations at the open ends make BNNTs significant for applications of nanoscale spintronics such as spin-polarized electron emitters.

  12. Spin density and orbital optimization in open shell systems: A rational and computationally efficient proposal.

    PubMed

    Giner, Emmanuel; Angeli, Celestino

    2016-03-14

    The present work describes a new method to compute accurate spin densities for open shell systems. The proposed approach follows two steps: first, it provides molecular orbitals which correctly take into account the spin delocalization; second, a proper CI treatment allows to account for the spin polarization effect while keeping a restricted formalism and avoiding spin contamination. The main idea of the optimization procedure is based on the orbital relaxation of the various charge transfer determinants responsible for the spin delocalization. The algorithm is tested and compared to other existing methods on a series of organic and inorganic open shell systems. The results reported here show that the new approach (almost black-box) provides accurate spin densities at a reasonable computational cost making it suitable for a systematic study of open shell systems.

  13. Spin polarized bound states in the continuum in open Aharonov-Bohm rings with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N.; Sadreev, Almas F.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the trapping of electrons with a definite spin polarization by bound states in the continuum (BSC) in the open Aharonov-Bohm rings in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI). Neglecting the Zeeman term we show the existence of BSCs in the one-dimensional ring when the eigenstates of the closed ring are doubly degenerate. With account of the Zeeman term BSCs occur only at the points of threefold degeneracy. The BSCs are found in the parametric space of flux and RSOI strength in close pairs with opposite spin polarization. Thereby the spin polarization of electrons transmitted through the ring can be altered by minor variation of magnetic or electric field at the vicinity of these pairs. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional open ring show similar results for the BSCs. Encircling the BSC points in the parametric space of the flux and the RSOI constant gives rise to a geometric phase.

  14. Spin polarized bound states in the continuum in open Aharonov-Bohm rings with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N; Sadreev, Almas F

    2016-07-06

    We consider the trapping of electrons with a definite spin polarization by bound states in the continuum (BSC) in the open Aharonov-Bohm rings in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI). Neglecting the Zeeman term we show the existence of BSCs in the one-dimensional ring when the eigenstates of the closed ring are doubly degenerate. With account of the Zeeman term BSCs occur only at the points of threefold degeneracy. The BSCs are found in the parametric space of flux and RSOI strength in close pairs with opposite spin polarization. Thereby the spin polarization of electrons transmitted through the ring can be altered by minor variation of magnetic or electric field at the vicinity of these pairs. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional open ring show similar results for the BSCs. Encircling the BSC points in the parametric space of the flux and the RSOI constant gives rise to a geometric phase.

  15. Organization and nucleotide sequence of the glutamine synthetase (glnA) gene from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Y; Morgenthaler, P; Hottinger, H; Söll, D

    1992-01-01

    A 3.3-kb BamHI fragment of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DNA was cloned and sequenced. It complements an Escherichia coli glnA deletion strain and hybridizes strongly to a DNA containing the Bacillus subtilis glnA gene. DNA sequence analysis of the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DNA showed it to contain the glnA gene encoding class I glutamine synthetase, as judged by extensive homology with other prokaryotic glnA genes. The sequence suggests that the enzyme encoded in this gene is not controlled by adenylylation. Based on a comparison of glutamine synthetase sequences, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus is much closer to gram-positive eubacteria, especially Clostridium acetobutylicum, than to gram-negative eubacteria and archaebacteria. The fragment contains another open reading frame encoding a protein of unknown function consisting of 306 amino acids (ORF306), which is also present upstream of glnA of Bacillus cereus. In B. cereus, a repressor gene, glnR, is found between the open reading frame and glnA. Two proteins encoded by the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus gene were identified by the maxicell method; the sizes of these proteins are consistent with those of the open reading frames of ORF306 and glnA. The lack of a glnR gene in the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DNA in this position may indicate a gene rearrangement or a different mechanism of glnA gene expression. Images PMID:1359838

  16. Open quantum billiard in a magnetic field: A perfect spin filter

    SciTech Connect

    Isupova, G. G. Malyshev, A. I.

    2015-10-15

    The transport properties of an open system, a circular billiard with attached channels, are studied in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The inclusion of even a weak magnetic field in the structure plane is shown to cause the conductance to become dependent on the spin state of charge carriers. By choosing the system’s parameters, this property allows a spin filter based on it to be realized.

  17. The open XXZ spin chain model and the topological basis realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingyong; Du, Yangyang; Wu, Chunfeng; Wang, Gangcheng; Sun, Chunfang; Xue, Kang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, it is shown that the Hamiltonian of the open spin-1 XXZ chain model can be constructed from the generators of the Birman-Murakami-Wenzl (B-M-W) algebra. Without the topological parameter d (describing the unknotted loop ◯ in topology) reducing to a fixed value, the topological basis states can be connected with the open XXZ spin chain. Then some particular properties of the topological basis states in this system have been investigated. We find that the topological basis states are the three eigenstates of a four-spin-1 XXZ chain model without boundary term. Specifically, all the spin single states of the system fall on the topological basis subspace. And the number of the spin single states of the system is equal to that of the topological basis states.

  18. Maneuver reconstruction techniques for open-loop spin-stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frauenholz, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    The Pioneer missions were supported by spin-stabilized spacecraft designs using open-loop control and blow-down propulsion subsystems. Reliable estimates of the ever-changing performance inherent to these subsystems were needed to effectively design and reconstruct trajectory correction maneuver (TCM) strategies. These performance updates were obtained by adjusting model parameters to match independent telemetric and radiometric observations to define the simultaneous changes in attitude, velocity, and spin rate during a maneuver sequence.

  19. Higher spin modes as rolling tachyons in open string field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, Dimitri

    2016-09-01

    We find a simple analytic solution in open string field theory which, in the on-shell limit, generates a tower of higher-spin vertex operators in bosonic string theory. The solution is related to irregular off-shell vertex operators for Gaiotto states. The wave functions for the irregular vertex operators are described by equations following from the cubic effective action for generalized rolling tachyons, indicating that the evolution from flat to collective higher-spin background in string field theory occurs according to cosmological pattern. We discuss the relation between nonlocalities of the rolling tachyon action and those of higher-spin interactions.

  20. Graphene-diamond interface: Gap opening and electronic spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yandong; Dai, Ying; Guo, Meng; Huang, Baibiao

    2012-06-01

    Creating a finite band gap, injecting electronic spin, and finding a suitable substrate are the three important challenges for building graphene-based devices. Here, first-principles calculations are performed to investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of graphene adsorbed on the (111) surface of diamond, which is synthesized experimentally [Nature10.1038/nature09979 472, 74 (2011); J. Appl. Phys.10.1063/1.3627370 110, 044324 (2011); Nano Lett.10.1021/nl204545q 12, 1603 (2012); ACS Nano10.1021/nn204362p 6, 1018 (2012)]. Our results reveal that the graphene adsorbed on the diamond surface is a semiconductor with a finite gap depending on the adsorption arrangements due to the variation of on-site energy induced by the diamond surface, with the extra advantage of maintaining main characters of the linear band dispersion of graphene. More interestingly, different from typical graphene/semiconductor hybrid systems, we find that electronic spin can arise ``intrinsically'' in graphene owing to the exchange proximity interaction between electrons in graphene and localized electrons in the diamond surface rather than the characteristic graphene states. These predications strongly revive this new synthesized system as a viable candidate to overcome all the aforementioned challenges, providing an ideal platform for future graphene-based electronics.

  1. Entanglement and corner Hamiltonian spectra of integrable open spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Panjin; Katsura, Hosho; Trivedi, Nandini; Han, Jung Hoon

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the entanglement entropy (EE) and entanglement spectra (ES) of critical SU (N ) (2 ≤N ≤4 ) spin chains and other integrable models of finite length with the density matrix renormalization group method. For all models under investigation, we find a remarkable agreement of the level spacings and the degeneracy structure of the ES with the spectrum of the corner Hamiltonian (CS), defined as the generator of the associated corner transfer matrix. The correspondence holds between ES(n ) at the n th cut position from the edge of the spin model, and the spectrum CS(n ) of the corner Hamiltonian of length n , for all values of n that we have checked. The cut position dependence of the ES shows a period-N oscillatory behavior for a given SU (N ) chain, reminiscent of the oscillatory part of the entanglement entropy observed in the past for the same models. However, the oscillations of the ES do not die out in the bulk of the chain, in contrast to the asymptotically vanishing oscillation of the entanglement entropy. We present a heuristic argument based on Young tableaux construction that can explain the period-N structure of the ES qualitatively.

  2. OpenACC programs of the Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, Yukihiro

    2015-12-01

    We present sample OpenACC programs of the Swendsen-Wang multi-cluster spin flip algorithm. OpenACC is a directive-based programming model for accelerators without requiring modification to the underlying CPU code itself. In this paper, we deal with the classical spin models as with the sample CUDA programs (Komura and Okabe, 2014), that is, two-dimensional (2D) Ising model, three-dimensional (3D) Ising model, 2D Potts model, 3D Potts model, 2D XY model and 3D XY model. We explain the details of sample OpenACC programs and compare the performance of the present OpenACC implementations with that of the CUDA implementations for the 2D and 3D Ising models and the 2D and 3D XY models.

  3. Rapidly Spinning Black Holes in Quasars: An Open Question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Alireza; Hall, Patrick B.

    2009-01-01

    Wang et al. estimated an average radiative efficiency of 30%-35% for quasars at moderate redshift. We find that their method is not independent of quasar lifetimes and thus that quasars do not necessarily have such high efficiencies. Nonetheless, it is possible to derive interrelated constraints on quasar lifetimes, Eddington ratios, and radiative efficiencies of supermassive BH. We derive such constraints using a statistically complete sample of quasars with BH mass estimates from broad Mg II, made both with and without the radiation pressure correction of Marconi et al. We conclude that for quasars with L/L Edd gsim 0.02, lifetimes can range from 140 to 750 Myr for Schwarzschild BHs. Coupled with observed BH masses, quasar lifetimes of <= 140 Myr would imply that radiatively inefficient accretion or BH mergers must be important in the accretion history of quasars. Given reasonable assumptions about the quasar population, if the average quasar lifetime is <1 Gyr, and if radiatively inefficient accretion is unimportant, then not many BHs with Eddington ratio <0.2 can be rapidly spinning.

  4. Creation of localized spins in graphene by ring-opening of epoxy derived hydroxyl

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Weili; Sun, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Yongping; Tang, Nujiang; Du, Youwei

    2016-01-01

    Creation of high-density localized spins in the basal plane of graphene sheet by introduction of sp3-type defects is considered to be a potential route for the realization of high-magnetization graphene. Theoretical and experimental studies confirmed that hydroxyl can be an effective sp3-type candidate for inducing robust magnetic moment. However, the artificial generation of hydroxyl groups for creating high-density spins on the basal plane of graphene sheet is very scarce. Here we demonstrate that high-content hydroxyl groups can be generated on the basal plane of graphene oxide (GO) sheet by ring opening of epoxy groups. We show that by introduction of 10.74 at.% hydroxyl groups, the density of localized spins of GO can be significantly increased from 0.4 to 5.17 μB/1000 C. Thus, this study provided an effective method to obtain graphene with high-density localized spins. PMID:27225991

  5. Communication: spin densities within a unitary group based spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory: analytic evaluation of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants for the combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster scheme.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipayan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-07-07

    We report analytical calculations of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants in radicals using a spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory, namely, the unitary group based combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. A scheme for the evaluation of the one-particle spin-density matrix required in these calculations is outlined within the spin-free formulation of the COSCC approach. In this scheme, the one-particle spin-density matrix for an open-shell state with spin S and MS = + S is expressed in terms of the one- and two-particle spin-free (charge) density matrices obtained from the Lagrangian formulation that is used for calculating the analytic first derivatives of the energy. Benchmark calculations are presented for NO, NCO, CH2CN, and two conjugated π-radicals, viz., allyl and 1-pyrrolyl in order to demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  6. Self-similar spectral structures and edge-locking hierarchy in open-boundary spin chains

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Masudul

    2010-07-15

    For an anisotropic Heisenberg (XXZ) spin chain, we show that an open boundary induces a series of approximately self-similar features at different energy scales, high up in the eigenvalue spectrum. We present a nonequilibrium phenomenon related to this fractal structure, involving states in which a connected block near the edge is polarized oppositely to the rest of the chain. We show that such oppositely polarized blocks can be 'locked' to the edge of the spin chain and that there is a hierarchy of edge-locking effects at various orders of the anisotropy. The phenomenon enables dramatic control of quantum-state transmission and magnetization control.

  7. Bending and torsional vibrations of open tube booms on spinning spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J. N.; Davis, R.

    1977-01-01

    The mathematical formulation is presented of the coupled bending and twisting equations of motion for open tube booms in spinning spacecraft. The equations are applicable to a general class of open tube booms whose shear center does not coincide with the centroid of the cross section. The emphasis in this paper is on the treatment of the coupled bending and twisting motions. The equations of motion of the center of mass are provided in other references. The results of a simulation of the bending and twisting motion of a circular cross-section boom having a small longitudinal slot on a spinning spacecraft is provided. The simulation demonstrates that the centrifugal forces will induce twisting motion due to offset shear center.

  8. Open Systems with Error Bounds: Spin-Boson Model with Spectral Density Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascherpa, F.; Smirne, A.; Huelga, S. F.; Plenio, M. B.

    2017-03-01

    In the study of open quantum systems, one of the most common ways to describe environmental effects on the reduced dynamics is through the spectral density. However, in many models this object cannot be computed from first principles and needs to be inferred on phenomenological grounds or fitted to experimental data. Consequently, some uncertainty regarding its form and parameters is unavoidable; this in turn calls into question the accuracy of any theoretical predictions based on a given spectral density. Here, we focus on the spin-boson model as a prototypical open quantum system, find two error bounds on predicted expectation values in terms of the spectral density variation considered, and state a sufficient condition for the strongest one to apply. We further demonstrate an application of our result, by bounding the error brought about by the approximations involved in the hierarchical equations of motion resolution method for spin-boson dynamics.

  9. Open Systems with Error Bounds: Spin-Boson Model with Spectral Density Variations.

    PubMed

    Mascherpa, F; Smirne, A; Huelga, S F; Plenio, M B

    2017-03-10

    In the study of open quantum systems, one of the most common ways to describe environmental effects on the reduced dynamics is through the spectral density. However, in many models this object cannot be computed from first principles and needs to be inferred on phenomenological grounds or fitted to experimental data. Consequently, some uncertainty regarding its form and parameters is unavoidable; this in turn calls into question the accuracy of any theoretical predictions based on a given spectral density. Here, we focus on the spin-boson model as a prototypical open quantum system, find two error bounds on predicted expectation values in terms of the spectral density variation considered, and state a sufficient condition for the strongest one to apply. We further demonstrate an application of our result, by bounding the error brought about by the approximations involved in the hierarchical equations of motion resolution method for spin-boson dynamics.

  10. Torque Enhancement, Spin Equilibrium, and Jet Power from Disk-Induced Opening of Pulsar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfrey, Kyle; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of a rotating star’s magnetic field with a surrounding plasma disk lies at the heart of many questions posed by neutron stars in X-ray binaries. We consider the opening of stellar magnetic flux due to differential rotation along field lines coupling the star and disk, using a simple model for the disk-opened flux, the torques exerted on the star by the magnetosphere, and the power extracted by the electromagnetic wind. We examine the conditions under which the system enters an equilibrium spin state, in which the accretion torque is instantaneously balanced by the pulsar wind torque alone. For magnetic moments, spin frequencies, and accretion rates relevant to accreting millisecond pulsars, the spin-down torque from this enhanced pulsar wind can be substantially larger than that predicted by existing models of the disk-magnetosphere interaction, and is in principle capable of maintaining spin equilibrium at frequencies less than 1 kHz. We speculate that this mechanism may account for the non-detection of frequency increases during outbursts of SAX J1808.4-3658 and XTE J1814-338, and may be generally responsible for preventing spin-up to sub-millisecond periods. If the pulsar wind is collimated by the surrounding environment, the resulting jet can satisfy the power requirements of the highly relativistic outflows from Cir X-1 and Sco X-1. In this framework, the jet power scales relatively weakly with accretion rate, {L}{{j}}\\propto {\\dot{M}}4/7, and would be suppressed at high accretion rates only if the stellar magnetic moment is sufficiently low.

  11. Development of New Open-Shell Perturbation and Coupled-Cluster Theories Based on Symmetric Spin Orbitals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A new spin orbital basis is employed in the development of efficient open-shell coupled-cluster and perturbation theories that are based on a restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) reference function. The spin orbital basis differs from the standard one in the spin functions that are associated with the singly occupied spatial orbital. The occupied orbital (in the spin orbital basis) is assigned the delta(+) = 1/square root of 2(alpha+Beta) spin function while the unoccupied orbital is assigned the delta(-) = 1/square root of 2(alpha-Beta) spin function. The doubly occupied and unoccupied orbitals (in the reference function) are assigned the standard alpha and Beta spin functions. The coupled-cluster and perturbation theory wave functions based on this set of "symmetric spin orbitals" exhibit much more symmetry than those based on the standard spin orbital basis. This, together with interacting space arguments, leads to a dramatic reduction in the computational cost for both coupled-cluster and perturbation theory. Additionally, perturbation theory based on "symmetric spin orbitals" obeys Brillouin's theorem provided that spin and spatial excitations are both considered. Other properties of the coupled-cluster and perturbation theory wave functions and models will be discussed.

  12. Development of New Open-Shell Perturbation and Coupled-Cluster Theories Based on Symmetric Spin Orbitals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A new spin orbital basis is employed in the development of efficient open-shell coupled-cluster and perturbation theories that are based on a restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) reference function. The spin orbital basis differs from the standard one in the spin functions that are associated with the singly occupied spatial orbital. The occupied orbital (in the spin orbital basis) is assigned the delta(+) = 1/square root of 2(alpha+Beta) spin function while the unoccupied orbital is assigned the delta(-) = 1/square root of 2(alpha-Beta) spin function. The doubly occupied and unoccupied orbitals (in the reference function) are assigned the standard alpha and Beta spin functions. The coupled-cluster and perturbation theory wave functions based on this set of "symmetric spin orbitals" exhibit much more symmetry than those based on the standard spin orbital basis. This, together with interacting space arguments, leads to a dramatic reduction in the computational cost for both coupled-cluster and perturbation theory. Additionally, perturbation theory based on "symmetric spin orbitals" obeys Brillouin's theorem provided that spin and spatial excitations are both considered. Other properties of the coupled-cluster and perturbation theory wave functions and models will be discussed.

  13. An open-shell restricted Hartree-Fock perturbation theory based on symmetric spin orbitals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    1993-01-01

    A new open-shell perturbation theory is formulated in terms of symmetric spin orbitals. Only one set of spatial orbitals is required, thereby reducing the number of independent coefficients in the perturbed wavefunctions. For second order, the computational cost is shown to be similar to a closed-shell calculation. This formalism is therefore more efficient than the recently developed RMP, ROMP or RMP-MBPT theories. The perturbation theory described herein was designed to have a close correspondence with our recently proposed coupled-cluster theory based on symmetric spin orbitals. The first-order wavefunction contains contributions from only doubly excited determinants. Equilibrium structures and vibrational frequencies determined from second-order perturbation theory are presented for OH, NH, CH, 02, NH2 and CH2.

  14. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory utilizing density functional description of monomers for high-spin open-shell complexes.

    PubMed

    Zuchowski, Piotr S; Podeszwa, Rafał; Moszyński, Robert; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2008-08-28

    We present an implementation of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) to interactions of high-spin open-shell monomers forming high-spin dimers. The monomer spin-orbitals used in the expressions for the electrostatic and exchange contributions to the interaction energy are obtained from density functional theory using a spin-restricted formulation of the open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS) method. The dispersion and induction energies are expressed through the density-density response functions predicted by the time-dependent ROKS theory. The method was applied to several systems: NH...He, CN...Ne, H2O...HO2, and NH...NH. It provides accuracy comparable to that of the best previously available methods such as the open-shell coupled-cluster method with single, double, and noniterative triple excitations, RCCSD(T), with a significantly reduced computational cost.

  15. The GlnR Regulon in Streptococcus mutans Is Differentially Regulated by GlnR and PmrA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Chen, Yueh-Ying; Hung, Jui-Lung; Chen, Pei-Min; Chia, Jean-San

    2016-01-01

    GlnR-mediated repression of the GlnR regulon at acidic pH is required for optimal acid tolerance in Streptococcus mutans, the etiologic agent for dental caries. Unlike most streptococci, the GlnR regulon is also regulated by newly identified PmrA (SMUGS5_RS05810) at the transcriptional level in S. mutans GS5. Results from gel mobility shift assays confirmed that both GlnR and PmrA recognized the putative GlnR box in the promoter regions of the GlnR regulon genes. By using a chemostat culture system, we found that PmrA activated the expression of the GlnR regulon at pH 7, and that this activation was enhanced by excess glucose. Deletion of pmrA (strain ΔPmrA) reduced the survival rate of S. mutans GS5 at pH 3 moderately, whereas the GlnR mutant (strain ΔGlnR) exhibited an acid-sensitive phenotype in the acid killing experiments. Elevated biofilm formation in both ΔGlnR and ΔPmrA mutant strains is likely a result of indirect regulation of the GlnR regulon since GlnR and PmrA regulate the regulon differently. Taken together, it is suggested that activation of the GlnR regulon by PmrA at pH 7 ensures adequate biosynthesis of amino acid precursor, whereas repression by GlnR at acidic pH allows greater ATP generation for acid tolerance. The tight regulation of the GlnR regulon in response to pH provides an advantage for S. mutans to better survive in its primary niche, the oral cavity.

  16. Critical bifurcation point of the openZ(5)-symmetric spin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnier, B.

    1991-07-01

    The critical behavior of the general isotropic, ferromagnetic two-dimensional spin system with openZ(5) symmetry is studied with use of high-temperature expansions of its mass gap. On the basis of these expansions we propose a simple analytic representation of the mass gap which naturally reproduces all the different phase transitions exhibited by this model (first order and second order of the Ising and of the Kosterlitz-Thouless types). In addition, the bifurcation point where the soft phases originate is clearly identified with the Fateev-Zamolodchikov value.

  17. Sequence and expression of GLN3, a positive nitrogen regulatory gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encoding a protein with a putative zinc finger DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Minehart, P L; Magasanik, B

    1991-01-01

    The GLN3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the activation of transcription of a number of genes in response to the replacement of glutamine by glutamate as source of nitrogen. We cloned the GLN3 gene and constructed null alleles by gene disruption. GLN3 is not essential for growth, but increased copies of GLN3 lead to a drastic decrease in growth rate. The complete nucleotide sequence of the GLN3 gene was determined, revealing one open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 730 amino acids, with a molecular weight of approximately 80,000. The GLN3 protein contains a single putative Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger which has homology to the Neurospora crassa NIT2 protein, the Aspergillus nidulans AREA protein, and the erythroid-specific transcription factor GATA-1. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that the GLN3 protein binds the nitrogen upstream activation sequence of GLN1, the gene encoding glutamine synthetase. Neither control of transcription nor control of initiation of translation of GLN3 is important for regulation in response to glutamine availability. Images PMID:1682800

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of the Role of GlnD/GlnBK in Nitrogen Stress Adaptation by Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021

    PubMed Central

    Yurgel, Svetlana N.; Rice, Jennifer; Kahn, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional changes in the nitrogen stress response (NSR) of wild type S. meliloti Rm1021, and isogenic strains missing both PII proteins, GlnB and GlnK, or carrying a ΔglnD-sm2 mutation were analyzed using whole-genome microarrays. This approach allowed us to identify a number of new genes involved in the NSR and showed that the response of these bacteria to nitrogen stress overlaps with other stress responses, including induction of the fixK2 transcriptional activator and genes that are part of the phosphate stress response. Our data also show that GlnD and GlnBK proteins may regulate many genes that are not part of the NSR. Analysis of transcriptome profiles of the Rm1021 ΔglnD-sm2 strain allowed us to identify several genes that appear to be regulated by GlnD without the participation of the PII proteins. PMID:23516427

  19. Spin-adapted open-shell time-dependent density functional theory. III. An even better and simpler formulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2011-11-21

    The recently proposed spin-adapted time-dependent density functional theory (S-TD-DFT) [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 064106 (2010)] resolves the spin-contamination problem in describing singly excited states of high spin open-shell systems. It is an extension of the standard restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham-based TD-DFT which can only access those excited states due to singlet-coupled single excitations. It is also far superior over the unrestricted Kohn-Sham-based TD-DFT (U-TD-DFT) which suffers from severe spin contamination for those excited states due to triplet-coupled single excitations. Nonetheless, the accuracy of S-TD-DFT for high spin open-shell systems is still inferior to TD-DFT for well-behaved closed-shell systems. The reason can be traced back to the violation of the spin degeneracy conditions (SDC) by approximate exchange-correlation (XC) functionals. Noticing that spin-adapted random phase approximation (S-RPA) can indeed maintain the SDC by virtue of the Wigner-Eckart theorem, a hybrid ansatz combining the good of S-TD-DFT and S-RPA can immediately be envisaged. The resulting formalism, dubbed as X-TD-DFT, is free of spin contamination and can also be viewed as a S-RPA correction to the XC kernel of U-TD-DFT. Compared with S-TD-DFT, X-TD-DFT leads to much improved results for the low-lying excited states of, e.g., N(2)(+), yet with much reduced computational cost. Therefore, X-TD-DFT can be recommended for routine calculations of excited states of high spin open-shell systems.

  20. Derivation of matrix product states for the Heisenberg spin chain with open boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhongtao; Bolech, C. J.

    2017-03-01

    Using the algebraic Bethe Ansatz, we derive a matrix product representation of the exact Bethe-Ansatz states of the six-vertex Heisenberg chain (either X X X or X X Z and spin-1/2 ) with open boundary conditions. In this representation, the components of the Bethe eigenstates are expressed as traces of products of matrices that act on a tensor product of auxiliary spaces. As compared to the matrix product states of the same Heisenberg chain but with periodic boundary conditions, the dimension of the exact auxiliary matrices is enlarged as if the conserved number of spin-flips considered would have been doubled. This result is generic for any non-nested integrable model, as is clear from our derivation, and we further show this by providing an additional example of the same matrix product state construction for a well-known model of a gas of interacting bosons. Counterintuitively, the matrices do not depend on the spatial coordinate despite the open boundaries, and thus they suggest generic ways of exploiting (emergent) translational invariance both for finite size and in the thermodynamic limit.

  1. Communication: Spin densities within a unitary group based spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory: Analytic evaluation of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants for the combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Dipayan Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-07-07

    We report analytical calculations of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants in radicals using a spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory, namely, the unitary group based combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. A scheme for the evaluation of the one-particle spin-density matrix required in these calculations is outlined within the spin-free formulation of the COSCC approach. In this scheme, the one-particle spin-density matrix for an open-shell state with spin S and M{sub S} = + S is expressed in terms of the one- and two-particle spin-free (charge) density matrices obtained from the Lagrangian formulation that is used for calculating the analytic first derivatives of the energy. Benchmark calculations are presented for NO, NCO, CH{sub 2}CN, and two conjugated π-radicals, viz., allyl and 1-pyrrolyl in order to demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  2. Spin-orbit-path hybrid Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entanglement and open-destination teleportation with multiple degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lixiang; She Weilong

    2011-03-15

    We propose a scheme to generate hybrid Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entanglement where multiple photons are entangled in different degrees of freedom of spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), and path (linear momentum). The generation involves mapping the preliminary OAM entanglement of photon pairs onto their spin-orbit and spin-path degrees of freedom, respectively. Based on the hybrid GHZ entanglement, we demonstrate an open-destination teleportation with multiples degrees of freedom, via which a spin state of a single photon is teleported onto a superposition of multiple photons with the postselection technique and the original information could be read out at any photon in individual spin, OAM, or the linear-momentum state. Our scheme holds promise for asymmetric optical quantum network.

  3. An inhomogeneous T-Q equation for the open XXX chain with general boundary terms: completeness and arbitrary spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomechie, Rafael I.

    2013-11-01

    An inhomogeneous T-Q equation has recently been proposed by Cao, Yang, Shi and Wang for the open spin-1/2 XXX chain with general (nondiagonal) boundary terms. We argue that a simplified version of this equation describes all the eigenvalues of the transfer matrix of this model. We also propose a generating function for the inhomogeneous T-Q equations of arbitrary spin.

  4. Role of open boundary conditions on the hysteretic behaviour of one-dimensional spin crossover nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiruta, Daniel; Linares, Jorge; Miyashita, Seiji; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2014-05-01

    In order to explain clearly the role of the open boundary conditions (OBCs) on phase transition in one dimensional system, we consider an Ising model with both short-range (J) and long-range (G) interactions, which has allowed us to study the cooperative nature of spin-crossover (SCO) materials at the nanometer scale. At this end, we developed a transfer-matrix method for one-dimensional (1D) SCO system with free boundary conditions, and we give numerical evidences for how the thermal spin transition curves vary as a function of the physical parameters (J, G) or an applied pressure. Moreover for OBCs case, we have derived the bulk, surface and finite-size contributions to the free energy and we have investigated the variation of these energies as function of J and system size. We have found that the surface free energy behaves like J⟨σ⟩2, where ⟨σ⟩ is the average magnetization per site. Since the properties of the nanometric scale are dramatically influenced by the system's size (N), our analytical outcomes for the size dependence represent a step to achieve new characteristic of the future devices and also a way to find various novel properties which are absent in the bulk materials.

  5. Role of open boundary conditions on the hysteretic behaviour of one-dimensional spin crossover nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chiruta, Daniel; Linares, Jorge E-mail: miya@spin.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Boukheddaden, Kamel; Miyashita, Seiji E-mail: miya@spin.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-05-21

    In order to explain clearly the role of the open boundary conditions (OBCs) on phase transition in one dimensional system, we consider an Ising model with both short-range (J) and long-range (G) interactions, which has allowed us to study the cooperative nature of spin-crossover (SCO) materials at the nanometer scale. At this end, we developed a transfer-matrix method for one-dimensional (1D) SCO system with free boundary conditions, and we give numerical evidences for how the thermal spin transition curves vary as a function of the physical parameters (J, G) or an applied pressure. Moreover for OBCs case, we have derived the bulk, surface and finite-size contributions to the free energy and we have investigated the variation of these energies as function of J and system size. We have found that the surface free energy behaves like J〈σ〉{sup 2}, where 〈σ〉 is the average magnetization per site. Since the properties of the nanometric scale are dramatically influenced by the system's size (N), our analytical outcomes for the size dependence represent a step to achieve new characteristic of the future devices and also a way to find various novel properties which are absent in the bulk materials.

  6. Spin-adapted open-shell random phase approximation and time-dependent density functional theory. I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2010-08-14

    The spin-adaptation of single-reference quantum chemical methods for excited states of open-shell systems has been nontrivial. The primary reason is that the configuration space, generated by a truncated rank of excitations from only one component of a reference multiplet, is spin-incomplete. Those "missing" configurations are of higher ranks and can, in principle, be recaptured by a particular class of excitation operators. However, the resulting formalisms are then quite involved and there are situations [e.g., time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) under the adiabatic approximation] that prevent one from doing so. To solve this issue, we propose here a tensor-coupling scheme that invokes all the components of a reference multiplet (i.e., a tensor reference) rather than increases the excitation ranks. A minimal spin-adapted n-tuply excited configuration space can readily be constructed by tensor products between the n-tuple tensor excitation operators and the chosen tensor reference. Further combined with the tensor equation-of-motion formalism, very compact expressions for excitation energies can be obtained. As a first application of this general idea, a spin-adapted open-shell random phase approximation is first developed. The so-called "translation rule" is then adopted to formulate a spin-adapted, restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS)-based TD-DFT (ROKS-TD-DFT). Here, a particular symmetry structure has to be imposed on the exchange-correlation kernel. While the standard ROKS-TD-DFT can access only excited states due to singlet-coupled single excitations, i.e., only some of the singly excited states of the same spin (S(i)) as the reference, the new scheme can capture all the excited states of spin S(i)-1, S(i), or S(i)+1 due to both singlet- and triplet-coupled single excitations. The actual implementation and computation are very much like the (spin-contaminated) unrestricted Kohn-Sham-based TD-DFT. It is also shown that spin-contaminated spin

  7. Tomograms for open quantum systems: In(finite) dimensional optical and spin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thapliyal, Kishore; Banerjee, Subhashish; Pathak, Anirban

    2016-03-15

    Tomograms are obtained as probability distributions and are used to reconstruct a quantum state from experimentally measured values. We study the evolution of tomograms for different quantum systems, both finite and infinite dimensional. In realistic experimental conditions, quantum states are exposed to the ambient environment and hence subject to effects like decoherence and dissipation, which are dealt with here, consistently, using the formalism of open quantum systems. This is extremely relevant from the perspective of experimental implementation and issues related to state reconstruction in quantum computation and communication. These considerations are also expected to affect the quasiprobability distribution obtained from experimentally generated tomograms and nonclassicality observed from them. -- Highlights: •Tomograms are constructed for open quantum systems. •Finite and infinite dimensional quantum systems are studied. •Finite dimensional systems (phase states, single & two qubit spin states) are studied. •A dissipative harmonic oscillator is considered as an infinite dimensional system. •Both pure dephasing as well as dissipation effects are studied.

  8. Nonequilibrium effective field theory for absorbing state phase transitions in driven open quantum spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhold, Michael; Everest, Benjamin; Marcuzzi, Matteo; Lesanovsky, Igor; Diehl, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Phase transitions to absorbing states are among the simplest examples of critical phenomena out of equilibrium. The characteristic feature of these models is the presence of a fluctuationless configuration which the dynamics cannot leave, which has proved a rather stringent requirement in experiments. Recently, a proposal to seek such transitions in highly tunable systems of cold-atomic gases offers to probe this physics and, at the same time, to investigate the robustness of these transitions to quantum coherent effects. Here, we specifically focus on the interplay between classical and quantum fluctuations in a simple driven open quantum model which, in the classical limit, reproduces a contact process, which is known to undergo a continuous transition in the "directed percolation" universality class. We derive an effective long-wavelength field theory for the present class of open spin systems and show that, due to quantum fluctuations, the nature of the transition changes from second to first order, passing through a bicritical point which appears to belong instead to the "tricritical directed percolation" class.

  9. Spin-adapted open-shell time-dependent density functional theory. II. Theory and pilot application.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian; Zhang, Yong; Suo, Bingbing

    2011-04-07

    The excited states of open-shell systems calculated by unrestricted Kohn-Sham-based time-dependent density functional theory (U-TD-DFT) are often heavily spin-contaminated and hence meaningless. This is solved ultimately by the recently proposed spin-adapted time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) (S-TD-DFT) [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 064106 (2010)]. Unlike the standard restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham-based TD-DFT (R-TD-DFT) which can only access the singlet-coupled single excitations, the S-TD-DFT can capture both the singlet- and triplet-coupled single excitations with the same computational effort as the U-TD-DFT. The performances of the three approaches (U-TD-DFT, R-TD-DFT, and S-TD-DFT) are compared for both the spin-conserving and spin-flip excitations of prototypical open-shell systems, the nitrogen (N(2)(+)) and naphthalene (C(10)H(8)(+)) cations. The results show that the S-TD-DFT gives rise to balanced descriptions of excited states of open-shell systems.

  10. Independent transcription of glutamine synthetase (glnA2) and glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase (glnE) in Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hotter, Grant S; Mouat, Pania; Collins, Desmond M

    2008-09-01

    Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess four glutamine synthetase homologues, two of which, glnA1 and glnA2, are required for virulence and are located on the bacterial chromosome on either side of glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase (glnE). While glnA1 is encoded on the complementary strand, glnA2 is located 48bp upstream from glnE, raising the possibility that glnA2 and glnE may be co-transcribed. However, previous studies in M. bovis and M. tuberculosis have painted a contradictory picture of the (co)transcriptional status of glnA2 and glnE. Given the importance of the genes at the glnA1-glnE-glnA2 locus, we sought to clarify the transcriptional status of glnA2 and glnE in both M. bovis and M. tuberculosis. Reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that glnA2 and glnE were independently transcribed in all six M. bovis and M. tuberculosis strains examined. Northern analysis of the glnA2 transcript in M. bovis AF2122/97 and M. tuberculosis H37Rv showed that it was monocistronic. These results predicted the presence of a glnE transcriptional start site in the glnA2-glnE intergenic region. An identical start site was confirmed in M. bovis AF2122/97 and M. tuberculosis H37Rv using 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Typical mycobacterial -10 and -35 sequences are associated with this start site.

  11. Quantum correlations in different density-matrix representations of spin-1/2 open chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fel'dman, E. B.; Zenchuk, A. I.

    2012-07-01

    We consider quantum correlations in a spin-1/2 open chain of N nodes with the XY Hamiltonian using different bases for the density-matrix representation and the initial state with a single polarized node. These bases of our choice are the following: (i) the basis of eigenvectors of the fermion operators which appears naturally through the Jordan-Wigner transformation (this representation of the density matrix is referred to as the β representation); (ii) its Fourier representation (c representation of the density matrix); and (iii) the basis of eigenvectors of the operators Ijz (the z projection of the jth spin, j=1,⋯,N). Although for the short chains (a few nodes) the qualitative behavior of the entanglement and the discord are very similar (the difference is quantitative), this is not valid for longer chains (N≳10). In this case, there are qualitative and quantitative distinctions between the entanglement and the discord in all three cases. We underline the three most important features: (i) the quantum discord is static in the β representation, where the entanglement is identical to zero; (ii) in the c representation, the concurrence may be nonzero only between the nearest neighbors (with a single exception), while the discord is nonzero between any two nodes; and (iii) there is so-called “echo” in the evolution of the discord, which is not observed in the evolution of the concurrence. Using different bases, we may choose the preferable behavior of quantum correlations which allows a given quantum system to be more flexible in applications.

  12. Nitrogen regulation of protein-protein interactions and transcript levels of GlnK PII regulator and AmtB ammonium transporter homologs in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Pedro-Roig, Laia; Lange, Christian; Bonete, María José; Soppa, Jörg; Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2013-10-01

    Gene homologs of GlnK PII regulators and AmtB-type ammonium transporters are often paired on prokaryotic genomes, suggesting these proteins share an ancient functional relationship. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in Archaea that GlnK associates with AmtB in membrane fractions after ammonium shock, thus, providing a further insight into GlnK-AmtB as an ancient nitrogen sensor pair. For this work, Haloferax mediterranei was advanced for study through the generation of a pyrE2-based counterselection system that was used for targeted gene deletion and expression of Flag-tagged proteins from their native promoters. AmtB1-Flag was detected in membrane fractions of cells grown on nitrate and was found to coimmunoprecipitate with GlnK after ammonium shock. Thus, in analogy to bacteria, the archaeal GlnK PII may block the AmtB1 ammonium transporter under nitrogen-rich conditions. In addition to this regulated protein-protein interaction, the archaeal amtB-glnK gene pairs were found to be highly regulated by nitrogen availability with transcript levels high under conditions of nitrogen limitation and low during nitrogen excess. While transcript levels of glnK-amtB are similarly regulated by nitrogen availability in bacteria, transcriptional regulators of the bacterial glnK promoter including activation by the two-component signal transduction proteins NtrC (GlnG, NRI) and NtrB (GlnL, NRII) and sigma factor σ(N) (σ(54) ) are not conserved in archaea suggesting a novel mechanism of transcriptional control. © 2013 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Experimental Observation of a Topological Band Gap Opening in Ultracold Fermi Gases with Two-Dimensional Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zengming; Huang, Lianghui; Peng, Peng; Li, Donghao; Chen, Liangchao; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chuanwei; Wang, Pengjun; Zhang, Jing

    2016-12-02

    The recent experimental realization of synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) opens a new avenue for exploring novel quantum states with ultracold atoms. However, in experiments for generating two-dimensional SOC (e.g., Rashba type), a perpendicular Zeeman field, which opens a band gap at the Dirac point and induces many topological phenomena, is still lacking. Here, we theoretically propose and experimentally realize a simple scheme for generating two-dimensional SOC and a perpendicular Zeeman field simultaneously in ultracold Fermi gases by tuning the polarization of three Raman lasers that couple three hyperfine ground states of atoms. The resulting band gap opening at the Dirac point is probed using spin injection radio-frequency spectroscopy. Our observation may pave the way for exploring topological transport and topological superfluids with exotic Majorana and Weyl fermion excitations in ultracold atoms.

  14. Experimental Observation of a Topological Band Gap Opening in Ultracold Fermi Gases with Two-Dimensional Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zengming; Huang, Lianghui; Peng, Peng; Li, Donghao; Chen, Liangchao; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chuanwei; Wang, Pengjun; Zhang, Jing

    2016-12-01

    The recent experimental realization of synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) opens a new avenue for exploring novel quantum states with ultracold atoms. However, in experiments for generating two-dimensional SOC (e.g., Rashba type), a perpendicular Zeeman field, which opens a band gap at the Dirac point and induces many topological phenomena, is still lacking. Here, we theoretically propose and experimentally realize a simple scheme for generating two-dimensional SOC and a perpendicular Zeeman field simultaneously in ultracold Fermi gases by tuning the polarization of three Raman lasers that couple three hyperfine ground states of atoms. The resulting band gap opening at the Dirac point is probed using spin injection radio-frequency spectroscopy. Our observation may pave the way for exploring topological transport and topological superfluids with exotic Majorana and Weyl fermion excitations in ultracold atoms.

  15. Local conservation laws in spin-\\frac{1}{2} XY chains with open boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagotti, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    We revisit the conserved quantities of the spin-\\frac{1}{2} XY model with open boundary conditions. In the absence of a transverse field, we find new families of local charges and show that half of the seeming conservation laws are conserved only if the number of sites is odd. In even chains the set of noninteracting charges is abelian, like in the periodic case when the number of sites is odd. In odd chains the set is doubled and becomes non-abelian, like in even periodic chains. The dependence of the charges on the parity of the chain’s size undermines the common belief that the thermodynamic limit of diagonal ensembles exists. We consider also the transverse-field Ising chain, where the situation is more ordinary. The generalization to the XY model in a transverse field is not straightforward and we propose a general framework to carry out similar calculations. We conjecture the form of the bulk part of the local charges and discuss the emergence of quasilocal conserved quantities. We provide evidence that in a region of the parameter space there is a reduction of the number of quasilocal conservation laws invariant under chain inversion. As a by-product, we study a class of block-Toeplitz-plus-Hankel operators and identify the conditions that their symbols satisfy in order to commute with a given block-Toeplitz.

  16. Open clusters as laboratories for stellar spin-down and magnetic activity decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Agueros, Marcel A.; Covey, Kevin R.

    2017-01-01

    The oldest open clusters within 250 pc of the Sun, the Hyades and Praesepe, are important benchmarks for calibrating stellar properties such as rotation and magnetic activity. As they have the same age and roughly solar metallicity, these clusters serve as an ideal laboratory for testing the agreement between theoretical and empirical rotation-activity relations at ~600 Myr. The repurposed Kepler mission, K2, has allowed us to measure rotation periods for dozens of Hyads and hundreds of Praesepe members, including the first periods measured for fully convective Hyads. These data have enabled new tests of models describing the evolution of stellar rotation; discrepancies with these models imply that we still do not fully understand how magnetic fields affect stellar spin-down. I will present rotation periods measured for 48 Hyads and 699 Praesepe members with K2, along with associated Halpha and X-ray fluxes. I will also show how we can compare the dependence of H-alpha and X-ray emission on rotation in order to test theories of magnetic field topology and stellar dynamos. These tests inform models of stellar wind-driven angular momentum loss and the age-rotation-activity relation.

  17. The open XXX spin chain in the SoV framework: scalar product of separate states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanine, N.; Maillet, J. M.; Niccoli, G.; Terras, V.

    2017-06-01

    We consider the XXX open spin-1/2 chain with the most general non-diagonal boundary terms, that we solve by means of the quantum separation of variables (SoV) approach. We compute the scalar products of separate states, a class of states which notably contains all the eigenstates of the model. As usual for models solved by SoV, these scalar products can be expressed as some determinants with a non-trivial dependance in terms of the inhomogeneity parameters that have to be introduced for the method to be applicable. We show that these determinants can be transformed into alternative ones in which the homogeneous limit can easily be taken. These new representations can be considered as generalizations of the well-known determinant representation for the scalar products of the Bethe states of the periodic chain. In the particular case where a constraint is applied on the boundary parameters, such that the transfer matrix spectrum and eigenstates can be characterized in terms of polynomial solutions of a usual T-Q equation, the scalar product that we compute here corresponds to the scalar product between two off-shell Bethe-type states. If in addition one of the states is an eigenstate, the determinant representation can be simplified, hence leading in this boundary case to direct analogues of algebraic Bethe ansatz determinant representations of the scalar products for the periodic chain.

  18. GlnB/GlnK PII proteins and regulation of the Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 nitrogen stress response and symbiotic function.

    PubMed

    Yurgel, Svetlana N; Rice, Jennifer; Mulder, Monika; Kahn, Michael L

    2010-05-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 Delta glnD-sm2 mutant, which is predicted to make a GlnD nitrogen sensor protein truncated at its amino terminus, fixes nitrogen in symbiosis with alfalfa, but the plants cannot use this nitrogen for growth (S. N. Yurgel and M. L. Kahn, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105:18958-18963, 2008). The mutant also has a generalized nitrogen stress response (NSR) defect. These results suggest a connection between GlnD, symbiotic metabolism, and the NSR, but the nature of this connection is unknown. In many bacteria, GlnD modifies the PII proteins, GlnB and GlnK, as it transduces a measurement of bacterial nitrogen status to a cellular response. We have now constructed and analyzed Rm1021 mutants missing GlnB, GlnK, or both proteins. Rm1021 Delta glnK Delta glnB was much more defective in its NSR than either single mutant, suggesting that GlnB and GlnK overlap in regulating the NSR in free-living Rm1021. The single mutants and the double mutant all formed an effective symbiosis, indicating that symbiotic nitrogen exchange could occur without the need for either GlnB or GlnK. N-terminal truncation of the GlnD protein interfered with PII protein modification in vitro, suggesting either that unmodified PII proteins were responsible for the glnD mutant's ineffective phenotype or that connecting GlnD and appropriate symbiotic behavior does not require the PII proteins.

  19. Open spin chains with generic integrable boundaries: Baxter equation and Bethe ansatz completeness from separation of variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanine, N.; Maillet, J. M.; Niccoli, G.

    2014-05-01

    We solve the longstanding problem of defining a functional characterization of the spectrum of the transfer matrix associated with the most general spin-1/2 representations of the six-vertex reflection algebra for general inhomogeneous chains. The corresponding homogeneous limit reproduces the spectrum of the Hamiltonian of the spin-1/2 open XXZ and XXX quantum chains with the most general integrable boundaries. The spectrum is characterized by a second order finite difference functional equation of Baxter type with an inhomogeneous term which vanishes only for some special but yet interesting non-diagonal boundary conditions. This functional equation is shown to be equivalent to the known separation of variables (SOV) representation, hence proving that it defines a complete characterization of the transfer matrix spectrum. The polynomial form of the Q-function allows us to show that a finite system of generalized Bethe equations can also be used to describe the complete transfer matrix spectrum.

  20. Excited states of large open-shell molecules: an efficient, general, and spin-adapted approach based on a restricted open-shell ground state wave function.

    PubMed

    Roemelt, Michael; Neese, Frank

    2013-04-11

    A spin-adapted configuration interaction with singles method that is based on a restricted open-shell reference function (ROCIS) with general total spin S is presented. All excited configuration state functions (CSFs) are generated with the aid of a spin-free second quantization formalism that only leads to CSFs within the first order interacting space. By virtue of the CSF construction, the formalism involves higher than singly excited determinants but not higher than singly excited configurations. Matrix elements between CSFs are evaluated on the basis of commutator relationships using a symbolic algebra program. The final equations were, however, hand-coded in order to maximize performance. The method can be applied to fairly large systems with more than 100 atoms in reasonable wall-clock times and also parallelizes well. Test calculations demonstrate that the approach is far superior to UHF-based configuration interaction with single excitations but necessarily falls somewhat short of quantitative accuracy due to the lack of dynamic correlation contributions. In order to implicitly account for dynamic correlation in a crude way, the program optionally allows for the use of Kohn-Sham orbitals in combination with a modest downscaling of two-electron integrals (DFT/ROCIS). All two-electron integrals of Kohn-Sham orbitals that appear in the Hamiltonian matrix are reduced by a total of three scaling parameters that are suitable for a wide range of molecules. Test calculations on open-shell organic radicals as well as transition metal complexes demonstrate the wide applicability of the method and its ability to calculate the electronic spectra of large molecular systems.

  1. Comparison of spin dynamics and magnetic properties in antiferromagnetic closed and open molecular Cr-based rings.

    PubMed

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Bordonali, Lorenzo; Mariani, Manuel; Bordignon, Sara; Timco, Grigore; Winpenny, Richard; Borsa, Ferdinando; Lascialfari, Alessandro

    2015-12-23

    We present magnetization and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements performed in both closed Cr8 and open Cr8Zn antiferromagnetic molecular rings in the temperature range 1.65  <  T  <  300 K at different external magnetic fields. The magnetization measurements on Cr8Zn are consistent with a small decrease of the exchange constant J(Cr-Cr) and a much smaller gap between the singlet ground state and the first magnetic excited state when compared with the same properties of the closed ring Cr8, in agreement with previous inelastic neutron scattering results. The temperature dependence of the (1)H NMR nuclear spin lattice relaxation rate (NSLR), 1/T1(T), was found to be similar in both open and closed rings with a magnetic field dependent peak centered at a temperature of the order of the corresponding exchange constant J(Cr-Cr). Such main peak in the NSLR could be fitted with a single correlation frequency ω(c1) as in most molecular magnets. At low temperature T  <  4 K, a new feature not observed in previous NMR measurements on antiferromagnetic rings and consisting in a smaller peak of 1/T1(T) which is well resolved only in Cr8Zn, was singled out. This low-T peak indicates the presence of a second correlation frequency ω(c2) of the magnetization, found to be quite different between the two rings and thus possibly reflecting the different low temperature level structure associated with the different spin topology. The presence of ω(c2) is confirmed by the NMR spin-spin relaxation rate enhancement, which generates a two-steps wipe-out effect of the NMR signal intensity.

  2. Can density functional methods be used for open-shell actinide molecules? Comparison with multiconfigurational spin-orbit studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavaguéra-Sarrio, Carine; Vallet, Valérie; Maynau, Daniel; Marsden, Colin J.

    2004-09-01

    The geometries, electronic structures, and vibrational frequencies of two isoelectronic compounds PuO22+ and PuN2 have been studied in detail at the density functional theory (DFT) and multiconfigurational ab initio levels of theory. Dynamic correlation was taken into account using second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) and the variational difference-dedicated configuration interaction method for comparison with the results of the DFT study. Spin-orbit effects were included within the framework of an effective uncontracted spin-orbit configuration-interaction method which considers electron correlation effects and spin-orbit coupling on equal footing. The twelve lowest f-f electronic transitions are reported. The electronic ground state of both systems is found to be the Ω=4 component of 3Hg. We thus disagree with an earlier assignment of the ground state of PuN2 [E. F. Archibong and A. K. Ray, J. Mol. Struct: THEOCHEM 530, 165 (2000)]. Spin-orbit effects are small on both the geometry and vibrational frequencies of the ground states of PuO22+ and PuN2, but they completely change the distribution of electronically excited states. A comparison of results obtained with the two classes of methods allows us to demonstrate that an unambiguous assignment of the electronic ground state and electronic spectra requires the use of multireference methods including spin-orbit coupling. Single-reference methods such as DFT provide a reasonable description of the electronic properties of ground states of these open-shell systems, and therefore also of their structural and vibrational properties. The experimental antisymmetric stretching frequency of matrix-isolated PuN2 is reproduced well by both CASPT2 and DFT calculations; generalized gradient approximation formulations of DFT are more successful than hybrid versions in this respect. Ground-state properties of UO22+, UN2, UO2, PuO22+, and PuN2 are compared and discussed.

  3. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    DOE PAGES

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog ofmore » uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.« less

  4. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.

  5. Quantum group symmetries and completeness for \\boldsymbol {A}_{\\boldsymbol {2n}}^{\\boldsymbol{(2)}} open spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim; Nepomechie, Rafael I.; Wang, Chunguang

    2017-07-01

    We argue that the Hamiltonians for A(2)2n open quantum spin chains corresponding to two choices of integrable boundary conditions have the symmetries Uq(Bn) and Uq(Cn) , respectively. We find a formula for the Dynkin labels of the Bethe states (which determine the degeneracies of the corresponding eigenvalues) in terms of the numbers of Bethe roots of each type. With the help of this formula, we verify numerically (for a generic value of the anisotropy parameter) that the degeneracies and multiplicities of the spectra implied by the quantum group symmetries are completely described by the Bethe ansatz.

  6. Real-time simulation of nonequilibrium transport of magnetization in large open quantum spin systems driven by dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Hebenstreit, F.; Jiang, F.-J.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2015-09-01

    Using quantum Monte Carlo, we study the nonequilibrium transport of magnetization in large open strongly correlated quantum spin-1/2 systems driven by purely dissipative processes that conserve the uniform or staggered magnetization, disregarding unitary Hamiltonian dynamics. We prepare both a low-temperature Heisenberg ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet in two parts of the system that are initially isolated from each other. We then bring the two subsystems in contact and study their real-time dissipative dynamics for different geometries. The flow of the uniform or staggered magnetization from one part of the system to the other is described by a diffusion equation that can be derived analytically.

  7. Dynamics of open quantum spin systems: An assessment of the quantum master equation approach.

    PubMed

    Zhao, P; De Raedt, H; Miyashita, S; Jin, F; Michielsen, K

    2016-08-01

    Data of the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of a system containing one spin-1/2 particle interacting with a bath of up to 32 spin-1/2 particles is used to construct a Markovian quantum master equation describing the dynamics of the system spin. The procedure of obtaining this quantum master equation, which takes the form of a Bloch equation with time-independent coefficients, accounts for all non-Markovian effects inasmuch the general structure of the quantum master equation allows. Our simulation results show that, with a few rather exotic exceptions, the Bloch-type equation with time-independent coefficients provides a simple and accurate description of the dynamics of a spin-1/2 particle in contact with a thermal bath. A calculation of the coefficients that appear in the Redfield master equation in the Markovian limit shows that this perturbatively derived equation quantitatively differs from the numerically estimated Markovian master equation, the results of which agree very well with the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  8. Transcription of glutamine synthetase genes (glnA and glnN) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is differently regulated in response to nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Reyes, J C; Muro-Pastor, M I; Florencio, F J

    1997-04-01

    In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 we have previously reported the presence of two different proteins with glutamine synthetase activity: GSI, encoded by the glnA gene, and GSIII, encoded by the glnN gene. In this work we show that expression of both the glnA and glnN genes is subjected to transcriptional regulation in response to changes in nitrogen availability. Northern blot experiments and transcriptional fusions demonstrated that the glnA gene is highly transcribed in nitrate- or ammonium-grown cells and exhibits two- to fourfold-higher expression in nitrogen-starved cells. In contrast, the glnN gene is highly expressed only under nitrogen deficiency. Half-lives of both mRNAs, calculated after addition of rifampin or ammonium to nitrogen-starved cells, were not significantly different (2.5 or 3.4 min, respectively, for glnA mRNA; 1.9 or 1.4 min, respectively, for glnN mRNA), suggesting that changes in transcript stability are not involved in the regulation of the expression of both genes. Deletions of the glnA and glnN upstream regions were used to delimit the promoter and the regulatory sequences of both genes. Primer extension analysis showed that structure of the glnA gene promoter resembles those of the NtcA-regulated promoters. In addition, mobility shift assays demonstrated that purified, Escherichia coli-expressed Synechocystis NtcA protein binds to the promoter of the glnA gene. Primer extension also revealed the existence of a sequence related to the NtcA binding site upstream from the glnN promoter. However, E. coli-expressed NtcA failed to bind to this site. These findings suggest that an additional modification of NtcA or an additional factor is required for the regulation of glnN gene expression.

  9. Hyper Open-Shell States: The Lowest Excited Spin States of O Atom, Fe(2+) Ion, and FeF2.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltan; Verma, Pragya; Truhlar, Donald G

    2017-09-13

    Excited spin states are important for reactivity, catalysis, and magnetic applications. This work examines the relative energies of the spin states of O atom, Fe(2+) ion, and FeF2 and characterizes their excited spin states. Both single-configuration and multireference methods are used to establish the character of the lowest singlet excited state of all three systems and the lowest triplet excited state of Fe(2+) and FeF2. We find that the conventional representation of the orbital occupancies is incorrect in that the states have more unpaired electrons than the minimum number required by their total electron spin quantum number. In particular, we find that, for a given spin state, an electronic configuration with more than 2S unpaired electrons is more stable than the configuration with 2S unpaired electrons (where S is the spin of the system). For instance, triplet FeF2 with four unpaired electrons is lower in energy than triplet FeF2 with two unpaired electrons. Such highly open-shell configurations are labeled as hyper open-shell electronic configurations in this work and are compared to ordinary open-shell or closed-shell electronic configurations. The hyper open-shell states considered in this work are especially interesting because, unlike typical biradicals and polyradicals, the unpaired electrons are all on the same center. This work shows that the conventional perspective on spin-state energetics that usually assumes ordinary open shells for single-centered radicals needs modification to take into account, whenever possible, hyper open-shell configurations as well.

  10. Coupled-cluster method for open-shell heavy-element systems with spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhanli; Wang, Fan; Yang, Mingli

    2017-04-07

    The coupled-cluster approach with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) included in post-self-consistent field treatment (SOC-CC) using relativistic effective core potentials is extended to spatially non-degenerate open-shell systems in this work. The unrestricted Hartree-Fock determinant corresponding to the scalar relativistic Hamiltonian is employed as the reference and the open-shell SOC-CC approach is implemented at the CC singles and doubles (CCSD) level as well as at the CCSD level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations (CCSD(T)). Due to the breaking of time-reversal symmetry and spatial symmetry, this open-shell SOC-CC approach is rather expensive compared with the closed-shell SOC-CC approach. The open-shell SOC-CC approach is applied to some open-shell atoms and diatomic molecules with s(1), p(3), σ(1), or π(2) configuration. Our results indicate that rather accurate results can be achieved with the open-shell SOC-CCSD(T) approach for these systems. Dissociation energies for some closed-shell molecules containing heavy IIIA or VIIA atoms are also calculated using the closed-shell SOC-CC approach, where energies of the IIIA or VIIA atoms are obtained from those of the closed-shell ions and experimental ionization potentials or electron affinities. SOC-CCSD(T) approach affords reliable dissociation energies for these molecules. Furthermore, scalar-relativistic CCSD(T) approach with the same strategy can also provide reasonable dissociation energies for the 5th row IIIA or VIIA molecules, while the error becomes pronounced for the 6th row elements.

  11. Coupled-cluster method for open-shell heavy-element systems with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhanli; Wang, Fan; Yang, Mingli

    2017-04-01

    The coupled-cluster approach with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) included in post-self-consistent field treatment (SOC-CC) using relativistic effective core potentials is extended to spatially non-degenerate open-shell systems in this work. The unrestricted Hartree-Fock determinant corresponding to the scalar relativistic Hamiltonian is employed as the reference and the open-shell SOC-CC approach is implemented at the CC singles and doubles (CCSD) level as well as at the CCSD level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations (CCSD(T)). Due to the breaking of time-reversal symmetry and spatial symmetry, this open-shell SOC-CC approach is rather expensive compared with the closed-shell SOC-CC approach. The open-shell SOC-CC approach is applied to some open-shell atoms and diatomic molecules with s1, p3, σ1, or π2 configuration. Our results indicate that rather accurate results can be achieved with the open-shell SOC-CCSD(T) approach for these systems. Dissociation energies for some closed-shell molecules containing heavy IIIA or VIIA atoms are also calculated using the closed-shell SOC-CC approach, where energies of the IIIA or VIIA atoms are obtained from those of the closed-shell ions and experimental ionization potentials or electron affinities. SOC-CCSD(T) approach affords reliable dissociation energies for these molecules. Furthermore, scalar-relativistic CCSD(T) approach with the same strategy can also provide reasonable dissociation energies for the 5th row IIIA or VIIA molecules, while the error becomes pronounced for the 6th row elements.

  12. Efficient and accurate local single reference correlation methods for high-spin open-shell molecules using pair natural orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Andreas; Liakos, Dimitrios G.; Neese, Frank

    2011-12-01

    A production level implementation of the high-spin open-shell (spin unrestricted) single reference coupled pair, quadratic configuration interaction and coupled cluster methods with up to doubly excited determinants in the framework of the local pair natural orbital (LPNO) concept is reported. This work is an extension of the closed-shell LPNO methods developed earlier [F. Neese, F. Wennmohs, and A. Hansen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114108 (2009), 10.1063/1.3086717; F. Neese, A. Hansen, and D. G. Liakos, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 064103 (2009), 10.1063/1.3173827]. The internal space is spanned by localized orbitals, while the external space for each electron pair is represented by a truncated PNO expansion. The laborious integral transformation associated with the large number of PNOs becomes feasible through the extensive use of density fitting (resolution of the identity (RI)) techniques. Technical complications arising for the open-shell case and the use of quasi-restricted orbitals for the construction of the reference determinant are discussed in detail. As in the closed-shell case, only three cutoff parameters control the average number of PNOs per electron pair, the size of the significant pair list, and the number of contributing auxiliary basis functions per PNO. The chosen threshold default values ensure robustness and the results of the parent canonical methods are reproduced to high accuracy. Comprehensive numerical tests on absolute and relative energies as well as timings consistently show that the outstanding performance of the LPNO methods carries over to the open-shell case with minor modifications. Finally, hyperfine couplings calculated with the variational LPNO-CEPA/1 method, for which a well-defined expectation value type density exists, indicate the great potential of the LPNO approach for the efficient calculation of molecular properties.

  13. Revisiting the in vivo GlnR-binding sites at the genome scale in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, Paola; Aucouturier, Anne; Delumeau, Olivier; Auger, Sandrine

    2017-08-23

    In Bacillus subtilis, two major transcriptional factors, GlnR and TnrA, are involved in a sophisticated network of adaptive responses to nitrogen availability. GlnR was reported to repress the transcription of the glnRA, tnrA and ureABC operons under conditions of excess nitrogen. As GlnR and TnrA regulators share the same DNA binding motifs, a genome-wide mapping of in vivo GlnR-binding sites was still needed to clearly define the set of GlnR/TnrA motifs directly bound by GlnR. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with hybridization to DNA tiling arrays (ChIP-on-chip) to identify the GlnR DNA-binding sites, in vivo, at the genome scale. We provide evidence that GlnR binds reproducibly to 61 regions on the chromosome. Among those, 20 regions overlap the previously defined in vivo TnrA-binding sites. In combination with real-time in vivo transcriptional profiling using firefly luciferase, we identified the alsT gene as a new member of the GlnR regulon. Additionally, we characterized the GlnR secondary regulon, which is composed of promoter regions harboring a GlnR/TnrA box and bound by GlnR in vivo. However, the growth conditions revealing a GlnR-dependent regulation for this second category of genes are still unknown. Our findings show an extended overlap between the GlnR and TnrA in vivo binding sites. This could allow efficient and fine tuning of gene expression in response to nitrogen availability. GlnR appears to be part of complex transcriptional regulatory networks, which involves interactions between different regulatory proteins.

  14. Glutamine synthetase-constitutive mutation affecting the glnALG upstream promoter of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    León, P; Romero, D; Garciarrubio, A; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1985-12-01

    The spontaneous gln-76 mutation of Escherichia coli (Osorio et al., Mol. Gen. Genet. 194:114-123, 1984) was previously shown to be responsible for the cis-dominant constitutive expression of the glnA gene in the absence of a glnG-glnF activator system. Nucleotide sequence analysis has now revealed that gln-76 is a single transversion T.A to A.T, an up-promoter mutation affecting the -10 region of glnAp1, the upstream promoter of the glnALG control region. Both, wild-type and gln-76 DNA control regions were cloned into the promoter-probe plasmid pKO1. Galactokinase activity determinations of cells carrying the fused plasmids showed 10-fold more effective expression mediated by gln-76 than by the glnA wild-type control region. Primer extension experiments with RNA from strains carrying the gln-76 control region indicated that the transcription initiation sites were the same in both the gln-76 mutant and the wild type.

