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Sample records for open incisional hernia

  1. Incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Keith W

    2003-10-01

    Incisional ventral hernias are a common problem encountered by surgeons, with over 100,000 repairs being performed annually in the United States. Although many predisposing factors for incisional ventral hernia are patient-related, some factors such as type of primary closure and materials used may reduce the overall incidence of incisional ventral hernia. With the advent of prosthetic meshes being used for incisional ventral hernia repair, the recurrence rate has dropped to approximately 10%. More recently, with the development of prosthetic mesh that is now safe to place intraperitoneally, the recurrence rate has dropped to under 5%. The current controversies that exist for incisional ventral hernia repair are which approach to use (open versus laparoscopic) and what type of fixation (partial- versus full-thickness abdominal muscular/fascial wall) is necessary to stabilize the position of the mesh while tissue ingrowth occurs. During the next decade the answers to these controversies should be available in the surgical literature.

  2. Long-term recurrence and complication rates after incisional hernia repair with the open onlay technique

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Background Incisional hernia after abdominal surgery is a well-known complication. Controversy still exists with respect to the choice of hernia repair technique. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term recurrence rate as well as surgical complications in a consecutive group of patients undergoing open repair using an onlay mesh technique. Methods Consecutive patients undergoing open incisional hernia repair with onlay-technique between 01/05/1995 and 01/09/2007 at a single institution were included in the study. For follow-up patients were contacted by telephone, and answered a questionnaire containing questions related to the primary operation, the hernia and general risk factors. Patients were examined by a consultant surgeon in the outpatient clinic or in the patient's home if there was suspicion of an incisional hernia recurrence. Results The study included 56 patients with 100% follow-up. The median follow-up was 35 months (range 4–151). Recurrent incisional hernia was found in 8 of 56 patients (15%, 95% CI: 6–24). The overall complication rate was 13% (95% CI, 4–22). All complications were minor and needed no hospital admission. Conclusion This study with a long follow-up showed low recurrence and complication rates in patients undergoing incisional hernia repair with the open onlay technique. PMID:19400934

  3. Reducing the incidence of incisional hernias following open gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Capella, Rafael F; Iannace, Vincent A; Capella, Joseph F

    2007-04-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common complication following open gastric bypass (RYGBP) surgery. In an effort to reduce the incidence of incisional hernias with our form of open RYGBP, progressively smaller, upper midline epigastric incisions have been utilized along with permanent sutures. The purpose of this study is to analyze whether incision location, size and choice of suture material affect the incidence of incisional hernias following open RYGBP. Clinically evident incisional hernias and other wound complications and non-wound related complications were analyzed for 1,180 consecutive primary open proximal RYGBP procedures performed between August 2002 and June 2006. Progressively smaller, upper midline incisions were utilized during the time period of the study. Smaller incisions limited to the upper abdomen and approximated with permanent sutures were associated with significantly fewer hernias (P<0.01), wound dehiscences (P<0.03), eviscerations (P<0.03) and wound infections (P<0.03). Smaller incisions may also be associated with less postoperative discomfort. A reduction in incision size, the avoidance of the periumbilical region and the use of nonabsorbable sutures has significantly reduced the incidence of incisional hernias and acute fascial disruptions with our form of open RYGBP. These findings are consistent with LaPlace's law regarding wall tension and vessel radius. In addition, we found smaller incisions to be associated with fewer infections and seromas and less postoperative discomfort. A reduction in incision size has not been associated with an increase in morbidity or mortality or changes in the operative time.

  4. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal incisional hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal incisional hernia is a common complication after open abdominal operations. Laparoscopic procedures have obvious mini-invasive advantages for surgical treatment of abdominal incisional hernia, especially to cases with big hernia defect. Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernia has routine mode but the actual operations will be various according to the condition of every hernia. Key points of these operations include design of the position of trocars, closure of defects and fixation of meshes. The details of these issues and experiences of perioperative evaluation and treatment will be talked about in this article. PMID:27761446

  5. Open retromuscular mesh repair versus onlay technique of incisional hernia: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Demetrashvili, Zaza; Pipia, Irakli; Loladze, David; Metreveli, Tamar; Ekaladze, Eka; Kenchadze, George; Khutsishvili, Kakhi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized clinical study was to compare and analyze the results of two methods of treatment of incisional hernia: open retromuscular mesh repair and onlay technique. 180 patients who underwent open elective surgery for middle primary incisional hernia were randomized into two groups. The retomuscular mesh repair was used in the first group and the onlay technique - in the second group. Several preoperative and intraoperative factors, also wound complications (wound infection, hematoma, seroma) and hernia recurrence rate were determined and compared between the groups. The operative time was significantly longer in the retromuscular group compared with the onlay group (P < 0.001). In the retromuscular group 17 (22.1%) wound complications were observed, in the onlay group-39 (50.0%) wound complications. The difference was statistically significance (P < 0.001). Seroma was the most frequent postoperative wound complication, ranging from 16.9% to 41.0% among the groups, respectively (P = 0.0013). No significantly difference has been found between groups by wound infection and hematoma. 2 (2.6%) case of hernia recurrence was marked in retromuscular group and 4 (5.1%) case of hernia recurrence - in onlay group. But there was no statistically significantly difference between the two groups. Our research shows no significant difference in frequency of hernia recurrence between retromuscular mesh repair and onlay technique for treatment of incisional hernia. The usage of the retromuscular mesh repair is associated with significantly less wound complications than onlay technique. That can be considered as an advantage of retromuscular method, which makes it more preferential than onlay method. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ventral incisional hernia recurrence.

    PubMed

    Clark, J L

    2001-07-01

    During the period October 1993 to December 1996, 31 patients were operated on by the author for primary or recurrent ventral incisional hernia (VIH). Three patients were excluded from analysis because their records were unavailable for review. The median age of the 28 remaining patients at their initial procedure was 57.5 years (range, 37-78 years). The repair was performed with interrupted O-Ethibond sutures in all but 3 cases where Prolene suture was used secondary to noniatrogenic contamination or recurrent hernia. There were no unplanned enterotomies in the entire series and prophylactic intravenous antibiotics were used in all cases. The only significant complications were skin hyperemia after five repairs in 3 patients who were treated empirically with intravenous antibiotics, and 1 patient who had an antibiotic-associated rash. There were no 30-day mortalities. Prolene mesh was used exclusively in all repairs performed with mesh. Seven of these repairs (25%) were for recurrent VIH. Three of these seven patients had previous mesh repairs. Six of these seven patients who presented with recurrent VIH had a mesh repair and four developed a recurrence. Five of seven were active smokers, with one having severe obstructive lung disease. Four of seven related significant occupational lifting. Of the 21 patients having initial repair of VIH, mesh was used in 8 (38%). After a median follow-up of 13 months, there were 2 recurrent hernias (25%). The remaining 13 patients had primary closure of their hernias. After median follow-up of 25 months, there were 5 recurrences (38%). A total of 34 VIH repairs were performed on these 28 patients, of which 13 were for recurrent hernias. Five of thirteen (38%) of the mesh repairs for recurrent VIH failed. The median body mass index (BMI) for the 13 patients having primary repair was 26.4, and that for all 21 cases having mesh repair was 28.8. Patients with recurrent VIH frequently recur despite use of mesh, avoidance of

  7. The Management of Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsnorth, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Many thousand laparotomy incisions are created each year and the failure rate for closure of these abdominal wounds is between 10–15%, creating a large problem of incisional hernia. In the past many of these hernias have been neglected and treated with abdominal trusses or inadequately managed with high failure rates. The introduction of mesh has not had a significant impact because surgeons are not aware of modern effective techniques which may be used to reconstruct defects of the abdominal wall. This review will cover recent advances in incisional hernia surgery which affect the general surgeon, and also briefly review advanced techniques employed by specialist surgeons in anterior abdominal wall surgery. PMID:16719992

  8. Incisional and port-site hernias following robotic colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Harr, Jeffrey N; Juo, Yen-Yi; Luka, Samuel; Agarwal, Samir; Brody, Fred; Obias, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    The association between extraction site location, robotic trocar size, and the incidence of incisional hernias in robotic colorectal surgery remain unclear. Laparoscopic literature reports variable rates of incisional hernias versus open surgery, and variable rates of trocar site hernias. However, conclusions from these studies are confusing due to heterogeneity in closure techniques and may not be generalized to robotic cases. This study evaluates the effect of extraction site location on incisional hernia rates, as well as trocar hernia rates in robotic colorectal surgery. A retrospective review of multiport and single incision robotic colorectal surgeries from a single institution was performed. Patients underwent subtotal, segmental, or proctocolectomies, and were compared based on the extraction site through either a muscle-splitting (MS) or midline (ML) incision. Hernias were identified by imaging and/or physical exam. Demographics and risk factors for hernias were assessed. Groups were compared using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. The study included 259 colorectal surgery patients comprising 146 with MS and 113 with ML extraction sites. Postoperative computed tomograms were performed on 155 patients (59.8 %) with a mean follow-up of 16.5 months. The overall incisional hernia rate was 5.8 %. A significantly higher hernia rate was found among the ML group compared to the MS group (12.4 vs. 0.68 %, p < 0.0001). Of the known risk factors assessed, only increased BMI was associated with incisional hernias (OR 1.18). No trocar site hernias were found. Midline extraction sites are associated with a significantly increased rate of incisional hernias compared to muscle-splitting extraction sites. There is little evidence to recommend fascia closure of 8-mm trocar sites.

  9. [Prosthetic material in incisional hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    López-Cano, Manuel; Barreiro Morandeira, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    There are different designs of prosthesis for use in the repair of incisional hernia, and it is often difficult to choose the most appropriate. The biological behaviour of the material must be a key part in the selection, although this behaviour will vary depending on what materials are available. A proper understanding of the relationship of the material with the abdominal wall dynamics is another important factor in this selection. Finally we need a stable repair without long term side effects. This paper analyses the prostheses more commonly available for incisional hernia surgery in the non-emergency situation.

  10. Initial results of the National Registry of Incisional Hernia.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José Antonio; López-Cano, Manuel; Hernández-Granados, Pilar; Feliu, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to the data from the National Registry of Incisional Hernia (EVEREG) to determine the reality of the treatment of this condition in Spain. EVEREG is an online prospective database which has been functioning since July 2012; operations for incisional hernia are anonymously recorded. Up to March 2015, 4501 hernias from 95 of the 113 participating hospitals were registered. The mean age of the patients was 62.7, and 56.5% were women, with a mean BMI of 30.2kg/m(2); 29.8% presented a high surgical risk (ASA III-V). A total of 93.7% were scheduled surgeries, 88.3% open surgery and 22.2% were recurrent incisional hernias. There were 66.9% hernias after a midline laparotomy, and 81.4% of a transverse diameter of less than 10cm. A mesh was used in 96.2% of cases. Postoperative stay was 5.3 days and 29.1% presented a complication, with a mortality of 0.8%. After a median follow-up of 7.7 months a high rate of recurrence was detected (20.7% per year), especially in hernias that were operated on after a previous repair (18.1% primary vs. 30.6% recurrent; P=.004). the EVEREG registry is a useful tool to know the current situation of incisional hernia treatment. Analysis of the data shows several points that could be improved: a low rate of follow-up and high recurrence rate. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. The incidence of incisional hernias following ileostomy reversal in colorectal cancer patients treated with anterior resection.

    PubMed

    Fazekas, Balazs; Fazekas, Bence; Hendricks, J; Smart, N; Arulampalam, T

    2017-04-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study was to identify the rate of incisional hernia formation following ileostomy reversal in patients who underwent anterior resection for colorectal cancer. In addition, we aimed to ascertain risk factors for the development of reversal-site incisional hernias and to record the characteristics of the resultant hernias. MATERIALS AND METHODS Using a prospectively compiled database of colorectal cancer patients who were treated with anterior resection, we identified individuals who had undergone both ileostomy formation and subsequent reversal of their ileostomies from January 2005 to December 2014. Medical records were reviewed to record descriptive patient data about risk factors for hernia formation, operative details and any subsequent operations. Computed tomography reports were reviewed to identify the number, site and characteristics of incisional hernias. RESULTS A total of 121 patients were included in this study; 14.9% (n = 18) developed an incisional hernia at the ileostomy reversal site; 17.4% (n = 21) at a non-ileostomy site and 6.6% (n = 8) developed both. The reversal-site hernias were smaller both in width and length compared with the non-ileostomy-site hernias. Risk factors for the development of reversal-site incisional hernias were higher body mass index (BMI), lower age, open surgery, longer reversal time and a history of previous hernias. We did not detect a difference in the size of the incisional hernias that developed in patients with these specific risk factors. CONCLUSIONS Incisional hernias are a significant complication of ileostomy reversal. Further evaluation of the use of prophylactic mesh to reduce the incidence of incisional hernias may be worthwhile.

  12. Incisional Hernia Following Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Positioning.

    PubMed

    Bonatti, Matteo; Vezzali, Norberto; Frena, Antonio; Bonatti, Giampietro

    2016-06-01

    Incisional hernia represents a rare complication after ventriculoperitoneal shunt positioning due to failure of the fascial suture in the site of abdominal entrance of ventriculoperitoneal catheter. Clinical presentation can be extremely variable, according to patient's performance status, herniated material constitution (i.e. mesenteric fat, bowel loops or both) and complication occurrence (e.g. strangulation or intestinal obstruction). Early diagnosis is fundamental in order to surgically repair the defect and prevent further complications. We present the case of a paucisymptomatic incisional hernia following ventriculoperitoneal shunt positioning. Diagnosis was made by means of ultrasound and confirmed by means of computed tomography. The patient was successfully managed by means of surgical repositioning of herniated loop and re-suture.

  13. Incisional Hernia Following Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Bonatti, Matteo; Vezzali, Norberto; Frena, Antonio; Bonatti, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Incisional hernia represents a rare complication after ventriculoperitoneal shunt positioning due to failure of the fascial suture in the site of abdominal entrance of ventriculoperitoneal catheter. Clinical presentation can be extremely variable, according to patient’s performance status, herniated material constitution (i.e. mesenteric fat, bowel loops or both) and complication occurrence (e.g. strangulation or intestinal obstruction). Early diagnosis is fundamental in order to surgically repair the defect and prevent further complications. We present the case of a paucisymptomatic incisional hernia following ventriculoperitoneal shunt positioning. Diagnosis was made by means of ultrasound and confirmed by means of computed tomography. The patient was successfully managed by means of surgical repositioning of herniated loop and re-suture. PMID:27761180

  14. [Laparoscopic incisional hernia repair as first therapeutic choice].

    PubMed

    Verbo, A; Petito, L; Pedretti, G; Manno, A; Rizzo, G; Masi, A; Coco, C

    2005-08-01

    Incisional hernias are one of the most frequent complications of open abdominal surgery. Historically, the best results have been obtained with the open rives-stoppa approach. This is done by fixing a large piece of prosthetic mesh behind the rectus muscle. Laparoscopic approach allows similar mesh placement with minimal dissection and lower recurrence rate compared to the open mesh repair. Between October 2001 to September 2003, 75 consecutive patients were scheduled to undergo laparoscopic incisional hernia repair with ePTFE mesh (Gore-Tex Dualmesh Plus). Postoperative complications were recorded and analysed. Most were obese affected by multiple wall defects Conversion to open surgery was required in 1 case Postoperative complications occurred 13.3%. Recurrence occurred in one only case. The key to the success of this procedure is avoidance of complications. The laparoscopic approach is safe, effective and relatively complication-free option in the management of patients presenting with a first time or recurrent incisional hernia and recommended as the treatment of choice.

  15. Contraction of abdominal wall muscles influences size and occurrence of incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Lien, Samuel C; Hu, Yaxi; Wollstein, Adi; Franz, Michael G; Patel, Shaun P; Kuzon, William M; Urbanchek, Melanie G

    2015-07-01

    Incisional hernias are a complication in 10% of all open abdominal operations and can result in substantial morbidity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether inhibiting abdominal muscle contraction influences incisional hernia formation during the fascial healing after laparotomy. We hypothesized that decreasing the deformation of the abdominal musculature would decrease the size or occurrence of an incisional hernia. Using an established rat model for incisional hernia, a laparotomy through the linea alba was closed with 1 mid-incision, fast-absorbing suture. Three groups were compared: a sham group (sham; n = 6) received no laparotomy, and the saline hernia (SH; n = 6) and Botox hernia (BH; n = 6) groups were treated once with equal volumes of saline or botulinum toxin (Botox, Allergan) before the incomplete laparotomy closure. On postoperative day 14, the abdominal wall was examined for herniation and adhesions, and contractile forces were measured for abdominal wall muscles. No hernias developed in the sham rats. Rostral hernias developed in all SH and BH rats. Caudal hernias developed in all SH rats, but in only 50% of the BH rats. Rostral hernias in the BH group were 35% shorter and 43% narrower compared with those in the SH group (P < .05). The BH group had weaker abdominal muscles compared with the sham and SH groups (P < .05). In our rat model, partial paralysis of abdominal muscles decreases the number and size of incisional hernias. These results suggest that contractions of the abdominal wall muscle play a role in the pathophysiology of the formation of incisional hernias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Contraction of Abdominal Wall Muscles Influences Incisional Hernia Occurrence and Size

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Samuel C.; Hu, Yaxi; Wollstein, Adi; Franz, Michael G.; Patel, Shaun P.; Kuzon, William M.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Incisional hernias are a complication in 10% of all open abdominal operations and can result in significant morbidity. The purpose of this study is to determine if inhibiting abdominal muscle contraction influences incisional hernia formation during laparotomy healing. We hypothesize that reducing abdominal musculature deformation reduces incisional hernia occurrence and size. Study Design Using an established rat model for incisional hernia, a laparotomy through the linea alba was closed with one mid-incision, fast-absorbing suture. Three groups were compared: a SHAM group (SHAM; n = 6) received no laparotomies while the Saline Hernia (SH; n = 6) and Botox Hernia (BH; n = 6) groups were treated once with equal volume saline or Botulinum Toxin (Botox®, Allergan) before the incomplete laparotomy closure. On post-operative day 14, the abdominal wall was examined for herniation and adhesions and contractile forces were measured for abdominal wall muscles. Results No hernias developed in SHAM rats. Rostral hernias developed in all SH and BH rats. Caudal hernias developed in all SH rats, but in only 50% of the BH rats. Rostral hernias in the BH group were 35% shorter and 43% narrower compared to those in the SH group (p < 0.05). The BH group had weaker abdominal muscles compared to the SHAM and SH groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions In our rat model, partial paralysis of abdominal muscles reduces the number and size of incisional hernias. These results confirm abdominal wall muscle contractions play a significant role in the pathophysiology of incisional hernia formation. PMID:25817097

  17. Incisional hernia in the elderly: risk factors and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Caglià, Pietro; Tracia, Angelo; Borzì, Laura; Amodeo, Luca; Tracia, Lucio; Veroux, Massimiliano; Amodeo, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Ventral incisional hernia is a common complication of abdominal surgery. The marked improvements in medical technology and healthcare, lead to an increasing number of elderly patients to take advantage of even complex surgical procedures. The objective of this literature review was to analyze the risk factors for ventral incisional hernia in elderly patients and to identify measures that might decrease the incidence of this complication. An analysis of the surgical literature was performed using the search engines EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and PubMed with particular reference to elderly patients using the keywords: abdominal hernia, wound dehiscence, incisional hernia, incidence, trocar site hernia, and hernia prevention. In our opinion the risk factors for incisional hernia should be separately considered. First those related to the patients and to the abdominal surgery and, in addition, those related to the surgery of the abdominal wall defects. Reparative surgery of the abdominal wall, to date uniquely characterized by the use of the mesh, should be considered an additional risk factor for the occurrence of incisional hernia. However, the low incarceration risk, the risk of recurrence, the relevant rate of postoperative pain and discomfort and complications associated with mesh repair, as small bowel obstruction, mesh infection, and entero-cutaneous fistula, suggest that the general indication for surgical treatment of incisional hernias, in a symptomatic or oligosymptomatic elderly patients, should be critically reconsidered in order to avoid unnecessary surgery. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Incisional hernia involving the neobladder: technical considerations to avoid complications.

    PubMed

    Katkoori, Devendar; Jayathillake, Anuradha; Eldefrawy, Ahmed; Manoharan, Murugesan

    2009-06-30

    The management of incisional hernia following radical cystectomy (RC) and neobladder diversion poses a special challenge. Mesh erosion into the neobladder is a potential complication of hernia repair in this setting. We describe our experience and steps to avoid this complication. Three patients developed incisional hernias following RC involving the neobladder. The incisional hernias were repaired by the same surgeon. A systematic dissection and repair of the hernias with an onlay dual-layer mesh (made of polyglactin and polypropylene) was carried out. The critical steps were placing the polyglactin side of the mesh deeper and positioning of an omental flap anterior to the neobladder. The omental flap adds a protective layer that prevents adhesions between the neobladder and abdominal wall, and prevents erosion of the mesh into the fragile neobladder wall. All of these patients had received two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to RC. The time duration from RC to the repair of hernia was 7, 42, and 54 months. No intraoperative injury to the neobladder or other complication was noted during hernia repair. The patients were followed after hernia repair for 20, 22, and 42 months with no recurrence, mesh erosion, or other complications. Careful understanding and attention to details of the technique can minimize the risk of complications, especially incisional hernia recurrence, injury to the neobladder, and erosion of mesh into the neobladder wall.

  19. Incidence of Ostomy Site Incisional Hernias after Stoma Closure.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Stephen P; Francis, Jacquelyn K; Valerian, Brian T; Canete, Jonathan J; Chismark, A David; Lee, Edward C

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the incidence of ostomy site incisional hernias after stoma reversal at a single institution. This is a retrospective analysis from 2001 to 2011 evaluating the following demographics: age, gender, indication for stoma, urgent versus elective operation, time to closure, total follow-up time, the incidence of and reoperation for stoma incisional hernia, diabetes, postoperative wound infection, smoking status within six months of surgery, body mass index, and any immunosuppressive medications. A total of 365 patients were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 30 months. The clinical hernia rate was 19 percent. Significant risk factors for hernia development were age, diabetes, end colostomies, loop colostomies, body mass index >30, and undergoing an urgent operation. The median time to clinical hernia detection was 32 months. Sixty-four percent of patients required surgical repair of their stoma incisional hernia. A significant number of patients undergoing stoma closure developed an incisional hernia at the prior stoma site with the majority requiring definitive repair. These hernias are a late complication after stoma closure and likely why they are under-reported in the literature.

  20. Evolution and advances in laparoscopic ventral and incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Vorst, Alan L; Kaoutzanis, Christodoulos; Carbonell, Alfredo M; Franz, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Primary ventral hernias and ventral incisional hernias have been a challenge for surgeons throughout the ages. In the current era, incisional hernias have increased in prevalence due to the very high number of laparotomies performed in the 20th century. Even though minimally invasive surgery and hernia repair have evolved rapidly, general surgeons have yet to develop the ideal, standardized method that adequately decreases common postoperative complications, such as wound failure, hernia recurrence and pain. The evolution of laparoscopy and ventral hernia repair will be reviewed, from the rectoscopy of the 4th century to the advent of laparoscopy, from suture repair to the evolution of mesh reinforcement. The nuances of minimally invasive ventral and incisional hernia repair will be summarized, from preoperative considerations to variations in intraoperative practice. New techniques have become increasingly popular, such as primary defect closure, retrorectus mesh placement, and concomitant component separation. The advent of robotics has made some of these repairs more feasible, but only time and well-designed clinical studies will tell if this will be a durable modality for ventral and incisional hernia repair. PMID:26649152

  1. Incisional bladder hernia following appendectomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shin; Miura, Emi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Toshiyuki

    2014-10-01

    We herein report the case of a 68-year-old male who presented with a few years' history of swelling at the scar of an appendectomy, which he had undergone nearly 40 years earlier, and which was associated with radiating pain towards the penis when he pushed on the swelling. The scar was located in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. Abdominal sonography and a computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated the presence of an incisional bladder hernia, and surgery was performed. The herniated bladder was successfully replaced into the preperitoneal space, and the orifice was covered with a polypropylene mesh. Most bladder hernias develop in the inguinal and/or femoral region, and an incisional bladder hernia is extremely rare, especially after abdominal surgery. To our knowledge, this is the fourth report of an incisional bladder hernia following abdominal surgery.

  2. Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia Repair With Fibrin Glue in Select Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Olmi; Luca, Saguatti; Claudio, Pagano; Giuseppe, Vittoria; Enrico, Croce

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective: Laparoscopic treatment of incisional hernias can be performed using different types of fixation devices and prosthesis. We present a case series of 19 patients with incisional hernias with a diameter of <6cm, who underwent laparoscopic repair using Hi-tex dual-side mesh, positioned intraperitoneally, fixed to the abdominal wall by fibrin glue (Tissucol). Methods: Nineteen patients with incisional hernias <6cm in diameter were enrolled in this study and treated laparoscopically with Hi-tex and Tissucol. Surgical complications and patient outcomes were assessed with a clinical follow-up. Results: Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernias by using Hi-tex mesh affixed to the parietal wall with fibrin glue was feasible and easy in patients with parietal defects <6cm in diameter. Mean operating time was 30 minutes. Mean hospital stay was 1.5 days. Almost no postoperative pain, major surgical complications, seroma formation, relapses, or prosthesis infection occurred during a mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusions: In select patients, Hi-tex mesh affixed using fibrin glue allows laparoscopic repair of incisional hernias with very good patient outcomes, especially in terms of postoperative pain and seroma formation. PMID:20932376

  3. GOALS-incisional hernia: a valid assessment of simulated laparoscopic incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, Marilou; Ghaderi, Iman; Kaneva, Pepa; Vassiliou, Melina; Kolozsvari, Nicoleta; George, Ivan; Sutton, F Erica; Seagull, F Jacob; Park, Adrian E; Fried, Gerald M; Feldman, Liane S

    2011-03-01

    The Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills (GOALS) is a valid and reliable measure of basic, non-procedure-specific laparoscopic skills. GOALS-incisional hernia (GOALS-IH) was developed to evaluate performance of laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR). The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of GOALS-IH during LIHR simulation. GOALS-IH assesses 7 domains with a maximum score of 35. A total of 12 experienced surgeons and 10 novices performed LIHR on the Surgical Abdominal Wall simulator. Performance was assessed by a trained observer and by self-assessment using GOALS-IH, basic GOALS and a visual analog scale (VAS) for overall competence. Both interrater reliability and internal consistency were high (.76 and .95 respectively). Experienced surgeons had higher mean GOALS-IH scores than novices (32.3 ± 2 versus 22.7 ± 5). There was excellent correlation between GOALS-IH and other measures of performance (GOALS r = .93 and VAS r = .93). GOALS-IH is easy to use, valid and reliable for assessment of simulated LIHR.

  4. Prolene hernia system, ultrapro hernia system and 3D patch devices in the treatment of inguinal, femoral, umbilical and small incisional hernias in outpatient surgery.

    PubMed

    Dabić, D; Cerović, S; Azanjaç, B; Marić, B; Kostić, I

    2010-01-01

    The employment of a diversity of prosthetic materials and several types of mesh different in construction is opening a new chapter in hernia surgery and tension-free techniques are becoming a "golden standard" for repairing abdominal wall defects, whereas the conventional methods, i.e., the tension techniques are performed on young patients having small direct, indirect, or femoral hernias. The aim of this retrospective study is to present the results of using Prolene Hernia System (PHS), Ultrapro Hernia System (UHS) and 3D Patch (3DP) devices in the treatment of inguinal, femoral, umbilical and small incisional hernias in outpatient surgery. From January 2006 to January 2009, 70 patients were operated on for abdominal wall hernias (54 inguinal, 4 femoral, 8 umbilical and 4 small incisional hernias) using PHS, UHS and 3DP devices. All the patients underwent surgery under local infiltrative anaesthesia. All the surgical operations were performed by a single surgeon, 19 of them in the General Hospital and 51 in a private polyclinic. The mean size of the hernia defect in the inguinal, femoral and umbilical hernias was 2.5 cm (1-4 cm), while in the incisional hernias it was 4.5 cm (3-6 cm). The mean operating time was 2.4 hrs (2-6 hrs). There were no requirement for urinary drains. The mean follow-up was 18 months (0-36 months). The incidence of infection, chronic pain and recurrence was 0%. Three of the patients had complications: seroma in one patient with an incisional hernia and hematoma in two patients after inguinal hernia repair. The employment of PHS, UHS and 3DP devices, which have not yet been widely accepted in our hospitals, has had outstanding results in outpatient surgery. In addition, the type of anaesthesia and the 3D mesh construction prepare the way for a short hospital stay, smooth recovery and a swift return to normal activity.

  5. [Median incisional hernias and coexisting parastomal hernias : new surgical strategies and an algorithm for simultaneous repair].

    PubMed

    Köhler, G

    2014-08-01

    The co-occurrence of incisional and parastomal hernias (PSH) remains a surgical challenge. Standardized treatment guidelines are missing, and the patients concerned require an individualized surgical approach. The laparoscopic techniques can be performed with incised and/or stoma-lateralizing flat meshes with intraperitoneal onlay placement. The purely laparoscopic and laparoscopic-assisted approaches with 3-D meshes offer advantages regarding the complete coverage of the edges of the stomal areas and the option of equilateral or contralateral stoma relocation in cases of PSH, which are difficult to handle due to scarring, adhesions, and large fascial defects > 5 cm with intestinal hernia sac contents. A relevant stoma prolapse can be relocated by tunnel-like preformed 3-D meshes and shortening the stoma bowel. The positive effect on prolapse prevention arises from the dome of the 3-D mesh, which is directed toward the abdominal cavity and tightly fits to the bowel. In cases of large incisional hernias (> 8-10 cm in width) or young patients with higher physical demands, an open abdominal wall reconstruction in sublay technique is required. Component separation techniques that enable tension-free ventral fascial closure should be preferred to mesh-supported defect bridging methods. The modified posterior component separation with transversus abdominis release (TAR) and the minimally invasive anterior component separation are superior to the original Ramirez technique with respect to wound morbidity. By using 3-D textile implants, which were specially designed for parastomal hernia prevention, the stoma can be brought out through the lateral abdominal wall without increased risk of parastomal hernia or prolapse development. An algorithm for surgical treatment, in consideration of the complexity of combined hernias, is introduced for the first time.