  15. Glutamine synthetase-constitutive mutation affecting the glnALG upstream promoter of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    León, P; Romero, D; Garciarrubio, A; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1985-01-01

    The spontaneous gln-76 mutation of Escherichia coli (Osorio et al., Mol. Gen. Genet. 194:114-123, 1984) was previously shown to be responsible for the cis-dominant constitutive expression of the glnA gene in the absence of a glnG-glnF activator system. Nucleotide sequence analysis has now revealed that gln-76 is a single transversion T.A to A.T, an up-promoter mutation affecting the -10 region of glnAp1, the upstream promoter of the glnALG control region. Both, wild-type and gln-76 DNA control regions were cloned into the promoter-probe plasmid pKO1. Galactokinase activity determinations of cells carrying the fused plasmids showed 10-fold more effective expression mediated by gln-76 than by the glnA wild-type control region. Primer extension experiments with RNA from strains carrying the gln-76 control region indicated that the transcription initiation sites were the same in both the gln-76 mutant and the wild type. Images PMID:2866175

  16. A meta-analysis of XPD/ERCC2 Lys751Gln polymorphism and melanoma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yalin; Zhang, Hao; Ying, Haifeng; Jiang, Wencheng; Chen, Qiwen

    2015-01-01

    We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to determine the association between XPD/ERCC2 Lys751Gln polymorphism and melanoma susceptibility. Based on comprehensive searches of the MEDLINE, EMBASE and ISI Web of knowledge, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Wanfang Database, we identified eligible studies about the association between XPD/ERCC2 Lys751Gln polymorphism and melanoma risk. A total of 5,961 cases and 8,669 controls in studies were included in this meta-analysis. All studies were conducted in Caucasian populations. Allele model (Lys vs. Gln: P = 0.53; OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.91-1.05), and homozygous model (Lys/ Lys vs. Gln/Gln: P = 0.32; OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.81 to 1.07) did not show increased risk of developing melanoma. Similarly, dominant model (Lys/ Lys+Lys/Gln vs. Gln/Gln: P = 0.18; OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.83 to 1.03) and recessive model (Lys/ Lys vs. Lys/Gln+Gln/Gln: P = 0.73; OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.88 to 1.09) failed to show increased risk of developing melanoma. Our pooled data suggest that there was no evidence for a major role of XPD/ERCC2 Lys751Gln polymorphism in the pathogenesis of melanoma among Caucasian populations. PMID:26550341

  17. Streptococcus mutans GlnK protein: an unusual PII family member.

    PubMed

    Portugal, M E G; Souza, E M; Pedrosa, F O; Benelli, E M

    2011-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive bacterium present in the oral cavity, and is considered to be one of the leading causes of dental caries. S. mutans has a glnK gene, which codes for a PII-like protein that is possibly involved in the integration of carbon, nitrogen and energy metabolism in several organisms. To characterize the GlnK protein of S. mutans, the glnK gene was amplified by PCR, and cloned into the expression vectors pET29a(+) and pET28b(+). The native GlnK-Sm was purified by anion exchange (Q-Sepharose) and affinity (Hi-Trap Heparin) chromatography. The GlnK-His-Sm protein was purified using a Hi-Trap Chelating-Ni2+ column. The molecular mass of the GlnK-His-Sm proteins was 85 kDa as determined by gel filtration, indicating that this protein is a hexamer in solution. The GlnK-His-Sm protein is not uridylylated by the Escherichia coli GlnD protein. The activities of the GlnK-Sm and GlnK-His-Sm proteins were assayed in E. coli constitutively expressing the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifLA operon. In K. pneumoniae, NifL inhibits NifA activity in the presence of high ammonium levels and the GlnK protein is required to reduce the inhibition of NifL in the presence of low ammonium levels. The GlnK-Sm protein was unable to reduce NifL inhibition of NifA protein. Surprisingly, the GlnK-His-Sm protein was able to partially reduce NifL inhibition of the NifA protein under nitrogen-limiting conditions, in a manner similar to the GlnK protein of E. coli. These results suggested that S. mutans GlnK is functionally different from E. coli PII proteins.

  18. HhaI DNA methyltransferase uses the protruding Gln237 for active flipping of its target cytosine.

    PubMed

    Daujotyte, Dalia; Serva, Saulius; Vilkaitis, Giedrius; Merkiene, Egle; Venclovas, Ceslovas; Klimasauskas, Saulius

    2004-06-01

    Access to a nucleotide by its rotation out of the DNA helix (base flipping) is used by numerous DNA modification and repair enzymes. Despite extensive studies of the paradigm HhaI methyltransferase, initial events leading to base flipping remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that the replacement of the target C:G pair with the 2-aminopurine:T pair in the DNA or shortening of the side chain of Gln237 in the protein severely perturb base flipping, but retain specific DNA binding. Kinetic analyses and molecular modeling suggest that a steric interaction between the protruding side chain of Gln237 and the target cytosine in B-DNA reduces the energy barrier for flipping by 3 kcal/mol. Subsequent stabilization of an open state by further 4 kcal/mol is achieved through specific hydrogen bonding of the side chain to the orphan guanine. Gln237 thus plays a key role in actively opening the target C:G pair by a "push-and-bind" mechanism.

  19. A Hirshfeld interpretation of the charge, spin distribution, and polarity of the dipole moment of the open shell (3Sigma-) nitrogen halides: NF, NCl, and NBr.

    PubMed

    Harrison, James F

    2009-07-28

    We calculated the dipole moment function for the ground (3)Sigma(-)(m(S) = +1) state of the open shell molecules, NF, NCl, and NBr, and analyzed it in terms of the charge and spin distribution and the induced atomic dipoles using the Hirshfeld partitioning of the electron density. The smallest dipole moment (0.026ea(0)) obtains with NF, in which the atoms have the largest difference in electronegativity, while the dipole moments in NCl and NBr are 0.441ea(0) and 0.506ea(0), respectively. All dipoles have the N(-)X(+) polarity. In the sigma system alpha spin electrons flow from N to the halogen while beta spin electrons flow in the opposite direction and interestingly from both the sigma and the pi systems of the halogen to the sigma system of N. In NF the number of beta spins lost by F is essentially equal to the number of alpha spins gained and the atomic charges are essentially 0. The small dipole in NF is the result of a slight imbalance in the induced atomic dipoles. For NCl and NBr the halogen loses more beta spins than it gains alpha spins resulting in the polarity N(-)X(+). It is interesting that at equilibrium N gained electrons in the pi system while the halogen lost pi electrons relative to the separated atoms. This however is not back donation in the usual sense because the electrons gained by N have alpha spin while those lost by the halogen have beta spin. Detailed examination of the spin flow shows that the excess alpha electrons in the pi system of N come from an intra-atomic transfer from the N sigma system. The induced atomic dipole moments essentially cancel at all internuclear separations and the polarity of the dipole moment accurately reflects the molecular charge distribution.

  20. GlnK Facilitates the Dynamic Regulation of Bacterial Nitrogen Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosztolai, Adam; Schumacher, Jörg; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G.; Heydenreich, Franziska; Bennett, Mark H.; Buck, Martin; Barahona, Mauricio

    2017-05-01

    Ammonium assimilation in E. coli is regulated by two paralogous proteins (GlnB and GlnK), which orchestrate interactions with regulators of gene expression, transport proteins and metabolic pathways. Yet how they conjointly modulate the activity of glutamine synthetase (GS), the key enzyme for nitrogen assimilation, is poorly understood. We combine experiments and theory to study the dynamic roles of GlnB and GlnK during nitrogen starvation and upshift. We measure time-resolved in vivo concentrations of metabolites, total and post-translationally modified proteins, and develop a concise biochemical model of GlnB and GlnK that incorporates competition for active and allosteric sites, as well as functional sequestration of GlnK. The model predicts the responses of GS, GlnB and GlnK under time-varying external ammonium level in the wild type and two genetic knock-outs. Our results show that GlnK is tightly regulated under nitrogen-rich conditions, yet it is expressed during ammonium run-out and starvation. This suggests a role for GlnK as a buffer of nitrogen shock after starvation, and provides a further functional link between nitrogen and carbon metabolisms.

  1. GlnK Facilitates the Dynamic Regulation of Bacterial Nitrogen Assimilation.

    PubMed

    Gosztolai, Adam; Schumacher, Jörg; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G; Heydenreich, Franziska; Bennett, Mark H; Buck, Martin; Barahona, Mauricio

    2017-05-23

    Ammonium assimilation in Escherichia coli is regulated by two paralogous proteins (GlnB and GlnK), which orchestrate interactions with regulators of gene expression, transport proteins, and metabolic pathways. Yet how they conjointly modulate the activity of glutamine synthetase, the key enzyme for nitrogen assimilation, is poorly understood. We combine experiments and theory to study the dynamic roles of GlnB and GlnK during nitrogen starvation and upshift. We measure time-resolved in vivo concentrations of metabolites, total and posttranslationally modified proteins, and develop a concise biochemical model of GlnB and GlnK that incorporates competition for active and allosteric sites, as well as functional sequestration of GlnK. The model predicts the responses of glutamine synthetase, GlnB, and GlnK under time-varying external ammonium level in the wild-type and two genetic knock-outs. Our results show that GlnK is tightly regulated under nitrogen-rich conditions, yet it is expressed during ammonium run-out and starvation. This suggests a role for GlnK as a buffer of nitrogen shock after starvation, and provides a further functional link between nitrogen and carbon metabolisms. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of nitrogen metabolism is altered in a glnB mutant strain of Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Amar, M; Patriarca, E J; Manco, G; Bernard, P; Riccio, A; Lamberti, A; Defez, R; Iaccarino, M

    1994-02-01

    We isolated a Rhizobium leguminosarum mutant strain altered in the glnB gene. This event, which has never been described in the Rhizobiaceae, is rare in comparison to mutants isolated in the contiguous gene, glnA. The glnB mutation removes the glnBA promoter but in vivo does not prevent glnA expression from its own promoter, which is not nitrogen regulated. The glnB mutant strain does not grow on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source and it is Nod+, Fix+. Two -24/-12 promoters, for the glnII and glnBA genes, are constitutively expressed in the glnB mutant, while two -35/-10-like promoters for glnA and ntrBC are unaffected. We propose that the glnB gene product, the PII protein, plays a negative role in the ability of NtrC to activate transcription from its target promoters and a positive role in the mechanism of nitrate utilization.

  3. Structure of GlnK1, a signalling protein from Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    PubMed Central

    Litz, Claudia; Helfmann, Sarah; Gerhardt, Stefan; Andrade, Susana L. A.

    2011-01-01

    GlnB and GlnK are ancient signalling proteins that play a crucial role in the regulation of nitrogen assimilation. Both protein types can be present in the same genome as either single or multiple copies. However, the gene product of glnK is always found in an operon together with an amt gene encoding an ammonium-transport (Amt) protein. Complex formation between GlnK and Amt blocks ammonium uptake and depends on the nitrogen level in the cell, which is regulated through the binding of specific effector molecules to GlnK. In particular, an ammonium shock to a cell culture previously starved in this nitrogen source or the binding of ATP to purified GlnK can stimulate effective complex formation. While the binding of ATP/ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (as a signal for low intracellular nitrogen) to GlnK have been reported and several GlnB/K protein structures are available, essential functional questions remain un­answered. Here, the crystal structure of A. fulgidus GlnK1 at 2.28 Å resolution and a comparison with the crystal structures of other GlnK proteins, in particular with that of its paralogue GlnK2 from the same organism, is reported. PMID:21301082

  4. Schelling segregation in an open city: A kinetically constrained Blume-Emery-Griffiths spin-1 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauvin, Laetitia; Nadal, Jean-Pierre; Vannimenus, Jean

    2010-06-01

    In the 70s Schelling introduced a multiagent model to describe the segregation dynamics that may occur with individuals having only weak preferences for “similar” neighbors. Recently variants of this model have been discussed, in particular, with emphasis on the links with statistical physics models. Whereas these models consider a fixed number of agents moving on a lattice, here, we present a version allowing for exchanges with an external reservoir of agents. The density of agents is controlled by a parameter which can be viewed as measuring the attractiveness of the city lattice. This model is directly related to the zero-temperature dynamics of the Blume-Emery-Griffiths spin-1 model, with kinetic constraints. With a varying vacancy density, the dynamics with agents making deterministic decisions leads to a variety of “phases” whose main features are the characteristics of the interfaces between clusters of agents of different types. The domains of existence of each type of interface are obtained analytically as well as numerically. These interfaces may completely isolate the agents leading to another type of segregation as compared to what is observed in the original Schelling model, and we discuss its possible socioeconomic correlates.

  5. XRCC1 genetic polymorphism Arg399Gln and hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Li, Bo; Wei, Yonggang; Yan, Lvnan; Wen, Tianfu; Zhao, Jichun; Xu, Mingqing

    2011-07-01

    Studies investigating the association between X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) genetic polymorphism Arg399Gln and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk report conflicting results. The aim of this study was to quantitatively summarize the evidence for such a relationship. Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase, CNKI and Chinese Biomedicine Database. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for XRCC1 polymorphism and HCC were calculated in a fixed-effects model (the Mantel-Haenszel method) and a random-effects model (the DerSimonian and Laird method) when appropriate. The pooled ORs were performed for a codominant model (Gln/Gln vs. Arg/Arg, Arg/Gln vs. Arg/Arg), a dominant model (Gln/Gln+Arg/Gln vs. Arg/Arg) and a recessive model (Gln/Gln vs. Arg/Gln+Arg/Arg). This meta-analysis included 11 case-control studies, which included 2208 HCC cases and 3265 controls. Overall, the variant genotypes (Gln/Gln and Arg/Gln) of Arg399Gln were not associated with HCC risk when compared with the wild-type Arg/Arg homozygote (Gln/Gln vs. Arg/Arg, OR=1.01, 95% CI=0.79-1.28; Arg/Gln vs. Arg/Arg, OR=1.09, 95% CI=0.81-1.45). Similarly, no associations were found in the dominant and recessive models (dominant model, OR=1.12, 95% CI=0.85-1.47; recessive model, OR=0.99, 95% CI=0.79-1.25). Limiting the analysis to the studies within Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, the results were persistent and robust. When stratifying for ethnicity, country/region and source of controls, no evidence of a significant association was observed in any subgroup. No publication bias was found in the present study. No association is found between the XRCC1 polymorphism Arg399Gln and the risk of HCC. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Bacillus subtilis GlnR contains an autoinhibitory C-terminal domain required for the interaction with glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wray, Lewis V; Fisher, Susan H

    2008-04-01

    The Bacillus subtilis GlnR transcription factor regulates gene expression in response to changes in nitrogen availability. Glutamine synthetase transmits the nitrogen regulatory signal to GlnR. The DNA-binding activity of GlnR is activated by a transient protein-protein interaction with feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase that stabilizes GlnR-DNA complexes. This signal transduction mechanism was analysed by creating mutant GlnR proteins with partial or complete truncations of their C-terminal domains. The truncated GlnR proteins were found to constitutively repress gene expression in vivo. This constitutive repression did not require glutamine synthetase. Purified mutant GlnR proteins bound DNA in vitro more tightly than wild-type GlnR protein and this binding was not activated by feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase. While full-length GlnR is monomeric, the truncated GlnR proteins contained significant levels of dimers. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of GlnR acts as an autoinhibitory domain that prevents GlnR dimerization and thus impedes DNA binding. The GlnR C-terminal domain is also required for the interaction between GlnR and feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase. Compared with the full-length GlnR protein, the truncated GlnR proteins were defective in their interaction with feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase in cross-linking experiments.

  7. Role of the Escherichia coli glnALG operon in regulation of ammonium transport

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakuman, A.; Schulman, I.; MacNeil, D.; Barnes, E.M. Jr.

    1986-04-01

    Escherichia coli expresses a specific ammonium (methylammonium) transport system (Amt) when cultured with glutamate or glutamine as the nitrogen source. Over 95% of this Amt activity is repressed by growth of wild-type cells on media containing ammonia. The control of Amt expression was studied with strains containing specific mutations in the glnALG operon. GlnA/sup -/ (glutamine synthetase deficient) mutants, which contain polar mutations on glnL and glnG genes and therefore have the Reg/sup -/ phenotype (fail to turn on nitrogen-regulated operons such as histidase), expressed less than 10% of the Amt activity observed for the parental strain. Similarly, low levels of Amt were found in GlnG mutants having the GlnA/sup +/ Reg/sup -/ phenotype. However, GlnA/sup -/ RegC mutants (a phenotype constitutive for histidase) contained over 70% of the parental Amt activity. At steady-state levels, GlnA/sup -/ RegC mutants accumulated chemically unaltered (/sup 14/C)methylammonium against a 60- to 80-fold concentration gradient, whereas the labeled substrate was trapped within parental cells as ..gamma..-glutamylmethylamide. GlnL Reg/sup -/ mutants (normal glutamine synthetase regulation) had less than 4% of the Amt activity observed for the parental strain. However, the Amt activity of GlnL RegC mutants was slightly higher than that of the parental strain and was not repressed during growth of cells in media containing ammonia. These findings demonstrate that glutamine synthetase is not required for Amt in E. coli. The loss of Amt in certain GlnA/sup -/ strains is due to polar effects on glnL nd glnG genes, whose products are involved in expression of nitrogen-regulated genes, including that for Amt.

  8. Open-chain unsaturated selanyl sulfides: stereochemical structure and stereochemical behavior of their 77Se-1H spin-spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B; Penzik, Maxim V; Potapov, Vladimir A; Amosova, Svetlana V

    2012-10-01

    Stereochemical structure of nine Z-2-(vinylsulfanyl)ethenylselanyl organyl sulfides has been investigated by means of experimental measurements and second-order polarization propagator approach calculations of their (1)H-(1)H, (13)C-(1)H, and (77)Se-(1)H spin-spin coupling constants together with a theoretical conformational analysis performed at the MP2/6-311G** level. All nine compounds were shown to adopt the preferable skewed s-cis conformation of their terminal vinylsulfanyl group, whereas the favorable rotational conformations with respect to the internal rotations around the C-S and C-Se bonds of the internal ethenyl group are both skewed s-trans. Stereochemical trends of (77)Se-(1)H spin-spin coupling constants originating in the geometry of their coupling pathways and the selenium lone pair effect were rationalized in terms of the natural J-coupling analysis within the framework of the natural bond orbital approach.

  9. Three of four GlnR binding sites are essential for GlnR-mediated activation of transcription of the Amycolatopsis mediterranei nas operon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Shao, Zhi-Hui; Yuan, Hua; Lu, Yin-Hua; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Wang, Jin

    2013-06-01

    In Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32, genes responsible for nitrate assimilation formed one operon, nasACKBDEF, whose transcription is induced by the addition of nitrate. Here, we characterized GlnR as a direct transcriptional activator for the nas operon. The GlnR-protected DNA sequences in the promoter region of the nas operon were characterized by DNase I footprinting assay, the previously deduced Streptomyces coelicolor double 22-bp GlnR binding consensus sequences comprising a1, b1, a2, and b2 sites were identified, and the sites were then mutated individually to test their roles in both the binding of GlnR in vitro and the GlnR-mediated transcriptional activation in vivo. The results clearly showed that only three GlnR binding sites (a1, b1, and b2 sites) were required by GlnR for its specific binding to the nas promoter region and efficient activation of the transcription of the nas operon in U32, while the a2 site seemed unnecessary.

  10. Genome wide analysis of the complete GlnR nitrogen-response regulon in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nitrogen is an essential element for bacterial growth and an important component of biological macromolecules. Consequently, responding to nitrogen limitation is critical for bacterial survival and involves the interplay of signalling pathways and transcriptional regulation of nitrogen assimilation and scavenging genes. In the soil dwelling saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis the OmpR-type response regulator GlnR is thought to mediate the transcriptomic response to nitrogen limitation. However, to date only ten genes have been shown to be in the GlnR regulon, a vastly reduced number compared to other organisms. Results We investigated the role of GlnR in the nitrogen limitation response and determined the entire GlnR regulon, by combining expression profiling of M. smegmatis wild type and glnR deletion mutant, with GlnR-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing. We identify 53 GlnR binding sites during nitrogen limitation that control the expression of over 100 genes, demonstrating that GlnR is the regulator controlling the assimilation and utilisation of nitrogen. We also determine a consensus GlnR binding motif and identify key residues within the motif that are required for specific GlnR binding. Conclusions We have demonstrated that GlnR is the global nitrogen response regulator in M. smegmatis, directly regulating the expression of more than 100 genes. GlnR controls key nitrogen stress survival processes including primary nitrogen metabolism pathways, the ability to utilise nitrate and urea as alternative nitrogen sources, and the potential to use cellular components to provide a source of ammonium. These studies further our understanding of how mycobacteria survive nutrient limiting conditions. PMID:23642041

  11. Genome wide analysis of the complete GlnR nitrogen-response regulon in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Victoria A; Barton, Geraint R; Robertson, Brian D; Williams, Kerstin J

    2013-05-04

    Nitrogen is an essential element for bacterial growth and an important component of biological macromolecules. Consequently, responding to nitrogen limitation is critical for bacterial survival and involves the interplay of signalling pathways and transcriptional regulation of nitrogen assimilation and scavenging genes. In the soil dwelling saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis the OmpR-type response regulator GlnR is thought to mediate the transcriptomic response to nitrogen limitation. However, to date only ten genes have been shown to be in the GlnR regulon, a vastly reduced number compared to other organisms. We investigated the role of GlnR in the nitrogen limitation response and determined the entire GlnR regulon, by combining expression profiling of M. smegmatis wild type and glnR deletion mutant, with GlnR-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing. We identify 53 GlnR binding sites during nitrogen limitation that control the expression of over 100 genes, demonstrating that GlnR is the regulator controlling the assimilation and utilisation of nitrogen. We also determine a consensus GlnR binding motif and identify key residues within the motif that are required for specific GlnR binding. We have demonstrated that GlnR is the global nitrogen response regulator in M. smegmatis, directly regulating the expression of more than 100 genes. GlnR controls key nitrogen stress survival processes including primary nitrogen metabolism pathways, the ability to utilise nitrate and urea as alternative nitrogen sources, and the potential to use cellular components to provide a source of ammonium. These studies further our understanding of how mycobacteria survive nutrient limiting conditions.

  12. XPC Lys939Gln polymorphism, smoking and risk of sporadic colorectal cancer among Malaysians

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Aizat, Abdul Aziz; Siti Nurfatimah, Mohd Shahpudin; Aminudin, Mustapha Mohd; Ankathil, Ravindran

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the risk association of xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) Lys939Gln polymorphism alone and in combination with cigarette smoking on colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. METHODS: Peripheral blood samples of 510 study subjects (255 CRC patients, 255 controls)were collected. DNA was extracted and genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The association between polymorphic genotype and CRC predisposition was determined using the OR and 95%CI. RESULTS: The frequency of the homozygous variant (Gln/Gln) genotype was significantly higher in cases compared with controls (16.0% vs 10.2%, P = 0.049). The Gln/Gln genotype of XPC showed a significantly higher association with the risk of CRC (OR = 1.884; 95%CI: 1.082-3.277; P = 0.025). In the case of allele frequencies, variant allele C was associated with a significantly increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.375; 95%CI: 1.050-1.802; P = 0.020). Moreover, the risk was markedly higher for those who were carriers of the Gln/Gln variant genotype and were also cigarette smokers (OR = 3.409; 95%CI: 1.061-10.949; P = 0.032). CONCLUSION: The XPC Gln/Gln genotype alone and in combination with smoking increases the risk of CRC among Malaysians. PMID:23801864

  13. XPC Lys939Gln polymorphism, smoking and risk of sporadic colorectal cancer among Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Aizat, Abdul Aziz; Siti Nurfatimah, Mohd Shahpudin; Aminudin, Mustapha Mohd; Ankathil, Ravindran

    2013-06-21

    To investigate the risk association of xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) Lys939Gln polymorphism alone and in combination with cigarette smoking on colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. Peripheral blood samples of 510 study subjects (255 CRC patients, 255 controls)were collected. DNA was extracted and genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The association between polymorphic genotype and CRC predisposition was determined using the OR and 95%CI. The frequency of the homozygous variant (Gln/Gln) genotype was significantly higher in cases compared with controls (16.0% vs 10.2%, P = 0.049). The Gln/Gln genotype of XPC showed a significantly higher association with the risk of CRC (OR = 1.884; 95%CI: 1.082-3.277; P = 0.025). In the case of allele frequencies, variant allele C was associated with a significantly increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.375; 95%CI: 1.050-1.802; P = 0.020). Moreover, the risk was markedly higher for those who were carriers of the Gln/Gln variant genotype and were also cigarette smokers (OR = 3.409; 95%CI: 1.061-10.949; P = 0.032). The XPC Gln/Gln genotype alone and in combination with smoking increases the risk of CRC among Malaysians.

  14. Opening a nodal gap by fluctuating spin-density wave in lightly doped La2 -xSrxCuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapon, Itzik; Ellis, David S.; Drachuck, Gil; Bazalitski, Galina; Weschke, Eugen; Schierle, Enrico; Strempfer, Jörg; Niedermayer, Christof; Keren, Amit

    2017-03-01

    We investigate whether the spin or charge degrees of freedom are responsible for the nodal gap in underdoped cuprates by performing inelastic neutron scattering and x-ray diffraction measurements on La2 -xSrxCuO4 , which is on the edge of the antiferromagnetic phase. We found that a fluctuating incommensurate spin-density wave (SDW) with a bottom part of an hourglass dispersion exists even in this magnetic sample. The strongest component of these fluctuations diminishes at the same temperature where the nodal gap opens. X-ray scattering measurements on the same crystal show no signature of a charge-density wave (CDW). Therefore, we suggest that the nodal gap in the electronic band of this cuprate opens due to fluctuating SDW with no contribution from CDW.

  15. XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism is not associated with breast cancer in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuren; Mao, Xiaohuan; Ming, Liang

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted to explore the association of XRCC1 polymorphisms with Breast cancer (BC) risk in Asians, but the results have been inconsistent. We therefore performed the present meta-analysis to explore the relationship in detail. Reported studies were searched from 1990 to October 15, 2014 in PubMed and Wan fang Med Online. We performed a meta-analysis of 13 published case-control studies fitting our eligibility criteria. These studies involved XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphisms in 4984 BC cases and 5744 controls in dominant (ArgArg vs. GlnGln+ArgGln), recessive (ArgGln+ArgArg vs. GlnGln), and co-dominant (ArgArg vs. GlnGln) inheritance models. The total odds Ratio (OR) and 95% CI were calculated and analyzed by Review Manager 5.2 and STATE 12. Overall, significantly increased BC risk was observed in any genetic model (dominant model: odds ration [OR] = 1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.08, 1.58]; recessive model: OR = 0.63, 95% CI = [0.50, 0.81]; codominant model: OR = 2.52, 95% CI: [1.38, 4.60]) when all eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis. In further stratified analyses, no association was found between Arg399Gln polymorphism and BC risk in Chinese fewer than three hereditary models. Our results suggest that the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism may be associated with increased Breast cancer risk among Asians, except Chinese population.

  16. Direct Involvement of the Master Nitrogen Metabolism Regulator GlnR in Antibiotic Biosynthesis in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    He, Juan-Mei; Zhu, Hong; Zheng, Guo-Song; Liu, Pan-Pan; Wang, Jin; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Zhu, Guo-Qiang; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Lu, Yin-Hua

    2016-12-16

    GlnR, an OmpR-like orphan two-component system response regulator, is a master regulator of nitrogen metabolism in the genus Streptomyces In this work, evidence that GlnR is also directly involved in the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis is provided. In the model strain Streptomyces coelicolor M145, an in-frame deletion of glnR resulted in markedly increased actinorhodin (ACT) production but reduced undecylprodigiosin (RED) biosynthesis when exposed to R2YE culture medium. Transcriptional analysis coupled with DNA binding studies revealed that GlnR represses ACT but activates RED production directly via the pathway-specific activator genes actII-ORF4 and redZ, respectively. The precise GlnR-binding sites upstream of these two target genes were defined. In addition, the direct involvement of GlnR in antibiotic biosynthesis was further identified in Streptomyces avermitilis, which produces the important anthelmintic agent avermectin. We found that S. avermitilis GlnR (GlnRsav) could stimulate avermectin but repress oligomycin production directly through the respective pathway-specific activator genes, aveR and olmRI/RII To the best of our knowledge, this report describes the first experimental evidence demonstrating that GlnR regulates antibiotic biosynthesis directly through pathway-specific regulators in Streptomyces Our results suggest that GlnR-mediated regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis is likely to be universal in streptomycetes. These findings also indicate that GlnR is not only a master nitrogen regulator but also an important controller of secondary metabolism, which may help to balance nitrogen metabolism and antibiotic biosynthesis in streptomycetes.

  17. Double heterozygous mutations Gln100Leu and His348Gln of the F7 gene in a patient with factor VII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zheng, Fangxiu; Jin, Yanhui; Wang, Mingshan; Zhu, Liqing; Yang, Lihong

    2013-03-01

    A 25-year-old Chinese woman who had a history of easy bruising was admitted to hospital due to uncontrolled epistaxis. She showed factor VII activity level of 2% and factor VII antigen level of 4% of the normal value. We detected a novel missense mutation g.8355 A>T (p.Gln100Leu) in the second epidermal growth factor-like (EGF) domain and a g.11482 T>G (p.His348Gln) in the catalytic domain. Although the Gln100 residue is close to the junction of EGF-2 domain with the serine protease domain, we infer that the substitution of polar negatively charged Gln residue at the position 100 with introduction of nonpolar Leu residue may be likely to perturb proper folding, resulting in decreasing factor VII activity.

  18. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  19. The codon 399 Arg/Gln XRCC1 polymorphism is associated with lung cancer in Indians.

    PubMed

    Natukula, Kirmani; Jamil, Kaiser; Pingali, Usha Rani; Attili, Venkata Satya Suresh; Madireddy, Umamaheshwar Rao Naidu

    2013-01-01

    The XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross complimenting group-I) gene in BER (base excision repair) pathway is essential for DNA repair process. Polymorphisms in this gene are associated with variations in the repair efficiency which might predispose individuals to development of various cancers. Two variants of XRCC1gene (at codon 399), Gln/Gln and Arg/Gln, have been shown to be related to lowered DNA repair capacity and increased genomic instability in multiple studies. Hence our investigation focused on genotyping these variants to correlate with other multiple risk factors in lung cancer (NSCLC) patients since we hypothesized that these variants of the XRCC1 gene might influence disease susceptibility. We examined the frequency of the polymorphism in one hundred cases and an almost equal number of controls after recording their demographics with a structured questionnaire. Genomic DNA from blood samples was extracted for PCR studies, followed by RFLP to determine the variants. The significance of the data was statistically analyzed. The three genotypes in cases and controls were Arg/Arg (40% and 54.45%); Gln/Gln (19% and 9.90%), and Arg/Gln (41.0% and 35.64%) respectively. Among these 3 genotypes, we found Gln/Gln and Arg/Gln to show association with lung cancer. Correlating these genotypes with several parameters, we also found that these two variants were associated with risk in males (p<0.05) and with smoking habits (p<0.05). In females Arg/Gln genotype showed association with stage of the disease (p=0.04). This is the first report in South Indian scenario where Arg399Gln genotypes were found to be associated with stage of the disease in females. It is concluded that XRCC1 genotypes Gln/Gln and Arg/Gln may influence cancer susceptibility in patients with smoking habits and these functional SNPs in XRCC1 gene may act as attractive candidate biomarkers in lung cancer for diagnosis and prognosis.

  20. Lid opening and unfolding in human pancreatic lipase at low pH revealed by site-directed spin labeling EPR and FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ranaldi, Sebastien; Belle, Valérie; Woudstra, Mireille; Rodriguez, Jorge; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Sturgis, James; Carriere, Frederic; Fournel, Andre

    2009-01-27

    The structural changes induced in human pancreatic lipase (HPL) by lowering the pH were investigated using a combined approach involving the use of site-directed spin labeling coupled to electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL-EPR) and Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The secondary structure of HPL observed with ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was found to be stable in the pH range of 3.0-6.5, where HPL remained active. Using a spin-label introduced into the lid of HPL at position 249, a reversible opening of the lid controlling the access to the active site was observed by EPR spectroscopy in the pH range of 3.0-5.0. In the same pH range, some structural changes were also found to occur outside the lid in a peptide stretch located near catalytic aspartate 176, using a spin-label introduced at position 181. Below pH 3.0, ATR-FTIR measurements indicated that HPL had lost most of its secondary structure. At these pH levels, the loss of enzyme activity was irreversible and the ability of HPL to bind to lipid emulsions was abolished. The EPR spectrum of the spin-label introduced at position 181, which was typical of a spin-label having a high mobility, confirmed the drastic structural change undergone by HPL in this particular region. The EPR spectrum of the spin-label at position 249 indicated, however, that the environment of this residue within the lid was not affected at pH 3.0 in comparison with that observed in the pH range of 3.0-5.0. This finding suggests that the disulfide bridge between the hinges of the lid kept the secondary structure of the lid intact, whereas the HPL was completely unfolded.

  1. Nitrogen metabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti-alfalfa symbiosis: dissecting the role of GlnD and PII proteins.

    PubMed

    Yurgel, Svetlana N; Rice, Jennifer; Kahn, Michael L

    2012-03-01

    To contribute nitrogen for plant growth and establish an effective symbiosis with alfalfa, Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 needs normal operation of the GlnD protein, a bifunctional uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-cleavage enzyme that measures cellular nitrogen status and initiates a nitrogen stress response (NSR). However, the only two known targets of GlnD modification in Rm1021, the PII proteins GlnB and GlnK, are not necessary for effectiveness. We introduced a Tyr→Phe variant of GlnB, which cannot be uridylylated, into a glnBglnK background to approximate the expected state in a glnD-sm2 mutant, and this strain was effective. These results suggested that unmodified PII does not inhibit effectiveness. We also generated a glnBglnK-glnD triple mutant and used this and other mutants to dissect the role of these proteins in regulating the free-living NSR and nitrogen metabolism in symbiosis. The glnD-sm2 mutation was dominant to the glnBglnK mutations in symbiosis but recessive in some free-living phenotypes. The data show that the GlnD protein has a role in free-living growth and in symbiotic nitrogen exchange that does not depend on the PII proteins, suggesting that S. meliloti GlnD can communicate with the cell by alternate mechanisms.

  2. Orbital-optimized opposite-spin scaled second order correlation: An economical method to improve the description of open-shell molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lochan, Rohini C.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Coupled cluster methods based on Brueckner orbitals are well-known to resolve the problems of symmetry-breaking and spin-contamination that are often associated with Hartree-Fock orbitals. However their computational cost is large enough to prevent application to large molecules. Here they present a simple approximation where the orbitals are optimized with the mean-field energy plus a correlation energy taken as the opposite-spin component of the second order many-body correlation energy, scaled by an empirically chosen parameter (recommended as 1.2 for general applications). This optimized 2nd order opposite spin (abbreviated as O2) method requires fourth order computation on each orbital iteration. O2 is shown to yield predictions of structure and frequencies for closed shell molecules that are very similar to scaled second order Moller-Plesset methods. However it yields substantial improvements for open shell molecules, where problems with spin-contamination and symmetry breaking are shown to be greatly reduced.

  3. Analytic first derivatives for a spin-adapted open-shell coupled cluster theory: Evaluation of first-order electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Dipayan Gauss, Jürgen

    2014-09-14

    An analytic scheme is presented for the evaluation of first derivatives of the energy for a unitary group based spin-adapted coupled cluster (CC) theory, namely, the combinatoric open-shell CC (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. The widely used Lagrange multiplier approach is employed for the derivation of an analytical expression for the first derivative of the energy, which in combination with the well-established density-matrix formulation, is used for the computation of first-order electrical properties. Derivations of the spin-adapted lambda equations for determining the Lagrange multipliers and the expressions for the spin-free effective density matrices for the COSCC approach are presented. Orbital-relaxation effects due to the electric-field perturbation are treated via the Z-vector technique. We present calculations of the dipole moments for a number of doublet radicals in their ground states using restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) and quasi-restricted HF (QRHF) orbitals in order to demonstrate the applicability of our analytic scheme for computing energy derivatives. We also report calculations of the chlorine electric-field gradients and nuclear quadrupole-coupling constants for the CCl, CH{sub 2}Cl, ClO{sub 2}, and SiCl radicals.

  4. Analytic first derivatives for a spin-adapted open-shell coupled cluster theory: evaluation of first-order electrical properties.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipayan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2014-09-14

    An analytic scheme is presented for the evaluation of first derivatives of the energy for a unitary group based spin-adapted coupled cluster (CC) theory, namely, the combinatoric open-shell CC (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. The widely used Lagrange multiplier approach is employed for the derivation of an analytical expression for the first derivative of the energy, which in combination with the well-established density-matrix formulation, is used for the computation of first-order electrical properties. Derivations of the spin-adapted lambda equations for determining the Lagrange multipliers and the expressions for the spin-free effective density matrices for the COSCC approach are presented. Orbital-relaxation effects due to the electric-field perturbation are treated via the Z-vector technique. We present calculations of the dipole moments for a number of doublet radicals in their ground states using restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) and quasi-restricted HF (QRHF) orbitals in order to demonstrate the applicability of our analytic scheme for computing energy derivatives. We also report calculations of the chlorine electric-field gradients and nuclear quadrupole-coupling constants for the CCl, CH2Cl, ClO2, and SiCl radicals.

  5. A combined DFT and restricted open-shell configuration interaction method including spin-orbit coupling: Application to transition metal L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roemelt, Michael; Maganas, Dimitrios; DeBeer, Serena; Neese, Frank

    2013-05-01

    A novel restricted-open-shell configuration interaction with singles (ROCIS) approach for the calculation of transition metal L-edge X-ray absorption spectra is introduced. In this method, one first calculates the ground state and a number of excited states of the non-relativistic Hamiltonian. By construction, the total spin is a good quantum number in each of these states. For a ground state with total spin S excited states with spin S' = S, S - 1, and S + 1 are constructed. Using Wigner-Eckart algebra, all magnetic sublevels with MS = S, …, -S for each multiplet of spin S are obtained. The spin-orbit operator is represented by a mean-field approximation to the full Breit-Pauli spin-orbit operator and is diagonalized over this N-particle basis. This is equivalent to a quasi-degenerate treatment of the spin-orbit interaction to all orders. Importantly, the excitation space spans all of the molecular multiplets that arise from the atomic Russell-Saunders terms. Hence, the method represents a rigorous first-principles approach to the complicated low-symmetry molecular multiplet problem met in L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In order to gain computational efficiency, as well as additional accuracy, the excitation space is restricted to single excitations and the configuration interaction matrix is slightly parameterized in order to account for dynamic correlation effects in an average way. To this end, it is advantageous to employ Kohn-Sham rather than Hartree-Fock orbitals thus defining the density functional theory/ROCIS method. However, the method can also be used in an entirely non-empirical fashion. Only three global empirical parameters are introduced and have been determined here for future application of the method to any system containing any transition metal. The three parameters were carefully calibrated using the L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy spectra of a test set of coordination complexes containing first row transition metals. These

  6. Glutamine synthetase stabilizes the binding of GlnR to nitrogen fixation gene operators.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Gabriela de C; Hauf, Ksenia; Sant'Anna, Fernando H; Forchhammer, Karl; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2017-03-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a high energy demanding process carried out by diazotrophic microorganisms that supply combined nitrogen to the biosphere. The genes related to BNF are strictly regulated, but these mechanisms are poorly understood in gram-positive bacteria. The transcription factor GlnR was proposed to regulate nitrogen fixation-related genes based on Paenibacillus comparative genomics. In order to validate this proposal, we investigated BNF regulatory sequences in Paenibacillus riograndensis SBR5(T) genome. We identified GlnR-binding sites flanking σ(A) -binding sites upstream from BNF-related genes. GlnR binding to these sites was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. GlnR-DNA affinity is greatly enhanced when GlnR is in complex with feedback-inhibited (glutamine-occupied) glutamine synthetase (GS). GlnR-GS complex formation is also modulated by ATP and AMP. Thereby, gene repression exerted by the GlnR-GS complex is coupled with nitrogen (glutamine levels) and energetic status (ATP and AMP). Finally, we propose a DNA-looping model based on multiple operator sites that represents a strong and strict regulation for these genes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Synthetic approaches to peptides containing the L-Gln-L-Val-D(S)-Dmt motif.

    PubMed

    Suaifan, Ghadeer A R Y; Arafat, Tawfiq; Threadgill, Michael D

    2007-05-15

    The pseudoprolines S-Dmo (5,5-dimethyl-4-oxaproline) and R-Dmt (5,5-dimethyl-4-thiaproline) have been used to study the effects of forcing a fully cis conformation in peptides. Synthesis of peptides containing these (which have the same configuration as L-Pro) is straightforward. However, synthesis of peptides containing S-Dmt is difficult, owing to the rapid cyclisation of L-Aaa-S-Dmt amides and esters to form the corresponding diketopiperazines (DKP); thus the intermediacy of L-Aaa-S-Dmt amides and esters must be avoided in the synthetic sequence. Peptides containing the L-Gln-L-Val-D(S)-Dmt motif are particularly difficult, owing to the insolubility of coupling partners containing Gln. Introduction of Gln as N-Boc-pyroglutamate overcame the latter difficulty and the dipeptide active ester BocPygValOC(6)F(5) coupled in good yield with S-DmtOH. BocPygVal-S- DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2) was converted quantitatively to BocGlnVal-S-DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2) with ammonia, demonstrating the utility of this approach. Two peptide derivatives (CbzSerLysLeuGlnVal-S-DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2) and CbzSerSerLysLeuGlnVal-S- DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2)) were assembled, using these new methods of coupling a dipeptide acid active ester with S-DmtOH and introduction of Gln as Pyg, followed by conventional peptide couplings. The presence of the Val caused these peptides to be cleaved very slowly by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at Leu Gln, rather than the expected Gln Val.

  8. Neurovascular control during exercise in acute coronary syndrome patients with Gln27Glu polymorphism of β2-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Santos, Larissa; Martinez, Daniel G.; Nicolau, José Carlos; Moreira, Humberto G.; Alves, Maria Janieire; Pereira, Alexandre C.; Trombetta, Ivani C.; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Background Gln27Glu (rs1042714) polymorphism of the β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) has been association with cardiovascular functionality in healthy subjects. However, it is unknown whether the presence of the ADRB2 Gln27Glu polymorphism influences neurovascular responses during exercise in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We tested the hypothesis that patients with ACS homozygous for the Gln allele would have increased muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responses and decreased forearm vascular conductance (FVC) responses during exercise compared with patients carrying the Glu allele (Gln27Glu and Glu27Glu). In addition, exercise training would restore these responses in Gln27Gln patients. Methods and results Thirty-days after an ischemic event, 61 patients with ACS without ventricular dysfunction were divided into 2 groups: (1) Gln27Gln (n = 35, 53±1years) and (2) Gln27Glu+Glu27Glu (n = 26, 52±2years). MSNA was directly measured using the microneurography technique, blood pressure (BP) was measured with an automatic oscillometric device, and blood flow was measured using venous occlusion plethysmography. MSNA, mean BP, and FVC were evaluated at rest and during a 3-min handgrip exercise. The MSNA (P = 0.02) and mean BP (P = 0.04) responses during exercise were higher in the Gln27Gln patients compared with that in the Gln27Glu+Glu27Glu patients. No differences were found in FVC. Two months of exercise training significantly decreased the MSNA levels at baseline (P = 0.001) and in their response during exercise (P = 0.02) in Gln27Gln patients, but caused no changes in Gln27Glu+Glu27Glu patients. Exercise training increased FVC responses in Gln27Glu+Glu27Glu patients (P = 0.03), but not in Gln27Gln patients. Conclusion The exaggerated MSNA and mean BP responses during exercise suggest an increased cardiovascular risk in patients with ACS and Gln27Gln polymorphism. Exercise training emerges as an important strategy for restoring this reflex

  9. Reduced activity of glutamine synthetase in Rhodospirillum rubrum mutants lacking the adenylyltransferase GlnE.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Anders; Nordlund, Stefan; Teixeira, Pedro Filipe

    2009-10-01

    In the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, the GlnE adenylyltransferase (encoded by glnE) catalyzes reversible adenylylation of glutamine synthetase, thereby regulating nitrogen assimilation. We have generated glnE mutant strains that are unable to adenylylate glutamine synthetase (GS). Surprisingly, the activity of GS was lower in the mutants than in the wild type, even when grown in nitrogen-fixing conditions. Our results support the proposal that R. rubrum can only cope with the absence of an adenylylation system in the presence of lowered GS expression or activity. In general terms, this report also provides further support for the central role of GS in bacterial metabolism.

  10. XPC Lys939Gln polymorphism contributes to colorectal cancer susceptibility: evidence from a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Published studies investigating the association between XPC Lys939Gln polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk reported inconclusive results. We performed a meta-analysis to derive a precise estimation of the relationship. Methods A comprehensive literature search was done in databases PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library up to December 2013. The association between XPC Lys939Gln polymorphism and CRC risk was assessed by odds ratios (ORs) together with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Eight studies with 3,301 cases and 4,177 controls were included in the meta-analysis. We observed that the XPC Lys939Gln polymorphism was correlated with an increased CRC risk when all studies were pooled into the meta-analysis (Gln/lys vs. Lys/Lys: OR = 1.293, 95% CI 1.169–1.430, P = 0.000; Gln/Gln + Gln/lys vs. Lys/Lys: OR = 1.260, 95% CI 1.145–1.388, P = 0.000). In stratified analyses by ethnicity, smoking, and study quality, significant increased CRC risk was found in Asians (Gln/lys vs. Lys/Lys: OR = 1.345, 95% CI 1.187–1.523, P = 0.000; Gln/Gln + Gln/lys vs. Lys/Lys: OR = 1.317, 95% CI 1.170–1.484, P = 0.000), nonsmokers (Gln/Gln + Gln/lys vs. Lys/Lys: OR = 1.286, 95% CI 1.020–1.622, P = 0.033), and high quality studies. In subgroup analysis by source of control, significant increased CRC risk was found in both hospital-based studies and population-based studies. However, in subgroup analysis according to cancer location, no any significant association was detected. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that the XPC is a candidate gene for CRC susceptibility. The XPC Lys939Gln polymorphism may play an important role in CRC development among Asians and nonsmokers. Further large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm this association. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http

  11. Regulation of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 glutamine synthetase activity in a Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 derivative strain bearing the Anabaena glnA gene and a mutated host glnA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Mérida, A; Flores, E; Florencio, F J

    1992-01-01

    The glnA gene from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was cloned by hybridization with the glnA gene from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, and a deletion-insertion mutation of the Synechocystis gene was generated in vitro. A strain derived from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 which contained integrated into the chromosome, in addition to its own glnA gene, the Anabaena glnA gene was constructed. From that strain, a Synechocystis sp. glnA mutant could be obtained by transformation with the inactivated Synechocystis glnA gene; this mutant grew by using Anabaena glutamine synthetase and was not a glutamine auxotroph. A Synechocystis sp. glnA mutant could not be obtained, however, from the wild-type Synechocystis sp. The Anabaena glutamine synthetase enzyme was subject to ammonium-promoted inactivation when expressed in the Synechocystis strain but not in the Anabaena strain itself. Images PMID:1345914

  12. Regulation of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 glutamine synthetase activity in a Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 derivative strain bearing the Anabaena glnA gene and a mutated host glnA gene.

    PubMed

    Mérida, A; Flores, E; Florencio, F J

    1992-01-01

    The glnA gene from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was cloned by hybridization with the glnA gene from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, and a deletion-insertion mutation of the Synechocystis gene was generated in vitro. A strain derived from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 which contained integrated into the chromosome, in addition to its own glnA gene, the Anabaena glnA gene was constructed. From that strain, a Synechocystis sp. glnA mutant could be obtained by transformation with the inactivated Synechocystis glnA gene; this mutant grew by using Anabaena glutamine synthetase and was not a glutamine auxotroph. A Synechocystis sp. glnA mutant could not be obtained, however, from the wild-type Synechocystis sp. The Anabaena glutamine synthetase enzyme was subject to ammonium-promoted inactivation when expressed in the Synechocystis strain but not in the Anabaena strain itself.

  13. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of 4-N-carboxybutyl-5-fluorocytosyl-Arg-Gln-Trp-Arg-Arg-Trp-Trp-Gln-Arg-NH₂.

    PubMed

    Somlai, Csaba; Correche, Estela; Olivella, Monica; Tolosa, Laia; Lechon, Maria José Gomez; Dombi, György; Tóth, Gábor K; Penke, Botond; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2012-07-01

    The chemical synthesis of 4-N-carboxybutyl-5-fluorocytosine (II) in solution phase starting from 5-fluorocytosine and the solid phase synthesis of Arg-Gln-Trp-Arg-Arg-Trp-Trp-Gln-Arg-NH(2) attached to the 4-N-carboxybutyl-5-fluorocytosine residue at the N-terminus of the peptide (III) via peptide bond formation is reported. The target compound exhibited a significant cytotoxic activity against a culture of HepG2 cells. In addition our results demonstrated that this new compound affect cell viability, produce mitochondrial dysfunction as well as interfere with intracellular calcium homeostasis control; leading to cell malfunction and death.

  14. An explicitly spin-free compact open-shell coupled cluster theory using a multireference combinatoric exponential ansatz: formal development and pilot applications.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipayan; Mukherjee, Debashis

    2009-07-28

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive account of an explicitly spin-free compact state-universal multireference coupled cluster (CC) formalism for computing the state energies of simple open-shell systems, e.g., doublets and biradicals, where the target open-shell states can be described by a few configuration state functions spanning a model space. The cluster operators in this formalism are defined in terms of the spin-free unitary generators with respect to the common closed-shell component of all model functions (core) as vacuum. The spin-free cluster operators are either closed-shell-like n hole-n particle excitations (denoted by T(mu)) or involve excitations from the doubly occupied (nonvalence) orbitals to the singly occupied (valence) orbitals (denoted by S(e)(mu)). In addition, there are cluster operators with exchange spectator scatterings involving the valence orbitals (denoted by S(re)(mu)). We propose a new multireference cluster expansion ansatz for the wave operator with the above generally noncommuting cluster operators which essentially has the same physical content as the Jeziorski-Monkhorst ansatz with the commuting cluster operators defined in the spin-orbital basis. The T(mu) operators in our ansatz are taken to commute with all other operators, while the S(e)(mu) and S(re)(mu) operators are allowed to contract among themselves through the spectator valence orbitals. An important innovation of this ansatz is the choice of an appropriate automorphic factor accompanying each contracted composite of cluster operators in order to ensure that each distinct excitation generated by this composite appears only once in the wave operator. The resulting CC equations consist of two types of terms: a "direct" term and a "normalization" term containing the effective Hamiltonian operator. It is emphasized that the direct term is almost quartic in the cluster amplitudes, barring only a handful of terms and termination of the normalization term depends on

  15. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory based on unrestricted Kohn-Sham orbitals for high-spin open-shell van der Waals complexes.

    PubMed

    Hapka, Michał; Żuchowski, Piotr S; Szczęśniak, Małgorzata M; Chałasiński, Grzegorz

    2012-10-28

    Two open-shell formulations of the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory are presented. They are based on the spin-unrestricted Kohn-Sham (SAPT(UKS)) and unrestricted Hartree-Fock (SAPT(UHF)) descriptions of the monomers, respectively. The key reason behind development of SAPT(UKS) is that it is more compatible with density functional theory (DFT) compared to the previous formulation of open-shell SAPT based on spin-restricted Kohn-Sham method of Żuchowski et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 084101 (2008)]. The performance of SAPT(UKS) and SAPT(UHF) is tested for the following open-shell van der Waals complexes: He···NH, H(2)O···HO(2), He···OH, Ar···OH, Ar···NO. The results show an excellent agreement between SAPT(UKS) and SAPT(ROKS). Furthermore, for the first time SAPT based on DFT is shown to be suitable for the treatment of interactions involving Π-state radicals (He···OH, Ar···OH, Ar···NO). In the interactions of transition metal dimers ((3)Σ(u)(+))Au(2) and ((13)Σ(g)(+))Cr(2) we show that SAPT is incompatible with the use of effective core potentials. The interaction energies of both systems expressed instead as supermolecular UHF interaction plus dispersion from SAPT(UKS) result in reasonably accurate potential curves.

  16. Spin superfluidity and coherent spin precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkov, Yuriy M.

    2009-04-01

    The spontaneous phase coherent precession of the magnetization in superfluid 3He-B was discovered experimentally in 1984 at the Institute for Physical Problems, Moscow by Borovik-Romanov, Bunkov, Dmitriev and Mukharsky and simultaneously explained theoretically by Fomin (Institut Landau, Moscow). Its formation is a direct manifestation of spin superfluidity. The latter is the magnetic counterpart of mass superfluidity and superconductivity. It is also an example of the Bose-Einstein condensation of spin-wave excitations (magnons). The coherent spin precession opened the way for investigations of spin supercurrent magnetization transport and other related phenomena, such as spin-current Josephson effect, process of phase slippage at a critical value of spin supercurrent, spin-current vortices, non-topological solitons (analogous to Q-balls in high energy physics) etc. New measuring techniques based on coherent spin precession made the investigation of mass counterflow and mass vortices possible owing to the spin-mass interaction. New phenomena were observed: mass-spin vortices, the Goldstone mode of the mass vortex with non-axisymmetric core, superfluid density anisotropy etc. Different types of coherent spin precession were later found in superfluid 3He-A and 3He-B confined in anisotropic aerogel, in the states with counterflow and in 3He with reduced magnetization. Finally, spin superfluidity investigations developed the basis for a modern investigation of electron spin supercurrent and spintronics.

  17. Third-Order Incremental Dual-Basis Set Zero-Buffer Approach for Large High-Spin Open-Shell Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Dolg, Michael

    2015-03-10

    The third-order incremental dual-basis set zero-buffer approach (inc3-db-B0) is an efficient, accurate, and black-box quantum chemical method for obtaining correlation energies of large systems, and it has been successfully applied to many real chemical problems. In this work, we extend this approach to high-spin open-shell systems. In the open-shell approach, we will first decompose the occupied orbitals of a system into several domains by a K-means clustering algorithm. The essential part is that we preserve the active (singly occupied) orbitals in all the calculations of the domain correlation energies. The duplicated contributions of the active orbitals to the correlation energy are subtracted from the incremental expansion. All techniques of truncating the virtual space such as the B0 approximation can be applied. This open-shell inc3-db-B0 approach is combined with the CCSD and CCSD(T) methods and applied to the computations of a singlet-triplet gap and an electron detachment process. Our approach exhibits an accuracy better than 0.6 kcal/mol or 0.3 eV compared with the standard implementation, while it saves a large amount of the computational time and can be efficiently parallelized.

  18. Communication: spin-orbit splittings in degenerate open-shell states via Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster theory: a measure for the coupling contribution.

    PubMed

    Mück, Leonie Anna; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-03-21

    We propose a generally applicable scheme for the computation of spin-orbit (SO) splittings in degenerate open-shell systems using multireference coupled-cluster (MRCC) theory. As a specific method, Mukherjee's version of MRCC (Mk-MRCC) in conjunction with an effective mean-field SO operator is adapted for this purpose. An expression for the SO splittings is derived and implemented using Mk-MRCC analytic derivative techniques. The computed SO splittings are found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Due to the symmetry properties of the SO operator, SO splittings can be considered a quality measure for the coupling between reference determinants in Jeziorski-Monkhorst based MRCC methods. We thus provide numerical insights into the coupling problem of Mk-MRCC theory. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  19. The crystal structure of human GlnRS provides basis for the development of neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ognjenović, Jana; Wu, Jiang; Matthies, Doreen; Baxa, Ulrich; Subramaniam, Sriram; Ling, Jiqiang; Simonović, Miljan

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) is the singular enzyme responsible for translation of glutamine codons. Compound heterozygous mutations in GlnRS cause severe brain disorders by a poorly understood mechanism. Herein, we present crystal structures of the wild type and two pathological mutants of human GlnRS, which reveal, for the first time, the domain organization of the intact enzyme and the structure of the functionally important N-terminal domain (NTD). Pathological mutations mapping in the NTD alter the domain structure, and decrease catalytic activity and stability of GlnRS, whereas missense mutations in the catalytic domain induce misfolding of the enzyme. Our results suggest that the reduced catalytic efficiency and a propensity of GlnRS mutants to misfold trigger the disease development. This report broadens the spectrum of brain pathologies elicited by protein misfolding and provides a paradigm for understanding the role of mutations in aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in neurological diseases. PMID:26869582

  20. The crystal structure of human GlnRS provides basis for the development of neurological disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Ognjenovic, Jana; Wu, Jiang; Matthies, Doreen; Baxa, Ulrich; Subramaniam, Sriram; Ling, Jiqiang; Simonovic, Miljan

    2016-02-10

    Cytosolic glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) is the singular enzyme responsible for translation of glutamine codons. Compound heterozygous mutations in GlnRS cause severe brain disorders by a poorly understood mechanism. Herein, we present crystal structures of the wild type and two pathological mutants of human GlnRS, which reveal, for the first time, the domain organization of the intact enzyme and the structure of the functionally important N-terminal domain (NTD). Pathological mutations mapping in the NTD alter the domain structure, and decrease catalytic activity and stability of GlnRS, whereas missense mutations in the catalytic domain induce misfolding of the enzyme. Our results suggest that the reduced catalytic efficiency and a propensity of GlnRS mutants to misfold trigger the disease development. As a result, this report broadens the spectrum of brain pathologies elicited by protein misfolding and provides a paradigm for understanding the role of mutations in aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in neurological diseases. Keywords

  1. The crystal structure of human GlnRS provides basis for the development of neurological disorders

    DOE PAGES

    Ognjenovic, Jana; Wu, Jiang; Matthies, Doreen; ...

    2016-02-10

    Cytosolic glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) is the singular enzyme responsible for translation of glutamine codons. Compound heterozygous mutations in GlnRS cause severe brain disorders by a poorly understood mechanism. Herein, we present crystal structures of the wild type and two pathological mutants of human GlnRS, which reveal, for the first time, the domain organization of the intact enzyme and the structure of the functionally important N-terminal domain (NTD). Pathological mutations mapping in the NTD alter the domain structure, and decrease catalytic activity and stability of GlnRS, whereas missense mutations in the catalytic domain induce misfolding of the enzyme. Our results suggestmore » that the reduced catalytic efficiency and a propensity of GlnRS mutants to misfold trigger the disease development. As a result, this report broadens the spectrum of brain pathologies elicited by protein misfolding and provides a paradigm for understanding the role of mutations in aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in neurological diseases. Keywords« less

  2. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs.

    PubMed

    Driggers, Camden M; Hartman, Steven J; Karplus, P Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ∼15-30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue ("Arg-type" enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg ("Gln-type" enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis "Arg-type" enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha "Gln-type" CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among "Gln-type" CDO enzymes, we conclude that the "Gln-type" CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.

  3. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs

    PubMed Central

    Driggers, Camden M; Hartman, Steven J; Karplus, P Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ∼15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases. PMID:25307852

  4. A meta-analysis of xeroderma pigmentosum gene D Ls751Gln polymorphism and susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zhao, Yingren; Zhang, Aiyun; Ma, Juan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of most common malignant tumors worldwide, but with unclear mechanisms. Xeroderma pigmentosum gene D (XPD) is one important DNA damage repair gene and can be involved in protein mutation. Currently little has been known about XPD polymorphism and HCC susceptibility in Chinese people. This study used a meta-analysis approach to comprehensively investigate the correlation between XPD polymorphism and HCC susceptibility in Chinese population, based on previously published literatures. A computer retrieval system was used to collect all case-control studies about XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism and HCC susceptibility. Data in literatures were extracted for meta-analysis. After the primary screening, four independent studies, which were published in 3 English articles and one Chinese article, were recruited in this study. There were 1,717 samples included in all studies. Using Gln/Gln + Lys/Gln, Lys/Lys + Lys/Gln and Lys allels as the reference, HCC disease alleles including Lys/Lys, Gln/Gln and Gln had OR values (95% CI, I(2)) of 1.007 (0.657~4.672, 91%), 3.516 (0.220~20.661, 48%) and 3.225 (0.278~12.326, 84%), respectively. The polymorphism of XPD751 loci is closely correlated with primary HCC. Lys751Gln polymorphism of XPD gene can be used as one susceptibility factor for HCC.

  5. The Rhodobacter capsulatus glnB gene is regulated by NtrC at tandem rpoN-independent promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Foster-Hartnett, D; Kranz, R G

    1994-01-01

    The protein encoded by glnB of Rhodobacter capsulatus is part of a nitrogen-sensing cascade which regulates the expression of nitrogen fixation genes (nif). The expression of glnB was studied by using lacZ fusions, primer extension analysis, and in vitro DNase I footprinting. Our results suggest that glnB is transcribed from two promoters, one of which requires the R. capsulatus ntrC gene but is rpoN independent. Another promoter upstream of glnB is repressed by NtrC; purified R. capsulatus NtrC binds to sites that overlap this distal promoter region. Images PMID:8051036

  6. No association of the neuropeptide Y (Leu7Pro) and ghrelin gene (Arg51Gln, Leu72Met, Gln90Leu) single nucleotide polymorphisms with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Kindler, Jochen; Bailer, Ursula; de Zwaan, Martina; Fuchs, Karoline; Leisch, Friedrich; Grün, Bettina; Strnad, Alexandra; Stojanovic, Mirjana; Windisch, Julia; Lennkh-Wolfsberg, Claudia; El-Giamal, Nadja; Sieghart, Werner; Kasper, Siegfried; Aschauer, Harald

    2011-06-01

    Genetic factors likely contribute to the biological vulnerability of eating disorders. Case-control association study on one neuropeptide Y gene (Leu7Pro) polymorphism and three ghrelin gene (Arg51Gln, Leu72Met and Gln90Leu) polymorphisms. 114 eating disorder patients (46 with anorexia nervosa, 30 with bulimia nervosa, 38 with binge eating disorder) and 164 healthy controls were genotyped. No differences were detected between patients and controls for any of the four polymorphisms in allele frequency and genotype distribution (P > 0.05). Allele frequencies and genotypes had no significant influence on body mass index (P > 0.05) in eating disorder patients. Positive findings of former case-control studies of associations between ghrelin gene polymorphisms and eating disorders could not be replicated. Neuropeptide Y gene polymorphisms have not been investigated in eating disorders before.

  7. Gln3 is a main regulator of nitrogen assimilation in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Delos Santos, Francisco J; Riego-Ruiz, Lina

    2016-08-01

    After Candida albicans, the yeast Candida glabrata ranks second as an aetiological agent of candidaemia and is the most frequently encountered non-Candida albicans species in patients with invasive candidiasis. Transcriptome analysis in C. albicans, C. glabrata and Cryptoccocus neoformans has revealed that, when engulfed by macrophages, these yeasts upregulate genes involved in nutrient acquisition, including nitrogen transporters such as the general amino acid permease Gap1, the dicarboxylic amino acid permease Dip5, the basic amino acid permease Can1 and the ammonium permeases Mep1 and Mep2. Nitrogen assimilation has been well studied in model species of fungi, such as Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, little is known about nitrogen assimilation in C. glabrata. In the present study, we report a major role for Gln3 in the assimilation of glutamine, ammonium and proline. Ure2 also has a role in nitrogen assimilation, but it is only observable in ammonium and glutamine. In addition, Gat1 has a minor role, which is only observable in the absence of Ure2 and Gln3. Gln3 is absolutely necessary for full ammonium uptake from media. We have also shown that MEP2 gene expression in C. glabrata is completely dependent on Gln3, whereas GAP1 regulation is mainly exerted by Gln3, with the exception of proline where Gat1 has a minor role. In addition, in C. glabrata Ure2 appears to be a negative regulator of these NCR-sensitive genes, similarly to what has been described in S. cerevisiae. Our data place Gln3 as a key regulator of nitrogen assimilation.

  8. The "Gln-Type" Thiol Dioxygenase from Azotobacter vinelandii is a 3-Mercaptopropionic Acid Dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brad S; Subedi, Bishnu P; Sardar, Sinjinee; Crowell, Joshua K

    2015-12-29

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes the O2-dependent oxidation of l-cysteine to produce cysteinesulfinic acid. Bacterial CDOs have been subdivided as either "Arg-type" or "Gln-type" on the basis of the identity of conserved active site residues. To date, "Gln-type" enzymes remain largely uncharacterized. It was recently noted that the "Gln-type" enzymes are more homologous with another thiol dioxygenase [3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenase (MDO)] identified in Variovorax paradoxus, suggesting that enzymes of the "Gln-type" subclass are in fact MDOs. In this work, a putative "Gln-type" thiol dioxygenase from Azotobacter vinelandii (Av) was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Steady-state assays were performed using three substrates [3-mercaptopropionic acid (3mpa), l-cysteine (cys), and cysteamine (ca)]. Despite comparable maximal velocities, the "Gln-type" Av enzyme exhibited a specificity for 3mpa (kcat/KM = 72000 M(-1) s(-1)) nearly 2 orders of magnitude greater than those for cys (110 M(-1) s(-1)) and ca (11 M(-1) s(-1)). Supporting X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies were performed using nitric oxide (NO) as a surrogate for O2 binding to confirm obligate-ordered addition of substrate prior to NO. Stoichimetric addition of NO to solutions of 3mpa-bound enzyme quantitatively yields an iron-nitrosyl species (Av ES-NO) with EPR features consistent with a mononuclear (S = (3)/2) {FeNO}(7) site. Conversely, two distinct substrate-bound conformations were observed in Av ES-NO samples prepared with cys and ca, suggesting heterogeneous binding within the enzymatic active site. Analytical EPR simulations are provided to establish the relative binding affinity for each substrate (3map > cys > ca). Both kinetic and spectroscopic results presented here are consistent with 3mpa being the preferred substrate for this enzyme.

  9. Theory of open quantum systems with bath of electrons and phonons and spins: many-dissipaton density matrixes approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, YiJing

    2014-02-07

    This work establishes a strongly correlated system-and-bath dynamics theory, the many-dissipaton density operators formalism. It puts forward a quasi-particle picture for environmental influences. This picture unifies the physical descriptions and algebraic treatments on three distinct classes of quantum environments, electron bath, phonon bath, and two-level spin or exciton bath, as their participating in quantum dissipation processes. Dynamical variables for theoretical description are no longer just the reduced density matrix for system, but remarkably also those for quasi-particles of bath. The present theoretical formalism offers efficient and accurate means for the study of steady-state (nonequilibrium and equilibrium) and real-time dynamical properties of both systems and hybridizing environments. It further provides universal evaluations, exact in principle, on various correlation functions, including even those of environmental degrees of freedom in coupling with systems. Induced environmental dynamics could be reflected directly in experimentally measurable quantities, such as Fano resonances and quantum transport current shot noise statistics.

  10. Nuclear Gln3 Import Is Regulated by Nitrogen Catabolite Repression Whereas Export Is Specifically Regulated by Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajendra; Tate, Jennifer J; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Howe, Martha M; Nelson, David; Cooper, Terrance G

    2015-11-01

    Gln3, a transcription activator mediating nitrogen-responsive gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is sequestered in the cytoplasm, thereby minimizing nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive transcription when cells are grown in nitrogen-rich environments. In the face of adverse nitrogen supplies, Gln3 relocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of the NCR-sensitive regulon whose products transport and degrade a variety of poorly used nitrogen sources, thus expanding the cell's nitrogen-acquisition capability. Rapamycin also elicits nuclear Gln3 localization, implicating Target-of-rapamycin Complex 1 (TorC1) in nitrogen-responsive Gln3 regulation. However, we long ago established that TorC1 was not the sole regulatory system through which nitrogen-responsive regulation is achieved. Here we demonstrate two different ways in which intracellular Gln3 localization is regulated. Nuclear Gln3 entry is regulated by the cell's overall nitrogen supply, i.e., by NCR, as long accepted. However, once within the nucleus, Gln3 can follow one of two courses depending on the glutamine levels themselves or a metabolite directly related to glutamine. When glutamine levels are high, e.g., glutamine or ammonia as the sole nitrogen source or addition of glutamine analogues, Gln3 can exit from the nucleus without binding to DNA. In contrast, when glutamine levels are lowered, e.g., adding additional nitrogen sources to glutamine-grown cells or providing repressive nonglutamine nitrogen sources, Gln3 export does not occur in the absence of DNA binding. We also demonstrate that Gln3 residues 64-73 are required for nuclear Gln3 export. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Nuclear Gln3 Import Is Regulated by Nitrogen Catabolite Repression Whereas Export Is Specifically Regulated by Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rajendra; Tate, Jennifer J.; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Howe, Martha M.; Nelson, David; Cooper, Terrance G.

    2015-01-01

    Gln3, a transcription activator mediating nitrogen-responsive gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is sequestered in the cytoplasm, thereby minimizing nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive transcription when cells are grown in nitrogen-rich environments. In the face of adverse nitrogen supplies, Gln3 relocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of the NCR-sensitive regulon whose products transport and degrade a variety of poorly used nitrogen sources, thus expanding the cell’s nitrogen-acquisition capability. Rapamycin also elicits nuclear Gln3 localization, implicating Target-of-rapamycin Complex 1 (TorC1) in nitrogen-responsive Gln3 regulation. However, we long ago established that TorC1 was not the sole regulatory system through which nitrogen-responsive regulation is achieved. Here we demonstrate two different ways in which intracellular Gln3 localization is regulated. Nuclear Gln3 entry is regulated by the cell’s overall nitrogen supply, i.e., by NCR, as long accepted. However, once within the nucleus, Gln3 can follow one of two courses depending on the glutamine levels themselves or a metabolite directly related to glutamine. When glutamine levels are high, e.g., glutamine or ammonia as the sole nitrogen source or addition of glutamine analogues, Gln3 can exit from the nucleus without binding to DNA. In contrast, when glutamine levels are lowered, e.g., adding additional nitrogen sources to glutamine-grown cells or providing repressive nonglutamine nitrogen sources, Gln3 export does not occur in the absence of DNA binding. We also demonstrate that Gln3 residues 64–73 are required for nuclear Gln3 export. PMID:26333687

  12. Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase regulates its own synthesis by acting as a chaperone to stabilize GlnR-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Susan H; Wray, Lewis V

    2008-01-22

    The Bacillus subtilis GlnR repressor controls gene expression in response to nitrogen availability. Because all GlnR-regulated genes are expressed constitutively in mutants lacking glutamine synthetase (GS), GS is required for repression by GlnR. Feedback-inhibited GS (FBI-GS) was shown to activate GlnR DNA binding with an in vitro electophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The activation of GlnR DNA binding by GS in these experiments depended on the feedback inhibitor glutamine and did not occur with mutant GS proteins defective in regulating GlnR activity in vivo. Although stable GS-GlnR-DNA ternary complexes were not observed in the EMSA experiments, cross-linking experiments showed that a protein-protein interaction occurs between GlnR and FBI-GS. This interaction was reduced in the absence of the feedback inhibitor glutamine and with mutant GS proteins. Because FBI-GS significantly reduced the dissociation rate of the GlnR-DNA complexes, the stability of these complexes is enhanced by FBI-GS. These results argue that FBI-GS acts as a chaperone that activates GlnR DNA binding through a transient protein-protein interaction that stabilizes GlnR-DNA complexes. GS was shown to control the activity of the B. subtilis nitrogen transcription factor TnrA by forming a stable complex between FBI-GS and TnrA that inhibits TnrA DNA binding. Thus, B. subtilis GS is an enzyme with dual catalytic and regulatory functions that uses distinct mechanisms to control the activity of two different transcription factors.

  13. An Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Lys751Gln ERCC2 Gene and Ovarian Cancer in Polish Women

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Magdalena M.; Samulak, Dariusz; Romanowicz, Hanna; Sobkowski, Maciej; Smolarz, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the Lys751Gln (rs13181) ERCC2 gene polymorphism in clinical parameters and the risk for development of ovarian cancer. Material and Methods. The study consisted of 430 patients with ovarian cancer (mean age: 53.2 ± 10.11) and 430 healthy subjects (mean age: 50.31 ± 18.21). Analysis of the gene polymorphisms was performed using the PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each genotype and allele were calculated. Results. The results obtained indicate that the genotype Gln/Gln is associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer (OR 5.01; 95% CI 3.37–7.43; p < 0.0001). Association of Lys751Gln polymorphism with histological grading showed increased ERCC2 Gln/Gln (OR = 6.96; 95% CI 3.41–14.21; p < 0.0001) genotype in grading 1 as well as Gln allele overrepresentation (OR = 4.98; 95% CI 3.37–7.40; p < 0.0001) in G1 ovarian patients. Finally, with clinical FIGO staging under evaluation, an increase in ERCC2 Gln/Gln homozygote frequencies in staging I and Gln allele frequencies in SI were observed. Conclusion. On the basis of these results, we conclude that ERCC2 gene polymorphism Lys751Gln may be associated with an increased risk of ovarian carcinoma. PMID:26526682

  14. Quantum model of spin noise.

    PubMed

    Annabestani, R; Cory, D G; Emerson, J

    2015-03-01

    Any ensemble of quantum particles exhibits statistical fluctuations known as spin noise. Here, we provide a description of spin noise in the language of open quantum systems. The description unifies the signatures of spin noise under both strong and weak measurements. Further, the model accounts for arbitrary spin dynamics from an arbitrary initial state. In all cases we can find both the spin noise and its time correlation function.

  15. Leptin receptor expression and Gln223Arg polymorphism as prognostic markers in oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, P R S; Maia, L L; Santos, M; Peterle, G T; Alves, L U; Takamori, J T; Souza, R P; Barbosa, W M; Mercante, A M C; Nunes, F D; Carvalho, M B; Tajara, E H; Louro, I D; Silva-Conforti, A M A

    2015-11-25

    The leptin gene product is released into the blood stream, passes through the blood-brain barrier, and finds the leptin receptor (LEPR) in the central nervous system. This hormone regulates food intake, hematopoiesis, inflammation, immunity, differentiation, and cell proliferation. The LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism has been reported to alter receptor function and expression, both of which have been related with prognostics in several tumor types. Furthermore, several studies have shown a relationship between the Gln223Arg polymorphism and tumor development, and its role in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is now well understood. In this study, 315 DNA samples were used for LEPR Gln223Arg genotyping and 87 primary oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas were used for immunohistochemical expression analysis, such that a relationship between these and tumor development and prognosis could be established. Homozygous LEPR Arg223 was found to be associated with a 2-fold reduction in oral and oropharyngeal cancer risk. In contrast, the presence of the Arg223 allele in tumors was associated with worse disease-free and disease-specific survival. Low LEPR expression was found to be an independent risk factor, increasing the risk for lymph node metastasis 4-fold. In conclusion, the Gln223Arg polymorphism and LEPR expression might be valuable markers for oral and oropharyngeal cancer, suggesting that LEPR might serve as a potential target for future therapies.

  16. Synthesis of a Gln-Phe hydroxy-ethylene dipeptide isostere.

    PubMed

    Haug, Bengt Erik; Rich, Daniel H

    2004-12-09

    [structure: see text] The protected Gln-Phe hydroxyethylene dipeptide isostere 1 was synthesized as a precursor for preparation of potential inhibitors of Botulinum neurotoxin B metalloprotease. The method allows for the synthesis of additional hydroxyethylene dipeptide isosteres such as 2 with functionalized P1 side chains. The isosteres prepared were coupled with a dipeptide to produce protected pseudotetrapeptide derivatives.

  17. Reciprocal Regulation of GlnR and PhoP in Response to Nitrogen and Phosphate Limitations in Saccharopolyspora erythraea

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Li-li

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen and phosphate source sensing, uptake, and assimilation are essential for the growth and development of microorganisms. In this study, we demonstrated that SACE_6965 encodes the phosphate regulator PhoP, which controls the transcription of genes involved in phosphate metabolism in the erythromycin-producing Saccharopolyspora erythraea. We found that PhoP and the nitrogen regulator GlnR both regulate the transcription of glnR as well as other nitrogen metabolism-related genes. Interestingly, both GlnR- and PhoP-binding sites were identified in the phoP promoter region. Unlike the nonreciprocal regulation of GlnR and PhoP observed in Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, GlnR negatively controls the transcription of the phoP gene in S. erythraea. This suggests that GlnR directly affects phosphate metabolism and demonstrates that the cross talk between GlnR and PhoP is reciprocal. Although GlnR and PhoP sites in the glnR and phoP promoter regions are located in close proximity to one another (separated by only 2 to 4 bp), the binding of both regulators to their respective region was independent and noninterfering. These results indicate that two regulators could separately bind to their respective binding sites and control nitrogen and phosphate metabolism in response to environmental changes. The reciprocal cross talk observed between GlnR and PhoP serves as a foundation for understanding the regulation of complex primary and secondary metabolism in antibiotic-producing actinomycetes. PMID:26519391

  18. Nuclear localization domains of GATA activator Gln3 are required for transcription of target genes through dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Numamoto, Minori; Tagami, Shota; Ueda, Yusuke; Imabeppu, Yusuke; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Maekawa, Hiromi; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    The GATA transcription activator Gln3 in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) activates transcription of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive genes. In cells grown in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources, Gln3 is phosphorylated in a TOR-dependent manner and localizes in the cytoplasm. In cells grown in non-preferred nitrogen medium or treated with rapamycin, Gln3 is dephosphorylated and is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, thereby activating the transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. Caffeine treatment also induces dephosphorylation of Gln3 and its translocation to the nucleus and transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. However, the details of the mechanism by which phosphorylation controls Gln3 localization and transcriptional activity are unknown. Here, we focused on two regions of Gln3 with nuclear localization signal properties (NLS-K, and NLS-C) and one with nuclear export signal (NES). We constructed various mutants for our analyses: gln3 containing point mutations in all potential phosphoacceptor sites (Thr-339, Ser-344, Ser-347, Ser-355, Ser-391) in the NLS and NES regions to produce non-phosphorylatable (alanine) or mimic-phosphorylatable (aspartic acid) residues; and deletion mutants. We found that phosphorylation of Gln3 was impaired in all of these mutations and that the aspartic acid substitution mutants showed drastic reduction of Gln3-mediated transcriptional activity despite the fact that the mutations had no effect on nuclear localization of Gln3. Our observations suggest that these regions are required for transcription of target genes presumably through dephosphorylation. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cross section and transverse single-spin asymmetry of muons from open heavy-flavor decays in polarized p+p collisions at s=200??GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; ...

    2017-06-01

    The cross section and transverse single-spin asymmetries of μ- and μ+ from open heavy-flavor decays in polarized p+p collisions at √s = 200 GeV were measured in this paper by the PHENIX experiment during 2012 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Because heavy-flavor production is dominated by gluon-gluon interactions at √s = 200 GeV, these measurements offer a unique opportunity to obtain information on the trigluon correlation functions. The measurements are performed at forward and backward rapidity (1.4 < |y| < 2.0) over the transverse momentum range of 1.25 < pT < 7 GeV/c for the cross section and 1.25more » < pT < 5 GeV/c for the asymmetry measurements. The obtained cross section is compared to a fixed-order-plus-next-to-leading-log perturbative-quantum-chromodynamics calculation. Finally, the asymmetry results are consistent with zero within uncertainties, and a model calculation based on twist-3 three-gluon correlations agrees with the data.« less

  20. Leading and next-to-leading order gluon polarization in the nucleon and longitudinal double spin asymmetries from open charm muoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Antonov, A. A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Höppner, Ch.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Lauser, L.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Morreale, A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Perevalova, E.; Pesaro, G.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.-F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schmïden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A. N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G. I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N. V.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zvyagin, A.

    2013-03-01

    The gluon polarization in the nucleon was measured using open charm production by scattering 160GeV/c polarized muons off longitudinally polarized protons or deuterons. The data were taken by the COMPASS Collaboration between 2002 and 2007. A detailed account is given of the analysis method that includes the application of neural networks. Several decay channels of D0 mesons are investigated. Longitudinal spin asymmetries of the D meson production cross sections are extracted in bins of D0 transverse momentum and energy. At leading order QCD accuracy, the average gluon polarization is determined as ⟨Δg/g⟩LO=-0.06±0.21(stat.)±0.08(syst.) at the scale ⟨μ2⟩≈13(GeV/c)2 and an average gluon momentum fraction ⟨x⟩≈0.11. The average gluon polarization is also obtained at next-to-leading order QCD accuracy as ⟨Δg/g⟩ NLO=-0.13±0.15(stat.)±0.15(syst.) at the scale ⟨μ2⟩≈13(GeV/c)2 and ⟨x⟩≈0.20.

  1. Mechanism of disruption of the Amt-GlnK complex by P(II)-mediated sensing of 2-oxoglutarate.

    PubMed

    Maier, Sarah; Schleberger, Paula; Lü, Wei; Wacker, Tobias; Pflüger, Tobias; Litz, Claudia; Andrade, Susana L A

    2011-01-01

    GlnK proteins regulate the active uptake of ammonium by Amt transport proteins by inserting their regulatory T-loops into the transport channels of the Amt trimer and physically blocking substrate passage. They sense the cellular nitrogen status through 2-oxoglutarate, and the energy level of the cell by binding both ATP and ADP with different affinities. The hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus possesses three Amt proteins, each encoded in an operon with a GlnK ortholog. One of these proteins, GlnK2 was recently found to be incapable of binding 2-OG, and in order to understand the implications of this finding we conducted a detailed structural and functional analysis of a second GlnK protein from A. fulgidus, GlnK3. Contrary to Af-GlnK2 this protein was able to bind both ATP/2-OG and ADP to yield inactive and functional states, respectively. Due to the thermostable nature of the protein we could observe the exact positioning of the notoriously flexible T-loops and explain the binding behavior of GlnK proteins to their interaction partner, the Amt proteins. A thermodynamic analysis of these binding events using microcalorimetry evaluated by microstate modeling revealed significant differences in binding cooperativity compared to other characterized P(II) proteins, underlining the diversity and adaptability of this class of regulatory signaling proteins.

  2. Plasmodium Apicoplast Gln-tRNAGln Biosynthesis Utilizes a Unique GatAB Amidotransferase Essential for Erythrocytic Stage Parasites.

    PubMed

    Mailu, Boniface M; Li, Ling; Arthur, Jen; Nelson, Todd M; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Becker, Katja; Gardner, Malcolm J

    2015-12-04

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast indirect aminoacylation pathway utilizes a non-discriminating glutamyl-tRNA synthetase to synthesize Glu-tRNA(Gln) and a glutaminyl-tRNA amidotransferase to convert Glu-tRNA(Gln) to Gln-tRNA(Gln). Here, we show that Plasmodium falciparum and other apicomplexans possess a unique heterodimeric glutamyl-tRNA amidotransferase consisting of GatA and GatB subunits (GatAB). We localized the P. falciparum GatA and GatB subunits to the apicoplast in blood stage parasites and demonstrated that recombinant GatAB converts Glu-tRNA(Gln) to Gln-tRNA(Gln) in vitro. We demonstrate that the apicoplast GatAB-catalyzed reaction is essential to the parasite blood stages because we could not delete the Plasmodium berghei gene encoding GatA in blood stage parasites in vivo. A phylogenetic analysis placed the split between Plasmodium GatB, archaeal GatE, and bacterial GatB prior to the phylogenetic divide between bacteria and archaea. Moreover, Plasmodium GatA also appears to have emerged prior to the bacterial-archaeal phylogenetic divide. Thus, although GatAB is found in Plasmodium, it emerged prior to the phylogenetic separation of archaea and bacteria.

  3. Mechanism of Disruption of the Amt-GlnK Complex by PII-Mediated Sensing of 2-Oxoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Sarah; Schleberger, Paula; Lü, Wei; Wacker, Tobias; Pflüger, Tobias; Litz, Claudia; Andrade, Susana L. A.

    2011-01-01

    GlnK proteins regulate the active uptake of ammonium by Amt transport proteins by inserting their regulatory T-loops into the transport channels of the Amt trimer and physically blocking substrate passage. They sense the cellular nitrogen status through 2-oxoglutarate, and the energy level of the cell by binding both ATP and ADP with different affinities. The hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus possesses three Amt proteins, each encoded in an operon with a GlnK ortholog. One of these proteins, GlnK2 was recently found to be incapable of binding 2-OG, and in order to understand the implications of this finding we conducted a detailed structural and functional analysis of a second GlnK protein from A. fulgidus, GlnK3. Contrary to Af-GlnK2 this protein was able to bind both ATP/2-OG and ADP to yield inactive and functional states, respectively. Due to the thermostable nature of the protein we could observe the exact positioning of the notoriously flexible T-loops and explain the binding behavior of GlnK proteins to their interaction partner, the Amt proteins. A thermodynamic analysis of these binding events using microcalorimetry evaluated by microstate modeling revealed significant differences in binding cooperativity compared to other characterized PII proteins, underlining the diversity and adaptability of this class of regulatory signaling proteins. PMID:22039461

  4. Spin foams without spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnybida, Jeff

    2016-10-01

    We formulate the spin foam representation of discrete SU(2) gauge theory as a product of vertex amplitudes each of which is the spin network generating function of the boundary graph dual to the vertex. In doing so the sums over spins have been carried out. The boundary data of each n-valent node is explicitly reduced with respect to the local gauge invariance and has a manifest geometrical interpretation as a framed polyhedron of fixed total area. Ultimately, sums over spins are traded for contour integrals over simple poles and recoupling theory is avoided using generating functions.

  5. Overlapping repressor binding sites regulate expression of the Methanococcus maripaludis glnK1 operon

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Thomas J.; Hendrickson, Erik L.; Niess, Ulf M.; Moore, Brian C.; Haydock, Andrew K.; Leigh, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The euryarchaeal transcriptional repressor NrpR regulates a variety of nitrogen assimilation genes by 2-oxoglutarate-reversible binding to conserved palindromic operators. The number and positioning of these operators varies among promoter regions of regulated genes, suggesting NrpR can bind in different patterns. Particularly intriguing is the contrast between the nif and glnK1 promoter regions of Methanococcus maripaludis, where two operators are present but with different configurations. Here we study NrpR binding and regulation at the glnK1 promoter, where the two operator sequences overlap and occur on opposite faces of the double helix. We find that both operators function in binding, with a dimer of NrpR binding simultaneously to each overlapping operator. We show in vivo that the first operator plays a primary role in regulation and the second operator plays an enhancing role. This is the first demonstration of overlapping operators functioning in Archaea. PMID:20025661

  6. Identification of Rhodospirillum rubrum GlnB Variants That Are Altered in Their Ability To Interact with Different Targets in Response to Nitrogen Status Signals

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Conrad, Mary C.; Zhang, Yaoping; Roberts, Gary P.

    2006-01-01

    In Rhodospirillum rubrum, NifA, the transcriptional activator for the nif genes, is posttranslationally activated only by the uridylylated form of GlnB, one of three PII homologs in the organism. We have used the yeast two-hybrid system to detect variants of GlnB that interact better with NifA than does wild-type GlnB. When examined for physiological effects in R. rubrum, these GlnB* variants activated NifA in the presence of NH4+, which normally blocks NifA activation completely, and in the absence of GlnD, whose uridylylation of GlnB is also normally essential for NifA activation. When these variants were tested in the two-hybrid system for their interaction with NtrB, a receptor that should interact with the nonuridylylated form of GlnB, they were uniformly weaker than wild-type GlnB in that interaction. When expressed in R. rubrum either as single-copy integrants or on multiple-copy plasmids, these variants were also dramatically altered in terms of their ability to regulate several other receptors involved in nitrogen metabolism, including GlnE, NtrB/NtrC, and DRAT (dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyl transferase)-DRAG (dinitrogenase reductase-activating glycohydrolase). The consistent pattern throughout is that these GlnB variants partially mimic the uridylylated form of wild-type GlnB, even under nitrogen-excess conditions and in strains lacking GlnD. The results suggest that the role of uridylylation of GlnB is primarily to shift the equilibrium of GlnB from a “nitrogen-sufficient” form to a “nitrogen-deficient” form, each of which interacts with different but overlapping receptor proteins in the cell. These GlnB variants apparently shift that equilibrium through direct structural changes. PMID:16484197

  7. Tandem promoters determine regulation of the Klebsiella pneumoniae glutamine synthetase (glnA) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, R

    1984-01-01

    Transcription of the structural gene for glutamine synthetase (glnA) in Klebsiella pneumoniae is controlled by the nitrogen regulatory genes ntrA, ntrB and ntrC. The nucleotide sequence of the regulatory region upstream of the glnA gene is reported here. High resolution S1 mapping of in vivo transcripts indicates that the regulatory region contains tandem promoters separated by 100 nucleotides. Measurements of beta-galactosidase activities determined in vivo from glnA-lac fusions suggest that the upstream promoter (for RNA2) is negatively regulated by the ntrBC gene products whereas transcription from the downstream promoter (for RNA1) is positively activated by the ntrA gene product in the presence of either the ntrBC or the nifA genes. The nucleotide sequence of the upstream promoter resembles the consensus sequence for E. coli promoters, whereas the downstream promoter shows homology with the nitrogen fixation (nif) promoters of K. pneumoniae. Images PMID:6149519

  8. High-resolution MR cisternography of the cerebellopontine angle, obtained with a three-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo sequence in a 0.35-T open MR imaging unit.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, S; Ito, T; Iwayama, E; Fukatsu, H; Ishigaki, T

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution MR cisternography performed with 3D fast asymmetric spin-echo imaging (3D fast spin-echo with an ultra-long echo train length and asymmetric Fourier imaging) was optimized in a 0.35-T open MR imaging unit. The 0.35- and 1.5-T images of the two volunteers and three patients with acoustic schwannomas were then compared. The optimal parameters for images obtained by 3D fast asymmetric spin-echo imaging at 0.35 T were as follows: field of view, 15 cm; matrix, 256 x 256 x 40; section thickness, 1 mm; echo train length, 76; and imaging time, 10 minutes 44 seconds. Scans obtained from both normal volunteers showed the facial, cochlear, and superior and inferior vestibular nerves separately in the internal auditory canal on both 0.35- and 1.5-T images. All three acoustic schwannomas were depicted on both 0.35- and 1.5-T images. Screening for disease at the cerebellopontine angle and in the internal auditory canal, without the administration of contrast material on a low-field open MR imaging unit and within a clinically acceptable imaging time, may be possible. Further controlled prospective studies are required, however, before implementation on a wide basis. If proved effective, this may be of particular value for reducing healthcare costs and for imaging claustrophobic and pediatric patients in an open system.

  9. Arg399Gln polymorphism of XRCC1 gene and risk of colorectal cancer in Kashmir: A case control study.

    PubMed

    Nissar, Saniya; Lone, Tufail Ahmad; Banday, Mujeeb Zafar; Rasool, Roohi; Chowdri, Nissar A; Parray, Fazl Q; Abdullah, Safiya; Sameer, Aga Syed

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism in the susceptibility of a Kashmiri population to colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the genotype distribution of the XRCC1 gene in 130 CRC cases in comparison with that of 150 healthy subjects. There was no direct significant association between the XRCC1 genotypes and CRC; however, the Arg/Gln genotype was associated with an elevated risk of CRC (OR>1.47) and the Gln/Gln variant genotype was associated with an increased risk of CRC in various clinicopathological parameters. This study suggests that the XRCC1 polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of CRC.

  10. Arg399Gln polymorphism of XRCC1 gene and risk of colorectal cancer in Kashmir: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    NISSAR, SANIYA; LONE, TUFAIL AHMAD; BANDAY, MUJEEB ZAFAR; RASOOL, ROOHI; CHOWDRI, NISSAR A.; PARRAY, FAZL Q.; ABDULLAH, SAFIYA; SAMEER, AGA SYED

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism in the susceptibility of a Kashmiri population to colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the genotype distribution of the XRCC1 gene in 130 CRC cases in comparison with that of 150 healthy subjects. There was no direct significant association between the XRCC1 genotypes and CRC; however, the Arg/Gln genotype was associated with an elevated risk of CRC (OR>1.47) and the Gln/Gln variant genotype was associated with an increased risk of CRC in various clinicopathological parameters. This study suggests that the XRCC1 polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of CRC. PMID:23426866

  11. Roles of URE2 and GLN3 in the proline utilization pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, S; Falvey, D A; Brandriss, M C

    1995-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can use alternative nitrogen sources such as arginine, urea, allantoin, gamma-aminobutyrate, or proline when preferred nitrogen sources like glutamine, asparagine, or ammonium ions are unavailable in the environment. Utilization of alternative nitrogen sources requires the relief of nitrogen repression and induction of specific permeases and enzymes. The products of the GLN3 and URE2 genes are required for the appropriate transcription of many genes in alternative nitrogen assimilatory pathways. GLN3 appears to activate their transcription when good nitrogen sources are unavailable, and URE2 appears to repress their transcription when alternative nitrogen sources are not needed. The participation of nitrogen repression and the regulators GLN3 and URE2 in the proline utilization pathway was evaluated in this study. Comparison of PUT gene expression in cells grown in repressing or derepressing nitrogen sources, in the absence of the inducer proline, indicated that both PUT1 and PUT2 are regulated by nitrogen repression, although the effect on PUT2 is comparatively small. Recessive mutations in URE2 elevated expression of the PUT1 and PUT2 genes 5- to 10-fold when cells were grown on a nitrogen-repressing medium. Although PUT3, the proline utilization pathway transcriptional activator, is absolutely required for growth on proline as the sole nitrogen source, a put3 ure2 strain had somewhat elevated PUT gene expression, suggesting an effect of the ure2 mutation in the absence of the PUT3 product. PUT1 and PUT2 gene expression did not require the GLN3 activator protein for expression under either repressing or derepressing conditions. Therefore, regulation of the PUT genes by URE2 does not require a functional GLN3 protein. The effect of the ure2 mutation on the PUT genes is not due to increased internal proline levels. URE2 repression appears to be limited to nitrogen assimilatory systems and does not affect genes involved in carbon

  12. Inhibitory complex of the transmembrane ammonia channel, AmtB, and the cytosolic regulatory protein, GlnK, at 1.96 Å

    PubMed Central

    Gruswitz, Franz; O'Connell, Joseph; Stroud, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia conductance is highly regulated. A PII signal transduction protein, GlnK, is the final regulator of transmembrane ammonia conductance by the ammonia channel AmtB in Escherichia coli. The complex formed between AmtB and inhibitory GlnK at 1.96-Å resolution shows that the trimeric channel is blocked directly by GlnK and how, in response to intracellular nitrogen status, the ability of GlnK to block the channel is regulated by uridylylation/deuridylylation at Y51. ATP and Mg2+ augment the interaction of GlnK. The hydrolyzed product, adenosine 5′-diphosphate orients the surface of GlnK for AmtB blockade. 2-Oxoglutarate diminishes AmtB/GlnK association, and sites for 2-oxoglutarate are evaluated. PMID:17190799

  13. Amerindians show no association of PC-1 gene Gln121 allele and obesity: a thrifty gene population genetics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Diego; Fernandez-Honrado, Mercedes; Areces, Cristina; Algora, Manuel; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, Sedeka; Enriquez-de-Salamanca, Mercedes; Coca, Carmen; Arribas, Ignacio; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    PC-1 Gln121 gene is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, obesity and insulin resistance in European/American Caucasoids and Orientals. We have aimed to correlate for the first time this gene in Amerindians with obesity and their corresponding individuals genotypes with obesity in order to establish preventive medicine programs for this population and also studying the evolution of gene frequencies in world populations. Central obesity was diagnosed by waist circumference perimeter and food intake independent HDL-cholesterol plasma levels were measured. HLA genes were determined in order to more objectively ascertain participants Amerindians origin. 321 Amerindian blood donors who were healthy according to the blood doning parameters were studied. No association was found between PC-1 Gln121 variant and obesity. Significant HDL-cholesterol lower values were found in the PC-1 Lys121 bearing gene individuals versus PC-1 Gln121 bearing gene ones (45.1 ± 12.7 vs. 48.7 ± 15.2 mg/dl, p < 0.05). Population analyses showed a world geographical gradient in the PC-1 Gln121 allele frequency: around 9% in Orientals, 15% in European Caucasoids and 76% in Negroids. The conclusions are: (1) No association of PC-1 Gln121 gene is found with obesity in Amerindians when association is well established in Europeans. (2) PC-1 Gln121 gene is associated to higher levels of HDL-cholesterol than the alternative PC-1 Lys121 allele. This may be specific for Amerindians. (3) Amerindians have an intermediate frequency of this possible PC-1 Gln121 thrifty gene when compared with Negroid African Americans (78.5%) or Han Chinese (7.5%, p < 0.0001). Historical details of African and other groups may support the hypothesis that PC-1 Gln121 is indeed a thrifty gene.

  14. Single-spin entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, G. B.; Meerovich, V. M.; Sokolovsky, V. L.

    2017-09-01

    We show that the operators and the quadrupole and Zeeman Hamiltonians for a spin 3/2 can be represented in terms for a system of two coupling fictitious spins 1/2 using the Kronecker product of Pauli matrices. Particularly, the quadrupole Hamiltonian which describes the interaction of the nuclear quadrupole moment with an electric field gradient is represented as the Hamiltonian of the Ising model in a transverse selective magnetic field. The Zeeman Hamiltonian, which describes interaction of the nuclear spin with the external magnetic field, can be considered as the Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg model in a selective magnetic field. The total Hamiltonian can be interpreted as the Hamiltonian of 3 D Heisenberg model in an inhomogeneous magnetic field applied along the x-axis. The representation of a single spin 3/2 as two-spin 1/2 system allows us to study entanglement in the spin system. One of the features of the fictitious spin system is that, in both the pure and the mixed states, the concurrence tends to 0.5 with increase of an applied magnetic field. The representation of a spin 3/2 as a system of two coupling fictitious spins 1/2 and possibility of formation of the entangled states in this system open a way to the application of a single spin 3/2 in quantum computation.

  15. Molecular cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene coding for bovine S100A1 protein and its Glu32-->Gln and Glu73-->Gln mutants.

    PubMed

    Bolewska, K; Kozłowska, H; Goch, G; Mikołajek, B; Bierzyński, A

    1997-01-01

    Calcium binding S100A1 protein consists of two S100 alpha subunits. On the basis of sequence homology to other S100 proteins it is believed that the binding loops are formed by amino-acid residues 19-32 and 62-73 of S100 alpha polypeptide chain. In the oxidized form of the protein the subunits are linked covalently with each other by a disulphide bond between their Cys85 residues. A synthetic gene coding for bovine S100 alpha subunit was constructed and cloned into a derivative of pAED4 plasmid. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli utilizing the T7 expression system. The expression products were purified and identified using mass spectrometry and by sequencing of their N- and C-termini. Three different forms (a, b, and c) of S100 alpha were produced: with the native sequence, with the initiator methionine at the N-terminus, and with an additional alanine at the C-terminus as well as with the initiator methionine. The material was partly oxidized. Interestingly, only the homodimers of a, b, and c species were formed. The total yield of the protein was about 50 mg/l of culture. Genes coding for Glu32-->Gln and Glu73-->Gln mutants of S100 alpha were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in the same system. In both cases similar mixtures of oxidized and reduced a, b, and c species have been obtained. The total yield of E73Q mutant is similar to that of the native protein and that of E32Q lower by about a half. As expected, the mutants of S100 alpha subunits bind only one calcium ion.

  16. Bradyrhizobium japonicum glnB, a putative nitrogen-regulatory gene, is regulated by NtrC at tandem promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, G B; Thomashow, M F; Chelm, B K

    1989-01-01

    The glnB gene from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the endosymbiont of soybeans (Glycine max), was isolated and sequenced, and its expression was examined under various culture conditions and in soybean nodules. The B. japonicum glnB gene encodes a 12,237-dalton polypeptide that is highly homologous to the glnB gene products from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The gene is located directly upstream from glnA (encoding glutamine synthetase), a linkage not observed in enteric bacteria. The glnB gene from B. japonicum is expressed from tandem promoters, which are differentially regulated in response to the nitrogen status of the medium. Expression from the downstream promoter involves the B. japonicum ntrC gene product (NtrC) in both free-living and symbiotic cells. Thus, glnB, a putative nitrogen-regulatory gene in B. japonicum, is itself Ntr regulated, and NtrC is active in B. japonicum cells in their symbiotic state. Images PMID:2793830

  17. Enhanced spin polarization in graphene with spin energy gap induced by spin-orbit coupling and strain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng-Fang; Wu, Qing-Ping E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Chen, Ai-Xi E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Xiao, Xian-Bo; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the possibility of spin polarization in graphene. The result shows that a spin energy gap can be opened in the presence of both spin-orbit coupling and strain. We find that high spin polarization with large spin-polarized current is achieved in the spin energy gap. However, only one of the two modulations is present, no spin polarization can be generated. So the combination of the two modulations provides a way to design tunable spin polarization without need for a magnetic element or an external magnetic field.

  18. XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln polymorphisms and arsenic methylation capacity are associated with urothelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Chien-I; Huang, Ya-Li; Chen, Wei-Jen; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2014-09-15

    The association between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and bladder cancer has been widely studied. However, few studies have examined the correlation between urothelial carcinoma (UC) and arsenic or its metabolites. The aim of this study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes, XRCC1 Arg194Trp, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln, with urinary arsenic profiles and UC. To this end, we conducted a hospital-based case–control study with 324 UC patients and 647 age- and gender-matched non-cancer controls. Genomic DNA was used to examine the genotype of XRCC1 Arg194Trp, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PCR-RFLP). Urinary arsenic profiles were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) linked with hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. The XRCC1 399 Gln/Gln and 194 Arg/Trp and Trp/Trp genotypes were significantly related to UC, and the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) were 1.68 (1.03–2.75) and 0.66 (0.48–0.90), respectively. Participants with higher total urinary arsenic levels, a higher percentage of inorganic arsenic (InAs%) and a lower percentage of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA%) had a higher OR of UC. Participants carrying XRCC1 risk diplotypes G-C/G-C, A-C/A-C, and A-T/G-T, and who had higher total arsenic levels, higher InAs%, or lower DMA% compared to those with other XRCC1 diplotypes had a higher OR of UC. Our results suggest that the XRCC1 399 Gln/Gln and 194 Arg/Arg DNA repair genes play an important role in poor arsenic methylation capacity, thereby increasing the risk of UC in non-obvious arsenic exposure areas. - Highlights: • The XRCC1 399Gln/Gln genotype was significantly associated with increased OR of UC. • The XRCC1 194 Arg/Trp and Trp/Trp genotype had a significantly decreased OR of UC. • Combined effect of the XRCC1 genotypes and poor arsenic methylation capacity on

  19. Nitrogen control of the glnN gene that codes for GS type III, the only glutamine synthetase in the cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena sp. PCC 6903.

    PubMed

    Crespo, J L; García-Domínguez, M; Florencio, F J

    1998-12-01

    Pseudanabaena sp. strain PCC 6903 is the first cyanobacteria lacking the typical prokaryotic glutamine synthetase type I encoded by the glnA gene. The glnN gene product, glutamine synthetase type III, is the only glutamine synthetase activity present in this cyanobacterium. Analysis of glnN expression clearly indicated a nitrogen-dependent regulation. Pseudanabaena glnN gene expression and GSIII activity were upregulated under nitrogen starvation or using nitrate as a nitrogen source, while low levels of transcript and activity were found in ammonium-containing medium. Primer extension analysis showed that the glnN gene promoter structure resembled that of the NtcA-related promoters. Mobility shift assays demonstrated that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 NtcA protein, expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, bound to the promoter of the Pseudanabaena 6903 glnN gene. The NtcA control of the glnN gene in this cyanobacterium suggested that, in the absence of a glnA gene, NtcA took control of the only glutamine synthetase gene in a fashion similar to the way the glnA gene is governed in those cyanobacteria harbouring a glnA gene.

  20. Design of spin-Seebeck diode with spin semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-Qian; Yang, Yu-Rong; Fu, Hua-Hua; Wu, Ruqian

    2016-12-01

    We report a new design of spin-Seebeck diode using two-dimensional spin semiconductors such as sawtooth-like (ST) silicence nanoribbons (SiNRs), to generate unidirectional spin currents with a temperature gradient. ST SiNRs have subbands with opposite spins across the Fermi level and hence the flow of thermally excited carriers may produce a net spin current but not charge current. Moreover, we found that even-width ST SiNRs display a remarkable negative differential thermoelectric resistance due to a charge-current compensation mechanism. In contrast, odd-width ST SiNRs manifest features of a thermoelectric diode and can be used to produce both charge and spin currents with temperature gradient. These findings can be extended to other spin semiconductors and open the door for designs of new materials and spin caloritronic devices.

  1. Design of spin-Seebeck diode with spin semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao-Qian; Yang, Yu-Rong; Fu, Hua-Hua; Wu, Ruqian

    2016-12-16

    We report a new design of spin-Seebeck diode using two-dimensional spin semiconductors such as sawtooth-like (ST) silicence nanoribbons (SiNRs), to generate unidirectional spin currents with a temperature gradient. ST SiNRs have subbands with opposite spins across the Fermi level and hence the flow of thermally excited carriers may produce a net spin current but not charge current. Moreover, we found that even-width ST SiNRs display a remarkable negative differential thermoelectric resistance due to a charge-current compensation mechanism. In contrast, odd-width ST SiNRs manifest features of a thermoelectric diode and can be used to produce both charge and spin currents with temperature gradient. These findings can be extended to other spin semiconductors and open the door for designs of new materials and spin caloritronic devices.

  2. Spectroscopic Identification of Cyclic Imide b2-Ions from Peptides Containing Gln and Asn Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzetic, Josipa; Oomens, Jos

    2013-08-01

    In mass-spectrometry based peptide sequencing, formation of b- and y-type fragments by cleavage of the amide C-N bond constitutes the main dissociation pathway of protonated peptides under low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID). The structure of the b 2 fragment ion from peptides containing glutamine (Gln) and asparagine (Asn) residues is investigated here by infrared ion spectroscopy using the free electron laser FELIX. The spectra are compared with theoretical spectra calculated using density functional theory for different possible isomeric structures as well as to experimental spectra of synthesized model systems. The spectra unambiguously show that the b2-ions do not possess the common oxazolone structure, nor do they possess the alternative diketopiperazine structure. Instead, cyclic imide structures are formed through nucleophilic attack by the amide nitrogen atom of the Gln and Asn side chains. The alternative pathway involving nucleophilic attack from the side-chain amide oxygen atom leading to cyclic isoimide structures, which had been suggested by several authors, can clearly be excluded based on the present IR spectra. This mechanism is perhaps surprising as the amide oxygen atom is considered to be the better nucleophile; however, computations show that the products formed via attack by the amide nitrogen are considerably lower in energy. Hence, b2-ions with Asn or Gln in the second position form structures with a five-membered succinimide or a six-membered glutarimide ring, respectively. b2-Ions formed from peptides with Asn in the first position are spectroscopically shown to possess the classical oxazolone structure.

  3. TLR7 Gln11Leu single nucleotide polymorphism and susceptibility to cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    ELEFANTI, LISA; SACCO, GIORGIA; STAGNI, CAMILLA; RASTRELLI, MARCO; MENIN, CHIARA; RUSSO, IRENE; ALAIBAC, MAURO

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a life-threatening skin cancer. Its incidence is rapidly increasing, and early diagnosis is the main factor able to improve its poor prognosis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane glycoproteins that recognize pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns, against which TLRs activate the innate immune response and initiate the adaptive immune response. Genetic variations of these receptors may alter the immune system, and are involved in evolution and susceptibility to various diseases, including cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the presence of TLR7 glutamine (Gln) 11 leucine (Leu) polymorphism confers an increased susceptibility to cutaneous melanoma. For that purpose, a case-control study was performed with 182 melanoma cases and 89 controls. To highlight the possible association between the aforementioned polymorphism and the susceptibility to melanoma, 93 cases of single melanoma and 89 cases of multiple primary melanoma (MPM) were compared in the present study. Since the TLR7 gene is localized on the chromosome X, the allelic frequency of the Gln11Leu polymorphism was analyzed separately in males and females. The distribution of allele frequencies between melanoma cases and controls (P=0.245) and between single melanoma and MPM cases (P=0.482) was not significant. Therefore, the present results do not suggest an association between TLR7 Gln11Leu polymorphism and susceptibility to cutaneous melanoma. Further studies are required to analyze the influence of other TLR polymorphisms on the susceptibility to malignant melanoma and the involvement of innate immunity in this malignancy. PMID:27347137

  4. Glutamyl-gamma-boronate inhibitors of bacterial Glu-tRNA(Gln) amidotransferase.

    PubMed

    Decicco, C P; Nelson, D J; Luo, Y; Shen, L; Horiuchi, K Y; Amsler, K M; Foster, L A; Spitz, S M; Merrill, J J; Sizemore, C F; Rogers, K C; Copeland, R A; Harpel, M R

    2001-09-17

    Analogues of glutamyl-gamma-boronate (1) were synthesized as mechanism-based inhibitors of bacterial Glu-tRNA(Gln) amidotransferase (Glu-AdT) and were designed to engage a putative catalytic serine nucleophile required for the glutaminase activity of the enzyme. Although 1 provides potent enzyme inhibition, structure-activity studies revealed a narrow range of tolerated chemical changes that maintained activity. Nonetheless, growth inhibition of organisms that require Glu-AdT by the most potent enzyme inhibitors appears to validate mechanism-based inhibitor design of Glu-AdT as an approach to antimicrobial development.

  5. Anti-allergic effects of His-Ala-Gln tripeptide in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mamoru; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Yoshimoto, Yoshinobu; Kozai, Hana; Okamoto, Takeaki

    2017-02-01

    We examined the inhibitory effects of HAQ (His-Ala-Gln) peptide on type-1 allergy in vitro and in vivo. HAQ peptide inhibited β-hexosaminidase release and intracellular Ca(2+) levels of rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells. Oral administration of a HAQ peptide-added diet (1 mg/mouse/administration) to C3H/HeJ mice for 14 days led to significant suppression of allergic symptoms, but did not reduce allergen-specific IgE or IgG1.

  6. Relative Rates of Amino Acid Import via the ABC Transporter GlnPQ Determine the Growth Performance of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Fulyani, Faizah; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The GlnPQ transporter from Lactococcus lactis has the remarkable feature of having two substrate-binding domains (SBDs) fused to the N terminus of the transmembrane domain (TMD), and thus four SBDs are present in the homodimeric complex. Although X-ray structures and ligand binding data are available for both SBDs, little is known of how different amino acids compete with each other for transport via GlnPQ. Here we show GlnPQ has a broader substrate specificity than previously thought, with the ability to take up asparagine, glutamine, and glutamic acid, albeit via different routes and with different affinities. Asparagine and glutamine compete with each other at the level of binding to SBD1 and SBD2 (with differences in dissociation constant), but at the same time SBD1 and SBD2 compete with each other at the level of interaction with the translocator domain (with differences in affinity constant and rate of transport). Although glutamine transport via SBD1 is outcompeted by physiological concentrations of asparagine, SBD2 ensures high rates of import of the essential amino acid glutamine. Taken together, this study demonstrates that even in the presence of competing asparagine concentrations, GlnPQ has a high capacity to transport glutamine, which matches the high needs of the cell for glutamine and glutamate. IMPORTANCE GlnPQ is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter for glutamine, glutamic acid, and asparagine. The system is essential in various Gram-positive bacteria, including L. lactis and several pathogens. Here we show how the amino acids compete with each other for binding to the multiple SBDs of GlnPQ and how these SBDs compete with each other for substrate delivery to the transporter. Overall, our results show that GlnPQ has evolved to transport diverse substrates via different paths and to optimally acquire the abundant and essential amino acid glutamine. PMID:26553850

  7. Structural analysis of APOB variants, p.(Arg3527Gln), p.(Arg1164Thr) and p.(Gln4494del), causing Familial Hypercholesterolaemia provides novel insights into variant pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Higuero, J A; Etxebarria, A; Benito-Vicente, A; Alves, A C; Arrondo, J L R; Ostolaza, H; Bourbon, M; Martin, C

    2015-12-08

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder resulting from defects in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), in the apolipoprotein B (APOB) or in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) genes. In the majority of the cases FH is caused by mutations occurring within LDLR, while only few mutations in APOB and PCSK9 have been proved to cause disease. p.(Arg3527Gln) was the first mutation in APOB being identified and characterized. Recently two novel pathogenic APOB variants have been described: p.(Arg1164Thr) and p.(Gln4494del) showing impaired LDLR binding capacity, and diminished LDL uptake. The objective of this work was to analyse the structure of p.(Arg1164Thr) and p.(Gln4494del) variants to gain insight into their pathogenicity. Secondary structure of the human ApoB100 has been investigated by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and LDL particle size both by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and electron microscopy. The results show differences in secondary structure and/or in particle size of p.(Arg1164Thr) and p.(Gln4494del) variants compared with wild type. We conclude that these changes underlie the defective binding and uptake of p.(Arg1164Thr) and p.(Gln4494del) variants. Our study reveals that structural studies on pathogenic variants of APOB may provide very useful information to understand their role in FH disease.

  8. Structural analysis of APOB variants, p.(Arg3527Gln), p.(Arg1164Thr) and p.(Gln4494del), causing Familial Hypercholesterolaemia provides novel insights into variant pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Higuero, J. A.; Etxebarria, A.; Benito-Vicente, A.; Alves, A. C.; Arrondo, J. L. R.; Ostolaza, H.; Bourbon, M.; Martin, C.

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder resulting from defects in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), in the apolipoprotein B (APOB) or in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) genes. In the majority of the cases FH is caused by mutations occurring within LDLR, while only few mutations in APOB and PCSK9 have been proved to cause disease. p.(Arg3527Gln) was the first mutation in APOB being identified and characterized. Recently two novel pathogenic APOB variants have been described: p.(Arg1164Thr) and p.(Gln4494del) showing impaired LDLR binding capacity, and diminished LDL uptake. The objective of this work was to analyse the structure of p.(Arg1164Thr) and p.(Gln4494del) variants to gain insight into their pathogenicity. Secondary structure of the human ApoB100 has been investigated by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and LDL particle size both by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and electron microscopy. The results show differences in secondary structure and/or in particle size of p.(Arg1164Thr) and p.(Gln4494del) variants compared with wild type. We conclude that these changes underlie the defective binding and uptake of p.(Arg1164Thr) and p.(Gln4494del) variants. Our study reveals that structural studies on pathogenic variants of APOB may provide very useful information to understand their role in FH disease. PMID:26643808

  9. Spin Density Distribution in Open-Shell Transition Metal Systems: A Comparative Post-Hartree-Fock, Density Functional Theory, and Quantum Monte Carlo Study of the CuCl2 Molecule.

    PubMed

    Caffarel, Michel; Giner, Emmanuel; Scemama, Anthony; Ramírez-Solís, Alejandro

    2014-12-09

    We present a comparative study of the spatial distribution of the spin density of the ground state of CuCl2 using Density Functional Theory (DFT), quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), and post-Hartree-Fock wave function theory (WFT). A number of studies have shown that an accurate description of the electronic structure of the lowest-lying states of this molecule is particularly challenging due to the interplay between the strong dynamical correlation effects in the 3d shell and the delocalization of the 3d hole over the chlorine atoms. More generally, this problem is representative of the difficulties encountered when studying open-shell metal-containing molecular systems. Here, it is shown that qualitatively different results for the spin density distribution are obtained from the various quantum-mechanical approaches. At the DFT level, the spin density distribution is found to be very dependent on the functional employed. At the QMC level, Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) results are strongly dependent on the nodal structure of the trial wave function. Regarding wave function methods, most approaches not including a very high amount of dynamic correlation effects lead to a much too high localization of the spin density on the copper atom, in sharp contrast with DFT. To shed some light on these conflicting results Full CI-type (FCI) calculations using the 6-31G basis set and based on a selection process of the most important determinants, the so-called CIPSI approach (Configuration Interaction with Perturbative Selection done Iteratively) are performed. Quite remarkably, it is found that for this 63-electron molecule and a full CI space including about 10(18) determinants, the FCI limit can almost be reached. Putting all results together, a natural and coherent picture for the spin distribution is proposed.

  10. Effects of Ala-Gln feeding strategies on growth, metabolism, and crowding stress resistance of juvenile Cyprinus carpio var. Jian.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu-Mei; Guo, Gui-Liang; Sun, Li; Yang, Qiu-Shi; Wang, Gui-Qin; Qin, Gui-Xin; Zhang, Dong-Ming

    2016-04-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different L-alanyl-l-glutamine (Ala-Gln) feeding strategies on the growth performance, metabolism and crowding stress resistance related parameters in juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian) under crowded condition (80 g/L). Juvenile Jian carp (initial weight 26.1 ± 0.6 g) were distributed into five groups which fed with graded concentrations (0% or 1.0%) of Ala-Gln for eight weeks. Control group (I, 0/0) fed with control diet (0% Ala-Gln) throughout the feeding trial. The other four groups employed different control and experimental diet feeding strategies ranging from two weeks control diet fed and two weeks experimental diet (1% Ala-Gln) fed (II, 0/2) to eight weeks experimental diet fed (V, 4/4). Results revealed that Mean weight gain (MEG) under all different feeding strategies of Ala-Gln were significantly higher than that of the control group (p < 0.05), and MEG of group II (201.90%) was even higher than that of group IV (184.70%). Liver glycogen and blood total protein of groups II, III and V were significantly higher than that in groups I and IV (p < 0.05). The highest level of serum thyroxine (10.07 ng/ml), insulin-like growth factor-I (52.40 ng/ml) and insulin (9.73 μ IU/mL) were observed in group V. However, diet supplemented with Ala-Gln did not affect the levels of serum glucose, cortisol and catecholamine in fish. The mRNA expression of GR1a, GR1b and GR2 were also significantly changed in Ala-Gln supplementation groups compared with control group (p < 0.05). After fish intraperitoneally injected with virulent Aeromonas hydrophila, the fish survival rates were significantly increased in all Ala-Gln supplementation groups compared with control group (p < 0.05). Results from the present experiment showed the importance of dietary supplementation of Ala-Gln in benefaction of the growth performance, metabolism and crowding stress resistance in Jian carp breeding. The

  11. Nitrogen regulator GlnR controls uptake and utilization of non-phosphotransferase-system carbon sources in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Cheng-Heng; Yao, Lili; Xu, Ya; Liu, Wei-Bing; Zhou, Ying; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-12-22

    The regulatory mechanisms underlying the uptake and utilization of multiple types of carbohydrates in actinomycetes remain poorly understood. In this study, we show that GlnR (central regulator of nitrogen metabolism) serves as a universal regulator of nitrogen metabolism and plays an important, previously unknown role in controlling the transport of non-phosphotransferase-system (PTS) carbon sources in actinomycetes. It was observed that GlnR can directly interact with the promoters of most (13 of 20) carbohydrate ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter loci and can activate the transcription of these genes in response to nitrogen availability in industrial, erythromycin-producing Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Deletion of the glnR gene resulted in severe growth retardation under the culture conditions used, with select ABC-transported carbohydrates (maltose, sorbitol, mannitol, cellobiose, trehalose, or mannose) used as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, we found that GlnR-mediated regulation of carbohydrate transport was highly conserved in actinomycetes. These results demonstrate that GlnR serves a role beyond nitrogen metabolism, mediating critical functions in carbon metabolism and crosstalk of nitrogen- and carbon-metabolism pathways in response to the nutritional states of cells. These findings provide insights into the molecular regulation of transport and metabolism of non-PTS carbohydrates and reveal potential applications for the cofermentation of biomass-derived sugars in the production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals.

  12. Nitrogen regulator GlnR controls uptake and utilization of non-phosphotransferase-system carbon sources in actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Cheng-Heng; Yao, Lili; Xu, Ya; Liu, Wei-Bing; Zhou, Ying; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms underlying the uptake and utilization of multiple types of carbohydrates in actinomycetes remain poorly understood. In this study, we show that GlnR (central regulator of nitrogen metabolism) serves as a universal regulator of nitrogen metabolism and plays an important, previously unknown role in controlling the transport of non-phosphotransferase-system (PTS) carbon sources in actinomycetes. It was observed that GlnR can directly interact with the promoters of most (13 of 20) carbohydrate ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter loci and can activate the transcription of these genes in response to nitrogen availability in industrial, erythromycin-producing Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Deletion of the glnR gene resulted in severe growth retardation under the culture conditions used, with select ABC-transported carbohydrates (maltose, sorbitol, mannitol, cellobiose, trehalose, or mannose) used as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, we found that GlnR-mediated regulation of carbohydrate transport was highly conserved in actinomycetes. These results demonstrate that GlnR serves a role beyond nitrogen metabolism, mediating critical functions in carbon metabolism and crosstalk of nitrogen- and carbon-metabolism pathways in response to the nutritional states of cells. These findings provide insights into the molecular regulation of transport and metabolism of non-PTS carbohydrates and reveal potential applications for the cofermentation of biomass-derived sugars in the production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals. PMID:26644570

  13. Co-Expression of Wild-Type P2X7R with Gln460Arg Variant Alters Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Aprile-Garcia, Fernando; Metzger, Michael W.; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stadler, Herbert; Acuña, Matías; Liberman, Ana C.; Senin, Sergio A.; Gerez, Juan; Hoijman, Esteban; Refojo, Damian; Mitkovski, Mišo; Panhuysen, Markus; Stühmer, Walter; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M.; Arzt, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor is a member of the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels. A single-nucleotide polymorphism leading to a glutamine (Gln) by arginine (Arg) substitution at codon 460 of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has been associated with mood disorders. No change in function (loss or gain) has been described for this SNP so far. Here we show that although the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant per se is not compromised in its function, co-expression of wild-type P2X7R with P2X7R-Gln460Arg impairs receptor function with respect to calcium influx, channel currents and intracellular signaling in vitro. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation and FRET studies show that the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant physically interacts with P2X7R-WT. Specific silencing of either the normal or polymorphic variant rescues the heterozygous loss of function phenotype and restores normal function. The described loss of function due to co-expression, unique for mutations in the P2RX7 gene so far, explains the mechanism by which the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant affects the normal function of the channel and may represent a mechanism of action for other mutations. PMID:26986975

  14. Dual-targeted tRNA-dependent amidotransferase ensures both mitochondrial and chloroplastic Gln-tRNAGln synthesis in plants

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Claire; Bailly, Marc; Kern, Daniel; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Becker, Hubert; Duchêne, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNAs are generally formed by direct attachment of an amino acid to tRNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, but Gln-tRNA is an exception to this rule. Gln-tRNAGln is formed by this direct pathway in the eukaryotic cytosol and in protists or fungi mitochondria but is formed by an indirect transamidation pathway in most of bacteria, archaea, and chloroplasts. We show here that the formation of Gln-tRNAGln is also achieved by the indirect pathway in plant mitochondria. The mitochondrial-encoded tRNAGln, which is the only tRNAGln present in mitochondria, is first charged with glutamate by a nondiscriminating GluRS, then is converted into Gln-tRNAGln by a tRNA-dependent amidotransferase (AdT). The three subunits GatA, GatB, and GatC are imported into mitochondria and assemble into a functional GatCAB AdT. Moreover, the mitochondrial pathway of Gln-tRNAGln formation is shared with chloroplasts as both the GluRS, and the three AdT subunits are dual-imported into mitochondria and chloroplasts. PMID:18441100

  15. The effect of Gly-Gln [ß-endorphin30-31] on morphine-evoked serotonin and GABA efflux in the nucleus accumbens of conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Basaran, Nesrin F; Buyukuysal, R Levent; Sertac Yilmaz, M; Aydin, Sami; Cavun, Sinan; Millington, William R

    2016-08-01

    Glycyl-L-glutamine (Gly-Gln; β-endorphin30-31) is an endogenous dipeptide synthesized through the post-translational processing of β-endorphin1-31. Central Gly-Gln administration inhibits the rewarding properties of morphine and attenuates morphine tolerance, dependence and withdrawal although it does not interfere with morphine analgesia. In an earlier study, we found that Gly-Gln inhibits morphine-induced dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), consistent with its ability to inhibit morphine reward. To further investigate the mechanism responsible for its central effects we tested whether i.c.v. Gly-Gln administration influences the rise in extracellular serotonin and GABA concentrations evoked by morphine in the NAc. Conscious rats were treated with Gly-Gln (100nmol/5μl) or saline i.c.v. followed, 2min later, by morphine (2.5mg/kg) or saline i.p. and extracellular serotonin and GABA concentrations were analyzed by microdialysis and HPLC. Morphine administration increased extracellular serotonin and GABA concentrations significantly within 20min, as shown previously. Unexpectedly, Gly-Gln also increased extracellular serotonin concentrations significantly in control animals. Combined treatment with Gly-Gln+morphine also elevated extracellular serotonin concentrations although the magnitude of the response did not differ significantly from the effect of Gly-Gln or morphine, given alone suggesting that Gly-Gln suppressed morphine induced serotonin efflux. Gly-Gln abolished the morphine-induced rise in extracellular GABA concentrations but had no effect on extracellular GABA when given alone to otherwise untreated animals. These data show that Gly-Gln stimulates NAc serotonin efflux and, together with earlier studies, support the hypothesis that Gly-Gln inhibits the rewarding effects of morphine by modulating morphine induced dopamine, GABA and serotonin efflux in the NAc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PREFACE: Spin Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieny, B.; Sousa, R.; Prejbeanu, L.

    2007-04-01

    tunnel junctions were introduced as memory elements in new types of non-volatile magnetic memories (MRAM). A first 4Mbit product was launched by Freescale in July 2006. Future generations of memories are being developed by academic groups or companies. the combination of magnetic elements with CMOS components opens a whole new paradigm in hybrid electronic components which can change the common conception of the architecture of complex electronic components with a much tighter integration of logic and memory. the steady magnetic excitations stimulated by spin-transfer might be used in a variety of microwave components provided the output power can be increased. Intense research and development efforts are being aimed at increasing this power by the synchronization of oscillators. The articles compiled in this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, devoted to spin electronics, review these recent developments. All the contributors are greatly acknowledged.

  17. Hydrodynamics of spin-polarized transport and spin pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Gurzhi, R. N. Kalinenko, A. N.; Kopeliovich, A. I.; Pyshkin, P. V.; Yanovsky, A. V.

    2007-07-15

    The dynamics of a nonequilibrium spin system dominated by collisions preserving the total quasimomentum of the interacting electrons and quasiparticles is considered. An analysis of the derived hydrodynamic equations shows that weakly attenuated spin-polarization waves associated with an oscillating drift current can exist in a magnetically inhomogeneous conducting ring. Spin-polarized transport in a ballistic regime of wave propagation through a conductor is also considered, and a simple method is proposed for distinguishing these waves from spin and current oscillations that develop in the hydrodynamic regime. It is shown that a potential difference arises between the leads of an open nonuniformly spin-polarized conductor as a manifestation of spin polarization of electron density. This spin-mediated electrical phenomenon occurs in both hydrodynamic and diffusive limits.

  18. GATA2 germline mutations impair GATA2 transcription, causing haploinsufficiency: functional analysis of the p.Arg396Gln mutation.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Lavaud, Xabier; Landecho, Manuel F; Maicas, Miren; Urquiza, Leire; Merino, Juana; Moreno-Miralles, Isabel; Odero, María D

    2015-03-01

    Germline GATA2 mutations have been identified as the cause of familial syndromes with immunodeficiency and predisposition to myeloid malignancies. GATA2 mutations appear to cause loss of function of the mutated allele leading to haploinsufficiency; however, this postulate has not been experimentally validated as the basis of these syndromes. We hypothesized that mutations that are translated into abnormal proteins could affect the transcription of GATA2, triggering GATA2 deficiency. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays showed that the human GATA2 protein activates its own transcription through a specific region located at -2.4 kb, whereas the p.Thr354Met, p.Thr355del, and p.Arg396Gln germline mutations impair GATA2 promoter activation. Accordingly, GATA2 expression was decreased to ∼58% in a patient with p.Arg396Gln, compared with controls. p.Arg396Gln is the second most common mutation in these syndromes, and no previous functional analyses have been performed. We therefore analyzed p.Arg396Gln. Our data show that p.Arg396Gln is a loss-of-function mutation affecting DNA-binding ability and, as a consequence, it fails to maintain the immature characteristics of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, which could result in defects in this cell compartment. In conclusion, we show that human GATA2 binds to its own promoter, activating its transcription, and that the aforementioned mutations impair the transcription of GATA2. Our results indicate that they can affect other GATA2 target genes, which could partially explain the variability of symptoms in these diseases. Moreover, we show that p.Arg396Gln is a loss-of-function mutation, which is unable to retain the progenitor phenotype in cells where it is expressed.