  6. Tissucol application in dermolipectomy and incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Fernández Lobato, R; García Septiem, J; Ortega Deballon, P; Martín Lucas, F J; Ruíz de Adana, J C; Limones Esteban, M

    2001-01-01

    Biological adhesives have a lot of applications in surgical procedures. Here we present a prospective study with the aim of analyzing results of the application of Tissucol between the muscle layers and subcutaneous tissue after incisional hernia repair with polypropylene mesh and associated dermolipectomy. We assess clinical and technical parameters, local morbidity, and hospital stay. Fifty-six patients were divided into two groups. Patients with whom we used fibrin glue were older, with more obesity (P < 0.005) with associated diseases, and their incisional hernias were larger and more complicated to repair. Patients in the Tissucol group developed less local morbidity (hematomas or abscesses; P < 0.01), had a shorter mean hospital stay (P < 0.01), and required less wound care. The use of Tissucol improves the results of surgical repair of large abdominal incisional hernias repaired by mesh placement and dermolipectomy, and it decreases global morbidity and hospital stay are reduced.

  7. Antibiotic prophylaxis in incisional hernia repair using a prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ríos, A; Rodríguez, J M; Munitiz, V; Alcaraz, P; Pérez Flores, D; Parrilla, P

    2001-09-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis in clean surgery with implantation of prosthetic material is widely accepted, although there are no studies on its use in abdominal incisional hernia repair. The objective was to evaluate antibiotic chemoprophylaxis in incisional herniorrhaphy with the implantation of prosthetic material. A prospective non-randomized study (1990-1998) was conducted to analyse 216 patients undergoing surgery for abdominal incisional hernia who required a prosthesis (polypropylene) in the reconstruction and who met the criteria for clean surgery. Risk factors were observed in 31.5%, the most frequent being diabetes and obesity. The incisional hernia was located mostly in the abdominal midline and in 64.4% measured over 10 cm. Antibiotic prophylaxis was administered in 140 patients (64.8%) via the systemic route, the antibiotics being first- or second-generation cephalosporins or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. Surgical wound infection occurred in 39 patients (18.1%), 19 who had received antibiotic prophylaxis (13.6%) and 20 who had not (26.3%). In multivariate analysis using logistic regression, the variables with statistical significance for local septic infection were antibiotic prophylaxis and number of risk factors. We can conclude therefore that antibiotic chemoprophylaxis is useful in abdominal incisional herniorrhaphy surgery with implantation of prosthetic material for reducing local septic complications.

  8. Lightweight polypropylene mesh fixation in laparoscopic incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Giuseppe; Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Rizzello, Mario; Greco, Francesco; Iorio, Olga; Iossa, Angelo; Silecchia, Gianfranco

    2013-09-01

    The choice of the mesh and fixation methods in laparoscopic incisional hernia repair is a crucial issue in preventing complications and recurrence. The authors report a series of 40 consecutive laparoscopic incisional hernia repairs, focusing on the use of lightweight polypropylene mesh and on the way of mesh fixation. Forty laparoscopic incisional hernia repairs performed consecutively in 38 patients (16 males, 22 females) were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups depending on tacks used: Titanium tacks vs absorbable tacks. All patients received totally laparoscopic incisional hernia repair by the use of lightweight polypropylene mesh. No major post-operative complications were reported. Post-operative pain (evaluated by VNS) was higher in Group A (titanium tacks, p < 0.05). No differences in follow-up as well as in recurrence incidence (one case in both groups, <6 months time interval) were reported. Securestrap™ absorbable tacks are safe and effective and easy to use and did not increase the risk of mesh dislocation compared with non-absorbable tacks. The specific design well fits the lightweight polypropylene mesh Physiomesh™. Further evaluations in larger randomized studies are needed to confirm these preliminary data.

  9. Review of stoma site and midline incisional hernias after stoma reversal.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mylan T; Phatak, Uma R; Li, Linda T; Hicks, Stephanie C; Moffett, Jennifer M; Arita, Nestor A; Berger, Rachel L; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    2014-08-01

    The incidence of incisional hernias after stoma reversal is not well reported. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature reporting data on incisional hernias after stoma reversal. We evaluated both the incidence of stoma site and midline incisional hernias. A systematic review identified studies published between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 2012, reporting the incidence of incisional hernia after stoma reversal at either the stoma site or at the midline incision (in cases requiring laparotomy). Pediatric studies were excluded. Assessment of risk of bias, detection method, and essential study-specific characteristics (follow-up duration, stoma type, age, body mass index, and so forth) was done. Sixteen studies were included in the analysis; 1613 patients had 1613 stomas formed. Fifteen studies assessed stoma site hernias and five studies assessed midline incisional hernias. The median (range) incidence of stoma site incisional hernias was 8.3% (range 0%-33.9%) and for midline incisional hernias was 44.1% (range 8.7%-58.1%). When evaluating only studies with a low risk of bias, the incidence for stoma site incisional hernias is closer to one in three and for midline incisional hernias is closer to one in two. Stoma site and midline incisional hernias are significant clinical complications of stoma reversals. The quality of studies available is poor and heterogeneous. Future prospective randomized controlled trials or observational studies with standardized follow-up and outcome definitions/measurements are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Incisional Hernia in Women: Predisposing Factors and Management Where Mesh is not Readily Available

    PubMed Central

    Agbakwuru, EA; Olabanji, JK; Alatise, OI; Okwerekwu, RO; Esimai, OA

    2009-01-01

    Background / Aim: Incisional hernia is still relatively common in our practice. The aim of the study was to identify risk factors associated with incisional hernia in our region. The setting is the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria during a period when prosthetic mesh was not readily available. Patients and Methods: All the women who presented with incisional hernia between 1996 and 2005 were prospectively studied using a standard form to obtain information on pre-hernia (index) operations and possible predisposing factors. They all had open surgical repair and were followed up for 18–60 months. Results: Forty-four women were treated during study period. The index surgeries leading to the hernias were emergency caesarian section 26/44 (59.1%), emergency exploratory laparotomy 6/44 (13.6%), and elective surgeries 12/44 (27.3%). Major associated risk factors were the use of wrong suture materials for fascia repair, midline incisions, wound sepsis, and overweight. Conclusion: For elective surgeries, reduction of weight should be encouraged when appropriate, and transverse incisions are preferred. Absorbable sutures, especially chromic catgut, should be avoided in fascia closure. Antibiotics should be used for complicated obstetric cases. PMID:21483511

  11. Laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mann, CD; Luther, A; Hart, C

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The laparoscopic approach to repairing ventral and incisional hernias has gained increasing popularity worldwide. We reviewed the experience of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair at a district general hospital in the UK with particular reference to patients with massive defects (diameter ≥15cm) and the morbidly obese. Methods A total of 144 patients underwent laparoscopic ventral (incisional or umbilical/paraumbilical) hernia repair between April 2007 and September 2012. Results The prevalence of conversion to open surgery was 2.8%. The prevalence of postoperative complications was 3.5%. Median postoperative follow-up was 30.2 months. A total of 5.6% cases suffered late complications and 2.8% developed recurrence. Thirty-four patients underwent repair of defects ≥10cm in diameter with a prevalence of recurrence of 5.6%. Sixteen patients underwent repair of ‘massive’ incisional hernia (diameter ≥15cm) with a prevalence of recurrence of 12.5%. Sixteen patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥40kg/m2 (range, 40–61kg/m2) underwent laparoscopic repair with a prevalence of recurrence of 6.3% (p>0.05 vs BMI <40kg/m2). Conclusions Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair can be carried out safely with a low prevalence of recurrence. It may have advantages in morbidly obese patients in whom open repair would represent a significant undertaking. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair may be used in cases of large and massive hernias, in which the risk of recurrence increases but is comparable with open repair and associated with low morbidity. PMID:25519261

  12. Apoptosis-Like Cell Death Induction and Aberrant Fibroblast Properties in Human Incisional Hernia Fascia

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Ramon; Quiles, Maria T.; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Lopez-Cano, Manuel; Huguet, Pere; Ramon-y-Cajal, Santiago; Reventos, Jaume; Armengol, Manel; Arbos, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Incisional hernia often occurs following laparotomy and can be a source of serious problems. Although there is evidence that a biological cause may underlie its development, the mechanistic link between the local tissue microenvironment and tissue rupture is lacking. In this study, we used matched tissue-based and in vitro primary cell culture systems to examine the possible involvement of fascia fibroblasts in incisional hernia pathogenesis. Fascia biopsies were collected at surgery from incisional hernia patients and non-incisional hernia controls. Tissue samples were analyzed by histology and immunoblotting methods. Fascia primary fibroblast cultures were assessed at morphological, ultrastructural, and functional levels. We document tissue and fibroblast loss coupled to caspase-3 activation and induction of apoptosis-like cell-death mechanisms in incisional hernia fascia. Alterations in cytoskeleton organization and solubility were also observed. Incisional hernia fibroblasts showed a consistent phenotype throughout early passages in vitro, which was characterized by significantly enhanced cell proliferation and migration, reduced adhesion, and altered cytoskeleton properties, as compared to non-incisional hernia fibroblasts. Moreover, incisional hernia fibroblasts displayed morphological and ultrastructural alterations compatible with autophagic processes or lysosomal dysfunction, together with enhanced sensitivity to proapoptotic challenges. Overall, these data suggest an ongoing complex interplay of cell death induction, aberrant fibroblast function, and tissue loss in incisional hernia fascia, which may significantly contribute to altered matrix maintenance and tissue rupture in vivo. PMID:21641387

  13. Port-site transversus abdominis fascia closure reduced the incidence of incisional hernia following retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Takei, A; Sazuka, T; Nakamura, K; Nihei, N; Ichikawa, T

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of incisional hernia after laparoscopic surgery is reportedly 0-5.2 %; there are only a few reports of that following retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy. We evaluated the incidence of and risk factors for incisional hernia after retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy, and the efficacy of our novel prophylaxis technique. A total of 207 renal cell carcinoma patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy at Chiba University Hospital were retrospectively enrolled in this study. We compared the incidences of incisional hernia following the transperitoneal vs. retroperitoneal approaches, and, among the latter group, the incidences with vs. without use of our prophylaxis method. Also among the retroperitoneal-approach group, we evaluated selected patient characteristics as potential hernia risk factors. The rate of incisional hernias was 14 (8.7 %) after 161 retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomies and one (2.2 %) after 46 transperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomies (P = 0.132). For those undergoing the retroperitoneal approach, 14 (11.3 %) hernias were identified in 124 non-prophylaxed patients and none in 37 prophylaxed patients. Transversus abdominis fascia closure was a statistically significant factor for reducing the incidence of incisional hernia after retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy (P = 0.0324): rectus abdominis muscle thickness ≤7 mm and perioperative blood loss >100 ml were statistically significant independent risk factors, by multivariate analysis. To prevent incisional hernia after retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy in the patients with risk factors, it is useful to close the transversus abdominis fascia at the port sites from inside the surgical cavity, through the open specimen-removal trocar port site, under direct observation.

  14. Laparoscopic approach to recurrent incisional hernia repair: a 3-year experience.

    PubMed

    Verbo, Alessandro; Petito, Luigi; Manno, Alberto; Coco, Claudio; Mattana, Claudio; Lurati, Massimo; Pedretti, Giorgio; Rizzo, Gianluca; Sermoneta, Daniel; Lodoli, Claudio; Nunziata, Joseph; D'Ugo, Domenico

    2007-10-01

    Incisional hernias are one of the most frequent complications of open abdominal surgery. The incidence of relapses after a conventional repair procedure is higher in recurrent than in primary cases (30%-50% vs. 11%-20%). The laparoscopic approach can prevent the complications associated with the conventional approach when dealing with recurrent incisional hernias. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laparoscopic treatment in such cases. We prospectively analyzed data from 41 consecutive patients with recurrent incisional hernias, who submitted to a laparoscopic repair procedure with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene Dual Mesh (Gore-Tex Dual Mesh Plus Biomaterial; W.L. Gore 8 Associates) from December 2001 to December 2004. All of the patients underwent clinical follow-up at 1, 6, and 12 months and then yearly. An ultrasound scan of the abdominal wall was performed at 6 and 12 months after the procedure. The parameters considered for the analysis were: mesh size, operating time, hospital stay, postoperative complications, and recurrences. The defects were usually localized along midline laparotomies. The mean mesh size was 400 cm2, the mean operating time was 68 minutes, and the mean length of hospital stay was 2.7 days. Complications were encountered in 17% of patients. The mean follow-up was 38 months (range, 18-54). Recurrence was reported in 1 case only (2.4%), which occurred within the first 6 months after the operation. The laparoscopic repair of recurrent incisional hernia seems to be an effective alternative to the conventional approach, as it can give lower recurrence and complication rates.

  15. Effect of botulinum toxin type A in lateral abdominal wall muscles thickness and length of patients with midline incisional hernia secondary to open abdomen management.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Hurtado, T R; Nuño-Guzmán, C M; Miranda-Díaz, A G; Troyo-Sanromán, R; Navarro-Ibarra, R; Bravo-Cuéllar, L

    2014-10-01

    Abdominal wall hernia secondary to open abdomen management represents a surgical challenge. The hernia worsens due to lateral muscle retraction. Our objective was to evaluate if Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTA) application in lateral abdominal wall muscles modifies its thickness and length. A clinical trial of male trauma patients with hernia secondary to open abdomen management was performed from January 2009 to July 2011. Thickness and length of lateral abdominal muscles were measured by a basal Computed Tomography and 1 month after BTA application. A dosage of 250 units of BTA was applied at five points at each side between the external and internal oblique muscles under ultrasonographic guidance. Statistical analysis for differences between basal and after BTA application measures was performed by a paired Student's t test (significance: p < 0.05). Seventeen male patients with a mean age of 35 years were included. There were muscle measure modifications in all the patients. Left muscle thickness: mean reduction of 1 ± 0.55 cm (p < 0.001). Right muscle thickness: mean reduction of 1.00 ± 0.49 cm (p < 0.001). Left muscle length: mean increase of 2.44 ± 1.22 cm (p < 0.001). Right muscle length: mean increase of 2.59 ± 1.38 cm (p < 0.001). No complications secondary to BTA or recurrences at mean follow-up of 49 months were observed. BTA application in lateral abdominal muscles decreases its thickness and increases its length in abdominal wall hernia patients secondary to open abdomen management.

  16. Laparoscopic repair of incisional and ventral hernias with the new type of meshes: randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Grubnik, Aleksandra V.; Vorotyntseva, Kseniya O.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair (LIVHR) was first reported by Le Blanc and Booth in 1993. Many studies are available in the literature that have shown that laparoscopic repair of incisional and ventral hernia is preferred over open repair because of lower recurrence rates (less than 10%), less wound morbidity, less pain, and early return to work. Aim To identify the long-term outcomes between the different types of meshes and two techniques of mesh fixation, i.e., tacks (method Double crown) and transfascial polypropylene sutures. Material and methods A total of 92 patients underwent LIVHR at our department between January 2009 and August 2012. The hernias were umbilical in 26 patients, paraumbilical in 15 patients and incisional in 51 patients. All patients admitted for LIVHR were randomized to either group I (tacker fixation of ePTFE meshes) or group II (suture fixation of meshes with nitinol frame) using computer-generated random numbers with block randomization and sealed envelopes for concealed allocation. Results The mean mesh fixation time was significantly higher in the tacker fixation group (117 ±15 min vs. 72 ±6 min, p < 0.01). There were no conversions in either group. The median postoperative hospital stay was 3.5 ±1.5 days. All patients were followed up at 1, 3, 6, 12 and every 6 months thereafter postoperatively. There were 5 recurrences in the study population. In group I there were 4 patients with recurrence, and only 1 patient in the group with meshes with a nitinol frame. Conclusions Meshes of the new generation with a nitinol framework can significantly improve laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. The fixation of these meshes is very simple using 3–4 transfascial sutures. The absence of shrinkage of these meshes makes the probability of recurrence minimal. Absence of tackers allows postoperative pain to be minimized. We consider that these new meshes can significantly improve laparoscopic ventral hernia repair

  17. Comparison of ultrasonography and physical examination in the diagnosis of incisional hernia in a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bloemen, A; van Dooren, P; Huizinga, B F; Hoofwijk, A G M

    2012-02-01

    Incisional hernia is a frequent complication of abdominal surgery (incidence 2-20%). Diagnosis by physical examination is sometimes difficult, especially in small incisional hernias or in obese patients. The additional diagnostic value of standardized ultrasonography was evaluated in this prospective study. A total of 456 patients participating in a randomized trial comparing two suture materials for closure of the abdominal fascia underwent physical examination and ultrasonography at 6-month intervals. Wound complaints and treatment of incisional hernia were also noted. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests (SPSS). Interest variability analysis was performed. During a median follow-up of 31 months, 103 incisional hernias were found. A total of 82 incisional hernias were found by physical examination and an additional 21 with ultrasonography. Six of these additional hernias were symptomatic and only one of the additional hernias received operative treatment. The false-negative rates for physical examination and ultrasonography were 25.3 and 24.4%, respectively. Interest variability was low, with a Kappa of 0.697 (P < 0.001). There are no clear diagnostic criteria for incisional hernia available in the literature. Standardized combination of ultrasonography with physical examination during follow-up yields a significant number of, mostly asymptomatic, hernias, which would not be found using physical examination alone. This is especially relevant in research settings.

  18. Incisional hernia postrepair of abdominal aortic occlusive and aneurysmal disease: five-year incidence.

    PubMed

    Alnassar, Sami; Bawahab, Mohammed; Abdoh, Ahmed; Guzman, Randolph; Al Tuwaijiri, Talal; Louridas, George

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to report the five-year incidence of incisional hernia after vascular repair of abdominal aortic occlusive (AOD) and aneurysmal disease (AAA), and to determine the factors associated with the development of this complication. Consecutive patients who underwent AAA and AOD at the University of Manitoba, Canada, between January 1999 and December 2002, were recruited and evaluated by clinical examination one week, one month and six months after the surgery, and through medical records review thereafter. The development of postoperative incisional hernia was recorded and analyzed. Two-hundred four patients, with a mean age of 70.1 years, provided consent for the study. The overall five-year incidence of incisional hernia was 69.1% and the overall median failure time was 48 months. The median failure time was 48 months for AOD and 36 months for AAA (P < 0.01). The urgent and ruptured AAA repair had a higher five-year incidence of incisional hernia as compared with AOD or elective AAA repair (P < 0.01). A history of bilateral inguinal hernia was significantly associated with incisional hernia (P < 0.05). Men and patients who were 65 years and older had a higher five-year incidence of incisional hernia (P < 0.01). Age ≥65 years, male gender, hypertension and past bilateral inguinal hernia repair double the risk for the development of incisional hernia (hazard ratio = 2.1. 2.2, 1.7 and 2.8, respectively). In conclusion, the five-year incidence of incisional hernia after vascular repair of AOD or AAA is 69.1%, and tends to occur late after vascular repair.

  19. [Historic analysis of complex incisional hernia: to an understanding of the double prosthetic repair technique].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Egea, Alfredo; Aguayo-Albasini, José Luis

    2010-11-01

    The treatment of complex incisional hernias is, on occasions, a real social and professional, and still controversial, challenge. A multitude of techniques have been described over the years in an attempt to solve this problem. The social context and technological development of each period are essential to understand the continuous changes in the way of performing these techniques. This article caries out an historical review of the prosthetic treatment of incisional hernias, trying to understand and apply the basic principles of the treatment of all incisional hernias to the repair with a double mesh. Copyright © 2010 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Incisional Hernia as a Cause of Blader Outlet Obstruction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shadan; Desai, Gunjan; Sharma, Kartikeya; Thomas, Shaji

    2016-01-01

    Incisional hernia usually contains intra peritoneal organs as its content. Extra peritoneal structures like bladder as a content of incisional hernia are relatively uncommon. We managed a young male with an incisional hernia containing a large bladder diverticulum as its content. The bladder diverticulum was going up to the base of scrotum along the posterolateral surface of penile corpora. The patient was diagnosed pre operatively with radiological investigations and underwent exploration with release of diverticulum from corpora and pubic arch followed by diverticulectomy and herniorraphy. To the best of our knowledge and available literature search, there isn’t any similar reported case. PMID:27790521

  1. [Hernia surgery in urology. Part 2: parastomal, trocar and incisional hernias - fundamentals of clinical diagnostics and treatment].

    PubMed

    Franz, T; Schwalenberg, T; Dietrich, A; Müller, J; Stolzenburg, J-U

    2013-06-01

    Hernias are a common occurrence with a correspondingly huge clinical and economic impact on the healthcare system. Parastomal and trocar hernias are rare in routine urological work. The therapy of parastomal hernias remains problematic but basically the surgeon is able to use conventional techniques with suture repair or procedures with mesh implantation. The conventional parastomal hernia repair with mesh can be classified into sublay, onlay and intraperitoneal techniques. Furthermore, a relocation of the stoma is possible. Trocar hernias represent a rare but hazardous complication. Due to the increase in keyhole surgery there is also the danger of a rise in their occurrence. Incisional hernias occur frequently in patients who have undergone laparotomy and for repair different surgical techniques and types of meshes are available. This article presents an overview of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical symptoms, diagnostic and therapy of parastomal, trocar and incisional hernias.

  2. Late recurrence of benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma complicated with an incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Canbay, Emel; Ishibashi, Haruaki; Sako, Shouzou; Kitai, Toshiyuki; Nishino, Eisei; Yonemura, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma (BMPM) is a rare disease arising from the peritoneal mesothelium. Here, we report a 57-year-old woman admitted to our unit with an incisional hernia fifteen years later following her first operation due to BMPM. Computerized tomography demonstrated a cystic appearing mass with intraabdominal extension in hernia sac. The patient underwent en bloc resection of the mass and hernia repair. An immunohistochemical analysis of the mass confirmed the recurrence of BMPM. Our case supports that BMPM has slowly progressive nature and can recur with complicated incisional hernia long time after primary resection. Diagnosis and long-term followup are crucial for clarifying the characteristics of this disease.

  3. Enterocutaneous fistula due to mesh fixation in the repair of lateral incisional hernia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Reddy, Rajesh; Dharanipragada, Kadambari; Jagdish, Sadasivan

    2008-12-02

    Enterocutaneous fistula following mesh repair of incisional hernia is usually due to mesh erosion of the underlying viscus and presents late. We describe an early enterocutaneous fistula due to an unusual but a potential mode of bowel injury during mesh fixation. This case is reported to emphasize the need for greater attention to the technique of mesh fixation. We suggest laparoscopic guidance to prevent this serious complication in lateral Incisional hernias with ill defined edges of the defect.

  4. Enterocutaneous fistula due to mesh fixation in the repair of lateral incisional hernia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Reddy, Rajesh; Dharanipragada, Kadambari; Jagdish, Sadasivan

    2008-01-01

    Enterocutaneous fistula following mesh repair of incisional hernia is usually due to mesh erosion of the underlying viscus and presents late. We describe an early enterocutaneous fistula due to an unusual but a potential mode of bowel injury during mesh fixation. This case is reported to emphasize the need for greater attention to the technique of mesh fixation. We suggest laparoscopic guidance to prevent this serious complication in lateral Incisional hernias with ill defined edges of the defect. PMID:19055713

  5. Abdominal muscle function and incisional hernia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K K; Kjaer, M; Jorgensen, L N

    2014-08-01

    Although ventral incisional hernia (VIH) repair in patients is often evaluated in terms of hernia recurrence rate and health-related quality of life, there is no clear consensus regarding optimal operative treatment based on these parameters. It was proposed that health-related quality of life depends largely on abdominal muscle function (AMF), and the present review thus evaluates to what extent AMF is influenced by VIH and surgical repair. The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for articles following a systematic strategy for inclusion. A total of seven studies described AMF in relation to VIH. Five studies examined AMF using objective isokinetic dynamometers to determine muscle strength, and two studies examined AMF by clinical examination-based muscle tests. Both equipment-related and functional muscle tests exist for use in patients with VIH, but very few studies have evaluated AMF in VIH. There are no randomized controlled studies to describe the impact of VIH repair on AMF, and no optimal surgical treatment in relation to AMF after VIH repair can be advocated for at this time.

  6. Short- and mid-term outcome after laparoscopic repair of large incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Baccari, P; Nifosi, J; Ghirardelli, L; Staudacher, C

    2013-10-01

    To compare the outcome after laparoscopic incisional and ventral herniorrhaphy (LIVH) for fascial defect larger or equal than 15 cm in width with the outcome after LIVH in patients with hernia defect smaller than 15 cm. From 2003 through 2010, 350 patients were submitted to LIVH. In 70 cases, hernia defect was ≥15 cm in width and in 280 was <15 cm. Incisional hernias were often recurrent, double or multiorificial. In the group of larger hernias, the rate of obesity, recurrent hernia and multiorificial hernia was 27.1, 24.2 and 12.8 %, respectively, and in the group of smaller hernias 27.3, 16.1 and 2.8 %, respectively. Patients were interviewed using McGill pain score test to measure postoperative quality of life (QoL) in the mid-term. LIVH for hernia ≥15 cm required longer surgical time (p = 0.034) and postoperative hospital stay (p = 0.0001). Besides, there were higher rate of postoperative prolonged ileus (p = 0.035) and polmonitis (p = 0.001). Overall recurrence rate was 2.6, 8.6 % for larger and 1.1 % for smaller incisional hernias, p = 0.045. Mc Gill pain test revealed no significant difference in the two groups of patients in postoperative QoL within 36 months. Laparoscopic approach seems safe and effective even to repair large incisional hernia, the rate of recurrence was higher, but acceptable, if compared to smaller hernias. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest reported series of incisional hernias ≥15 cm managed by laparoscopy.

  7. Postoperative interstitial hernia as a cause of obscure incisional wound site pain.

    PubMed

    Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Smietański, Maciej

    2012-03-01

    An interstitial hernia is one in which the hernia sac is located between the layers of the abdominal wall. The analysis of contemporary literature shows that interstitial hernias are most often seen in children as a type of inguinal hernia and often accompany undescended testis. The hernia sac is usually located between the external-oblique and internal-oblique muscles in a lateral-cephalic direction. The authors present 3 cases of interstitial hernia found during laparoscopic exploration of the front abdominal wall done due to incisional wound site pain. No previous diagnosis of hernia was considered in all the cases. Hernias were found as complications of appendectomy and wound healing after radiotherapy of uterine and cervical cancer. In conclusion, in obscure wound site pain, the presence of an interstitial postoperative hernia should be considered as a possible reason for the complaint. Laparoscopic examination of the anterior abdominal wall during adhesiolysis in patients with abdominal pain enables proper diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Female Gender and Diabetes Mellitus Increase the Risk of Recurrence after Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, FD; Coleman, M; Ahmed, Z; Bunni, J; Bunting, D; Elshaer, M; Evans, V; Kimble, A; Kostalas, M; Page, G; Singh, J; Szczebiot, L; Wienand-Barnett, S; Wilkins, A; Williams, O; Newell, P

    2015-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic hernia repair is used widely for the repair of incisional hernias. Few case studies have focussed on purely ‘incisional’ hernias. This multicentre series represents a collaborative effort and employed statistical analyses to provide insight into the factors predisposing to recurrence of incisional hernia after laparoscopic repair. A specific hypothesis (ie, laterality of hernias as well as proximity to the xyphoid process and pubic symphysis predisposes to recurrence) was also tested. Methods This was a retrospective study of all laparoscopic incisional hernias undertaken in six centres from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010. It comprised a comprehensive review of case notes and a follow-up using a structured telephone questionnaire. Patient demographics, previous medical/surgical history, surgical procedure, postoperative recovery, and perceived effect on quality of life were recorded. Repairs undertaken for primary ventral hernias were excluded. A logistic regression analysis was then fitted with recurrence as the primary outcome. Results A total of 186 cases (91 females) were identified. Median follow-up was 42 months. Telephone interviews were answered by 115/186 (62%) of subjects. Logistic regression analyses suggested that only female sex (odds ratio (OR) 3.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.39–8.97) and diabetes mellitus (3.54; 1–12.56) significantly increased the risk of recurrence. Position of the defect had no statistical effect. Conclusions These data suggest an increased risk of recurrence after laparoscopic incisional hernia repair in females and subjects with diabetes mellitus. These data will help inform surgeons and patients when considering laparoscopic management of incisional hernias. We recommend a centrally hosted, prospectively maintained national/international database to carry out additional research. PMID:25723687

  9. Risk of Late-Onset Adhesions and Incisional Hernia Repairs after Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bensley, Rodney P; Schermerhorn, Marc L; Hurks, Rob; Sachs, Teviah; Boyd, Christopher A; O’Malley, A James; Cotterill, Philip; Landon, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Long-term adhesion-related complications and incisional hernias after abdominal surgery are common and costly. There are few data on the risk of these complications after different abdominal operations. STUDY DESIGN We identified Medicare beneficiaries who underwent endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm from 2001–2008 who presumably are not at risk for laparotomy-related complications. We identified all laparoscopic and open operations involving the abdomen, pelvis, or retroperitoneum and categorized them into 5 groups according to invasiveness. We then identified laparotomy-related complications for up to 5 years after the index operation and compared these with the baseline rate of complications in a control group of patients who did not undergo an abdominal operation. RESULTS We studied 85,663 patients, 7,513 (8.8%) of which underwent a laparotomy, including 2,783 major abdominal operations, 709 minor abdominal operations, 963 ventral hernia repairs, 493 retroperitoneal/pelvic operations, and 2,565 laparoscopic operations. Mean age was 76.7 years and 82.0% were male. Major abdominal operations carried the highest risk for adhesion-related complications (14.3% and 25.0% at 2 and 5 years compared with 4.0% and 7.8% for the control group; p < 0.001) and incisional hernias (7.8% and 12.0% compared with 0.6% and 1.2% for the control group; p < 0.001). Laparoscopic operations (4.6% and 10.7% for adhesions, 1.9% and 3.2% for incisional hernias) carried the lowest risk. CONCLUSIONS Late-onset laparotomy-related complications are frequent and their risk extends through 5 years beyond the perioperative period. With the advancement and expansion of laparoscopic techniques and its attendant lower risk for long-term complications, these results can alter the risk-to-benefit profile of various types of abdominal operations and can also strengthen the rationale for additional development of laparoscopic approaches to abdominal operations. PMID

  10. Repair of Concomitant Incisional and Parastomal Hernias Using a Hybrid Technique: A Series of 32 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinyong; Tian, Wen; Li, Jiye; Sun, Pengjun; Pei, Lijuan; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    Background Concomitant incisional and parastomal hernias is a challenging condition. We used a hybrid technique of sublay and onlay to treat patients with this condition. Material/Methods The clinical data of 32 consecutive patients treated from February 2008 to April 2014 for concomitant incisional and parastomal hernias were retrospectively reviewed. The mean diameter was 9 (range 4–13) cm of the incisional hernias, and 6 (range 4.5–8) cm of the parastomal hernias. Results The mean operative time was 247 (range 220–290) min. The mean hospital stay was 20 (range 14–27) days. All surgical wounds healed by primary intention. Seven patients had postoperative seroma and were well managed with puncture and compression. All 32 patients were followed up for a mean of 48 (range 5–68) months. Four patients recurred with parastomal hernias and were treated with secondary surgery. No further recurrence occurred until the last follow-up. Conclusions This hybrid technique of sublay and onlay is only suitable for the repair of complex incisional and parastomal hernias. PMID:26186130