  19. Controlled spatial separation of spins and coherent dynamics in spin-orbit-coupled nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Chen, Chin-Hung; Fan, Ju-Chun; Smith, L. W.; Creeth, G. L.; Chang, Che-Wei; Pepper, M.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Chen, Tse-Ming

    2017-07-01

    The spatial separation of electron spins followed by the control of their individual spin dynamics has recently emerged as an essential ingredient in many proposals for spin-based technologies because it would enable both of the two spin species to be simultaneously utilized, distinct from most of the current spintronic studies and technologies wherein only one spin species could be handled at a time. Here we demonstrate that the spatial spin splitting of a coherent beam of electrons can be achieved and controlled using the interplay between an external magnetic field and Rashba spin-orbit interaction in semiconductor nanostructures. The technique of transverse magnetic focusing is used to detect this spin separation. More notably, our ability to engineer the spin-orbit interactions enables us to simultaneously manipulate and probe the coherent spin dynamics of both spin species and hence their correlation, which could open a route towards spintronics and spin-based quantum information processing.

  20. Controlled spatial separation of spins and coherent dynamics in spin-orbit-coupled nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Chen, Chin-Hung; Fan, Ju-Chun; Smith, L W; Creeth, G L; Chang, Che-Wei; Pepper, M; Griffiths, J P; Farrer, I; Beere, H E; Jones, G A C; Ritchie, D A; Chen, Tse-Ming

    2017-07-10

    The spatial separation of electron spins followed by the control of their individual spin dynamics has recently emerged as an essential ingredient in many proposals for spin-based technologies because it would enable both of the two spin species to be simultaneously utilized, distinct from most of the current spintronic studies and technologies wherein only one spin species could be handled at a time. Here we demonstrate that the spatial spin splitting of a coherent beam of electrons can be achieved and controlled using the interplay between an external magnetic field and Rashba spin-orbit interaction in semiconductor nanostructures. The technique of transverse magnetic focusing is used to detect this spin separation. More notably, our ability to engineer the spin-orbit interactions enables us to simultaneously manipulate and probe the coherent spin dynamics of both spin species and hence their correlation, which could open a route towards spintronics and spin-based quantum information processing.

  1. Tensor spin observables and spin stucture at low Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Slifer, Karl J.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss recent spin structure results from Jefferson Lab, and outline an emerging program to study tensor spin observables using solid deuteron targets. These new experiments open the potential to study hidden color, the tensor nature of short range correlations, and to probe for exotic gluonic states.

  2. Efficient spin transport through polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, J. B. S.; Alves Santos, O.; Gomes, J. P.; Assis, H. S.; Felix, J. F.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.

    2017-01-01

    By using the spin pumping process, we show that it is possible to transport a pure spin current across layers of conducting polyaniline (PANI) with several hundred nanometers sandwiched between a film of the ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and a thin layer of platinum. The spin current generated by microwave-driven ferromagnetic resonance of the YIG film, injected through the YIG/PANI interface, crosses the whole PANI layer and then is injected into the Pt layer. By means of the inverse spin Hall effect in the Pt, the spin current is converted into charge current and electrically detected as a dc voltage. We measured a spin diffusion length in PANI of 590 ± 40 nm, which is very large compared with normal metals, demonstrating that PANI can be used as an efficient spin current conductor and poor charge current conductor, opening the path towards spintronics applications based in this very attractive material.

  3. Post-translational Serine/Threonine Phosphorylation and Lysine Acetylation: A Novel Regulatory Aspect of the Global Nitrogen Response Regulator GlnR in S. coelicolor M145

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Rafat; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Tiffert, Yvonne; Heberer, Martin; Meky, Mohamed; Ahmed, Yousra; Matthews, Arne; Krysenko, Sergii; Jakobi, Marco; Hinder, Markus; Moore, Jane; Okoniewski, Nicole; Maček, Boris; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Bera, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Soil-dwelling Streptomyces bacteria such as S.coelicolor have to constantly adapt to the nitrogen (N) availability in their habitat. Thus, strict transcriptional and post-translational control of the N-assimilation is fundamental for survival of this species. GlnR is a global response regulator that controls transcription of the genes related to the N-assimilation in S. coelicolor and other members of the Actinomycetales. GlnR represents an atypical orphan response regulator that is not activated by the phosphorylation of the conserved aspartate residue (Asp 50). We have applied transcriptional analysis, LC-MS/MS analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to understand the regulation of GlnR in S. coelicolor M145. The expression of glnR and GlnR-target genes was revisited under four different N-defined conditions and a complex N-rich condition. Although, the expression of selected GlnR-target genes was strongly responsive to changing N-concentrations, the glnR expression itself was independent of the N-availability. Using LC-MS/MSanalysis we demonstrated that GlnR was post-translationally modified. The post-translational modifications of GlnR comprise phosphorylation of the serine/threonine residues and acetylation of lysine residues. In the complex N-rich medium GlnR was phosphorylated on six serine/threonine residues and acetylated on one lysine residue. Under defined N-excess conditions only two phosphorylated residues were detected whereas under defined N-limiting conditions no phosphorylation was observed. GlnR phosphorylation is thus clearly correlated with N-rich conditions. Furthermore, GlnR was acetylated on four lysine residues independently of the N-concentration in the defined media and on only one lysine residue in the complex N-rich medium. Using EMSAs we demonstrated that phosphorylation inhibited the binding of GlnR to its targets genes, whereas acetylation had little influence on the formation of GlnR-DNA complex. This study clearly

  4. Association of xeroderma pigmentosum group D (Asp312Asn, Lys751Gln) and cytidine deaminase (Lys27Gln, Ala70Thr) polymorphisms with outcome in Chinese non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with cisplatin-gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M; Ding, Y J; Feng, Y; Zhang, Q R; Xiang, Y; Wan, H Y

    2014-04-29

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) plays a key role in the repair of DNA and platinum resistance lesions. Cytidine deaminase (CDA) genes determine the velocity of gemcitabine catalysis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between XPD and CDA genotypes and outcome in non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. We used polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism to evaluate genetic polymorphisms of XPD (Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln) and CDA (Lys27Gln and Ala70Thr) in 93 NSCLC patients treated with a cisplatin-gemcitabine regimen. There were no significant correlations between the XPD polymorphisms Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln with clinical benefits (P>0.05). Time to progression (TTP) did not differ between patients with wild type genotypes and those heterozygous for the single nucleotide polymorphism loci of XPD. However, a significant difference was observed in overall survival (OS) between XPD Asp312Asp and XPD Asp312Asn individuals (20.0 vs 12.4 months, P=0.04). Furthermore, the OS of patients with wild type genotypes was longer (20.5 months) than that of patients carrying the XPD 751Lys/Gln polymorphism (11.5 months). No significant differences in TTP or OS were observed in patients carrying different genotypes of CDA Lys27Gln, and no mutations were observed at the CDA Ala70Thr site. These results provide suggestive evidence of a favorable effect for the XPD 312Asp/Asp and XPD 751Lys/Lys genotypes with respect to overall survival rates in platinum-treated NSCLC patients. However, the CDA 27 polymorphism does not appear to affect the efficacy of gemcitabine.

  5. Characterization of protein acyltransferase function of recombinant purified GlnA1 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a moon lighting property.

    PubMed

    Baghel, Anil S; Tandon, Rashmi; Gupta, Garima; Kumar, Ajit; Sharma, Raman K; Aggarwal, Neha; Kathuria, Abha; Saini, Neeraj K; Bose, Mridula; Prasad, Ashok K; Sharma, Sunil K; Nath, Mahendra; Parmar, Virinder S; Raj, Hanumantharao G

    2011-12-20

    The protein acetyltransferase (MTAase) function of glutamine synthetase of Mycobacterium smegmatis was established earlier. In this paper, studies were undertaken to examine MTAase function of recombinant glutamine synthetase (rGlnA1) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which showed >80% similarity with M. smegmatis GlnA. The specificity of MTAase to several acyl derivative of coumarins was examined. The results clearly indicated that MTAase exhibited differential specificities to several acyloxycoumarins. Further, MTAase was also found capable of transferring propionyl and butyryl groups from propoxy and butoxy derivatives of 4-methylcoumarin. These observations characterized MTAase in general as a protein acyltransferase. MTAase catalyzed acetylation of GST by 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (DAMC), a model acetoxy coumarin was confirmed by MALDI-TOF-MS as well as western blot analysis using acetylated lysine polyclonal antibody. In order to validate the active site of rGlnA1 for TAase activity, effect of DAMC and L-methionine-S-sulfoximine (MSO) on GS and TAase activity of rGlnA1 were studied. The results indicated that the active sites of GS and TAase were found different. Acetyl CoA, a universal biological acetyl group donor, was also found to be a substrate for MTAase. These results appropriately characterize glutamine synthetase of Mtb exhibiting transacylase action as a moonlighting protein.

  6. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, D

    2016-04-27

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined.

  7. Contribution of Gln9 and Phe80 to substrate binding in ribonuclease MC1 from bitter gourd seeds.

    PubMed

    Numata, T; Kimura, M

    2001-11-01

    Ribonuclease MC1 (RNase MC1) isolated from bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) seeds specifically cleaves phosphodiester bonds on the 5'-side of uridine. The crystal structures of RNase MC1 in complex with 2'-UMP or 3'-UMP reveal that Gln9, Asn71, Leu73, and Phe80 are involved in uridine binding by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions [Suzuki et al. (2000) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 275, 572-576]. To evaluate the contribution of Gln9 and Phe80 to uridine binding, Gln9 was replaced with Ala, Phe, Glu, or His, and Phe80 with Ala by site-directed mutagenesis. The kinetic properties of the resulting mutant enzymes were characterized using cytidylyl-3',5'-uridine (CpU) as a substrate. The mutant Q9A exhibited a 3.7-fold increased K(m) and 27.6-fold decreased k(cat), while three other mutations, Q9F, Q9E, and Q9H, predominantly affected the k(cat) value. Replacing Phe80 with Ala drastically reduced the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) with a minimum K(m) value equal to 8 mM. It was further found that the hydrolytic activities of the mutants toward cytidine-2',3'-cyclic monophosphate (cCMP) were reduced. These results demonstrate that Gln9 and Phe80 play essential roles not only in uridine binding but also in hydrolytic activity. Moreover, we produced double Ala substituted mutants at Gln9, Asn71, Leu73, and Phe80, and compared their kinetic properties with those of the corresponding single mutants. The results suggest that these four residues may contribute to uridine binding in a mutually independent manner.

  8. XRCC1 Arg399Gln was associated with repair capacity for DNA damage induced by occupational chromium exposure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Occupational chromium exposure may induce DNA damage and lead to lung cancer and other work-related diseases. DNA repair gene polymorphisms, which may alter the efficiency of DNA repair, thus may contribute to genetic susceptibility of DNA damage. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the genetic variations of 9 major DNA repair genes could modulate the hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI))-induced DNA damage. Findings The median (P25-P75) of Olive tail moment was 0.93 (0.58–1.79) for individuals carrying GG genotype of XRCC1 Arg399Gln (G/A), 0.73 (0.46–1.35) for GA heterozygote and 0.50 (0.43–0.93) for AA genotype. Significant difference was found among the subjects with three different genotypes (P = 0.048) after adjusting the confounding factors. The median of Olive tail moment of the subjects carrying A allele (the genotypes of AA and GA) was 0.66 (0.44–1.31), which was significantly lower than that of subjects with GG genotype (P = 0.043). The A allele conferred a significantly reduced risk of DNA damage with the OR of 0.39 (95% CI: 0.15–0.99, P = 0.048). No significant association was found between the XRCC1Arg194Trp, ERCC1 C8092A, ERCC5 His1104Asp, ERCC6 Gly399Asp, GSTP1 Ile105Val, OGG1 Ser326Cys, XPC Lys939Gln, XPD Lys751Gln and DNA damage. Conclusion The polymorphism of Arg399Gln in XRCC1 was associated with the Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. XRCC1 Arg399Gln may serve as a genetic biomarker of susceptibility for Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. PMID:22642904

  9. Tor Pathway Control of the Nitrogen-responsive DAL5 Gene Bifurcates at the Level of Gln3 and Gat1 Regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Georis, Isabelle; Tate, Jennifer J.; Cooper, Terrance G.; Dubois, Evelyne

    2008-01-01

    The Tor1,2 protein kinases globally influence many cellular processes including nitrogen-responsive gene expression that correlates with intracellular localization of GATA transcription activators Gln3 and Gat1/Nil1. Gln3-Myc13 and Gat1-Myc13 are restricted to the cytoplasm of cells provided with good nitrogen sources, e.g. glutamine. Following the addition of the Tor1,2 inhibitor, rapamycin, both transcription factors relocate to the nucleus. Gln3-Myc13 localization is highly dependent upon Ure2 and type 2A-related phosphatase, Sit4. Ure2 is required for Gln3 to be restricted to the cytoplasm of cells provided with good nitrogen sources, and Sit4 is required for its location to the nucleus following rapamycin treatment. The paucity of analogous information concerning Gat1 regulation prompted us to investigate the effects of deleting SIT4 and URE2 on Gat1-Myc13 localization, DNA binding, and NCR-sensitive transcription. Our data demonstrate that Tor pathway control of NCR-responsive transcription bifurcates at the regulation of Gln3 and Gat1. Gat1-Myc13 localization is not strongly influenced by deleting URE2, nor is its nuclear targeting following rapamycin treatment strongly dependent on Sit4. ChIP experiments demonstrated that Gat1-Myc13 can bind to the DAL5 promoter in the absence of Gln3. Gln3-Myc13, on the other hand, cannot bind to DAL5 in the absence of Gat1. We conclude that: (i) Tor pathway regulation of Gat1 differs markedly from that of Gln3, (ii) nuclear targeting of Gln3-Myc13 is alone insufficient for its recruitment to the DAL5 promoter, and (iii) the Tor pathway continues to play an important regulatory role in NCR-sensitive transcription even after Gln3-Myc13 is localized to the nucleus. PMID:18245087

  10. Maps for Lorentz transformations of spin

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Thomas F.; Shaji, Anil; Sudarshan, E. C. G.

    2006-03-15

    Lorentz transformations of spin density matrices for a particle with positive mass and spin 1/2 are described by maps of the kind used in open quantum dynamics. They show how the Lorentz transformations of the spin depend on the momentum. Since the spin and momentum generally are not independent, the maps generally are not completely positive and act in limited domains. States with two momentum values are considered, so the maps are for the spin qubit correlated with the qubit made from the two momentum values, and results from the open quantum dynamics of two coupled qubits can be applied. Inverses are used to show that every Lorentz transformation completely removes the spin polarization, and so completely removes the information, from a number of spin density matrices. The size of the spin polarization that is removed is calculated for particular cases.

  11. Decoherence effects on the quantum spin channels

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jianming; Zhou Zhengwei; Guo Guangcan

    2006-08-15

    An open ended spin chain can serve as a quantum data bus for the coherent transfer of quantum state information. In this paper, we investigate the efficiency of such quantum spin channels which work in a decoherence environment. Our results show that the decoherence will significantly reduce the fidelity of quantum communication through the spin channels. Generally speaking, as the distance increases, the decoherence effects become more serious, which will put some constraints on the spin chains for long distance quantum state transfer.

  12. Domain Wall Motion by the Magnonic Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinzke, D.; Nowak, U.

    2011-07-01

    The recently discovered spin Seebeck effect refers to a spin current induced by a temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic material. It combines spin degrees of freedom with caloric properties, opening the door for the invention of new, spin caloritronic devices. Using spin model simulations as well as an innovative, multiscale micromagnetic framework we show that magnonic spin currents caused by temperature gradients lead to spin transfer torque effects, which can drag a domain wall in a ferromagnetic nanostructure towards the hotter part of the wire. This effect opens new perspectives for the control and manipulation of domain structures.

  13. Domain wall motion by the magnonic spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Hinzke, D; Nowak, U

    2011-07-08

    The recently discovered spin Seebeck effect refers to a spin current induced by a temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic material. It combines spin degrees of freedom with caloric properties, opening the door for the invention of new, spin caloritronic devices. Using spin model simulations as well as an innovative, multiscale micromagnetic framework we show that magnonic spin currents caused by temperature gradients lead to spin transfer torque effects, which can drag a domain wall in a ferromagnetic nanostructure towards the hotter part of the wire. This effect opens new perspectives for the control and manipulation of domain structures.

  14. A water-mediated and substrate-assisted aminoacylation mechanism in the discriminating aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase GlnRS and non-discriminating GluRS.

    PubMed

    Aboelnga, Mohamed M; Hayward, John J; Gauld, James W

    2017-09-27

    Glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) catalyzes the aminoacylation of glutamine to the corresponding tRNA(Gln). However, most bacteria and all archaea lack GlnRS and thus an indirect noncanonical aminoacylation is required. With the assistance of a non-discriminating version of Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases (ND-GluRS) the tRNA(Gln) is misaminoacylated by glutamate. In this study, we have computationally investigated the aminoacylation mechanism in GlnRS and ND-GluRS employing Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, Quantum Mechanics (QM) cluster and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. Our investigations demonstrated the feasibility of a water-mediated, substrate-assisted catalysis pathway with rate limiting steps occurring at energy barriers of 25.0 and 25.4 kcal mol(-1) for GlnRS and ND-GluRS, respectively. A conserved lysine residue participates in a second proton transfer to facilitate the departure of the adenosine monophosphate (AMP) group. Thermodynamically stable (-29.9 and -9.3 kcal mol(-1) for GlnRS and ND-GluRS) product complexes are obtained only when the AMP group is neutral.

  15. GDH1 expression is regulated by GLN3, GCN4, and HAP4 under respiratory growth.

    PubMed

    Riego, Lina; Avendaño, Amaranta; DeLuna, Alexander; Rodríguez, Ekaterina; González, Alicia

    2002-04-26

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes encoded by GDH1 and GDH3 catalyze the synthesis of glutamate from ammonium and alpha-ketoglutarate. In this work we analyzed GDH1 transcriptional regulation, in order to deepen the studies in regard to its physiological role. Our results indicate that: (i) GDH1 expression is strictly controlled in ethanol-grown cultures, constituting a fine-tuning mechanism that modulates the abundance of Gdh1p monomers under this condition, (ii) GDH1 expression is controlled by transcriptional activators that have been considered as exclusive of either nitrogen (Gln3p and Gcn4p) or carbon metabolism (HAP complex), and (iii) chromatin remodeling complexes play a role in GDH1 expression; ADA2 and ADA3 up-regulated GDH1 expression on ethanol, while that on glucose was ADA3-dependent. SPT3 and SNF2 activated GDH1 expression on either carbon source whereas GCN5 played no role in any condition tested. The above described combinatorial control results in a refined mechanism that coordinates carbon and nitrogen utilization.

  16. IL23R(Arg381Gln) Functional Polymorphism Is Associated with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis Severity

    PubMed Central

    Boukadida, Jalel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the association between a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the interleukin-23 receptor gene (IL23R; rs11209026, 1142 Gwild type → Areduced function, Arg381Gln) and disease severity outcome in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in the Tunisian population. SNP was investigated in a population of 168 patients with active pulmonary TB (cases were stratified into patients with minimal/moderate lung involvement, i.e., patients with minimal/moderate disease [Pmd], and patients with extensive lung involvement, i.e., patients with active disease [Pad]) and 150 healthy subjects. Genotype analyses were carried out using the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. We have found that the IL23R reduced-function allele 1142A and genotypes AA and AG were overrepresented, especially in the Pad subgroup compared with the control group (51% versus 18% [P = 10−8], 33% versus 5% [P = 10−8], and 36% versus 26% [P = 5 × 10−3], respectively). Additionally, comparison of the Pad and the Pmd groups showed that the A allele and AA genotype seemed to be associated with 2.79-fold (P = 4 × 10−5) and 7.74-fold (P = 10−5) increased risks of TB with minimal/moderate lung involvement, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the reduced-function polymorphism 1142G → A encoded by IL23R influences the outcome of disease severity of active pulmonary TB in Tunisian patients. PMID:22695161

  17. A novel repressor of nif and glnA expression in the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    PubMed

    Lie, Thomas J; Leigh, John A

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen assimilation in the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis is regulated by transcriptional repression involving a palindromic 'nitrogen operator' repressor binding sequence. Here we report the isolation of the nitrogen repressor, NrpR, from M. maripaludis using DNA affinity purification. Deletion of the nrpR gene resulted in loss of nitrogen operator binding activity in cell extracts and loss of repression of nif (nitrogen-fixation) and glnA (glutamine synthetase) gene expression in vivo. Genetic complementation of the nrpR mutation restored all functions. NrpR contained a putative N-terminal winged helix-turn-helix motif followed by two mutually homologous domains of unknown function. Comparison of the migration of NrpR in gel-filtration chromatography with its subunit molecular weight (60 kDa) suggested that NrpR was a tetramer. Several lines of evidence suggested that the level of NrpR itself is not regulated, and the binding affinity of NrpR to the nitrogen operator is controlled by an unknown mechanism. Homologues of NrpR were found only in certain species in the kingdom Euryarchaeota. Full length homologues were found in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus, and homologues lacking one or more of the three polypeptide domains were found in Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Methanopyrus kandleri, Methanosarcina acetivorans, and Methanosarcina mazei. NrpR represents a new family of regulators unique to the Euryarchaeota.

  18. Controlled spatial separation of spins and coherent dynamics in spin-orbit-coupled nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Chen, Chin-Hung; Fan, Ju-Chun; Smith, L. W.; Creeth, G. L.; Chang, Che-Wei; Pepper, M.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Chen, Tse-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The spatial separation of electron spins followed by the control of their individual spin dynamics has recently emerged as an essential ingredient in many proposals for spin-based technologies because it would enable both of the two spin species to be simultaneously utilized, distinct from most of the current spintronic studies and technologies wherein only one spin species could be handled at a time. Here we demonstrate that the spatial spin splitting of a coherent beam of electrons can be achieved and controlled using the interplay between an external magnetic field and Rashba spin–orbit interaction in semiconductor nanostructures. The technique of transverse magnetic focusing is used to detect this spin separation. More notably, our ability to engineer the spin–orbit interactions enables us to simultaneously manipulate and probe the coherent spin dynamics of both spin species and hence their correlation, which could open a route towards spintronics and spin-based quantum information processing. PMID:28691707

  19. Spin Chern number and topological phase transition on the Lieb lattice with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Zhou, Bin

    2017-03-01

    We propose that quantum anomalous Hall effect may occur in the Lieb lattice, when Rashba spin-orbit coupling, spin-independent and spin-dependent staggered potentials are introduced into the lattice. It is found that spin Chern numbers of two degenerate flat bands change from 0 to ±2 due to Rashba spin-orbit coupling effect. The inclusion of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and two kinds of staggered potentials opens a gap between the two flat bands. The topological property of the gap is determined by the amplitudes of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and staggered potentials, and thus the topological phase transition from quantum anomalous Hall effect to normal insulator can occur. Finally, the topological phase transition from quantum spin Hall state to normal insulator is discussed when Rashba spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling coexist in the Lieb lattice.

  20. Role of GlnR in acid-mediated repression of genes encoding proteins involved in glutamine and glutamate metabolism in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Min; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Yu, Sung-Liang; Sher, Singh; Lai, Chern-Hsiung; Chia, Jean-San

    2010-04-01

    The acid tolerance response (ATR) is one of the major virulence traits of Streptococcus mutans. In this study, the role of GlnR in acid-mediated gene repression that affects the adaptive ATR in S. mutans was investigated. Using a whole-genome microarray and in silico analyses, we demonstrated that GlnR and the GlnR box (ATGTNAN(7)TNACAT) were involved in the transcriptional repression of clusters of genes encoding proteins involved in glutamine and glutamate metabolism under acidic challenge. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that the coordinated regulation of the GlnR regulon occurred 5 min after acid treatment and that prolonged acid exposure (30 min) resulted in further reduction in expression. A lower level but consistent reduction in response to acidic pH was also observed in chemostat-grown cells, confirming the negative regulation of GlnR. The repression by GlnR through the GlnR box in response to acidic pH was further confirmed in the citBZC operon, containing genes encoding the first three enzymes in the glutamine/glutamate biosynthesis pathway. The survival rate of the GlnR-deficient mutant at pH 2.8 was more than 10-fold lower than that in the wild-type strain 45 min after acid treatment, suggesting that the GlnR regulon participates in S. mutans ATR. It is hypothesized that downregulation of the synthesis of the amino acid precursors in response to acid challenge would promote citrate metabolism to pyruvate, with the consumption of H(+) and potential ATP synthesis. Such regulation will ensure an optimal acid adaption in S. mutans.

  1. Expression of glnA in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 is initiated from a single nif-like promoter under various nitrogen conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Kupiec, R; Gurevitz, M; Zilberstein, A

    1993-01-01

    The glnA mRNA, encoding glutamine synthetase, is differentially accumulated in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 in media containing different nitrogen sources. With the different nitrogen compounds, transcription of glnA initiated at a single site located -146 nucleotides upstream of the translation start site of the gene. A similarity of the nif-like promoter of the glnA gene of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 and a binding-site sequence for the Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 transcription regulator, NtcA, were found upstream of the transcription initiation site. Images PMID:7902350

  2. In vivo formation of glutamyl-tRNA(Gln) in Escherichia coli by heterologous glutamyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Harold; Lefimil, Claudia; Min, Bokkee; Söll, Dieter; Orellana, Omar

    2004-01-16

    Two types of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase exist: the discriminating enzyme (D-GluRS) forms only Glu-tRNA(Glu), while the non-discriminating one (ND-GluRS) also synthesizes Glu-tRNA(Gln), a required intermediate in protein synthesis in many organisms (but not in Escherichia coli). Testing the capacity to complement a thermosensitive E. coli gltX mutant and to suppress an E. coli trpA49 missense mutant we examined the properties of heterologous gltX genes. We demonstrate that while Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans GluRS1 and Bacillus subtilis Q373R GluRS form Glu-tRNA(Glu), A. ferrooxidans and Helicobacter pylori GluRS2 form Glu-tRNA(Gln) in E. coli in vivo.

  3. Cutting edge: Gln22 of mouse MD-2 is essential for species-specific lipopolysaccharide mimetic action of taxol.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, K; Gomi, K; Nishijima, M

    2001-01-01

    MD-2 associates with the extracellular domain of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and greatly enhances LPS signaling via TLR4. Taxol, which mimics the action of LPS on murine macrophages, induces signals via mouse TLR4-MD-2, but not via human TLR4-MD-2. Here we investigated the molecular basis for this species-specific action of Taxol. Expression of mouse MD-2 conferred both LPS and Taxol responsiveness on human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing mouse TLR4, whereas expression of human MD-2 conferred LPS responsiveness alone, suggesting that MD-2 is responsible for the species-specificity as to Taxol responsiveness. Furthermore, mouse MD-2 mutants, in which Gln(22) was changed to other amino acids, showed dramatically reduced ability to confer Taxol responsiveness, although their ability to confer LPS responsiveness was not affected. These results indicated that Gln(22) of mouse MD-2 is essential for Taxol signaling but not for LPS signaling.

  4. Analysis of Gln223Agr Polymorphism of Leptin Receptor Gene in Type II Diabetic Mellitus Subjects among Malaysians

    PubMed Central

    Etemad, Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Pishva, Seyyed Reza; Heidari, Farzad; Aziz, Ahmad Fazli Abdul; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Mohamed; Pei, Chong Pei; Ismail, Patimah

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is known as the adipose peptide hormone. It plays an important role in the regulation of body fat and inhibits food intake by its action. Moreover, it is believed that leptin level deductions might be the cause of obesity and may play an important role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), as well as in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The Leptin Receptor (LEPR) gene and its polymorphisms have not been extensively studied in relation to the T2DM and its complications in various populations. In this study, we have determined the association of Gln223Agr loci of LEPR gene in three ethnic groups of Malaysia, namely: Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 284 T2DM subjects and 281 healthy individuals were recruited based on International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal specimens of the subjects. The commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was carried out by proper restriction enzyme MSP I to both amplify and digest the Gln223Agr polymorphism. The p-value among the three studied races was 0.057, 0.011 and 0.095, respectively. The values such as age, WHR, FPG, HbA1C, LDL, HDL, Chol and Family History were significantly different among the subjects with Gln223Agr polymorphism of LEPR (p < 0.05). PMID:24051404

  5. Evaluation of the Myocilin Mutation Gln368Stop Demonstrates Reduced Penetrance for Glaucoma in European Populations.

    PubMed

    Nag, Abhishek; Lu, Han; Arno, Matthew; Iglesias, Adriana I; Bonnemaijer, Pieter; Broer, Linda; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Klaver, Caroline C W; van Duijn, Cornelia; Hysi, Pirro G; Hammond, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Sequence variations in the myocilin (MYOC) gene account for approximately 2% to 4% of glaucoma cases. One particular MYOC mutation, Gln368Stop (dbSNP accession number: rs74315329), is the most common genetic mutation causing glaucoma by increasing intraocular pressure (IOP). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of this MYOC mutation on IOP using data from large-scale European population panels (directly sequenced and imputation based). Cross-sectional, cohort study. For this study, the penetrance of the variant rs74315329 was estimated in 2 population-based cohorts, the TwinsUK (N = 6092) and the Rotterdam Study (RS) (N =11 189). Carriers of the risk allele for rs74315329 were identified using whole-genome sequencing and imputation data (based on 1000 Genomes Project and Haplotype Reference Consortium panels). The penetrance of this variant was evaluated using IOP measurements and data on visual field testing/a diagnosis of glaucoma (if available). The penetrance of the variant rs74315329 was estimated from the percentage of the carriers of the risk allele of the variant who had high IOP (ocular hypertension) or glaucoma. In our study, the observed penetrance of the variant rs74315329 in relation to increased IOP was 12.5% and 19.4% in the TwinsUK and the RS, respectively. Thus, our study suggests a much lower penetrance for rs74315329 for ocular hypertension (and thus glaucoma), in comparison with that reported previously. The significance of this finding is that higher numbers of healthy individuals in the population are expected to be carriers of this mutation, which in turn reduces the utility of identifying carriers of this mutation as a screening tool for glaucoma. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. IL23R(Arg381Gln) functional polymorphism is associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis severity.

    PubMed

    Ben-Selma, Walid; Boukadida, Jalel

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the association between a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the interleukin-23 receptor gene (IL23R; rs11209026, 1142 G(wild type) → A(reduced function), Arg381Gln) and disease severity outcome in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in the Tunisian population. SNP was investigated in a population of 168 patients with active pulmonary TB (cases were stratified into patients with minimal/moderate lung involvement, i.e., patients with minimal/moderate disease [Pmd], and patients with extensive lung involvement, i.e., patients with active disease [Pad]) and 150 healthy subjects. Genotype analyses were carried out using the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. We have found that the IL23R reduced-function allele 1142A and genotypes AA and AG were overrepresented, especially in the Pad subgroup compared with the control group (51% versus 18% [P = 10(-8)], 33% versus 5% [P = 10(-8)], and 36% versus 26% [P = 5 × 10(-3)], respectively). Additionally, comparison of the Pad and the Pmd groups showed that the A allele and AA genotype seemed to be associated with 2.79-fold (P = 4 × 10(-5)) and 7.74-fold (P = 10(-5)) increased risks of TB with minimal/moderate lung involvement, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the reduced-function polymorphism 1142G → A encoded by IL23R influences the outcome of disease severity of active pulmonary TB in Tunisian patients.

  7. Effects of freezing and the cryoprotectant lactobionic acid in the structure of GlnK protein evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC).

    PubMed

    Misugi, Cíntia Tiemi; Savi, Lizandra Kamradt; Iwankiw, Patrícia Kanczewski; Masson, Maria Lucia; de Oliveira, Marco Aurélio Schüler; Igarashi-Mafra, Luciana; Mafra, Marcos Rogério

    2017-01-01

    Freezing is a widely applied method in food preservation. The technique has negative effects on sensory and textural properties of some foods. In this study the effects of the freeze-thaw process and lactobionic acid (LBA) as a cryoprotectant on GlnK protein solution were evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The freeze-thaw cycles caused changes in GlnK conformation and interactions with small ligands (adenosine triphosphate, ATP). CD assay demonstrated changes in the molar ellipticity values of the samples subjected to freezing, indicating conformational changes to the GlnK protein. Additionally, ITC analysis indicated that the freeze-thaw process caused changes in the interaction properties of GlnK with its ligand ATP. LBA cryoprotectant activity was also evaluated and with both of the techniques it was demonstrated that the compound prevented the damage caused by the freeze-thaw process, thereby maintaining the characteristics of the samples.

  8. Spin-wave diode

    DOE PAGES

    Lan, Jin; Yu, Weichao; Wu, Ruqian; ...

    2015-12-28

    A diode, a device allowing unidirectional signal transmission, is a fundamental element of logic structures, and it lies at the heart of modern information systems. The spin wave or magnon, representing a collective quasiparticle excitation of the magnetic order in magnetic materials, is a promising candidate for an information carrier for the next-generation energy-saving technologies. Here, we propose a scalable and reprogrammable pure spin-wave logic hardware architecture using domain walls and surface anisotropy stripes as waveguides on a single magnetic wafer. We demonstrate theoretically the design principle of the simplest logic component, a spin-wave diode, utilizing the chiral bound statesmore » in a magnetic domain wall with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and confirm its performance through micromagnetic simulations. As a result, these findings open a new vista for realizing different types of pure spin-wave logic components and finally achieving an energy-efficient and hardware-reprogrammable spin-wave computer.« less

  9. Spin hydrodynamic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, R.; Matsuo, M.; Ono, M.; Harii, K.; Chudo, H.; Okayasu, S.; Ieda, J.; Takahashi, S.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generation is the conversion of fluid kinetic energy into electricity. Such conversion, which has been applied to various types of electric power generation, is driven by the Lorentz force acting on charged particles and thus a magnetic field is necessary. On the other hand, recent studies of spintronics have revealed the similarity between the function of a magnetic field and that of spin-orbit interactions in condensed matter. This suggests the existence of an undiscovered route to realize the conversion of fluid dynamics into electricity without using magnetic fields. Here we show electric voltage generation from fluid dynamics free from magnetic fields; we excited liquid-metal flows in a narrow channel and observed longitudinal voltage generation in the liquid. This voltage has nothing to do with electrification or thermoelectric effects, but turned out to follow a universal scaling rule based on a spin-mediated scenario. The result shows that the observed voltage is caused by spin-current generation from a fluid motion: spin hydrodynamic generation. The observed phenomenon allows us to make mechanical spin-current and electric generators, opening a door to fluid spintronics.

  10. Co-Inactivation of GlnR and CodY Regulators Impacts Pneumococcal Cell Wall Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Calum; Bootsma, Hester J.; Aldridge, Christine; Manuse, Sylvie; Gisch, Nicolas; Schwudke, Dominik; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Grangeasse, Christophe; Polard, Patrice; Vollmer, Waldemar; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    CodY, a nutritional regulator highly conserved in low G+C Gram-positive bacteria, is essential in Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). A published codY mutant possessed suppressing mutations inactivating the fatC and amiC genes, respectively belonging to iron (Fat/Fec) and oligopeptide (Ami) ABC permease operons, which are directly repressed by CodY. Here we analyzed two additional published codY mutants to further explore the essentiality of CodY. We show that one, in which the regulator of glutamine/glutamate metabolism glnR had been inactivated by design, had only a suppressor in fecE (a gene in the fat/fec operon), while the other possessed both fecE and amiC mutations. Independent isolation of three different fat/fec suppressors thus establishes that reduction of iron import is crucial for survival without CodY. We refer to these as primary suppressors, while inactivation of ami, which is not essential for survival of codY mutants and acquired after initial fat/fec inactivation, can be regarded as a secondary suppressor. The availability of codY- ami+ cells allowed us to establish that CodY activates competence for genetic transformation indirectly, presumably by repressing ami which is known to antagonize competence. The glnR codY fecE mutant was then found to be only partially viable on solid medium and hypersensitive to peptidoglycan (PG) targeting agents such as the antibiotic cefotaxime and the muramidase lysozyme. While analysis of PG and teichoic acid composition uncovered no alteration in the glnR codY fecE mutant compared to wildtype, electron microscopy revealed altered ultrastructure of the cell wall in the mutant, establishing that co-inactivation of GlnR and CodY regulators impacts pneumococcal cell wall physiology. In light of rising levels of resistance to PG-targeting antibiotics of natural pneumococcal isolates, GlnR and CodY constitute potential alternative therapeutic targets to combat this debilitating pathogen, as co

  11. Geometric spin echo under zero field

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Komura, Yusuke; Mishima, Shota; Tanaka, Touta; Niikura, Naeko; Kosaka, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Spin echo is a fundamental tool for quantum registers and biomedical imaging. It is believed that a strong magnetic field is needed for the spin echo to provide long memory and high resolution, since a degenerate spin cannot be controlled or addressed under a zero magnetic field. While a degenerate spin is never subject to dynamic control, it is still subject to geometric control. Here we show the spin echo of a degenerate spin subsystem, which is geometrically controlled via a mediating state split by the crystal field, in a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. The demonstration reveals that the degenerate spin is protected by inherent symmetry breaking called zero-field splitting. The geometric spin echo under zero field provides an ideal way to maintain the coherence without any dynamics, thus opening the way to pseudo-static quantum random access memory and non-invasive biosensors. PMID:27193936

  12. Geometric spin echo under zero field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Komura, Yusuke; Mishima, Shota; Tanaka, Touta; Niikura, Naeko; Kosaka, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Spin echo is a fundamental tool for quantum registers and biomedical imaging. It is believed that a strong magnetic field is needed for the spin echo to provide long memory and high resolution, since a degenerate spin cannot be controlled or addressed under a zero magnetic field. While a degenerate spin is never subject to dynamic control, it is still subject to geometric control. Here we show the spin echo of a degenerate spin subsystem, which is geometrically controlled via a mediating state split by the crystal field, in a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. The demonstration reveals that the degenerate spin is protected by inherent symmetry breaking called zero-field splitting. The geometric spin echo under zero field provides an ideal way to maintain the coherence without any dynamics, thus opening the way to pseudo-static quantum random access memory and non-invasive biosensors.

  13. Effects of T-loop modification on the PII-signalling protein: structure of uridylylated Escherichia coli GlnB bound to ATP.

    PubMed

    Palanca, Carles; Rubio, Vicente

    2017-03-26

    To adapt to environments with variable nitrogen sources and richness, the widely distributed homotrimeric PII signalling proteins bind their allosteric effectors ADP/ATP/2-oxoglutarate, and experience nitrogen-sensitive uridylylation of their flexible T-loops at Tyr51, regulating their interactions with effector proteins. To clarify whether uridylylation triggers a given T-loop conformation, we determined the crystal structure of the classical paradigm of PII protein, Escherichia coli GlnB (EcGlnB), in fully uridylylated form (EcGlnB-UMP3 ). This is the first structure of a postranslationally modified PII protein. This required recombinant production and purification of the uridylylating enzyme GlnD and its use for full uridylylation of large amounts of recombinantly produced pure EcGlnB. Unlike crystalline non-uridylylated EcGlnB, in which T-loops are fixed, uridylylation rendered the T-loop highly mobile because of loss of contacts mediated by Tyr51, with concomitant abolition of T-loop anchoring via Arg38 on the ATP site. This site was occupied by ATP, providing the first, long-sought snapshot of the EcGlnB-ATP complex, connecting ATP binding with T-loop changes. Inferences are made on the mechanisms of PII selectivity for ATP and of PII-UMP3 signalling, proposing a model for the architecture of the complex of EcGlnB-UMP3 with the uridylylation-sensitive PII target ATase (which adenylylates/deadenylylates glutamine synthetase [GS]) and with GS.

  14. Regulation of general amino acid permeases Gap1p, GATA transcription factors Gln3p and Gat1p on 2-phenylethanol biosynthesis via Ehrlich pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianrui; Wang, Zhaoyue; Guo, Xuena; Liu, Sha; He, Xiuping

    2017-01-20

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, when l-phenylalanine (l-Phe) is used as the sole nitrogen source, 2-phenylethanol (PE) is mainly synthesized via the Ehrlich pathway. General amino acid permease Gap1p is response of aromatic amino acids transportation, and GATA transcription factors Gln3p and Gat1p regulate the transcription of permease gene and catabolic enzyme genes for nitrogen sources and aromatic amino acids utilization. In this study, it was demonstrated that over-expressing GLN3 gene from industrial yeast strain MT2 or S. cerevisiae haploid strain YS58, 2-PE synthesis levels of recombinant strains increased 54% or 40% than that of the control strain, which suggested that higher Gln3p activity in yeast has positive regulation effect on 2-PE biosynthesis via Ehrlich pathway. The recombinant strains with over-expression of GAT1 gene from MT2 or YS58 also up-regulated Ehrlich pathway for 2-PE biosynthesis and increased 2-PE production. Similarly, when GAP1 gene respectively from MT2 or YS58 was over-expressed, 2-PE yield was improved obviously, suggesting that GAP1 over-expressing in yeast also promoted Ehrlich pathway to produce 2-PE. The synergistic regulation of GLN3/GAT1 or GLN3/GAP1 over-expression was similar to that of single factor over-expression. Among these regulatory factors, Gln3p of industrial yeast strain MT2 caused stronger regulation on target genes than that of haploid strain YS58, which might be due to the differences in translational efficiency or nuclear localization of each Gln3p, or due to their different spatial structures and binding domains. Further results showed that efficient Gln3p expression in MT2 brought about higher 2-PE, 3.59gL(-1), which was of potential significant for commercial exploitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A new type of glutamine synthetase in cyanobacteria: the protein encoded by the glnN gene supports nitrogen assimilation in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J

    1994-01-01

    A new glutamine synthetase gene, glnN, which encodes a polypeptide of 724 amino acid residues (M(r), 79,416), has been identified in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803; this is the second gene that encodes a glutamine synthetase (GS) in this cyanobacterium. The functionality of this gene was evidenced by its ability to complement an Escherichia coli glnA mutant and to support Synechocystis growth in a strain whose glnA gene was inactivated by insertional mutagenesis. In this mutant (strain SJCR3), as well as in the wild-type strain, the second GS activity was subject to regulation by the nitrogen source, being strongly enhanced in nitrogen-free medium. Transcriptional fusion of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene with the 5'-upstream region of glnN suggested that synthesis of the second Synechocystis GS is regulated at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, the level of glnN mRNA, a transcript of about 2,300 bases, was found to be strongly increased in nitrogen-free medium. The glnN product is similar to the GS subunits of Bacteroides fragilis and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, two obligate anaerobic bacteria whose GSs are markedly different from other prokaryotic and eukaryotic GSs. However, significant similarity is evident in the five regions which are homologous in all of the GSs so far described. The new GS gene was also found in other cyanobacteria but not in N2-fixing filamentous species. Images PMID:7906687

  16. Nitrogen availability and electron transport control the expression of glnB gene (encoding PII protein) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    García-Domínguez, M; Florencio, F J

    1997-12-01

    The glnB gene from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that encodes the PII protein has been cloned by heterologous hybridization using the corresponding glnB gene from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942. An ORF of 336 nucleotides appeared that potentially coded for a protein of 112 amino acid residues (M(r) 12,397). The deduced amino acid sequence revealed a high identity (higher than 80%) with its cyanobacterial counterparts and a basal level of identity (close to 60%) with other PII proteins. A single mRNA of about 680 nucleotides was found under all growth conditions studied. glnB gene expression was specifically activated under nitrogen deprivation (a 10-fold increase respect to nitrogen-replete conditions). No differences in glnB mRNA levels were observed when using nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. Amount of glnB mRNA decreased to undetectable levels when transferring cells to the dark, but effect was avoided by adding glucose to the culture medium. Primer extension analysis and band-shift assays indicated that expression of the glnB gene, elevated under nitrogen deprivation, might lie under the control of the nitrogen transcriptional regulator NtcA, although constitutive levels of expression were also detected from a sigma 70-dependent Escherichia coli-like promoter.

  17. Spin-spin and spin-orbit interactions in nanographene fragments: a quantum chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Perumal, S; Minaev, B; Ågren, H

    2012-03-14

    The relativistic behavior of graphene structures, starting from the fundamental building blocks--the poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) along with other PAH nanographenes--is studied to quantify any associated intrinsic magnetism in the triplet (T) state and subsequently in the ground singlet (S) state with account of possible S-T mixture induced by spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We employ a first principle quantum chemical-based approach and density functional theory (DFT) for a systematic treatment of the spin-Hamiltonian by considering both the spin-orbit and spin-spin interactions as dependent on different numbers of benzene rings. We assess these relativistic spin-coupling phenomena in terms of splitting parameters which cause magnetic anisotropy in absence of external perturbations. Possible routes for changes in the couplings in terms of doping and defects are also simulated and discussed. Accounting for the artificial character of the broken-symmetry solutions for strong spin polarization of the so-called "singlet open-shell" ground state in zigzag graphene nanoribbons predicted by spin-unrestricted DFT approaches, we interpolate results from more sophisticated methods for the S-T gaps and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) integrals and find that these spin interactions become weak as function of size and increasing decoupling of electrons at the edges. This leads to reduced electron spin-spin interaction and hence almost negligible intrinsic magnetism in the carbon-based PAHs and carbon nanographene fragments. Our results are in agreement with the fact that direct experimental evidence of edge magnetism in pristine graphene has been reported so far. We support the notion that magnetism in graphene only can be ascribed to structural defects or impurities.

  18. Cross section and transverse single-spin asymmetry of muons from open heavy-flavor decays in polarized p +p collisions at √{s }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Ayuso, C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bagoly, A.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boer, M.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butler, C.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Canoa Roman, V.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Do, J. H.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dumancic, M.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Elder, T.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fan, W.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hill, K.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ito, Y.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Ji, Z.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jorjadze, V.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapukchyan, D.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karthas, S.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kincses, D.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kudo, S.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lallow, E. O.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Leung, Y. H.; Lewis, B.; Lewis, N. A.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, M. X.; Loggins, V.-R.; Lokos, S.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Majoros, T.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malaev, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Masuda, H.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Metzger, W. J.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mihalik, D. E.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Morrow, S. I. M.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagai, K.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagashima, T.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Novotny, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J.-C.; Peng, W.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perezlara, C. E.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Phipps, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Pun, A.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Radzevich, P. V.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Richford, D.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Runchey, J.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, K.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skoby, M. J.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, K. L.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Syed, S.; Takahara, A.; Takeda, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnai, G.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Ueda, Y.; Ujvari, B.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Carson, S.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Wang, Z.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; Wolin, S.; Wong, C. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xu, C.; Xu, Q.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Yin, P.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zharko, S.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    The cross section and transverse single-spin asymmetries of μ- and μ+ from open heavy-flavor decays in polarized p +p collisions at √{s }=200 GeV were measured by the PHENIX experiment during 2012 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Because heavy-flavor production is dominated by gluon-gluon interactions at √{s }=200 GeV , these measurements offer a unique opportunity to obtain information on the trigluon correlation functions. The measurements are performed at forward and backward rapidity (1.4 <|y |<2.0 ) over the transverse momentum range of 1.25

  19. GlnK, a PII-homologue: structure reveals ATP binding site and indicates how the T-loops may be involved in molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Cheah, E; Carr, P D; van Heeswijk, W C; Westerhoff, H V; Vasudevan, S G; Ollis, D L

    1998-09-11

    GlnK is a recently discovered homologue of the PII signal protein, an indicator of the nitrogen status of bacteria. PII occupies a central position in the dual cascade that regulates the activity of glutamine synthetase and the transcription of its gene. The complete role of Escherichia coli GlnK is yet to be determined, but already it is known that GlnK behaves like PII and can substitute for PII under some circumstances thereby adding to the subtleties of nitrogen regulation. There are also indications that the roles of the two proteins differ; the expression of PII is constitutive while that of GlnK is linked to the level of nitrogen in the cell. The discovery of GlnK begs the question of why E. coli has both GlnK and PII. Clearly, the structural similarities and differences of GlnK and PII will lead to a better understanding of how PII-like proteins function in E. coli and other organisms. We have crystallised and solved the X-ray structure of GlnK at 2.0 A resolution. The asymmetric unit has two independent copies of the GlnK subunit and both pack around 3-fold axes to form trimers. The trimers have a barrel-like core with recognition loops (the T-loops) that protrude from the top of the molecule. The two GlnK molecules have similar core structures to PII but differ significantly at the C terminus and the loops. The T-loops of the two GlnK molecules also differ from each other; one is disordered while the conformation of the other is stabilised by lattice contacts. The conformation of the ordered T-loop of GlnK differs from that observed in the PII structure despite the fact that their sequences are very similar. The structures suggest that the T-loops do not have a rigid structure and that they may be flexible in solution. The presence of a turn of 310 helix in the middle of the T-loop suggests that secondary structure could form when it interacts with soluble receptor enzymes.Co-crystals of GlnK and ATP were used to determine the structure of the complex. In

  20. Gln-41 is intermolecularly cross-linked to Lys-113 in F-actin by N-(4-azidobenzoyl)-putrescine.

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, G.; Michel, H.; Shabanowitz, J.; Hunt, D. F.; Chatterjie, N.; Healy-Louie, G.; Elzinga, M.

    1992-01-01

    The bifunctional reagent N-(4-azidobenzoyl)-putrescine was synthesized and covalently bound to rabbit skeletal muscle actin. The incorporation was mediated by guinea pig liver transglutaminase under conditions similar to those described by Takashi (1988, Biochemistry 27, 938-943); up to 0.5 M/M were incorporated into G-actin, whereas F-actin was refractory to incorporation. Peptide fractionation showed that at least 90% of the label was bound to Gln-41. The labeled G-actin was polymerized, and irradiation of the F-actin led to covalent intermolecular cross-linking. A cross-linked peptide complex was isolated from a tryptic digest of the cross-linked actin in which digestion was limited to arginine; sequence analysis as well as mass spectrometry indicated that the linked peptides contained residues 40-62 and residues 96-116, and that the actual cross-link was between Gln-41 and Lys-113. Thus the gamma-carboxyl group of Gln-41 must be within 10.7 A of the side chain (probably the amino group) of Lys-113 in an adjacent actin monomer. In the atomic model for F-actin proposed by Holmes et al. (1990, Nature 347, 44-49), the alpha-carbons of these residues in adjacent monomers along the two-start helices are sufficiently close to permit cross-linking of their side chains, and, pending atomic resolution of the side chains, the results presented here seem to support the proposed model. PMID:1363931

  1. GRK5 Gln41Leu polymorphism is not associated with sensitivity to β1-adrenergic blockade in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kurnik, Daniel; Cunningham, Andrew J; Sofowora, Gbenga G; Kohli, Utkarsh; Li, Chun; Friedman, Eitan A; Muszkat, Mordechai; Menon, Usha B; Wood, Alastair JJ; Stein, C Michael

    2010-01-01

    Aims A common, functionally significant polymorphism in GRK5 (Gln41Leu) encodes a gain-of-function enzyme that enhances desensitization of the β1-adrenergic receptor. GRK5 Leu41 has been postulated to confer endogenous ‘genetic β-blockade’ and contribute to an attenuated response to β-blockers in black subjects. The effects of this GRK5 variant on sensitivity to a β-blocker have not been studied in humans. We hypothesized that the GRK5 Gln41Leu variant contributes to interindividual variability in response to β-blockade and to the ethnic difference in sensitivity between black and Caucasian individuals. Materials & methods We measured the heart rate at rest and during a graded incremental exercise in 154 healthy subjects (85 white and 69 black) before and after an oral administration of 25 mg atenolol. We determined the genotypes of GRK5 (Gln41Leu), β1-adrenergic receptor (ADRB1 Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly) genotypes and plasma atenolol concentrations. The effects of genotype and covariates on sensitivity to atenolol, measured as the reduction in exercise-induced tachycardia, were determined using multiple regression analyses. Results The minor allele frequency of GRK5 Leu41 was 32.6% in blacks and 0% in whites. Black individuals were less sensitive to atenolol than white individuals (p ≤ 0.011) but this was not explained by the GRK5 genotype. The GRK5 genotype had no effect on resting heart rate before (p = 0.61) and after adjustment for age, sex, ethnicity, atenolol concentrations, BMI and ADRB1 genotypes (p = 0.81). The decrease in heart rate after atenolol administration did not differ significantly according to the GRK5 genotype at rest or after exercise, before (all p > 0.14) and after statistical adjustment for covariates (all p > 0.17). Conclusion The GRK5 Gln41Leu polymorphism does not affect sensitivity to the β1-adrenergic blocker, atenolol, during acute physiological adrenergic stimulation, nor does it contribute to the ethnic differences in

  2. XRCC-1 Gene Polymorphism (Arg399Gln) and Susceptibility to Development of Lung Cancer in Cohort of North Indian Population: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, Mohit; Mohapatra, Debabratta; Grover, Rajesh K; Puri, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Smoking has been considered to be the major cause of lung cancer. However, only a fraction of cigarette smokers develop this disease. This suggests the importance of genetic constitution in predicting the individual’s susceptibility towards lung cancer. This genetic susceptibility may result from inherited polymorphisms in genes controlling carcinogen metabolism and repair of damaged deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). These repair systems are fundamental to the maintenance of genomic integrity. X-ray repair cross complimenting group I (XRCC1), a major DNA repair gene in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. It is involved in repair by interacting with components of DNA at the site of damage. Inconsistent results have been reported regarding the associations between the Arg399Gln polymorphism of XRCC1. This study demonstrates the importance of recognition of this relationship of lung carcinoma and genetic constitution of the person which will help guide clinicians on the optimal screening of this disease. Aim: To assess the role of XRCC1 gene polymorphism (Arg399Gln) directly on the variation in susceptibility to development of lung cancer in North Indian subjects. Materials and Methods: One hundred males with diagnosed cases of lung cancer were recruited from Delhi State Cancer Institute (DSCI). Hundred healthy volunteers were taken as controls. DNA isolation was done and Polymerase chain reaction–Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR–RFLP) procedure undertaken to amplify the region containing Arg/Gln substitution at codon 399 (in exon 10). Results: XRCC1 gene polymorphism is associated with increased risk of lung cancer when the Arg/Arg genotype was used as the reference group. The Arg/Gln and Gln/Gln was associated with statistically increased risk for cancer. Conclusion: Arg399Gln polymorphism in XRCC1 gene polymorphism is associated with lung cancer in North Indian subjects and screening for this polymorphism will help in targeting

  3. The Annexin I Sequence Gln9-Ala10-Trp11-Phe12 Is a Core Structure for Interaction with the Formyl Peptide Receptor 1*

    PubMed Central

    Movitz, Charlotta; Brive, Lars; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Rabiet, Marie-Josèphe; Dahlgren, Claes

    2010-01-01

    The N-terminal part of the calcium-regulated and phospholipid-binding protein annexin AI contains peptide sequences with pro- and anti-inflammatory activities. We have earlier shown that a proinflammatory signal triggered by one of these peptides, Gln9–Lys25, is mediated by FPR1, a member of the formyl peptide receptor family expressed in human neutrophils. To determine the core structure in Gln9–Lys25, smaller peptides were generated, and their capacity to activate neutrophils was determined. A peptide spanning from amino acid Glu14 to Lys25 was inactive, whereas the activity was retained in the Gln9–Tyr20 peptide. Removal of amino acids from the C and N terminus of Gln9–Tyr20 revealed that the first amino acid (Gln9) was of the utmost importance for activity. The core structure that activated the neutrophil NADPH oxidase to release superoxide anions was Gln9-Ala10-Trp11-Phe12. This peptide also inhibited the activity induced by N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe and WKYMVM. A structural model of the peptide agonist-FPR1 complex suggests that the transmembrane part of the binding pocket of the receptor binds optimally to a tetrapeptide. According to the model and the results presented, the N-terminal amino acid glutamine in Gln9–Phe12 is located close to the bottom of the binding cleft, leaving for steric reasons insufficient space to extend the peptide at the N terminus. The addition of amino acids at the C terminus will not affect binding. The model presented may be helpful in developing specific FPR1 ligands. PMID:20220135

  4. A mutant GlnD nitrogen sensor protein leads to a nitrogen-fixing but ineffective Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis with alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Yurgel, Svetlana N; Kahn, Michael L

    2008-12-02

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between rhizobia and legume plants is a model of coevolved nutritional complementation. The plants reduce atmospheric CO(2) by photosynthesis and provide carbon compounds to symbiotically associated bacteria; the rhizobia use these compounds to reduce (fix) atmospheric N(2) to ammonia, a form of nitrogen the plants can use. A key feature of symbiotic N(2) fixation is that N(2) fixation is uncoupled from bacterial nitrogen stress metabolism so that the rhizobia generate "excess" ammonia and release this ammonia to the plant. In the symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and alfalfa, mutations in GlnD, the major bacterial nitrogen stress response sensor protein, led to a symbiosis in which nitrogen was fixed (Fix(+)) but was not effective (Eff(-)) in substantially increasing plant growth. Fixed (15)N(2) was transported to the shoots, but most fixed (15)N was not present in the plant after 24 h. Analysis of free-living S. meliloti strains with mutations in genes related to nitrogen stress response regulation (glnD, glnB, ntrC, and ntrA) showed that catabolism of various nitrogen-containing compounds depended on the NtrC and GlnD components of the nitrogen stress response cascade. However, only mutants of GlnD with an amino terminal deletion had the unusual Fix(+)Eff(-) symbiotic phenotype, and the data suggest that these glnD mutants export fixed nitrogen in a form that the plants cannot use. These results indicate that bacterial nitrogen stress regulation is important to symbiotic productivity and suggest that GlnD may act in a novel way to influence symbiotic behavior.

  5. A mutant GlnD nitrogen sensor protein leads to a nitrogen-fixing but ineffective Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis with alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Yurgel, Svetlana N.; Kahn, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between rhizobia and legume plants is a model of coevolved nutritional complementation. The plants reduce atmospheric CO2 by photosynthesis and provide carbon compounds to symbiotically associated bacteria; the rhizobia use these compounds to reduce (fix) atmospheric N2 to ammonia, a form of nitrogen the plants can use. A key feature of symbiotic N2 fixation is that N2 fixation is uncoupled from bacterial nitrogen stress metabolism so that the rhizobia generate “excess” ammonia and release this ammonia to the plant. In the symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and alfalfa, mutations in GlnD, the major bacterial nitrogen stress response sensor protein, led to a symbiosis in which nitrogen was fixed (Fix+) but was not effective (Eff−) in substantially increasing plant growth. Fixed 15N2 was transported to the shoots, but most fixed 15N was not present in the plant after 24 h. Analysis of free-living S. meliloti strains with mutations in genes related to nitrogen stress response regulation (glnD, glnB, ntrC, and ntrA) showed that catabolism of various nitrogen-containing compounds depended on the NtrC and GlnD components of the nitrogen stress response cascade. However, only mutants of GlnD with an amino terminal deletion had the unusual Fix+Eff− symbiotic phenotype, and the data suggest that these glnD mutants export fixed nitrogen in a form that the plants cannot use. These results indicate that bacterial nitrogen stress regulation is important to symbiotic productivity and suggest that GlnD may act in a novel way to influence symbiotic behavior. PMID:19020095

  6. Charge and spin transport in mesoscopic superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, M J; Hübler, F; Kolenda, S

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: Non-equilibrium charge transport in superconductors has been investigated intensely in the 1970s and 1980s, mostly in the vicinity of the critical temperature. Much less attention has been paid to low temperatures and the role of the quasiparticle spin. Results: We report here on nonlocal transport in superconductor hybrid structures at very low temperatures. By comparing the nonlocal conductance obtained by using ferromagnetic and normal-metal detectors, we discriminate charge and spin degrees of freedom. We observe spin injection and long-range transport of pure, chargeless spin currents in the regime of large Zeeman splitting. We elucidate charge and spin transport by comparison to theoretical models. Conclusion: The observed long-range chargeless spin transport opens a new path to manipulate and utilize the quasiparticle spin in superconductor nanostructures. PMID:24605283

  7. Spin filter for arbitrary spins by substrate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Biplab; Römer, Rudolf A.; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2016-08-01

    We design spin filters for particles with potentially arbitrary spin S≤ft(=1/2,1,3/2,\\ldots \\right) using a one-dimensional periodic chain of magnetic atoms as a quantum device. Describing the system within a tight-binding formalism we present an analytical method to unravel the analogy between a one-dimensional magnetic chain and a multi-strand ladder network. This analogy is crucial, and is subsequently exploited to engineer gaps in the energy spectrum by an appropriate choice of the magnetic substrate. We obtain an exact correlation between the magnitude of the spin of the incoming beam of particles and the magnetic moment of the substrate atoms in the chain desired for opening up of a spectral gap. Results of spin polarized transport, calculated within a transfer matrix formalism, are presented for particles having half-integer as well as higher spin states. We find that the chain can be made to act as a quantum device which opens a transmission window only for selected spin components over certain ranges of the Fermi energy, blocking them in the remaining part of the spectrum. The results appear to be robust even when the choice of the substrate atoms deviates substantially from the ideal situation, as verified by extending the ideas to the case of a ‘spin spiral’. Interestingly, the spin spiral geometry, apart from exhibiting the filtering effect, is also seen to act as a device flipping spins—an effect that can be monitored by an interplay of the system size and the period of the spiral. Our scheme is applicable to ultracold quantum gases, and might inspire future experiments in this direction.

  8. Variant Alleles in XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln Polymorphisms Increase Risk of Gastrointestinal Cancer in Sabah, North Borneo.

    PubMed

    Halim, Noor Hanis Abu; Chong, Eric Tzyy Jiann; Goh, Lucky Poh Wah; Chuah, Jitt Aun; See, Edwin Un Hean; Chua, Kek Heng; Lee, Ping-Chin

    2016-01-01

    The XRCC1 protein facilitates various DNA repair pathways; single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in this gene are associated with a risk of gastrointestinal cancer (GIC) with inconsistent results, but no data have been previously reported for the Sabah, North Borneo, population. We accordingly investigated the XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln SNPs in terms of GIC risk in Sabah. We performed genotyping for both SNPs for 250 GIC patients and 572 healthy volunteers using a polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism approach. We validated heterozygosity and homozygosity for both SNPs using direct sequencing. The presence of a variant 194Trp allele in the Arg194Trp SNP was significantly associated with a higher risk of GIC, especially with gastric and colorectal cancers. We additionally found that the variant 399Gln allele in Arg399Gln SNP was associated with a greater risk of developing gastric cancer. Our combined analysis revealed that inheritance of variant alleles in both SNPs increased the GIC risk in Sabah population. Based on our etiological analysis, we found that subjects ≥50 years and males who carrying the variant 194Trp allele, and Bajau subjects carrying the 399Gln allele had a significantly increased risk of GIC. Our findings suggest that inheritance of variant alleles in XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln SNPs may act as biomarkers for the early detection of GIC, especially for gastric and colorectal cancers in the Sabah population.

  9. DNA Repair Gene (XRCC1) Polymorphism (Arg399Gln) Associated with Schizophrenia in South Indian Population: A Genotypic and Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Sujitha, S. P.; Kumar, D. Thirumal; Doss, C. George Priya; Aavula, K.; Ramesh, R.; Lakshmanan, S.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anilkumar, G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper depicts the first report from an Indian population on the association between the variant Arg399Gln of XRCC1 locus in the DNA repair system and schizophrenia, the debilitating disease that affects 1% of the world population. Genotypic analysis of a total of 523 subjects (260 patients and 263 controls) revealed an overwhelming presence of Gln399Gln in the case subjects against the controls (P < 0.0068), indicating significant level of association of this nsSNP with schizophrenia; the Gln399 allele frequency was also perceptibly more in cases than in controls (p < 0.003; OR = 1.448). The results of the genotypic studies were further validated using pathogenicity and stability prediction analysis employing computational tools [I-Mutant Suite, iStable, PolyPhen2, SNAP, and PROVEAN], with a view toassess the magnitude of deleteriousness of the mutation. The pathogenicity analysis reveals that the nsSNP could be deleterious inasmuch as it could affect the functionality of the gene, and interfere with protein function. Molecular dynamics simulation of 60ns was performed using GROMACS to analyse structural change due to a mutation (Arg399Gln) that was never examined before. RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds, radius of gyration and SASA analysis showedthe existence of asignificant difference between the native and the mutant protein. The present study gives astrong indication that the XRCC1 locus deserves serious attention, as it could be a potential candidatecontributing to the etio-pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26824244

  10. Crystal Structure of a Thermostable Alanine Racemase from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 Reveals the Role of Gln360 in Substrate Selection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoliang; He, Guangzheng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Shujing; Ju, Jiansong; Xu, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent alanine racemase catalyzes racemization of L-Ala to D-Ala, a key component of the peptidoglycan network in bacterial cell wall. It has been extensively studied as an important antimicrobial drug target due to its restriction in eukaryotes. However, many marketed alanine racemase inhibitors also act on eukaryotic PLP-dependent enzymes and cause side effects. A thermostable alanine racemase (AlrTt) from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 contains an evolutionarily non-conserved residue Gln360 in inner layer of the substrate entryway, which is supposed to be a key determinant in substrate specificity. Here we determined the crystal structure of AlrTt in complex with L-Ala at 2.7 Å resolution, and investigated the role of Gln360 by saturation mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. Compared to typical bacterial alanine racemase, presence of Gln360 and conformational changes of active site residues disrupted the hydrogen bonding interactions necessary for proper PLP immobilization, and decreased both the substrate affinity and turnover number of AlrTt. However, it could be complemented by introduction of hydrophobic amino acids at Gln360, through steric blocking and interactions with a hydrophobic patch near active site pocket. These observations explained the low racemase activity of AlrTt, revealed the essential role of Gln360 in substrate selection, and its preference for hydrophobic amino acids especially Tyr in bacterial alanine racemization. Our work will contribute new insights into the alanine racemization mechanism for antimicrobial drug development.

  11. Position dependence of amino acid intrinsic helical propensities II: non-charged polar residues: Ser, Thr, Asn, and Gln.

    PubMed Central

    Petukhov, M.; Uegaki, K.; Yumoto, N.; Yoshikawa, S.; Serrano, L.

    1999-01-01

    The assumption that the intrinsic alpha-helical propensities of the amino acids are position independent was critical in several helix/coil transition theories. In the first paper of these series, we reported that this is not the case for Gly and nonpolar aliphatic amino acids (Val, Leu, Met, and Ile). Here we have analyzed the helical intrinsic propensities of noncharged polar residues (Ser, Thr, Asn, and Gln) at different positions of a model polyalanine-based peptide. We found that Thr is more favorable (by approximately 0.3 kcal/mol) at positions N1 and N2 than in the helix center, although for Ser, Asn, and Gln the differences are smaller (+/-0.2 kcal/mol), and in many cases within the experimental error. There is a reasonable agreement (+/-0.2 kcal/mol) between the calculated free energies, using the ECEPP/2 force field equipped with a hydration potential, and the experimental data, except at position N1. PMID:10548060

  12. Plasmodium Apicoplast Gln-tRNAGln Biosynthesis Utilizes a Unique GatAB Amidotransferase Essential for Erythrocytic Stage Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Mailu, Boniface M.; Li, Ling; Arthur, Jen; Nelson, Todd M.; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Becker, Katja; Gardner, Malcolm J.

    2015-01-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast indirect aminoacylation pathway utilizes a non-discriminating glutamyl-tRNA synthetase to synthesize Glu-tRNAGln and a glutaminyl-tRNA amidotransferase to convert Glu-tRNAGln to Gln-tRNAGln. Here, we show that Plasmodium falciparum and other apicomplexans possess a unique heterodimeric glutamyl-tRNA amidotransferase consisting of GatA and GatB subunits (GatAB). We localized the P. falciparum GatA and GatB subunits to the apicoplast in blood stage parasites and demonstrated that recombinant GatAB converts Glu-tRNAGln to Gln-tRNAGln in vitro. We demonstrate that the apicoplast GatAB-catalyzed reaction is essential to the parasite blood stages because we could not delete the Plasmodium berghei gene encoding GatA in blood stage parasites in vivo. A phylogenetic analysis placed the split between Plasmodium GatB, archaeal GatE, and bacterial GatB prior to the phylogenetic divide between bacteria and archaea. Moreover, Plasmodium GatA also appears to have emerged prior to the bacterial-archaeal phylogenetic divide. Thus, although GatAB is found in Plasmodium, it emerged prior to the phylogenetic separation of archaea and bacteria. PMID:26318454

  13. Magnetoelectric control of spin currents

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, J. E.; Vargas, J. M.; Avilés-Félix, L.; Butera, A.

    2016-06-13

    The ability to control the spin current injection has been explored on a hybrid magnetoelectric system consisting of a (011)-cut ferroelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMNT) single crystal, a ferromagnetic FePt alloy, and a metallic Pt. With this PMNT/FePt/Pt structure we have been able to control the magnetic field position or the microwave excitation frequency at which the spin pumping phenomenon between FePt and Pt occurs. We demonstrate that the magnetoelectric heterostructure operating in the L-T (longitudinal magnetized-transverse polarized) mode couples the PMNT crystal to the magnetostrictive FePt/Pt bilayer, displaying a strong magnetoelectric coefficient of ∼140 Oe cm kV{sup −1}. Our results show that this mechanism can be effectively exploited as a tunable spin current intensity emitter and open the possibility to create an oscillating or a bistable switch to effectively manipulate spin currents.

  14. Spin ejector

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Flanigan, John J.; Kindley, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus for spin ejecting a body having a flat plate base containing bosses. The apparatus has a base plate and a main ejection shaft extending perpendicularly from the base plate. A compressible cylindrical spring is disposed about the shaft. Bearings are located between the shaft and the spring. A housing containing a helical aperture releasably engages the base plate and surrounds the shaft bearings and the spring. A piston having an aperture follower disposed in the housing aperture is seated on the spring and is guided by the shaft and the aperture. The spring is compressed and when released causes the piston to spin eject the body.

  15. Spin-torque generator engineered by natural oxidation of Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hongyu; Kageyama, Yuito; Kanno, Yusuke; Enishi, Nagisa; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-10-01

    The spin Hall effect is a spin-orbit coupling phenomenon, which enables electric generation and detection of spin currents. This relativistic effect provides a way for realizing efficient spintronic devices based on electric manipulation of magnetization through spin torque. However, it has been believed that heavy metals are indispensable for the spin-torque generation. Here we show that the spin Hall effect in Cu, a light metal with weak spin-orbit coupling, is significantly enhanced through natural oxidation. We demonstrate that the spin-torque generation efficiency of a Cu/Ni81Fe19 bilayer is enhanced by over two orders of magnitude by tuning the surface oxidation, reaching the efficiency of Pt/ferromagnetic metal bilayers. This finding illustrates a crucial role of oxidation in the spin Hall effect, opening a route for engineering the spin-torque generator by oxygen control and manipulating magnetization without using heavy metals.

  16. Spin-torque generator engineered by natural oxidation of Cu.

    PubMed

    An, Hongyu; Kageyama, Yuito; Kanno, Yusuke; Enishi, Nagisa; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-10-11

    The spin Hall effect is a spin-orbit coupling phenomenon, which enables electric generation and detection of spin currents. This relativistic effect provides a way for realizing efficient spintronic devices based on electric manipulation of magnetization through spin torque. However, it has been believed that heavy metals are indispensable for the spin-torque generation. Here we show that the spin Hall effect in Cu, a light metal with weak spin-orbit coupling, is significantly enhanced through natural oxidation. We demonstrate that the spin-torque generation efficiency of a Cu/Ni81Fe19 bilayer is enhanced by over two orders of magnitude by tuning the surface oxidation, reaching the efficiency of Pt/ferromagnetic metal bilayers. This finding illustrates a crucial role of oxidation in the spin Hall effect, opening a route for engineering the spin-torque generator by oxygen control and manipulating magnetization without using heavy metals.

  17. Coherent control over three-dimensional spin polarization for the spin-orbit coupled surface state of Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kenta; Yaji, Koichiro; Nakayama, M.; Harasawa, A.; Ishida, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Chen, C.-T.; Kondo, T.; Komori, F.; Shin, S.

    2016-10-01

    Interference of spin-up and spin-down eigenstates depicts spin rotation of electrons, which is a fundamental concept of quantum mechanics and presents technological challenges for the electrical spin manipulation. Here, we visualize this coherent spin physics through laser spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on a spin-orbital entangled surface state of a topological insulator. It is revealed that the linearly polarized laser can simultaneously excite spin-up and spin-down states, and these quantum-spin bases are coherently superposed in photoelectron states. The superposition and the resulting spin rotation is manipulated by the direction of the laser field. Moreover, the full observation of the spin rotation displays the phase of the quantum states. This presents a new facet of laser-photoemission technique for investigation of quantum-spin physics, opening new possibilities in the field of quantum spintronic applications.

  18. Generation of full polarization in ferromagnetic graphene with spin energy gap

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qing-Ping; Liu, Zheng-Fang E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Zhi-Min; Chen, Ai-Xi E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.edu.cn; Xiao, Xian-Bo

    2014-12-22

    We propose a workable scheme for the generation of full spin polarization in ferromagnetic graphene system with strain or Rashba spin-orbit interaction. A spin energy gap can be opened in ferromagnetic graphene system in the presence of strain or Rashba spin-orbit interaction, leading to the full polarization in the spin energy gap. In addition, under the combined modulation of strain and Rashba spin-orbit interaction, the ferromagnetic graphene system can generate significantly large spin-polarized current with a full polarization in the spin energy gap. It is anticipated to apply such a phenomenon to design the electron spin devices based on the graphene.

  19. Spin decoherence of magnetic atoms on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, F.; Fernández-Rossier, J.

    2017-02-01

    We review the problem of spin decoherence of magnetic atoms deposited on a surface. Recent breakthroughs in scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) make it possible to probe the spin dynamics of individual atoms, either isolated or integrated in nanoengineered spin structures. Transport pump and probe techniques with spin polarized tips permit measuring the spin relaxation time T1 , while novel demonstration of electrically driven STM single spin resonance has provided a direct measurement of the spin coherence time T2 of an individual magnetic adatom. Here we address the problem of spin decoherence from the theoretical point of view. First we provide a short general overview of decoherence in open quantum systems and we discuss with some detail ambiguities that arise in the case of degenerate spectra, relevant for magnetic atoms. Second, we address the physical mechanisms that allows probing the spin coherence of magnetic atoms on surfaces. Third, we discuss the main spin decoherence mechanisms at work on a surface, most notably, Kondo interaction, but also spin-phonon coupling and dephasing by Johnson noise. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications in the broader context of quantum technologies.

  20. Spin Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    is now well established in scientific and engineering communities that Moore’s Law, having been an excellent predictor of integrated circuit density...for semiconductor electronics, spin-electronic devices have the potential to achieve much higher integration densities. Conventional electronics is...devices would include non-volatility permitting data retention in non-powered conditions, increased integration densities, higher data processing

  1. Novel effects of a transposon insertion in the Vibrio fischeri glnD gene: defects in iron uptake and symbiotic persistence in addition to nitrogen utilization.

    PubMed

    Graf, J; Ruby, E G

    2000-07-01

    Vibrio fischeri is the sole species colonizing the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian squid, Euprymna scolopes. Upon entering the nascent light organ of a newly hatched juvenile squid, the bacteria undergo morphological and physiological changes that include the loss of flagellation and the induction of bioluminescence. These and other events reveal a pattern of genetic regulation that is a response to the colonization of host tissue. In this study, we isolated and characterized a glnD:mTn5Cm mutant of V. fischeri. In addition to the predicted defects in the efficiency of nitrogen utilization, this glnD mutant had an unexpected reduction in the ability to produce siderophore and grow under iron-limiting conditions. Although the glnD mutant could colonize juvenile squid normally over the first 24 h, it was subsequently unable to persist in the light organ to the usual extent. This persistence phenotype was more severe if the mutant was pregrown under iron-limiting conditions before inoculation, but could be ameliorated by the presence of excess iron. These results indicate that the ability to respond to iron limitation may be an important requirement in the developing symbiosis. Supplying the glnD gene in trans restored normal efficiency of nitrogen use, iron sequestration and colonization phenotypes to the glnD:mTn5Cm mutant; thus, there appears to be a genetic and/or metabolic linkage between nitrogen sensing, siderophore synthesis and symbiosis competence in V. fischeri that involves the glnD gene.

  2. A mutant lacking the glutamine synthetase gene (glnA) is impaired in the regulation of the nitrate assimilation system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J

    1994-01-01

    The existence in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 of two genes (glnA and glnN) coding for glutamine synthetase (GS) has been recently reported (J.C. Reyes and F.J. Florencio, J. Bacteriol. 176:1260-1267, 1994). In the current work, the regulation of the nitrate assimilation system was studied with a glnA-disrupted Synechocystis mutant (strain SJCR3) in which the only GS activity is that corresponding to the glnN product. This mutant was unable to grow in ammonium-containing medium because of its very low levels of GS activity. In the SJCR3 strain, nitrate and nitrite reductases were not repressed by ammonium, and short-term ammonium-promoted inhibition of nitrate uptake was impaired. In Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, nitrate seems to act as a true inducer of its assimilation system, in a way similar to that proposed for the dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. A spontaneous derivative strain from SJCR3 (SJCR3.1), was able to grow in ammonium-containing medium and exhibited a fourfold-higher level of GS activity than but the same amount of glnN transcript as its parental strain (SJCR3). Taken together, these finding suggest that SJCR3.1 is a mutant affected in the posttranscriptional regulation of the GS encoded by glnN. This strain recovered regulation by ammonium of nitrate assimilation. SJCR3 cells were completely depleted of intracellular glutamine shortly after addition of ammonium to cells growing with nitrate, while SJCR3.1 cells maintained glutamine levels similar to that reached in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Our results indicate that metabolic signals that control the nitrate assimilation system in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 require ammonium metabolism through GS. Images PMID:8002575

  3. A mutant lacking the glutamine synthetase gene (glnA) is impaired in the regulation of the nitrate assimilation system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J

    1994-12-01

    The existence in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 of two genes (glnA and glnN) coding for glutamine synthetase (GS) has been recently reported (J.C. Reyes and F.J. Florencio, J. Bacteriol. 176:1260-1267, 1994). In the current work, the regulation of the nitrate assimilation system was studied with a glnA-disrupted Synechocystis mutant (strain SJCR3) in which the only GS activity is that corresponding to the glnN product. This mutant was unable to grow in ammonium-containing medium because of its very low levels of GS activity. In the SJCR3 strain, nitrate and nitrite reductases were not repressed by ammonium, and short-term ammonium-promoted inhibition of nitrate uptake was impaired. In Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, nitrate seems to act as a true inducer of its assimilation system, in a way similar to that proposed for the dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. A spontaneous derivative strain from SJCR3 (SJCR3.1), was able to grow in ammonium-containing medium and exhibited a fourfold-higher level of GS activity than but the same amount of glnN transcript as its parental strain (SJCR3). Taken together, these finding suggest that SJCR3.1 is a mutant affected in the posttranscriptional regulation of the GS encoded by glnN. This strain recovered regulation by ammonium of nitrate assimilation. SJCR3 cells were completely depleted of intracellular glutamine shortly after addition of ammonium to cells growing with nitrate, while SJCR3.1 cells maintained glutamine levels similar to that reached in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Our results indicate that metabolic signals that control the nitrate assimilation system in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 require ammonium metabolism through GS.

  4. Perspective: Interface generation of spin-orbit torques

    DOE PAGES

    Sklenar, Joseph; Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; ...

    2016-11-14

    We present that most of the modern spintronics developments rely on the manipulation of magnetization states via electric currents, which started with the discovery of spin transfer torque effects 20 years ago. By now, it has been realized that spin-orbit coupling provides a particularly efficient pathway for generating spin torques from charge currents. At the same time, spin-orbit effects can be enhanced at interfaces, which opens up novel device concepts. Here, we discuss two examples of such interfacial spin-orbit torques, namely, systems with inherently two-dimensional materials and metallic bilayers with strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling at their interfaces. We show howmore » ferromagnetic resonance excited by spin-orbit torques can provide information about the underlying mechanisms. In addition, this article provides a brief overview of recent developments with respect to interfacial spin-orbit torques and an outlook of still open questions.« less

  5. Perspective: Interface generation of spin-orbit torques

    SciTech Connect

    Sklenar, Joseph; Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Jiang, Wanjun; Saglam, Hilal; Pearson, John E.; Ketterson, John B.; Hoffmann, Axel

    2016-11-14

    We present that most of the modern spintronics developments rely on the manipulation of magnetization states via electric currents, which started with the discovery of spin transfer torque effects 20 years ago. By now, it has been realized that spin-orbit coupling provides a particularly efficient pathway for generating spin torques from charge currents. At the same time, spin-orbit effects can be enhanced at interfaces, which opens up novel device concepts. Here, we discuss two examples of such interfacial spin-orbit torques, namely, systems with inherently two-dimensional materials and metallic bilayers with strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling at their interfaces. We show how ferromagnetic resonance excited by spin-orbit torques can provide information about the underlying mechanisms. In addition, this article provides a brief overview of recent developments with respect to interfacial spin-orbit torques and an outlook of still open questions.

  6. Perspective: Interface generation of spin-orbit torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklenar, Joseph; Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Jiang, Wanjun; Saglam, Hilal; Pearson, John E.; Ketterson, John B.; Hoffmann, Axel

    2016-11-01

    Most of the modern spintronics developments rely on the manipulation of magnetization states via electric currents, which started with the discovery of spin transfer torque effects 20 years ago. By now, it has been realized that spin-orbit coupling provides a particularly efficient pathway for generating spin torques from charge currents. At the same time, spin-orbit effects can be enhanced at interfaces, which opens up novel device concepts. Here, we discuss two examples of such interfacial spin-orbit torques, namely, systems with inherently two-dimensional materials and metallic bilayers with strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling at their interfaces. We show how ferromagnetic resonance excited by spin-orbit torques can provide information about the underlying mechanisms. In addition, this article provides a brief overview of recent developments with respect to interfacial spin-orbit torques and an outlook of still open questions.

  7. Spin pumping and spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Eiji

    2012-02-01

    Utilization of a spin current, a flow of electrons' spins in a solid, is the key technology in spintronics that will allow the achievement of efficient magnetic memories and computing devices. In this technology, generation and detection of spin currents are necessary. Here, we review inverse spin-Hall effect and spin-current-generation phenomena recently discovered both in metals and insulators: inverse spin-Hall effect, spin pumping, and spin Seebeck effect. (1)Spin pumping and spin torque in a Mott insulator system We found that spin pumping and spin torque effects appear also at an interface between Pt and an insulator YIG.. This means that we can connect a spin current carried by conduction electrons and a spin-wave spin current flowing in insulators. We demonstrate electric signal transmission by using these effects and interconversion of the spin currents [1]. (2) Spin Seebeck effect We have observed, by using the inverse spin-Hall effect [2], spin voltage generation from a heat current in a NiFe, named the spin-Seebeck effect [3]. Surprisingly, spin-Seebeck effect was found to appear even in insulators [4], a situation completely different from conventional charge Seebeck effect. The result implies an important role of elementary excitation in solids beside charge in the spin Seebeck effect. In the talk, we review the recent progress of the research on this effect. This research is collaboration with K. Ando, K. Uchida, Y. Kajiwara, S. Maekawa, G. E. W. Bauer, S. Takahashi, and J. Ieda. [4pt] [1] Y. Kajiwara and E. Saitoh et al. Nature 464 (2010) 262. [0pt] [2] E. Saitoh et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 (2006) 182509. [0pt] [3] K. Uchida and E. Saitoh et al., Nature 455 (2008)778. [0pt] [4] K. Uchida and E. Saitoh et al.,Nature materials 9 (2010) 894 - 897.

  8. Association between the XPG Asp1104His and XPF Arg415Gln Polymorphisms and Risk of Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wu; Liu, Yi; Su, Jiao; Wang, Su-Lan; Shen, Xu-Liang; Yang, Xian-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Backgroud The XPG (xeroderma pigmentosum type G) Asp1104His and XPF (xeroderma pigmentosum type F) Arg415Gln polymorphisms had been implicated in cancer susceptibility. The previous published data on the association between XPG Asp1104His and XPF Arg415Gln polymorphisms and cancer risk remained controversial. Methodology/Principal Findings To derive a more precise estimation of the association between the XPG Asp1104His and XPF Arg415Gln polymorphisms and overall cancer risk, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between cancer susceptibility and XPG Asp1104His (32,162 cases and 39,858 controls from 66 studies) and XPF Arg415Gln polymorphisms (17,864 cases and 20,578 controls from 32 studies) in different inheritance models. We used odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals to assess the strength of the association. Overall, significantly elevated cancer risk was found when all studies were pooled into the meta-analysis of XPG Asp1104His (dominant model: OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.00–1.10; Asp/His vs. Asp/Asp: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01–1.11). In the further stratified and sensitivity analyses, significantly decreased lung cancer risk was found for XPF Arg415Gln (dominant model: OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.71–0.96; Arg/Gln versus Arg/Arg: OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.71–0.97; additive model: OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.72–0.95) and significantly increased other cancer risk was found among hospital-based studies for XPG Asp1104His (dominant model: OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02–1.49). Conclusions/Significance In summary, this meta-analysis suggests that XPF Arg415Gln polymorphism may be associated with decreased lung cancer risk and XPG Asp1104His may be a low-penetrant risk factor in some cancers development. And larger scale primary studies are required to further evaluate the interaction of XPG Asp1104His and XPF Arg415Gln polymorphisms and cancer risk in specific populations. PMID:24802942

  9. Spin qubit relaxation in a moving quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2013-08-01

    Long-range quantum communication for spin qubits is an important open problem. Here we study decoherence of an electron spin qubit that is being transported in a moving quantum dot. We focus on spin decoherence due to spin-orbit interaction and a random electric potential. We find that at the lowest order, the motion induces longitudinal spin relaxation, with a rate linear in the dot velocity. Our calculated spin relaxation time ranges from sub μs in GaAs to above ms in Si, making this relaxation a significant decoherence channel. Our results also give clear indications on how to reduce the decoherence effect of electron motion.

  10. Indirect control of antiferromagnetic domain walls with spin current.

    PubMed

    Wieser, R; Vedmedenko, E Y; Wiesendanger, R

    2011-02-11

    The indirect controlled displacement of an antiferromagnetic domain wall by a spin current is studied by Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert spin dynamics. The antiferromagnetic domain wall can be shifted both by a spin-polarized tunnel current of a scanning tunneling microscope or by a current driven ferromagnetic domain wall in an exchange coupled antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic layer system. The indirect control of antiferromagnetic domain walls opens up a new and promising direction for future spin device applications based on antiferromagnetic materials.

  11. Detection of atomic spin labels in a lipid bilayer using a single-spin nanodiamond probe.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Stefan; Simpson, David A; Hall, Liam T; Perunicic, Viktor; Senn, Philipp; Steinert, Steffen; McGuinness, Liam P; Johnson, Brett C; Ohshima, Takeshi; Caruso, Frank; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Scholten, Robert E; Mulvaney, Paul; Hollenberg, Lloyd

    2013-07-02

    Magnetic field fluctuations arising from fundamental spins are ubiquitous in nanoscale biology, and are a rich source of information about the processes that generate them. However, the ability to detect the few spins involved without averaging over large ensembles has remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate the detection of gadolinium spin labels in an artificial cell membrane under ambient conditions using a single-spin nanodiamond sensor. Changes in the spin relaxation time of the sensor located in the lipid bilayer were optically detected and found to be sensitive to near-individual (4 ± 2) proximal gadolinium atomic labels. The detection of such small numbers of spins in a model biological setting, with projected detection times of 1 s [corresponding to a sensitivity of ∼5 Gd spins per Hz(1/2)], opens a pathway for in situ nanoscale detection of dynamical processes in biology.

  12. Spin valve effect of the interfacial spin accumulation in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lichuan; Zhang, Dainan; Zhang, Huaiwu; Tang, Xiaoli; Bai, Feiming; Zhong, Zhiyong; Fan, Xin; Xiao, John Q.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spin valve effect in yttrium iron garnet/platinum (YIG/Pt) bilayers. The spin Hall effect (SHE) generates spin accumulation at the YIG/Pt interface and can be opened/closed by magnetization switching in the electrical insulator YIG. The interfacial spin accumulation was measured in both YIG/Pt and YIG/Cu/Pt structures using a planar Hall configuration. The spin valve effect remained, even after a 2 nm thick Cu layer was inserted between the YIG and Pt layers, which aimed to exclude the induced magnetization at the YIG/Pt interface. The transverse Hall voltage and switching field were dependent on the applied charge current density. The origin of this behavior can be explained by the SHE induced torque exerted on the domain wall, caused by the transfer of the spin angular momentum from the spin-polarized current to the YIG magnetic moment.

  13. Spin valve effect of the interfacial spin accumulation in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Lichuan; Zhang, Dainan; Zhang, Huaiwu Tang, Xiaoli; Bai, Feiming; Zhong, Zhiyong; Fan, Xin; Xiao, John Q.

    2014-09-29

    We report the spin valve effect in yttrium iron garnet/platinum (YIG/Pt) bilayers. The spin Hall effect (SHE) generates spin accumulation at the YIG/Pt interface and can be opened/closed by magnetization switching in the electrical insulator YIG. The interfacial spin accumulation was measured in both YIG/Pt and YIG/Cu/Pt structures using a planar Hall configuration. The spin valve effect remained, even after a 2 nm thick Cu layer was inserted between the YIG and Pt layers, which aimed to exclude the induced magnetization at the YIG/Pt interface. The transverse Hall voltage and switching field were dependent on the applied charge current density. The origin of this behavior can be explained by the SHE induced torque exerted on the domain wall, caused by the transfer of the spin angular momentum from the spin-polarized current to the YIG magnetic moment.

  14. High spin isomer beam line at RIKEN

    SciTech Connect

    Kishida, T.; Ideguchi, E.; Wu, H.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear high spin states have been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical studies. For the production of high spin states, fusion reactions are usually used. The orbital angular momentum brought in the reaction is changed into the nuclear spin of the compound nucleus. However, the maximum induced angular momentum is limited in this mechanism by the maximum impact parameter of the fusion reaction and by the competition with fission reactions. It is, therefore, difficult to populate very high spin states, and as a result, large {gamma}-detector arrays have been developed in order to detect subtle signals from such very high spin states. The use of high spin isomers in the fusion reactions can break this limitation because the high spin isomers have their intrinsic angular momentum, which can bring the additional angular momentum without increasing the excitation energy. There are two methods to use the high spin isomers for secondary reactions: the use of the high spin isomers as a target and that as a beam. A high spin isomer target has already been developed and used for several experiments. But this method has an inevitable shortcoming that only {open_quotes}long-lived{close_quotes} isomers can be used for a target: {sup 178}Hf{sup m2} (16{sup +}) with a half-life of 31 years in the present case. By developing a high spin isomer beam, the authors can utilize various short-lived isomers with a short half-life around 1 {mu}s. The high spin isomer beam line of RIKEN Accelerator Facility is a unique apparatus in the world which provides a high spin isomer as a secondary beam. The combination of fusion-evaporation reaction and inverse kinematics are used to produce high spin isomer beams; in particular, the adoption of `inverse kinematics` is essential to use short-lived isomers as a beam.

  15. Tensor spin observables and spin stucture at low Q{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Slifer, K.

    2015-04-10

    We discuss recent spin structure results from Jefferson Lab, and outline an emerging program to study tensor spin observables using solid deuteron targets. These new experiments open the potential to study hidden color, the tensor nature of short range correlations, and to probe for exotic gluonic states.

  16. Spinning Moons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-10

    Most inner moons in the solar system keep one face pointed toward their central planet; this frame from an animation by NASA New Horizons shows that certainly isnt the case with the small moons of Pluto, which behave like spinning tops. Pluto is shown at center with, in order, from smaller to wider orbit: Charon, Styx, Nix, Kerberos, Hydra. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20152

  17. Spin-Circuit Representation of Spin Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kuntal

    2017-07-01

    Circuit theory has been tremendously successful in translating physical equations into circuit elements in an organized form for further analysis and proposing creative designs for applications. With the advent of new materials and phenomena in the field of spintronics and nanomagnetics, it is imperative to construct the spin-circuit representations for different materials and phenomena. Spin pumping is a phenomenon by which a pure spin current can be injected into the adjacent layers. If the adjacent layer is a material with a high spin-orbit coupling, a considerable amount of charge voltage can be generated via the inverse spin Hall effect allowing spin detection. Here we develop the spin-circuit representation of spin pumping. We then combine it with the spin-circuit representation for the materials having spin Hall effect to show that it reproduces the standard results as in the literature. We further show how complex multilayers can be analyzed by simply writing a netlist.

  18. The role of Gln61 and Glu63 of Ras GTPases in their activation by NF1 and Ras GAP.

    PubMed Central

    Nur-E-Kamal, M S; Maruta, H

    1992-01-01

    Two distinct GAPs of 120 and 235 kDa called GAP1 and NF1 serve as attenuators of Ras, a member of GTP-dependent signal transducers, by stimulating its intrinsic guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity. The GAP1 (also called Ras GAP) is highly specific for Ras and does not stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of Rap1 or Rho. Using GAP1C, the C-terminal GTPase activating domain (residues 720-1044) of bovine GAP1, we have shown previously that the GAP1 specificity is determined by the Ras domain (residues 61-65) where Gln61 plays the primary role. The corresponding domain (residues 1175-1531) of human NF1 (called NF1C), which shares only 26% sequence identity with the GAP1C, also activates Ras GTPases. In this article, we demonstrate that the NF1C, like the GAP1C, is highly specific for Ras and does not activate either Rap1 or Rho GTPases. Furthermore, using a series of chimeric Ras/Rap1 and mutated Ras GTPases, we show that Gln at position 61 of the GTPases primarily determines that NF1C as well as GAP1C activates Ras GTPases, but not Rap1 GTPases, and Glu at position 63 of the GTPases is required for maximizing the sensitivity of Ras GTPases to both NF1C and GAP1C. Interestingly, replacement of Glu63 of c-HaRas by Lys reduces its intrinsic GTPase activity and abolishes the GTPase activation by both NF1C and GAP1C. Thus, the potentiation of oncogenicity by Lys63 mutation of c-HaRas appears primarily to be due to the loss of its sensitivity to the two major Ras signal attenuators (NF1 and GAP1). PMID:1362901

  19. Effect of ZIP2 Gln/Arg/Leu (rs2234632) polymorphism on zinc homeostasis and inflammatory response following zinc supplementation.

    PubMed

    Giacconi, Robertina; Costarelli, Laura; Malavolta, Marco; Cardelli, Maurizio; Galeazzi, Roberta; Piacenza, Francesco; Gasparini, Nazzarena; Basso, Andrea; Mariani, Erminia; Fulop, Tamas; Rink, Lothar; Dedoussis, George; Herbein, Georges; Jajte, Jolanta; Provinciali, Mauro; Busco, Franco; Mocchegiani, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Zinc dyshomeostasis may lead to an augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines promoting chronic inflammation and increasing the susceptibility to age-related diseases. Several studies suggest that the zinc transporter protein ZIP2 may play a relevant role in the immune system especially during zinc deficiency, while a polymorphism on the coding region of ZIP2 gene (Gln/Arg/Leu) has been associated with severe carotid artery disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of ZIP2 SNP on zinc and inflammatory status in 1090 elderly healthy free-living subjects enrolled in the ZincAge project and to assess the effect of zinc supplementation on zinc status, inflammatory mediators, and zinc transporter expression depending on ZIP2 genotype. ZIP2 Leu- (Arg43Arg) carriers showed enhanced IL-6, TNF-α, and RANTES plasma levels associated with decreased free cytosolic zinc in PBMCs and an upregulation of zinc transporters ZIP2, ZIP8, and Znt1. Moreover, Leu- subjects displayed significant decrement of inflammatory mediators such as MCP-1, TNF-α, and RANTES following zinc supplementation. In summary, this investigation provides new evidence on the effect of ZIP2 Gln/Arg/Leu polymorphism on proinflammatory mediators and zinc homeostasis in elderly population with a more pronounced anti-inflammatory effect of zinc supplementation in subjects carrying ZIP2 Leu- (Arg43Arg) genotype. These novel findings could be useful in identifying elderly subjects who may benefit of zinc intervention to decrease the inflammatory status and to prevent or delay the development of age-related diseases.

  20. Snell's Law for Spin Waves.

    PubMed

    Stigloher, J; Decker, M; Körner, H S; Tanabe, K; Moriyama, T; Taniguchi, T; Hata, H; Madami, M; Gubbiotti, G; Kobayashi, K; Ono, T; Back, C H

    2016-07-15

    We report the experimental observation of Snell's law for magnetostatic spin waves in thin ferromagnetic Permalloy films by imaging incident, refracted, and reflected waves. We use a thickness step as the interface between two media with different dispersion relations. Since the dispersion relation for magnetostatic waves in thin ferromagnetic films is anisotropic, deviations from the isotropic Snell's law known in optics are observed for incidence angles larger than 25° with respect to the interface normal between the two magnetic media. Furthermore, we can show that the thickness step modifies the wavelength and the amplitude of the incident waves. Our findings open up a new way of spin wave steering for magnonic applications.

  1. Snell's Law for Spin Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stigloher, J.; Decker, M.; Körner, H. S.; Tanabe, K.; Moriyama, T.; Taniguchi, T.; Hata, H.; Madami, M.; Gubbiotti, G.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T.; Back, C. H.

    2016-07-01

    We report the experimental observation of Snell's law for magnetostatic spin waves in thin ferromagnetic Permalloy films by imaging incident, refracted, and reflected waves. We use a thickness step as the interface between two media with different dispersion relations. Since the dispersion relation for magnetostatic waves in thin ferromagnetic films is anisotropic, deviations from the isotropic Snell's law known in optics are observed for incidence angles larger than 25 ° with respect to the interface normal between the two magnetic media. Furthermore, we can show that the thickness step modifies the wavelength and the amplitude of the incident waves. Our findings open up a new way of spin wave steering for magnonic applications.

  2. spin pumping occurred under nonlinear spin precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hengan; Fan, Xiaolong; Ma, Li; Zhou, Shiming; Xue, Desheng

    Spin pumping occurs when a pure-spin current is injected into a normal metal thin layer by an adjacent ferromagnetic metal layer undergoing ferromagnetic resonance, which can be understood as the inverse effect of spin torque, and gives access to the physics of magnetization dynamics and damping. An interesting question is that whether spin pumping occurring under nonlinear spin dynamics would differ from linear case. It is known that nonlinear spin dynamics differ distinctly from linear response, a variety of amplitude dependent nonlinear effect would present. It has been found that for spin precession angle above a few degrees, nonlinear damping term would present and dominated the dynamic energy/spin-moment dissipation. Since spin pumping are closely related to the damping process, it is interesting to ask whether the nonlinear damping term could be involved in spin pumping process. We studied the spin pumping effect occurring under nonlinear spin precession. A device which is a Pt/YIG microstrip coupled with coplanar waveguide was used. High power excitation resulted in spin precession entering in a nonlinear regime. Foldover resonance lineshape and nonlinear damping have been observed. Based on those nonlinear effects, we determined the values of the precession cone angles, and the maximum cone angle can reach a values as high as 21.5 degrees. We found that even in nonlinear regime, spin pumping is still linear, which means the nonlinear damping and foldover would not affect spin pumping process.

  3. Docking Studies of Glutamine Valproic Acid Derivative (S)-5- amino-2-(heptan-4-ylamino)-5-oxopentanoic Acid (Gln-VPA) on HDAC8 with Biological Evaluation in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramos, F; Luna-Palencia, G R; Vásquez-Moctezuma, I; Méndez-Luna, D; Fragoso-Vázquez, M J; Trujillo-Ferrara, J; Meraz-Ríos, M A; Mendieta-Wejebe, J E; Correa-Basurto, J

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we focused on evaluating a novel compound developed by our group. This molecule, derived from glutamine (Gln) and valproic acid (VPA), denominated (S)- 5-amino-2-(heptan-4-ylamino)-5-oxopentanoic acid (Gln-VPA), was submitted to docking studies on histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) to explore its non-bonded interactions. The theoretical results were validated in HeLa cells as a cancer cell model and in human dermal fibroblasts as a normal cell model. The effects of Gln-VPA on HeLa and normal fibroblasts in terms of cell survival and the ability to inhibit HDAC activity in nude nuclear proteins and in nuclear proteins of whole cells treated for 24 h were analyzed. The HeLa cell cycle was analyzed after 24 and 48 h of treatment with Gln-VPA. The docking studies show that Gln-VPA can reach the catalytic site of HDAC8. Gln-VPA was organically synthesized with a purity greater than 97%, and its structure was validated using mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. Gln-VPA showed a similar effect to VPA as an HDAC inhibitor but with less toxicity to fibroblasts. Although Gln-VPA was less efficient than VPA in reducing the survival of HeLa cells, it could be studied for use as a cancer cell sensitizer.

  4. Identification and functional characterization of NifA variants that are independent of GlnB activation in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Xiaoxiao; Zhu, Yu; Pohlmann, Edward L.; Li, Jilun; Zhang, Yaoping; Roberts, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of NifA, the transcriptional activator of the nitrogen fixation (nif) gene, is tightly regulated in response to ammonium and oxygen. However, the mechanisms for the regulation of NifA activity are quite different among various nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Unlike the well-studied NifL–NifA regulatory systems in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Azotobacter vinelandii, in Rhodospirillum rubrum NifA is activated by a direct protein–protein interaction with the uridylylated form of GlnB, which in turn causes a conformational change in NifA. We report the identification of several substitutions in the N-terminal GAF domain of R. rubrum NifA that allow NifA to be activated in the absence of GlnB. Presumably these substitutions cause conformational changes in NifA necessary for activation, without interaction with GlnB. We also found that wild-type NifA can be activated in a GlnB-independent manner under certain growth conditions, suggesting that some other effector(s) can also activate NifA. An attempt to use Tn5 mutagenesis to obtain mutants that altered the pool of these presumptive effector(s) failed, though much rarer spontaneous mutations in nifA were detected. This suggests that the necessary alteration of the pool of effector(s) for NifA activation cannot be obtained by knockout mutations. PMID:18757802

  5. Hap2-3-5-Gln3 determine transcriptional activation of GDH1 and ASN1 under repressive nitrogen conditions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Hugo; Aranda, Cristina; López, Geovani; Riego, Lina; González, Alicia

    2011-03-01

    The transcriptional activation response relies on a repertoire of transcriptional activators, which decipher regulatory information through their specific binding to cognate sequences, and their capacity to selectively recruit the components that constitute a given transcriptional complex. We have addressed the possibility of achieving novel transcriptional responses by the construction of a new transcriptional regulator--the Hap2-3-5-Gln3 hybrid modulator--harbouring the HAP complex polypeptides that constitute the DNA-binding domain (Hap2-3-5) and the Gln3 activation domain, which usually act in an uncombined fashion. The results presented in this paper show that transcriptional activation of GDH1 and ASN1 under repressive nitrogen conditions is achieved through the action of the novel Hap2-3-5-Gln3 transcriptional regulator. We propose that the combination of the Hap DNA-binding and Gln3 activation domains results in a hybrid modulator that elicits a novel transcriptional response not evoked when these modulators act independently.

  6. Effect of ATP and 2-oxoglutarate on the in vitro interaction between the NifA GAF domain and the GlnB protein of Azospirillum brasilense

    PubMed Central

    Sotomaior, P.; Araújo, L.M.; Nishikawa, C.Y.; Huergo, L.F.; Monteiro, R.A.; Pedrosa, F.O.; Chubatsu, L.S.; Souza, E.M.

    2012-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a diazotroph that associates with important agricultural crops and thus has potential to be a nitrogen biofertilizer. The A. brasilense transcription regulator NifA, which seems to be constitutively expressed, activates the transcription of nitrogen fixation genes. It has been suggested that the nitrogen status-signaling protein GlnB regulates NifA activity by direct interaction with the NifA N-terminal GAF domain, preventing the inhibitory effect of this domain under conditions of nitrogen fixation. In the present study, we show that an N-terminal truncated form of NifA no longer required GlnB for activity and lost regulation by ammonium. On the other hand, in trans co-expression of the N-terminal GAF domain inhibited the N-truncated protein in response to fixed nitrogen levels. We also used pull-down assays to show in vitro interaction between the purified N-terminal GAF domain of NifA and the GlnB protein. The results showed that A. brasilense GlnB interacts directly with the NifA N-terminal domain and this interaction is dependent on the presence of ATP and 2-oxoglutarate. PMID:22983183

  7. Genetic polymorphisms of xeroderma pigmentosum group D gene Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln and susceptibility to prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingtong; Qi, Can; Tie, Chong; Guo, Zhanjun

    2013-11-10

    Many studies have reported the role of xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) with prostate cancer risk, but the results remained controversial. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a meta-analysis was performed. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated to assess the association between XPD Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk. A total of 8 studies including 2620 cases and 3225 controls described Asp312Asn genotypes, among which 10 articles involving 3230 cases and 3582 controls described Lys751Gln genotypes and were also involved in this meta-analysis. When all the eligible studies were pooled into this meta-analysis, a significant association between prostate cancer risk and XPD Asp312Asn polymorphism was found. For Asp312Asn polymorphism, in the stratified analysis by ethnicity and source of controls, prostate cancer risk was observed in co-dominant, dominant and recessive models, while no evidence of any associations of XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism with prostate cancer was found in the overall or subgroup analyses. Our meta-analysis supports that the XPD Asp312Asn polymorphism contributed to the risk of prostate cancer from currently available evidence. However, a study with a larger sample size is needed to further evaluate gene-environment interaction on XPD Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk.

  8. XRCC1 Arg399Gln Polymorphism Confers Risk of Breast Cancer in American Population: A Meta-Analysis of 10846 Cases and 11723 Controls

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong; Zhao, Li; Peng, Yang; Zhou, Shudong; Li, Lixia; Chen, Sidong; Gao, Yanhui

    2014-01-01

    Background In the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene, a polymorphism, Arg399Gln (rs25487), has been shown to change neoconservative amino acid and thus result in alternation of DNA repair capacity. Numerous studies have investigated the association between Arg399Gln and breast cancer risk in the American population, but yielding inconsistent results. This study aimed to clarify the role of this polymorphism in susceptibility to breast cancer. Methods Literatures were searched in multiple databases including PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, EBSCO and ScienceDirect databases up to April 2013. A comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the overall odds ratio (OR), by integrating data from 18 case control studies of 10846 cases and 11723 controls in the American population. Results Overall, significant association was observed between the Arg399Gln polymorphism and breast cancer risk under the random-effects model (OR for dominant model = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02–1.24, Pheterogeneity = 0.003; OR for additive model = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.01–1.14, Pheterogeneity = 0.017). Further sensitivity analysis supported the robust stability of this current result by showing similar ORs before and after removal of a single study. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism may significantly contribute to susceptibility of breast cancer in the American population. PMID:24489692

  9. Anisotropic spin-orbit induced splitting of intersubband spin plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baboux, F.; Perez, F.; Ullrich, C. A.; D'Amico, I.; Gómez, J.; Bernard, M.

    2013-01-01

    The anisotropic splitting of intersubband spin plasmons, resulting from spin-orbit coupling, is studied by angle-resolved inelastic light scattering on a [001]-oriented GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well. Confirming theoretical predictions made in [C. A. Ullrich and M. A. Flatté, Phys. Rev. B 68, 235310 (2003)], this splitting is proven to exhibit a characteristic two-fold symmetry with the in-plane orientation, and to increase with increasing modulus of the excitation momentum. This opens the way to a more complete investigation, aiming at evidencing the existence of a collective spin-orbit field driving these excitations. Note to the reader concerning PDF file: legends and scales of figures have been completed on January 30, 2013.

  10. Spin currents, spin torques, and the concept of spin superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rückriegel, Andreas; Kopietz, Peter

    2017-03-01

    In magnets with noncollinear spin configuration the expectation value of the conventionally defined spin current operator contains a contribution which renormalizes an external magnetic field and hence affects only the precessional motion of the spin polarization. This term, which has been named angular spin current by Sun and Xie [Phys. Rev. B 72, 245305 (2005)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.72.245305, does not describe the translational motion of magnetic moments. We give a prescription for how to separate these two types of spin transport and show that the translational movement of the spin is always polarized along the direction of the local magnetization. We also show that at vanishing temperature the classical magnetic order parameter in magnetic insulators cannot carry a translational spin current and elucidate how this affects the interpretation of spin supercurrents.

  11. Paramagnetic and Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stephen

    We report on the observation of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic insulators. By using a microscale on-chip local heater, it is possible to generate a large thermal gradient confined to the chip surface without a large increase in the total sample temperature. This technique allows us to easily access low temperatures (200 mK) and high magnetic fields (14 T) through conventional dilution refrigeration and superconducting magnet setups. By exploring this regime, we detect the spin Seebeck effect through the spin-flop transition in antiferromagnetic MnF2 when a large magnetic field (>9 T) is applied along the easy axis direction. Using the same technique, we are also able to resolve a spin Seebeck effect from the paramagnetic phase of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet Gd3Ga5O12 (gadolinium gallium garnet) and antiferromagnetic DyScO3 (DSO). Since these measurements occur above the ordering temperatures of these two materials, short-range magnetic order is implicated as the cause of the spin Seebeck effect in these systems. The discovery of the spin Seebeck effect in these two materials classes suggest that both antiferromagnetic spin waves and spin excitations from short range magnetic order may be used to generate spin current from insulators and that the spin wave spectra of individual materials are highly important to the specifics of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect. Since insulating antiferromagnets and paramagnets are far more common than the typical insulating ferrimagnetic materials used in spin Seebeck experiments, this discovery opens up a large new class of materials for use in spin caloritronic devices. All authors acknowledge support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Materials Sciences and Engineering Division. The use of facilities at the Center for Nanoscale Materials, was supported by the U.S. DOE, BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  12. A rare P2X7 variant Arg307Gln with absent pore formation function protects against neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ben J; Field, Judith; Dutertre, Sébastien; Ou, Amber; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Scott, Rodney; Lea, Rodney; Taylor, Bruce V; Stankovich, Jim; Butzkueven, Helmut; Gresle, Melissa; Laws, Simon M; Petrou, Steven; Hoffjan, Sabine; Akkad, Denis A; Graham, Colin A; Hawkins, Stanley; Glaser, Anna; Bedri, Sahl Khalid; Hillert, Jan; Matute, Carlos; Antiguedad, Alfredo; Wiley, James S

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic relapsing-remitting inflammatory disease of the central nervous system characterized by oligodendrocyte damage, demyelination and neuronal death. Genetic association studies have shown a 2-fold or greater prevalence of the HLA-DRB1*1501 allele in the MS population compared with normal Caucasians. In discovery cohorts of Australasian patients with MS (total 2941 patients and 3008 controls), we examined the associations of 12 functional polymorphisms of P2X7, a microglial/macrophage receptor with proinflammatory effects when activated by extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP). In discovery cohorts, rs28360457, coding for Arg307Gln was associated with MS and combined analysis showed a 2-fold lower minor allele frequency compared with controls (1.11% for MS and 2.15% for controls, P = 0.0000071). Replication analysis of four independent European MS case-control cohorts (total 2140 cases and 2634 controls) confirmed this association [odds ratio (OR) = 0.69, P = 0.026]. A meta-analysis of all Australasian and European cohorts indicated that Arg307Gln confers a 1.8-fold protective effect on MS risk (OR = 0.57, P = 0.0000024). Fresh human monocytes heterozygous for Arg307Gln have >85% loss of 'pore' function of the P2X7 receptor measured by ATP-induced ethidium uptake. Analysis shows Arg307Gln always occurred with 270His suggesting a single 307Gln-270His haplotype that confers dominant negative effects on P2X7 function and protection against MS. Modeling based on the homologous zP2X4 receptor showed Arg307 is located in a region rich in basic residues located only 12 Å from the ligand binding site. Our data show the protective effect against MS of a rare genetic variant of P2RX7 with heterozygotes showing near absent proinflammatory 'pore' function.

  13. U6 promoter-enhanced GlnUAG suppressor tRNA has higher suppression efficacy and can be stably expressed in 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Koukuntla, Ramesh; Ramsey, William J; Young, Won-Bin; Link, Charles J

    2013-02-01

    Almost one-third of all human genetic diseases are the result of nonsense mutations that can result in truncated proteins. Nonsense suppressor tRNAs (NSTs) were proposed as valuable tools for gene therapy of genetic diseases caused by premature termination codons (PTCs). Although various strategies have been adapted aiming to increase NST expression and efficacy, low suppression efficacies of NSTs and toxicity associated with stable expression of suppressor tRNAs have hampered the development of NST-mediated gene therapy. We have employed the U6 promoter to enhance Gln-Amber suppressor tRNA (GlnUAG) expression and to increase PTC suppression in mammalian cells. In an attempt to study the toxic effects of NSTs, a stable 293 cell line constitutively expressing a U6 promoter-enhanced GlnUAG tRNA was established. To examine whether any proteomic changes occurred in cells that constitutively express suppressor tRNA, whole cell proteins from cells with and without any suppressor tRNA expression were analyzed. The data obtained suggest that U6 promoter-enhanced GlnUAG tRNAs have higher suppression efficacies than multimers of the same suppressor tRNA without a U6 promoter. Proteomic analysis of cells constitutively expressing the GlnUAG suppressor tRNA indicates that stable expression of NSTs may not lead to significant read through of normal cellular proteins. Because most tRNAs have cell-specific differential expression, this technique will enable the expression of different kinds of suppressor tRNAs in various cell types at high, functionally relevant levels. The techniques developed in the present study may contribute to the further development of suppressor tRNA-mediated gene therapy. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Three genes encoding citrate synthases in Saccharopolyspora erythraea are regulated by the global nutrient-sensing regulators GlnR, DasR, and CRP.

    PubMed

    Liao, Cheng-Heng; Yao, Li-Li; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2014-10-08

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea has three citrate synthases encoded by gltA-2, citA, and citA4. Here, we characterized and identified the expression and regulatory properties of these synthases. Three pleiotropic global regulatory proteins of S. erythraea - CRP, GlnR, and DasR - are involved in carbon metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, and amino-sugar (chitin and GlcNAc) metabolism. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), we identified these regulators as proteins that bind directly to the promoter regions of all citrate synthase genes (gltA-2, citA, and citA4). Footprinting assays indicated the exact protect sequences of CRP, GlnR, and DasR on the promoter region of gltA-2, revealing binding competition between GlnR and DasR. Moreover, by comparing the transcription levels of citrate synthase genes between parental and glnR mutant or dasR mutant strains, or by comparing the transcription response of citrate synthases under various nutrient conditions, we found that GlnR and DasR negatively regulated citA and citA4 transcription but had no regulatory effects on the gltA-2 gene. Although no CRP mutant was available, the results indicated that CRP was a cAMP-binding receptor affecting gltA-2 transcription when the intracellular cAMP concentration increased. Thus, an overall model of CS regulation by C and/or N metabolism regulators and cAMP receptor protein was proposed.

  15. Adatom-induced local reconstructions in zigzag silicene nanoribbons: Spin semiconducting properties and large spin thermopowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. F.; Zou, X. L.; Kuang, Y. W.; Shao, Z. G.; Zhang, J.; Hong, X. K.; Zhang, D. B.; Feng, J. F.; Chen, X. S.; Liu, Y. S.

    2017-01-01

    Using first-principles methods, we have investigated magnetic properties and thermospin effects of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) absorbed by a single Si atom. After a relaxation, a steady dumbbell-like structure is formed, which induces a weaker antiferromagnetic (AFM) coupling between two zigzag edges. Therefore, a band gap is opened, meanwhile the adsorbed ZSiNRs show a spin semiconducting property. A large spin thermopower and weak charge thermopower in adsorbed ZSiNR-based devices can be simultaneously achieved, which is attributed to a nearly perfect mirror symmetry of spin-up and spin-down transmission spectra relative to the Fermi level.

  16. Nanopatterning spin-textures: A route to reconfigurable magnonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albisetti, E.; Petti, D.; Madami, M.; Tacchi, S.; Vavassori, P.; Riedo, E.; Bertacco, R.

    2017-05-01

    Magnonics is envisioned to enable highly efficient data transport and processing, by exploiting propagating perturbations in the spin-texture of magnetic materials. Despite the demonstrations of a plethora of proof-of-principle devices, the efficient excitation, transport and manipulation of spin-waves at the nanoscale is still an open challenge. Recently, we demonstrated that the spin-wave excitation and propagation can be controlled by nanopatterning reconfigurable spin-textures in a continuous exchange biased ferromagnetic film. Here, we show that by patterning 90° stripe-shaped magnetic domains, we spatially modulate the spin-wave excitation in a continuous film, and that by applying an external magnetic field we can reversibly "switch-off" the spin-wave excitation. This opens the way to the use of nanopatterned spin-textures, such as domains and domain walls, for exciting and manipulating magnons in reconfigurable nanocircuits.

  17. Entangled spins and ghost-spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatkar, Dileep P.; Narayan, K.

    2017-09-01

    We study patterns of quantum entanglement in systems of spins and ghost-spins regarding them as simple quantum mechanical toy models for theories containing negative norm states. We define a single ghost-spin as in [20] as a 2-state spin variable with an indefinite inner product in the state space. We find that whenever the spin sector is disentangled from the ghost-spin sector (both of which could be entangled within themselves), the reduced density matrix obtained by tracing over all the ghost-spins gives rise to positive entanglement entropy for positive norm states, while negative norm states have an entanglement entropy with a negative real part and a constant imaginary part. However when the spins are entangled with the ghost-spins, there are new entanglement patterns in general. For systems where the number of ghost-spins is even, it is possible to find subsectors of the Hilbert space where positive norm states always lead to positive entanglement entropy after tracing over the ghost-spins. With an odd number of ghost-spins however, we find that there always exist positive norm states with negative real part for entanglement entropy after tracing over the ghost-spins.

  18. Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2015-01-28

    A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

  19. The Open University Opens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunstall, Jeremy, Ed.

    Conceived by the British Labor Government in the 1960's the Open University was viewed as a way to extend higher education to Britain's working class, but enrollment figures in classes that represent traditional academic disciplines show that the student population is predominantly middle class. Bringing education into the home presents numerous…

  20. Kinetic analysis of spin current contribution to spectrum of electromagnetic waves in spin-1/2 plasma. I. Dielectric permeability tensor for magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2017-02-01

    The dielectric permeability tensor for spin polarized plasmas is derived in terms of the spin-1/2 quantum kinetic model in six-dimensional phase space. Expressions for the distribution function and spin distribution function are derived in linear approximations on the path of dielectric permeability tensor derivation. The dielectric permeability tensor is derived for the spin-polarized degenerate electron gas. It is also discussed at the finite temperature regime, where the equilibrium distribution function is presented by the spin-polarized Fermi-Dirac distribution. Consideration of the spin-polarized equilibrium states opens possibilities for the kinetic modeling of the thermal spin current contribution in the plasma dynamics.

  1. Spin depolarization in semiconductor spin detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A.; Oka, Y.; Abernathy, C. R.; Pearton, S. J.

    2006-02-01

    A brief review is given of our recent experimental results from in-depth investigations of spin depolarization and underlying physical mechanisms within semiconductor spin detectors based on II-VIs (e.g. Zn(Cd)Se quantum wells) and III-Vs (e.g. InGaN quantum wells), which are relevant to applications for spin-LEDs based on ZnMnSe/Zn(Cd)Se and GaMnN/InGaN structures. By employing cw and time-resolved magneto-optical and optical spin orientation spectroscopy in combination with tunable laser excitation, we show that spin depolarization within these spin detectors is very efficient and is an important factor limiting efficiency of spin detection. Detailed physical mechanisms leading to efficient spin depolarization will be discussed.

  2. Role of VicRKX and GlnR in pH-Dependent Regulation of the Streptococcus salivarius 57.I Urease Operon

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Szu-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ureolysis by Streptococcus salivarius is critical for pH homeostasis of dental plaque and prevention of dental caries. The expression of S. salivarius urease is induced by acidic pH and carbohydrate excess. The differential expression is mainly controlled at the transcriptional level from the promoter 5′ to ureI (pureI). Our previous study demonstrates that CodY represses pureI by binding to a CodY box 5′ to pureI, and the repression is more pronounced in cells grown at pH 7 than in cells grown at pH 5.5. Recent sequence analysis revealed a putative VicR consensus and two GlnR boxes 5′ to the CodY box. The results of DNA affinity precipitation assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR analysis confirmed that both GlnR and VicR interact with the predicted binding sites in pureI. Isogenic mutant strains (vicRKX null and glnR null) and their derivatives (harboring S. salivarius vicRKX and glnR, respectively) were generated in a recombinant Streptococcus gordonii strain harboring a pureI-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene fusion on gtfG to investigate the regulation of VicR and GlnR. The results indicated that GlnR activates, whereas VicR represses, pureI expression. The repression by VicR is more pronounced at pH 7, whereas GlnR is more active at pH 5.5. Furthermore, the VicR box acts as an upstream element to enhance pureI expression in the absence of the cognate regulator. The overall regulation by CodY, VicR, and GlnR in response to pH ensures an optimal expression of urease in S. salivarius when the enzyme is most needed. IMPORTANCE Dental plaque rich in alkali-producing bacteria is less cariogenic, and thus, urease-producing Streptococcus salivarius has been considered as a therapeutic agent for dental caries control. Being one of the few ureolytic microbes in the oral cavity, S. salivarius strain 57.I promotes its competitiveness by mass-producing urease only at acidic growth pH. Here, we

  3. Role of VicRKX and GlnR in pH-Dependent Regulation of the Streptococcus salivarius 57.I Urease Operon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Szu-Chuan; Chen, Yi-Ywan M

    2016-01-01

    Ureolysis by Streptococcus salivarius is critical for pH homeostasis of dental plaque and prevention of dental caries. The expression of S. salivarius urease is induced by acidic pH and carbohydrate excess. The differential expression is mainly controlled at the transcriptional level from the promoter 5' to ureI (p ureI ). Our previous study demonstrates that CodY represses p ureI by binding to a CodY box 5' to p ureI , and the repression is more pronounced in cells grown at pH 7 than in cells grown at pH 5.5. Recent sequence analysis revealed a putative VicR consensus and two GlnR boxes 5' to the CodY box. The results of DNA affinity precipitation assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR analysis confirmed that both GlnR and VicR interact with the predicted binding sites in p ureI . Isogenic mutant strains (vicRKX null and glnR null) and their derivatives (harboring S. salivarius vicRKX and glnR, respectively) were generated in a recombinant Streptococcus gordonii strain harboring a p ureI-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene fusion on gtfG to investigate the regulation of VicR and GlnR. The results indicated that GlnR activates, whereas VicR represses, p ureI expression. The repression by VicR is more pronounced at pH 7, whereas GlnR is more active at pH 5.5. Furthermore, the VicR box acts as an upstream element to enhance p ureI expression in the absence of the cognate regulator. The overall regulation by CodY, VicR, and GlnR in response to pH ensures an optimal expression of urease in S. salivarius when the enzyme is most needed. IMPORTANCE Dental plaque rich in alkali-producing bacteria is less cariogenic, and thus, urease-producing Streptococcus salivarius has been considered as a therapeutic agent for dental caries control. Being one of the few ureolytic microbes in the oral cavity, S. salivarius strain 57.I promotes its competitiveness by mass-producing urease only at acidic growth pH. Here, we

  4. The spin Hall effect as a probe of nonlinear spin fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Wei, D H; Niimi, Y; Gu, B; Ziman, T; Maekawa, S; Otani, Y

    2012-01-01

    The spin Hall effect and its inverse have key roles in spintronic devices as they allow conversion of charge currents to and from spin currents. The conversion efficiency strongly depends on material details, such as the electronic band structure and the nature of impurities. Here we show an anomaly in the inverse spin Hall effect in weak ferromagnetic NiPd alloys near their Curie temperatures with a shape independent of material details, such as Ni concentrations. By extending Kondo's model for the anomalous Hall effect, we explain the observed anomaly as originating from the second-order nonlinear spin fluctuation of Ni moments. This brings to light an essential symmetry difference between the spin Hall effect and the anomalous Hall effect, which reflects the first-order nonlinear fluctuations of local moments. Our finding opens up a new application of the spin Hall effect, by which a minuscule magnetic moment can be detected.

  5. Ultrafast and Gigantic Spin Injection in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, M.; Held, K.

    2016-05-01

    The injection of spin currents in semiconductors is one of the big challenges of spintronics. Motivated by the ultrafast demagnetization and spin injection into metals, we propose an alternative femtosecond route based on the laser excitation of superdiffusive spin currents in a ferromagnet such as Ni. Our calculations show that even though only a fraction of the current crosses the Ni-Si interface, the laser-induced creation of strong transient electrical fields at a ferromagnet-semiconductor interface allows for the injection of chargeless spin currents with record spin polarizations of 80%. Beyond that they are pulsed on the time scale of 100 fs which opens the door for new experiments and ultrafast spintronics.

  6. Water proton spin saturation affects measured protein backbone 15 N spin relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2011-12-01

    Protein backbone 15N NMR spin relaxation rates are useful in characterizing the protein dynamics and structures. To observe the protein nuclear-spin resonances a pulse sequence has to include a water suppression scheme. There are two commonly employed methods, saturating or dephasing the water spins with pulse field gradients and keeping them unperturbed with flip-back pulses. Here different water suppression methods were incorporated into pulse sequences to measure 15N longitudinal T1 and transversal rotating-frame T1ρ spin relaxation. Unexpectedly the 15N T1 relaxation time constants varied significantly with the choice of water suppression method. For a 25-kDa Escherichiacoli. glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) the T1 values acquired with the pulse sequence containing a water dephasing gradient are on average 20% longer than the ones obtained using a pulse sequence containing the water flip-back pulse. In contrast the two T1ρ data sets are correlated without an apparent offset. The average T1 difference was reduced to 12% when the experimental recycle delay was doubled, while the average T1 values from the flip-back measurements were nearly unchanged. Analysis of spectral signal to noise ratios ( s/ n) showed the apparent slower 15N relaxation obtained with the water dephasing experiment originated from the differences in 1H N recovery for each relaxation time point. This in turn offset signal reduction from 15N relaxation decay. The artifact becomes noticeable when the measured 15N relaxation time constant is comparable to recycle delay, e.g., the 15N T1 of medium to large proteins. The 15N relaxation rates measured with either water suppression schemes yield reasonable fits to the structure. However, data from the saturated scheme results in significantly lower Model-Free order parameters (< S2> = 0.81) than the non-saturated ones (< S2> = 0.88), indicating such order parameters may be previously underestimated.

  7. Hole spin relaxation in bilayer WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Wang, L.; Wu, M. W.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the hole spin relaxation due to the Rashba spin-orbit coupling induced by an external perpendicular electric field in bilayer WSe2. The Rashba spin-orbit coupling coefficients in bilayer WSe2 are constructed from the corresponding monolayer ones. In contrast to monolayer WSe2, the out-of-plane component of the bilayer Rashba spin-orbit coupling acts as a Zeeman-like field with opposite directions but identical values in the two valleys. For in-plane spins, this Zeeman-like field, together with the intervalley hole-phonon scattering, opens an intervalley spin relaxation channel, which is found to dominate the in-plane spin relaxation in bilayer WSe2 even at low temperature. For out-of-plane spins, this Zeeman-like field is superimposed by the identical Hartree-Fock effective magnetic fields in the two valleys, and hence different total effective magnetic fields between two valleys are obtained. Owing to the large difference of the total fields at large spin polarization, different out-of-plane spin relaxation times in the two valleys are obtained when the intervalley hole-phonon scattering is weak at low temperature and low hole density. This difference in the spin relaxation times can be suppressed by enhancing the intervalley hole-phonon scattering through increasing temperature or hole density. Moreover, at large spin polarization and low temperature, due to the weak intravalley hole-phonon scattering but relatively strong hole-hole Coulomb scattering, the fast spin precessions are found to result in a quasi-hot-hole Fermi distribution characterized by an effective hot-hole temperature larger than the temperature, which also enhances the intervalley scattering. During this process, it is interesting to discover that the initially equal hole densities in the two valleys are broken in the temporal evolution, and a valley polarization is built up. It is further revealed that this comes from the different spin relaxation processes at large spin

  8. Integrable deformations of the XXZ spin chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisert, Niklas; Fiévet, Lucas; de Leeuw, Marius; Loebbert, Florian

    2013-09-01

    We consider integrable deformations of the XXZ spin chain for periodic and open boundary conditions. In particular, we classify all long-range deformations and study their impact on the spectrum. As compared to the XXX case, we have the z-spin at our disposal, which induces two additional deformations: the short-range magnetic twist and a new long-range momentum-dependent twist.