  11. Burst abdomen and incisional hernia: a prospective study of 1129 major laparotomies.

    PubMed Central

    Bucknall, T E; Cox, P J; Ellis, H

    1982-01-01

    Burst abdomen and incisional herniation are continuing problems for the general surgeon. A prospective study was carried out to define the extent of the problem. Over five years from 1975 to 1980 a total of 1129 major laparotomy wounds in adults were assessed at regular intervals for 12 months after operation. There were 19 burst abdomens (1.7%) and 84 incisional hernias (7.4%). The introduction of the mass-closure technique reduced the incidence of burst abdomen from over 3% in 1975 to 0.95% in 1979. It did not, however, improve the rate for incisional hernias, which was 7.6% in 1979. Many factors are associated with incisional herniation: old age, male sex, obesity, bowel surgery, type of suture, chest infection, abdominal distension, and, most important, wound infection. More work is needed to find the ideal method of wound closure, and efforts should be made to eliminate wound infection. PMID:6279229

  12. Late post liver transplant protein losing enteropathy: Rare complication of incisional hernia

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jonathan D; Perera, M Thamara PR; Pal, CY; Neuberger, James; Mirza, Darius F

    2013-01-01

    Development of oedema and hypoproteinaemia in a liver transplant recipient may be the first signs of graft dysfunction and should prompt a full assessment. We report the novel case of a patient who, years after liver transplantation developed a functional blind loop in an incisional hernia, which manifested as oedema and hypoproteinaemia secondary to protein losing enteropathy. After numerous investigations, the diagnosis was made by flurodeoxyglucose positron emmision tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Surgical repair of the incisional hernia was followed several months later by resolution of the protein loss, and confirmed at a post operative FDG-PET scan at one year. PMID:23885154

  13. Is laparoscopic treatment of incisional and recurrent hernias associated with an increased risk for complications?

    PubMed

    Meyer, Rüdiger; Häge, Anna; Zimmermann, Markus; Bruch, Hans-Peter; Keck, Tobias; Hoffmann, Martin; Schlöricke, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Hernias of the ventral abdominal wall can be treated with an intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM). The aim of this cohort study was to analyze the complications and recurrence rates after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair focusing especially on incisional and recurrent hernias. The study population comprised 149 patients with a hernia of the abdominal wall, which was treated with an IPOM between January 2006 and January 2011. Fifty-one patients had a primary hernia (group I) and 98 patients had preceding abdominal surgery (group II). In group II 64 patients had an incisional hernia and 34 patients had a recurrent hernia. The median body mass index was 30.3 kg/m(2) (14.8-69.1) without any significance in sub-group comparison. The mean duration of surgery and the length of stay were significantly longer in group II (p < 0.05). The overall rate of minor complications was 18.1%. There were significantly more minor complications in group II (7.8% vs. 23.5%, p = 0.02). Notably, there were also significantly more major complications in group II (14.3% vs. 2.0%; p = 0.02). The recurrence rate was significantly higher in group II (group I: 3.9% vs. group II: 16.3%, p < 0.05). There were no early recurrences in group I, but 5 early recurrences in group II. Laparoscopic treatment of complex hernias as incisional hernias, recurrent hernias and hernias with interenteric and enteroperitoneal adhesions is associated with high rates of minor and major complications. A high level of expertise of the surgeon and the camera-guiding assistant is therefore needed. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tactical and surgical techniques issues in the surgical treatment of incisional hernias

    PubMed Central

    Gangură, AG; Palade, RŞ

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Within five years, between 2006 and 2011, a total of 368 incisional hernias have been operated in the Surgery Clinic 1, University Emergency Hospital Bucharest. The study followed the morphological and biological parameters, associated pathology, tactics and surgical technique used and postoperative morbidity. The average age of patients was 61.75 years, female sex was predominant (81.25%), and incisional hernias were large and giant in a percentage of 73.37%. Locations were predominantly median (83.42%). Recurrent incisional hernias and multiple relapsed hernias represented 25.54%. Associated pathology was dominated by obesity (51,09%) and cardiovascular disease (37,77%). We have used both methods of tissue procedures (22.83%), and the prosthetic procedures (77.17%). Prosthetic techniques, retro muscle fitting mesh in the rectus abdominis muscle sheath (Rives-Stoppa technique), fitting ov er the fascia and tissue replacement techniques were performed. Immediate postoperative morbidity was represented by seroma (14.13%), prolonged postoperative ileus (8.69%), prolonged hematic drainage (6.52%), and hematoma (1.9%). Late postoperative morbidity was given by granulomas (5.7%) and recurrence of incisional hernias (4.34%). Good and very good results were obtained in the 89.96% of the operated cases. PMID:25408770

  15. Late Recurrence of Benign Multicystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Complicated with an Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Canbay, Emel; Ishibashi, Haruaki; Sako, Shouzou; Kitai, Toshiyuki; Nishino, Eisei; Yonemura, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma (BMPM) is a rare disease arising from the peritoneal mesothelium. Here, we report a 57-year-old woman admitted to our unit with an incisional hernia fifteen years later following her first operation due to BMPM. Computerized tomography demonstrated a cystic appearing mass with intraabdominal extension in hernia sac. The patient underwent en bloc resection of the mass and hernia repair. An immunohistochemical analysis of the mass confirmed the recurrence of BMPM. Our case supports that BMPM has slowly progressive nature and can recur with complicated incisional hernia long time after primary resection. Diagnosis and long-term followup are crucial for clarifying the characteristics of this disease. PMID:23533919

  16. Diagnosis of a Strangulated Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia with Point-of-Care Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Argintaru, Niran; Al-Den, Ahmed; Chenkin, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    The use of point-of-care ultrasound for the diagnosis of bowel obstructions and hernias is becoming increasingly common in the emergency department (ED). Using a relatively rare case of an incisional port hernia, we demonstrate the ultrasound findings of a strangulated hernia causing a partial small bowel obstruction. A 46-year-old female presented four days following a laparoscopic surgery complaining of abdominal pain, nausea and lack of bowel movements. There was a palpable mass in the left lower quadrant under the 12mm trocar port incision. ED point-of-care ultrasound revealed herniated akinetic loops of bowel through her laparoscopy incision. This is the first case report to describe the use of point-of-care ultrasound for the diagnosis of a strangulated incisional port hernia at the bedside. PMID:25987928

  17. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: outcomes in primary versus incisional hernias: no effect of defect closure.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, J R; Vaktskjold, A; Trondsen, E; Øyen, O M; Reiertsen, O

    2015-06-01

    Supposing divergent aetiology, we found it interesting to investigate outcomes between primary (PH) versus incisional (IH) hernias. In addition, we wanted to analyse the effect of defect closure and mesh fixation techniques. 37 patients with PH and 70 with IH were enrolled in a prospective cohort-study, treated with laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) and randomised to ± transfascial sutures. In addition, we analysed results from a retrospective study with 36 PH and 51 IH patients. Mean follow-up time was 38 months in the prospective study and 27 months in the retrospective study. 35 % of PH's and 10 % of IH's were recurrences after previous suture repair. No late infections or mesh removals occurred. Recurrence rates in the prospective study were 0 vs. 4.3 % (p = 0.55) and the complication rates were 16 vs. 27 % (p = 0.24) in favour of the PH cohort. The IH group had a mesh protrusion rate of 13 vs. 5 % in the PH group (p = 0.32), and significantly (p < 0.01) larger hernias and adhesion score, longer operating time (100 vs. 79 min) and admission time (2.8 vs. 1.6 days). Closure of the hernia defect did not influence rate of seroma, pain at 2 months, protrusion or recurrence. An overall increased complication rate was seen after defect closure (OR 3.42; CI 1.25-9.33). With PH, in comparison to IH treated with LVHR, no differences were observed regarding recurrence, protrusion or complication rates. Defect closure (raphe), when using absorbable suture, did not benefit long-term outcomes and caused a higher overall complication rate. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT00455299).

  18. Prospective evaluation of surgeon physical examination for detection of incisional hernias.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Rebeccah B; Beck, William C; Holzman, Michael D; Sharp, Kenneth W; Nealon, William H; Poulose, Benjamin K

    2014-03-01

    Surgeon physical examination is often used to monitor for hernia recurrence in clinical and research settings, despite a lack of information on its effectiveness. This study aims to compare surgeon-reviewed CT with surgeon physical examination for the detection of incisional hernia. General surgery patients with an earlier abdominal operation and a recent viewable CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis were enrolled prospectively. Patients with a stoma, fistula, or soft-tissue infection were excluded. Surgeon-reviewed CT was treated as the gold standard. Patients were stratified by body mass index into nonobese (body mass index <30) and obese groups. Testing characteristics and real-world performance, including positive predictive value and negative predictive value, were calculated. One hundred and eighty-one patients (mean age 54 years, 68% female) were enrolled. Hernia prevalence was 55%. Mean area of hernias was 44.6 cm(2). Surgeon physical examination had a low sensitivity (77%) and negative predictive value (77%). This difference was more pronounced in obese patients, with sensitivity of 73% and negative predictive value 69%. Surgeon physical examination is inferior to CT for detection of incisional hernia, and fails to detect approximately 23% of hernias. In obese patients, 31% of hernias are missed by surgeon physical examination. This has important implications for clinical follow-up and design of studies evaluating hernia recurrence, as ascertainment of this result must be reliable and accurate. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Preliminary results in the use of a new composite prosthesis in incisional hernia repair].

    PubMed

    Bove, A; Pungente, S; Corradetti, L; Bongarzoni, G; Palone, G; Corbellini, L

    2007-01-01

    The repair of incisional hernias with the use of prosthetic biomaterials is the standard of care today. There are different prosthetic biomaterials that can be used to repair incisional hernias. These materials can be divided into products that are single component or a combination. Incisional hernia repair using the intraperitoneal implantation of a prosthesis requires mesh with impervious properties. This is preliminary study with a new composite non resorbable mesh in polyethylene terephthalate-polyurethane (HI-TEX PARP MP) used for incisional hernia repair in intraperitoneal implantation. This mesh has one permeable side in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) for rapid tissue fixation and another side in polyurethane (PEU), hydrophobic in order to avoid cell penetration. This is a preliminary study of medical records of 24 patients (17 women and 7 men) in whom intraperitoneal placement of composite prosthetics in polyethylene terephthalate-polyurethane (HI-TEX PARP MP) was used between September 2004 and September 2006. The incisional hernias were recurrent in 8 patients. The underside of the mesh was placed in direct contact with the visceral peritoneum, whereas the upper side made contact with the subcutaneous tissue. No intraoperative complications occurred. Postoperatively, 1 had seromas, 1 had phlegmon of the wound without removing prosthetics. There was 1 death but not dependent of the surgical performance. The follow-up, was 12 months (range 1 month-2 years); none had discomfort; only one patient had recurrence. Intraperitoneal placement of HI-TEX PARP MP has several advantages over other techniques including minimal adhesions, a decreased risk of infection and recurrences. In addition this mesh is more economics than the other prosthetics in use.

  20. Dynamic ultrasound with postural change facilitated the detection of an incisional hernia in a case with negative MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Wongsithichai, Patcharaporn; Chang, Ke-Vin; Hung, Chen-Yu; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2015-09-01

    Incisional hernias commonly develop after abdominal surgeries with a lower incidence in patients receiving laparoscopy. Diagnosis through a non-surgical approach is usually made by computed tomography or magnetic resonance images (MRI) but both image modalities require patients to be examined in a supine position. We reported a case noticing a mass over her right lower abdomen after a laparoscopic liver segmentectomy with negative findings of hernia on MRI. A hernia sac was found by ultrasound with the patient being standing, highlighting the utility of dynamic ultrasound with postural change in investigation of incisional hernias.

  1. Interparietal hernias after open retromuscular hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, A M

    2008-12-01

    The retromuscular or sublay repair of ventral hernias, popularized by Rives and Stoppa, requires that a layer of tissue be reapproximated dorsal to the mesh to separate the bowel from the prosthetic. This is the first report of two patients who developed bowel obstruction resulting from interparietal incarceration between the posterior rectus sheath and the prosthetic graft through a defect in this dorsal layer. Both patients underwent open retromuscular hernia repair, one with lightweight polypropylene mesh, the other with human acellular dermal matrix. Postoperatively (day 3 and day 42, respectively), the patients developed signs of bowel obstruction. Computed tomography demonstrated the herniation of the small bowel into the potential space between the prosthesis and the posterior rectus sheath. The first patient underwent successful laparoscopic repair, while the second patient had an open operation to reduce the incarcerated bowel and repair the defect. In the patient convalescing from an uneventful retromuscular hernia repair who develops signs and symptoms of a bowel obstruction, there should be a high index of suspicion that an interparietal hernia may have formed, with the small bowel herniated into the surgically created space between the prosthetic and the posterior rectus sheath.

  2. Incisional Intercostal Hernia With Prolapse of the Colon After Right Partial Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Kurashima, Yukiko; Watanabe, Chie; Ohata, Kazunori; Hashiba, Ryoya; Tanaka, Shogo; Uenishi, Takahiro; Ohno, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman with a history of myocardial infarction, gallstones, and right renal cancer was referred to our department because of right flank pain. She had a surgical scar on the right abdomen between the 10th and 11th ribs; computed tomography demonstrated intercostal herniation of the colon. Recognizing the possibility of adhesions of the hernia and colon, we used a median skin incision and patched a polyester mesh coated with absorbent collagen. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, with no pain for 6 months postoperatively. Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernias with abdominal contents commonly develop after trauma or thoracic surgery. Incisional intercostal hernias seldom develop after nephrectomy; the present case is only the fourth report. We conjecture that a costochondral incision can induce subluxation of the costotransverse joint, intercostal nerve injury, and atrophy of the intercostal and abdominal oblique muscles. Surgeons must therefore recognize the potential, albeit rare, for intercostal hernia after nephrectomy. PMID:24229033

  3. Incisional intercostal hernia with prolapse of the colon after right partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Kurashima, Yukiko; Watanabe, Chie; Ohata, Kazunori; Hashiba, Ryoya; Tanaka, Shogo; Uenishi, Takahiro; Ohno, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman with a history of myocardial infarction, gallstones, and right renal cancer was referred to our department because of right flank pain. She had a surgical scar on the right abdomen between the 10th and 11th ribs; computed tomography demonstrated intercostal herniation of the colon. Recognizing the possibility of adhesions of the hernia and colon, we used a median skin incision and patched a polyester mesh coated with absorbent collagen. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, with no pain for 6 months postoperatively. Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernias with abdominal contents commonly develop after trauma or thoracic surgery. Incisional intercostal hernias seldom develop after nephrectomy; the present case is only the fourth report. We conjecture that a costochondral incision can induce subluxation of the costotransverse joint, intercostal nerve injury, and atrophy of the intercostal and abdominal oblique muscles. Surgeons must therefore recognize the potential, albeit rare, for intercostal hernia after nephrectomy.

  4. Surgical mesh for ventral incisional hernia repairs: Understanding mesh design

    PubMed Central

    Rastegarpour, Ali; Cheung, Michael; Vardhan, Madhurima; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Butler, Charles E; Levinson, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Surgical mesh has become an indispensable tool in hernia repair to improve outcomes and reduce costs; however, efforts are constantly being undertaken in mesh development to overcome postoperative complications. Common complications include infection, pain, adhesions, mesh extrusion and hernia recurrence. Reducing the complications of mesh implantation is of utmost importance given that hernias occur in hundreds of thousands of patients per year in the United States. In the present review, the authors present the different types of hernia meshes, discuss the key properties of mesh design, and demonstrate how each design element affects performance and complications. The present article will provide a basis for surgeons to understand which mesh to choose for patient care and why, and will explain the important technological aspects that will continue to evolve over the ensuing years. PMID:27054138

  5. Preoperative abdominal muscle elongation with botulinum toxin A for complex incisional ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Farooque, Faisal; Jacombs, Anita S W; Roussos, Emmanouel; Read, John W; Dardano, Anthony N; Edye, Michael; Ibrahim, Nabeel

    2016-01-01

    Surgical repair of recurrent abdominal incisional hernia(s) can be challenging due to complex operative conditions, intense post-operative pain, potential respiratory compromise and lateral muscle traction predisposing to early recurrence. We report our preliminary results with botulinum toxin A (BTA) injection causing flaccid paralysis (relaxation) of the lateral abdominal wall muscles prior to surgery. A prospective pilot study measured the effect of preoperative BTA prior to elective repair of recurrent abdominal hernias. Under ultrasound control, 2 weeks prior to surgery, 50 units of BTA was injected into the external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles at three sites on each side of the lateral abdominal wall (total dose 300 units). Pre- and post-BTA abdominal computed tomography measured changes in abdominal wall muscle thickness and length. All hernias were repaired with laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted mesh techniques in a single or two-staged procedure. Eight patients received BTA injections which were tolerated with no complications. Post-BTA preoperative computed tomography showed a significant increase in mean length of lateral abdominal wall from 18.5 cm pre-BTA to 21.3 cm post-BTA (P = 0.017) with a mean unstretched length gain of 2.8 cm per side (range 0.8-6.0 cm). All hernias were surgically reduced with mesh with no early recurrence. Preoperative BTA injection prior to complex abdominal hernia repair is a safe procedure that causes flaccid relaxation, elongation and thinning of the lateral abdominal muscles and decrease in hernia defect. Although further evaluation is required, BTA injections may be a useful adjunct to surgical repair of complex incisional hernias. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  6. Incidence of Port-Site Incisional Hernia After Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rainville, Harvey; Ikedilo, Ojinika; Vemulapali, Pratibha

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is gaining popularity among minimally invasive surgeons and is now being applied to a broad number of surgical procedures. Although this technique uses only 1 port, the diameter of the incision is larger than in standard laparoscopic surgery. The long-term incidence of port-site hernias after single-incision laparoscopic surgery has yet to be determined. Methods: All patients who underwent a single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedure from May 2008 through May 2009 were included in the study. Single-incision laparoscopic surgical operations were performed either by a multiport technique or with a 3-trocar single-incision laparoscopic surgery port. The patients were seen at 30 to 36 months' follow-up, at which time they were examined for any evidence of port-site incisional hernia. Patients found to have hernias on clinical examination underwent repairs with mesh. Results: A total of 211 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The types of operations included were cholecystectomy, appendectomy, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric banding, Nissen fundoplication, colectomy, and gastrojejunostomy. We found a port-site hernia rate of 2.9% at 30 to 36 months' follow-up. Conclusion: Port-site incisional hernia after single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedures remains a major setback for patients. The true incidence remains largely unknown because most patients are asymptomatic and therefore do not seek surgical aid. PMID:24960483

  7. Performance of simulated laparoscopic incisional hernia repair correlates with operating room performance.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Iman; Vaillancourt, Marilou; Sroka, Gideon; Kaneva, Pepa A; Seagull, F Jacob; George, Ivan; Sutton, Erica; Park, Adrian E; Vassiliou, Melina C; Fried, Gerald M; Feldman, Liane S

    2011-01-01

    the role of simulation for training in procedures such as laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether performance in simulated LIHR correlates with operating room (OR) performance. subjects performed LIHR in the University of Maryland Surgical Abdominal Wall (SAW) simulator and the OR. Trained observers used a LIHR-specific global rating scale (Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills-Incisional Hernia) to assess performance. Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills-Incisional Hernia includes 7 domains (trocar placement, adhesiolysis, mesh sizing, mesh positioning, mesh fixation, knowledge and autonomy in instrument use, and overall competence). The correlation between simulator and OR performance was assessed using the Pearson coefficient. fourteen surgeons from 2 surgical departments participated. Experienced surgeons (n = 9) were defined as attending surgeons and minimally invasive surgury (MIS) fellows, and novice surgeons (n = 5) were general surgery residents (postgraduate years 3-5). The correlation between performance in the OR and the simulator for the entire group was .87 (95% confidence interval, .63-.96; P < .001). there was an excellent correlation between LIHR performance in the simulator and clinical LIHR. This suggests that performance in the SAW simulator may predict performance in the operating room. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Central mesh recurrence after incisional hernia repair with Marlex--are the meshes strong enough?

    PubMed

    Langer, C; Neufang, T; Kley, C; Liersch, T; Becker, H

    2001-09-01

    The use of biomaterial meshes in the repair of incisional abdominal wall hernias is now widely accepted internationally. The introduction of synthetic meshes to achieve tension-free repair has led to a satisfactory reduction in the recurrence rate to less than 10%. However, the use of such biomaterials can result in the occurrence of undesirable complications such as increased risk of infection, seromas, restriction of the abdominal wall and failure caused by mesh shrinkage. Additionally, at the time of writing there is much discussion concerning the potential risk of a persistent foreign body reaction directly associated with the meshes with regard to possible malignant transformation. As such, the trend seems to be toward the use of lighter meshes utilizing less non-absorbable material. One particular novel mesh theoretically capable of guaranteeing the necessary mechanical stability uses 70% less biomaterial. Against this background, we report a central mesh recurrence through the mesh following incisional hernia repair with a Marlex mesh. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a central mesh recurrence, and we discuss a possible mechanism with particular emphasis on the required abdominal wall forces both physiologically and after incisional hernia repair.

  9. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum and botulinum toxin type A in patients with large incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Lledó, J; Torregrosa, A; Ballester, N; Carreño, O; Carbonell, F; Pastor, P G; Pamies, J; Cortés, V; Bonafé, S; Iserte, J

    2017-04-01

    Combination of preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum (PPP) and botulinum toxin type A (BT) has not been previously reported in the management of large incisional hernia (LIH). Observational study of 45 consecutive patients with LIH between June 2010 and July 2014. The diameters of the hernia sac, the volumes of the incisional hernia (VIH) and the abdominal cavity (VAC), and the VIH/VAC ratio were measured before and after PPP and BT using abdominal CT scan data. We indicated the combination of both techniques when the volume of the incisional hernia (VIH)/volume of the abdominal cavity (VAC) ratio was >20%. The median insufflated volume of air for PPP was 8.600 ± 3.200 cc (4.500-13.250), over a period of 14.3 ± 1.3 days (13-16). BT administration time was 40.2 ± 3.3 days (37-44). We obtained an average value of reduction of 14% of the VIH/VAC ratio after PPP and BT (p < 0.05). Complications associated with PPP were 15.5%, and with surgical technique, 26.6%. No complications occurred during the BT administration. Reconstructive technique was anterior CST and primary fascial closure was achieved in all patients. Median follow-up was 40.5 ± 19 months (12-60) and we reported 2 cases of hernia recurrence (4.4%). Preoperative combination of PPP and BT is feasible and a useful tool in the surgical management of LIH, although at the cost of some specific complications.

  10. A double blind randomized controlled trial comparing primary suture closure with mesh augmented closure to reduce incisional hernia incidence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Incisional hernia is the most frequently seen long term complication after laparotomy causing much morbidity and even mortality. The overall incidence remains 11-20%, despite studies attempting to optimize closing techniques. Two patient groups, patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and obese patients, have a risk for incisional hernia after laparotomy of more than 30%. These patients might benefit from mesh augmented midline closure as a means to reduce incisional hernia incidence. Methods/design The PRImary Mesh Closure of Abdominal Midline Wound (PRIMA) trial is a double-blinded international multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing running slowly absorbable suture closure with the same closure augmented with a sublay or onlay mesh. Primary endpoint will be incisional hernia incidence 2 years postoperatively. Secondary outcomes will be postoperative complications, pain, quality of life and cost effectiveness. A total of 460 patients will be included in three arms of the study and randomized between running suture closure, onlay mesh closure or sublay mesh closure. Follow-up will be at 1, 3, 12 and 24 months with ultrasound imaging performed at 6 and 24 months to objectify the presence of incisional hernia. Patients, investigators and radiologists will be blinded throughout the whole follow up. Disccusion The use of prosthetic mesh has proven effective and safe in incisional hernia surgery however its use in a prophylactic manner has yet to be properly investigated. The PRIMA trial will provide level 1b evidence whether mesh augmented midline abdominal closure reduces incisional hernia incidence in high risk groups. Trial registration Clinical trial.gov NCT00761475. PMID:24499111

  11. The economic burden of incisional ventral hernia repair: a multicentric cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Gillion, J-F; Sanders, D; Miserez, M; Muysoms, F

    2016-12-01

    A systematic review of literature led us to take note that little was known about the costs of incisional ventral hernia repair (IVHR). Therefore we wanted to assess the actual costs of IVHR. The total costs are the sum of direct (hospital costs) and indirect (sick leave) costs. The direct costs were retrieved from a multi-centric cost analysis done among a large panel of 51 French public hospitals, involving 3239 IVHR. One hundred and thirty-two unitary expenditure items were thoroughly evaluated by the accountants of a specialized public agency (ATIH) dedicated to investigate the costs of the French Health Care system. The indirect costs (costs of the post-operative inability to work and loss of profit due to the disruption in the ongoing work) were estimated from the data the Hernia Club registry, involving 790 patients, and over a large panel of different Collective Agreements. The mean total cost for an IVHR in France in 2011 was estimated to be 6451€, ranging from 4731€ for unemployed patients to 10,107€ for employed patients whose indirect costs (5376€) were slightly higher than the direct costs. Reducing the incidence of incisional hernia after abdominal surgery with 5 % for instance by implementation of the European Hernia Society Guidelines on closure of abdominal wall incisions, or maybe even by use of prophylactic mesh augmentation in high risk patients could result in a national cost savings of 4 million Euros.

  12. Use of a new type of PTFE mesh in laparoscopic incisional hernia repair: the continuing evolution of technique and surgical expertise.

    PubMed

    Verbo, Alessandro; Petito, Luigi; Pedretti, Giorgio; Lurati, Massimo; D'Alba, Pierfrancesco; Coco, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of our first 44 laparoscopic incisional hernia repairs. This study examines the effectiveness of this technique in patients presenting with a first-time or recurrent incisional hernia. From October 2001 to November 2002, a total of 45 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic incisional hernia repair with a new form of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) mesh. Patient data, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative records, were recorded and analyzed. Mean defect size was 84 cm2, mean mesh size was 311 cm2, mean surgical time was 65 minutes, and mean hospital stay was 2.25 days. Postoperative complications occurred in four patients (9.1%). The laparoscopic approach is a safe, effective, and relatively complication-free option in the management of first-time and recurrent incisional hernias. The use of modified ePTFE mesh with a dual surface in incisional hernia repair enables early tissue attachment, reduces adhesions, and could reduce the incidence of recurrences.

  13. The economic analysis of two treatment procedures for incisional hernias - alloplastic versus tissular

    PubMed Central

    Mavrodin, C; Pariza, G; Ion, D; Ciurea, M

    2014-01-01

    Incisional hernias are a common complication of abdominal surgery. Research shows that their incidence reaches 10%-11% of the total number of patients subject to laparotomy. Recurrent hernias are the main complication of eventrations and its rate ranges from 5 to 54%, depending on both the surgical procedure used and the follow-up methods. The goal of this study is the comparative cost analysis of two procedures used in the treatment of event rations, tissular versus alloplastic, the former, leading very often to recurrence requiring a new surgical intervention. The analysis comprised 156 cases of surgeries performed for incisional hernia in 2007 in the clinic of Surgery III, SUUB (Bucharest University Emergency Hospital). Tissular procedures were used in 42 cases and prosthetic procedures in 114 cases. The medium-term postoperative follow-up has revealed 17 relapses (40.4%) in the tissular batch and no relapse in the batch where parietal prosthesis was used. If the short-term costs of the tissular procedures are low as compared with the prosthetic procedures, on the medium-term the costs increase by 24.35% due to the high rate of relapses of tissular procedures. Therefore, the tissular procedure must be abandoned due to the high rate of relapse, as this drives additional costs required for the alloplastic repair of the abdominal parietal defects in a subsequent surgical intervention. PMID:24653765

  14. Functional impairment and complaints following incisional hernia repair with different polypropylene meshes.

    PubMed

    Welty, G; Klinge, U; Klosterhalfen, B; Kasperk, R; Schumpelick, V

    2001-09-01

    The influence of mesh material on the clinical outcome of hernia repair has often been neglected, although recent studies have clearly demonstrated the importance of mesh properties for integration in the abdominal wall. Of particular significance are the amount of mesh material and the pore size. In the following study, patients received different mesh types with distinct amounts of polypropylene and of various pore sizes for incisional hernia repair. We investigated whether the type of material influenced the clinical and functional outcomes. Between 1991 and 1999, 235 patients received polypropylene meshes in a sublay position for incisional hernia repair: 115 patients were implanted with a Marlex heavy-weight mesh (Mhw mesh), 37 patients with an Atrium heavy-weight mesh (Ahw mesh) and 83 with a Vypro low-weight mesh (Vlw mesh). The study protocol included ultrasound examination and 3D-stereography in all patients, with a total follow-up of 24 +/- 13 months (Mhw-mesh), 11 +/- 8 months (Ahw-mesh) and 8 +/- 7 months (Vlw-mesh). Our findings demonstrate that the side effects of mesh implantation, comprising paraesthesia and restriction of abdominal wall mobility, were significantly affected by the type of material implanted. Three-dimensional stereographic examinations were well in accordance with our clinical findings. Our data support the hypothesis that the use of low-weight large-pore meshes is advantageous for abdominal wall function.

  15. Reconstruction of the Abdominal Wall in Anatomical Plans. Pre- and Postoperative Keys in Repairing “Cold” Incisional Hernias

    PubMed Central

    POPA, FLORINA; ROSCA, OANA; GEORGESCU, ALEXANDRU; CANNISTRA, CLAUDIO

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The clinical results of the vertical “vest-over-pants” Mayo repair were evaluated, and the risk factors for incisional hernia recurrence were studied. The purpose of this study is to point out the importance of reducing pre and post operative risk factors in the incisional hernia repair process in order to achieve a physiologically normal abdominal wall. Methods Twenty patients diagnosed with incisional hernia underwent an abdominal reconstruction procedure using the Mayo (Paletot) technique at Bichat Claude Bernard Hospital between 2005 and 2015. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon and all patients were pre-operatively prepared, identifying all coexisting conditions and treating them accordingly before undergoing surgery. Results All patients underwent at least one surgical operation before the hernia repair procedure and a quarter had experienced at least three, prior to this one. Nine patients had a body mass index of >30 kg/m2. Additional risk factors and comorbidities included obesity in 45%, diabetes mellitus in 10%, smoking in 55%, and high blood pressure in 40%. Hernia defect width was from 3 cm (25% F) to 15 cm (5% M) of which nine patients (45%) had a 10 cm defect. Most of the patients had an average hospitalization of 7 days. The patients were carefully monitored and were called on periodic consultations after 3, 6, and 12 months from the moment of the procedure. Patient feedback regarding hernia recurrence and complaints about the scar were noted. Physical examination is essential in determining the hernia recurrence therefore the scar was examined for any abnormalities that may have occurred, which was defined as any palpable or detected fascial defect located within seven centimeters of the hernia repair. Post-operative complications: seroma formation, wound hematoma, superficial and deep wound infection, recurrences and chronic pain were followed and no complications were registered during the follow-up period

  16. Reconstruction of the Abdominal Wall in Anatomical Plans. Pre- and Postoperative Keys in Repairing "Cold" Incisional Hernias.