  9. Superfluid Spin Transport Through Easy-Plane Ferromagnetic Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2014-06-01

    Superfluid spin transport—dissipationless transport of spin—is theoretically studied in a ferromagnetic insulator with easy-plane anisotropy. We consider an open geometry where the spin current is injected into the ferromagnet from one side by a metallic reservoir with a nonequilibrium spin accumulation and ejected into another metallic reservoir located downstream. Spin transport is studied using a combination of magnetoelectric circuit theory, Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert phenomenology, and microscopic linear-response theory. We discuss how spin superfluidity can be probed in a magnetically mediated negative electron-drag experiment.

  10. The Impact of LEP G-2548A and LEPR Gln223Arg Polymorphisms on Adiposity, Leptin, and Leptin-Receptor Serum Levels in a Mexican Mestizo Population

    PubMed Central

    Chavarria-Avila, Efraín; Gomez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Ruiz-Quezada, Sandra-Luz; Castro-Albarran, Jorge; Sánchez-López, Lizeth; Martín-Marquez, Beatriz Teresita; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa-Elena

    2015-01-01

    The polymorphisms in leptin (LEP G-2548A) and leptin-receptor (LEPR Gln223Arg) seem to influence obesity and lipid metabolism among others. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of these polymorphisms on adiposity, leptin (sLeptin), and leptin-receptor (sLeptin-receptor) serum concentrations as well as inflammation markers. We included 382 adults originally from Western Mexico. They were genotyped by PCR-RFLP. Obese individuals showed higher sLeptin (58.2 ± 31.35 ng/mL) but lower sLeptin-receptor (12.6 ± 3.74 ng/mL) levels than normal weight ones (17.6 ± 14.62 ng/mL, 17.4 ± 4.62 ng/mL, resp.), P < 0.001. Obese subjects carriers of Arg/Arg genotype had more (P = 0.016) sLeptin-receptor (14.7 ± 4.96 ng/mL) and less (P = 0.004) sLeptin (44.0 ± 28.12 ng/mL) levels than Gln/Gln genotype (11.0 ± 2.92 ng/mL, 80.3 ± 33.24 ng/mL, resp.). Body fat mass was lower (P from 0.003 to 0.045) for A/A (36.5% ± 6.80) or Arg/Arg (36.8% ± 6.82) genotypes with respect to G/G (41.3% ± 5.52) and G/A (41.6% ± 5.61) or Gln/Gln (43.7% ± 4.74) and Gln/Arg (41.0% ± 5.52) genotypes carriers. Our results suggest that LEP -2548A and LEPR 223Arg could be genetic markers of less body fat mass accumulation in obese subjects from Western Mexico. PMID:26064921

  11. The Impact of LEP G-2548A and LEPR Gln223Arg Polymorphisms on Adiposity, Leptin, and Leptin-Receptor Serum Levels in a Mexican Mestizo Population.

    PubMed

    Chavarria-Avila, Efraín; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Gomez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Ruiz-Quezada, Sandra-Luz; Castro-Albarran, Jorge; Sánchez-López, Lizeth; Martín-Marquez, Beatriz Teresita; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa-Elena

    2015-01-01

    The polymorphisms in leptin (LEP G-2548A) and leptin-receptor (LEPR Gln223Arg) seem to influence obesity and lipid metabolism among others. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of these polymorphisms on adiposity, leptin (sLeptin), and leptin-receptor (sLeptin-receptor) serum concentrations as well as inflammation markers. We included 382 adults originally from Western Mexico. They were genotyped by PCR-RFLP. Obese individuals showed higher sLeptin (58.2 ± 31.35 ng/mL) but lower sLeptin-receptor (12.6 ± 3.74 ng/mL) levels than normal weight ones (17.6 ± 14.62 ng/mL, 17.4 ± 4.62 ng/mL, resp.), P < 0.001. Obese subjects carriers of Arg/Arg genotype had more (P = 0.016) sLeptin-receptor (14.7 ± 4.96 ng/mL) and less (P = 0.004) sLeptin (44.0 ± 28.12 ng/mL) levels than Gln/Gln genotype (11.0 ± 2.92 ng/mL, 80.3 ± 33.24 ng/mL, resp.). Body fat mass was lower (P from 0.003 to 0.045) for A/A (36.5% ± 6.80) or Arg/Arg (36.8% ± 6.82) genotypes with respect to G/G (41.3% ± 5.52) and G/A (41.6% ± 5.61) or Gln/Gln (43.7% ± 4.74) and Gln/Arg (41.0% ± 5.52) genotypes carriers. Our results suggest that LEP -2548A and LEPR 223Arg could be genetic markers of less body fat mass accumulation in obese subjects from Western Mexico.

  12. High-Tc spin superfluidity in antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Bunkov, Yu M; Alakshin, E M; Gazizulin, R R; Klochkov, A V; Kuzmin, V V; L'vov, V S; Tagirov, M S

    2012-04-27

    We report the observation of the unusual behavior of induction decay signals in antiferromagnetic monocrystals with Suhl-Nakamura interactions. The signals show the formation of the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of magnons and the existence of spin supercurrent, in complete analogy with the spin superfluidity in the superfluid (3)He and the atomic BEC of quantum gases. In the experiments described here, the temperature of the magnon BEC is a thousand times larger than in the superfluid (3)He. It opens a possibility to apply the spin supercurrent for various magnetic spintronics applications.

  13. Kinetics of transcription initiation directed by multiple cis-regulatory elements on the glnAp2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaolai; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2016-12-15

    Transcription initiation is orchestrated by dynamic molecular interactions, with kinetic steps difficult to detect. Utilizing a hybrid method, we aim to unravel essential kinetic steps of transcriptional regulation on the glnAp2 promoter, whose regulatory region includes two enhancers (sites I and II) and three low-affinity sequences (sites III-V), to which the transcriptional activator NtrC binds. By structure reconstruction, we analyze all possible organization architectures of the transcription apparatus (TA). The main regulatory mode involves two NtrC hexamers: one at enhancer II transiently associates with site V such that the other at enhancer I can rapidly approach and catalyze the σ(54)-RNA polymerase holoenzyme. We build a kinetic model characterizing essential steps of the TA operation; with the known kinetics of the holoenzyme interacting with DNA, this model enables the kinetics beyond technical detection to be determined by fitting the input-output function of the wild-type promoter. The model further quantitatively reproduces transcriptional activities of various mutated promoters. These results reveal different roles played by two enhancers and interpret why the low-affinity elements conditionally enhance or repress transcription. This work presents an integrated dynamic picture of regulated transcription initiation and suggests an evolutionarily conserved characteristic guaranteeing reliable transcriptional response to regulatory signals. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Kinetics of transcription initiation directed by multiple cis-regulatory elements on the glnAp2 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaolai; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Transcription initiation is orchestrated by dynamic molecular interactions, with kinetic steps difficult to detect. Utilizing a hybrid method, we aim to unravel essential kinetic steps of transcriptional regulation on the glnAp2 promoter, whose regulatory region includes two enhancers (sites I and II) and three low-affinity sequences (sites III-V), to which the transcriptional activator NtrC binds. By structure reconstruction, we analyze all possible organization architectures of the transcription apparatus (TA). The main regulatory mode involves two NtrC hexamers: one at enhancer II transiently associates with site V such that the other at enhancer I can rapidly approach and catalyze the σ54-RNA polymerase holoenzyme. We build a kinetic model characterizing essential steps of the TA operation; with the known kinetics of the holoenzyme interacting with DNA, this model enables the kinetics beyond technical detection to be determined by fitting the input-output function of the wild-type promoter. The model further quantitatively reproduces transcriptional activities of various mutated promoters. These results reveal different roles played by two enhancers and interpret why the low-affinity elements conditionally enhance or repress transcription. This work presents an integrated dynamic picture of regulated transcription initiation and suggests an evolutionarily conserved characteristic guaranteeing reliable transcriptional response to regulatory signals. PMID:27899598

  15. Gate-Driven Pure Spin Current in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaoyang; Su, Li; Si, Zhizhong; Zhang, Youguang; Bournel, Arnaud; Zhang, Yue; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Fert, Albert; Zhao, Weisheng

    2017-09-01

    The manipulation of spin current is a promising solution for low-power devices beyond CMOS. However, conventional methods, such as spin-transfer torque or spin-orbit torque for magnetic tunnel junctions, suffer from large power consumption due to frequent spin-charge conversions. An important challenge is, thus, to realize long-distance transport of pure spin current, together with efficient manipulation. Here, the mechanism of gate-driven pure spin current in graphene is presented. Such a mechanism relies on the electrical gating of carrier-density-dependent conductivity and spin-diffusion length in graphene. The gate-driven feature is adopted to realize the pure spin-current demultiplexing operation, which enables gate-controllable distribution of the pure spin current into graphene branches. Compared with the Elliott-Yafet spin-relaxation mechanism, the D'yakonov-Perel spin-relaxation mechanism results in more appreciable demultiplexing performance. The feature of the pure spin-current demultiplexing operation will allow a number of logic functions to be cascaded without spin-charge conversions and open a route for future ultra-low-power devices.

  16. Spin-Spin Coupling in Asteroidal Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Gravitationally bound binaries constitute a substantial fraction of the small body population of the solar system, and characterization of their rotational states is instrumental to understanding their formation and dynamical evolution. Unlike planets, numerous small bodies can maintain a perpetual aspheroidal shape, giving rise to a richer array of non-trivial gravitational dynamics. In this work, we explore the rotational evolution of triaxial satellites that orbit permanently deformed central objects, with specific emphasis on quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. Our analysis shows that in addition to conventional spin-orbit resonances, both prograde and retrograde spin-spin resonances naturally arise for closely orbiting, highly deformed bodies. Application of our results to the illustrative examples of (87) Sylvia and (216) Kleopatra multi-asteroid systems implies capture probabilities slightly below ~10% for leading-order spin-spin resonances. Cumulatively, our results suggest that spin-spin coupling may be consequential for highly elongated, tightly orbiting binary objects.

  17. A coarse-grained method to predict the open-to-closed behavior of glutamine binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Dashuai; Gong, Weikang; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Yang; Li, Chunhua

    2017-08-01

    The Glutamine-Binding Protein (GlnBP) of Escherichia coli is responsible for the first step in the active transport of glutamine across the cytoplasmic membrane. In present work, we explored the allosteric pathway of GlnBP from the open to closed states during the substrate binding process with the adaptive anisotropic network model (aANM). The results show that the allosteric transition proceeds in a coupled way and is more likely to be driven by the movement of hinge regions. The large-scale hinge-bending motion between the large and small domains occurs, accompanied by an interdomain twisting motion which proceeds mainly in the middle stage. The cooperative motion between the dominant hinge-bending motion and the twisting motion exerts a crucial role in the open-closed motion of GlnBP. These results are in close agreement with previous experimental and theoretical data, implying that the topology structure plays a crucial role in the allosteric transition process of GlnBP.

  18. Tunable all electric spin polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, Nikhil K.

    symmetrically biased and that bias is varied to maximize the amount of spin polarization in the channel. We have fabricated several InAs based QPCs with four SGs and have shown that the experimental results were in qualitative agreement with our NEGF simulations. Our main finding is that the range of common mode bias on the first set of gates over which maximum spin polarization can be achieved is much broader for the four gate structure compared to the case of a single pair of in-plane SGs. In addition, we have observed both hysteresis and negative differential regions in the conductance for specific biasing conditions. We believe these are evidence of Coulomb and Spin Blockade effects on the conductance of these devices and cannot be explained within the context of a NEGF approach and require a many-body approach to the description of carrier transport. Our studies suggest that the study of spin valve structures composed of a quantum dot or wire coupled to the source and drain via asymmetrically biased QPCs should open a new area in the field of spintronics.

  19. Spin-Polarization-Induced Preedge Transitions in the Sulfur K-Edge XAS Spectra of Open-Shell Transition-Metal Sulfates: Spectroscopic Validation of σ-Bond Electron Transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Frank, Patrick; Szilagyi, Robert K.; Gramlich, Volker; ...

    2017-01-09

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) spectra of the monodentate sulfate complexes [MII(itao)(SO4)(H2O)0,1] (M = Co, Ni, Cu) and [Cu(Me6tren)(SO4)] exhibit well-defined preedge transitions at 2479.4, 2479.9, 2478.4, and 2477.7 eV, respectively, despite having no direct metal–sulfur bond, while the XAS preedge of [Zn(itao)(SO4)] is featureless. The sulfur K-edge XAS of [Cu(itao)(SO4)] but not of [Cu(Me6tren)(SO4)] uniquely exhibits a weak transition at 2472.1 eV, an extraordinary 8.7 eV below the first inflection of the rising K-edge. Preedge transitions also appear in the sulfur K-edge XAS of crystalline [MII(SO4)(H2O)] (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu, but not Zn) and inmore » sulfates of higher-valent early transition metals. Ground-state density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations show that charge transfer from coordinated sulfate to paramagnetic late transition metals produces spin polarization that differentially mixes the spin-up (α) and spin-down (β) spin orbitals of the sulfate ligand, inducing negative spin density at the sulfate sulfur. Ground-state DFT calculations show that sulfur 3p character then mixes into metal 4s and 4p valence orbitals and various combinations of ligand antibonding orbitals, producing measurable sulfur XAS transitions. TDDFT calculations confirm the presence of XAS preedge features 0.5–2 eV below the rising sulfur K-edge energy. The 2472.1 eV feature arises when orbitals at lower energy than the frontier occupied orbitals with S 3p character mix with the copper(II) electron hole. Transmission of spin polarization and thus of radical character through several bonds between the sulfur and electron hole provides a new mechanism for the counterintuitive appearance of preedge transitions in the XAS spectra of transition-metal oxoanion ligands in the absence of any direct metal–absorber bond. The 2472.1 eV transition is evidence for further radicalization from copper(II), which extends across

  20. Spin-Polarization-Induced Preedge Transitions in the Sulfur K-Edge XAS Spectra of Open-Shell Transition-Metal Sulfates: Spectroscopic Validation of σ-Bond Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Frank, Patrick; Szilagyi, Robert K; Gramlich, Volker; Hsu, Hua-Fen; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O

    2017-02-06

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) spectra of the monodentate sulfate complexes [M(II)(itao)(SO4)(H2O)0,1] (M = Co, Ni, Cu) and [Cu(Me6tren)(SO4)] exhibit well-defined preedge transitions at 2479.4, 2479.9, 2478.4, and 2477.7 eV, respectively, despite having no direct metal-sulfur bond, while the XAS preedge of [Zn(itao)(SO4)] is featureless. The sulfur K-edge XAS of [Cu(itao)(SO4)] but not of [Cu(Me6tren)(SO4)] uniquely exhibits a weak transition at 2472.1 eV, an extraordinary 8.7 eV below the first inflection of the rising K-edge. Preedge transitions also appear in the sulfur K-edge XAS of crystalline [M(II)(SO4)(H2O)] (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu, but not Zn) and in sulfates of higher-valent early transition metals. Ground-state density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations show that charge transfer from coordinated sulfate to paramagnetic late transition metals produces spin polarization that differentially mixes the spin-up (α) and spin-down (β) spin orbitals of the sulfate ligand, inducing negative spin density at the sulfate sulfur. Ground-state DFT calculations show that sulfur 3p character then mixes into metal 4s and 4p valence orbitals and various combinations of ligand antibonding orbitals, producing measurable sulfur XAS transitions. TDDFT calculations confirm the presence of XAS preedge features 0.5-2 eV below the rising sulfur K-edge energy. The 2472.1 eV feature arises when orbitals at lower energy than the frontier occupied orbitals with S 3p character mix with the copper(II) electron hole. Transmission of spin polarization and thus of radical character through several bonds between the sulfur and electron hole provides a new mechanism for the counterintuitive appearance of preedge transitions in the XAS spectra of transition-metal oxoanion ligands in the absence of any direct metal-absorber bond. The 2472.1 eV transition is evidence for further radicalization from copper(II), which extends across a

  1. RHIC SPIN FLIPPER

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; ROSER, T.

    2007-06-25

    This paper proposes a new design of spin flipper for RHIC to obtain full spin flip with the spin tune staying at half integer. The traditional technique of using an rf dipole or solenoid as spin flipper to achieve full spin flip in the presence of full Siberian snake requires one to change the snake configuration to move the spin tune away from half integer. This is not practical for an operational high energy polarized proton collider like RHIC where beam lifetime is sensitive to small betatron tune change. The design of the new spin flipper as well as numerical simulations are presented.

  2. Spin-1 quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Daichi; Kubo, Toshihiro; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We study the quantum walks of two interacting spin-1 bosons. We derive an exact solution for the time-dependent wave function, which describes the two-particle dynamics governed by the one-dimensional spin-1 Bose-Hubbard model. We show that propagation dynamics in real space and mixing dynamics in spin space are correlated via the spin-dependent interaction in this system. The spin-mixing dynamics has two characteristic frequencies in the limit of large spin-dependent interactions. One of the characteristic frequencies is determined by the energy difference between two bound states, and the other frequency relates to the cotunneling process of a pair of spin-1 bosons. Furthermore, we numerically analyze the growth of the spin correlations in quantum walks. We find that long-range spin correlations emerge showing a clear dependence on the sign of the spin-dependent interaction and the initial state.

  3. Prospects for neutrino spin coherence in supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, James Y.; Patwardhan, Amol V.; Fuller, George M.

    2017-03-01

    We present neutrino bulb model simulations of Majorana neutrino coherent spin transformation (i.e., neutrino-antineutrino transformation), coupled to neutrino flavor evolution, for conditions corresponding to the neutronization burst epoch of an oxygen-neon-magnesium core collapse supernova. Significant neutrino spin transformation in, for example, the neutronization burst could alter the fluences of neutrinos and antineutrinos in a way which is potentially detectable for a Galactic core collapse supernova. Our calculations for the first time incorporate geometric dilution in the spin evolution of the neutrinos and combine two-flavor and three-flavor evolution with spin mixing physics. We find that significant spin transformations can occur, but only with a large neutrino luminosity and an electron fraction (Ye) profile which facilitates adiabatic conditions for the spin-channel resonance. Using our adopted parameters of neutrino energy spectra, luminosity, density and Ye profiles, our calculations require an unrealistically large neutrino rest mass to sustain the spin transformation. It is an open question whether examining different density profiles or incorporating other sources of nonlinear feedback, such as Ye feedback, could mitigate this need. We find that spin transformations are not sensitive to the flavor structure of neutrinos; i.e., the spin transformations occur regardless of whether we simulate two- or three-flavor transformations. In the two-flavor case, spin transformations were insensitive to the choice of solar or atmospheric mass-squared splitting as well as the choice of the Majorana phase. Importantly, our three-flavor simulations, as well as our two-flavor simulations done with the atmospheric mass-squared splitting, show that the inclusion of spin degrees of freedom can significantly and qualitatively alter neutrino flavor evolution.

  4. Caprine PrP variants harboring Asp-146, His-154 and Gln-211 alleles display reduced convertibility upon interaction with pathogenic murine prion protein in scrapie infected cells.

    PubMed

    Kanata, Eirini; Arsenakis, Minas; Sklaviadis, Theodoros

    2016-09-02

    Scrapie, the prion disease of sheep and goats, is a devastating malady of small ruminants. Due to its infectious nature, epidemic outbreaks may occur in flocks/herds consisting of highly susceptible animals. Field studies identified scrapie-protective caprine PrP variants, harboring specific single amino acid changes (Met-142, Arg-143, Asp-146, Ser-146, His-154, Gln-211 and Lys-222). Their effects are under further evaluation, and aim to determine the most protective allele. We assessed some of these variants (Asp-146, His-154, Gln-211 and Lys-222), after their exogenous expression as murine-caprine chimeras in a scrapie- infected murine cell line. We report that exogenously expressed PrPs undergo conformational conversion upon interaction with the endogenous pathological murine prion protein (PrP(SC)), which results in the detection of goat-specific and partially PK-resistant moieties. These moieties display a PK-resistance pattern distinct from the one detected in natural goat scrapie cases. Within this cellular model, distinct conformational conversion potentials were assigned to the tested variants. Molecules carrying the Asp-146, His-154 and Gln-211 alleles showed significantly lower conversion levels compared to wild type, confirming their protective effects against scrapie. Although we utilized a heterologous conversion system, this is to our knowledge, the first study of caprine PrP variants in a cellular context of scrapie, that confirms the protective effects of some of the studied alleles.

  5. Caprine PrP variants harboring Asp-146, His-154 and Gln-211 alleles display reduced convertibility upon interaction with pathogenic murine prion protein in scrapie infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanata, Eirini; Arsenakis, Minas; Sklaviadis, Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scrapie, the prion disease of sheep and goats, is a devastating malady of small ruminants. Due to its infectious nature, epidemic outbreaks may occur in flocks/herds consisting of highly susceptible animals. Field studies identified scrapie-protective caprine PrP variants, harboring specific single amino acid changes (Met-142, Arg-143, Asp-146, Ser-146, His-154, Gln-211 and Lys-222). Their effects are under further evaluation, and aim to determine the most protective allele. We assessed some of these variants (Asp-146, His-154, Gln-211 and Lys-222), after their exogenous expression as murine-caprine chimeras in a scrapie- infected murine cell line. We report that exogenously expressed PrPs undergo conformational conversion upon interaction with the endogenous pathological murine prion protein (PrPSC), which results in the detection of goat-specific and partially PK-resistant moieties. These moieties display a PK-resistance pattern distinct from the one detected in natural goat scrapie cases. Within this cellular model, distinct conformational conversion potentials were assigned to the tested variants. Molecules carrying the Asp-146, His-154 and Gln-211 alleles showed significantly lower conversion levels compared to wild type, confirming their protective effects against scrapie. Although we utilized a heterologous conversion system, this is to our knowledge, the first study of caprine PrP variants in a cellular context of scrapie, that confirms the protective effects of some of the studied alleles. PMID:27537339

  6. Roles of Residues Arg-61 and Gln-38 of Human DNA Polymerase η in Bypass of Deoxyguanosine and 7,8-Dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yan; Patra, Amritraj; Harp, Joel M.; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Like the other Y-family DNA polymerases, human DNA polymerase η (hpol η) has relatively low fidelity and is able to tolerate damage during DNA synthesis, including 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxoG), one of the most abundant DNA lesions in the genome. Crystal structures show that Arg-61 and Gln-38 are located near the active site and may play important roles in the fidelity and efficiency of hpol η. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace these side chains either alone or together, and the wild type or mutant proteins were purified and tested by replicating DNA past deoxyguanosine (G) or 8-oxoG. The catalytic activity of hpol η was dramatically disrupted by the R61M and Q38A/R61A mutations, as opposed to the R61A and Q38A single mutants. Crystal structures of hpol η mutant ternary complexes reveal that polarized water molecules can mimic and partially compensate for the missing side chains of Arg-61 and Gln-38 in the Q38A/R61A mutant. The combined data indicate that the positioning and positive charge of Arg-61 synergistically contribute to the nucleotidyl transfer reaction, with additional influence exerted by Gln-38. In addition, gel filtration chromatography separated multimeric and monomeric forms of wild type and mutant hpol η, indicating the possibility that hpol η forms multimers in vivo. PMID:25947374

  7. Regulatory circuit for responses of nitrogen catabolic gene expression to the GLN3 and DAL80 proteins and nitrogen catabolite repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, J R; Rai, R; el Berry, H M; Cooper, T G

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrate that expression of the UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, PUT1, PUT2, PUT4, and DAL4 genes is sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression. The expression of all these genes, with the exception of UGA1 and PUT2, also required a functional GLN3 protein. In addition, GLN3 protein was required for expression of the DAL1, DAL2, DAL7, GDH1, and GDH2 genes. The UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, and DAL4 genes markedly increased their expression when the DAL80 locus, encoding a negative regulatory element, was disrupted. Expression of the GDH1, PUT1, PUT2, and PUT4 genes also responded to DAL80 disruption, but much more modestly. Expression of GLN1 and GDH2 exhibited parallel responses to the provision of asparagine and glutamine as nitrogen sources but did not follow the regulatory responses noted above for the nitrogen catabolic genes such as DAL5. Steady-state mRNA levels of both genes did not significantly decrease when glutamine was provided as nitrogen source but were lowered by the provision of asparagine. They also did not respond to disruption of DAL80.

  8. The central role of Gln63 for the hydrogen bonding network and UV-visible spectrum of the AppA BLUF domain.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ya-Wen; Götze, Jan P; Thiel, Walter

    2012-07-19

    In blue-light sensing using flavin (BLUF) domains, the side-chain orientation of key residues close to the flavin chromophore is still under debate. We report quantum refinements of the wild-type AppA BLUF protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides starting from two published X-ray structures (1YRX and 2IYG) with different arrangements of the residues around the chromophore. Quantum refinement uses the same experimental X-ray raw data as conventional refinement, but includes data from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations as restraints, which is expected to be more reliable than the normally employed MM data. In addition to quantum refinement, pure QM/MM geometry optimizations are performed for the 1YRX and 2IYG structures and for five models derived therefrom. Vertical excitation energies are computed at the QM(DFT/MRCI)/MM level to assess the resulting structures. The experimental absorption maximum of the dark state of wild-type AppA is well reproduced for structures that contain the Gln63 residue in 1YRX-type orientation. The computed excitation energies are red-shifted for structures with a flipped Gln63 residue in 2IYG-type orientation. The calculated 1YRX- and 2IYG-type hydrogen-bonding networks are discussed in detail, particularly with regard to the orientation of the chromophore and the Gln63, Trp104, and Met106 residues.

  9. Noncollinear Spin States for Density Functional Calculations of Open-Shell and Multi-Configurational Systems: Dissociation of MnO and NiO and Barrier Heights of O3, BeH2, and H4.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sijie; Truhlar, Donald G

    2013-12-10

    When the spins of molecular orbitals are allowed to be aligned with different directions in space rather than being aligned collinearly, the resulting noncollinear spin orbitals add extra flexibility to variational optimization of the orbitals, and solutions obtained with collinear spin orbitals may be unstable with respect to becoming noncollinear in the expanded variational space. The goal of the present work is to explore whether and in what way the molecular orbitals of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory become noncollinear when fully optimized for multi-reference molecules, transition states, and reaction paths. (We note that a noncollinear determinant has intermediate flexibility between a collinear determinant and a linear combination of many collinear determinants with completely independent coefficients. However, the Kohn-Sham method is defined to involve the variational optimization of a single determinant, and a noncollinear determinant represents the limit of complete optimization in the Kohn-Sham scheme.) We compare the results obtained with the noncollinear Kohn-Sham (NKS) scheme to those obtained with the widely used unrestricted Kohn-Sham (UKS) scheme for two types of multi-reference systems. For the dissociation of the MnO and NiO transition metal oxides, we find UKS fails to dissociate to the ground states of neutral atoms, while NKS dissociates to the correct limit and predicts potential energy curves that vary smoothly at intermediate bond lengths. This is due to the instability of UKS solutions at large bond distances. For barrier heights of O3, BeH2, and H4, NKS is shown to stabilize the multi-reference transition states by expanding the variational space. Although the errors vary because they are closely coupled with the capability of the employed exchange-correlation functionals in treating the multi-configurational states, these findings demonstrate that results with collinear spin orbitals should be further scrutinized, and future

  10. Magnons, Spin Current and Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2012-02-01

    When metals and semiconductors are placed in a temperature gradient, the electric voltage is generated. This mechanism to convert heat into electricity, the so-called Seebeck effect, has attracted much attention recently as the mechanism for utilizing wasted heat energy. [1]. Ferromagnetic insulators are good conductors of spin current, i.e., the flow of electron spins [2]. When they are placed in a temperature gradient, generated are magnons, spin current and the spin voltage [3], i.e., spin accumulation. Once the spin voltage is converted into the electric voltage by inverse spin Hall effect in attached metal films such as Pt, the electric voltage is obtained from heat energy [4-5]. This is called the spin Seebeck effect. Here, we present the linear-response theory of spin Seebeck effect based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem [6-8] and discuss a variety of the devices. [4pt] [1] S. Maekawa et al, Physics of Transition Metal Oxides (Springer, 2004). [0pt] [2] S. Maekawa: Nature Materials 8, 777 (2009). [0pt] [3] Concept in Spin Electronics, eds. S. Maekawa (Oxford University Press, 2006). [0pt] [4] K. Uchida et al., Nature 455, 778 (2008). [0pt] [5] K. Uchida et al., Nature Materials 9, 894 (2010) [0pt] [6] H. Adachi et al., APL 97, 252506 (2010) and Phys. Rev. B 83, 094410 (2011). [0pt] [7] J. Ohe et al., Phys. Rev. B (2011) [0pt] [8] K. Uchida et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 104419 (2010).

  11. Neutron spin evolution through broadband current sheet spin flippers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stonaha, P.; Hendrie, J.; Lee, W. T.; Pynn, Roger

    2013-10-01

    Controlled manipulation of neutron spin is a critical tool for many neutron scattering techniques. We have constructed current-sheet, neutron spin flippers for use in Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME) that comprise pairs of open-faced solenoids which introduce an abrupt field reversal at a shared boundary. The magnetic fields generated by the coils have been mapped and compared with both an analytical approximation and a numerical boundary integral calculation. The agreement is generally good, allowing the former method to be used for rapid calculations of the Larmor phase acquired by a neutron passing through the flipper. The evolution of the neutron spin through the current sheets inside the flipper is calculated for various geometries of the current-carrying conductors, including different wire shapes, arrangements, and common imperfections. The flipping efficiency is found to be sensitive to gaps between wires and between current sheets. SESAME requires flippers with high fields and flipping planes inclined to the neutron beam. To avoid substantial neutron depolarization, such flippers require an interdigitated arrangement of wires.

  12. Long-range spin Seebeck effect and acoustic spin pumping.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Adachi, H; An, T; Ota, T; Toda, M; Hillebrands, B; Maekawa, S; Saitoh, E

    2011-10-01

    Imagine that a metallic wire is attached to a part of a large insulator, which itself exhibits no magnetization. It seems impossible for electrons in the wire to register where the wire is positioned on the insulator. Here we found that, using a Ni₈₁Fe₁₉/Pt bilayer wire on an insulating sapphire plate, electrons in the wire recognize their position on the sapphire. Under a temperature gradient in the sapphire, surprisingly, the voltage generated in the Pt layer is shown to reflect the wire position, although the wire is isolated both electrically and magnetically. This non-local voltage is due to the coupling of spins and phonons: the only possible carrier of information in this system. We demonstrate this coupling by directly injecting sound waves, which realizes the acoustic spin pumping. Our finding provides a persuasive answer to the long-range nature of the spin Seebeck effect, and it opens the door to 'acoustic spintronics' in which sound waves are exploited for constructing spin-based devices.

  13. Neutron spin evolution through broadband current sheet spin flippers.

    PubMed

    Stonaha, P; Hendrie, J; Lee, W T; Pynn, Roger

    2013-10-01

    Controlled manipulation of neutron spin is a critical tool for many neutron scattering techniques. We have constructed current-sheet, neutron spin flippers for use in Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME) that comprise pairs of open-faced solenoids which introduce an abrupt field reversal at a shared boundary. The magnetic fields generated by the coils have been mapped and compared with both an analytical approximation and a numerical boundary integral calculation. The agreement is generally good, allowing the former method to be used for rapid calculations of the Larmor phase acquired by a neutron passing through the flipper. The evolution of the neutron spin through the current sheets inside the flipper is calculated for various geometries of the current-carrying conductors, including different wire shapes, arrangements, and common imperfections. The flipping efficiency is found to be sensitive to gaps between wires and between current sheets. SESAME requires flippers with high fields and flipping planes inclined to the neutron beam. To avoid substantial neutron depolarization, such flippers require an interdigitated arrangement of wires.

  14. Aminoacyl-tRNA Quality Control is Required for Efficient Activation of the TOR Pathway Regulator Gln3p.

    PubMed

    Mohler, Kyle; Mann, Rebecca; Kyle, Amanda; Reynolds, Noah; Ibba, Michael

    2017-09-14

    The aminoacylation status of the cellular tRNA pool regulates both general amino acid control (GAAC) and target of rapamycin (TOR) stress response pathways in yeast. Consequently, fidelity of translation at the level of aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis plays a central role in determining accuracy and sensitivity of stress responses. To investigate effects of translational quality control (QC) on cell physiology under stress conditions, phenotypic microarray analyses were used to identify changes in QC deficient cells. Nitrogen source growth assays showed QC deficient yeast grew differently compared to WT. The QC deficient strain was more tolerant to caffeine treatment than wild type through altered interactions with the TOR and GAAC pathways. Increased caffeine tolerance of the QC deficient strain was consistent with the observation that the activity of Gln3p, a transcription factor controlled by the TOR pathway, is decreased in the QC deficient strain compared to WT. GCN4 translation, which is typically repressed in the absence of nutritional stress, was enhanced in the QC deficient strain through TOR inhibition. QC did not impact cell cycle regulation; however, the chronological lifespan of QC deficient yeast strains decreased compared to wild type, likely due to translational errors and alteration of the TOR-associated regulon. These findings support the idea that changes in translational fidelity provide a mechanism of cellular adaptation by modulating TOR activity. This, in turn, supports a central role for aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis QC in the integrated stress response by maintaining the proper aa-tRNA pools necessary to coordinate the GAAC and TOR.

  15. Interacting spin-orbit-coupled spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kuei; Qu, Chunlei; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Yongping; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2016-02-01

    The recent experimental realization of spin-orbit (SO) coupling for spin-1 ultracold atoms opens an interesting avenue for exploring SO-coupling-related physics in large-spin systems, which is generally unattainable in electronic materials. In this paper, we study the effects of interactions between atoms on the ground states and collective excitations of SO-coupled spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in the presence of a spin-tensor potential. We find that ferromagnetic interaction between atoms can induce a stripe phase exhibiting in-phase or out-of-phase modulating patterns between spin-tensor and zero-spin-component density waves. We characterize the phase transitions between different phases using the spin-tensor density as well as the collective dipole motion of the BEC. We show that there exists a double maxon-roton structure in the Bogoliubov-excitation spectrum, attributed to the three band minima of the SO-coupled spin-1 BEC.

  16. Spin dynamics simulation of electron spin relaxation in Ni{sup 2+}(aq)

    SciTech Connect

    Rantaharju, Jyrki Mareš, Jiří Vaara, Juha

    2014-07-07

    The ability to quantitatively predict and analyze the rate of electron spin relaxation of open-shell systems is important for electron paramagnetic resonance and paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. We present a combined molecular dynamics (MD), quantum chemistry (QC), and spin dynamics simulation method for calculating such spin relaxation rates. The method is based on the sampling of a MD trajectory by QC calculations, to produce instantaneous parameters of the spin Hamiltonian used, in turn, to numerically solve the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the time evolution of the spin density matrix. We demonstrate the approach by simulating the relaxation of electron spin in an aqueous solution of Ni{sup 2+} ion. The spin-lattice (T{sub 1}) and spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxation rates are extracted directly from the simulations of the time dependence of the longitudinal and transverse magnetization, respectively. Good agreement with the available, indirectly obtained experimental data is obtained by our method.

  17. Spin-filtering at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidemann, Christian; PAX Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    The Spin Filtering experiments at COSY and AD at CERN within the framework of the Polarized Antiproton EXperiments (PAX) are proposed to determine the spin-dependent cross sections in bar pp scattering by observation of the buildup of polarization of an initially unpolarized stored antiproton beam after multiple passage through an internal polarized gas target. In order to commission the experimental setup for the AD and to understand the relevant machine parameters spin-filtering will first be done with protons at COSY. A first major step toward this goal has been achieved with the installation of the required mini-β section in summer 2009 and it's commissioning in January 2010. The target chamber together with the atomic beam source and the so-called Breit-Rabi polarimeter have been installed and commissioned in summer 2010. In addition an openable storage cell has been used. It provides a target thickness of 5·1013 atoms/cm2. We report on the status of spin-filtering experiments at COSY and the outcome of a recent beam time including studies on beam lifetime limitations like intra-beam scattering and the electron-cooling performance as well as machine acceptance studies.

  18. Magnetic Domain Wall Floating on a Spin Superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically investigate the transfer of angular momentum between a spin superfluid and a domain wall in an exchange coupled easy-axis and easy-plane magnetic insulator system. A domain wall in the easy-axis magnet absorbs spin angular momentum via disrupting the flow of a superfluid spin current in the easy-plane magnet. Focusing on an open geometry, where the spin current is injected electrically via a nonequilibrium spin accumulation, we derive analytical expressions for the resultant superfluid-mediated motion of the domain wall. The analytical results are supported by micromagnetic simulations. The proposed phenomenon extends the regime of magnon-driven domain-wall motion to the case where the magnons are condensed and exhibit superfluidity. Furthermore, by controlling the pinning of the domain wall, we propose a realization of a reconfigurable spin transistor. The long-distance dissipationless character of spin superfluids can thus be exploited for manipulating soliton-based memory and logic devices.

  19. Hierarchical spin-orbital polarization of a giant Rashba system.

    PubMed

    Bawden, Lewis; Riley, Jonathan M; Kim, Choong H; Sankar, Raman; Monkman, Eric J; Shai, Daniel E; Wei, Haofei I; Lochocki, Edward B; Wells, Justin W; Meevasana, Worawat; Kim, Timur K; Hoesch, Moritz; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Fennie, Craig J; Shen, Kyle M; Chou, Fangcheng; King, Phil D C

    2015-09-01

    The Rashba effect is one of the most striking manifestations of spin-orbit coupling in solids and provides a cornerstone for the burgeoning field of semiconductor spintronics. It is typically assumed to manifest as a momentum-dependent splitting of a single initially spin-degenerate band into two branches with opposite spin polarization. Combining polarization-dependent and resonant angle-resolved photoemission measurements with density functional theory calculations, we show that the two "spin-split" branches of the model giant Rashba system BiTeI additionally develop disparate orbital textures, each of which is coupled to a distinct spin configuration. This necessitates a reinterpretation of spin splitting in Rashba-like systems and opens new possibilities for controlling spin polarization through the orbital sector.

  20. Hierarchical spin-orbital polarization of a giant Rashba system

    PubMed Central

    Bawden, Lewis; Riley, Jonathan M.; Kim, Choong H.; Sankar, Raman; Monkman, Eric J.; Shai, Daniel E.; Wei, Haofei I.; Lochocki, Edward B.; Wells, Justin W.; Meevasana, Worawat; Kim, Timur K.; Hoesch, Moritz; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Fennie, Craig J.; Shen, Kyle M.; Chou, Fangcheng; King, Phil D. C.

    2015-01-01

    The Rashba effect is one of the most striking manifestations of spin-orbit coupling in solids and provides a cornerstone for the burgeoning field of semiconductor spintronics. It is typically assumed to manifest as a momentum-dependent splitting of a single initially spin-degenerate band into two branches with opposite spin polarization. Combining polarization-dependent and resonant angle-resolved photoemission measurements with density functional theory calculations, we show that the two “spin-split” branches of the model giant Rashba system BiTeI additionally develop disparate orbital textures, each of which is coupled to a distinct spin configuration. This necessitates a reinterpretation of spin splitting in Rashba-like systems and opens new possibilities for controlling spin polarization through the orbital sector. PMID:26601268

  1. Protecting and enhancing spin squeezing from decoherence using weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xiang-Ping; Rong, Man-Sheng; Fang, Mao-Fa

    2017-06-01

    We propose an efficient method to protect spin squeezing under the action of amplitude-damping, depolarizing and phase-damping channels based on measurement reversal from weak measurement, and consider an ensemble of N independent spin-1/2 particles with exchange symmetry. We show that spin squeezing can be enhanced greatly under three different decoherence channels and spin-squeezing sudden death can be avoided undergoing amplitude-damping and phase-damping channels. Moreover, we find that the spin-squeezing parameters can be completely recovered to its initial value under amplitude-damping channel by changing weak measurement strength irrespective of sufficiently strong decoherence. For the phase-damping channel, the spin-squeezing parameter can be recovered to a certain stationary value in certain conditions. Our results provide an active way to suppress decoherence and enhance the spin squeezing under decoherence, which is rather significant for quantum metrology in open systems.

  2. (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8[mPEG]: a novel, long-acting, mini-PEGylated cholecystokinin (CCK) agonist that improves metabolic status in dietary-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Nigel; Frizelle, Pamela; O'Harte, Finbarr P M; Flatt, Peter R

    2013-08-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a gastrointestinal hormone that has been proposed as a potential therapeutic option for obesity-diabetes. As such, (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8 is an N-terminally modified CCK-8 analogue with improved biological effectiveness over the native peptide. The current study has examined the in vitro stability, biological activity and in vivo therapeutic applicability of a novel second generation mini-PEGylated form of (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8, (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8[mPEG]. (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8[mPEG] was completely resistant to enzymatic degradation and in addition displayed similar insulinotropic (p<0.05 to p<0.001) and satiating effects (p<0.01 to p<0.001) as (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8. This confirmed the capability of (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8[mPEG] to bind to and activate the CCK receptor. Sub-chronic twice daily injection of (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8[mPEG] in high fat fed mice for 35days significantly decreased body weight gain (p<0.05), food intake (p<0.01 to p<0.001) and triacylglycerol deposition in liver (p<0.001) and muscle (p<0.001). Furthermore, (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8[mPEG] markedly improved intraperitoneal glucose tolerance (p<0.05) and insulin sensitivity (p<0.001). Despite this therapeutic profile, once daily injection of (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8[mPEG] in high fat fed mice for 33days, at the same dose, was not associated with alterations in food intake and body weight. In addition, metabolic responses to exogenous glucose and insulin injection were similar to saline treated controls. These studies emphasise the therapeutic potential of (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8[mPEG] and similar molecules. A more detailed analysis of the dose and administration schedule employed for (pGlu-Gln)-CCK-8[mPEG] could provide a novel and effective compound to treat obesity-diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitrogen Starvation and TorC1 Inhibition Differentially Affect Nuclear Localization of the Gln3 and Gat1 Transcription Factors Through the Rare Glutamine tRNACUG in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Jennifer J.; Rai, Rajendra; Cooper, Terrance G.

    2015-01-01

    A leucine, leucyl-tRNA synthetase–dependent pathway activates TorC1 kinase and its downstream stimulation of protein synthesis, a major nitrogen consumer. We previously demonstrated, however, that control of Gln3, a transcription activator of catabolic genes whose products generate the nitrogenous precursors for protein synthesis, is not subject to leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. This led us to conclude that excess nitrogen-dependent down-regulation of Gln3 occurs via a second mechanism that is independent of leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. A major site of Gln3 and Gat1 (another GATA-binding transcription activator) control occurs at their access to the nucleus. In excess nitrogen, Gln3 and Gat1 are sequestered in the cytoplasm in a Ure2-dependent manner. They become nuclear and activate transcription when nitrogen becomes limiting. Long-term nitrogen starvation and treatment of cells with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (Msx) also elicit nuclear Gln3 localization. The sensitivity of Gln3 localization to glutamine and inhibition of glutamine synthesis prompted us to investigate the effects of a glutamine tRNA mutation (sup70-65) on nitrogen-responsive control of Gln3 and Gat1. We found that nuclear Gln3 localization elicited by short- and long-term nitrogen starvation; growth in a poor, derepressive medium; Msx or rapamycin treatment; or ure2Δ mutation is abolished in a sup70-65 mutant. However, nuclear Gat1 localization, which also exhibits a glutamine tRNACUG requirement for its response to short-term nitrogen starvation or growth in proline medium or a ure2Δ mutation, does not require tRNACUG for its response to rapamycin. Also, in contrast with Gln3, Gat1 localization does not respond to long-term nitrogen starvation. These observations demonstrate the existence of a specific nitrogen-responsive component participating in the control of Gln3 and Gat1 localization and their downstream production of nitrogenous precursors

  4. Spin Rotation of Formalism for Spin Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio,A.

    2008-02-01

    The problem of which coefficients are adequate to correctly represent the spin rotation in vector spin tracking for polarized proton and deuteron beams in synchrotrons is here re-examined in the light of recent discussions. The main aim of this note is to show where some previous erroneous results originated and how to code spin rotation in a tracking code. Some analysis of a recent experiment is presented that confirm the correctness of the assumptions.

  5. Effects of symmetry and spin configuration on spin-dependent transport properties of iron-phthalocyanine-based devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Li-Ling; Yang, Bing-Chu Li, Xin-Mei; Cao, Can; Long, Meng-Qiu

    2014-07-21

    Spin-dependent transport properties of nanodevices constructed by iron-phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule sandwiched between two zigzag graphene nanoribbon electrodes are studied using first-principles quantum transport calculations. The effects of the symmetry and spin configuration of electrodes have been taken into account. It is found that large magnetoresistance, large spin polarization, dual spin-filtering, and negative differential resistance (NDR) can coexist in these devices. Our results show that 5Z-FePc system presents well conductive ability in both parallel (P) and anti-parallel (AP) configurations. For 6Z-FePc-P system, spin filtering effect and large spin polarization can be found. A dual spin filtering and NDR can also be shown in 6Z-FePc-AP. Our studies indicate that the dual spin filtering effect depends on the orbitals symmetry of the energy bands and spin mismatching of the electrodes. And all the effects would open up possibilities for their applications in spin-valve, spin-filter as well as effective spin diode devices.

  6. Energy spectra of a spin-½ XY spin molecule interacting with a single mode field cavity: Numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, H.; Donkov, A. A.; Chamati, H.

    2016-10-01

    In a previous paper [J.Phys.: Conf. Ser. 682 (2016) 012032] we studied analytically the energy spectra of a finite-size spin ½ XY chain (molecule) coupled at an arbitrary spin site to a single mode of an electromagnetic field via the Jaynes-Cummings model. We considered spin rings and open spin molecules with up to 4 spins and an interaction restricted to nearest-neighbours. Here we extend our investigation, addressing numerically the energy spectra of molecules of up to 10 spins with nearest-neighbour or long- range interaction. Furthermore we analyze the behaviour of an invariant operator, constructed by combining the magnetization of the spin-chain and the total number of photons in the system. We found a strong dependence on the number (even or odd) of sites in the molecules. This study is aimed at finding the appropriate combination of the physical parameters that could make the system suitable for use in quantum computations.

  7. Spin Seebeck power generators

    SciTech Connect

    Cahaya, Adam B.; Tretiakov, O. A.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2014-01-27

    We derive expressions for the efficiency and figure of merit of two spin caloritronic devices based on the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), i.e., the generation of spin currents by a temperature gradient. The inverse spin Hall effect is conventionally used to detect the SSE and offers advantages for large area applications. We also propose a device that converts spin current into electric one by means of a spin-valve detector, which scales favorably to small sizes and approaches a figure of merit of 0.5 at room temperature.

  8. Spin-Mechatronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Mamoru; Saitoh, Eiji; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the interconversion phenomena between spin and mechanical angular momentum in moving objects. In particular, the recent results on spin manipulation and spin-current generation by mechanical motion are examined. In accelerating systems, spin-dependent gauge fields emerge, which enable the conversion from mechanical angular momentum into spins. Such a spin-mechanical effect is predicted by quantum theory in a non-inertial frame. Experiments which confirm the effect, i.e., the resonance frequency shift in nuclear magnetic resonance, the stray field measurement of rotating metals, and electric voltage generation in liquid metals, are discussed.

  9. Atomic displacements due to spin-spin repulsion in conjugated alternant hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Benzi, Michele

    2013-05-01

    We develop a theoretical model to account for the spin-induced atomic displacements in conjugated alternant hydrocarbons. It appears to be responsible for an enlargement of the distance between pairs of atoms separated by two atoms and located at the end of linear polyenes. It also correlates very well with the bond dissociation enthalpies for the cleavage of the C-H bond as well as to the spin density at carbon atoms in both open and closed shell at graphene nanoflakes (GNFs). Finally, we have modified the Schrödinger equation to study the propagation of the spin-induced perturbations through the atoms of GNFs.

  10. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-01-01

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field-effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. Our findings open up the exciting possibility of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale. PMID:27048928

  11. Spin doping using transition metal phthalocyanine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atxabal, A.; Ribeiro, M.; Parui, S.; Urreta, L.; Sagasta, E.; Sun, X.; Llopis, R.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular spins have become key enablers for exploring magnetic interactions, quantum information processes and many-body effects in metals. Metal-organic molecules, in particular, let the spin state of the core metal ion to be modified according to its organic environment, allowing localized magnetic moments to emerge as functional entities with radically different properties from its simple atomic counterparts. Here, using and preserving the integrity of transition metal phthalocyanine high-spin complexes, we demonstrate the magnetic doping of gold thin films, effectively creating a new ground state. We demonstrate it by electrical transport measurements that are sensitive to the scattering of itinerant electrons with magnetic impurities, such as Kondo effect and weak antilocalization. Our work expands in a simple and powerful way the classes of materials that can be used as magnetic dopants, opening a new channel to couple the wide range of molecular properties with spin phenomena at a functional scale.

  12. Spin doping using transition metal phthalocyanine molecules

    PubMed Central

    Atxabal, A.; Ribeiro, M.; Parui, S.; Urreta, L.; Sagasta, E.; Sun, X.; Llopis, R.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular spins have become key enablers for exploring magnetic interactions, quantum information processes and many-body effects in metals. Metal-organic molecules, in particular, let the spin state of the core metal ion to be modified according to its organic environment, allowing localized magnetic moments to emerge as functional entities with radically different properties from its simple atomic counterparts. Here, using and preserving the integrity of transition metal phthalocyanine high-spin complexes, we demonstrate the magnetic doping of gold thin films, effectively creating a new ground state. We demonstrate it by electrical transport measurements that are sensitive to the scattering of itinerant electrons with magnetic impurities, such as Kondo effect and weak antilocalization. Our work expands in a simple and powerful way the classes of materials that can be used as magnetic dopants, opening a new channel to couple the wide range of molecular properties with spin phenomena at a functional scale. PMID:27941810

  13. Thermally driven magnetic precession in spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luc, David; Waintal, Xavier

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the angular dependence of the spin torque generated when applying a temperature difference across a spin valve. Our study shows the presence of a nontrivial fixed point in this angular dependence. This fixed point opens the possibility for a temperature gradient to stabilize radio frequency oscillations without the need for an external magnetic field. This so-called "wavy" behavior can already be found upon applying a voltage difference across a spin valve but we find that this effect is much more pronounced with a temperature difference. We find that a spin asymmetry of the Seebeck coefficient of the order of 20 μ VK -1 should be large enough for a temperature gradient of a few degrees to trigger the radio-frequency oscillations. Our semiclassical theory is fully parametrized with experimentally measured(able) parameters and allows one to quantitatively predict the amplitude of the torque.

  14. Integral dependent spin couplings in CI calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iberle, K.; Davidson, E. R.

    1982-06-01

    Although the number of ways to combine Slater determinants to form spin eigenfunctions increases rapidly with the number of open shells, most of these spin couplings will make only a small contribution to a given state, provided the spin coupling is chosen judiciously. The technique of limiting calculations to the interacting subspace pioneered by Bunge (1970) was employed by Munch and Davidson (1975) to the vanadium atom. The use of an interacting space looses its advantage in more complex cases. However, the problem can always be reduced to only one interacting spin coupling by making the coefficients integral dependent. The present investigation is concerned with the performance of integral dependent interacting couplings, taking into account the results of three test calculations.

  15. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-04-06

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. In conclusion, our findings open up the exciting possibility of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale.

  16. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; ...

    2016-04-06

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. In conclusion, our findings open up the exciting possibilitymore » of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale.« less

  17. Integral dependent spin couplings in CI calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iberle, K.; Davidson, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    Although the number of ways to combine Slater determinants to form spin eigenfunctions increases rapidly with the number of open shells, most of these spin couplings will make only a small contribution to a given state, provided the spin coupling is chosen judiciously. The technique of limiting calculations to the interacting subspace pioneered by Bunge (1970) was employed by Munch and Davidson (1975) to the vanadium atom. The use of an interacting space looses its advantage in more complex cases. However, the problem can always be reduced to only one interacting spin coupling by making the coefficients integral dependent. The present investigation is concerned with the performance of integral dependent interacting couplings, taking into account the results of three test calculations.

  18. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-04-01

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field-effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. Our findings open up the exciting possibility of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale.

  19. Optical pumping production of spin polarized hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.; Happer, W.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1984-09-01

    There has been much interest recently in the production of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen in various fields, including controlled fusion, quantum fluids, high energy, and nuclear physics. One promising method for the development of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen is the utilization of optical pumping with a laser. Optical pumping is a process in which photon angular momentum is converted into electron and nuclear spin. The advent of tunable CW dye lasers (approx. 1 watt) allows the production of greater than 10/sup 18/ polarized atoms/sec. We have begun a program at Princeton to investigate the physics and technology of using optical pumping to produce large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen. Initial experiments have been done in small closed glass cells. Eventually, a flowing system, open target, or polarized ion source could be constructed.

  20. Spin doping using transition metal phthalocyanine molecules.

    PubMed

    Atxabal, A; Ribeiro, M; Parui, S; Urreta, L; Sagasta, E; Sun, X; Llopis, R; Casanova, F; Hueso, L E

    2016-12-12

    Molecular spins have become key enablers for exploring magnetic interactions, quantum information processes and many-body effects in metals. Metal-organic molecules, in particular, let the spin state of the core metal ion to be modified according to its organic environment, allowing localized magnetic moments to emerge as functional entities with radically different properties from its simple atomic counterparts. Here, using and preserving the integrity of transition metal phthalocyanine high-spin complexes, we demonstrate the magnetic doping of gold thin films, effectively creating a new ground state. We demonstrate it by electrical transport measurements that are sensitive to the scattering of itinerant electrons with magnetic impurities, such as Kondo effect and weak antilocalization. Our work expands in a simple and powerful way the classes of materials that can be used as magnetic dopants, opening a new channel to couple the wide range of molecular properties with spin phenomena at a functional scale.

  1. (3) He Spin Filter for Neutrons.

    PubMed

    Batz, M; Baeßler, S; Heil, W; Otten, E W; Rudersdorf, D; Schmiedeskamp, J; Sobolev, Y; Wolf, M

    2005-01-01

    The strongly spin-dependent absorption of neutrons in nuclear spin-polarized (3)He opens up the possibility of polarizing neutrons from reactors and spallation sources over the full kinematical range of cold, thermal and hot neutrons. This paper gives a report on the neutron spin filter (NSF) development program at Mainz. The polarization technique is based on direct optical pumping of metastable (3)He atoms combined with a polarization preserving mechanical compression of the gas up to a pressure of several bar, necessary to run a NSF. The concept of a remote type of operation using detachable NSF cells is presented which requires long nuclear spin relaxation times of order 100 hours. A short survey of their use under experimental conditions, e.g. large solid-angle polarization analysis, is given. In neutron particle physics NSFs are used in precision measurements to test fundamental symmetry concepts.

  2. LADEE Spin Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    During preparations for NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) observatory launch on Sept. 6, 2013, the spacecraft went through final preparations and close-outs, which included checking alignment after its cross-country shipment, checking the propulsion system for leaks, inspecting and repairing solar panels, and final electrical tests. After these activities were completed, more challenging portions of the launch preparations began: spin testing and fueling. To make sure that the spacecraft is perfectly balanced for flight, engineers mounted it onto a spin table and rotate it at high speeds, approximately one revolution per second. The team measured any offsets during the spinning, and then added small weights to the spacecraft to balance it. Once the spacecraft was balanced dry, the team loaded the propulsion tanks with fuel, oxidizer, and pressurant. The spin testing was performed again "wet," or with fuel, in order to see if the balance changed with the full fuel tanks. Engineers from NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., have now successfully completed launch preparation activities for LADEE, which has been encapsulated into the nose-cone of the Minotaur V rocket at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. LADEE is ready to launch when the window opens on Friday. Image Credit: NASA ----- What is LADEE? The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is designed to study the Moon's thin exosphere and the lunar dust environment. An "exosphere" is an atmosphere that is so thin and tenuous that molecules don't collide with each other. Studying the Moon's exosphere will help scientists understand other planetary bodies with exospheres too, like Mercury and some of Jupiter's bigger moons. The orbiter will determine the density, composition and temporal and spatial variability of the Moon's exosphere to help us understand where the species in the exosphere come from and the role of the solar wind, lunar surface

  3. PREFACE: SPIN2010 - Preface for Conference Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ströher, Hans; Rathmann, Frank

    2011-03-01

    SPIN2010, the 19th International Spin Physics Symposium, took place between 27 September and 2 October, 2010 on the campus of Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH (FZJ) in Jülich, Germany. The scientific program of this Symposium included many topics related to spin phenomena in particle and nuclear physics as well as those in related fields. The International Spin Physics Symposium series has combined the High Energy Spin Symposia and the Nuclear Polarization Conferences since 2000. The most recent two Symposia were held in Virginia, USA (October 2008) and in Kyoto, Japan (October 2006). The meeting was opened by the chairman of the Board of Management of Jülich Forschungszentrum, Professor Achim Bachem, who cordially welcomed the participants from all over the world and gave a brief introduction to the Center and the research conducted there. The scientific program consisted of plenary sessions and parallel sessions and included the following topics: Fundamental symmetries and spin Spin structure of hadrons Spin physics beyond the Standard Model Spin in hadronic reactions Spin physics with photons and leptons Spin physics in nuclear reactions and nuclei Acceleration, storage, and polarimetry of polarized beams Polarized ion and lepton sources and targets Future facilities and experiments Medical and technological applications of spin physics The 6-day symposium had about 300 participants. In total 35 plenary talks (including 3 summaries of other spin physics meetings) and 163 contributed talks were given. The contents of many of these can be found in the present contributions, arranged according to the above topics and the time sequence. In addition, a public lecture on "Drall in der Quantenwelt", presented by H O Meyer (Bloomington) was received very well. Participants had the option to visit the Cooler synchrotron COSY at the Nuclear Physics Institute (IKP) and the 9.4 T MRT-PET hybrid scanner at the Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM), two unique

  4. The Master T-Operator for Inhomogeneous XXX Spin Chain and mKP Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabrodin, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Following the approach of [Alexandrov A., Kazakov V., Leurent S., Tsuboi Z., Zabrodin A., J. High Energy Phys. 2013 (2013), no. 9, 064, 65 pages, arXiv:1112.3310], we show how to construct the master T-operator for the quantum inhomogeneous GL(N) XXX spin chain with twisted boundary conditions. It satisfies the bilinear identity and Hirota equations for the classical mKP hierarchy. We also characterize the class of solutions to the mKP hierarchy that correspond to eigenvalues of the master T-operator and study dynamics of their zeros as functions of the spectral parameter. This implies a remarkable connection between the quantum spin chain and the classical Ruijsenaars-Schneider system of particles.

  5. Nonmagnetic semiconductor spin transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, K. C.; Lau, Wayne H.; Gündoǧdu, K.; Flatté, Michael E.; Boggess, Thomas F.

    2003-10-01

    We propose a spin transistor using only nonmagnetic materials that exploits the characteristics of bulk inversion asymmetry (BIA) in (110) symmetric quantum wells. We show that extremely large spin splittings due to BIA are possible in (110) InAs/GaSb/AlSb heterostructures, which together with the enhanced spin decay times in (110) quantum wells demonstrates the potential for exploitation of BIA effects in semiconductor spintronics devices. Spin injection and detection is achieved using spin-dependent resonant interband tunneling and spin transistor action is realized through control of the electron spin lifetime in an InAs lateral transport channel using an applied electric field (Rashba effect). This device may also be used as a spin valve, or a magnetic field sensor.

  6. Control Spin with Candor and Charm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rist, Marilee C.

    1991-01-01

    On a systemwide level, spin control means defining the issues and formulating an agenda for addressing them. On a personal level, school executives should develop a communications style that stresses honesty, updated information for everyone, wise choice of issues, appropriate responses to criticism, openness to expert advice, willingness to share…

  7. ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln alter DNA repair efficiency of platinum-induced DNA damage through P53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guopei; Guan, Yangyang; Zhao, Yuejiao; van der Straaten, Tahar; Xiao, Sha; Xue, Ping; Zhu, Guolian; Liu, Qiufang; Cai, Yuan; Jin, Cuihong; Yang, Jinghua; Wu, Shengwen; Lu, Xiaobo

    2017-02-01

    Platinum-based treatment causes Pt-DNA adducts which lead to cell death. The platinum-induced DNA damage is recognized and repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) system of which ERCC2/XPD is a critical enzyme. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in ERCC2/XPD have been found to be associated with platinum resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln (rs13181) polymorphism is causally related to DNA repair capacity of platinum-induced DNA damage. First, cDNA clones expressing different genotypes of the polymorphism was transfected to an ERCC2/XPD defective CHO cell line (UV5). Second, all cells were treated with cisplatin. Cellular survival rate were investigated by MTT growth inhibition assay, DNA damage levels were investigated by comet assay and RAD51 staining. The distribution of cell cycle and the change of apoptosis rates were detected by a flow cytometric method (FCM). Finally, P53mRNA and phospho-P53 protein levels were further investigated in order to explore a possible explanation. As expected, there was a significantly increased in viability of UV5(ERCC2 (AA)) as compared to UV5(ERCC2 (CC)) after cisplatin treatment. The DNA damage level of UV5(ERCC2 (AA)) was significant decreased compared to UV5(ERCC2 (CC)) at 24 h of treatment. Mutation of ERCC2rs13181 AA to CC causes a prolonged S phase in cell cycle. UV5(ERCC2 (AA)) alleviated the apoptosis compared to UV5(ERCC2 (CC)), meanwhile P53mRNA levels in UV(ERCC2 (AA)) was also lower when compared UV5(ERCC2 (CC)). It co-incides with a prolonged high expression of phospho-P53, which is relevant for cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and the DNA damage response (DDR). We concluded that ERCC2/XPD rs13181 polymorphism is possibly related to the DNA repair capacity of platinum-induced DNA damage. This functional study provides some clues to clarify the relationship between cisplatin resistance and ERCC2/XPDrs13181 polymorphism.

  8. Quasiequilibria in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, Jamie D.

    2010-03-15

    In this work, the steady-state or quasiequilibrium resulting from periodically modulating the Liouvillian of an open quantum system, L-circumflex-circumflex(t), is investigated. It is shown that differences between the quasiequilibrium and the instantaneous equilibrium occur due to nonadiabatic contributions from the gauge field connecting the instantaneous eigenstates of L-circumflex-circumflex(t) to a fixed basis. These nonadiabatic contributions are shown to result in an additional rotation and/or depolarization for a single spin-1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field and to affect the thermal mixing of two coupled spins interacting with a time-dependent magnetic field.

  9. Spinning eggs and ballerinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Measurements are presented on the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that the spin, the angular momentum and the kinetic energy all decrease as the egg rises, unlike the case of a ballerina who can increase her spin and kinetic energy by reducing her moment of inertia. The observed effects can be explained, in part, in terms of rolling friction between the egg and the surface on which it spins.

  10. Spinning Eggs and Ballerinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Measurements are presented on the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that the spin, the angular momentum and the kinetic energy all decrease as the egg rises, unlike the case of a ballerina who can increase her spin and kinetic energy by reducing her moment of inertia. The observed effects can be explained, in part, in terms of rolling friction…

  11. Spinning Eggs and Ballerinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Measurements are presented on the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that the spin, the angular momentum and the kinetic energy all decrease as the egg rises, unlike the case of a ballerina who can increase her spin and kinetic energy by reducing her moment of inertia. The observed effects can be explained, in part, in terms of rolling friction…

  12. Wurtzite spin lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria Junior, Paulo E.; Xu, Gaofeng; Chen, Yang-Fang; Sipahi, Guilherme M.; Žutić, Igor

    2017-03-01

    Semiconductor lasers are strongly altered by adding spin-polarized carriers. Such spin lasers could overcome many limitations of their conventional (spin-unpolarized) counterparts. While the vast majority of experiments in spin lasers employed zinc-blende semiconductors, the room-temperature electrical manipulation was first demonstrated in wurtzite GaN-based lasers. However, the underlying theoretical description of wurtzite spin lasers is still missing. To address this situation, focusing on (In,Ga)N-based wurtzite quantum wells, we develop a theoretical framework in which the calculated microscopic spin-dependent gain is combined with a simple rate equation model. A small spin-orbit coupling in these wurtzites supports simultaneous spin polarizations of electrons and holes, providing unexplored opportunities to control spin lasers. For example, the gain asymmetry, as one of the key figures of merit related to spin amplification, can change the sign by simply increasing the carrier density. The lasing threshold reduction has a nonmonotonic dependence on electron-spin polarization, even for a nonvanishing hole spin polarization.

  13. All-electrical generation of spin-polarized currents in quantum spin Hall insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, L. L.; Cheung, K. T.; Zhang, L.; Wang, J.

    2017-03-01

    The control and generation of spin-polarized current (SPC) without magnetic materials and an external magnetic field is a big challenge in spintronics and normally requires a spin-flip mechanism. In this Rapid Communication, we show the theoretical discovery of all-electrical generation of SPC without relying on spin-flip spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We find that the SPC can be produced as long as an energy-dependent phase difference between the spin up and down electrons can be established. We verify this through quantum transport calculations on a gated stanene zigzag nanoribbon, which is a quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator. Our calculations indicate that the transient current as well as ac conductance are significantly spin polarized, which results from the genetic phase difference between spin up and down electrons after traversing the system. Our results are robust against edge imperfections and generally valid for other QSH insulators, such as silicene and germanene, etc. These findings establish a different route for generating SPCs by purely electrical means and open the door for interesting applications of semiconductor spintronics.

  14. The spin-partitioned total position-spread tensor: An application to Heisenberg spin chains.

    PubMed

    Fertitta, Edoardo; El Khatib, Muammar; Bendazzoli, Gian Luigi; Paulus, Beate; Evangelisti, Stefano; Leininger, Thierry

    2015-12-28

    The spin partition of the Total Position-Spread (TPS) tensor has been performed for one-dimensional Heisenberg chains with open boundary conditions. Both the cases of a ferromagnetic (high-spin) and an anti-ferromagnetic (low-spin) ground-state have been considered. In the case of a low-spin ground-state, the use of alternating magnetic couplings allowed to investigate the effect of spin-pairing. The behavior of the spin-partitioned TPS (SP-TPS) tensor as a function of the number of sites turned to be closely related to the presence of an energy gap between the ground-state and the first excited-state at the thermodynamic limit. Indeed, a gapped energy spectrum is associated to a linear growth of the SP-TPS tensor with the number of sites. On the other hand, in gapless situations, the spread presents a faster-than-linear growth, resulting in the divergence of its per-site value. Finally, for the case of a high-spin wave function, an analytical expression of the dependence of the SP-TPS on the number of sites n and the total spin-projection Sz has been derived.

  15. The spin-partitioned total position-spread tensor: An application to Heisenberg spin chains

    SciTech Connect

    Fertitta, Edoardo; Paulus, Beate; El Khatib, Muammar; Evangelisti, Stefano; Leininger, Thierry

    2015-12-28

    The spin partition of the Total Position-Spread (TPS) tensor has been performed for one-dimensional Heisenberg chains with open boundary conditions. Both the cases of a ferromagnetic (high-spin) and an anti-ferromagnetic (low-spin) ground-state have been considered. In the case of a low-spin ground-state, the use of alternating magnetic couplings allowed to investigate the effect of spin-pairing. The behavior of the spin-partitioned TPS (SP-TPS) tensor as a function of the number of sites turned to be closely related to the presence of an energy gap between the ground-state and the first excited-state at the thermodynamic limit. Indeed, a gapped energy spectrum is associated to a linear growth of the SP-TPS tensor with the number of sites. On the other hand, in gapless situations, the spread presents a faster-than-linear growth, resulting in the divergence of its per-site value. Finally, for the case of a high-spin wave function, an analytical expression of the dependence of the SP-TPS on the number of sites n and the total spin-projection S{sub z} has been derived.

  16. The spin-partitioned total position-spread tensor: An application to Heisenberg spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertitta, Edoardo; El Khatib, Muammar; Bendazzoli, Gian Luigi; Paulus, Beate; Evangelisti, Stefano; Leininger, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    The spin partition of the Total Position-Spread (TPS) tensor has been performed for one-dimensional Heisenberg chains with open boundary conditions. Both the cases of a ferromagnetic (high-spin) and an anti-ferromagnetic (low-spin) ground-state have been considered. In the case of a low-spin ground-state, the use of alternating magnetic couplings allowed to investigate the effect of spin-pairing. The behavior of the spin-partitioned TPS (SP-TPS) tensor as a function of the number of sites turned to be closely related to the presence of an energy gap between the ground-state and the first excited-state at the thermodynamic limit. Indeed, a gapped energy spectrum is associated to a linear growth of the SP-TPS tensor with the number of sites. On the other hand, in gapless situations, the spread presents a faster-than-linear growth, resulting in the divergence of its per-site value. Finally, for the case of a high-spin wave function, an analytical expression of the dependence of the SP-TPS on the number of sites n and the total spin-projection Sz has been derived.

  17. Role of β/δ101Gln in Regulating the Effect of Temperature and Allosteric Effectors on Oxygen Affinity in Woolly Mammoth Hemoglobin†

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yue; Byrd, Catherine; Shen, Tong-Jian; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Tam, Tsuey Chyi S.; Ho, Chien

    2013-01-01

    The oxygen affinity of woolly mammoth hemoglobin (rHb WM) is less affected by temperature change than that of Asian elephant hemoglobin (rHb AE) or human adult hemoglobin (Hb A). We report here a biochemical-biophysical study of Hb A, rHb AE, rHb WM and three rHb WM mutants with amino acid substitutions at β/δ101 (β/δ101Gln→Glu, Lys, or Asp) plus a double and a triple mutant, designed to clarify the role of the β/δ101 residue. The β/δ101Gln residue is important for responding to allosteric effectors, such as phosphate, inositol hexaphosphate (IHP), and chloride. The rHb WM mutants studied generally have higher affinity for oxygen under various conditions of pH, temperature, and salt concentration, and in the presence or absence of organic phosphate, than do rHb WM, rHb AE and Hb A. Titrations for the O2 affinity of these mutant rHbs as a function of chloride concentration indicate a lower heterotopic effect of this anion due to the replacement of β/δ101Gln in rHb WM. The alkaline Bohr effect of rHb WM and its mutants is reduced by 20–50% compared to that of Hb A and is independent of changes in temperature, in contrast to what has been observed in the hemoglobins of most mammalian species, including human. The results of our study on the temperature dependence of the O2 affinity of rHb WM and its mutant rHbs illustrate the important role of β/δ101Gln in regulating the functional properties of these hemoglobins. PMID:24228693

  18. How the extra methylene group affects the ligation properties of Glu vs. Asp and Gln vs. Asn amino acids: a DFT/PCM study.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Doudeva, Lyudmila

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the extra methylene group on the ligation properties of glutamic (Glu) vs. aspartic (Asp) acid, and glutamine (Gln) vs. asparagine (Asn) amino acids-two pairs of protein building blocks differing by the length of their side chains-has been studied by employing DFT calculations combined with polarizable continuum model (PCM) computations. Complexes of the nominal species with partner ligands of various structures, charge states, and degree of solvent exposure have been examined. The results obtained reveal that the difference in the alkyl chain length of these amino acid residues does not affect the mode of their binding. This, however, influences the thermodynamics of the ligand-ligand and ligand-metal recognition thus bestowing unique ligation characteristics on the competing entities. The calculations reveal that the competition between the longer-chain and shorter-chain analogs is entropy driven and that the differential electronic effects are of minor importance for the process. Thus, the outcome of the rivalry between Asp and Glu, and Asn and Gln is almost unaffected by the nature of the partner ligand, its charge state and, in most cases, the dielectric properties of the binding site. The longer-chain Glu, as opposed to its shorter-chain Asp counterpart, is the preferred partner ligand in various protein binding sites. Contrariwise, the shorter-chain Asn binds more favorably to the respective binding sites than its longer-chain Gln analog. The results obtained shed additional light on the intimate mechanism of the ligand-ligand and ligand-metal recognition in proteins and could be employed as guidelines in protein engineering and design.

  19. The beta2 adrenergic receptor Gln27Glu polymorphism affects insulin resistance in patients with heart failure: possible modulation by choice of beta blocker.

    PubMed

    Vardeny, Orly; Detry, Michelle A; Moran, John J M; Johnson, Maryl R; Sweitzer, Nancy K

    2008-12-01

    Insulin resistance is prevalent in heart failure (HF) patients, and beta2 adrenergic receptors (beta2-AR) are involved in glucose homeostasis. We hypothesized that beta2-AR Gln27Glu and Arg16Gly polymorphisms affect insulin resistance in HF patients, and we explored if effects of beta2-AR polymorphisms on glucose handling are modified by choice of beta blocker. We studied 30 nondiabetic adults with HF and a history of systolic dysfunction; 15 were receiving metoprolol succinate, and 15 were receiving carvedilol. We measured fasting glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance, and we determined beta2-AR genotypes at codons 27 and 16. The cohort was insulin resistant with a mean HOMA-IR score of 3.4 (95% CI, 2.3 to 4.5; normal value, 1.0). Patients with the Glu27Glu genotype exhibited higher insulin and HOMA-IR compared to individuals carrying a Gln allele (P = 0.019). Patients taking carvedilol demonstrated lower insulin resistance if also carrying a wild-type allele at codon 27 (fasting insulin, 9.8 +/- 10.5 versus 20.5 +/- 2.1 for variant, P = 0.072; HOMA-IR, 2.4 +/- 2.7 versus 5.1 +/- 0.6, P = 0.074); those on metoprolol succinate had high insulin resistance irrespective of genotype. The beta2-AR Glu27Glu genotype may be associated with higher insulin concentrations and insulin resistance in patients with HF. Future studies are needed to confirm whether treatment with carvedilol may be associated with decreased insulin and insulin resistance in beta2-AR codon 27 Gln carriers.

  20. Role of β/δ101Gln in regulating the effect of temperature and allosteric effectors on oxygen affinity in woolly mammoth hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Byrd, Catherine; Shen, Tong-Jian; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Tam, Tsuey Chyi S; Ho, Chien

    2013-12-10

    The oxygen affinity of woolly mammoth hemoglobin (rHb WM) is less affected by temperature change than that of Asian elephant hemoglobin (rHb AE) or human normal adult hemoglobin (Hb A). We report here a biochemical-biophysical study of Hb A, rHb AE, rHb WM, and three rHb WM mutants with amino acid substitutions at β/δ101 (β/δ101Gln→Glu, Lys, or Asp) plus a double and a triple mutant, designed to clarify the role of the β/δ101 residue. The β/δ101Gln residue is important for responding to allosteric effectors, such as phosphate, inositol hexaphosphate (IHP), and chloride. The rHb WM mutants studied generally have higher affinity for oxygen under various conditions of pH, temperature, and salt concentration, and in the presence or absence of organic phosphate, than do rHb WM, rHb AE, and Hb A. Titrations for the O2 affinity of these mutant rHbs as a function of chloride concentration indicate a lower heterotopic effect of this anion due to the replacement of β/δ101Gln in rHb WM. The alkaline Bohr effect of rHb WM and its mutants is reduced by 20-50% compared to that of Hb A and is independent of changes in temperature, in contrast to what has been observed in the hemoglobins of most mammalian species, including human. The results of our study on the temperature dependence of the O2 affinity of rHb WM and its mutant rHbs illustrate the important role of β/δ101Gln in regulating the functional properties of these hemoglobins.

  1. Elementary particles with continuous spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, Xavier; Skvortsov, Evgeny D.

    2017-08-01

    Classical results and recent developments on the theoretical description of elementary particles with “continuous” spin are reviewed. At free level, these fields are described by unitary irreducible representations of the isometry group (either Poincaré or anti-de Sitter group) with an infinite number of physical degrees of freedom per space-time point. Their basic group-theoretical and field-theoretical descriptions are reviewed in some details. We mention a list of open issues which are crucial to address for assessing their physical status and potential relevance.

  2. The Steady Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, Richard; Schmidt, Wilhelm

    1931-01-01

    With the object of further clarifying the problem of spinning, the equilibrium of the forces and moments acting on an airplane is discussed in light of the most recent test data. Convinced that in a spin the flight attitude by only small angles of yaw is more or less completely steady, the study is primarily devoted to an investigation of steady spin with no side slip. At small angles, wholly arbitrary and perfectly steady spins may be forced, depending on the type of control displacements. But at large angles only very steep and only "approaching steady" spins are possible, no matter what the control displacements.

  3. The effect of nitrate addition on abundance of nirK, nirS and gln genes in acidified Norway spruce forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bárta, Jiří; Tahovská, Karolina; Kaåa, Jiří; Antrå¯Čková, Hana Å.

    2010-05-01

    The denitrification is the main biotic process leading to loses of fixed nitrogen as well as removal of excess of nitrate (NO3-) from the soil environment. The reduction of NO2- to nitric oxide (NO) distinguishes the 'true' denitrifiers from other nitrate-respiring bacteria. This reaction is catalyzed by two different types of nitrite reductases, either a cytochrome cd1 encoded by nirS gene (nirS denitrifiers) or a Cu-containing enzyme encoded by nirK gene (nirK denitrifiers). The nirS denitrifiers are located mostly in rhizosphere, while the nirK denitrifiers are more abundant in bulk soil. These two groups can be also classified as markers of denitrification. Glutamine synthetase is one of the main bacterial NH4+ assimilating enzymes; it is coded by glnI gene. Glutamine synthetase is mostly active when N is the limiting factor for bacterial growth. There is recent evidence that the activity may be affected by the presence of alternative N source (i.e. NO3-). However, in anaerobic condition NO3- can be used also by the denitrifying bacteria so there may be strong competition for this nutrient. The laboratory experiment was performed to evaluate the effect of nitrates (NO3-) on abundance of nirK, nirS and gln gene copy numbers. The amount of NO3- corresponded to the actual atmospheric depositions on experimental sites in the Bohemian Forest. Litter organic layer (0-5cm of soil) was used for laboratory incubation experiment. Four replicates of control (no addition of NO3-), and NO3-addition were incubated anaerobically for one month. After the incubation DNA was extracted and the number of nirK, nirS and gln gene copies was determined using qPCR (SYBRGreen methodology). Results showed that the addition of NO3- significantly increased the number of nirK and nirS denitrifiers from 5.9x106 to 1.1x107 and from not detectable amount to 1.4x106, respectively. The gln gene copy number was also higher after NO3-addition. However, the difference was not statistically

  4. Sequence and characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana cDNAs isolated by functional complementation of a yeast gln3 gdh1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Truong, H N; Caboche, M; Daniel-Vedele, F

    1997-06-30

    We have isolated two Arabidopsis thaliana cDNAs by complementation of a yeast gln3 gdh1 strain that is affected in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism. The two clones (RGA1 and RGA2) are homologous to each other and to the SCARECROW (SCR) gene that is involved in regulating an asymmetric cell division in plants. RGA1, RGA2 and SCR share several structural features and may define a new family of genes. RGA1 and RGA2 have been mapped, respectively, to chromosome II and I, and their expression in plant is constitutive.

  5. Macroscopic rotation of photon polarization induced by a single spin.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Christophe; Demory, Justin; Loo, Vivien; Lemaître, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Glazov, Mikhaïl; Krebs, Olivier; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale; Lanco, Loïc

    2015-02-17

    Entangling a single spin to the polarization of a single incoming photon, generated by an external source, would open new paradigms in quantum optics such as delayed-photon entanglement, deterministic logic gates or fault-tolerant quantum computing. These perspectives rely on the possibility that a single spin induces a macroscopic rotation of a photon polarization. Such polarization rotations induced by single spins were recently observed, yet limited to a few 10(-3) degrees due to poor spin-photon coupling. Here we report the enhancement by three orders of magnitude of the spin-photon interaction, using a cavity quantum electrodynamics device. A single hole spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is deterministically coupled to a micropillar cavity. The cavity-enhanced coupling between the incoming photons and the solid-state spin results in a polarization rotation by ± 6° when the spin is optically initialized in the up or down state. These results open the way towards a spin-based quantum network.

  6. Open Content in Open Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansa, Sarah Whitcher; Kansa, Eric C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the challenges and rewards of sharing research content through a discussion of Open Context, a new open access data publication system for field sciences and museum collections. Open Context is the first data repository of its kind, allowing self-publication of research data, community commentary through tagging, and clear…

  7. How "Open" is Open Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moisey, Susan D.

    1984-01-01

    The roots of the open learning system approach to education are explored and the relationship between its goals and the succeeding models/methodologies are examined in the context of open and closed systems theories. An open systems orientation to learning system development is recommended. (MSE)

  8. Spinning around in Transition-Metal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Swart, Marcel; Gruden, Maja

    2016-12-20

    The great diversity and richness of transition metal chemistry, such as the features of an open d-shell, opened a way to numerous areas of scientific research and technological applications. Depending on the nature of the metal and its environment, there are often several energetically accessible spin states, and the progress in accurate theoretical treatment of this complicated phenomenon is presented in this Account. The spin state energetics of a transition metal complex can be predicted theoretically on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) or wave function based methodology, where DFT has advantages since it can be applied routinely to medium-to-large-sized molecules and spin-state consistent density functionals are now available. Additional factors such as the effect of the basis set, thermochemical contributions, solvation, relativity, and dispersion, have been investigated by many researchers, but challenges in unambiguous assignment of spin states still remain. The first DFT studies showed intrinsic spin-state preferences of hybrid functionals for high spin and early generalized gradient approximation functionals for low spin. Progress in the development of density functional approximations (DFAs) then led to a class of specially designed DFAs, such as OPBE, SSB-D, and S12g, and brought a very intriguing and fascinating observation that the spin states of transition metals and the SN2 barriers of organic molecules are somehow intimately linked. Among the many noteworthy results that emerged from the search for the appropriate description of the complicated spin state preferences in transition metals, we mainly focused on the examination of the connection between the spin state and the structures or coordination modes of the transition metal complexes. Changes in spin states normally lead only to changes in the metal-ligand bond lengths, but to the best of our knowledge, the dapsox ligand showed the first example of a transition-metal complex where a

  9. Spin supplementary conditions for spinning compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikóczi, Balázs

    2017-03-01

    We consider different spin supplementary conditions (SSC) for a spinning compact binary with the leading-order spin-orbit (SO) interaction. The Lagrangian of the binary system can be constructed, but it is acceleration-dependent in two cases of SSC. We rewrite the generalized Hamiltonian formalism proposed by Ostrogradsky and compute the conserved quantities and the dissipative part of relative motion during the gravitational radiation of each SSC. We give the orbital elements and observed quantities of the SO dynamics, for instance, the energy and the orbital angular momentum losses and waveforms, and discuss their SSC dependence.

  10. Inverse spin Hall effect by spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. Y.; Horing, Norman J. M.; Lei, X. L.

    2007-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [S. O. Valenzuela and M. Tinkham, Nature (London) 442, 176 (2006)], the authors present a quantitative microscopic theory to investigate the inverse spin-Hall effect with spin injection into aluminum considering both intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit couplings using the orthogonalized-plane-wave method. Their theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is also clear that the magnitude of the anomalous Hall resistivity is mainly due to contributions from extrinsic skew scattering.

  11. Spin-Dependent Transport through Chiral Molecules Studied by Spin-Dependent Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    dark” measurements, we also describe photoelectrochemical measurements in which light is used to affect the spin selective electron transport through the chiral molecules. We describe how the excitation of a chromophore (such as CdSe nanoparticles), which is attached to a chiral working electrode, can flip the preferred spin orientation of the photocurrent, when measured under the identical conditions. Thus, chirality-induced spin polarization, when combined with light and magnetic field effects, opens new avenues for the study of the spin transport properties of chiral molecules and biomolecules and for creating new types of spintronic devices in which light and molecular chirality provide new functions and properties. PMID:27797176

  12. Spin-Dependent Transport through Chiral Molecules Studied by Spin-Dependent Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Fontanesi, Claudio; Waldeck, David H; Naaman, Ron

    2016-11-15

    photoelectrochemical measurements in which light is used to affect the spin selective electron transport through the chiral molecules. We describe how the excitation of a chromophore (such as CdSe nanoparticles), which is attached to a chiral working electrode, can flip the preferred spin orientation of the photocurrent, when measured under the identical conditions. Thus, chirality-induced spin polarization, when combined with light and magnetic field effects, opens new avenues for the study of the spin transport properties of chiral molecules and biomolecules and for creating new types of spintronic devices in which light and molecular chirality provide new functions and properties.

  13. Generalized Momentum Control of the Spin-Stabilized Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benegalrao, Suyog; Queen, Steven; Shah, Neerav; Blackman, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Angular momentum control maneuvers required to keep spin-axis in science box. Traditional approach uses de-coupled modes for pointing, spin, nutation Impractical for MMS Frequency and Number of maneuvers (Orbit Control, Pointing, Nutation, Spin, four observatories, every 2-4 weeks). Difficult to implement de-coupled open-loop control with flexible wire booms. Desire a unified angular momentum controller. Comprehensively control pointing, spin, and nutation.

  14. Spin-transfer torque induced spin waves in antiferromagnetic insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Matthew W.; Guo, Wei; Stocks, George Malcolm; Xiao, Di; Xiao, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of exciting spin waves in insulating antiferromagnetic films by injecting spin current at the surface. We analyze both magnetically compensated and uncompensated interfaces. We find that the spin current induced spin-transfer torque can excite spin waves in insulating antiferromagnetic materials and that the chirality of the excited spin wave is determined by the polarization of the injected spin current. Furthermore, the presence of magnetic surface anisotropy can greatly increase the accessibility of these excitations.

  15. Spin-transfer torque induced spin waves in antiferromagnetic insulators

    DOE PAGES

    Daniels, Matthew W.; Guo, Wei; Stocks, George Malcolm; ...

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of exciting spin waves in insulating antiferromagnetic films by injecting spin current at the surface. We analyze both magnetically compensated and uncompensated interfaces. We find that the spin current induced spin-transfer torque can excite spin waves in insulating antiferromagnetic materials and that the chirality of the excited spin wave is determined by the polarization of the injected spin current. Furthermore, the presence of magnetic surface anisotropy can greatly increase the accessibility of these excitations.

  16. Superfluid Spin Transport through Easy-Plane Ferromagnetic Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2014-03-01

    Superfluid spin transport | dissipationless transport of spin | is theoretically studied in a ferromagnetic insulator with easy-plane anisotropy. We consider an open geometry where spin current is injected into the ferromagnet from one side by a metallic reservoir with a nonequilibrium spin accumulation, and ejected into another metallic reservoir located downstream. Spin transport through the device is studied using a combination of magnetoelectric circuit theory, Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert phenomenology, and microscopic linear-response theory. We discuss how spin superfluidity can be probed using a magnetically-mediated electron-drag experiment. This work was supported in part by FAME (an SRC STARnet center sponsored by MARCO and DARPA), the NSF under Grant No. DMR-0840965, and Grant No. 228481 from the Simons Foundation.

  17. A two-dimensional spin field-effect switch.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenjing; Txoperena, Oihana; Llopis, Roger; Dery, Hanan; Hueso, Luis E; Casanova, Fèlix

    2016-11-11

    Future development in spintronic devices will require an advanced control of spin currents, for example by an electric field. Here we demonstrate an approach that differs from previous proposals such as the Datta and Das modulator, and that is based on a van de Waals heterostructure of atomically thin graphene and semiconducting MoS2. Our device combines the superior spin transport properties of graphene with the strong spin-orbit coupling of MoS2 and allows switching of the spin current in the graphene channel between ON and OFF states by tuning the spin absorption into the MoS2 with a gate electrode. Our proposal holds potential for technologically relevant applications such as search engines or pattern recognition circuits, and opens possibilities towards electrical injection of spins into transition metal dichalcogenides and alike materials.

  18. Multistability of a coherent spin ensemble in a semiconductor microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraïso, T. K.; Wouters, M.; Léger, Y.; Morier-Genoud, F.; Deveaud-Plédran, B.

    2010-08-01

    Coherent manipulation of spin ensembles is a key issue in the development of spintronics. In particular, multivalued spin switching may lead to new schemes of logic gating and memories. This phenomenon has been studied with atom vapours 30 years ago, but is still awaited in the solid state. Here, we demonstrate spin multistability with microcavity polaritons in a trap. Owing to the spinor nature of these light-matter quasiparticles and to the anisotropy of their interactions, we can optically control the spin state of a single confined level by tuning the excitation power, frequency and polarization. First, we realize high-efficiency power-dependent polarization switching. Then, at constant excitation power, we evidence polarization hysteresis and determine the conditions for realizing multivalued spin switching. Finally, we demonstrate an unexpected regime, where our system behaves as a high-contrast spin trigger. These results open new pathways to the development of advanced spintronics devices and to the realization of multivalued logic circuits.

  19. A two-dimensional spin field-effect switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wenjing; Txoperena, Oihana; Llopis, Roger; Dery, Hanan; Hueso, Luis E.; Casanova, Fèlix

    2016-11-01

    Future development in spintronic devices will require an advanced control of spin currents, for example by an electric field. Here we demonstrate an approach that differs from previous proposals such as the Datta and Das modulator, and that is based on a van de Waals heterostructure of atomically thin graphene and semiconducting MoS2. Our device combines the superior spin transport properties of graphene with the strong spin-orbit coupling of MoS2 and allows switching of the spin current in the graphene channel between ON and OFF states by tuning the spin absorption into the MoS2 with a gate electrode. Our proposal holds potential for technologically relevant applications such as search engines or pattern recognition circuits, and opens possibilities towards electrical injection of spins into transition metal dichalcogenides and alike materials.

  20. Electron spin from self interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Spavieri, G. |

    1992-06-01

    The author explores the possibility that the electron self-interaction is the origin of the spin and of the radiative effects of QED. The electron is conceived as a charged, massless, point particle with a quantum or stochastic, internal motion about its center of mass and bound by a self-interaction potential. The hydrodynamic equations of motion describing the electron in its center of mass frame are related to non-Markovian stochastic equations recently used to derive the Schroedinger equation. By averaging over this stochastic internal motion and identifying the energy with the rest mass energy, the angular momentum exhibits properties characteristic of spin. The electromagnetic self-interactions added to the Hamiltonian of the particle correct the g factor to yield the anomalous value (g{minus}2)/2 {approx} 1159.7(2.3) X 10{sup {minus}6} in agreement with experiment. Calculations of other {open_quotes}radiative{close_quotes} effects including the Lamb shift are presented. The results obtained are finite and suggest that the QED corrections attributed to radiative effects could be obtained classically, i.e., without second quantization and renormalization, by complementing the Dirac theory with this self-interaction mechanism. The g factor dependence on the external magnetic field of this and other spin models is compared with that of QED, showing that these theories can be tested by the present precision measurements of the g factor. 33 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Slow spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orendac, Martin; Sedlakova, Lucia; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Vrabel, Peter; Feher, Alexander; Pajerowski, Daniel M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Meisel, Mark W.; Shirai, Masae; Bramwell, Steven T.

    2009-03-01

    Spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7 was investigated using the magnetocaloric effect and susceptibility. The magnetocaloric behavior of Dy2Ti2O7 at temperatures where the orientation of spins is governed by ``ice rules`` (T < Tice) revealed thermally activated relaxation; however, the resulting temperature dependence of the relaxation time is more complicated than anticipated by a mere extrapolation of the corresponding high temperature data [1]. A susceptibility study of Ho2Ti2O7 was performed at T > Tice and in high magnetic fields, and the results suggest a slow relaxation of spins analogous to the behavior reported in a highly polarized cooperative paramagnet [2]. [1] J. Snyder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 107201. [2] B. G. Ueland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 027216.

  2. Spin multiplicity dependence of nonlinear optical properties.

    PubMed

    Jha, Prakash Chandra; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Agren, Hans

    2009-03-23

    Open-shell spin-restricted time-dependent density functional theory is applied to explore the spin multiplicity dependence of linear and nonlinear optical properties. An open-shell neutral conjugated system, the C(4)H(4)N radical in the doublet X(2)A(2), quartet X(4)A(2), and sextet X(6)A(1) states, is chosen as a model system to illustrate various aspects of the theory. It is found that irrespective of the exchange-correlation functional employed, the components of the polarizability alpha(-omega,omega) and first hyperpolarizability beta(-2 omega,omega,omega) show very different dependency with respect to the multiplicity, with an increasing trend for higher spin states. This is rationalized by the decrease in conjugation and stability of the system with increasing multiplicity, and by the way the interaction between unpaired electrons and the external field is shielded by remaining electrons of the molecule. The study suggests the applicability of open-shell systems for frequency-dependent nonlinear optical properties and for the possibility of spin control for such properties.

  3. Information storage capacity of discrete spin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Beni

    2013-11-15

    Understanding the limits imposed on information storage capacity of physical systems is a problem of fundamental and practical importance which bridges physics and information science. There is a well-known upper bound on the amount of information that can be stored reliably in a given volume of discrete spin systems which are supported by gapped local Hamiltonians. However, all the previously known systems were far below this theoretical bound, and it remained open whether there exists a gapped spin system that saturates this bound. Here, we present a construction of spin systems which saturate this theoretical limit asymptotically by borrowing an idea from fractal properties arising in the Sierpinski triangle. Our construction provides not only the best classical error-correcting code which is physically realizable as the energy ground space of gapped frustration-free Hamiltonians, but also a new research avenue for correlated spin phases with fractal spin configurations. -- Highlights: •We propose a spin model with fractal ground states and study its coding properties. •We show that the model asymptotically saturates a theoretical limit on information storage capacity. •We discuss its relations to various theoretical physics problems.

  4. Spin Coherence in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-10

    C. A. Ullrich and M. E. Flatté, ``Intersubband spin -density excitations in quantum wells with Rashba spin splitting ’’, Physical Review B 66...Ge quantum dots, tuning of spin coherence times for electron spin , tuning of dipolar magnetic fields for nuclear spin , spontaneous spin polarization ...unstable to the formation of spin - polarized packets at room temperature. We also predict that orbital angular momentum quenching in quantum dots will

  5. Coherence and control of single electron spins in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersypen, Lieven

    2008-03-01

    Following our earlier work on single-shot read-out and relaxation of a single spin in a quantum dot, we now demonstrate coherent control of a single spin (detection is done using a second spin in a neighbouring dot). First, we manipulate the spin using conventional magnetic resonance. Next, we show that we can also rotate the spin using electric fields instead of magnetic fields. In both cases, 90 rotations can be realized in about 50 ns or less. We use these control techniques to probe decoherence of an isolated electron spin. The spin dephases in about 30 ns, due to the hyperfine interaction with the uncontrolled nuclear spin bath in the host material of the dot. However, since the nuclear spin dynamics is very slow, this dephasing can be largely reversed using a spin-echo pulse. Echo decay times of about 0.5 us are obtained at 70 mT. In parallel, we have started work on quantum dots in graphene, which is expected to offer superior coherence times. As a first step, we have succeeded in opening a bandgap in bilayer graphene, necessary for electrostatic confinement of carriers. F.H.L. Koppens et al., Nature 446, 56 (2006). K.C. Nowack et al., Science Express, 1 Nov 2007. F.H.L. Koppens et al., arXiv:0711.0479. J.B. Oostinga, Nature Mat., in press.

  6. Magnetization oscillations and waves driven by pure spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. E.; Urazhdin, S.; de Loubens, G.; Klein, O.; Cros, V.; Anane, A.; Demokritov, S. O.

    2017-02-01

    Recent advances in the studies of pure spin currents-flows of angular momentum (spin) not accompanied by the electric currents-have opened new horizons for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. The main advantage of pure spin current, as compared to the spin-polarized electric current, is the possibility to exert spin transfer torque on the magnetization in thin magnetic films without the electrical current flow through the material. In addition to minimizing Joule heating and electromigration effects, this enables the implementation of spin torque devices based on the low-loss insulating magnetic materials, and offers an unprecedented geometric flexibility. Here we review the recent experimental achievements in investigations of magnetization oscillations excited by pure spin currents in different nanomagnetic systems based on metallic and insulating magnetic materials. We discuss the spectral properties of spin-current nano-oscillators, and relate them to the spatial characteristics of the excited dynamic magnetic modes determined by the spatially-resolved measurements. We also show that these systems support locking of the oscillations to external microwave signals, as well as their mutual synchronization, and can be used as efficient nanoscale sources of propagating spin waves.

  7. Simulating generic spin-boson models with matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael L.; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-11-01

    The global coupling of few-level quantum systems ("spins") to a discrete set of bosonic modes is a key ingredient for many applications in quantum science, including large-scale entanglement generation, quantum simulation of the dynamics of long-range interacting spin models, and hybrid platforms for force and spin sensing. We present a general numerical framework for treating the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of such models based on matrix product states. Our approach applies for generic spin-boson systems: it treats any spatial and operator dependence of the two-body spin-boson coupling and places no restrictions on relative energy scales. We show that the full counting statistics of collective spin measurements and infidelity of quantum simulation due to spin-boson entanglement, both of which are difficult to obtain by other techniques, are readily calculable in our approach. We benchmark our method using a recently developed exact solution for a particular spin-boson coupling relevant to trapped ion quantum simulators. Finally, we show how decoherence can be incorporated within our framework using the method of quantum trajectories, and study the dynamics of an open-system spin-boson model with spatially nonuniform spin-boson coupling relevant for trapped atomic ion crystals in the presence of molecular ion impurities.

  8. Cooper pairs spintronics in triplet spin valves.

    PubMed

    Romeo, F; Citro, R

    2013-11-27

    We study a spin valve with a triplet superconductor spacer intercalated between two ferromagnets with noncollinear magnetizations. We show that the magnetoresistance of the triplet spin valve depends on the relative orientations of the d vector, characterizing the superconducting order parameter, and the magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers. For devices characterized by a long superconductor, the effects of a polarized current sustained by Cooper pairs only are observed. In this regime, a supermagnetoresistance effect emerges, and the chiral symmetry of the order parameter of the superconducting spacer is easily recognized. Our findings open new perspectives in designing spintronics devices based on the cooperation of ferromagnetic and triplet correlations.

  9. Communication: quantum dynamics in classical spin baths.

    PubMed

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2013-07-21

    A formalism for studying the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in classical spin baths is introduced. The theory is based on generalized antisymmetric brackets and predicts the presence of open-path off-diagonal geometric phases in the evolution of the density matrix. The weak coupling limit of the equation can be integrated by standard algorithms and provides a non-Markovian approach to the computer simulation of quantum systems in classical spin environments. It is expected that the theory and numerical schemes presented here have a wide applicability.

  10. Communication: Quantum dynamics in classical spin baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    A formalism for studying the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in classical spin baths is introduced. The theory is based on generalized antisymmetric brackets and predicts the presence of open-path off-diagonal geometric phases in the evolution of the density matrix. The weak coupling limit of the equation can be integrated by standard algorithms and provides a non-Markovian approach to the computer simulation of quantum systems in classical spin environments. It is expected that the theory and numerical schemes presented here have a wide applicability.

  11. Motion of spinning molecules in inhomogeneous fields

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, Johannes; Gershnabel, Erez; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2011-02-15

    Several laser techniques have been suggested and demonstrated recently for preparing polarizable molecules in rapidly spinning states with a disk-like angular distribution. We consider motion of these spinning disks in inhomogeneous fields and show that the molecular trajectories may be precisely controlled by the tilt of the plane of the laser-induced rotation. The feasibility of the scheme is illustrated by optical deflection of linear molecules twirled by two delayed cross-polarized laser pulses. These results open new ways for many applications involving molecular focusing, guiding, and trapping and may be suitable for separating molecular mixtures by optical and static fields.

  12. The critical role of a hydrogen bond between Gln63 and Trp104 in the blue-light sensing BLUF domain that controls AppA activity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Shinji; Tomida, Yoshiyuki; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Takamiya, Ken-Ichiro

    2007-05-18

    AppA is a novel blue-light receptor that controls photosynthetic gene expression in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The photocycle reaction of the light-sensing domain, BLUF, is unique in the sense that a few hydrogen bond rearrangements are accompanied by only slight structural changes of the bound chromophore. However, the exact features of the hydrogen bond network around the active site are still the subject of some controversy. Here we present biochemical and genetic evidence showing that either Gln63 or Trp104 in the active site of the BLUF domain is crucial for light sensing, which in turn controls the antirepressor activity of AppA. Specifically, the Q63L and W104A mutants of AppA are insensitive to blue light in vivo and in vitro, and their activity is similar to that of the light-adapted wild-type AppA. Based on spectroscopic and structural information described previously, we conclude that light-dependent formation and breakage of the hydrogen bond between Gln63 and Trp104 are critical for the light-sensing mechanism of AppA.

  13. Leptin Receptor Gene Gln223Arg Polymorphism Is Not Associated with Hypertension: A Preliminary Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Geórgia das Graças; Guimarães, Andre L. S.; Veloso, Rosângela R.; Reis, Tatiana C.; Gomes, Crizian S.; Neto, João F. R.; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is responsible for high morbidity and mortality as one of the most important cardiometabolic risk factors. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the Gln223Arg in the leptin receptor (LEPR) influences the prevalence of hypertension. A cross-sectional study was carried out in individuals aged ≥ 18 years. Polymorphism identification was performed using PCR-RFLP analysis. Participants with blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mmHg or medication use were considered hypertensive. Frequencies, means, cross-tabulations, and multivariate models were produced to study differences in hypertension prevalence by genotypes. The study includes 470 participants. The frequency of GG polymorphism variant was 10.43%, 46.81% AG, and 42.77% AA. The distribution of hypertension frequency by LEPR genotypes was the following: AA 43.8%, AG 40.4%, and GG 40.8%; there were no significant differences between groups. Comparative analysis which used multivariate Poisson regression adjusted by many potential confounders (age, sex, schooling, smoking, alcohol intake, obesity, and family history of parental obesity) did not modify this result. In this large sample of population-based study, the association of the LEPR Gln223Arg gene polymorphism with hypertension was not observed. PMID:24772364

  14. Novel Expression Pattern of Cytosolic Gln Synthetase in Nitrogen-Fixing Root Nodules of the Actinorhizal Host, Datisca glomerata1[w

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Alison M.; Murphy, Terence M.; Okubara, Patricia A.; Jacobsen, Karin R.; Swensen, Susan M.; Pawlowski, Katharina

    2004-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) is the key enzyme of primary ammonia assimilation in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of legumes and actinorhizal (Frankia-nodulated) plants. In root nodules of Datisca glomerata (Datiscaceae), transcripts hybridizing to a conserved coding region of the abundant nodule isoform, DgGS1-1, are abundant in uninfected nodule cortical tissue, but expression was not detectable in the infected zone or in the nodule meristem. Similarly, the GS holoprotein is immunolocalized exclusively to the uninfected nodule tissue. Phylogenetic analysis of the full-length cDNA of DgGS1-1 indicates affinities with cytosolic GS genes from legumes, the actinorhizal species Alnus glutinosa, and nonnodulating species, Vitis vinifera and Hevea brasilensis. The D. glomerata nodule GS expression pattern is a new variant among reported root nodule symbioses and may reflect an unusual nitrogen transfer pathway from the Frankia nodule microsymbiont to the plant infected tissue, coupled to a distinctive nitrogen cycle in the uninfected cortical tissue. Arg, Gln, and Glu are the major amino acids present in D. glomerata nodules, but Arg was not detected at high levels in leaves or roots. Arg as a major nodule nitrogen storage form is not found in other root nodule types except in the phylogenetically related Coriaria. Catabolism of Arg through the urea cycle could generate free ammonium in the uninfected tissue where GS is expressed. PMID:15247391

  15. Relationships between plasma leptin levels, leptin G2548A, leptin receptor Gln223Arg polymorphisms and gestational diabetes mellitus in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Peng, Songxu; Li, Wei; Wan, Zhihua; Fan, Linlin; Du, Yukai

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine concentrations of leptin and biochemical parameters in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) patients and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) individuals, and also to explore the links of leptin (LEP) G2548A and leptin receptor (LEPR) Gln223Arg polymorphisms with leptin levels and GDM risk among Chinese. Our study included 357 GDM and 355 NGT individuals who were at 24~30 gestational weeks. Plasma leptin and insulin levels were analyzed by ELISA. Gene polymorphisms were genotyped using TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The results showed that plasma leptin levels were significantly higher in the impaired fasting glucose (IFG) group than NGT group (34.35 (26.54, 56.48) ng/mL vs 26.31 (17.99, 37.87) ng/mL, P < 0.05). Plasma leptin levels correlated with plasma fasting insulin levels, pre-pregnant body mass index, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index both in GDM and NGT group (P < 0.05). However, neither LEP G2548A nor LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphisms were significantly associated with GDM risk and plasma leptin levels (P > 0.05). Our findings showed that high leptin level was associated with GDM. And larger and more rigorous researches were needed to further explore the association of LEP and LEPR gene polymorphisms and GDM among Chinese population. PMID:27034205

  16. Similarities in the structure of the transcriptional repressor AmtR in two different space groups suggest a model for the interaction with GlnK.

    PubMed

    Sevvana, Madhumati; Hasselt, Kristin; Grau, Florian C; Burkovski, Andreas; Muller, Yves A

    2017-03-01

    AmtR belongs to the TetR family of transcription regulators and is a global nitrogen regulator that is induced under nitrogen-starvation conditions in Corynebacterium glutamicum. AmtR regulates the expression of transporters and enzymes for the assimilation of ammonium and alternative nitrogen sources, for example urea, amino acids etc. The recognition of operator DNA by homodimeric AmtR is not regulated by small-molecule effectors as in other TetR-family members but by a trimeric adenylylated PII-type signal transduction protein named GlnK. The crystal structure of ligand-free AmtR (AmtRorth) has been solved at a resolution of 2.1 Å in space group P21212. Comparison of its quaternary assembly with the previously solved native AmtR structure (PDB entry 5dy1) in a trigonal crystal system (AmtRtri) not only shows how a solvent-content reduction triggers a space-group switch but also suggests a model for how dimeric AmtR might stoichiometrically interact with trimeric adenylylated GlnK.

  17. Spin-polarization and spin-dependent logic gates in a double quantum ring based on Rashba spin-orbit effect: Non-equilibrium Green's function approach

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, Leila Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2014-02-28

    Spin-dependent electron transport in an open double quantum ring, when each ring is made up of four quantum dots and threaded by a magnetic flux, is studied. Two independent and tunable gate voltages are applied to induce Rashba spin-orbit effect in the quantum rings. Using non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we study the effects of electron-electron interaction on spin-dependent electron transport and show that although the electron-electron interaction induces an energy gap, it has no considerable effect when the bias voltage is sufficiently high. We also show that the double quantum ring can operate as a spin-filter for both spin up and spin down electrons. The spin-polarization of transmitted electrons can be tuned from −1 (pure spin-down current) to +1 (pure spin-up current) by changing the magnetic flux and/or the gates voltage. Also, the double quantum ring can act as AND and NOR gates when the system parameters such as Rashba coefficient are properly adjusted.

  18. Metabolic regulation of Escherichia coli and its gdhA, glnL, gltB, D mutants under different carbon and nitrogen limitations in the continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-27

    It is quite important to understand how the central metabolism is regulated under nitrogen (N)- limitation as well as carbon (C)- limitation. In particular, the effect of C/N ratio on the metabolism is of practical interest for the heterologous protein production, PHB production, etc. Although the carbon and nitrogen metabolisms are interconnected and the overall mechanism is complicated, it is strongly desirable to clarify the effects of culture environment on the metabolism from the practical application point of view. The effect of C/N ratio on the metabolism in Escherichia coli was investigated in the aerobic continuous culture at the dilution rate of 0.2 h-1 based on fermentation data, transcriptional RNA level, and enzyme activity data. The glucose concentration was kept at 10 g/l, while ammonium sulfate concentration was varied from 5.94 to 0.594 g/l. The resultant C/N ratios were 1.68 (100%), 2.81(60%), 4.21(40%), 8.42(20%), and 16.84(10%), where the percentage values in brackets indicate the ratio of N- concentration as compared to the case of 5.94 g/l of ammonium sulfate. The mRNA levels of crp and mlc decreased, which caused ptsG transcript expression to be up-regulated as C/N ratio increased. As C/N ratio increased cra transcript expression decreased, which caused ptsH, pfkA, and pykF to be up-regulated. At high C/N ratio, transcriptional mRNA level of soxR/S increased, which may be due to the activated respiratory chain as indicated by up-regulations of such genes as cyoA, cydB, ndh as well as the increase in the specific CO2 production rate. The rpoN transcript expression increased with the increase in C/N ratio, which led glnA, L, G and gltD transcript expression to change in similar fashion. The nac transcript expression showed similar trend as rpoN, while gdhA transcript expression changed in reverse direction. The transcriptional mRNA level of glnB, which codes for PII, glnD and glnK increased as C/N ratio increases. It was shown that GS

  19. Selectable towline spin chute system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vairo, Daniel M. (Inventor); Whipple, Raymond D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An emergency spin recovery parachute is presented that is housed within a centrally mounted housing on the aft end of an aircraft and connected to a ring fitting within the housing. Two selectively latching shackles connected to separate towlines are openly disposed adjacent the ring fitting. The towlines extend in opposite directions from the housing along the aircraft wing to attachment points adjacent the wing-tips where the other end of each towline is secured. Upon pilot command, one of the open shackles latches to the ring fitting to attach the towline connected thereto, and a second command signal deploys the parachute. Suitable break-away straps secure the towlines to the aircraft surface until the parachute is deployed and the resulting force on the towline attached to the parachute overcomes the straps and permits the towline to extend to the point of attachment to exert sufficient drag on the spinning aircraft to permit the pilot to regain control of the aircraft. To employ the parachute as a drag chute to reduce landing speeds, both shackles and their respective towlines are latched to the ring fitting.

  20. Spin Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  1. Spin-Dependent Transport in Fe/GaAs(100)/Fe Vertical Spin-Valves

    PubMed Central

    Wong, P. K. Johnny; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Jing; Will, Iain G.; Xu, Yongbing; Xia, Ke; Holmes, Stuart N.; Farrer, Ian; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, Dave A.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of magnetic materials with semiconductors will lead to the development of the next spintronics devices such as spin field effect transistor (SFET), which is capable of both data storage and processing. While the fabrication and transport studies of lateral SFET have attracted greatly attentions, there are only few studies of vertical devices, which may offer the opportunity for the future three-dimensional integration. Here, we provide evidence of two-terminal electrical spin injection and detection in Fe/GaAs/Fe vertical spin-valves (SVs) with the GaAs layer of 50 nanometers thick and top and bottom Fe electrodes deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. The spin-valve effect, which corresponds to the individual switching of the top and bottom Fe layers, is bias dependent and observed up to 20 K. We propose that the strongly bias- and temperature-dependent MR is associated with spin transport at the interfacial Fe/GaAs Schottky contacts and in the GaAs membranes, where balance between the barrier profiles as well as the dwell time to spin lifetime ratio are crucial factors for determining the device operations. The demonstration of the fabrication and spin injection in the vertical SV with a semiconductor interlayer is expected to open a new avenue in exploring the SFET. PMID:27432047

  2. Spin-Dependent Transport in Fe/GaAs(100)/Fe Vertical Spin-Valves.

    PubMed

    Wong, P K Johnny; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Jing; Will, Iain G; Xu, Yongbing; Xia, Ke; Holmes, Stuart N; Farrer, Ian; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, Dave A

    2016-07-19

    The integration of magnetic materials with semiconductors will lead to the development of the next spintronics devices such as spin field effect transistor (SFET), which is capable of both data storage and processing. While the fabrication and transport studies of lateral SFET have attracted greatly attentions, there are only few studies of vertical devices, which may offer the opportunity for the future three-dimensional integration. Here, we provide evidence of two-terminal electrical spin injection and detection in Fe/GaAs/Fe vertical spin-valves (SVs) with the GaAs layer of 50 nanometers thick and top and bottom Fe electrodes deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. The spin-valve effect, which corresponds to the individual switching of the top and bottom Fe layers, is bias dependent and observed up to 20 K. We propose that the strongly bias- and temperature-dependent MR is associated with spin transport at the interfacial Fe/GaAs Schottky contacts and in the GaAs membranes, where balance between the barrier profiles as well as the dwell time to spin lifetime ratio are crucial factors for determining the device operations. The demonstration of the fabrication and spin injection in the vertical SV with a semiconductor interlayer is expected to open a new avenue in exploring the SFET.

  3. Spin-Dependent Transport in Fe/GaAs(100)/Fe Vertical Spin-Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, P. K. Johnny; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Jing; Will, Iain G.; Xu, Yongbing; Xia, Ke; Holmes, Stuart N.; Farrer, Ian; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, Dave A.

    2016-07-01

    The integration of magnetic materials with semiconductors will lead to the development of the next spintronics devices such as spin field effect transistor (SFET), which is capable of both data storage and processing. While the fabrication and transport studies of lateral SFET have attracted greatly attentions, there are only few studies of vertical devices, which may offer the opportunity for the future three-dimensional integration. Here, we provide evidence of two-terminal electrical spin injection and detection in Fe/GaAs/Fe vertical spin-valves (SVs) with the GaAs layer of 50 nanometers thick and top and bottom Fe electrodes deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. The spin-valve effect, which corresponds to the individual switching of the top and bottom Fe layers, is bias dependent and observed up to 20 K. We propose that the strongly bias- and temperature-dependent MR is associated with spin transport at the interfacial Fe/GaAs Schottky contacts and in the GaAs membranes, where balance between the barrier profiles as well as the dwell time to spin lifetime ratio are crucial factors for determining the device operations. The demonstration of the fabrication and spin injection in the vertical SV with a semiconductor interlayer is expected to open a new avenue in exploring the SFET.

  4. Spin-flip configuration interaction singles with exact spin-projection: Theory and applications to strongly correlated systems.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi

    2015-10-14

    Spin-flip approaches capture static correlation with the same computational scaling as the ordinary single reference methods. Here, we extend spin-flip configuration interaction singles (SFCIS) by projecting out intrinsic spin-contamination to make it spin-complete, rather than by explicitly complementing it with spin-coupled configurations. We give a general formalism of spin-projection for SFCIS, applicable to any spin states. The proposed method is viewed as a natural unification of SFCIS and spin-projected CIS to achieve a better qualitative accuracy at a low computational cost. While our wave function ansatz is more compact than previously proposed spin-complete SF approaches, it successfully offers more general static correlation beyond biradicals without sacrificing good quantum numbers. It is also shown that our method is invariant with respect to open-shell orbital rotations, due to the uniqueness of spin-projection. We will report benchmark calculations to demonstrate its qualitative performance on strongly correlated systems, including conical intersections that appear both in ground-excited and excited-excited degeneracies.

  5. Spin-flip configuration interaction singles with exact spin-projection: Theory and applications to strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Spin-flip approaches capture static correlation with the same computational scaling as the ordinary single reference methods. Here, we extend spin-flip configuration interaction singles (SFCIS) by projecting out intrinsic spin-contamination to make it spin-complete, rather than by explicitly complementing it with spin-coupled configurations. We give a general formalism of spin-projection for SFCIS, applicable to any spin states. The proposed method is viewed as a natural unification of SFCIS and spin-projected CIS to achieve a better qualitative accuracy at a low computational cost. While our wave function ansatz is more compact than previously proposed spin-complete SF approaches, it successfully offers more general static correlation beyond biradicals without sacrificing good quantum numbers. It is also shown that our method is invariant with respect to open-shell orbital rotations, due to the uniqueness of spin-projection. We will report benchmark calculations to demonstrate its qualitative performance on strongly correlated systems, including conical intersections that appear both in ground-excited and excited-excited degeneracies.

  6. Spin-flip configuration interaction singles with exact spin-projection: Theory and applications to strongly correlated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi

    2015-10-14

    Spin-flip approaches capture static correlation with the same computational scaling as the ordinary single reference methods. Here, we extend spin-flip configuration interaction singles (SFCIS) by projecting out intrinsic spin-contamination to make it spin-complete, rather than by explicitly complementing it with spin-coupled configurations. We give a general formalism of spin-projection for SFCIS, applicable to any spin states. The proposed method is viewed as a natural unification of SFCIS and spin-projected CIS to achieve a better qualitative accuracy at a low computational cost. While our wave function ansatz is more compact than previously proposed spin-complete SF approaches, it successfully offers more general static correlation beyond biradicals without sacrificing good quantum numbers. It is also shown that our method is invariant with respect to open-shell orbital rotations, due to the uniqueness of spin-projection. We will report benchmark calculations to demonstrate its qualitative performance on strongly correlated systems, including conical intersections that appear both in ground-excited and excited-excited degeneracies.

  7. Stripe phase and double-roton excitations in interacting spin-orbit-coupled spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kuei; Qu, Chunlei; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Yongping; Zhang, Chuanwei

    Spin-orbit (SO) coupling plays a major role in many important phenomena in condensed matter physics. However, the SO coupling physics in high-spin systems, especially with superfluids, has not been well explored because of the spin half of electrons in solids. In this context, the recent experimental realization of spin-orbit coupling in spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) has opened a completely new avenue for exploring SO-coupled high-spin superfluids. Nevertheless, the experiment has only revealed the single-particle physics of the system. Here, we study the effects of interactions between atoms on the ground states and collective excitations of SO-coupled spin-1 BECs in the presence of a spin-tensor potential. We find that ferromagnetic interaction between atoms can induce a stripe phase exhibiting two modulating patterns. We characterize the phase transitions between different phases using the spin-tensor density as well as the collective dipole motion of the BEC. We show that there exists a new type of double maxon-roton structure in the Bogoliubov-excitation spectrum, attributing to the three band minima of the SO-coupled spin-1 BEC. Our work could motivate further theoretical and experimental study along this direction.

  8. Wildlife openings

    Treesearch

    William M. Healy

    1989-01-01

    Openings provide important feeding areas for forest wildlife because herbaceous vegetation grows much more abundantly in the open than beneath a forest canopy. Herbage (grasses and forbs) is generally more nutritious and digestible than woody plant growth. Herbage is important in the diet of deer, especially in late winter and early spring. Voles and rabbits use...

  9. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  10. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  11. Spin caloritronics in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Angsula; Frota, H. O.

    2015-06-14

    Spin caloritronics, the combination of spintronics with thermoelectrics, exploiting both the intrinsic spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment in addition to its fundamental electronic charge and temperature, is an emerging technology mainly in the development of low-power-consumption technology. In this work, we study the thermoelectric properties of a Rashba dot attached to two single layer/bilayer graphene sheets as leads. The temperature difference on the two graphene leads induces a spin current, which depends on the temperature and chemical potential. We demonstrate that the Rashba dot behaves as a spin filter for selected values of the chemical potential and is able to filter electrons by their spin orientation. The spin thermopower has also been studied where the effects of the chemical potential, temperature, and also the Rashba term have been observed.

  12. Electric field effects on spin accumulation in Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} using tunable spin injection contacts at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerbeek, A. M.; Vries, E. K. de; Wees, B. J. van; Banerjee, T.; Dankert, A.; Dash, S. P.

    2014-05-26

    We report on features in charge transport and spin injection in an oxide semiconductor, Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3}. This is demonstrated using electrically tunable spin injection contacts which exploit the large electric field at the interface and its interplay with the relative permittivity of the semiconductor. We realize spin accumulation in Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} which displays a unique dependence of the spin lifetime with bias polarity. These findings suggest a strong influence of the interface electric field on the charge transport as well as on spin accumulation unlike in conventional semiconductors and opens up promising avenues in oxide spintronics.

  13. Spin coating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Torczynski, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

  14. Picosecond Spin Caloritronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David G.

    The coupling of spin and heat, i.e., spin caloritronics, gives rise to new physical phenomena in nanoscale spin devices and new ways to manipulate local magnetization. Our work in this field takes advantage of recent advances in the measurement and understanding of heat transport at the nanoscale using ultrafast lasers. We use a picosecond duration pump laser pulses as a source of heat and picosecond duration probe laser pulses to detect changes in temperature, spin accumulation, and spin transfer torque using a combination of time-domain thermoreflectance and time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect Our pump-probe optical methods enable us to change the temperature of ferromagnetic layers on a picosecond time-scale and generate enormous heat fluxes on the order of 100 GW m-2 that persist for ~ 30 ps. Thermally-driven ultrafast demagnetization of a perpendicular ferromagnet leads to spin accumulation in a normal metal and spin transfer torque in an in-plane ferromagnet. The data are well described by models of spin generation and transport based on differences and gradients of thermodynamic parameters. The spin-dependent Seebeck effect of a perpendicular ferromagnetic layer converts a heat current into spin current, which in turn can be used to exert a spin transfer torque (STT) on a second ferromagnetic layer with in-plane magnetization. Using a [Co,Ni] multilayer as the source of spin, an energy fluence of ~ 4 J m-2 creates thermal STT sufficient to induce ~ 1 % tilting of the magnetization of a 2 nm-thick CoFeB layer.

  15. Rockets for spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The potential effectiveness of rockets as an auxiliary means for an aircraft to effect recovery from spins was investigated. The advances in rocket technology produced by the space effort suggested that currently available systems might obviate many of the problems encountered in earlier rocket systems. A modern fighter configuration known to exhibit a flat spin mode was selected. An analytical study was made of the thrust requirements for a rocket spin recovery system for the subject configuration. These results were then applied to a preliminary systems study of rocket components appropriate to the problem. Subsequent spin tunnel tests were run to evaluate the analytical results.

  16. Picosecond Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimling, Johannes; Choi, Gyung-Min; Brangham, Jack T.; Matalla-Wagner, Tristan; Huebner, Torsten; Kuschel, Timo; Yang, Fengyuan; Cahill, David G.

    2017-02-01

    We report time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in normal metal /Y3Fe5 O12 bilayers driven by an interfacial temperature difference between electrons and magnons. The measured time evolution of spin accumulation induced by laser excitation indicates transfer of angular momentum across normal metal /Y3Fe5 O12 interfaces on a picosecond time scale, too short for contributions from a bulk temperature gradient in an yttrium iron garnet. The product of spin-mixing conductance and the interfacial spin Seebeck coefficient determined is of the order of 108 A m-2 K-1 .

  17. Operator spin foam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Benjamin; Hellmann, Frank; Kamiński, Wojciech; Kisielowski, Marcin; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a systematic approach to spin foams. We define operator spin foams, that is foams labelled by group representations and operators, as our main tool. A set of moves we define in the set of the operator spin foams (among other operations) allows us to split the faces and the edges of the foams. We assign to each operator spin foam a contracted operator, by using the contractions at the vertices and suitably adjusted face amplitudes. The emergence of the face amplitudes is the consequence of assuming the invariance of the contracted operator with respect to the moves. Next, we define spin foam models and consider the class of models assumed to be symmetric with respect to the moves we have introduced, and assuming their partition functions (state sums) are defined by the contracted operators. Briefly speaking, those operator spin foam models are invariant with respect to the cellular decomposition, and are sensitive only to the topology and colouring of the foam. Imposing an extra symmetry leads to a family we call natural operator spin foam models. This symmetry, combined with assumed invariance with respect to the edge splitting move, determines a complete characterization of a general natural model. It can be obtained by applying arbitrary (quantum) constraints on an arbitrary BF spin foam model. In particular, imposing suitable constraints on a spin(4) BF spin foam model is exactly the way we tend to view 4D quantum gravity, starting with the BC model and continuing with the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine (EPRL) or Freidel-Krasnov (FK) models. That makes our framework directly applicable to those models. Specifically, our operator spin foam framework can be translated into the language of spin foams and partition functions. Among our natural spin foam models there are the BF spin foam model, the BC model, and a model corresponding to the EPRL intertwiners. Our operator spin foam framework can also be used for more general spin

  18. SPIN FLIPPING IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; LEHRACH,A.; LUCCIO,A.; MACKAY,W.W.; ROSER,T.; TSOUPAS,N.

    2001-06-18

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), polarized protons will be accelerated and stored for spin physics experiments. Two full helical snakes will be used to eliminate the depolarization due to imperfection and intrinsic spin resonances. Since no resonances are crossed in RHIC, the beam polarization remains fixed through acceleration. However, in order to reduce systematic errors, the experiment often requires the polarization direction reversed. This paper presents a method of using an ac dipole to obtain a full spin flip in the presence of two full snakes [1]. A similar method of using an rf solenoid for spin flip was tested at IUCF [2,3].

  19. GlnR negatively regulates the transcription of the alanine dehydrogenase encoding gene ald in Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32 under nitrogen limited conditions via specific binding to its major transcription initiation site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Chen; Duan, Na; Li, Bin; Ding, Xiao-Ming; Yao, Yu-Feng; Hu, Jun; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium assimilation is catalyzed by two enzymatic pathways, i.e., glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) and alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) in Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, the AlaDH pathway is the major route for ammonium assimilation, while the GS/GOGAT pathway takes over when the extracellular nitrogen supply is limited. The global nitrogen regulator GlnR was previously characterized to activate the transcription of the GS encoding gene glnA in response to nitrogen limitation and is demonstrated in this study as a repressor for the transcription of the AlaDH encoding gene ald, whose regulation is consistent with the switch of the ammonium assimilation pathways from AlaDH to GS/GOGAT responding to nitrogen limitation. Three transcription initiation sites (TISs) of ald were determined with primer extension assay, among which transcription from aldP2 contributed the major transcripts under nitrogen-rich conditions but was repressed to an undetectable level in response to nitrogen limitation. Through DNase I footprinting assay, two separate regions were found to be protected by GlnR within ald promoter, within which three GlnR binding sites (a1, b1 sites in region I and a2 site in region II) were defined. Interestingly, the major TIS aldP2 is located in the middle of a2 site within region II. Therefore, one may easily conclude that GlnR represses the transcription of ald via specific binding to the GlnR binding sites, which obviously blocks the transcription initiation from aldP2 and therefore reduces ald transcripts.

  20. Spin-mediated Hybrid Quantum Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Airlia; Chang, Laura; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Bariani, Francesco; Singh, Swati; Date, Aditya; Chakram, Srivatsan; Schwab, Keith; Meystre, Pierre; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2015-05-01

    We describe our realization of a hybrid quantum system where a macroscopic mechanical resonator is coupled to the collective spin of an ultracold gas through a remote optical interface. Through this interface, the spin ensemble is capable of sympathetic cooling, sub-SQL detection and quantum control of the mechanical resonator. As such, this hybrid quantum system presents a powerful scheme to combine the robustness of the mesoscopic resonator with the sensitivity and coherence of the spin ensemble. Our ongoing studies of this system include various aspects of quantum metrology and the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of open quantum systems. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics, the DARPA QuASAR program through a grant from the ARO and an NSF INSPIRE award.

  1. Higher-order spin and charge dynamics in a quantum dot-lead hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R; Amaha, Shinichi; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Allison, Giles; Stano, Peter; Noiri, Akito; Ito, Takumi; Loss, Daniel; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D; Tarucha, Seigo

    2017-09-22

    Understanding the dynamics of open quantum systems is important and challenging in basic physics and applications for quantum devices and quantum computing. Semiconductor quantum dots offer a good platform to explore the physics of open quantum systems because we can tune parameters including the coupling to the environment or leads. Here, we apply the fast single-shot measurement techniques from spin qubit experiments to explore the spin and charge dynamics due to tunnel coupling to a lead in a quantum dot-lead hybrid system. We experimentally observe both spin and charge time evolution via first- and second-order tunneling processes, and reveal the dynamics of the spin-flip through the intermediate state. These results enable and stimulate the exploration of spin dynamics in dot-lead hybrid systems, and may offer useful resources for spin manipulation and simulation of open quantum systems.