    PubMed

    Popa, Florina; Rosca, Oana; Georgescu, Alexandru; Cannistra, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The clinical results of the vertical "vest-over-pants" Mayo repair were evaluated, and the risk factors for incisional hernia recurrence were studied. The purpose of this study is to point out the importance of reducing pre and post operative risk factors in the incisional hernia repair process in order to achieve a physiologically normal abdominal wall. Twenty patients diagnosed with incisional hernia underwent an abdominal reconstruction procedure using the Mayo (Paletot) technique at Bichat Claude Bernard Hospital between 2005 and 2015. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon and all patients were pre-operatively prepared, identifying all coexisting conditions and treating them accordingly before undergoing surgery. All patients underwent at least one surgical operation before the hernia repair procedure and a quarter had experienced at least three, prior to this one. Nine patients had a body mass index of >30 kg/m2. Additional risk factors and comorbidities included obesity in 45%, diabetes mellitus in 10%, smoking in 55%, and high blood pressure in 40%. Hernia defect width was from 3 cm (25% F) to 15 cm (5% M) of which nine patients (45%) had a 10 cm defect. Most of the patients had an average hospitalization of 7 days. The patients were carefully monitored and were called on periodic consultations after 3, 6, and 12 months from the moment of the procedure. Patient feedback regarding hernia recurrence and complaints about the scar were noted. Physical examination is essential in determining the hernia recurrence therefore the scar was examined for any abnormalities that may have occurred, which was defined as any palpable or detected fascial defect located within seven centimeters of the hernia repair. Post-operative complications: seroma formation, wound hematoma, superficial and deep wound infection, recurrences and chronic pain were followed and no complications were registered during the follow-up period. Reducing the risk factors to a minimum

  17. Measurement of intra-abdominal pressure in large incisional hernia repair to prevent abdominal compartmental syndrome.

    PubMed

    Angelici, A M; Perotti, B; Dezzi, C; Amatucci, C; Mancuso, G; Caronna, R; Palumbo, P

    2016-01-01

    The repair of large incisional hernias may occasionally lead to a substantial increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), and rarely to abdominal compartmental syndrome (ACS) with subsequent respiratory, vascular, and visceral complications. Measurement of the IAP has recently become a common practice in monitoring critical patients, even though such measurements were obtained in the early 1900s. A prospective study involving 54 patients undergoing elective abdominal wall gap repair (mean length, 17.4 cm) with a tension-free technique after incisional hernia was conducted. The purpose of the study was to determine whether or not urinary pressure for indirect IAP measurement is a reliable method for the early identification of patients with a higher risk of developing ACS. IAP measurements were performed using a Foley catheter connected to a HOLTECH® medical manometer. IAP values were determined preoperatively, after anesthetic induction, upon patient awakening, upon patient arrival in the ward after surgery, and 24 h after surgery before removing the catheter. All patients were treated by the same surgical team using a prosthetic composite mesh (PARIETEX®). Incisional hernia repair caused an increase in the mean IAP score of 2.68 mmHg in 47 of 54 patients (87.04%); the IAP was decreased in two patients (3.7%) and remained equal in five patients before and 24 h after surgery (9.26%). FEV-1, measured 24 h after surgery, increased in 50 patients (92.6%), remained stable in two patients (3.7%), and decreased in two patients (3.7%). The mean increase in FEV-1 was 0.0676 L (maximum increase = 0.42 L and minimum increase = 0.01 L) in any patient who developed ACS. Measurement of urinary bladder pressure has been shown to be easy to perform and free of complications. Measurement of urinary bladder pressure can also be a useful tool to identify patients with a higher risk of developing ACS.

  18. Abdominal Wall Mycetoma Presented as Obstructed Incisional Hernia of Cesarean Section in Eastern Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Elhardello, Osama A.; Adam, Elsadig S.; Adam, Ishag

    2007-01-01

    Mycetoma a worldwide disease frequently occurs in the tropics with the highest prevalence being in Africa. Madurella mycetomatis is the main causative organism of human eumycetoma in Sudan. The legs and feet were commonly the sites of the infection. A 22-year-old lady was presented with painful abdominal swelling around a previous caesarian section scar. A provisional diagnosis of obstructed incisional hernia was put. Histopathological examination revealed macroscopically four masses of soft tissue. Microscopic sections showed grains of Madurella mycetomatis. PMID:17485822

  19. Laparoscopic-assisted Primary Repair of a Complicated Ventral Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Brian; Geis, W. Peter

    2005-01-01

    Postoperative wound dehiscence is a difficult problem for the general surgeon. Often, patients are too sick, or the wound environment is too hostile, to undergo primary repair. When an eventual repair is performed, a variety of methods are available, but most are associated with unacceptably high morbidity rates, specifically high incidences of recurrences and poor cosmetic outcome. We present here a case of postoperative wound dehiscence following a colostomy takedown repaired in a previously undescribed way—a laparoscopically assisted ventral incisional hernia repair. The method of repair is described, and the current literature regarding alternatives is reviewed. PMID:15984722

  20. Large abdominal incisional hernias: repair by fascial approximation reinforced with a stainless steel mesh.

    PubMed

    Validire, J; Imbaud, P; Dutet, D; Duron, J J

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and fifty large abdominal incisional hernias were treated following a standardized operating technique using metallic mesh (Toilinox) and approximation of the anterior sheath of the rectus abdominis. The average follow-up was four years. Good clinical results without pain were found in more than 95 per cent of the patients. Recurrence occurred in 9.5 per cent of the patients. The complications, wound infection or parietal necrosis, never necessitated removal of the prosthesis. These results justify the use of this technique even when intra-abdominal septic procedure is associated.

  1. Health Technology Assessment of laparoscopic compared to conventional surgery with and without mesh for incisional hernia repair regarding safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Meik; Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk; Roll, Stephanie; Kulp, Werner; Vauth, Christoph; Greiner, Wolfgang; Willich, Stefan; von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Incisional hernias are a common complication following abdominal surgery and they represent about 80% of all ventral hernia. In uncomplicated postoperative follow-up they can develop in about eleven percent of cases and up to 23% of cases with wound infections or other forms of wound complications. Localisation and size of the incisional hernia can vary according to the causal abdominal scar. Conservative treatment (e. g. weight reduction) is only available to relieve symptoms while operative treatments are the only therapeutic treatment option for incisional hernia. Traditionally, open suture repair was used for incisional hernia repair but was associated with recurrence rates as high as 46%. To strengthen the abdominal wall and prevent the development of recurrences the additional implantation of an alloplastic mesh is nowadays commonly used. Conventional hernia surgery as well as minimally invasive surgery, introduced in the early 90s, make use of this mesh-technique and thereby showed marked reductions in recurrence rates. However, there are possible side effects associated with mesh-implantation. Therefore recommendations remain uncertain on which technique to apply for incisional hernia repair and which technique might, under specific circumstances, be associated with advantages over others. Objectives The goal of this HTA-Report is to compare laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR) and conventional incisional hernia repair with and without mesh-implantation in terms of their medical efficacy and safety, their cost-effectiveness as well as their ethical, social und legal implications. In addition, this report aims to compare different techniques of mesh-implantation and mesh-fixation as well as to identify factors, in which certain techniques might be associated with advantages over others. Methods Relevant publications were identified by means of a structured search of databases accessed through the German Institute of Medical Documentation

  2. Health Technology Assessment of laparoscopic compared to conventional surgery with and without mesh for incisional hernia repair regarding safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Meik; Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk; Roll, Stephanie; Kulp, Werner; Vauth, Christoph; Greiner, Wolfgang; Willich, Stefan; von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2008-03-07

    Incisional hernias are a common complication following abdominal surgery and they represent about 80% of all ventral hernia. In uncomplicated postoperative follow-up they can develop in about eleven percent of cases and up to 23% of cases with wound infections or other forms of wound complications. Localisation and size of the incisional hernia can vary according to the causal abdominal scar. Conservative treatment (e. g. weight reduction) is only available to relieve symptoms while operative treatments are the only therapeutic treatment option for incisional hernia. Traditionally, open suture repair was used for incisional hernia repair but was associated with recurrence rates as high as 46%. To strengthen the abdominal wall and prevent the development of recurrences the additional implantation of an alloplastic mesh is nowadays commonly used. Conventional hernia surgery as well as minimally invasive surgery, introduced in the early 90s, make use of this mesh-technique and thereby showed marked reductions in recurrence rates. However, there are possible side effects associated with mesh-implantation. Therefore recommendations remain uncertain on which technique to apply for incisional hernia repair and which technique might, under specific circumstances, be associated with advantages over others. The goal of this HTA-Report is to compare laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR) and conventional incisional hernia repair with and without mesh-implantation in terms of their medical efficacy and safety, their cost-effectiveness as well as their ethical, social und legal implications. In addition, this report aims to compare different techniques of mesh-implantation and mesh-fixation as well as to identify factors, in which certain techniques might be associated with advantages over others. Relevant publications were identified by means of a structured search of databases accessed through the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI) as well

  3. Adherent appendix vermiformis within an incisional hernia after kidney transplantation mimicking acute appendicitis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Y; Scheuerlein, H; Götz, M; Settmacher, U

    2012-06-01

    We report a very rare case concerning a 69-year-old woman with acute onset pain in the right lower abdomen. Kidney transplantation for chronic renal insufficiency had been performed 4 years previously. Clinical examination and diagnostic imaging revealed an appendix-associated incisional hernia at the lateral edge of the inguinal scar. We performed a laparoscopic appendectomy and hernia repair with external knots. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the 5th postoperative day in a good general condition. Appendix-associated hernias are very rare but can cause severe complications in case of delayed diagnosis, particularly in patients undergoing immunosuppressive treatment.

  4. Long-term Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Suture Versus Mesh Repair of Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Jacobus W.A.; Luijendijk, Roland W.; Hop, Wim C.J.; Halm, Jens A.; Verdaasdonk, Emiel G.G.; Jeekel, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the best treatment of incisional hernia, taking into account recurrence, complications, discomfort, cosmetic result, and patient satisfaction. Background: Long-term results of incisional hernia repair are lacking. Retrospective studies and the midterm results of this study indicate that mesh repair is superior to suture repair. However, many surgeons are still performing suture repair. Methods: Between 1992 and 1998, a multicenter trial was performed, in which 181 eligible patients with a primary or first-time recurrent midline incisional hernia were randomly assigned to suture or mesh repair. In 2003, follow-up was updated. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months for suture repair and 81 months for mesh repair patients. The 10-year cumulative rate of recurrence was 63% for suture repair and 32% for mesh repair (P < 0.001). Abdominal aneurysm (P = 0.01) and wound infection (P = 0.02) were identified as independent risk factors for recurrence. In patients with small incisional hernias, the recurrence rates were 67% after suture repair and 17% after mesh repair (P = 0.003). One hundred twenty-six patients completed long-term follow-up (median follow-up 98 months). In the mesh repair group, 17% suffered a complication, compared with 8% in the suture repair group (P = 0.17). Abdominal pain was more frequent in suture repair patients (P = 0.01), but there was no difference in scar pain, cosmetic result, and patient satisfaction. Conclusions: Mesh repair results in a lower recurrence rate and less abdominal pain and does not result in more complications than suture repair. Suture repair of incisional hernia should be abandoned. PMID:15383785

  5. Patient satisfaction, chronic pain, and quality of life after elective incisional hernia repair: effects of recurrence and repair technique.

    PubMed

    Snyder, C W; Graham, L A; Vick, C C; Gray, S H; Finan, K R; Hawn, M T

    2011-04-01

    To determine the effects of repair technique and hernia recurrence on patient-reported outcomes after incisional hernia repair. This cohort study included patients from sixteen Veteran's Affairs Medical Centers across the United States who underwent elective incisional hernia repair between 1997 and 2002. Technical details and outcomes (repair type and recurrence status) were determined by physician chart review. Patient satisfaction, chronic pain (McGill pain scale and visual analogue scale), and health-related quality of life (Short Form 36) were evaluated with a mailed survey at a median of five years after repair. Multivariable regression modeling was performed to evaluate the effect of repair type and recurrence status on patient-reported outcomes. Of 854 patients alive at the time of survey mailing, 371 responded (43.4%). Patients with active recurrence were more likely to be dissatisfied with their results (odds ratio (OR) 6.2, P < 0.0001), to have chronic sensory hernia site pain (OR 3.2, P = 0.01), to report disturbance from pain (OR 2.1, P = 0.04), and to have significantly worse quality of life on the Physical Function, General Health, and Physical Component Score domains. Repair technique with permanent mesh versus suture had no independent effect on patient satisfaction, chronic pain, or QOL. Recurrence has a substantial negative effect on patient-reported outcomes after incisional hernia repair, whereas the repair technique has no independent effect.

  6. Predictors of outpatient resource utilization following ventral and incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Wade, Alex; Plymale, Margaret A; Davenport, Daniel L; Johnson, Sara E; Madabhushi, Vashisht V; Mastoroudis, Erica; Tancula, Charlie; Roth, John Scott

    2017-09-15

    Little is known about the predictors of increased ambulatory costs following open ventral and incisional hernia repair (VIHR); however, postoperative complications would be expected to be associated with an increased burden on outpatient resources. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of perioperative factors on outpatient resource utilization following VIHR. With IRB approval, the surgery scheduling system was queried to identify all cases of VIHR done at our institution over 3 years. Cases with other procedures done at time of VIHR were excluded. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program clinical data, physician billing data which included market and payor across cases, and medical record review data were combined and evaluated in order to quantify care and predictors of usage during the 6 months postoperatively. Data were analyzed for 308 patients. Median patient age was 52 years (SD = 13.3), and over half were female. The number of outpatient visits to the surgical office varied from 0 to 18 [median = 2; interquartile range (IQR) = 1-3]. CDC Wound Class >1 was associated with increase of mean 1.4 visits (IQR: 0.5-2.3); p = 0.003. Component separation, longer duration of operation, and increased mesh size were also predictive of increased number of office visits (p < 0.01). Postoperative infected seroma/seroma requiring drainage added a mean 2.3 visits (IQR: 1.3-3.3), (p < 0.001); and deep wound infection added a mean 3.9 visits (IQR: 1.9-5.9) (p < 0.001). Postoperative complications confer a significant burden for patients and to the outpatient surgical office. In an era in which improved quality and cost-efficiency has become imperative, measures to decrease risk of postoperative complications particularly for more complex VIHR would be expected to decrease resource utilization and increase value of care.

  7. A Minimally Invasive Approach For Treating Postoperative Seromas After Incisional Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, Shannon C.

    2001-01-01

    Background: The most frequent wound complication following repair of large incisional hernias is seroma formation, especially when the use of a mesh onlay requires extensive subcutaneous undermining. Treatment options for postoperative seromas include observation for spontaneous resolution, percutaneous aspiration, closed suction drainage, abdominal binders, and sclerosant. Methods: A novel technique for treating persistent postoperative seromas is presented herein. This technique involves a 3-puncture minimally invasive approach that can be performed in an outpatient setting. Evacuation of serous fluid and fibrinous debris is followed by argon beam scarification of the seroma cavity lining. Talc slurry is then introduced into the cavity. Three patients have been treated with this technique. Results: All 3 patients had successful ablation of seromas that had persisted despite standard treatment modalities. Conclusion: A minimally invasive approach is a reasonable and safe alternative for treating persistent postoperative seromas. PMID:11548834

  8. Incarceration of Meckel's diverticulum through a ventral incisional defect: a rare presentation of Littre's hernia.

    PubMed

    Salemis, N S

    2009-08-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract and is the result of the incomplete obliteration of the omphalomesenteric duct. Herniation of Meckel's diverticulum is called Littre's hernia and is a rare occurrence. Herein is described an extremely rare case of incarcerated and strangulated Meckel's diverticulum through an incisional ventral defect in a 59-year-old female patient, who presented with manifestations of acute surgical abdomen. At emergency laparotomy, a strangulated small-bowel loop containing a Meckel's diverticulum was found, which had migrated through the subcutaneous tissues to the right iliac fossa, where a painful mass was palpated on admission. Segmental resection of the ischemic ileum was performed and the abdomen was closed without the use of a prosthetic mesh. Histopathological findings were suggestive of a true diverticulum containing heterotopic gastric mucosa.

  9. A new technique for minimally invasive abdominal wall reconstruction of complex incisional hernias: totally laparoscopic component separation and incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Moazzez, Ashkan; Mason, Rodney J; Katkhouda, Namir

    2010-10-01

    Since Ramirez et al. presented the first case of component separation for abdominal wall hernias in 1990, it has undergone multiple modifications. This technique, which has been mainly used for large hernias where primary closure of the abdominal wall is not feasible, or for staged management of patients with open abdomens, results in multiple wound complications. In 2007, Rosen et al. reported on the laparoscopic approach to component separation that is associated with less subcutaneous dissection and the consequent advantage of a decreased risk of flap necrosis and wound infection. Here we discuss our totally laparoscopic approach to abdominal wall reconstruction. A minimally invasive abdominal wall reconstruction consists of a bilateral component separation, an intra-abdominal adhesiolysis, primary approximation of rectus muscles, and placement of an intraperitoneal mesh for reinforcing the repair, all performed laparoscopically. Patient-selection criteria, detailed operative technique, tips in preventing and managing the potential pitfalls, and postoperative care are discussed.

  10. Predictors of surgical site infection in laparoscopic and open ventral incisional herniorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Kaufman, Derrick; Reda, Domenic; Itani, Kamal M F

    2010-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after ventral incisional hernia repair (VIH) can result in serious consequences. We sought to identify patient, procedure, and/or hernia characteristics that are associated with SSI in VIH. Between 2004 and 2006, patients were randomized in four Veteran Affairs (VA) hospitals to undergo laparoscopic or open VIH. Patients who developed SSI within eight weeks postoperatively were compared to those who did not. A bivariate analysis for each factor and a multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to determine factors associated with SSI. The variables studied included patient characteristics and co-morbidities (e.g., age, gender, race, ethnicity, body mass index, ASA classification, diabetes, steroid use), hernia characteristics (e.g., size, duration, number of previous incisions), procedure characteristics (e.g., open versus laparoscopic, blood loss, use of postoperative drains, operating room temperature) and surgeons' experience (resident training level, number of open VIH previously performed by the attending surgeon). Antibiotic prophylaxis, anticoagulation protocols, preparation of the skin, draping of the wound, body temperature control, and closure of the surgical site were all standardized and monitored throughout the study period. Out of 145 patients who underwent VIH, 21 developed a SSI (14.5%). Patients who underwent open VIH had significantly more SSIs than those who underwent laparoscopic VIH (22.1% versus 3.4%; P = 0.002). Among patients who underwent open VIH, those who developed SSI had a recorded intraoperative blood loss greater than 25 mL (68.4% versus 40.3%; P = 0.030), were more likely to have a drain placed (79.0% versus 49.3%; P = 0.021) and were more likey to be operated on by surgeons with less than 75 open VIH case experience (52.6% versus 28.4%; P = 0.048). Patient and hernia characteristics were similar between the two groups. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, the open surgical technique was

  11. Laparoscopic Repair of Incisional Hernia Following Liver Transplantation-Early Experience of a Single Institution in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kuo, S-C; Lin, C-C; Elsarawy, A; Lin, Y-H; Wang, S-H; Wu, Y-J; Chen, C-L

    2017-10-01

    Ventral incisional hernia (VIH) is not uncommon following liver transplantation. Open repair was traditionally adopted for its management. Laparoscopic repair of VIH has been performed successfully in nontransplant patients with evidence of reduced recurrence rates and hospital stay. However, the application of VIH in post-transplantation patients has not been well established. Herein, we provide our initial experience with laparoscopic repair of post-transplantation VIH. From March 2015 to March 2016, 18 cases of post-transplantation VIH were subjected to laparoscopic repair (laparoscopy group). A historical control group of 17 patients who underwent conventional open repair (open group) from January 2013 to January 2015 were identified for comparison. The demographics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively compared. There were no significant differences among basic demographics between the 2 groups. No conversion was recorded in the laparoscopy group. Recurrence of VIH up to the end of the study period was not noted. In the laparoscopy group, the minor complications were lower (16.7% vs 52.9%; P = .035), the length of hospital stay was shorter (3 d vs 7 d, P = .007), but the median operative time was longer (137.5 min vs 106 min; P = .003). Laparoscopic repair of post-transplantation VIH is a safe and feasible procedure with shorter length of hospital stay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ventral incisional hernia (VIH) repair after liver transplantation (OLT) with a biological mesh: experience in 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Schaffellner, S; Sereinigg, M; Wagner, D; Jakoby, E; Kniepeiss, D; Stiegler, P; Haybäck, J; Müller, H

    2016-05-01

    Hernias after orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) occur in about 30 % of cases. Predisposing factors in liver cirrhotic patients of cases are ascites, low abdominal muscle mass and cachexia before and immunosuppression after OLT. Standard operative transplant-technique even in small hernias is to implant a mesh. For patients after liver transplantation a porcine non-cross linked biological patch being less immunogenic than synthetic and cross-linked meshes is chosen for ventral incisional hernia repair. 3 patients (1 female, 2 male), OLT indications Hepatitis C, exogenous- toxic cirrhosis, median-age 53 (51 - 56) and median time to hernia occurrence after OLT were 10 month (6 - 18 m) are documented. 2 patients suffered from diabetes, 2 from chronic-obstructive lung disease. Maintenance immunosuppressions were Everolimus in 1 patient, Everolimus + MMF in the second and Everolimus +Tacrolimus in the third patient. The biological was chosen for hernia repair due to the preexisting risk- factors. Meshes, 10 × 16 cm were placed, in IPOM (Intra-Peritonel-Onlay-Mesh) -position by relaparatomy. Insolvable, monofile, interrupted sutures were used. All patients recovered primarily, and were dismissed within 10 d post OP. No wound healing disorders or signs of postoperative infections occurred. All are free of hernia recurrence in a mean observation time of 22 month (10 - 36). The usage of porcine non-cross-linked biological patches seems feasible for incisional hernia repair after OLT. Wound infections in these patients have been observed with other meshes. Further investigation is needed to prove potential superiority of this biological to the other meshes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Evaluation of surgical performance during laparoscopic incisional hernia repair: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Iman; Vaillancourt, Marilou; Sroka, Gideon; Kaneva, Pepa A; Vassiliou, Melina C; Choy, Ian; Okrainec, Allan; Seagull, F Jacob; Sutton, Erica; George, Ivan; Park, Adrian; Brintzenhoff, Rita; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Fried, Gerald M; Feldman, Liane S

    2011-08-01

    Laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR) is a common procedure requiring advanced laparoscopic skills. This study aimed to develop a procedure-specific tool to assess the performance of LIHR and to evaluate its reliability and validity. The Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills-Incisional Hernia (GOALS-IH) is a 7-item global rating scale developed by experts to evaluate the steps of LIHR (placement of trocars, adhesiolysis, estimation of mesh size and shape, mesh orientation and positioning, mesh fixation, knowledge and autonomy in use of instruments, overall competence), each rated on a 5-point Likert scale. During LIHR, 13 attending surgeons and fellows experienced in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and 19 novice surgeons (postgraduate years [PGYs], 3-5) were evaluated at four teaching hospitals by the attending surgeon, a trained observer, and self-assessment using GOALS-IH, and by a previously validated 5-item general laparoscopic rating scale (GOALS). Interrater reliability was assessed by intraclass correlation (ICC), and internal consistency of rating items was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Known-groups construct validity was assessed by using the t-test and by correlating of the number of self-reported LIHR cases with the total score. Concurrent validity was assessed by correlating the GOALS-IH score with the GOALS general rating scale. Data are presented as mean and 95% confidence interval (CI). Interrater reliability for the total GOALS-IH score was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.60-0.89) between observers and attending surgeons, 0.81 (95% CI, 0.58-0.92) between participants and attending surgeons, and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.76-0.96) between participants and observers. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach's alpha, 0.93). Experienced surgeons performed significantly better than novices as assessed by GOALS-IH (31; 95% CI, 29-33 vs. 21; 95% CI, 19-24; p < 0.01). Very good correlation was found between GOALS-IH and previous LIHR experience (r = 0.82; p < 0

  14. CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL MODEL FOR STUDY OF ADHESIONS AFTER INCISIONAL HERNIAS INDUCED IN RATS’ AND REPAIR OF ABDOMINAL WALL WITH DIFFERENT BIOMATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    SERIGIOLLE, Leonardo Carvalho; BARBIERI, Renato Lamounier; GOMES, Helbert Minuncio Pereira; RODRIGUES, Daren Athiê Boy; STUDART, Sarah do Valle; LEME, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adhesions induced by biomaterials experimentally implanted in the abdominal cavity are basically studied by primary repair of different abdominal wall defects or by the correction of incisional hernias previously performed with no precise definition of the most appropriate model. Aim: To describe the adhesions which occur after the development of incisional hernias, before the prosthesis implantation, in an experimental model to study the changes induced by different meshes. Methods: Incisional hernias were performed in 10 rats with hernia orifices of standardized dimensions, obtained by the median incision of the abdominal wall and eversion of the defect edges. Ten days after the procedure adhesions of abdominal structures were found when hernias were repaired with different meshes. Results: The results showed hernia sac well defined in all rats ten days after the initial procedure. Adhesions of the greater omentum occurred in five animals of which two also showed adhesions of small bowel loops besides the omentum, and another two showed liver adhesions as well as the greater omentum, numbers with statistical significance by Student's t test (p<0.05). Conclusion: Although it reproduces the real clinical situation, the choice of experimental model of incisional hernia repair previously induced implies important adhesions, with possible repercussions in the evaluation of the second operation, when different implants of synthetic materials are used. PMID:26537141

  15. Transverse Versus Vertical Camera Port Incision in Robotic Radical Prostatectomy: Effect on Incisional Hernias and Cosmesis

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Shawn; Skarecky, Douglas; Osann, Kathy; Juarez, Reina; Ahlering, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the incidence of incisional hernias (IHs) and propose a simple modification to reduce the incidence of IHs. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) historically uses a vertical midline camera port incision to extract the prostate. METHODS Of 900 consecutive RARPs, the initial 735 had a vertical and subsequent 165 transverse incisions. Two methods were used to identify IHs: clinic visits noted in the prospective database and screening using electronic mail. We compared the baseline factors between the vertical IH and IH-free cohorts. The maximal scar width was recorded in 178 consecutive men presenting to our clinic: vertical (n = 107) and transverse (n = 71). RESULTS IHs occurred significantly more often after a vertical incision (5.3% vs 0.6%, P = .005). The IH rates after a vertical incision could be estimated to be as great as 16.7% (18 of 108) using the electronic mail respondents or as low as 3.3% (21 of 627) according to clinic follow-up. On univariate analysis, baseline age, International Index of Erectile Function 5-item questionnaire, prostate weight, bother score (all P ≤ .05), and body mass index (P = .058) were associated with an increased risk of an IH. After adjusting for baseline factors on multivariate logistic regression analysis, the relative odds of developing an IH with a vertical versus transverse incision was 11 (95% confidence interval 1.5–82). The average maximal scar width was reduced from 5.5 to 2.0 mm (P < .0001). CONCLUSION In the present sample population, the vertical IH rate was estimated to be potentially as low as 3.3% or as great as 16.7%. On multivariate analysis, a greater body mass index and larger prostate size significantly increased the risk of hernia development. Transverse incisions dramatically reduced the rate of IHs and the maximal scar width. The IH rates varied significantly by reporting method. PMID:21741689

  16. Parietex™ Composite mesh versus DynaMesh(®)-IPOM for laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tandon, A; Shahzad, K; Pathak, S; Oommen, C M; Nunes, Q M; Smart, N

    2016-11-01

    INTRODUCTION Laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair (LIVHR) is widely accepted and safe but the type of mesh used is still debated. We retrospectively compared postoperative outcomes with two different meshes commonly used in LIVHR. METHODS This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent incisional hernia repair between January 2008 and December 2010. Two meshes were used: Parietex™ Composite (Covidien, New Haven, CT, USA) and the DynaMesh(®)-IPOM (FEG Textiltechnik mbH, Aachen, Germany). The two groups were compared with respect to recurrence rates, incidence of seroma and intestinal obstruction. RESULTS Among the 88 patients who underwent LIVHR, 75 patients (85.2%) presented with primary incisional hernia, 10 (11.4%) presented with a first recurrence and 3 (3.4%) presented with a second recurrence. Median follow-up was 53.6 months (range 40-61 months). 12.9% of patients had recurrence in the Parietex™ Composite mesh group (n=62) in comparison to 3.8% in the DynaMesh(®)-IPOM mesh group (n=26; P=0.20). DynaMesh(®)-IPOM was associated with a significantly higher incidence of intestinal obstruction secondary to adhesions (11.5% vs. 0%, P=0.006) and lower incidence of seroma and haematoma formation compared to Parietex™ composite mesh group (0% vs. 6.4% of patients; P=0.185). CONCLUSIONS LIVHR is a safe and feasible technique. Dynamesh(®)-IPOM is associated with a significantly higher incidence of adhesion related bowel obstruction, albeit with a lower incidence of recurrence, seroma and haematoma formation compared with Parietex™ Composite mesh. However, there is a need for further well-designed, multicentre randomised controlled studies to investigate the use of these meshes.

  17. Pilot study on objective measurement of abdominal wall strength in patients with ventral incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael; Goldberg, Ross F; Dinkins, Maryane M; Asbun, Horacio J; Daniel Smith, C; Preissler, Susanne; Bowers, Steven P

    2011-11-01

    Outcomes after ventral incisional hernia (VIH) repair are measured by recurrence rate and subjective measures. No objective metrics evaluate functional outcomes after abdominal wall reconstruction. This study aimed to develop testing of abdominal wall strength (AWS) that could be validated as a useful metric. Data were prospectively collected during 9 months from 35 patients. A total of 10 patients were evaluated before and after VIH repair, for a total of 45 encounters. The patients were tested simultaneously or in succession by two of three examiners. Data were collected for three tests: double leg lowering (DLL), trunk raising (TR), and supine reaching (SR). Raw data were compared and tested for validity, and continuous data were transformed to categorical data. Agreement was measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for DLL and using kappa for the ordinal measures. Simultaneous testing yielded the following interobserver reliability: DLL (0.96 and 0.87), TR (1.00 and 0.95), and SR (0.76). Reproducibility was assessed by consecutive tests, with correlation as follows: DLL (0.81), TR (0.81), and RCH (0.21). Due to poor interobserver reliability for the SR test compared with the DLL and TR tests, the SR test was excluded from calculation of an overall score. Based on raw data distribution from the DLL and TR tests, the DLL data were categorized into 10º increments, allowing construction of a 10-point score. The median AWS score was 5 (interquartile range [IQR], 4-7), and there was agreement within 1 point for 42 of the 45 encounters (93%). The findings from this study demonstrate that the 10-point AWS score may measure AWS in an accurate and reproducible fashion, with potential for objective description of abdominal wall function of VIH patients. This score may help to identify patients suited for abdominal wall reconstruction while measuring progress after VIH repair. Further longitudinal outcomes studies are needed.

  18. Isometric abdominal wall muscle strength assessment in individuals with incisional hernia: a prospective reliability study.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K K; Kjaer, M; Jorgensen, L N

    2016-12-01

    To determine the reliability of measurements obtained by the Good Strength dynamometer, determining isometric abdominal wall and back muscle strength in patients with ventral incisional hernia (VIH) and healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall. Ten patients with VIH and ten healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall were each examined twice with a 1 week interval. Examination included the assessment of truncal flexion and extension as measured with the Good Strength dynamometer, the completion of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and the self-assessment of truncal strength on a visual analogue scale (SATS). The test-retest reliability of truncal flexion and extension was assessed by interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland and Altman graphs. Finally, correlations between truncal strength, and IPAQ and SATS were examined. Truncal flexion and extension showed excellent test-retest reliability for both patients with VIH (ICC 0.91 and 0.99) and healthy controls (ICC 0.97 and 0.96). Bland and Altman plots showed that no systematic bias was present for neither truncal flexion nor extension when assessing reliability. For patients with VIH, no significant correlations between objective measures of truncal strength and IPAQ or SATS were found. For healthy controls, both truncal flexion (τ 0.58, p = 0.025) and extension (τ 0.58, p = 0.025) correlated significantly with SATS, while no other significant correlation between truncal strength measures and IPAQ was found. The Good Strength dynamometer provided a reliable, low-cost measure of truncal flexion and extension in patients with VIH.

  19. Discovery of novel plasma proteins as biomarkers for the development of incisional hernias after midline incision in patients with colorectal cancer: The ColoCare study.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Jürgen; Pianka, Frank; Stüttgen, Nina; Rho, Junghyun; Gigic, Biljana; Zhang, Yuzheng; Habermann, Nina; Schrotz-King, Petra; Abbenhardt-Martin, Clare; Zielske, Lin; Lampe, Paul D; Ulrich, Alexis; Diener, Markus K; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2017-03-01

    Ventral incisional hernia is the most common long-term complication after an abdominal operation. Among newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients, we screened the preoperative plasma proteome to explore predictive markers for the development of an incisional hernia. We utilized preoperative plasma samples of 72 newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients who underwent midline incision for tumor resection between 2010 and 2013. A total of 21 patients with incisional hernia occurrence were matched with 51 patients with at least 18 months follow-up without an incisional hernia by sex, age, and body mass index. To assess predictive markers of incisional hernia risk, we screened the plasma proteome for >2,000 distinct proteins using a well-validated antibody microarray test. Paired t tests were used to compare protein levels between cases and controls. A gene-set-enrichment analysis (Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) was applied to test for differences in signaling pathways between the 2 groups. The proteome screen identified 25 proteins that showed elevated or reduced plasma levels in the hernia group compared to the control group (nominal P values < .05). Several proteins were in pathways associated with wound healing (CCL21, SHBG, BRF2) or cell adhesion (PCDH15, CDH3, EPCAM). Our study shows that there are multiple individual and groups of plasma proteins that could feasibly predict the personal hernia risk prior to undergoing an operation. Further investigations in larger, independent sample sets are warranted to replicate findings and validate clinical utility of potential biomarkers. After validation, such a biomarker could be incorporated into a multifactorial risk model to guide clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. No enterocutaneous fistula development in a cohort of 695 patients after incisional hernia repair using intraperitoneal uncoated polyproylene mesh.

    PubMed

    Brandi, C D; Roche, S; Bertone, S; Fratantoni, M E

    2017-02-01

    To determine the incidence of enterocutaneous fistulas (ECFs) developed after elective incisional hernia (IH) repair using intraperitoneal uncoated polypropylene (PPE) mesh. This is a retrospective descriptive study of a prospective cohort of patients undergoing elective IH repair using intraperitoneal uncoated PPE mesh at the Department of General Surgery of a high complexity University Hospital. Between January 1992 and December 2013, 695 IH repairs were performed using intraperitoneal uncoated PPE mesh. The omentum was placed between the mesh and bowel in 507 patients (73 %). In 188 patients (27 %) it was not possible to place the omentum between the mesh and bowel; therefore, in 69 patients (9.92 %) the PPE mesh was placed over the bowel, whereas in 119 patients (17.12 %) a Vicryl® mesh was placed between the bowel and PPE mesh. Six hundred and seventy-eight (97.5 %) IH repairs were open whereas 17 (2.5 %) were laparoscopic. Postoperative complications consisted of seroma (5.9 %), hematoma (4.3 %), wound infection (4.8 %), and mesh infection (4.0 %). Recurrence of IH occurred in 52 patients (7.4 %) after a mean follow-up of 59 months. Four (0.5 %) patients required additional surgery due to intestinal occlusion. Neither acute nor chronic ECFs were encountered during follow-up in 695 patients. Based on these results, the placement of intraperitoneal uncoated PPE mesh for elective IH repair might be a safe procedure that is not associated with ECF formation.

  1. Abdominal closure reinforcement by using polypropylene mesh functionalized with poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers and growth factors for prevention of incisional hernia formation.

    PubMed

    Plencner, Martin; East, Barbora; Tonar, Zbyněk; Otáhal, Martin; Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; Krejčí, Tomáš; Litvinec, Andrej; Buzgo, Matej; Míčková, Andrea; Nečas, Alois; Hoch, Jiří; Amler, Evžen

    2014-01-01

    Incisional hernia affects up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. Unlike other types of hernia, its prognosis is poor, and patients suffer from recurrence within 10 years of the operation. Currently used hernia-repair meshes do not guarantee success, but only extend the recurrence-free period by about 5 years. Most of them are nonresorbable, and these implants can lead to many complications that are in some cases life-threatening. Electrospun nanofibers of various polymers have been used as tissue scaffolds and have been explored extensively in the last decade, due to their low cost and good biocompatibility. Their architecture mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We tested a biodegradable polyester poly-ε-caprolactone in the form of nanofibers as a scaffold for fascia healing in an abdominal closure-reinforcement model for prevention of incisional hernia formation. Both in vitro tests and an experiment on a rabbit model showed promising results.

  2. Abdominal closure reinforcement by using polypropylene mesh functionalized with poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers and growth factors for prevention of incisional hernia formation

    PubMed Central

    Plencner, Martin; East, Barbora; Tonar, Zbyněk; Otáhal, Martin; Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; Krejčí, Tomáš; Litvinec, Andrej; Buzgo, Matej; Míčková, Andrea; Nečas, Alois; Hoch, Jiří; Amler, Evžen

    2014-01-01

    Incisional hernia affects up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. Unlike other types of hernia, its prognosis is poor, and patients suffer from recurrence within 10 years of the operation. Currently used hernia-repair meshes do not guarantee success, but only extend the recurrence-free period by about 5 years. Most of them are nonresorbable, and these implants can lead to many complications that are in some cases life-threatening. Electrospun nanofibers of various polymers have been used as tissue scaffolds and have been explored extensively in the last decade, due to their low cost and good biocompatibility. Their architecture mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We tested a biodegradable polyester poly-ε-caprolactone in the form of nanofibers as a scaffold for fascia healing in an abdominal closure-reinforcement model for prevention of incisional hernia formation. Both in vitro tests and an experiment on a rabbit model showed promising results. PMID:25031534

  3. Colocutaneous Fistula after Open Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kallis, Panayiotis; Koronakis, Nikolaos; Hadjicostas, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    The plug-and-patch technique is frequently used for the open repair of inguinal hernias; however, serious complications may arise on rare occasions. We present the case of a 69-year-old patient who presented with a colocutaneous fistula with the sigmoid colon 9 years after the repair of a left sliding inguinal hernia with the plug-and-patch technique. The patient underwent sigmoidectomy and excision of the fistulous track. He was discharged on postoperative day 5 and had an uneventful recovery. Although such complications are reported rarely, the surgeon must be aware of them when deciding upon the method of hernia repair. PMID:27738544

  4. Comparison of PTFE, pericardium bovine and fascia lata for repair of incisional hernia in rat model, experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kapan, S; Kapan, M; Goksoy, E; Karabicak, I; Oktar, H

    2003-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a frequent complication of abdominal surgery developing in 11-20 % of patients undergoing an abdominal operation. Regarding morbidity and loss of manpower, incisional hernias continue to be a fundamental problem for surgeons. In this experimental study, three commonly used mesh materials (Goretex PTFE; Tutoplast Fascia lata; Tutopatch Pericardium bovine) were compared according to effectiveness, strength, adhesion formation, histological changes, and early complications. Three groups, each consisting of 14 rats, have been formed as group A: polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), group B: pericardium bovine and group C: fascia lata. Evaluations were achieved at the end of the first and second postoperative week, respectively. Adhesion formation, wound maturation, bursting pressure, and tensile strength were evaluated. No statistically significant difference regarding adhesion formation was observed between groups although adhesion formation was less significant in PTFE and pericardium bovine groups than in the fascia lata group. Bursting pressure and tensile strength values were significantly higher in PTFE group than in the fascia lata group ( P<0.05). No statistically significant difference was observed between groups regarding wound maturation. In this experimental model, PTFE and pericardium bovine were found to be superior to fascia lata in abdominal wall repair.

  5. Rare case of a strangulated intercostal flank hernia following open nephrectomy: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O.; Jones, Frank; Turner, Jacquelyn; Cason, Frederick; Clark, Clarence

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flank incisions may be associated with incisional flank hernias, which may progress to incarceration and strangulation. Compromised integrity of the abdominal and intercostal musculature due to previous surgery may be associated with herniation of abdominal contents into the intercostal space. There have been six previously reported cases of herniation into the intercostal space after a flank incision for a surgical procedure. This case highlights the clinical picture associated with an emergent strangulated hernia and highlights the critical steps in its management. Presentation of case We present a case of a 79-year-old adult man with multiple comorbidities presenting with a strangulated flank hernia secondary to an intercostal incision for a right-sided open nephrectomy. The strangulated hernia required emergent intervention including right-sided hemi-colectomy with ileostomy and mucous fistula. Discussion Abdominal incisional hernias are rare and therefore easily overlooked, but may result in significant morbidity or even death in the patient.. The diagnosis can be made with a thorough clinical examination and ultrasound or computed topographical investigation. Once a hernia has become incarcerated, emergent surgical management is necessary to avoid strangulation and small bowel obstruction. Conclusion Urgent diagnosis and treatment of this extremely rare hernia is paramount especially in the setting of strangulation. PMID:26629848

  6. Rare case of a strangulated intercostal flank hernia following open nephrectomy: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Jones, Frank; Turner, Jacquelyn; Cason, Frederick; Clark, Clarence

    2015-01-01

    Flank incisions may be associated with incisional flank hernias, which may progress to incarceration and strangulation. Compromised integrity of the abdominal and intercostal musculature due to previous surgery may be associated with herniation of abdominal contents into the intercostal space. There have been six previously reported cases of herniation into the intercostal space after a flank incision for a surgical procedure. This case highlights the clinical picture associated with an emergent strangulated hernia and highlights the critical steps in its management. We present a case of a 79-year-old adult man with multiple comorbidities presenting with a strangulated flank hernia secondary to an intercostal incision for a right-sided open nephrectomy. The strangulated hernia required emergent intervention including right-sided hemi-colectomy with ileostomy and mucous fistula. Abdominal incisional hernias are rare and therefore easily overlooked, but may result in significant morbidity or even death in the patient.. The diagnosis can be made with a thorough clinical examination and ultrasound or computed topographical investigation. Once a hernia has become incarcerated, emergent surgical management is necessary to avoid strangulation and small bowel obstruction. Urgent diagnosis and treatment of this extremely rare hernia is paramount especially in the setting of strangulation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Development and Validation of a Risk Stratification Score for Ventral Incisional Hernia after Abdominal Surgery: Hernia Expectation Rates iN Intra-Abdominal Surgery (The HERNIA Project)

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Christopher J; Ko, Tien C; Kao, Lillian S; Nguyen, Mylan T; Holihan, Julie L; Alawadi, Zeinab; Nguyen, Duyen H; Gonzalez, Juan Ramon; Arita, Nestor T; Roth, J Scott; Liang, Mike K

    2015-01-01

    Background Ventral incisional hernias (VIH) develop in up to 20% of patients following abdominal surgery. No widely applicable pre-operative risk-assessment tool exists. We aim to develop and validate a risk-assessment tool to predict VIH following abdominal surgery. Study Design A prospective study of all patients undergoing abdominal surgery was conducted at a single institution from 2008-2010. Variables were defined in accordance with the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project. VIH was determined through clinical and radiographic evaluation. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was built from a development cohort (2008-2009) to identify predictors of VIH. The HERNIAscore was created by converting the hazards ratios (HR) to points. The predictive accuracy was assessed on the validation cohort (2010) using a receiver operator characteristic curve and calculating the area under the curve (AUC). Results Of 625 patients followed for a median of 41(0.3-64 months), 93(13.9%) developed a VIH. The training cohort (n=428, VIH=70,16.4%) identified four independent predictors: laparotomy (HR 4.77, 95%CI 2.61-8.70) or hand-assisted laparoscopy (HR=4.00, 95% CI 2.08-7.70), COPD (HR=2.35; 95%CI 1.44-3.83), and BMI≥25 (HR=1.74; 95% CI 1.04-2.91). Factors that were not predictive included age, gender, ASA score, albumin, immunosuppression, prior surgery, and suture material/technique. The predictive score had an AUC=0.77(95%CI0.68-0.86) using the validation cohort (n=197, VIH=23,11.6%). Using the HERNIAscore--HERNIAscore=4*Laparotomy+3*HAL+1*COPD+1* BMI≥25--three classes stratified the risk of VIH: Class I (0-3 points):5.2%, Class II (4-5 points):19.6%, and Class III (6 points):55.0%. Conclusions The HERNIAscore accurately identifies patients at increased risk for VIH. While external validation is needed, this provides a starting point to counsel patients and guide clinical decisions. Increasing the use of laparoscopy, weight-loss programs, community smoking

  8. Development and validation of a risk stratification score for ventral incisional hernia after abdominal surgery: hernia expectation rates in intra-abdominal surgery (the HERNIA Project).

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Christopher J; Ko, Tien C; Kao, Lillian S; Nguyen, Mylan T; Holihan, Julie L; Alawadi, Zeinab; Nguyen, Duyen H; Flores, Juan R; Arita, Nestor T; Roth, J Scott; Liang, Mike K

    2015-04-01

    Ventral incisional hernias (VIH) develop in up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. No widely applicable preoperative risk-assessment tool exists. We aimed to develop and validate a risk-assessment tool to predict VIH after abdominal surgery. A prospective study of all patients undergoing abdominal surgery was conducted at a single institution from 2008 to 2010. Variables were defined in accordance with the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project, and VIH was determined through clinical and radiographic evaluation. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was built from a development cohort (2008 to 2009) to identify predictors of VIH. The HERNIAscore was created by converting the hazards ratios (HR) to points. The predictive accuracy was assessed on the validation cohort (2010) using a receiver operator characteristic curve and calculating the area under the curve (AUC). Of 625 patients followed for a median of 41 months (range 0.3 to 64 months), 93 (13.9%) developed a VIH. The training cohort (n = 428, VIH = 70, 16.4%) identified 4 independent predictors: laparotomy (HR 4.77, 95% CI 2.61 to 8.70) or hand-assisted laparoscopy (HAL, HR 4.00, 95% CI 2.08 to 7.70), COPD (HR 2.35; 95% CI 1.44 to 3.83), and BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) (HR1.74; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.91). Factors that were not predictive included age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, albumin, immunosuppression, previous surgery, and suture material or technique. The predictive score had an AUC = 0.77 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.86) using the validation cohort (n = 197, VIH = 23, 11.6%). Using the HERNIAscore: HERNIAscore = 4(∗)Laparotomy+3(∗)HAL+1(∗)COPD+1(∗) BMI ≥ 25, 3 classes stratified the risk of VIH: class I (0 to 3 points),5.2%; class II (4 to 5 points),19.6%; and class III (6 points), 55.0%. The HERNIAscore accurately identifies patients at increased risk for VIH. Although external validation is needed, this provides a starting point to counsel patients and guide

  9. A computerized tomography scan method for calculating the hernia sac and abdominal cavity volume in complex large incisional hernia with loss of domain.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E Y; Yoo, J H; Rodrigues, A J; Utiyama, E M; Birolini, D; Rasslan, S

    2010-02-01

    Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum (PPP) is a safe and effective procedure in the treatment of large incisional hernia (size > 10 cm in width or length) with loss of domain (LIHLD). There is no consensus in the literature on the amount of gas that must be insufflated in a PPP program or even how long it should be maintained. We describe a technique for calculating the hernia sac volume (HSV) and abdominal cavity volume (ACV) based on abdominal computerized tomography (ACT) scanning that eliminates the need for subjective criteria for inclusion in a PPP program and shows the amount of gas that must be insufflated into the abdominal cavity in the PPP program. Our technique is indicated for all patients with large or recurrent incisional hernias evaluated by a senior surgeon with suspected LIHLD. We reviewed our experience from 2001 to 2008 of 23 consecutive hernia surgical procedures of LIHLD undergoing preoperative evaluation with CT scanning and PPP. An ACT was required in all patients with suspected LIHLD in order to determine HSV and ACV. The PPP was performed only if the volume ratio HSV/ACV (VR = HSV/ACV) was >or=25% (VR >or= 25%). We have performed this procedure on 23 patients, with a mean age of 55.6 years (range 31-83). There were 16 women and 7 men with an average age of 55.6 years (range 31-83), and a mean BMI of 38.5 kg/m(2) (range 23-55.2). Almost all patients (21 of 23 patients-91.30%) were overweight; 43.5% (10 patients) were severely obese (obese class III). The mean calculated volumes for ACV and HSV were 9,410 ml (range 6,060-19,230 ml) and 4,500 ml (range 1,850-6,600 ml), respectively. The PPP is performed by permanent catheter placed in a minor surgical procedure. The total amount of CO(2) insufflated ranged from 2,000 to 7,000 ml (mean 4,000 ml). Patients required a mean of 10 PPP sessions (range 4-18) to achieve the desired volume of gas (that is the same volume that was calculated for the hernia sac). Since PPP sessions were performed

  10. Incisional surgical site infection after elective open surgery for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kosuke; Kusumi, Takaya; Hosokawa, Masao; Nishida, Yasunori; Sumikawa, Sosuke; Furukawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence and risk factors for incisional surgical site infections (SSI) in patients undergoing elective open surgery for colorectal cancer. We conducted prospective surveillance of incisional SSI after elective colorectal resections performed by a single surgeon for a 1-year period. Variables associated with infection, as identified in the literature, were collected and statistically analyzed for their association with incisional SSI development. A total of 224 patients were identified for evaluation. The mean patient age was 67 years, and 120 (55%) were male. Thirty-three (14.7%) patients were diagnosed with incisional SSI. Multivariate analysis suggested that incisional SSI was independently associated with TNM stages III and IV (odds ratio [OR], 2.4) and intraoperative hypotension (OR, 3.4). The incidence of incisional SSI in our cohort was well within values generally reported in the literature. Our data suggest the importance of the maintenance of intraoperative normotension to reduce the development of incisional SSI.

  11. Polypropylene and polypropylene/polyglecaprone (Ultrapro®) meshes in the repair of incisional hernia in rats.

    PubMed

    Utiyama, Edivaldo Massazo; Rosa, Maria Beatriz Sartor de Faria; Andres, Marina de Paula; Miranda, Jocielle Santos de; Damous, Sérgio Henrique Bastos; Birolini, Cláudio Augusto Vianna; Damous, Luciana Lamarão; Montero, Edna Frasson de Souza

    2015-06-01

    To compare the inflammatory response of three different meshes on abdominal hernia repair in an experimental model of incisional hernia. Median fascial incision and skin synthesis was performed on 30 Wistar rats. After 21 days, abdominal hernia developed was corrected as follows: 1) No mesh; 2) Polypropylene mesh; and, 3) Ultrapro(r) mesh. After 21 days, the mesh and surrounding tissue were submitted to macroscopic (presence of adhesions, mesh retraction), microscopic analysis to identify and quantify the inflammatory and fibrotic response using a score based on a predefined scale of 0-3 degrees, evaluating infiltration of macrophages, giant cells, neutrophils and lymphocytes. No significant difference was seen among groups in adherences, fibrosis, giant cells, macrophages, neutrophils or lymphocytes (p>0.05). Mesh shrinkage was observed in all groups, but also no difference was observed between polypropylene and Ultrapro mesh (7.0±9.9 vs. 7.4±10.1, respectively, p=0.967). Post-operatory complications included fistula, abscess, dehiscence, serohematic collection and reherniation, but with no difference among groups (p=0.363). There is no difference between polypropylene (high-density) and Ultrapro(r) (low-density) meshes at 21 days after surgery in extraperitoneal use in rats, comparing inflammatory response, mesh shortening, adhesions or complications.

  12. Does prophylactic mesh placement in elective, midline laparotomy reduce the incidence of incisional hernia? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Borab, Zachary M; Shakir, Sameer; Lanni, Michael A; Tecce, Michael G; MacDonald, John; Hope, William W; Fischer, John P

    2017-04-01

    Operative intervention to correct incisional hernia affects 150,000 patients annually, with 1 in 3 repairs recurring within 9 years. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of incisional hernia and postoperative complications in elective midline laparotomy patients after the use of prophylactic mesh placement and primary suture closure. A systematic review was performed to identify studies comparing prophylactic mesh placement to primary suture closure in elective, midline laparotomy at index abdominal aponeurosis closure. The primary outcome was incisional hernia. Secondary outcomes included postoperative complications. Fourteen studies were included (2,114 patients), with 1,152 receiving prophylactic mesh placement. Prophylactic mesh placement decreased the risk of incisional hernia overall when compared to primary suture closure (relative risk = 0.15; P < .00001) and in trials using only polypropylene mesh versus 4:1 primary suture closure (relative risk = 0.15; P = .003). Prophylactic mesh placement reduced the risk of incisional hernia regardless of mesh location or composition: onlay (relative risk = 0.07; P < .0001), retrorectus (relative risk = 0.04; P = .002), and preperitoneal (relative risk = 0.18; P = .02). Prophylactic mesh placement increased risk of seroma overall (relative risk = 1.95; P < .0001), onlay (relative risk = 2.43; P = .01) and preperitoneal (relative risk = 1.47; P = .01) but not retrorectus plane (relative risk = 1.55; P = .26). Polypropylene mesh increased seroma risk only in the onlay position (relative risk = 2.77; P = .04). Prophylactic mesh placement patients are at increased risk for chronic wound pain compared to primary suture closure (relative risk = 1.70; P = .03). Prophylactic mesh placement is associated with an 85% postoperative incisional hernia risk reduction when compared to primary suture closure in at-risk patients undergoing elective, midline laparotomy closure

  13. Characterization of ventral incisional hernia and repair using shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Anuj; Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Shajudeen, Peer Shafeeq; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Cabrera, Fernando J; Weiner, Bradley K; Dunkin, Brian J; Tasciotti, Ennio; Righetti, Raffaella

    2017-04-01

    To assess the integrity of hernia repair, imaging modalities such as computed tomography or ultrasound (US) are commonly used. Neither modality has currently the capacity to simultaneously image the mesh and quantify a prosthetic and surrounding tissue stiffness. In this pilot study, we hypothesize that US shear wave elastography (SWE) can be used to identify a polyester mesh and a biologic graft and to assess their stiffness noninvasively in a rat model of bridging hernia repair. Lewis rats underwent hernia creation and repair with Parietex or Strattice at 30 d. After 3 mo, the animals were euthanized, and the Young's Modulus was measured using SWE. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the hernia pre- and post-repair were performed using in-house image processing algorithms. SWE was capable of accurate and real-time assessment and diagnosis of the hernia defects in vivo. Young's Modulus of Parietex meshes and Strattice grafts as estimated from the shear wave elastograms were found to be statistically different from each other (P < 0.05). Accurate three-dimensional reconstructions of the hernia defects pre- and post-repair were generated. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using US SWE to detect ventral hernias and evaluate mesh repair in vivo. Our results indicate that the presence of a hernia and repair can be reliably visualized by SWE and three dimensionally reconstructed. Thus, this technique may provide both structural and functional information regarding the hernia and the repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mesh Location in Open Ventral Hernia Repair: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Holihan, Julie L; Nguyen, Duyen H; Nguyen, Mylan T; Mo, Jiandi; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    2016-01-01

    There is no consensus on the ideal location for mesh placement in open ventral hernia repair (OVHR). We aim to identify the mesh location associated with the lowest rate of recurrence following OVHR using a systematic review and meta-analysis. A search was performed for studies comparing at least two of four locations for mesh placement during OVHR (onlay, inlay, sublay, and underlay). Outcomes assessed were hernia recurrence and surgical site infection (SSI). Pairwise meta-analysis was performed to compare all direct treatment of mesh locations. A multiple treatment meta-analysis was performed to compare all mesh locations in the Bayesian framework. Sensitivity analyses were planned for the following: studies with a low risk of bias, incisional hernias, by hernia size, and by mesh type (synthetic or biologic). Twenty-one studies were identified (n = 5,891). Sublay placement of mesh was associated with the lowest risk for recurrence [OR 0.218 (95% CI 0.06-0.47)] and was the best of the four treatment modalities assessed [Prob (best) = 94.2%]. Sublay was also associated with the lowest risk for SSI [OR 0.449 (95% CI 0.12-1.16)] and was the best of the 4 treatment modalities assessed [Prob (best) = 77.3%]. When only assessing studies at low risk of bias, of incisional hernias, and using synthetic mesh, the probability that sublay had the lowest rate of recurrence and SSI was high. Sublay mesh location has lower complication rates than other mesh locations. While additional randomized controlled trials are needed to validate these findings, this network meta-analysis suggests the probability of sublay being the best location for mesh placement is high.

  15. Life-threatening Petersen's hernia following open Beger's procedure

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yan Li; Haworth, Alexander; Wilson, Jeremy; Magee, Conor J.

    2016-01-01

    Petersen's hernia (an internal hernia between the transverse mesocolon and Roux limb following Roux-en-Y reconstruction) is well described following laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. We describe a Petersen-type hernia in a patient who had undergone complex open upper gastrointestinal surgery for chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26994105

  16. Gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to late-onset enteric fistula after polyester mesh repair of an incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Moussi, A; Daldoul, S; Bourguiba, B; Othmani, D; Zaouche, A

    2012-04-01

    The occurrence of enteric fistulae after wall repair using a prosthetic mesh is a serious but, fortunately, rare complication. We report the case of a 66-year-old diabetic man who presented with gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to an intra-abdominal abscess caused by intestinal erosion six years after an incisional hernia repair using a polyester mesh. The aim of this case report is to illustrate the seriousness of enteric fistula after parietal repair using a synthetic material.

  17. Telerobotic Laparoscopic Repair of Incisional Ventral Hernias Using Intraperitoneal Prosthetic Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Hourmont, Katherine; Wasielewski, Annette

    2003-01-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair shortens the length of hospital stay and achieves low rates of hernia recurrence. The inherent difficulties of performing advanced laparoscopy operations, however, have limited the adoption of this technique by many surgeons. We hypothesized that the virtual operative field and hand-like instruments of a telerobotic surgical system could overcome these limitations. We present herein the first 2 reported cases of telerobotic laparoscopic ventral hernia repair with mesh. The operations were accomplished with the da Vinci telerobotic surgical system. The hernia defects were repaired with dual-sided, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) mesh. The mesh was secured in place with 8 sutures that were passed through the abdominal wall, and 5-mm surgical tacks were placed around the circumference of the mesh. The 2 operations were accomplished with total operative times of 120 and 135 minutes and total operating room times of 166 and 180 minutes, respectively. The patients were discharged home on postoperative days 1 and 4. The surgeon sat in an ergonomically comfortable position at a computer console that was remote from the patient. Immersion of the surgeon within the 3-dimensional virtual operative field expedited each stage of these procedures. The articulation of the wristed telerobotic instruments greatly facilitated reaching the anterior abdominal cavity near the abdominal wall. This report indicates that telerobotic laparoscopic ventral hernia repair is feasible and suggests that telepresence technology facilitates this procedure. PMID:12722992

  18. Effects of Blocking αvβ₃ integrin by a recombinant RGD disintegrin on remodeling of wound healing after induction of incisional hernia in rats.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Claudio Ricardo de; Marqueti, Rita de Cassia; Cominetti, Marcia Regina; Vieira, Estela Sant Ana; Ribeiro, Juliana Uema; Pontes, Carmen Lucia Salla; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Selistre-de-Araujo, Heloisa Sobreiro

    2014-01-01

    Incisional hernia (IH) is characterized by defective wound healing process. Disba-01, a αvb₃ integrin blocker has shown to control the rate of wound repair and therefore it could be a target for new wound healing therapies.The objective of the study was to determine the changes induced by Disba-01 on repair of wound healing after induced IH in rats. Thirty two male albino rats were submitted to IH and divided into 4 experimental groups: G1, placebo control; G2, DisBa-01-treated; G3, anti-αvβ₃ antibodies-treated and G4, anti-α₂ antibodies-treated. Histological. biochemical and extracellular matrix remodeling analysis of abdominal wall were evaluated. After 14 days, 100% of the G2 did not present hernia, and the hernia ring was closed by a thin membrane. In contrast, all groups maintained incisional hernia. DisBa-01 also increased the number macrophages and fibroblasts and induced the formation of new vessels. Additionally, MMP-2 was strongly activated only in G2 (P<0.05). Anti- αvβ₃-integrin antibodies produced similar results than Disba-01 but not anti-α₂ integrin blocking antibodies. These results strongly indicate that Disba-01 has an important role in the control of wound healing and the blocking of this integrin may be an interesting therapeutical strategy in IH.