  2. Quantum spin liquid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Kanoda, Kazushi; Ng, Tai-Kai

    2017-04-01

    This is an introductory review of the physics of quantum spin liquid states. Quantum magnetism is a rapidly evolving field, and recent developments reveal that the ground states and low-energy physics of frustrated spin systems may develop many exotic behaviors once we leave the regime of semiclassical approaches. The purpose of this article is to introduce these developments. The article begins by explaining how semiclassical approaches fail once quantum mechanics become important and then describe the alternative approaches for addressing the problem. Mainly spin-1 /2 systems are discussed, and most of the time is spent in this article on one particular set of plausible spin liquid states in which spins are represented by fermions. These states are spin-singlet states and may be viewed as an extension of Fermi liquid states to Mott insulators, and they are usually classified in the category of so-called S U (2 ), U (1 ), or Z2 spin liquid states. A review is given of the basic theory regarding these states and the extensions of these states to include the effect of spin-orbit coupling and to higher spin (S >1 /2 ) systems. Two other important approaches with strong influences on the understanding of spin liquid states are also introduced: (i) matrix product states and projected entangled pair states and (ii) the Kitaev honeycomb model. Experimental progress concerning spin liquid states in realistic materials, including anisotropic triangular-lattice systems [κ -(ET )2Cu2(CN )3 and EtMe3Sb [Pd (dmit )2]2 ], kagome-lattice system [ZnCu3(OH )6Cl2 ], and hyperkagome lattice system (Na4 Ir3 O8 ), is reviewed and compared against the corresponding theories.

  3. Effect of spin rotation coupling on spin transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Debashree Basu, B.

    2013-12-15

    We have studied the spin rotation coupling (SRC) as an ingredient to explain different spin-related issues. This special kind of coupling can play the role of a Dresselhaus like coupling in certain conditions. Consequently, one can control the spin splitting, induced by the Dresselhaus like term, which is unusual in a semiconductor heterostructure. Within this framework, we also study the renormalization of the spin-dependent electric field and spin current due to the k{sup →}⋅p{sup →} perturbation, by taking into account the interband mixing in the rotating system. In this paper we predict the enhancement of the spin-dependent electric field resulting from the renormalized spin rotation coupling. The renormalization factor of the spin electric field is different from that of the SRC or Zeeman coupling. The effect of renormalized SRC on spin current and Berry curvature is also studied. Interestingly, in the presence of this SRC-induced SOC it is possible to describe spin splitting as well as spin galvanic effect in semiconductors. -- Highlights: •Studied effect of spin rotation coupling on the spin electric field, spin current and Berry curvature. •In the k{sup →}⋅p{sup →} framework we study the renormalization of spin electric field and spin current. •For an inertial system we have discussed the spin splitting. •Expression for the Berry phase in the inertial system is discussed. •The inertial spin galvanic effect is studied.

  4. Spin Pumping and Measurement of Spin Currents in Optical Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, C; Lohse, M; Citro, R; Bloch, I

    2016-10-21

    We report on the experimental implementation of a spin pump with ultracold bosonic atoms in an optical superlattice. In the limit of isolated double wells, it represents a 1D dynamical version of the quantum spin Hall effect. Starting from an antiferromagnetically ordered spin chain, we periodically vary the underlying spin-dependent Hamiltonian and observe a spin current without charge transport. We demonstrate a novel detection method to measure spin currents in optical lattices via superexchange oscillations emerging after a projection onto static double wells. Furthermore, we directly verify spin transport through in situ measurements of the spins' center-of-mass displacement.

  5. Spin Pumping and Measurement of Spin Currents in Optical Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, C.; Lohse, M.; Citro, R.; Bloch, I.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the experimental implementation of a spin pump with ultracold bosonic atoms in an optical superlattice. In the limit of isolated double wells, it represents a 1D dynamical version of the quantum spin Hall effect. Starting from an antiferromagnetically ordered spin chain, we periodically vary the underlying spin-dependent Hamiltonian and observe a spin current without charge transport. We demonstrate a novel detection method to measure spin currents in optical lattices via superexchange oscillations emerging after a projection onto static double wells. Furthermore, we directly verify spin transport through in situ measurements of the spins' center-of-mass displacement.

  6. Amino acid residues Gln4020 and Lys4021 of the ryanodine receptor type 1 are required for activation by 4-chloro-m-cresol.

    PubMed

    Fessenden, James D; Feng, Wei; Pessah, Isaac N; Allen, Paul D

    2006-07-28

    The ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) and type 2 (RyR2), but not type 3 (RyR3), are efficiently activated by 4-chloro-m-cresol (4-CmC). We previously showed that a 173-amino acid segment of RyR1 (residues 4007-4180) is required for channel activation by 4-CmC (Fessenden, J. D., Perez, C. F., Goth, S., Pessah, I. N., and Allen, P. D. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 28727-28735). In the present study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to identify individual amino acid(s) within this region that mediate 4-CmC activation. In RyR1, substitution of 11 amino acids conserved between RyR1 and RyR2, but divergent in RyR3, with their RyR3 counterparts reduced 4-CmC sensitivity to the same degree as substitution of the entire 173-amino acid segment. Further analysis of various RyR1 mutants containing successively smaller numbers of these mutations identified 2 amino acid residues (Gln(4020) and Lys(4021)) that, when mutated to their RyR3 counterparts (Leu(3873) and Gln(3874)), abolished 4-CmC activation of RyR1. Mutation of either of these residues alone did not abolish 4-CmC sensitivity, although Q4020L partially reduced 4-CmC-induced Ca(2+) transients. In addition, mutation of the corresponding residues in RyR3 to their RyR1 counterparts (L3873Q/Q3874K) imparted 4-CmC sensitivity to RyR3. Recordings of single RyR1 channels indicated that 4-CmC applied to either the luminal or cytoplasmic side activated the channel with equal potency. Secondary structure modeling in the vicinity of the Gln(4020)-Lys(4021) dipeptide suggests that the region contains a surface-exposed region adjacent to a hydrophobic segment, indicating that both hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions of RyR1 are necessary for 4-CmC binding to the channel and/or to translate allosteric 4-CmC binding into channel activation.

  7. Electron spin susceptibility of superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Levitov, L.S.; Nazarov, Y.V.; Eliashberg, G.M.

    1985-03-10

    The effect of spin polarization due to the Meissner currents on the electron spin susceptibility of a superconductor is studied. This effect accounts for a susceptibility considerably stronger than that of a normal metal. The spin distribution is discussed.

  8. Spin splitting generated in a Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect

    Wójcik, P. Adamowski, J. Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.

    2015-07-07

    We have studied the spin splitting of the current in the Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact (QPC) in a perpendicular magnetic field. Our calculations show that the appropriate tuning of the QPC potential and the external magnetic field leads to an almost perfect separation of the spin-polarized currents: electrons with opposite spins flow out through different output branches. The spin splitting results from the joint effect of the QPC, the spin Zeeman splitting, and the electron transport through the edge states formed in the nanowire at the sufficiently high magnetic field. The Y-shaped nanostructure can be used to split the unpolarized current into two spin currents with opposite spins as well as to detect the flow of the spin current. We have found that the separation of the spin currents is only slightly affected by the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The spin-splitter device is an analogue of the optical device—the birefractive crystal that splits the unpolarized light into two beams with perpendicular polarizations. In the magnetic-field range, in which the current is carried through the edges states, the spin splitting is robust against the spin-independent scattering. This feature opens up a possibility of the application of the Y-shaped nanostructure as a non-ballistic spin-splitter device in spintronics.

  9. Coherent transport and manipulation of spins in indirect-exciton nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violante, A.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.

    2015-03-01

    We report on the coherent control and transport of indirect-exciton (IX) spins in GaAs double quantum well (DQW) nanostructures. The spin dynamics was investigated by optically generating spins using a focused, circularly polarized light spot and by probing their spatial distribution using spatially and polarization resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Optically injected IX spins precess while moving over distances exceeding 20 μ m from the excitation spot with a precession length that depends on the spin transport direction as well as on the bias applied across the DQW structure. This behavior is attributed to the spin precession in the effective magnetic field induced by the spin-orbit interaction. From the dependence of the spin dynamics on the transport direction, bias, and external magnetic fields we directly determined the Dresselhaus and Rashba electron spin splitting coefficients for the DQW structure. The precession dynamics is essentially independent of the IX density, thus indicating that the long spin lifetimes are not associated with IX collective effects. The long IX lifetimes, together with the negligible contribution of holes to the spin dynamics, are rather attributed to spatial separation of the electron and hole wave functions by the electric field, which reduces the electron-hole exchange interaction. If extended to the single-exciton regime, the present results on coherent spin precession over long transport distances as well as the control of the spin vector using electric and magnetic fields open the way for the application of IX spins in quantum information processing.

  10. Spin splitting generated in a Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, P.; Adamowski, J.; Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the spin splitting of the current in the Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact (QPC) in a perpendicular magnetic field. Our calculations show that the appropriate tuning of the QPC potential and the external magnetic field leads to an almost perfect separation of the spin-polarized currents: electrons with opposite spins flow out through different output branches. The spin splitting results from the joint effect of the QPC, the spin Zeeman splitting, and the electron transport through the edge states formed in the nanowire at the sufficiently high magnetic field. The Y-shaped nanostructure can be used to split the unpolarized current into two spin currents with opposite spins as well as to detect the flow of the spin current. We have found that the separation of the spin currents is only slightly affected by the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The spin-splitter device is an analogue of the optical device—the birefractive crystal that splits the unpolarized light into two beams with perpendicular polarizations. In the magnetic-field range, in which the current is carried through the edges states, the spin splitting is robust against the spin-independent scattering. This feature opens up a possibility of the application of the Y-shaped nanostructure as a non-ballistic spin-splitter device in spintronics.

  11. All-electric control of single atom spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, Sander

    2011-03-01

    The quantum state of a single spin is a great candidate for forming a qubit. Spin systems in various forms are considered for the task, ranging from electrons trapped in artificial quantum dots to magnetic dopants in semiconductors and diamond. In this talk I will review recent progress towards controlling the spins of individual atoms on a surface through local access with an STM probe tip: an intriguing approach in view of the possibility to rearrange the atoms at will so as to build multi-atom structures. Magnetic d-metal atoms, separated from a metal substrate by a thin decoupling layer, are studied through inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS): a tool by which transition energies of the spin state can be accurately followed. By addressing the atoms with a spin-filtered probe tip, controlled excitations or de-excitations can be made, effectively pumping the spin into a magnetization direction of choice. In a more recent experiment, spin pumping is performed in short pulses, opening up ways to control atomic spins in the time domain. I will discuss avenues to further develop this technique, eventually leading to coherent control of an atomic spin qubit.

  12. Putting a new spin on unoccupied electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donath, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Inverse photoemission provides experimental information on the unoccupied electronic states, which is complementary to that obtained by photoemission about the occupied states. The first experimental demonstration of inverse photoemission in the vacuum ultraviolet energy range in 1977 was followed by an important add-on in 1982, the use of spin-polarized electrons. This pioneering experiment opened the way to reveal the spin character of unoccupied electron states in ferromagnets. In this contribution, I will describe the technical development of spin-resolved inverse photoemission with respect to efficiency as well as energy, momentum and spin resolution since the beginning until today. I will give a review about important results obtained by this technique. For about three decades, exchange-split electron states of majority and minority spin character at ferromagnetic surfaces and in ultrathin films were the topics of interest. Since recently, spin textures in momentum space caused by spin-orbit interaction in Rashba systems and topological insulators offer a new field of application for spin-resolved inverse photoemission. I will present a selection of examples, from small and giant Rashba splittings to rotating spins with chiral texture, influenced by the specific symmetry of the system and the orbital character of the respective states.

  13. Topological Spin Glass in Diluted Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Arnab; Moessner, R.

    2015-06-01

    It is a salient experimental fact that a large fraction of candidate spin liquid materials freeze as the temperature is lowered. The question naturally arises whether such freezing is intrinsic to the spin liquid ("disorder-free glassiness") or extrinsic, in the sense that a topological phase simply coexists with standard freezing of impurities. Here, we demonstrate a surprising third alternative, namely, that freezing and topological liquidity are inseparably linked. The topological phase reacts to the introduction of disorder by generating degrees of freedom of a new type (along with interactions between them), which in turn undergo a freezing transition while the topological phase supporting them remains intact.

  14. Topological Spin Glass in Diluted Spin Ice.

    PubMed

    Sen, Arnab; Moessner, R

    2015-06-19

    It is a salient experimental fact that a large fraction of candidate spin liquid materials freeze as the temperature is lowered. The question naturally arises whether such freezing is intrinsic to the spin liquid ("disorder-free glassiness") or extrinsic, in the sense that a topological phase simply coexists with standard freezing of impurities. Here, we demonstrate a surprising third alternative, namely, that freezing and topological liquidity are inseparably linked. The topological phase reacts to the introduction of disorder by generating degrees of freedom of a new type (along with interactions between them), which in turn undergo a freezing transition while the topological phase supporting them remains intact.

  15. Spin Waves in Quasiequilibrium Spin Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, Kevin S.; Dahal, Hari P.

    2006-07-28

    Using the Landau Fermi liquid theory we discovered a new propagating transverse spin wave in a paramagnetic system which is driven slightly out of equilibrium without applying an external magnetic field. We find a gapless mode which describes the uniform precession of the magnetization in the absence of a magnetic field. We also find a gapped mode associated with the precession of the spin current around the internal field. The gapless mode has a quadratic dispersion leading to a T{sup 3/2} contribution to the specific heat. These modes significantly contribute to the dynamic structure function.

  16. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  17. Sparkling and Spinning Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Ruth Kearney

    1964-01-01

    Teachers should foster in children's writing the use of words with "sparkle" and "spin"--"sparkle" implying brightness and vitality, "spin" connoting industry, patience, and painstaking work. By providing creative listening experiences with good children's or adult literature, the teacher can encourage students to broaden their imaginations and…

  18. Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Stephen M; Zhang, Wei; Kc, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E; Jiang, J Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-04

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF_{2}. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF_{2} (110) (30  nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF_{2} (110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF_{2} through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2-80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9  T) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF_{2} thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  19. Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Zhang, Wei; KC, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E.; Jiang, J. Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-01

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF2 . A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF2 (110) (30 nm )/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF2 (110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF2 through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2-80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9 T ) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF2 thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  20. Spin coating of electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-01-01

    Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

  1. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spin, mass, and symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, M.E.

    1994-12-01

    When the strong interactions were a mystery, spin seemed to be just a complication on top of an already puzzling set of phenomena. But now that particle physicists have understood the strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions, to be gauge theories, with matter built of quarks and leptons, it is recognized that the special properties of spin 1/2 and spin 1 particles have taken central role in the understanding of Nature. The lectures in this summer school will be devoted to the use of spin in unravelling detailed questions about the fundamental interactions. Thus, why not begin by posing a deeper question: Why is there spin? More precisely, why do the basic pointlike constituents of Nature carry intrinsic nonzero quanta of angular momentum? Though the authos has found no definite answer to this question, the pursuit of an answer has led through a wonderful tangle of speculations on the deep structure of Nature. Is spin constructed or is it fundamental? Is it the requirement of symmetry? In the furthest flights taken, it seems that space-time itself is too restrictive a notion, and that this must be generalized in order to gain a full appreciation of spin. In any case, there is no doubt that spin must play a central role in unlocking the mysteries of fundamental physics.

  3. Antiferromagnetic spin Seebeck effect.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Stephen M.; Zhang, Wei; KC, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E.; Jiang, J. Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-03

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF2. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF2 (110) (30nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF2(110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF2 through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2–80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9T) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF2 thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  4. Observing Black Hole Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2015-08-01

    Black hole spin is important in both the fundamental physics and astrophysics realms. In fundamental terms, many extensions and alternatives to General Relativity (GR) reveal themselves through effects related to (or at least of the same order as) spin. Astrophysically, spin is a fossil record of how black holes have grown and may, in addition, be an important source of energy (e.g., powering relativistic jets from black hole systems). I shall review recent progress on observational studies of black hole spin, especially those made in the X-ray waveband. We now have multiple techniques that can be applied in our search for black hole spin; I shall discuss the concordance (or, sometimes, lack thereof) between these techniques. Finally, I shall discuss what we can expect in the next few years with the launch of new X-ray instrumentation as well as the deployment of the Event Horizon Telescope.

  5. Spin Seebeck insulator.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Xiao, J; Adachi, H; Ohe, J; Takahashi, S; Ieda, J; Ota, T; Kajiwara, Y; Umezawa, H; Kawai, H; Bauer, G E W; Maekawa, S; Saitoh, E

    2010-11-01

    Thermoelectric generation is an essential function in future energy-saving technologies. However, it has so far been an exclusive feature of electric conductors, a situation which limits its application; conduction electrons are often problematic in the thermal design of devices. Here we report electric voltage generation from heat flowing in an insulator. We reveal that, despite the absence of conduction electrons, the magnetic insulator LaY(2)Fe(5)O(12) can convert a heat flow into a spin voltage. Attached Pt films can then transform this spin voltage into an electric voltage as a result of the inverse spin Hall effect. The experimental results require us to introduce a thermally activated interface spin exchange between LaY(2)Fe(5)O(12) and Pt. Our findings extend the range of potential materials for thermoelectric applications and provide a crucial piece of information for understanding the physics of the spin Seebeck effect.

  6. Fractionalized spin-wave continuum in kagome spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jia-Wei; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    Motivated by spin-wave continuum (SWC) observed in recent neutron scattering experiments in Herbertsmithite, we use Gutzwiller-projected wave functions to study dynamic spin structure factor S (q , ω) of spin liquid states on the kagome lattice. Spin-1 excited states in spin liquids are represented by Gutzwiller-projected two-spinon excited wave functions. We investigate three different spin liquid candidates, spinon Fermi-surface spin liquid (FSL), Dirac spin liquid (DSL) and random-flux spin liquid (RSL). FSL and RSL have low energy peaks in S (q , ω) at K points in the extended magnetic Brillouin zone, in contrast to experiments where low energy peaks are found at M points. There is no obviuos contradiction between DSL and neutron scattering measurements. Besides a fractionalized spin (i.e. spin-1/2), spinons in DSL carry a fractionalized crystal momentum which is potentially detectable in SWC in the neutron scattering measurements.

  7. Emergence by Design in Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisoli, Cristiano; Morrison, Muir; Chern, Gia-Wei; Gilbert, Ian; Zhang, Sheng; Schiffer, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Recently a new perspective has opened in the study of frustration through the creation of artificial frustrated magnetic systems. These materials consist of arrays of lithographically fabricated single-domain ferromagnetic nanostructures that behave like giant Ising spins, whose interactions can be controlled through appropriate choices of their geometric properties and arrangement on a (frustrated) lattice. Higher control, inclusive of genuine thermal ensembles have replaced the earlier and coarser methods based on magnetic agitation. Dynamical versions are now being realized, characterized in real time via PEEM, revealing statistical mechanics in action. This affords implementation of new geometries, not found in nature, for dedicated bottom up design of desired emergent properties. Born as a scientific toy to investigate frustration-by-design, artificial spin ice might now be used to open ``a path into an uncharted territory, a landscape of advanced functional materials in which topological effects on physical properties can be explored and harnessed.''.

  8. Synchronization of spin-transfer torque oscillators by spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects

    SciTech Connect

    Elyasi, Mehrdad; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-02-14

    We have proposed a method to synchronize multiple spin-transfer torque oscillators based on spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects. The proposed oscillator system consists of a series of nano-magnets in junction with a normal metal with high spin-orbit coupling, and an accumulative feedback loop. We conduct simulations to demonstrate the effect of modulated charge currents in the normal metal due to spin pumping from each nano-magnet. We show that the interplay between the spin Hall effect and inverse spin Hall effect results in synchronization of the nano-magnets.

  9. Spin superconductor in ferromagnetic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qing-Feng; Jiang, Zhao-Tan; Yu, Yue; Xie, X. C.

    2011-12-01

    We show a spin superconductor in ferromagnetic graphene as the counterpart to the charge superconductor in which a spin-polarized electron-hole pair plays the role of the spin 2(ℏ/2) “Cooper pair” with a neutral charge. We present a BCS-type theory for the spin superconductor. With the “London-type equations” of the super-spin-current density, we show the existence of an electric “Meissner effect” against a spatial varying electric field. We further study a spin superconductor/normal conductor/spin superconductor junction and predict a spin-current Josephson effect.

  10. Transverse Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, William

    2014-05-01

    Transverse spin diffusion is a relatively new transport coefficient and a review of its history and physical basis will be presented. In NMR spin diffusion is often measured by spin echo techniques, which involve spin currents perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization, in contrast with the usual longitudinal case where the current is parallel to the magnetization. The first indication that this involved new physics was the Leggett-Rice effect (1970) in which spin waves, new spin-echo behavior, and an altered spin diffusion coefficient were predicted in liquid 3He. This effect gave the possibility of the first measurement of F1a, the parameter of the Landau Fermi-liquid theory mean-field responsible for the effect. In 1982 Lhuillier and Laloe found a transport equation very similar to the Leggett equation, but valid for highly-polarized dilute Boltzmann Bose and Fermi gases, and describing the ``identical spin rotation effect'' (ISRE), the analog of a Landau mean field. Coincidentally Bashkin and Meyerovich had also given equivalent descriptions of transport in polarized Boltzmann gases. That a mean-field effect could exists in dilute Boltzmann gases was theoretically surprising, but was confirmed experimentally. At low polarization the basic transverse diffusion constant D⊥ coincides with the longitudinal value D∥ however Meyerovich first pointed out that they could differ in highly polarized degenerate gases. Indeed detailed calculations (Jeon and Mullin) showed that, while D∥ is proportional to T-2, D⊥ approaches a constant (depending on polarization) at low T. Considerable controversy existed until experimental verification was achieved in 2004. The importance of ISRE again arose in 2008 as the basis of ``anomalous spin-state segregation'' in Duke and JILA experiments. More recently application of the ideas of transverse spin diffusion to strongly interacting Fermi gases has resulted in the observation of the diffusion constants at the quantum

  11. [Hemoglobins, XXXVII. The primary structure of a monomeric insect hemoglobin (Erythrocruorin), component CTT IIIa of Chironomus thummi thummi. An anomalous Heme complex: E7 Gln, E11 Ile].

    PubMed

    Steer, W; Braunitzer, G

    1981-01-01

    The primary structure of the monomeric hemoglobin CTT IIIa of the midge larva of Chironomus thummi thummi is presented. Cyanogenbromide peptides and tryptic peptides were used for sequence analysis. The primary structure was established with a small number of large peptides. The complete sequencing of the cyanogen bromide peptides was enabled by the C-terminal fixation of arginine. The primary structure of CTT IIIa is compared to the beta-chains of human and to the monomeric component CTT III: CTT IIIa possesses a "tail" of 9 amino acids on the N-terminus, and shows only a small number of identical residues compared to the number that other CTT hemoglobins share with each other. Also the heme complex is unusual: E7 Gln and E11 Ile.

  12. The mitochondrial tRNA(Gln) T4353C mutation may not be associated with essential hypertension in Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing; Pei, Hui; Lan, Chao

    2016-09-01

    We reported here the possible role of a mitochondrial tRNA mutation: T4353C in clinical expression of essential hypertension in Chinese population. The human mammalian mitochondrial tRNA database was used to analyze the conservation index of this mutation between different species. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that the T4353C mutation belonged to human mitochondrial haplogroup HV, a West Eurasian haplogroup found throughout Western Asia and Eastern European but was infrequent in China. In addition, structural prediction of the T4353C mutation indicated that this transition did not alter the secondary structure of tRNA(Gln). Together, our data indicated that the T4353C mutation occurred infrequent and may not be associated with essential hypertension in Han Chinese population.

  13. Association between ERCC2 Lys751Gln polymorphism and the risk of pancreatic cancer, especially among Asians: evidence from a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Lu, Zi-Peng; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Liu, Dong-Fang; Shi, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Chun; Qin, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; He, Yuan; Wu, Peng-Fei; Miao, Yi; Jiang, Kui-Rong

    2017-02-16

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of Excision repair cross-complementing group 2 (ERCC2) gene are suspected to affect the risk of pancreatic cancer. Many studies have reported the association between ERCC2 Lys751Gln polymorphism (rs13181) and the susceptibility to pancreatic cancer, but the outcomes remained controversial. To comprehensively determine this association, we conducted a meta-analysis based on a total of eight studies. Evidence for this association was obtained from the PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases. In general, a significant association was found between ERCC2 rs13181 polymorphism and the susceptibility to pancreatic cancer in four genetic models [CC vs. AA: OR = 1.56, (95% CI: 1.28-1.90), P = 0.470; AC/CC vs. AA: OR=1.20, (95% CI: 1.06-1.36), P = 0.396; CC vs.

  14. Partial hypogonadotropic hypogonadism associated with the Leu266Arg and Gln106Arg mutation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Quintos, J B; Krotz, Stephan; Vogiatzi, Maria G; Kralickova, Milena; New, Maria I

    2009-02-01

    We describe a patient with partial hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by a compound heterozygous GnRH-R mutation. She is a 20-year-old tall, eunuchoid female referred for evaluation of primary amenorrhea. Spontaneous thelarche occurred at the age of 15 years. Breast and pubic hair were at Tanner stages 3 and 4, respectively. Evaluation revealed low plasma estradiol level and absence of withdrawal bleeding after progestin challenge. Pelvic ultrasonography showed a small uterus and ovaries. Bone age was delayed at 14.5 years. Bone mineral density showed osteopenia. Endogenous LH secretory pattern was abnormal with low amplitude and frequency, but responded to pulsatile GnRH administration. The coding exons of the GnRH-R gene were amplified and the PCR products were sequenced bidirectionally. Two different mutations were identified: one in exon 1 (Gln106Arg) and the other in exon 3 (Leu266Arg).

  15. TLR7 Gln11Leu single nucleotide polymorphism and response to treatment with imiquimod in patients with basal cell carcinoma: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Piaserico, Stefano; Michelotto, Anna; Frigo, Anna C; Alaibac, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    The Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonist, imiquimod, offers a topical and noninvasive therapeutic method for the clinical treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In this study we explored the relationship between the functional X-linked TLR7 rs179008/Gln11Leu polymorphism and the response to imiquimod in patients with BCC. Thirty-four BCC patients treated with imiquimod were included in the study. SNP genotyping of the TLR7 promoter polymorphism was performed by TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. In the group of female nonresponders to imiquimod a higher frequency of the altered genotype compared with responders was observed. Similarly, in the group of male nonresponders to imiquimod both patients with the mutated genotype were nonresponders. The results of this study show that patients carrying at least one T allele of the TLR7 promoter polymorphism are associated with an increased probability to be resistant to imiquimod therapy.

  16. Spin transport at interfaces with spin-orbit coupling: Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, V. P.; Stiles, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    We generalize magnetoelectronic circuit theory to account for spin transfer to and from the atomic lattice via interfacial spin-orbit coupling. This enables a proper treatment of spin transport at interfaces between a ferromagnet and a heavy-metal nonmagnet. This generalized approach describes spin transport in terms of drops in spin and charge accumulations across the interface (as in the standard approach), but additionally includes the responses from in-plane electric fields and offsets in spin accumulations. A key finding is that in-plane electric fields give rise to spin accumulations and spin currents that can be polarized in any direction, generalizing the Rashba-Edelstein and spin Hall effects. The spin accumulations exert torques on the magnetization at the interface when they are misaligned from the magnetization. The additional out-of-plane spin currents exert torques via the spin-transfer mechanism on the ferromagnetic layer. To account for these phenomena we also describe spin torques within the generalized circuit theory. The additional effects included in this generalized circuit theory suggest modifications in the interpretations of experiments involving spin-orbit torques, spin pumping, spin memory loss, the Rashba-Edelstein effect, and the spin Hall magnetoresistance.

  17. Attosecond control of spin polarization in electron-ion recollision driven by intense tailored fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuso, David; Jiménez-Galán, Alvaro; Morales, Felipe; Ivanov, Misha; Smirnova, Olga

    2017-07-01

    Tunnel ionization of noble gas atoms driven by a strong circularly polarized laser field in combination with a counter-rotating second harmonic generates spin-polarized electrons correlated to the spin-polarized ionic core. Crucially, such two-color field can bring the spin-polarized electrons back to the parent ion, enabling the scattering of the spin-polarized electron on the spin-polarized parent ion. Here we show how one can control the degree of spin polarization as a function of electron energy and recollision time by tuning the laser parameters, such as the relative intensities of the counter-rotating fields. The attosecond precision of the control over the degree of spin polarization opens the door for attosecond control and spectroscopy of spin-resolved dynamics.

  18. Crossover to the anomalous quantum regime in the extrinsic spin Hall effect of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milletarı, Mirco; Ferreira, Aires

    2016-11-01

    Recent reports of spin-orbit coupling enhancement in chemically modified graphene have opened doors to studies of the spin Hall effect with massless chiral fermions. Here, we theoretically investigate the interaction and impurity density dependence of the extrinsic spin Hall effect in spin-orbit coupled graphene. We present a nonperturbative quantum diagrammatic calculation of the spin Hall response function in the strong-coupling regime that incorporates skew scattering and anomalous impurity density-independent contributions on equal footing. The spin Hall conductivity dependence on Fermi energy and electron-impurity interaction strength reveals the existence of experimentally accessible regions where anomalous quantum processes dominate. Our findings suggest that spin-orbit-coupled graphene is an ideal model system for probing the competition between semiclassical and bona fide quantum scattering mechanisms underlying the spin Hall effect.

  19. Spin Polarized Transport and Spin Relaxation in Quantum Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenk, Paul; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Ohe, Jun-Ichiro; Ohtsuki, Tomi; Kramer, Bernhard; Kettemann, Stefan

    We give an introduction to spin dynamics in quantum wires. After a review of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) mechanisms in semiconductors, the spin diffusion equation with SOC is introduced. We discuss the particular conditions in which solutions of the spin diffusion equation with vanishing spin relaxation rates exist, where the spin density forms persistent spin helices. We give an overview of spin relaxation mechanisms, with particular emphasis on the motional narrowing mechanism in disordered conductors, the D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation. The solution of the spin diffusion equation in quantum wires shows that the spin relaxation becomes diminished when reducing the wire width below the spin precession length L SO. This corresponds to an effective alignment of the spin-orbit field in quantum wires and the formation of persistent spin helices whose form as well as amplitude is a measure of the particular SOCs, the linear Rashba and the linear Dresselhaus coupling. Cubic Dresselhaus coupling is found to yield in diffusive wires an undiminished contribution to the spin relaxation rate, however. We discuss recent experimental results which confirm the reduction of the spin relaxation rate. We next review theoretical proposals for creating spin-polarized currents in a T-shape structure with Rashba-SOC. For relatively small SOC, high spin polarization can be obtained. However, the corresponding conductance has been found to be small. Due to the self-duality of the scattering matrix for a system with spin-orbit interaction, no spin polarization of the current can be obtained for single-channel transport in two-terminal devices. Therefore, one has to consider at least a conductor with three terminals. We review results showing that the amplitude of the spin polarization becomes large if the SOC is sufficiently strong. We argue that the predicted effect should be experimentally accessible in InAs. For a possible experimental realization of InAs spin filters, see [1].

  20. Electrical creation of spin polarization in silicon at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Ron

    2010-03-01

    The integration of magnetism and mainstream semiconductor electronics could impact information technology in ways beyond imagination. A pivotal step is the implementation of spin-based electronic functionality in silicon devices. Much of the interest in silicon derives from its prevalence in semiconductor technology and from the robustness and longevity of spin as it is only weakly coupled to other degrees of freedom in the material. Recently it has become possible to induce and detect spin polarization in otherwise non-magnetic semiconductors (GaAs and Si) using all-electrical structures, but so far at temperatures below 150 K and only in n-type material. The main challenges are: (i) to design fully electrical silicon-based spintronic devices with large spin signals, (ii) to demonstrate device operation at room temperature, (iii) to do so for n-type and p-type material, and (iv) to find ways to manipulate spins and spin flow with a gate electric field. After a brief overview of the state of affairs, our recent advances in these areas are described. In particular, we demonstrate room-temperature electrical injection of spin polarization into n-type and p-type silicon from a ferromagnetic tunnel contact, spin manipulation using the Hanle effect, and the electrical detection of the induced spin accumulation. It is shown that a spin splitting as large as 2.9 meV can be created in Si at room temperature, corresponding to an electron spin polarization of 4.6%. The results open the way to the implementation of spin functionality in complementary silicon devices and electronic circuits operating at ambient temperature, and to the exploration of their prospects as well as the fundamental rules that govern their behavior. [4pt] [1] S.P. Dash, S. Sharma, R.S. Patel, M.P. de Jong and R. Jansen, Nature 462, 491 (2009).

  1. Influence of ADRB2 Gln27Glu and ADRB3 Trp64Arg polymorphisms on body weight and body composition changes after a controlled weight-loss intervention.

    PubMed

    Szendrei, Barbara; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Amigo, Teresa; Wang, Guan; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Benito, Pedro J; Gomez-Candela, Carmen; Calderón, Francisco J; Cupeiro, Rocío

    2016-03-01

    The β-2 and β-3 adrenergic receptors (ADRB2 and ADRB3) are thought to play a role in energy expenditure and lipolysis. However, the effects of the ADRB2 glutamine (Gln) 27 glutamic acid (glutamate) (Glu) and ADRB3 tryptophan (Trp) 64 arginine (Arg) polymorphisms on weight loss remain controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of these polymorphisms on changes in weight and body composition during a controlled weight-loss program. One hundred seventy-three healthy overweight and obese participants (91 women, 82 men) aged 18-50 years participated in a 22-week-long intervention based on a hypocaloric diet and exercise. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: strength, endurance, strength and endurance combined, and physical activity recommendations only. Body weight, body mass index (BMI), and body composition variables were assessed before and after the intervention. Genetic analysis was carried out according to standard protocols. No effect of the ADRB2 gene was shown on final weight, BMI, or body composition, although in the supervised male group, Glu27 carriers tended to have greater weight (p = 0.019, 2.5 kg) and BMI (p = 0.019, 0.88 kg/m(2)) reductions than did noncarriers. There seems to be an individual effect of the ADRB3 polymorphism on fat mass (p = 0.004) and fat percentage (p = 0.036), in addition to an interaction with exercise for fat mass (p = 0.038). After the intervention, carriers of the Arg64 allele had a greater fat mass and fat percentage than did noncarriers (p = 0.004, 2.8 kg). In conclusion, the ADRB2 Gln27Glu and ADRB3 Trp64Arg polymorphisms may influence weight loss and body composition, although the current evidence is weak; however, further studies are necessary to clarify their roles.

  2. Recent advances in the spin Hall effect of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Huang, Kun; Liu, Yachao; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2017-06-01

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) of light, as an analogue of the SHE in electronic systems, is a promising candidate for investigating the SHE in semiconductor spintronics/valleytronics, high-energy physics and condensed matter physics, owing to their similar topological nature in the spin-orbit interaction. The SHE of light exhibits unique potential for exploring the physical properties of nanostructures, such as determining the optical thickness, and the material properties of metallic and magnetic thin films and even atomically thin two-dimensional materials. More importantly, it opens a possible pathway for controlling the spin states of photons and developing next-generation photonic spin Hall devices as a fundamental constituent of the emerging spinoptics. In this review, based on the viewpoint of the geometric phase gradient, we give a detailed presentation of the recent advances in the SHE of light and its applications in precision metrology and future spin-based photonics.

  3. A two-dimensional spin field-effect switch

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wenjing; Txoperena, Oihana; Llopis, Roger; Dery, Hanan; Hueso, Luis E.; Casanova, Felix

    2016-11-11

    Future development in spintronic devices will require an advanced control of spin currents, for example by an electric field. Here we demonstrate an approach that differs from previous proposals such as the Datta and Das modulator, and that is based on a van de Waals heterostructure of atomically thin graphene and semiconducting MoS2. Our device combines the superior spin transport properties of graphene with the strong spin–orbit coupling of MoS2 and allows switching of the spin current in the graphene channel between ON and OFF states by tuning the spin absorption into the MoS2 with a gate electrode. Lastly, our proposal holds potential for technologically relevant applications such as search engines or pattern recognition circuits, and opens possibilities towards electrical injection of spins into transition metal dichalcogenides and alike materials.

  4. A two-dimensional spin field-effect switch

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Wenjing; Txoperena, Oihana; Llopis, Roger; ...

    2016-11-11

    Future development in spintronic devices will require an advanced control of spin currents, for example by an electric field. Here we demonstrate an approach that differs from previous proposals such as the Datta and Das modulator, and that is based on a van de Waals heterostructure of atomically thin graphene and semiconducting MoS2. Our device combines the superior spin transport properties of graphene with the strong spin–orbit coupling of MoS2 and allows switching of the spin current in the graphene channel between ON and OFF states by tuning the spin absorption into the MoS2 with a gate electrode. Lastly, ourmore » proposal holds potential for technologically relevant applications such as search engines or pattern recognition circuits, and opens possibilities towards electrical injection of spins into transition metal dichalcogenides and alike materials.« less

  5. Nanopillar spin filter tunnel junctions with manganite barriers.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bhagwati; Egilmez, Mehmet; Schoofs, Frank; Fix, Thomas; Vickers, Mary E; Zhang, Wenrui; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Blamire, Mark G

    2014-05-14

    The potential of a manganite ferromagnetic insulator in the field of spin-filtering has been demonstrated. For this, an ultrathin film of Sm0.75Sr0.25MnO3 is integrated as a barrier in an epitaxial oxide nanopillar tunnel junction and a high spin polarization of up to 75% at 5 K has been achieved. A large zero-bias anomaly observed in the dynamic conductance at low temperatures is explained in terms of the Kondo scattering model. In addition, a decrease in spin polarization at low bias and hysteretic magneto-resistance at low temperatures are reported. The results open up new possibilities for spin-electronics and suggest exploration of other manganites-based materials for the room temperature spin-filter applications.

  6. Foucault's pendulum, a classical analog for the electron spin state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linck, Rebecca A.

    Spin has long been regarded as a fundamentally quantum phenomena that is incapable of being described classically. To bridge the gap and show that aspects of spin's quantum nature can be described classically, this work uses a classical Lagrangian based on the coupled oscillations of Foucault's pendulum as an analog for the electron spin state in an external magnetic field. With this analog it is possible to demonstrate that Foucault's pendulum not only serves as a basis for explaining geometric phase, but is also a basis for reproducing a broad range of behavior from Zeeman-like frequency splitting to precession of the spin state. By demonstrating that unmeasured electron spin states can be fully described in classical terms, this research opens the door to using the tools of classical physics to examine an inherently quantum phenomenon.

  7. Recent advances in the spin Hall effect of light.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Huang, Kun; Liu, Yachao; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2017-03-30

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) of light, as an analogue of the SHE in electronic systems, is a promising candidate for investigating the SHE in semiconductor spintronics/valleytronics, high-energy physics and condensed matter physics, owing to their similar topological nature in the spin-orbit interaction. The SHE of light exhibits unique potential for exploring the physical properties of nanostructures, such as determining the optical thickness, and the material properties of metallic and magnetic thin films and even atomically thin two-dimensional materials. More importantly, it opens a possible pathway for controlling the spin states of photons and developing next-generation photonic spin Hall devices as a fundamental constituent of the emerging spinoptics. In this review, based on the viewpoint of the geometric phase gradient, we give a detailed presentation of the recent advances in the SHE of light and its applications in precision metrology and future spin-based photonics.

  8. Hydrodynamics of Normal Atomic Gases with Spin-orbit Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yan-Hua; Yu, Zhenhua

    2015-01-01

    Successful realization of spin-orbit coupling in atomic gases by the NIST scheme opens the prospect of studying the effects of spin-orbit coupling on many-body physics in an unprecedentedly controllable way. Here we derive the linearized hydrodynamic equations for the normal atomic gases of the spin-orbit coupling by the NIST scheme with zero detuning. We show that the hydrodynamics of the system crucially depends on the momentum susceptibilities which can be modified by the spin-orbit coupling. We reveal the effects of the spin-orbit coupling on the sound velocities and the dipole mode frequency of the gases by applying our formalism to the ideal Fermi gas. We also discuss the generalization of our results to other situations. PMID:26483090

  9. Hydrodynamics of Normal Atomic Gases with Spin-orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan-Hua; Yu, Zhenhua

    2015-10-20

    Successful realization of spin-orbit coupling in atomic gases by the NIST scheme opens the prospect of studying the effects of spin-orbit coupling on many-body physics in an unprecedentedly controllable way. Here we derive the linearized hydrodynamic equations for the normal atomic gases of the spin-orbit coupling by the NIST scheme with zero detuning. We show that the hydrodynamics of the system crucially depends on the momentum susceptibilities which can be modified by the spin-orbit coupling. We reveal the effects of the spin-orbit coupling on the sound velocities and the dipole mode frequency of the gases by applying our formalism to the ideal Fermi gas. We also discuss the generalization of our results to other situations.

  10. Designing magnetic organic lattices from high-spin polycyclic units.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Georges; Suaud, Nicolas; Guihéry, Nathalie; Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2011-11-18

    This work addresses the conception of purely organic magnetic materials by properly bridging high-spin polycyclic hydrocarbons A and B, through covalent ligands L. The strategy varies two degrees of freedom that govern the magnetic character of the A-L--B sequence, namely, the bridge response to spin polarization and the relative signs of spin density on carbon atoms to which the bridge is attached. Topological prescriptions based on Ovchinnikov's rule are proposed to predict ground-state spin multiplicities of various A-L-B sets. The relevance of these guiding principles is essentially confirmed through DFT calculations on dimers connected by conjugated bridges. The transferability of interunit magnetic couplings to larger assemblies is further checked, the building blocks tending to maintain their high-spin character whatever the environment. Such local designs open the way to periodic lattices of ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic, or paramagnetic materials.

  11. A two-dimensional spin field-effect switch

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenjing; Txoperena, Oihana; Llopis, Roger; Dery, Hanan; Hueso, Luis E.; Casanova, Fèlix

    2016-01-01

    Future development in spintronic devices will require an advanced control of spin currents, for example by an electric field. Here we demonstrate an approach that differs from previous proposals such as the Datta and Das modulator, and that is based on a van de Waals heterostructure of atomically thin graphene and semiconducting MoS2. Our device combines the superior spin transport properties of graphene with the strong spin–orbit coupling of MoS2 and allows switching of the spin current in the graphene channel between ON and OFF states by tuning the spin absorption into the MoS2 with a gate electrode. Our proposal holds potential for technologically relevant applications such as search engines or pattern recognition circuits, and opens possibilities towards electrical injection of spins into transition metal dichalcogenides and alike materials. PMID:27834365

  12. All electrical propagating spin wave spectroscopy with broadband wavevector capability

    SciTech Connect

    Ciubotaru, F.; Devolder, T.; Manfrini, M.; Adelmann, C.; Radu, I. P.

    2016-07-04

    We developed an all electrical experiment to perform the broadband phase-resolved spectroscopy of propagating spin waves in micrometer sized thin magnetic stripes. The magnetostatic surface spin waves are excited and detected by scaled down to 125 nm wide inductive antennas, which award ultra broadband wavevector capability. The wavevector selection can be done by applying an excitation frequency above the ferromagnetic resonance. Wavevector demultiplexing is done at the spin wave detector thanks to the rotation of the spin wave phase upon propagation. A simple model accounts for the main features of the apparatus transfer functions. Our approach opens an avenue for the all electrical study of wavevector-dependent spin wave properties including dispersion spectra or non-reciprocal propagation.

  13. Non-Markovian Dynamics of Spin Squeezing Under Detuning Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xing; Wu, Jia-Ju; Zhong, Wo-Jun; Li, Yan-Ling

    The dynamics of spin squeezing of an ensemble of N separate spin-1/2 particles, each coupled to a zero-temperature non-Markovian reservoir have been investigated. We show that the initial spin squeezing could be prolonged for a long time by utilizing detuning modification. We further explore that the spin squeezing sudden death (SSSD) could be circumvented with the increasing of detuning. By comparison with the results in Markovian regime with detuning and those in non-Markovian regime without detuning, we conclude that the disappearance of SSSD and the robust preservation of spin squeezing should be attributed to the combination of detuning and non-Markovian effect. The present results may be of direct importance for quantum metrology in open systems.

  14. Donor-driven spin relaxation in multivalley semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Chalaev, Oleg; Dery, Hanan

    2014-10-17

    The observed dependence of spin relaxation on the identity of the donor atom in n-type silicon has remained without explanation for decades and poses a long-standing open question with important consequences for modern spintronics. Taking into account the multivalley nature of the conduction band in silicon and germanium, we show that the spin-flip amplitude is dominated by short-range scattering off the central-cell potential of impurities after which the electron is transferred to a valley on a different axis in k space. Through symmetry arguments, we show that this spin-flip process can strongly affect the spin relaxation in all multivalley materials in which time-reversal cannot connect distinct valleys. From the physical insights gained from the theory, we provide guidelines to significantly enhance the spin lifetime in semiconductor spintronics devices.

  15. Cavity Mediated Manipulation of Distant Spin Currents Using a Cavity-Magnon-Polariton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lihui; Harder, Michael; Hyde, Paul; Zhang, Zhaohui; Hu, Can-Ming; Chen, Y. P.; Xiao, John Q.

    2017-05-01

    Using electrical detection of a strongly coupled spin-photon system comprised of a microwave cavity mode and two magnetic samples, we demonstrate the long distance manipulation of spin currents. This distant control is not limited by the spin diffusion length, instead depending on the interplay between the local and global properties of the coupled system, enabling systematic spin current control over large distance scales (several centimeters in this work). This flexibility opens the door to improved spin current generation and manipulation for cavity spintronic devices.

  16. Control of the spin to charge conversion using the inverse Rashba-Edelstein effect

    SciTech Connect

    Sangiao, S.; De Teresa, J. M.; Morellon, L.; Martinez-Velarte, M. C.; Lucas, I.; Viret, M.

    2015-04-27

    We show here that using spin orbit coupling interactions at a metallic interface it is possible to control the sign of the spin to charge conversion in a spin pumping experiment. Using the intrinsic symmetry of the “Inverse Rashba Edelstein Effect” (IREE) in a Bi/Ag interface, the charge current changes sign when reversing the order of the Ag and Bi stacking. This confirms the IREE nature of the conversion of spin into charge in these interfaces and opens the way to tailoring the spin sensing voltage by an appropriate trilayer sequence.

  17. Interfacial spin-filter assisted spin transfer torque effect in Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.-H.; Chu, F.-C.

    2015-03-01

    The first-principles calculation is employed to demonstrate the spin-selective transport properties and the non-collinear spin-transfer torque (STT) effect in the newly proposed Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction. The subtle spin-polarized charge transfer solely at O/Co interface gives rise to the interfacial spin-filter (ISF) effect, which can be simulated within the tight binding model to verify the general expression of STT. This allows us to predict the asymmetric bias behavior of non-collinear STT directly via the interplay between the first-principles calculated spin current densities in collinear magnetic configurations. We believe that the ISF effect, introduced by the combination between wurtzite-BeO barrier and the fcc-Co electrode, may open a new and promising route in semiconductor-based spintronics applications.

  18. Interfacial spin-filter assisted spin transfer torque effect in Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.-H. Chu, F.-C.

    2015-03-07

    The first-principles calculation is employed to demonstrate the spin-selective transport properties and the non-collinear spin-transfer torque (STT) effect in the newly proposed Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction. The subtle spin-polarized charge transfer solely at O/Co interface gives rise to the interfacial spin-filter (ISF) effect, which can be simulated within the tight binding model to verify the general expression of STT. This allows us to predict the asymmetric bias behavior of non-collinear STT directly via the interplay between the first-principles calculated spin current densities in collinear magnetic configurations. We believe that the ISF effect, introduced by the combination between wurtzite-BeO barrier and the fcc-Co electrode, may open a new and promising route in semiconductor-based spintronics applications.

  19. Edge dynamics in a quantum spin Hall state: effects from Rashba spin-orbit interaction.

    PubMed

    Ström, Anders; Johannesson, Henrik; Japaridze, G I

    2010-06-25

    We analyze the dynamics of the helical edge modes of a quantum spin Hall state in the presence of a spatially nonuniform Rashba spin-orbit (SO) interaction. A randomly fluctuating Rashba SO coupling is found to open a scattering channel which causes localization of the edge modes for a weakly screened electron-electron (e-e) interaction. A periodic modulation of the SO coupling, with a wave number commensurate with the Fermi momentum, makes the edge insulating already at intermediate strengths of the e-e interaction. We discuss implications for experiments on edge state transport in a HgTe quantum well.

  20. Spin forming development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.

    1982-05-01

    Bendix product applications require the capability of fabricating heavy gage, high strength materials. Five commercial sources have been identified that have the capability of spin forming metal thicknesses greater than 9.5 mm and four equiment manufacturers produce machines with this capability. Twelve assemblies selected as candidates for spin forming applications require spin forming of titanium, 250 maraging steel, 17-4 pH stainless steel, Nitronic 40 steel, 304 L stainless steel, and 6061 aluminum. Twelve parts have been cold spin formed from a 250 maraging steel 8.1 mm wall thickness machine preform, and six have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick flat plate. Thirty-three Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy parts and 26 17-4 pH stainless steel parts have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick plate. Hot spin forming directly from plate has demonstrated the feasibility and favorable economics of this fabrication technique for Bendix applications.

  1. Towards a Compositional SPIN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses our initial experience with introducing automated assume-guarantee verification based on learning in the SPIN tool. We believe that compositional verification techniques such as assume-guarantee reasoning could complement the state-reduction techniques that SPIN already supports, thus increasing the size of systems that SPIN can handle. We present a "light-weight" approach to evaluating the benefits of learning-based assume-guarantee reasoning in the context of SPIN: we turn our previous implementation of learning for the LTSA tool into a main program that externally invokes SPIN to provide the model checking-related answers. Despite its performance overheads (which mandate a future implementation within SPIN itself), this approach provides accurate information about the savings in memory. We have experimented with several versions of learning-based assume guarantee reasoning, including a novel heuristic introduced here for generating component assumptions when their environment is unavailable. We illustrate the benefits of learning-based assume-guarantee reasoning in SPIN through the example of a resource arbiter for a spacecraft. Keywords: assume-guarantee reasoning, model checking, learning.

  2. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  3. Spin forming development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, W. G.

    1982-05-01

    Bendix product applications require the capability of fabricating heavy gage, high strength materials. Five commercial sources have been identified that have the capability of spin forming metal thicknesses greater than 9.5 mm and four equipment manufacturers produce machines with this capability. Twelve assemblies selected as candidates for spin forming applications require spin forming of titanium, 250 maraging steel, 17-4 pH stainless steel, Nitronic 40 steel, 304 L stainless steel, and 6061 aluminum. Twelve parts have been cold spin formed from a 250 maraging steel 8.1 mm wall thickness machine preform, and six have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick flat plate. Thirty-three Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy parts and 26 17-4 pH stainless steel parts have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick plate. Hot spin forming directly from plate has demonstrated the feasibility and favorable economics of this fabrication technique for Bendix applications.

  4. Foucault's Pendulum, Analog for an Electron Spin State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linck, Rebecca

    2012-11-01

    The classical Lagrangian that describes the coupled oscillations of Foucault's pendulum presents an interesting analog to an electron's spin state in an external magnetic field. With a simple modification, this classical Lagrangian yields equations of motion that directly map onto the Schrodinger-Pauli Equation. This analog goes well beyond the geometric phase, reproducing a broad range of behavior from Zeeman-like frequency splitting to precession of the spin state. By demonstrating that unmeasured spin states can be fully described in classical terms, this research opens the door to using the tools of classical physics to examine an inherently quantum phenomenon.

  5. Rotational bands terminating at maximal spin in the valence space

    SciTech Connect

    Ragnarsson, I.; Afanasjev, A.V.

    1996-12-31

    For nuclei with mass A {le} 120, the spin available in {open_quotes}normal deformation configurations{close_quotes} is experimentally accessible with present detector systems. Of special interest are the nuclei which show collective features at low or medium-high spin and where the corresponding rotational bands with increasing spin can be followed in a continuous way to or close to a non-collective terminating state. Some specific features in this context are discussed for nuclei in the A = 80 region and for {sup 117,118}Xe.

  6. Spin wave propagation in a uniformly biased curved magnonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Davies, C. S.; Kruglyak, V. V.; Romanenko, D. V.; Grishin, S. V.; Beginin, E. N.; Sharaevskii, Y. P.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2017-08-01

    Using Brillouin light scattering microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, we study the propagation and transformation of magnetostatic spin waves across uniformly biased curved magnonic waveguides. Our results demonstrate that the spin wave transmission through the bend can be enhanced or weakened by modifying the distribution of the inhomogeneous internal magnetic field spanning the structure. Our results open up the possibility of optimally molding the flow of spin waves across networks of magnonic waveguides, thereby representing a step forward in the design and construction of the more complex magnonic circuitry.

  7. Nonequilibrium Phase Transition in a Periodically Driven XY Spin Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosen, Tomaž; Ilievski, Enej

    2011-08-01

    We present a general formulation of Floquet states of periodically time-dependent open Markovian quasifree fermionic many-body systems in terms of a discrete Lyapunov equation. Illustrating the technique, we analyze periodically kicked XY spin-(1)/(2) chain which is coupled to a pair of Lindblad reservoirs at its ends. A complex phase diagram is reported with reentrant phases of long range and exponentially decaying spin-spin correlations as some of the system’s parameters are varied. The structure of phase diagram is reproduced in terms of counting nontrivial stationary points of Floquet quasiparticle dispersion relation.

  8. The Scattering of Particles with Spin from Targets with Spin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Noel M.

    1978-01-01

    The density matrix is used to obtain an expression for the mean value of any spin operator in the scattering of particles with arbitrary spin. The example of spin-1/2-spin-1 scattering is developed and physical information obtained by establishing connections with the polarization tensor and Wolfenstein observables. (Author/GA)

  9. The Scattering of Particles with Spin from Targets with Spin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Noel M.

    1978-01-01

    The density matrix is used to obtain an expression for the mean value of any spin operator in the scattering of particles with arbitrary spin. The example of spin-1/2-spin-1 scattering is developed and physical information obtained by establishing connections with the polarization tensor and Wolfenstein observables. (Author/GA)

  10. Spin drift and spin diffusion currents in semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Idrish Miah, M

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of a spin drift-diffusion model, we show how the spin current is composed and find that spin drift and spin diffusion contribute additively to the spin current, where the spin diffusion current decreases with electric field while the spin drift current increases, demonstrating that the extension of the spin diffusion length by a strong field does not result in a significant increase in spin current in semiconductors owing to the competing effect of the electric field on diffusion. We also find that there is a spin drift-diffusion crossover field for a process in which the drift and diffusion contribute equally to the spin current, which suggests a possible method of identifying whether the process for a given electric field is in the spin drift or spin diffusion regime. Spin drift-diffusion crossover fields for GaAs are calculated and are found to be quite small. We derive the relations between intrinsic spin diffusion length and the spin drift-diffusion crossover field of a semiconductor for different electron statistical regimes. The findings resulting from this investigation might be important for semiconductor spintronics. PMID:27878011

  11. Macroscopic rotation of photon polarization induced by a single spin

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Christophe; Demory, Justin; Loo, Vivien; Lemaître, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Glazov, Mikhaïl; Krebs, Olivier; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale; Lanco, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Entangling a single spin to the polarization of a single incoming photon, generated by an external source, would open new paradigms in quantum optics such as delayed-photon entanglement, deterministic logic gates or fault-tolerant quantum computing. These perspectives rely on the possibility that a single spin induces a macroscopic rotation of a photon polarization. Such polarization rotations induced by single spins were recently observed, yet limited to a few 10−3 degrees due to poor spin–photon coupling. Here we report the enhancement by three orders of magnitude of the spin–photon interaction, using a cavity quantum electrodynamics device. A single hole spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is deterministically coupled to a micropillar cavity. The cavity-enhanced coupling between the incoming photons and the solid-state spin results in a polarization rotation by ±6° when the spin is optically initialized in the up or down state. These results open the way towards a spin-based quantum network. PMID:25687134

  12. Higher spins and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Per; Ross, Simon F.

    2013-05-01

    The principles of quantum mechanics and relativity impose rigid constraints on theories of massless particles with nonzero spin. Indeed, Yang-Mills theory and General Relativity are the unique solution in the case of spin-1 and spin-2. In asymptotically flat spacetime, there are fundamental obstacles to formulating fully consistent interacting theories of particles of spin greater than 2. However, indications are that such theories are just barely possible in asymptotically anti-de Sitter or de Sitter spacetimes, where the non-existence of an S-matrix provides an escape from the theorems restricting theories in Minkowski spacetime. These higher spin gravity theories are therefore of great intrinsic interest, since they, along with supergravity, provide the only known field theories generalizing the local invariance principles of Yang-Mills theory and General Relativity. While work on higher spin gravity goes back several decades, the subject has gained broader appeal in recent years due to its appearance in the AdS/CFT correspondence. In three and four spacetime dimensions, there exist duality proposals linking higher spin gravity theories to specific conformal field theories living in two and three dimensions respectively. The enlarged symmetry algebra of the conformal field theories renders them exactly soluble, which makes them excellent laboratories for understanding in detail the holographic mechanism behind AdS/CFT duality. Steady progress is also being made on better understanding the space of possible higher spin gravity theories and their physical content. This work includes classifying the possible field multiplets and their interactions, constructing exact solutions of the nonlinear field equations, and relating higher spin theories to string theory. A full understanding of these theories will involve coming to grips with the novel symmetry principles that enlarge those of General Relativity and Yang-Mills theory, and one can hope that this will provide

  13. Spin transport in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2012-02-01

    Conventional electronic transistors involve the control of electronic charge at the nanoscale to realize memory, logic and communication functions. All these electronic charges, however, also carry a spin that remains unutilized in present commercial devices. This has motivated the search for new materials that propagate spin-polarized currents over large distances. Among the most promising materials for spintronics has been graphene. Micron-scale spin relaxation lengths have been previously demonstrated in single-layer graphene. Recently, we showed that bilayer graphene is a far more interesting candidate for spintronics. By fabricating spin valves on bilayer graphene we have achieved at room temperature spin relaxation times up to 2 nanoseconds, which are an order of magnitude higher than for single layer graphene [1]. Furthermore, the spin-relaxation time scales inversely with the mobility of BLG sample. This indicates the importance of D'yakonov-Perel' spin scattering in BLG. Last not but least, the presence of an electric field tunable band gap in bilayer graphene makes it particularly appealing. Our work provides fundamental insight into the unique properties of bilayer graphene for spintronic applications. Remarkably, a similar difference between single layer and bilayer graphene is also observed in large area graphene grown by the CVD method on copper. These results demonstrate the potential of CVD graphene in realistic spintronics devices [2]. [4pt] [1] T - Y. Yang et al., Observation of Long Spin-Relaxation Times in Bilayer Graphene at Room Temperature, PRL (2011). [0pt] [2] A. Avsar et al., Towards Wafer Scale Fabrication of Graphene Based Spin Valve Devices, Nano Lett. (2011).

  14. Open Education and the Open Science Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Openness as a complex code word for a variety of digital trends and movements has emerged as an alternative mode of "social production" based on the growing and overlapping complexities of open source, open access, open archiving, open publishing, and open science. This paper argues that the openness movement with its reinforcing structure of…

  15. Open Education and the Open Science Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Openness as a complex code word for a variety of digital trends and movements has emerged as an alternative mode of "social production" based on the growing and overlapping complexities of open source, open access, open archiving, open publishing, and open science. This paper argues that the openness movement with its reinforcing structure of…

  16. Nonlocality without inequality for spin-s systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkri, Samir; Choudhary, Sujit K.

    2005-08-15

    We critically review earlier works on Hardy's nonlocality argument for two spin-s systems and show that solutions previously found in this regard were restricted due to imposition of some conditions which have no role in the argument of nonlocality. We provide a compact form of the nonlocality condition for two spin-s particles, and we also extend it to n number of spin-s particles. Finally we apply a more general kind of nonlocality argument, still without an inequality, to higher-spin systems.

  17. Structural insight into the role of Gln293Met mutation on the Peloruside A/Laulimalide association with αβ-tubulin from molecular dynamics simulations, binding free energy calculations and weak interactions analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zúñiga, Matías A.; Alderete, Joel B.; Jaña, Gonzalo A.; Jiménez, Verónica A.

    2017-07-01

    Peloruside A (PLA) and Laulimalide (LAU) are novel microtubule-stabilizing agents with promising properties against different cancer types. These ligands share a non-taxoid binding site at the outer surface of β-tubulin and promote microtubule stabilization by bridging two adjacent αβ-tubulin dimers from parallel protofilaments. Recent site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirmed the existence of a unique β-tubulin site mutation (Gln293Met) that specifically increased the activity of PLA and caused resistance to LAU, without affecting the stability of microtubules in the absence of the ligands. In this work, fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to examine the PLA and LAU association with native and mutated αβ-tubulin in the search for structural and energetic evidence to explain the role of Gln293Met mutation on determining the activity of these ligands. Our results revealed that Gln293Met mutation induced the loss of relevant LAU-tubulin contacts but exerted negligible changes in the interaction networks responsible for PLA-tubulin association. Binding free energy calculations (MM/GBSA and MM/PBSA), and weak interaction analysis (aNCI) predicted an increased affinity for PLA, and a weakened association for LAU after mutation, thus suggesting that Gln293Met mutation exerts its action by a modulation of drug-tubulin interactions. These results are valuable to increase understanding about PLA and LAU activity and to assist the future design of novel agents targeting the PLA/LAU binding pocket.

  18. The IL23R A/Gln381 Allele Promotes IL-23 Unresponsiveness in Human Memory T-Helper 17 Cells and Impairs Th17 Responses in Psoriasis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Meglio, Paola; Villanova, Federica; Napolitano, Luca; Tosi, Isabella; Terranova Barberio, Manuela; Mak, Rose K; Nutland, Sarah; Smith, Catherine H; Barker, Jonathan N W N; Todd, John A; Nestle, Frank O

    2013-01-01

    We and others have shown that the minor, nonconserved allele Gln381 of the Arg381Gln single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs11209026G>A) of the IL-23 receptor gene (IL23R) protects against psoriasis. Moreover, we have recently shown impaired IL-23-induced IL-17A production and STAT-3 phosphorylation in Th17 cells generated in vitro from healthy individuals heterozygous for the protective A allele (GA). However, the biological effect of this variant has not been determined in homozygous carriers of the protective A allele (AA), nor in psoriatic patients. Here we expand our functional investigation of the IL23R Arg381Gln gene variant to include AA homozygous individuals. By using isolated memory CD4+ T cells, we found attenuated IL-23-induced Th17 response in heterozygous individuals. Moreover, we found that AA homozygous individuals were strikingly unresponsive to IL-23, with minimal or no IL-17A and IL-17F production and failure of human memory Th17 cell survival/expansion. Finally, IL-23-induced Th17 response was also attenuated in age- and sex-matched GA versus GG psoriatic patients undergoing systemic treatment. Taken together, our data provide evidence for an allele-dosage effect for IL-23R Gln381 and indicate that common gene alleles associated with complex diseases might have biological effects of considerable magnitude in homozygous carriers. PMID:23563201

  19. Direct Identification of Dilute Surface Spins on Al2 O3 : Origin of Flux Noise in Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, S. E.; Adamyan, A. A.; Lindström, T.; Erts, D.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Danilov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An on-chip electron spin resonance technique is applied to reveal the nature and origin of surface spins on Al2 O3 . We measure a spin density of 2.2 ×1 017 spins/m2 , attributed to physisorbed atomic hydrogen and S =1 /2 electron spin states on the surface. This is direct evidence for the nature of spins responsible for flux noise in quantum circuits, which has been an issue of interest for several decades. Our findings open up a new approach to the identification and controlled reduction of paramagnetic sources of noise and decoherence in superconducting quantum devices.

  20. Higher spin cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Chethan; Raju, Avinash; Roy, Shubho; Thakur, Somyadip

    2014-02-01

    We construct cosmological solutions of higher spin gravity in 2+1 dimensional de Sitter space. We show that a consistent thermodynamics can be obtained for their horizons by demanding appropriate holonomy conditions. This is equivalent to demanding the integrability of the Euclidean boundary conformal field theory partition function, and it reduces to Gibbons-Hawking thermodynamics in the spin-2 case. By using the prescription of Maldacena, we relate the thermodynamics of these solutions to those of higher spin black holes in AdS3.