  19. A Risk Model and Cost Analysis of Incisional Hernia After Elective, Abdominal Surgery Based Upon 12,373 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, John P.; Basta, Marten N.; Mirzabeigi, Michael N.; Bauder, Andrew R.; Fox, Justin P.; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Serletti, Joseph M.; Kovach, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Incisional hernia (IH) remains a common, highly morbid, and costly complication. Modest progress has been realized in surgical technique and mesh technology; however, few advances have been achieved toward understanding risk and prevention. In light of the increasing emphasis on prevention in today's health care environment and the billions in costs for surgically treated IH, greater focus on predictive risk models is needed. Methods: All patients undergoing gastrointestinal or gynecologic procedures from January 1, 2005 to June 1, 2013, within the University of Pennsylvania Health System were identified. Comorbidities and operative characteristics were assessed. The primary outcome was surgically treated IH after index procedures. Patients with prior hernia, less than 1-year follow-up, or emergency surgical procedures were excluded. Cox hazard regression modeling with bootstrapped validation, risk factor stratification, and assessment of model performance were conducted. Results: A total of 12,373 patients with a 3.5% incidence of surgically treated IH (follow-up 32.2 ± 26.6 months) were identified. The cost of surgical treatment of IH and management of associated complications exceeded $17.5 million. Notable independent risk factors for IH were ostomy reversal (HR = 2.76), recent chemotherapy (HR = 2.04), bariatric surgery (HR = 1.78), smoking history (HR = 1.74), liver disease (HR = 1.60), and obesity (HR = 1.96). High-risk patients (20.6%) developed IH compared with 0.5% of low-risk patients (C-statistic = 0.78). Conclusions: This study demonstrates an internally validated preoperative risk model of surgically treated IH after 12,000 elective, intra-abdominal procedures to provide more individualized risk counseling and to better inform evidence-based algorithms for the role of prophylactic mesh. PMID:26465784

  20. Multilayer myofascial-mesh repair for giant midline incisional hernias: a novel advantageous combination of old and new techniques.

    PubMed

    Picazo-Yeste, Joaquín; Morandeira-Rivas, Antonio; Moreno-Sanz, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    The components separation technique has been proposed as the best solution when facing large abdominal wall defects. In counterpart, this sometimes comes at the price of high rates of wound complications and recurrence. Moreover, the components separation method alone seems insufficient for huge defects, in which it is impossible to reapproximate the rectus muscles without tension. For these cases, we illustrate a novel operation using a modified components separation technique. Twenty-eight patients with giant midline incisional hernias were treated with a combination of the components separation (bilateral sliding rectus abdominis advancement flaps), an autologous multilayer repair, and a retromuscular mesh reinforcement. Twenty-four (85%) patients have been analyzed. Transverse defect size ranged from 15 to 25 cm (average, 18.8 cm). Wound complications occurred in nine (37%) cases; three of them required drainage of a subcutaneous abscess. After a mean follow-up of 22 (range, 12-48) months, one (4%) recurrence was identified. Multilayer myofascial-mesh repair was associated with a low recurrence rate, and wound complications were managed without issues. This approach is a reliable technique for most surgeons and may constitute a new part of the armamentarium for the repair of challenging defects.

  1. Progressive preoperative pneumoperitoneum preparation (the Goni Moreno protocol) prior to large incisional hernia surgery: volumetric, respiratory and clinical impacts. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, C; Dumont, F; Fuks, D; Yzet, T; Verhaeghe, P; Regimbeau, J-M

    2012-02-01

    Progressive preoperative pneumoperitoneum (PPP) is used to prepare incisional hernias with loss of domain (IHLD) operations. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of PPP on peritoneal volume [measured using a new computed tomography (CT)-based method] and respiratory function. From July 2004 to July 2008, 19 patients were included in a prospective, observational study. The volumes of the incisional hernia (VIH), the abdominal cavity (VAC), the total peritoneal content (VP) and the VIH/VP ratio were measured before and after PPP using abdominal CT scan data. Spirometric parameters were measured before and after PPP, and postoperative clinical data were evaluated. Before and after PPP, the mean VIH was 1,420 cc and 2,110 cc (P  < 0.01), and the mean VAC was 9,083 cc and 11,104 cc (P < 0.01). The VAC increased by 2,021 cc (P < 0.01) and was greater than the mean VIH before PPP. After PPP, the spirometric measurements revealed a restrictive syndrome. The overall postoperative morbidity rate was 37%. PPP increased the hernia and abdominal volumes. PPP induced a progressive, restrictive syndrome.

  2. Significant improvement of biocompatibility of polypropylene mesh for incisional hernia repair by using poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers functionalized with thrombocyte-rich solution

    PubMed Central

    Plencner, Martin; Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; East, Barbora; Buzgo, Matej; Vysloužilová, Lucie; Hoch, Jiří; Amler, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Incisional hernia is the most common postoperative complication, affecting up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. Insertion of a synthetic surgical mesh has become the standard of care in ventral hernia repair. However, the implementation of a mesh does not reduce the risk of recurrence and the onset of hernia recurrence is only delayed by 2–3 years. Nowadays, more than 100 surgical meshes are available on the market, with polypropylene the most widely used for ventral hernia repair. Nonetheless, the ideal mesh does not exist yet; it still needs to be developed. Polycaprolactone nanofibers appear to be a suitable material for different kinds of cells, including fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells. The aim of the study reported here was to develop a functionalized scaffold for ventral hernia regeneration. We prepared a novel composite scaffold based on a polypropylene surgical mesh functionalized with poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibers and adhered thrombocytes as a natural source of growth factors. In extensive in vitro tests, we proved the biocompatibility of PCL nanofibers with adhered thrombocytes deposited on a polypropylene mesh. Compared with polypropylene mesh alone, this composite scaffold provided better adhesion, growth, metabolic activity, proliferation, and viability of mouse fibroblasts in all tests and was even better than a polypropylene mesh functionalized with PCL nanofibers. The gradual release of growth factors from biocompatible nanofiber-modified scaffolds seems to be a promising approach in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25878497

  3. Significant improvement of biocompatibility of polypropylene mesh for incisional hernia repair by using poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers functionalized with thrombocyte-rich solution.

    PubMed

    Plencner, Martin; Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; East, Barbora; Buzgo, Matej; Vysloužilová, Lucie; Hoch, Jiří; Amler, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Incisional hernia is the most common postoperative complication, affecting up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. Insertion of a synthetic surgical mesh has become the standard of care in ventral hernia repair. However, the implementation of a mesh does not reduce the risk of recurrence and the onset of hernia recurrence is only delayed by 2-3 years. Nowadays, more than 100 surgical meshes are available on the market, with polypropylene the most widely used for ventral hernia repair. Nonetheless, the ideal mesh does not exist yet; it still needs to be developed. Polycaprolactone nanofibers appear to be a suitable material for different kinds of cells, including fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells. The aim of the study reported here was to develop a functionalized scaffold for ventral hernia regeneration. We prepared a novel composite scaffold based on a polypropylene surgical mesh functionalized with poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibers and adhered thrombocytes as a natural source of growth factors. In extensive in vitro tests, we proved the biocompatibility of PCL nanofibers with adhered thrombocytes deposited on a polypropylene mesh. Compared with polypropylene mesh alone, this composite scaffold provided better adhesion, growth, metabolic activity, proliferation, and viability of mouse fibroblasts in all tests and was even better than a polypropylene mesh functionalized with PCL nanofibers. The gradual release of growth factors from biocompatible nanofiber-modified scaffolds seems to be a promising approach in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  4. [Incisional hernias after median laparotomy. A concept for anatomic reconstruction of the abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Wenger, A; Del Frari, B; Frari, B Del; Piza-Katzer, H

    2013-04-01

    The abdominal wall is a complex system of fibres and has its function in stabilisation of the lower back and pressure build-up for coughing and evacuation of the bowels. In case of incicional hernias after median laparotomy, which occur in 10-20%, reconstruction is a great challange for the surgeon. As methods of repair doubling of fascias, implantation of mesh grafts and muscle transfers have been described. In the following article we present a concept for anatomic and functional restoration of the abdominal wall in a selected patient population. Besides an exact surgical technique, the patient's compliance for weight reduction, special work-out and wearing a bodice pre- and postoperatively is essential for a good result. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Randomized controlled trial of the use of a large-pore polypropylene mesh to prevent incisional hernia in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    García-Ureña, Miguel Ángel; López-Monclús, Javier; Hernando, Luis Alberto Blázquez; Montes, Daniel Melero; Valle de Lersundi, Alvaro Robín; Pavón, Camilo Castellón; Ceinos, Carmen Jiménez; Quindós, Patricia López

    2015-05-01

    To reduce the incidence of incisional hernia (IH) in colorectal surgery by implanting a mesh on the overlay position. The incidence of IH in colorectal surgery may be as high as 40%. IH causes severe health and cosmetic problems, and its repair increases health care costs. Randomized, controlled, prospective trial. Patients undergoing any colorectal procedure (both elective and emergency) through a midline laparotomy were divided into 2 groups. The abdomen was closed with an identical technique in both groups, except for the implantation of an overlay large-pore polypropylene mesh in the study group. Patients were followed up clinically and radiologically for 24 months. A total of 107 patients were included: 53 in the study group and 54 in the control group. Both groups were homogeneous, except for a higher incidence of diabetes in the mesh group. There were 20 emergency procedures in the study group and 17 in the control group. There were no statistical differences in surgical site infections, seromas, or mortality between the groups (33.3%, 13.8%, and 3.7% in the control group and 18.9%, 13.2%, and 3.8% in the study group). No mesh rejection was reported. The incidence of IH was 17 of 54 (31.5%) in the control group and 6 of 53 (11.3%) in the study group (P = 0.011). The incidence of IH is high in patients undergoing elective or emergency surgery for colorectal diseases. The addition of a prophylactic large-pore polypropylene mesh on the overlay position decreases the incidence of IH without adding morbidity.

  6. Incisional Reinforcement in High-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Feldmann, Timothy F.; Young, Monica T.; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Hernia formation after surgical procedures continues to be an important cause of surgical morbidity. Incisional reinforcement at the time of the initial operation has been used in some patient populations to reduce the risk of subsequent hernia formation. In this article, reinforcement techniques in different surgical wounds are examined to identify situations in which hernia formation may be prevented. Mesh use for midline closure, pelvic floor reconstruction, and stoma site reinforcement is discussed. Additionally, the use of retention sutures, closure of the open abdomen, and reinforcement after component separation are examined using current literature. Although existing studies do not support the routine use of mesh reinforcement for all surgical incisions, certain patient populations appear to benefit from reinforcement with lower rates of subsequent hernia formation. The identification and characterization of these groups will guide the future use of mesh reinforcement in surgical incisions. PMID:25435823

  7. Combined laparoscopic and open extraperitoneal approach to scrotal hernias.

    PubMed

    Ferzli, G S; Rim, S; Edwards, E D

    2013-04-01

    Laparoscopic repair of scrotal hernias is often a difficult endeavor to successfully complete. The longstanding nature of these hernias often results in significant adhesions and anatomic distortion of the inguinal floor. These two issues make reduction of the hernia arduous and subsequent reinforcement of the parietal sac difficult. We have previously described techniques to increase the chances of success when attempting laparoscopic repair of scrotal hernias. Here, we describe some of those techniques as well as a combined laparoscopic and open approach to achieve a robust preperitoneal repair of incarcerated scrotal hernias when the usual totally extraperitoneal approach does not work. We performed a retrospective review of 1890 TEP hernia repairs we performed from 1990 to 2010. Rate of conversion to an open approach or a combined laparoscopic and open approach was examined. Incidence of complications or recurrences was assessed over a 12-month follow-up period. Among the 1890 TEP repairs, 94 large scrotal hernias were identified. Of these, nine cases (9.5 %) required conversion to an open procedure due to an incarcerated and indurated omentum. Three were completed with a conventional open preperitoneal whereas six patients (6.4 %) underwent repair with the combined approach. In this group, no recurrences or complications were found over a 12-month period. In cases where a large scrotal hernia may be difficult or dangerous to reduce laparoscopically, immediate conversion to an open repair may not be necessary. A combined laparoscopic and open approach can greatly assist in the visualization and dissection of the preperitoneal space, thereby facilitating reduction of the hernia and placement of the mesh.

  8. Open Rives-Stoppa ventral hernia repair made simple and successful but not for everyone.

    PubMed

    Heartsill, L; Richards, M L; Arfai, N; Lee, A; Bingener-Casey, J; Schwesinger, W H; Sirinek, K R

    2005-05-01

    The Rives-Stoppa (RS) repair of ventral incisional hernias (VIHR) is technically difficult. It involves the retromuscular placement of mesh anterior to the posterior fascia and the primary closure of the anterior fascia. Recurrence rates are 0-8%. We proposed that the operation could be done with equal success by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position and primarily closing the fascia anterior to the mesh. 81 patients who had undergone an open RS-VIHR with intraperitoneal mesh were evaluated for hernia recurrence and factors associated with recurrence. 55 women and 26 men (mean BMI 38+/-9) underwent RS-VIHR (mean age 49+/-11 years). Of these patients, 44 (54%) had a prior VIHR, 30 (37%) had an incarcerated hernia and 34 (42%) had multiple fascial defects. PTFE was used in 83% and Prolene in 12%. Average LOS was 5.8+/-12 days. All received perioperative intravenous antibiotics and 28% were discharged on oral antibiotics. Follow-up averaged 30+/-24 months. Recurrent VIH developed in 12/81 (15%), with three occurring after removal of infected mesh and one after a laparotomy. Excluding these four, the recurrence rate was 10%. There was no correlation between hernia recurrence and age, BMI, hernia size, number of prior repairs, or LOS (t-test p>0.05). Hernia recurrence did not correlate with gender, prior peritoneal contamination, incarceration, multiple defects, adhesions, mesh type, oral antibiotics, cardiac disease, diabetes, tobacco use, or seroma (X(2) p>0.05). Those with a wound infection and/or abscess formation had a significantly higher recurrent hernia rate (60% vs. 8%, X(2) p<0.001). Patients with pulmonary disease had a significantly higher recurrence rate (50% vs. 12%, X(2) p=0.01). RS-VIHR with intraperitoneal mesh is a successful and less technically challenging method of repair than prior modifications. Aggressive efforts to identify infection and treat early may prevent abscess formation and subsequent recurrent hernia. Patients with chronic

  9. Significance of measurements of herniary area and volume and abdominal cavity volume in the treatment of incisional hernia: application of CT 3D reconstruction in 17 cases.

    PubMed

    Yao, Sheng; Li, Ji-ye; Liu, Fei-de; Pei, Li-juan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the value of CT 3D reconstruction in the diagnosis and treatment of incisional hernia and the related factor of abdominal cavity volume. Abdominal wall defect and herniary volume were measured using 3D reconstruction based on plain CT scans in 17 patients with incisional hernias. The herniary diameter, area and volume could be measured in the 17 patients and the abdominal cavity volume was also measured in 10 patients using the 3D reconstruction technique. The correlation indices of the abdominal cavity volume with the patient's height, weight and body mass index (BMI) were all less than 0.01. Herniary area and volume and abdominal cavity volume can be accurately calculated through CT 3D reconstruction. The patch area should be more than 5 times as large as the defect area; combined with the perioperative overlap margin measurement method, this results in more scientific surgical management. The ratio of the herniary volume to the abdominal cavity volume may be conducive to preoperative assessment of the risk of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS); however, the ratio that may lead to postoperative ACS remains to be determined. There are correlations of abdominal cavity volume with patient height, weight and BMI, especially with weight. We therefore propose that the abdominal cavity volume should be evaluated with internationally accepted indices.

  10. Guidelines for laparoscopic treatment of ventral and incisional abdominal wall hernias (International Endohernia Society (IEHS)-part 1.

    PubMed

    Bittner, R; Bingener-Casey, J; Dietz, U; Fabian, M; Ferzli, G S; Fortelny, R H; Köckerling, F; Kukleta, J; Leblanc, K; Lomanto, D; Misra, M C; Bansal, V K; Morales-Conde, S; Ramshaw, B; Reinpold, W; Rim, S; Rohr, M; Schrittwieser, R; Simon, Th; Smietanski, M; Stechemesser, B; Timoney, M; Chowbey, P

    2014-01-01

    Guidelines are increasingly determining the decision process in day-to-day clinical work. Guidelines describe the current best possible standard in diagnostics and therapy. They should be developed by an international panel of experts, whereby alongside individual experience, above all, the results of comparative studies are decisive. According to the results of high-ranking scientific studies published in peer-reviewed journals, statements and recommendations are formulated, and these are graded strictly according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. Guidelines can therefore be valuable in helping particularly the young surgeon in his or her day-to-day work to find the best decision for the patient when confronted with a wide and confusing range of options. However, even experienced surgeons benefit because by virtue of a heavy workload and commitment, they often find it difficult to keep up with the ever-increasing published literature. All guidelines require regular updating, usually every 3 years, in line with progress in the field. The current Guidelines focus on technique and perioperative management of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and constitute the first comprehensive guidelines on this topic. In this issue of Surgical Endoscopy, the first part of the Guidelines is published including sections on basics, indication for surgery, perioperative management, and key points of technique. The next part (Part 2) of the Guidelines will address complications and comparisons between open and laparoscopic techniques. Part 3 will cover mesh technology, hernia prophylaxis, technique-related issues, new technologic developments, lumbar and other unusual hernias, and training/education.

  11. Cancer Survivorship: Defining the Incidence of Incisional Hernia After Resection for Intra-Abdominal Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Rebeccah B; Ousley, Jenny; Beveridge, Gloria B; Phillips, Sharon E; Pierce, Richard A; Holzman, Michael D; Sharp, Kenneth W; Nealon, William H; Poulose, Benjamin K

    2016-12-01

    Cancer survivorship focuses largely on improving quality of life. We aimed to determine the rate of ventral incisional hernia (VIH) formation after cancer resection, with implications for survivorship. Patients without prior VIH who underwent abdominal malignancy resections at a tertiary center were followed up to 2 years. Patients with a viewable preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan and CT within 2 years postoperatively were included. Primary outcome was postoperative VIH on CT, reviewed by a panel of surgeons uninvolved with the original operation. Factors associated with VIH were determined using Cox proportional hazards regression. 1847 CTs were reviewed among 491 patients (59 % men), with inter-rater reliability 0.85 for the panel. Mean age was 60 ± 12 years; mean follow-up time 13 ± 8 months. VIH occurred in 41 % and differed across diagnoses: urologic/gynecologic (30 %), colorectal (53 %), and all others (56 %) (p < 0.001). Factors associated with VIH (adjusting for stage, age, adjuvant therapy, smoking, and steroid use) included: incision location [flank (ref), midline, hazard ratio (HR) 6.89 (95 %CI 2.43-19.57); periumbilical, HR 6.24 (95 %CI 1.84-21.22); subcostal, HR 4.55 (95 %CI 1.51-13.70)], cancer type [urologic/gynecologic (ref), other {gastrointestinal, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, retroperitoneal, and others} HR 1.86 (95 %CI 1.26-2.73)], laparoscopic-assisted operation [laparoscopic (ref), HR 2.68 (95 %CI 1.44-4.98)], surgical site infection [HR 1.60 (95 %CI 1.08-2.37)], and body mass index [HR 1.06 (95 %CI 1.03-1.08)]. The rate of VIH after abdominal cancer operations is high. VIH may impact cancer survivorship with pain and need for additional operations. Further studies assessing the impact on QOL and prevention efforts are needed.

  12. Incidence of incisional hernia in the specimen extraction site for laparoscopic colorectal surgery: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lawrence; Abou-Khalil, Maria; Liberman, Sender; Boutros, Marylise; Fried, Gerald M; Feldman, Liane S

    2017-04-25

    The incidence of incisional hernia(IH) may be affected by the choice of specimen extraction incision. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing the incidence of IH after midline and off-midline incisions in patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery. A systematic search was performed according to PRISMA guidelines to identify all comparative studies from January 1991-August 2016 on the incidence of IH after midline and off-midline(transverse or Pfannenstiel) incisions in patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Case series and studies reporting the IH after stoma site extraction, SILS, or NOTES were excluded. The MINORS instrument was used for quality assessment for observational studies. Weighted estimates were calculated using a random-effects model. A total of 17 articles were identified and included for meta-analysis, 16 of which were observational studies and 1 was an RCT. The mean MINORS score for observational studies was 12.9 (SD 3.2, range 7-17). Sample sizes in the midline (mean 185, range 20-995) and off-midline(mean 184, range 20-903) groups were similar. Follow-up ranged from 17.3 to 42 months. The pooled incidence of IH was 10.6% (338/3177) in midline, 3.7% (48/1314) in transverse, and 0.9% (9/956) in Pfannenstiel incisions. IH was significantly higher in the midline compared to off-midline groups (weighted OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.0-8.3, I (2) = 79.7%, p for heterogeneity <0.001). Midline incisions were also at higher risk of IH versus transverse (weighted OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.7, I (2) = 72.7%, p for heterogeneity <0.001) and Pfannenstiel (weighted OR 8.6, 95% CI 3.0-24.6, I (2) = 43.5%, p for heterogeneity = 0.101) incisions. There was no publication bias according the funnel plot or statistically (Egger's p = 0.336). Midline incisions for specimen extraction in laparoscopic colorectal surgery are at significantly higher risk of IH compared to off-midline (transverse or

  13. Current Trends in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Patapis, Paul; Zavras, Nick; Tzanetis, Panagiotis; Machairas, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical technique, postoperative complications, and possible recurrence after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) in comparison with open ventral hernia repair (OVHR), based on the international literature. Database: A Medline search of the current English literature was performed using the terms laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and incisional hernia repair. Conclusions: LVHR is a safe alternative to the open method, with the main advantages being minimal postoperative pain, shorter recovery, and decreased wound and mesh infections. Incidental enterotomy can be avoided by using a meticulous technique and sharp dissection to avoid thermal injury. PMID:26273186

  14. Erosion of small intestine with necrotising fasciitis of over lying abdominal wall after expanded poly-tetrafluoroethylene mesh implantation: A rare complication after laparoscopic incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Ashish; Gupta, Akshara; Gupta, Achal; Shrivastava, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    Complications such as bowel erosions, enterocutaneous fistulae are rare with the use of expandedpoly-tetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) mesh in laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR). This unusual case patient presented to us with necrotising fasciitis of overlying anterior abdominal wall with peritonitis withsepticaemia and underwent aLIHR6 weeks before, which has not been reported till yet. We report a case of LIHR, presented to us with necrotising fasciitis of overlying anterior abdominal wall, peritonitis and septicaemia which was managed by small bowel segmental resection and exteriorisation of the ends, debridement of overlying anterior abdominal wall and maximum resection of implanted mesh. This case is unusual secondary to long experience with ePTFE mesh and the lack of published cases similar to this one. A brief review of relevant literature has been included in the article. We recommend pre-peritoneal placement of dual mesh fixed preferably by trans-abdominal polypropylene suture in LIHR. PMID:24019695

  15. Chronic pain after open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nikkolo, Ceith; Lepner, Urmas

    2016-01-01

    Following the widespread use of mesh repairs, recurrence rates after inguinal hernia surgery have become acceptable and focus has shifted from recurrence to chronic pain. Although pain can be controlled with analgesics, chronic postsurgical pain is a major clinical problem, which can significantly influence the patient's quality of life. The rate of chronic pain after inguinal hernia mesh repair can reach 51.6%. The reasons for posthernioplasty chronic pain are often unclear. It has been linked to nerve injury and nerve entrapment, but there is also association between the rate of chronic pain and the type of mesh used for hernia repair. As there are >160 meshes available in the market, it is difficult to choose a mesh whose usage would result in the best outcome. Different mesh characteristics have been studied, among them weight of mesh has probably gained the most attention. The choice of adequate therapy for chronic groin pain after inguinal hernia repair is controversial. The European Hernia Society recommends that a multidisciplinary approach at a pain clinic should be considered for the treatment of chronic postoperative pain. Although surgical treatment of chronic posthernioplasty pain is limited because of the lack of relevant research data, resection of entrapped nerves, mesh removal in the case of mesh related pain or removal of fixation sutures can be beneficial for the patient with severe pain after inguinal hernia surgery. One drawback of published studies is the lack of consensus over definition of chronic pain, which makes it complicated to compare the results of different studies and to conduct meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Therefore, a uniform definition of chronic pain and its best assessment methods should be developed in order to conduct top quality multicenter randomized trials. Further research to develop meshes with optimal parameters is of vital importance and should be encouraged.

  16. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernia: one-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael S.

    1993-05-01

    In this study, 101 consecutive laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repairs (LTPR) were performed in 62 patients by a single surgeon. The series was begun in April 1991, and involved repair of 49 direct, 41 indirect, 4 femoral, 3 umbilical, 3 sliding, and 1 incisional hernias. Twelve cases were bilateral, eleven hernias were incarcerated, and fifteen hernias were recurrent. There were no intraoperative complications, and none of the procedures required conversion to open surgery. Patients experienced the following postoperative complications: transient testicular pain (1), transient anterior thigh paresthesias (2), urinary retention requiring TURP (1), and hernia recurrences (2). Follow up has ranged from 4 - 15 months and initial results have been encouraging.

  17. Cost-utility analysis of the use of prophylactic mesh augmentation compared with primary fascial suture repair in patients at high risk for incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Fischer, John P; Basta, Marten N; Wink, Jason D; Krishnan, Naveen M; Kovach, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Although hernia repair with mesh can be successful, prophylactic mesh augmentation (PMA) represents a potentially useful preventative technique to mitigate incisional hernia risk in select high-risk patients. The efficacy, cost-benefit, and societal value of such an intervention are not known. The aim of this study was to determine the cost-utility of using prophylactic mesh to augment fascial incisions. A decision tree model was employed to evaluate the cost-utility of using PMA relative to primary suture closure (PSC) after elective laparotomy. The authors adopted the societal perspective for cost and utility estimates. A systematic review of the literature on PMA was performed. The costs in this study included direct hospital costs and indirect costs to society, and utilities were obtained through a survey of 300 English-speaking members of the general public evaluating 14 health state scenarios relating to ventral hernia. PSC without mesh demonstrated an expected average cost of $17,182 (average quality-adjusted life-year [QALY] of 21.17) compared with $15,450 (expected QALY was 21.21) for PMA. PSC was associated with an incremental cost-efficacy ratio (ICER) of -$42,444/QALY compared with PMA such that PMA was more effective and less costly. Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis was performed demonstrating more simulations resulting in ICERs for PSC above the willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000/QALY, supporting the finding that PMA is superior. Cost-utility analysis of PSC compared to PMA for abdominal laparotomy closure demonstrates PMA to be more effective, less costly, and overall more cost-effective than PSC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevention of incisional hernia with prophylactic onlay and sublay mesh reinforcement versus primary suture only in midline laparotomies (PRIMA): 2-year follow-up of a multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jairam, An P; Timmermans, Lucas; Eker, Hasan H; Pierik, Robert E G J M; van Klaveren, David; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Timman, Reinier; van der Ham, Arie C; Dawson, Imro; Charbon, Jan A; Schuhmacher, Christoph; Mihaljevic, André; Izbicki, Jakob R; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Knebel, Philip; Fortelny, René H; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Lange, Johan F; Jeekel, Hans J

    2017-08-05

    Incisional hernia is a frequent long-term complication after abdominal surgery, with a prevalence greater than 30% in high-risk groups. The aim of the PRIMA trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of mesh reinforcement in high-risk patients, to prevent incisional hernia. We did a multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial at 11 hospitals in Austria, Germany, and the Netherlands. We included patients aged 18 years or older who were undergoing elective midline laparotomy and had either an abdominal aortic aneurysm or a body-mass index (BMI) of 27 kg/m(2) or higher. We randomly assigned participants using a computer-generated randomisation sequence to one of three treatment groups: primary suture; onlay mesh reinforcement; or sublay mesh reinforcement. The primary endpoint was incidence of incisional hernia during 2 years of follow-up, analysed by intention to treat. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated by logistic regression. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00761475. Between March, 2009, and December, 2012, 498 patients were enrolled to the study, of whom 18 were excluded before randomisation. Therefore, we included 480 patients in the primary analysis: 107 were assigned primary suture only, 188 were allocated onlay mesh reinforcement, and 185 were assigned sublay mesh reinforcement. 92 patients were identified with an incisional hernia, 33 (30%) who were allocated primary suture only, 25 (13%) who were assigned onlay mesh reinforcement, and 34 (18%) who were assigned sublay mesh reinforcement (onlay mesh reinforcement vs primary suture, OR 0·37, 95% CI 0·20-0·69; p=0·0016; sublay mesh reinforcement vs primary suture, 0·55, 0·30-1·00; p=0·05). Seromas were more frequent in patients allocated onlay mesh reinforcement (34 of 188) than in those assigned primary suture (five of 107; p=0·002) or sublay mesh reinforcement (13 of 185; p=0·002). The incidence of wound infection did not differ between treatment groups (14

  19. A Risk Model and Cost Analysis of Incisional Hernia After Elective, Abdominal Surgery Based Upon 12,373 Cases: The Case for Targeted Prophylactic Intervention.

    PubMed

    Fischer, John P; Basta, Marten N; Mirzabeigi, Michael N; Bauder, Andrew R; Fox, Justin P; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Serletti, Joseph M; Kovach, Stephen J

    2016-05-01

    Incisional hernia (IH) remains a common, highly morbid, and costly complication. Modest progress has been realized in surgical technique and mesh technology; however, few advances have been achieved toward understanding risk and prevention. In light of the increasing emphasis on prevention in today's health care environment and the billions in costs for surgically treated IH, greater focus on predictive risk models is needed. All patients undergoing gastrointestinal or gynecologic procedures from January 1, 2005 to June 1, 2013, within the University of Pennsylvania Health System were identified. Comorbidities and operative characteristics were assessed. The primary outcome was surgically treated IH after index procedures. Patients with prior hernia, less than 1-year follow-up, or emergency surgical procedures were excluded. Cox hazard regression modeling with bootstrapped validation, risk factor stratification, and assessment of model performance were conducted. A total of 12,373 patients with a 3.5% incidence of surgically treated IH (follow-up 32.2 ± 26.6 months) were identified. The cost of surgical treatment of IH and management of associated complications exceeded $17.5 million. Notable independent risk factors for IH were ostomy reversal (HR = 2.76), recent chemotherapy (HR = 2.04), bariatric surgery (HR = 1.78), smoking history (HR = 1.74), liver disease (HR = 1.60), and obesity (HR = 1.96). High-risk patients (20.6%) developed IH compared with 0.5% of low-risk patients (C-statistic = 0.78). This study demonstrates an internally validated preoperative risk model of surgically treated IH after 12,000 elective, intra-abdominal procedures to provide more individualized risk counseling and to better inform evidence-based algorithms for the role of prophylactic mesh.

  20. Inguinal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... for hernias are Open hernia repair. During an open hernia repair, a health care provider usually gives a patient local anesthesia in the abdomen with sedation; however, some patients may have sedation ...

  1. Meshless treatment of open inguinal hernia repair: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kassab, Paulo; Franciulli, Ettore Ferrari; Wroclawski, Carolina Kassab; Ilias, Elias Jirjoss; Castro, Osvaldo Antônio Prado; Malheiros, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate two types of meshless open inguinal repair and to evaluate the recurrence rate. Methods: We operated on sequentially 98 men and 15 women with 144 unilateral or bilateral inguinal hernias between December 1988 and April 2007. The surgeries were performed by two experienced surgeons and divided into two groups: Bassini or McVay reconstructive surgery techniques. Bassini type reinforcements were employed for Nyhus II and IIIB with minor destruction of the posterior wall. Patients with Nyhus type IIIA, type IIIB with major destruction of the fascia transversalis, and type IIIC were subjected to the McVay technique. Results: Seventy-five hernias were corrected using the McVay technique. Only two recurrences (2.67%) were observed in this group. For group Bassini, two recurrences for 69 hernias (2.89%) were observed (p=0.658). Mean age for the recurrent group was 56 years. No differences were observed between the ages of males and females (52 years). Conclusions: Non-mesh repair in inguinal hernia can be safely used if performed by experienced surgeons. PMID:23843059

  2. Comparative analysis of open and robotic transversus abdominis release for ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Bittner, James G; Alrefai, Sameer; Vy, Michelle; Mabe, Micah; Del Prado, Paul A R; Clingempeel, Natasha L

    2017-07-20

    Transversus abdominis release (TAR) is a safe, effective strategy to repair complex ventral incisional hernia (VIH); however, open TAR (o-TAR) often necessitates prolonged hospitalization. Robot-assisted TAR (r-TAR) may benefit short-term outcomes and shorten convalescence. This study compares 90-day outcomes of o-TAR and r-TAR for VIH repair. A single-center, retrospective review of patients who underwent o-TAR or r-TAR for VIH from 2015 to 2016 was conducted. Patient and hernia characteristics, operative data, and 90-day outcomes were compared. The primary outcome was hospital length of stay, and secondary metrics were morbidity, surgical site events, and readmission. Overall, 102 patients were identified (76 o-TAR and 26 r-TAR). Patients were comparable regarding age, gender, body mass index, and the presence of co-morbidities. Diabetes was more common in the open group (22.3 vs. 0%, P = 0.01). Most VIH defects were midline (89.5 vs. 83%, P = 0.47) and recurrent (52.6 vs. 58.3%, P = 0.65). Hernia characteristics were similar regarding mean defect size (260 ± 209 vs. 235 ± 107 cm(2), P = 0.55), mesh removal, and type/size mesh implanted. Average operative time was longer in the r-TAR cohort (287 ± 121 vs. 365 ± 78 min, P < 0.01) despite most receiving mesh fixation with fibrin sealant alone (18.4 vs. 91.7%, P < 0.01). r-TAR trended toward lower morbidity (39.2 vs. 19.2%, P = 0.09), less severe complications, and similar rates of surgical site events and readmission (6.6 vs. 7.7%, P = 1.00). In addition, r-TAR resulted in a significantly shorter median hospital length of stay compared to o-TAR (6 days, 95% CI 5.9-8.3 vs. 3 days, 95% CI 3.2-4.3). In select patients, the robotic surgical platform facilitates a safe, minimally invasive approach to complex abdominal wall reconstruction, specifically TAR. Robot-assisted TAR for VIH offers the short-term benefits of low morbidity and decreased hospital length of stay compared to open TAR.

  3. Open safety pin ingestion presenting as incarcerated umbilical hernia.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Bilal; Sheikh, Afzal

    2011-09-01

    Foreign body ingestion is common in children. Sharp foreign bodies are potentially harmful and can result various complications. An 8-month-old infant presented with incarcerated umbilical hernia. With a suspicion of strangulation, operation was performed that revealed a loop of ileum being stuck in the umbilical defect. The loop of ileum was freed from the umbilicus which demonstrated open ends of safety pin piercing out of bowel lumen. The enterotomy followed by removal of safety pin was performed.

  4. Open Retromuscular Repair of Parastomal Hernias with Synthetic Mesh.

    PubMed

    Beffa, Lucas R; Warren, Jeremy A; Cobb, William S; Knoedler, Bryan; Ewing, Joseph A; Carbonell, Alfredo M

    2017-08-01

    Parastomal hernias (PHs) cause significant morbidity in patients with permanent ostomies, and several laparoscopic and open repair techniques have been described. We report our experience with open retromuscular repair of PHs using permanent synthetic mesh. A prospectively maintained database was retrospectively reviewed to identify patients undergoing PH repair. Primary outcomes are surgical site occurrence, surgical site infection (SSI), and hernia recurrence. Variables were analyzed using Pearson's χ2 test or Fisher's exact test. Values of P < 0.05 were considered significant. Forty-six patients underwent retromuscular PH repair with permanent synthetic mesh. There were 26 patients with colostomies and 20 with ileostomies. All the patients were repaired using a keyhole retromuscular technique and direct passage of stoma through mesh. Transversus abdominis release was performed in 65.2 per cent of cases. Permanent synthetic polypropylene mesh was used in all cases. Surgical site occurrence occurred in 47.8 per cent of patients, SSI in 17.4 per cent, and hernia recurrence in 21.7 per cent. Resiting the stoma yielded the highest rate of SSI (40%) compared with leaving the stoma in situ (11.8%) or rematuring the stoma (0%; P = 0.011). Open keyhole retromuscular PH repair of PH with permanent synthetic mesh is safe, effective, and durable.

  5. Intraoperative use of fluorescent imaging with indocyanine green changes management of abdominal wall flaps during open ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jonathan; May, Audriene; Ryan, Heidi; Tsuda, Shawn

    2015-07-01

    Wound complications including infection and necrosis remain common during complex open ventral hernia repair. Advancements or enhancements in imaging technology may abate some of these issues but requires more investigation. Laser-assisted fluorescent imaging with indocyanine green (Spy Elite, LifeCell Corporation, Branchburg, NJ) allows visualization and quantification of perfusion, facilitating management of poorly perfused tissue. Ten patients, who underwent large or massive ventral or incisional hernia repair with biologic graft reinforcement and either perforator-sparing components separation or primary open repair, underwent intraoperative laser-assisted fluorescent imaging with indocyanine green from August 2012 to August 2013. The cases were reviewed by an independent data collector with primary outcomes of postoperative skin infection and/or abdominal wall necrosis. Three (30%) patients had adequate perfusion, while seven (70%) patients had inadequate skin perfusion and necessitated excision of additional tissue. Of the patients whose ischemic tissue was removed, four (57%) patients had an infection and no patients developed necrosis postoperatively. Of the patients who had no removal of additional skin, one (33%) patient developed an infection and one (33%) patients developed skin necrosis. The intraoperative use of laser-assisted fluorescent imaging with indocyanine green may change management of abdominal wall flaps, even in perforator-sparing operations. Our study series is small and cannot suggest statistical significance in the potential benefit of intraoperative imaging, but shows that up to 70% of patients may require change in management due to poorly perfused tissue flaps.

  6. Stratification of surgical site infection by operative factors and comparison of infection rates after hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Margaret A; Nickel, Katelin B; Wallace, Anna E; Mines, Daniel; Fraser, Victoria J; Warren, David K

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether operative factors are associated with risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after hernia repair. Retrospective cohort study. Patients Commercially insured enrollees aged 6 months-64 years with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure or Current Procedural Terminology, fourth edition, codes for inguinal/femoral, umbilical, and incisional/ventral hernia repair procedures from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2010. SSIs within 90 days after hernia repair were identified by diagnosis codes. The χ2 and Fisher exact tests were used to compare SSI incidence by operative factors. A total of 119,973 hernia repair procedures were analyzed. The incidence of SSI differed significantly by anatomic site, with rates of 0.45% (352/77,666) for inguinal/femoral, 1.16% (288/24,917) for umbilical, and 4.11% (715/17,390) for incisional/ventral hernia repair. Within anatomic sites, the incidence of SSI was significantly higher for open versus laparoscopic inguinal/femoral (0.48% [295/61,142] vs 0.34% [57/16,524], P=.020) and incisional/ventral (4.20% [701/16,699] vs 2.03% [14/691], P=.005) hernia repairs. The rate of SSI was higher following procedures with bowel obstruction/necrosis than procedures without obstruction/necrosis for open inguinal/femoral (0.89% [48/5,422] vs 0.44% [247/55,720], P<.001) and umbilical (1.57% [131/8,355] vs 0.95% [157/16,562], P<.001), but not incisional/ventral hernia repair (4.01% [224/5,585] vs 4.16% [491/11,805], P=.645). The incidence of SSI was highest after open procedures, incisional/ventral repairs, and hernia repairs with bowel obstruction/necrosis. Stratification of hernia repair SSI rates by some operative factors may facilitate accurate comparison of SSI rates between facilities.

  7. Evaluation of fenestrated and non-fenestrated biologic grafts in a porcine model of mature ventral incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, E. D.; Melman, L.; Deeken, C. R.; Greco, S. C.; Frisella, M. M.; Matthews, B. D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to compare the tissue incorporation of a novel fenestrated and non-fenestrated crosslinked porcine dermal matrix (CPDM) (CollaMend™, Davol Inc., Warwick, RI) in a porcine model of ventral hernia repair. Methods Bilateral abdominal wall defects were created in 12 Yucatan minipigs and repaired with a preperitoneal or intraperitoneal technique 21 days after hernia creation. Animals were randomized to fenestrated or non-fenestrated CPDM for n = 6 pieces of each graft in the preperitoneal or intraperitoneal location. All animals were sacrificed at 1 month. Adhesion characteristics and graft contraction/growth were measured by the Garrard adhesion grading scale and transparent grid overlay. Histological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained slides was performed to assess graft incorporation. Tissue incorporation strength was measured by a T-peel tensile test. The strength of explanted CPDM alone and de novo CPDM was measured by a uniaxial tensile test using a tensiometer (Instron, Norwood, MA) at a displacement rate of 0.42 mm/s. Statistical significance (P < 0.05) was determined for histological analysis using a Kruskal–Wallis non-parametric test with a Bonferroni correction, and for all other analyses using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a Bonferroni post-test or a Kruskal–Wallis non-parametric test with a Dunn’s post-test. Results Intraperitoneal placement of fenestrated CPDM resulted in a significantly higher area of adhesions and adhesion score compared to the preperitoneal placement of fenestrated CPDM (P < 0.05). For both preperitoneal and intraperitoneal placement, histological findings demonstrated greater incorporation of the graft due to the fenestrations. No significant differences were detected in the uniaxial tensile strengths of the graft materials alone, either due to the graft type (non-fenestrated vs. fenestrated) or due to the placement location (preperitoneal vs. intraperitoneal

  8. Long-term outcomes of 1326 laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair with the routine suturing concept: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Chelala, E; Baraké, H; Estievenart, J; Dessily, M; Charara, F; Allé, J L

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective chart analysis reports and assesses the long-term (beyond 10 years) safety and efficiency of a single institution's experience in 1326 laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repairs (LIVHR), defending the principle of the suturing defect (augmentation repair concept) prior to laparoscopic reinforcement with a composite mesh (IPOM Plus). This study aims to prove the feasibility and validity of IPOM Plus repair, among other concepts, as a well-justified treatment of incisional or ventral hernias, rendering a good long-term outcome result. A single institution's systematic retrospective review of 1326 LIVHR was conducted between the years 2000 and 2014. A standardized technique of routine closure of the defect prior to the intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) reinforcement was performed in all patients. The standardized technique of "defect closure" by laparoscopy approximating the linea alba under physiological tension was assigned by either the transparietal U reverse interrupted stitches or the extracorporeal closure in larger defects. All patients benefited from the implant Parietex composite mesh through an Intraperitoneal Onlay Mesh placement with transfacial suturing. LIVHR was performed on 1326 patients, 52.57% female and 47.43% male. The majority of our patients were young (mean age 52.19 years) and obese (average BMI 32.57 kg/m2). The mean operating time was 70 min and hospital stay 2 days, with a mean follow-up of 78 months. On the overall early complications of 5.78%, we achieved over time the elimination of the dead space by routine closure of the defect, thus reducing seroma formation to 2.56%, with a low risk of infection <1%. Post-op sepsis occurred in only nine cases. Three secondary serosal breakdowns and two late perforations were re-operated, and three diabetic patients had infected hematomas, necessitating mesh removal. Through technical improvement in the suturing concept and our growing experience, we managed to reduce the

  9. Polyvinylidene Fluoride Mesh (PVDF, DynaMesh®-IPOM) in The Laparoscopic Treatment of Incisional Hernia: A Prospective Comparative Trial versus Gore® ePTFE DUALMESH® Plus.

    PubMed

    Verbo, Alessandro; Pafundi, Paolo; Manno, Alberto; Bacccaro, Rocco; Veneziani, Augusto; Colli, Rosa; Coco, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Laparoscopic approach is now generally accepted for the treatment of incisional hernia. The ideal mesh is still to be found. The aim of this study is to compare the well-known Gore® DUALMESH® Plus (WL Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) to a new prosthesis, the DynaMesh®-IPOM (FEG Textiltechnik GmbH, Aachen, Germany), to clinically verify its potential benefits in the laparoscopic treatment of incisional hernia. Comparing the results of the laparoscopic treatment of two groups of patients affected by incisional hernia using Gore® DUALMESH® Plus and DynaMesh®-IPOM. There were 45 females and 31 males, with age variable from 21 to 84 years of age. The two groups were well matched for age (median age 60 years for group A and 57.6 years for group B-p=0.44) and sex (28F and 17M group A and 13 F and 18 M group B-p=0.008), while median BMI resulted slightly higher in group B (26.12 group A and 29.74 group B-p=0.001). The median size of the defect was similar in the two groups (87.5 mm group A and 83.4 mm for group B-p=0.83), while the median operating time was slightly longer in group A (77 min group A and 67 min group B-p=0.44). No difference in the length of hospital stay was evidenced between the two groups (3.19 days for group A and 3 days for group B-p=0.74). Time to return to physical activity was similar between the two groups (13.46 days for group A and 12.7 days for group B-p=0.32). Minor complications occurred in 15 cases (19.7%): seromas (7 cases), prolonged ileus (6 cases), and hemoperitoneum (2 cases), without significant difference in the incidence of such complications in the two groups. Five recurrences (6.5% of cases) occurred. No differences in the recurrence rate was noted between the two groups (3 cases/7% for group A and 2 cases/6% for group B-p=00.7). DynaMesh®-IPOM proved to be a safe and effective mesh for the laparoscopic repair of incisional hernia even when compared to DUALMESH® Plus.

  10. The use of an algorithm for prophylactic mesh use in high risk patients reduces the incidence of incisional hernia following laparotomy for colorectal cancer resection.

    PubMed

    Argudo, Núria; Iskra, M Pilar; Pera, Miguel; Sancho, Juan J; Grande, Luis; López-Cano, Manuel; Pereira, José Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Incisional hernia (IH) after colorectal surgery is highly prevalent. The objective of this study is to assess the utility of an algorithm to decide on mesh augmentation after a midline laparotomy for colorectal resection to prevent IH in high-risk patients. A prospective study was conducted including all patients undergoing a midline laparotomy for colorectal resection between January 2011 and June 2014, after the implementation of a decision algorithm for prophylactic mesh augmentation in selected high-risk patients. Intention-to-treat analyses were conducted between patients in which the algorithm was correctly applied and those in which it was not. From the 235 patients analysed, the algorithm was followed in 166 patients, the resting 69 cases were used as a control group. From an initial adherence to the algorithm of 40% in the first semester, a 90.3% adherence was achieved in the seventh semester. The incidence of IH decreased as the adherence to the algorithm increased (from 28 to 0%) with a time-related correlation (R(2)=0.781). A statistically significant reduction in IH incidence was demonstrated in high-risk groups in which the algorithm was correctly applied (10,2 vs. 46,3%; p=0,0001; OR: 7,58;95%; CI: 3,8-15). Survival analysis showed that the differences remained constant during follow-up. The implementation of the algorithm reduces the incidence of IH in high-risk patients. The adherence to the algorithm also correlates with a decrease in the incidence of IH. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Laparoscopic Repair Reduces Incidence of Surgical Site Infections for All Ventral Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Nestor A.; Nguyen, Mylan T.; Nguyen, Duyen H.; Berger, Rachel L.; Lew, Debbie F.; Suliburk, James T.; Askenasy, Erik P.; Kao, Lillian S.; Liang, Mike K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of laparoscopic repair of ventral hernias remains incompletely defined. We hypothesize that laparoscopy, compared to open repair with mesh, decreases surgical site infection (SSI) for all ventral hernia types. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were reviewed to identify studies evaluating outcomes of laparoscopic versus open repair with mesh of ventral hernias and divided into groups (primary or incisional). Studies with high risk of bias were excluded. Primary outcomes of interest were recurrence and SSI. Fixed effects model was used unless significant heterogeneity, assessed with the Higgins I-square (I2), was encountered. Results There were five and fifteen studies for primary and incisional cohorts. No difference was seen in recurrence between laparoscopic and open repair in the two hernia groups. SSI was more common with open repair in both hernia groups: primary (OR 4.17, 95%CI [2.03–8.55]) and incisional (OR 5.16, 95%CI [2.79–9.57]). Conclusions Laparoscopic repair, compared to open repair with mesh, decreases rates of SSI in all types of ventral hernias with no difference in recurrence. This data suggests that laparoscopic approach may be the treatment of choice for all types of ventral hernias. PMID:25294541

  12. Quality of life following component separation versus standard open ventral hernia repair for large hernias.

    PubMed

    Klima, David A; Tsirline, Victor B; Belyansky, Igor; Dacey, Kristian T; Lincourt, Amy E; Kercher, Kent W; Heniford, B Todd

    2014-04-01

    Component separation (CS) has become a viable alternative to repair large ventral defects when the fascia cannot be reapproximated. However, the impact of transecting the external oblique to facilitate closure of the abdomen on quality of life (QOL) has yet to be investigated. The study goal was to investigate QOL and outcomes after standard open ventral hernia repair (OVHR) versus CS for large ventral hernias. Prospective data for all CSs were reviewed and compared with matched OVHR controls. All defects were 100 to 1000 cm2 in size and repaired with mesh. Comorbidities, complications, outcomes, and Carolinas Comfort Scale (CCS) scores, were reviewed. Seventy-four CS patients were compared with 154 patients undergoing standard OVHR with similar defect sizes. Age (56.7±13.0 vs. 54.7 ± 12.3 years, P = .26), defect sizes (299 ± 160 vs. 304 ± 210 cm2, P = .87), and BMI (32.7 ± 6.9 vs. 34.2 ± 9.0 kg/m2, P = .26) were similar in both groups, respectively. There were no differences in major postoperative complications (P = .22), mesh infections (P = 1.00), wound infections (P = .07), or hernia recurrence (P = .09), but wound breakdown increased after CS (10% vs. 1%, P < .001) as did seroma interventions (15% vs. 4%, P = .005). Postoperative CCS scores were similar at 1 month (P = .82) and 1 year (P = .14). In the first comparative study of its kind, it is found that patient undergoing CS with mesh reinforcement had equal short- and long-term QOL outcomes compared with similar patients who underwent standard OVHR. Whereas wound breakdown and seroma formation are higher, the overall complication, mesh infection, and recurrence rates are similar.

  13. Histologic and biomechanical evaluation of a novel macroporous polytetrafluoroethylene knit mesh compared to lightweight and heavyweight polypropylene mesh in a porcine model of ventral incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Melman, L.; Jenkins, E. D.; Hamilton, N. A.; Bender, L. C.; Brodt, M. D.; Deeken, C. R.; Greco, S. C.; Frisella, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the biocompatibility of heavyweight polypropylene (HWPP), lightweight polypropylene (LWPP), and monofilament knit polytetrafluoroethylene (mkPTFE) mesh by comparing biomechanics and histologic response at 1, 3, and 5 months in a porcine model of incisional hernia repair. Methods Bilateral full-thickness abdominal wall defects measuring 4 cm in length were created in 27 Yucatan minipigs. Twenty-one days after hernia creation, animals underwent bilateral preperitoneal ventral hernia repair with 8 × 10 cm pieces of mesh. Repairs were randomized to Bard®Mesh (HWPP, Bard/Davol, http://www.davol.com), ULTRAPRO® (LWPP, Ethicon, http://www.ethicon.com), and GORE®INFINIT Mesh (mkPTFE, Gore & Associates, http://www.gore.com). Nine animals were sacrificed at each timepoint (1, 3, and 5 months). At harvest, a 3 × 4 cm sample of mesh and incorporated tissue was taken from the center of the implant site and subjected to uniaxial tensile testing at a rate of 0.42 mm/s. The maximum force (N) and tensile strength (N/cm) were measured with a tensiometer, and stiffness (N/mm) was calculated from the slope of the force-versus-displacement curve. Adjacent sections of tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and analyzed for inflammation, fibrosis, and tissue ingrowth. Data are reported as mean ± SEM. Statistical significance (P < 0.05) was determined using a two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post-test. Results No significant difference in maximum force was detected between meshes at any of the time points (P > 0.05 for all comparisons). However, for each mesh type, the maximum strength at 5 months was significantly lower than that at 1 month (P < 0.05). No significant difference in stiffness was detected between the mesh types or between timepoints (P > 0.05 for all comparisons). No significant differences with regard to inflammation, fibrosis, or tissue ingrowth were detected between mesh types at any time point (P > 0.09 for all comparisons). However

  14. A new open anterior tension-free onlay patch technique for inguinofemoral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Devesa, Hugo Enrique; Martinez-Dejesús, Fermín; Martínez-Mier, Gustavo; Viñas-Dozal, Julio Cesar

    2005-07-01

    The high rate of misdiagnosed, coincident, or recurrent femoral hernias while or after mesh herniorrhaphy suggests its systematic search. We introduced a new open anterior tension-free mesh herniorrhaphy with a novel design. A description of the operative technique and patients demographics is presented. Two hundred sixty-eight hernias were repaired with this technique in a 5-year period. Two hundred twelve patients had a primary inguinal hernia. An unsuspected femoral hernia was discovered in 39 patients with a preoperatively diagnosed inguinal hernia. Operative time was 45 minutes, most patients were discharged in less than 24 hours, no recurrence has been noted, and minor complications were present. Most patients had minimal pain and returned to their normal activities within 10 days after surgery. This technique has the same advantages of open tension-free repairs, allows identification of femoral hernias, and protects a herniorrhaphy for recurrence.

  15. Use of double-layer autologous dermal flap in the treatment of recurrent and/or infected incisional hernias: presentation of the surgical technique and the results of 1-year follow-up-a prospective, consecutive cohort study.

    PubMed

    Martis, G; Damjanovich, L

    2016-06-01

    The difficulties of treating recurrent and/or infected incisional hernias are well known in surgical practice. Several surgical techniques and various types of grafts are available for surgeons. This study presents a new surgical technique option together with the results of the 1-year follow-up. The primary aim of the study is to present the surgical technique of the procedure suitable for the treatment of recurrent and/or infected incisional hernias. The secondary aim is to determine the recurrence rate and analyse the surgical complications. The tertiary aim is to present the quality of life test results performed 3, 6 and 12 months after the surgery. The authors evaluated the results of 36 recurrent and/or infected incisional hernia surgeries (11 men, average age 60.6 years; 25 women, average age 58.9 years) performed with their own surgical method in the framework of a tightly controlled, prospective, interventional and observational consecutive cohort study conducted between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013 at a university surgical department. The study evaluates the results of the 1-year follow-up period. All 36 patients had at least one recurrence of abdominal wall hernia; 12 of them also had concurrent infection of the synthetic graft and a complicating fistula. The mean BMI was 31.82 kg/m(2) (25.2-43.5 kg/m(2)). The average size of the abdominal wall defect was 145.9 cm(2) (59-275 cm(2)). The abdominal wall reconstruction was performed using an autologous, double-layer dermal flap. The grafts, which had been inserted during previous surgeries, were removed completely. The autologous dermal tissue was prepared using the flap harvested during dermolipectomy. The reconstruction was achieved using a tension-free technique. The essence of the abdominal wall reconstruction is the completion of the abdominal wall defect by a double-layer autologous dermal flap. The original abdominal wall defect was not closed by direct sutures. The quality of the

  16. National results after ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Helgstrand, Frederik

    2016-07-01

    Ventral hernia repairs are among the most frequently performed surgical procedures. The variations of repair techniques are multiple and outcome has been unacceptable. Despite the high volume, it has been difficult to obtain sufficient data to provide evidence for best practice. In order to monitor national surgical quality and provide the warranted high volume data, the first national ventral hernia register (The Danish Ventral Hernia Database) was established in 2007 in Denmark. The present study series show that data from a well-established database supported by clinical examinations, patient files, questionnaires, and administrative data makes it possible to obtain nationwide high volume data and to achieve evidence for better outcome in a complex surgical condition as ventral hernia. Due to the high volume and included variables on surgical technique, it is now possible to make analyses adjusting for a variety of surgical techniques and different hernia specifications. We documented high 30-day complications and recurrence rates for both primary and secondary ventral hernias in a nationwide cohort. Furthermore, recurrence found by clinical examination was shown to exceed the number of patients undergoing reoperation for recurrence by a factor 4-5. The nationwide adjusted analyses proved that open mesh and laparoscopic repair for umbilical and epigastric hernias does not differ in 30-day outcome or in risk of recurrence. There is a minor risk reduction in early complications after open sutured repairs. However, the risk for a later recurrence repair is significantly higher after sutured repairs compared with mesh repairs. The study series showed that large hernia defects and open re-pairs were independent predictors for 30-day complications after an incisional hernia repair. Open procedures and large hernia defects were independent risk factors for a later recurrence re-pair. However, patients with large defects (> 15 cm) seemed to benefit from an open mesh

  17. [Treatment of large postoperative hernias using intraperitoneal meshes].

    PubMed

    Trojanowski, Piotr; Witczak, Witold; Najdecki, Marek; Stanowski, Edward

    2007-05-01

    Most common hernias among men and women are inguinal hernias (75-80%) and postoperative (incisional) hernias (8-10%). Management of large incisional hernias (hernia gate bigger than 10 cm) both primary and recurrent could be an encounter for a surgeon. In surgical repair of large hernia use of synthetic materials (mesh) is being prefered. Using mesh can significantly decrease recurrence rate (<10%), compare to operations without synthetic grafts where risk of recurrence can reach 50%. One of the methods of surgical treatment of large abdominal hernias is intraperitoneal placing of implants. For such purpose complex meshes (multi-layered) should be used to prevent adhesion of the mesh to the intestines and avoid dangerous complications such as migration of the mesh through the tissues, perforation of the urine bladder, small and large intestine, forming fistulas and blocking intestines. Presentation of own experience in dealing with patients with large postoperative abdominal hernias using composite meshes: Bard--Composix Mesh, Parietex--Composite Sofradim and Proceed Ethicon. Since 2003 to 2006 were performed 7 surgical repairs of large abdominal hernia via an open aproach. 3 male, 4 female, average age 47 years old. Every hernia gate was wider than 15 cm. Bard mesh was used three times, Sofradim and Ethicon two times. Mesh was implanted without tension with single sutures and overlap of more than 5 cm from the edge of the hernia gate. Mesh was separated from intestines with greater momentum if it was possible. Anticoagulant and antibiotic preventive therapies were applied as a rule. Average time of operation was 140 minutes; average time of postoperative hospitalization was 8 days. Only one case was complicated with seroma which was treated with transcutaneous punctures with good result. (1) Surgical treatment of large abdominal hernia using composite mesh (intraperitoneal). in selected cases has good results. (2) The limiting factor of using presented method is

  18. Hiatal hernia in pediatric patients: laparoscopic versus open approaches

    PubMed Central

    Namgoong, Jung-Man; Kim, Seong-Chul; Hwang, Ji-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of laparoscopic approach for hiatal hernia (HH) in pediatric patients. Methods This was a retrospective study of 33 patients younger than 18 years who underwent an operation for HH between January 1999 and December 2012. Results The HH symptoms were various and included regurgitation, vomiting, weight loss, cough, hoarseness, and cyanosis. Among the 33 patients, there were 25 sliding types, 1 paraesophageal type, and 7 mixed types. Open surgery (OS) and laparoscopic surgery (LS) were used in 16 and 17 patients, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in sex, age, or body weight between the groups. The median operating time was longer in the LS group (150 minutes; range, 90-250 minutes vs. 125 minutes; range, 66-194 minutes; P = 0.028). Time to oral intake was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (1 day; range, 1-3 days vs. 2 days; range, 1-7 days; P = 0.001) and time to full feeding was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (6 days; range, 3-16 days vs. 10 days; range, 3-33 days; P = 0.048). There were no differences in length of hospital stay and complications between the two groups. There was no perioperative mortality or recurrence of HH. Conclusion A good surgical outcome for laparoscopic correction of HH was seen in pediatric patients. PMID:24851228

  19. Sir Ganga Ram Hospital classification of groin and ventral abdominal wall hernias

    PubMed Central

    Chowbey, Pradeep K; Khullar, Rajesh; Mehrotra, Magan; Sharma, Anil; Soni, Vandana; Baijal, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Background: Numerous classifications for groin and ventral hernias have been proposed over the past five to six decades. The old, simple classification of groin hernia in to direct, inguinal and femoral components is no longer adequate to understand the complex pathophysiology and management of these hernias. The most commonly followed classification for ventral hernias divide them into congenital, acquired, incisional and traumatic, which also does not convey any information regarding the predicted level of difficulty. Aim: All the previous classification systems were based on open hernia repairs and have their own fallacies particularly for uncommon hernias that cannot be classified in these systems. With the advent of laparoscopic/ endoscopic approach, surgical access to the hernia as well as the functional anatomy viewed by the surgeon changed. This change in the surgical approach and functional anatomy opened the doors for newer classifications. The authors have thus proposed a classification system based on the expected level of intraoperative difficulty for endoscopic hernia repair. Classification: In the proposed classification higher grades signify increasing levels of expected intraoperative difficulty. This functional classification grades groin hernias according to the: a) Pre -operative predictive level of difficulty of endoscopic surgery, and b) Intraoperative factors that lead to a difficult repair. Pre operative factors include multiple or pantaloon hernias, recurrent hernias, irreducible and incarcerated hernias. Intraoperative factors include reducibility at operation, degree of descent of the hernial sac and previous hernia repairs. Hernial defects greater than 7 cm in diameter are categorized one grade higher. Conclusion: Though there have been several classification systems for groin or inguinal hernias, none have been described for total classification of all ventral hernias of the abdomen. The system proposed by us includes all abdominal wall

  20. A Comparative Analysis Between Laparoscopic and Open Ventral Hernia Repair at a Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    DAVIES, STEPHEN W.; TURZA, KRISTIN C.; SAWYER, ROBERT G.; SCHIRMER, BRUCE D.; HALLOWELL, PETER T.

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair reportedly yields lower postoperative complications than open repair. We hypothesized that patients undergoing laparoscopic repair would have lower postoperative infectious outcomes. Also, certain preoperative patient characteristics and preoperative hernia characteristics are hypothesized to increase complication risk in both groups. All ventral hernia repairs performed at University of Virginia from January 2004 to January 2006 were reviewed. Primary outcomes included wound healing complications and hernia recurrence. Categorical data were analyzed with χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests. Continuous variables were evaluated with independent t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests. Multivariable logistic regression was performed. A total of 268 repairs (110 open, 158 laparoscopic) were evaluated. Patient and hernia characteristics were similar between groups, though the percents of wound contamination (5.4% vs 0.6%; P = 0.02) and simultaneous surgery (7.2% vs 0%; P = 0.001) were greater in the open procedures. Univariate analysis also revealed that open cases had a greater incidence of postoperative superficial surgical site infection (SSI) (30.0% vs 10.7%; P < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that both diabetes and open repair were associated with an increased risk of superficial SSI (P = 0.019; odds ratio = 3.512; 95% confidence interval = 1.229–10.037 and P = 0.001; odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.9–11.2, respectively). Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair yielded lower rates of postoperative superficial SSI than open surgery. Other pre-operative patient characteristics and preoperative hernia characteristics, with the exception of diabetes, were not found to be associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications. PMID:22856497

  1. VOLUME CALCULATION OF RATS' ORGANS AND ITS APPLICATION IN THE VALIDATION OF THE VOLUME RELATION BETWEEN THE ABDOMINAL CAVITY AND THE HERNIAL SAC IN INCISIONAL HERNIAS WITH "LOSS OF ABDOMINAL DOMAIN"

    PubMed Central

    de ARAÚJO, Luz Marina Gonçalves; SERIGIOLLE, Leonardo Carvalho; GOMES, Helbert Minuncio Pereira; RODRIGUES, Daren Athiê Boy; LOPES, Carolina Marques; LEME, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2014-01-01

    Background The calculation of the volume ratio between the hernia sac and the abdominal cavity of incisional hernias is based on tomographic sections as well as the mathematical formula of the volume of the ellipsoid, which allows determining whether this is a giant hernia or there is a "loss of domain". As the images used are not exact geometric figures, the study of the volume of two solid organs of Wistar rats was performed to validate these calculations. Aim To correlate two methods for determining the volume of the kidney and spleen of rats, comparing a direct method of observation of the volume with the mathematical calculation of this value. Methods The volume of left kidney, geometrically more regular, and spleen, with its peculiar shape, of ten animals was established in cubic centimeters after complete immersion in water with the aid of a beaker graduated in millimeters. These values ​​were compared with those obtained by calculating the same volume with a specific mathematical formula: V = 4/3 × π × (r1 x r2 x r3). Data were compared and statistically analyzed by Student's t test. RESULTS: Although the average volume obtained was higher through the direct method (1.13 cm3 for the left kidney and 0.71 cm3 for the spleen) than the values ​​calculated with the mathematical formula (0.81 cm3 and 0.54 cm3), there were no statistically significant differences between the values ​​found for the two organs (p>0.05). Conclusion There was adequate correlation between the direct calculation of the volume of the kidney and spleen with the result of mathematical calculation of these values ​​in the animals' studies. PMID:25184766

  2. Volume calculation of rats' organs and its application in the validation of the volume relation between the abdominal cavity and the hernial sac in incisional hernias with "loss of abdominal domain".

    PubMed

    Araújo, Luz Marina Gonçalves de; Serigiolle, Leonardo Carvalho; Gomes, Helbert Minuncio Pereira; Rodrigues, Daren Athiê Boy; Lopes, Carolina Marques; Leme, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2014-01-01

    The calculation of the volume ratio between the hernia sac and the abdominal cavity of incisional hernias is based on tomographic sections as well as the mathematical formula of the volume of the ellipsoid, which allows determining whether this is a giant hernia or there is a "loss of domain". As the images used are not exact geometric figures, the study of the volume of two solid organs of Wistar rats was performed to validate these calculations. To correlate two methods for determining the volume of the kidney and spleen of rats, comparing a direct method of observation of the volume with the mathematical calculation of this value. The volume of left kidney, geometrically more regular, and spleen, with its peculiar shape, of ten animals was established in cubic centimeters after complete immersion in water with the aid of a beaker graduated in millimeters. These values ​​were compared with those obtained by calculating the same volume with a specific mathematical formula: V = 4/3 × π × (r1 x r2 x r3). Data were compared and statistically analyzed by Student's t test. Although the average volume obtained was higher through the direct method (1.13 cm3 for the left kidney and 0.71 cm3 for the spleen) than the values ​​calculated with the mathematical formula (0.81 cm3 and 0.54 cm3), there were no statistically significant differences between the values ​​found for the two organs (p>0.05). There was adequate correlation between the direct calculation of the volume of the kidney and spleen with the result of mathematical calculation of these values ​​in the animals' studies.

  3. Open tension free repair of inguinal hernias; the Lichtenstein technique

    PubMed Central

    Sakorafas, George H; Halikias, Ioannis; Nissotakis, Christos; Kotsifopoulos, Nikolaos; Stavrou, Alexios; Antonopoulos, Constantinos; Kassaras, George A

    2001-01-01

    Background Recurrences have been a significant problem following hernia repair. Prosthetic materials have been increasingly used in hernia repair to prevent recurrences. Their use has been associated with several advantages, such as less postoperative pain, rapid recovery, low recurrence rates. Methods In this retrospective study, 540 tension-free inguinal hernia repairs were performed between August 1994 and December 1999 in 510 patients, using a polypropylene mesh (Lichtenstein technique). The main outcome measure was early and late morbidity and especially recurrence. Results Inguinal hernia was indirect in 55 % of cases (297 patients), direct in 30 % (162 patients) and of the pantaloon (mixed) type in 15 % (81 patients). Mean patient age was 53.7 years (range, 18 – 85). Follow-up was completed in 407 patients (80 %) by clinical examination or phone call. The median follow-up period was 3.8 years (range, 1 – 6 years). Seroma and hematoma formation requiring drainage was observed in 6 and 2 patients, respectively, while transient testicular swelling occurred in 5 patients. We have not observed acute infection or abscess formation related to the presence of the foreign body (mesh). In two patients, however, a delayed rejection of the mesh occurred 10 months and 4 years following surgery. There was one recurrence of the hernia (in one of these patients with late mesh rejection) (recurrence rate = 0.2 %). Postoperative neuralgia was observed in 5 patients (1 %). Conclusion Lichtenstein tension-free mesh inguinal hernia repair is a simple, safe, comfortable, effective method, with extremely low early and late morbidity and remarkably low recurrence rate and therefore it is our preferred method for hernia repair since 1994. PMID:11696246

  4. [New aspects in hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Lammers, B J; Goretzki, P E; Otto, T

    2005-07-01

    In the last 10 years in Germany we have seen a lot of hernia repairs using mesh.Meta-analysis shows the advantages of using meshes in hernia surgery; recurrence rates in inguinal hernia surgery are less than 3% in studies. There is some discussion about minimally invasive surgery in Germany.In incisional hernia surgery there is no discussion about using meshes. The role of minimally invasive surgery has not yet been defined.

  5. Endoscopic extraperitoneal repair of a Grynfeltt hernia.

    PubMed

    Postema, R R; Bonjer, H J

    2002-04-01

    There are three types of lumbar hernia: congenital, acquired, and incisional hernias. Acquired hernia can appear in two forms: the inferior (Petit) type and the superior type, first described by Grynfeltt in 1866. We report endoscopic extraperitoneal repair of a Grynfeltt hernia. A 46-year-old woman presented with a painful swelling in the left lumbar region that had caused her increasing discomfort. The diagnosis of Grynfeltt's hernia was made, and she underwent surgery. With the patient in a left-side decubitus position, access to the extraperitoneal space was gained by inserting a 10-mm inflatable balloon trocar just anteriorly to the midaxillary line between the 12th rib and the superior iliac crest through a muscle-splitting incision into the extraperitoneal space. After the balloon trocar had been removed a blunt-tip trocar was inserted. Using two 5-mm trocars, one above and another below the 10-mm port in the midaxillary line, the hernia could be reduced. A polypropylene mesh graft was introduced through the 10-mm trocar and tacked with spiral tackers. The patient could be discharged the next day after requiring only minimal analgesics. At this writing, 2 (1/2) years after the operation, there is no sign of recurrence. This Grynfeltt hernia could safely be treated using the extraperitoneal approach, which obviates opening and closing the peritoneum, thereby reducing operative time and possibly postoperative complications.

  6. Risk-adjusted procedure tailoring leads to uniformly low complication rates in ventral and incisional hernia repair: a propensity score analysis and internal validation of classification criteria.

    PubMed

    Dietz, U A; Fleischhacker, A; Menzel, S; Klinge, U; Jurowich, C; Haas, K; Heuschmann, P; Germer, C-T; Wiegering, A

    2017-08-01

    The usual approach in hernia surgery is to select the ideal repair method independent of the patient's characteristics. In the present study, we change the approach to ask which technique is best for the individual patient`s risk profile. For this, two criteria are important: does the patient need reconstruction of the abdominal wall? or does he or she need treatment of symptoms without being exposed to unnecessarily high perioperative risks? In a heuristic selection procedure, 486 consecutive patients were classified according to their characteristics as low-risk or high-risk for postoperative complications. Low-risk patients preferentially underwent open abdominal wall reconstruction with mesh (MFR + mesh), high-risk patients mainly a bridging-mesh procedure, either by laparoscopic (Lap.-IPOM) or open approach (Open-IPOM). Primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative complications. Secondary outcome was the recurrence-free interval. The propensity score was used for covariate adjustment analyzing recurrence rate as well as postoperative complications using Cox regression and logistic regression, respectively. Comparison of all surgical procedures showed risk factors had no independent influence on occurrence of complications (p = 0.110). Hernial gap width was an independent factor for occurrence of complications (p = 0.002). Propensity score adjustment revealed Lap.-IPOM to have a significantly higher recurrence rate than MFR + mesh (HR 2.367, 95% CI 1.123-4.957, p = 0.024). Three or more risk factors were protective against recurrence (HR 0.454, 95% CI 0.221-0.924, p = 0.030). In the univariate Cox regression analysis for recurrence, age >50 years was a protective prognostic factor (HR 0.412, 95% CI 0.245-0.702, p = 0.002). The classification criteria applied were internally validated. The heuristic algorithm ensured that patients at high-risk of complications did not have a higher perioperative complication rate than patients at low-risk.

  7. Stratification of Surgical Site Infection by Operative Factors and Comparison of Infection Rates after Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Margaret A.; Nickel, Katelin B.; Wallace, Anna E.; Mines, Daniel; Fraser, Victoria J.; Warren, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The National Healthcare Safety Network does not risk adjust surgical site infection (SSI) rates after hernia repair by operative factors. We investigated whether operative factors are associated with risk of SSI after hernia repair. Design Retrospective cohort study. Patients Commercially-insured enrollees aged 6 months–64 years with ICD-9-CM procedure or CPT-4 codes for inguinal/femoral, umbilical, and incisional/ventral hernia repair procedures from 1/1/2004–12/31/2010. Methods SSIs within 90 days after hernia repair were identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare SSI incidence by operative factors. Results A total of 119,973 hernia repair procedures were included in the analysis. The incidence of SSI differed significantly by anatomic site, with rates of 0.45% (352/77,666) for inguinal/femoral, 1.16% (288/24,917) for umbilical, and 4.11% (715/17,390) for incisional/ventral hernia repair. Within anatomic sites, the incidence of SSI was significantly higher for open versus laparoscopic inguinal/femoral (0.48% [295/61,142] versus 0.34% [57/16,524], p=0.020) and incisional/ventral (4.20% [701/16,699] versus 2.03% [14/691], p=0.005) hernia repairs. The rate of SSI was higher following procedures with bowel obstruction/necrosis than procedures without obstruction/necrosis for open inguinal/femoral (0.89% [48/5,422] versus 0.44% [247/55,720], p<0.001) and umbilical (1.57% [131/8,355] versus 0.95% [157/16,562], p<0.001), but not incisional/ventral hernia repair (4.01% [224/5,585] versus 4.16% [491/11,805], p=0.645). Conclusions The incidence of SSI was highest after open procedures, incisional/ventral repairs, and hernia repairs with bowel obstruction/necrosis. Our findings suggest that stratification of hernia repair SSI rates by some operative factors may be important to facilitate accurate comparison of SSI rates between facilities. PMID:25695175

  8. Comparative Study of Prolene Hernia System and Lichtenstein Method for Open Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Badkur, Mayank

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolene Hernia System (PHS) is a bi-layered polypropylene mesh with a connector that combines the anterior and posterior inguinal hernia repair, but still not very popular in this part of the country. Hence a prospective & randomized comparative study was undertaken to compare PHS with the already popular Lichtenstein Hernia Repair (LHR) and determine the post-operative outcome. Materials and Methods Total 67 inguinal hernia repairs were randomly assigned to either PHS or LHR method, and data was collected regarding various outcome measures like duration of surgery, post-operative pain, requirement of analgesia, return to normal activity, and early and late complications. Results Mean duration of surgery was significantly higher for PHS group than LHR group (65.4 min vs 51.26 min, p-value <0.0001). Significant difference was noted between the PHS and LHR group in terms of moderate to severe post-operative pain (15.15% vs 41.18%,p-value 0.018), time of requirement of analgesia (3.7 vs 4.6 days, p-value 0.024), and time to return to normal activity (2.7 vs 3.4 days, p-value 0.023), all in favour of the former technique. No intra-operative complication was noted in either of the groups. 5 patients had early complications in PHS group and 6 in LHR group, but this was statistically not significant. The average time of follow-up for the study was 7.8 month, ranging from 1 to 18 months. Chronic inguinal pain was noted in 1 and 2 patients respectively in PHS and LHR group, again statistically not significant. No recurrence was noted in both the groups till the time of follow-up. Conclusion PHS is a safe and better alternative to the time honored Lichtenstein hernia repair with the added advantage of strengthening whole of myopectineal orifice, and virtually eliminating any risk of recurrence. PMID:26266158

  9. Factors that affect recurrence after incisional herniorrhaphy with prosthetic material.

    PubMed

    Rios, A; Rodriguez, J M; Munitiz, V; Alcaraz, P; Pérez, D; Parrilla, P

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate the risk factors for recurrence after prosthetic incisional herniorrhaphy. Retrospective study. Tertiary referral centre, Spain. 246 patients who had incisional herniorrhaphy with a prosthetic material (polypropylene) between 1990 and 1997 A reinforcement mesh was inserted when the hernia was more than 5 cm. In incisional hernias less than 5 cm the reinforcement mesh was inserted when the repair was under tension or when tissues were noted to be weak during the operation. Age, sex, obesity, the presence of bronchial disease, previous repair of the incisional hernia, type of surgery, size and site of hernia and presence of local complications during the immediate postoperative period. Mean (SD) follow-up was 77 (6) months (minimum follow up two years). The hernia recurred in 43 cases (17%) (mean time of recurrence 10 (8) months). Age over 60 years, previous herniorrhaphy, size of hernia, and postoperative local complications were significant risk factors (p < 0.01) in both the univariate and multivariate analyses. Patients at the greater risk of recurrence are those aged over 60 years, with large, recurrent hernias and who develop local complications during the postoperative period.

  10. Influencing factors for port-site hernias after single-incision laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Buckley, F P; Vassaur, H E; Jupiter, D C; Crosby, J H; Wheeless, C J; Vassaur, J L

    2016-10-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has been demonstrated to be a feasible alternative to multiport laparoscopy, but concerns over port-site incisional hernias have not been well addressed. A retrospective study was performed to determine the rate of port-site hernias as well as influencing risk factors for developing this complication. A review of all consecutive patients who underwent SILS over 4 years was conducted using electronic medical records in a multi-specialty integrated healthcare system. Statistical evaluation included descriptive analysis of demographics in addition to bivariate and multivariate analyses of potential risk factors, which were age, gender, BMI, procedure, existing insertion-site hernia, wound infection, tobacco use, steroid use, and diabetes. 787 patients who underwent SILS without conversion to open were reviewed. There were 454 cholecystectomies, 189 appendectomies, 72 colectomies, 21 fundoplications, 15 transabdominal inguinal herniorrhaphies, and 36 other surgeries. Cases included 532 (67.6 %) women, and among all patients mean age was 44.65 (±19.05) years and mean BMI of 28.04 (±6). Of these, 50 (6.35 %) patients were documented as developing port-site incisional hernias by a health care provider or by incidental imaging. Of the risk factors analyzed, insertion-site hernia, age, and BMI were significant. Multivariate analysis indicated that both preexisting hernia and BMI were significant risk factors (p value = 0.00212; p value = 0.0307). Morbidly obese patients had the highest incidence of incisional hernias at 18.18 % (p value = 0.02). When selecting patients for SILS, surgeons should consider the presence of an umbilical hernia, increased age and obesity as risk factors for developing a port-site hernia.

  11. Economic evaluation of open versus laparoscopic hernia repair: some pragmatic considerations for the measurement of costs.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, E; Donaldson, C; Grant, A

    1998-12-01

    Laparoscopic hernia repair costs more than open repair. This increase in cost largely is because of the use of disposables. Indirect cost benefits of laparoscopic procedure because of a more rapid return to normal activity are different to calculate but may be present for select groups of patients.

  12. Comparison of institutional costs for laparoscopic preperitoneal inguinal hernia versus open repair and its reimbursement in an ambulatory surgery center.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Volker R; Morrison, John E

    2008-02-01

    To compare institutional costs for open versus laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair and its relationship to reimbursement in an ambulatory surgery center in the United States. Analysis of institutional costs in US$ of 2006 for all nonreusables used in a laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair using a polyester mesh compared with open hernia repair using polypropylene mesh. A comparison of the institution's disposable costs related to reimbursement at an ambulatory surgery center in Southeastern United States was performed to identify the most cost-effective procedure for the outpatient facility. As fixed and indirect costs of the ambulatory surgery center are similar for both procedures, a cost difference can only be found in direct disposable costs with that being US$ 235.57 for the procedure-specific disposables in the laparoscopic hernia repair as compared with US$ 117.15 for the open hernia repair. Cost for identical disposables used in both procedures amounted to US$ 32.57. Laparoscopic TEP hernia repair has a higher cost for procedure related disposables versus the open hernia repair at +US$ 118.42 mainly being due to the more costly polyester mesh. A flat rate reimbursement of US$ 1800 for a laparoscopic procedure compared with only US$ 950 for the open procedure minus all disposable cost results in a higher institutional income of +US&$ 731.58 (US$ 1531.86 vs. US$ 800.28), from which other institutional costs can be paid. Despite marginally higher procedure-related disposable costs for laparoscopic TEP hernia repair, the institutional income is remarkably higher owing to a better reimbursement for this procedure in ambulatory surgery centers. From the institution's point of view, laparoscopic hernia repair is by far the more cost-effective procedure when compared with an open hernia procedure at the present time.

  13. Impact of postoperative complications on the risk for chronic groin pain after open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Anders; Sandblom, Gabriel; Fränneby, Ulf; Sondén, Anders; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Dahlstrand, Ursula

    2017-02-01

    Chronic pain is common after inguinal hernia repair and has become one of the most important outcome measures for this procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not there is a relationship between specific postoperative complications and risk for chronic pain after open inguinal hernia repair. A prospective cohort study was designed in which participants responded to the Inguinal Pain Questionnaire regarding postoperative groin pain 8 years after inguinal hernia repair. Responses to the questionnaire were matched with data from a previous study regarding reported postoperative complications after open inguinal hernia repair. Participants were recruited originally from the Swedish Hernia Register. Response rate was 82.4% (952/1,155). The primary outcome was chronic pain in the operated groin at follow-up. Grading of pain was performed using the Inguinal Pain Questionnaire. A total of 170 patients (17.9%) reported groin pain and 29 patients (3.0%) reported severe groin pain. The risk for developing chronic groin pain was greater in patients with severe pain in the preoperative or immediate postoperative period (odds ratio 2.09; 95% confidence interval 1.28-3.41). Risk for chronic pain decreased for every 1-year increase in age at the time of operation (odds ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.00). Both preoperative pain and pain in the immediate postoperative period are strong risk factors for chronic groin pain. Risk factor patterns should be considered before operative repair of presumed symptomatic inguinal hernias. The problem of postoperative pain must be addressed regarding both pre-emptive and postoperative analgesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comprehensive preoperative evaluation and repair of inguinal hernias at the time of open radical retropubic prostatectomy decreases risk of developing post-prostatectomy hernia.

    PubMed

    Marien, Tracy; Taouli, Bachir; Telegrafi, Shpetim; Babb, James S; Lepor, Herbert

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Some studies have evaluated preoperative and intraoperative examination for inguinal hernias and their repair, noting a decrease in the rate of post-prostatectomy hernias. However, this did not eradicate post-prostatectomy hernias, indicating that this method probably missed subclinical hernias. Other studies looked at prophylactic procedures to prevent the formation of inguinal hernias at the time of prostatectomy and showed a decrease in the rate of postoperative hernias. To our knowledge this is the only series evaluating a multi-modal approach with magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and examination to identify all clinical and subclinical hernias and repair them at the time of prostatectomy. This approach only subjects those patients at risk for symptomatic hernias to an additional procedure and decreases the post-prostatectomy hernia rate to <1%. • To assess if a comprehensive evaluation to diagnose clinical and subclinical hernias and repair of these hernias at the time of open radical retropubic prostatectomy (ORRP) decreases the incidence of clinical inguinal hernias (IHs) after ORRP. • Between 1 July 2007 and 31 July 2010, 281 consecutive men underwent ORRP by a single surgeon. • Of these men, 207 (74%) underwent comprehensive preoperative screening for IH, which included physical examination, upstanding ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. • Between 12 and 24 months after ORRP, 178 (86%) of these men completed a questionnaire designed to capture development of clinical IHs. • Of the 178 evaluable patients, 92 (52%) were diagnosed preoperatively with IH by at least one diagnostic modality. • Forty-one and 51 of the men had bilateral or unilateral IHs, respectively for a total of 133 IHs. • No preoperative factor was significantly associated with the presence of an IH before prostatectomy. • No groin subjected to IH repair (IHR) at the time of ORRP developed a

  15. Outcome and cost comparison of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair versus Open Lichtenstein technique.

    PubMed

    Anadol, Ziya A; Ersoy, Emin; Taneri, Ferit; Tekin, Ercüment

    2004-06-01

    Laparoscopic hernia repair has all the advantages of a tension free repair. This study compares the laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach with tension-free open hernia repair in terms of operative time, postoperative pain, hospital stay, complications, and cost. Open and TAPP repairs using polypropylene mesh were performed in two groups of 25 male patients. The difference in operative times between the groups was not significant. Mean pain scores (0-100) for the open group were 54.12 +/- 13.06 at 12 hours and 37.24 +/- 11.38 at 24 hours, significantly higher than the corresponding scores of 38.36 +/- 8.21 at 12 hours and 20.92 +/- 8.73 at 24 hours for the TAPP group (P < 0.05). The mean postoperative analgesic dose was 6.72 +/- 2.72 in the TAPP group, which was insignificantly lower than 7.52 +/- 2.00 in the open group. Mean hospital stay was 2.24 +/- 0.97 days in the open group and 1.52 +/- 0.51 in the TAPP group, which was significant (P < 0.05). Twenty patients (80%) in the TAPP group rated themselves highly satisfied with the surgery as compared to 11 patients (44%) in the open group (P < 0.05). There was no recurrence in either group during a mean followup period of 13.5 months (range, 8-28 months). Laparoscopic hernia repair was significantly more expensive than open (1100 US dollars versus 629 US dollars). TAPP repair is superior to open repair in terms of shorter hospital stay, lower postoperative pain, and better patient satisfaction. It is also safe, with no recurrence in a short-term period. This technique will be the operation of choice for the treatment of groin hernia after long-term results have been established in our center.

  16. Randomised controlled trial of laparoscopic versus open mesh repair for inguinal hernia: outcome and cost

    PubMed Central

    Wellwood, James; Sculpher, Mark J; Stoker, David; Nicholls, Graham J; Geddes, Cathy; Whitehead, Anne; Singh, Rameet; Spiegelhalter, David

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To compare tension-free open mesh hernioplasty under local anaesthetic with transabdominal preperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair under general anaesthetic. Design: A randomised controlled trial of 403 patients with inguinal hernias. Setting: Two acute general hospitals in London between May 1995 and December 1996. Subjects: 400 patients with a diagnosis of groin hernia, 200 in each group. Main outcome measures: Time until discharge, postoperative pain, and complications; patients’ perceived health (SF-36), duration of convalescence, and patients’ satisfaction with surgery; and health service costs. Results: More patients in the open group (96%) than in the laparoscopic group (89%) were discharged on the same day as the operation (χ2=6.7; 1 df; P=0.01). Although pain scores were lower in the open group while the effect of the local anaesthetic persisted (proportional odds ratio at 2 hours 3.5 (2.3 to 5.1)), scores after open repair were significantly higher for each day of the first week (0.5 (0.3 to 0.7) on day 7) and during the second week (0.7 (0.5 to 0.9)). At 1 month there was a greater improvement (or less deterioration) in mean SF-36 scores over baseline in the laparoscopic group compared with the open group on seven of eight dimensions, reaching significance on five. For every activity considered the median time until return to normal was significantly shorter for the laparoscopic group. Patients randomised to laparoscopic repair were more satisfied with surgery at 1 month and 3 months after surgery. The mean cost per patient of laparoscopic repair was £335 (95% confidence interval £228 to £441) more than the cost of open repair. Conclusion: This study confirms that laparoscopic hernia repair has considerable short term clinical advantages after discharge compared with open mesh hernioplasty, although it was more expensive. Key messages In the 4 hours after surgery laparoscopic hernia repair with general anaesthesia causes more pain

  17. The superiority of paracostal endoscopic-assisted gastropexy over open incisional and belt loop gastropexy in dogs: a comparison of three prophylactic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, A.; Mahmoodifard, M.; Razavifard, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic gastropexy is a procedure that prevents the occurrence of a life threatening condition known as gastric dilation and volvulus (GDV) in dogs. The objective of this study was to compare incisional, belt loop and minimally invasive endoscopically assisted gastropexy by evaluating different parameters such as surgical time, length of scar and score of pain in dogs. Twenty-one healthy, mixed-breed adult dogs weighting 14.3 ± 2.6 kg were randomly divided into three groups. Three gastropexy techniques applied in the following order: incisional (group I), belt loop (group B), and endoscopically assisted gastropexy (group E). Surgical time, anesthetic time, length of surgical incision and score of pain 3 h after surgery were recorded for all dogs. Two weeks after the surgery, positive-contrast gastrography was used to evaluate stomach position and total gastric emptying time. Ultrasonography was also used to evaluate the gastropexy two months after the surgery. Adhesion was confirmed two months after the surgery between the stomach wall at the pyloric antrum and the right side of the body wall in all dogs by ultrasound. The mean surgical time, length of surgical incision and score of pain were significantly lower in group E compared to group I and B (P<0.05). No significant differences were found in total gastric emptying time and gastropexy thickness post-operatively (P>0.05). Due to advantages observed in the current study, the endoscopically assisted technique seems to be a suitable alternative to open incisional and belt loop gastropexies for performing prophylactic gastropexy, especially when performed by skilled surgeons. PMID:27822237

  18. Thoracoscopic Versus Open Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Repair: Single Tertiary Center Review.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Anna F; Sola, Richard; Arnold, Michael R; Cosper, Graham H; Schulman, Andrew M

    2017-10-04

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) can be repaired open or through thoracoscopy. Thoracoscopic CDH repair could improve cosmesis and avoid the complications of laparotomy, but may have higher recurrence rates. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of thoracoscopic versus open CDH repair, with regard to recurrence, perioperative parameters, and postoperative complications. We performed a retrospective review of open versus thoracoscopic CDH repairs over an 8.5-year period. The primary outcome was hernia recurrence. Secondary outcomes included intraoperative partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) levels, length of stay, and postoperative complications. All statistical analyses were performed using standard statistical methods. A total of 54 infants underwent CDH repair during the study period, of whom 25 underwent successful thoracoscopic repair. Two patients who had undergone open repair developed recurrent diaphragmatic hernias (recurrence rate 3.7%). Operative time and intraoperative pCO2 levels did not differ between groups. Length of stay was shorter in the thoracoscopic cohort. Four patients in the open cohort developed ventral hernias and five developed bowel obstructions during follow-up. No long-term complications were identified in the thoracoscopic cohort. The median follow-up was 27 months. In our experience, thoracoscopic CDH repair was performed safely and with similar outcomes compared to open repair. In addition to improved cosmesis, thoracoscopic repair may avoid some of the long-term complications of laparotomy. In our series, none of the thoracoscopic CDH repairs recurred. We conclude that thoracoscopic CDH repair is a safe and appropriate technique for select neonates.

  19. Outcomes of pediatric inguinal hernia repair with or without opening the external oblique muscle fascia

    PubMed Central

    Nazem, Masoud; Dastgerdi, Mohamad Masoud Heydari; Sirousfard, Motaherh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering that complications and outcome of each method of pediatric inguinal hernia repair are one of the determinants for pediatric surgeons for selection of the appropriate surgical technique, we compared the early and late complications of two inguinal repair techniques, with and without opening the external oblique muscle fascia. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial study, boy children aged 1-month to 6 years with diagnosed inguinal hernia were included and randomly allocated into two groups for undergoing two types of hernia repair techniques, with and without opening the external oblique muscle fascia. Surgical complications such as fever, scrotal edema and hematoma, and wound infections classified as early complication and recurrence, testis atrophy and sensory impairment of inguinal area classified as late complications. The rates of mentioned early and late complications were compared in the two interventional groups. Results: In this study, 66 patients were selected and allocated to the two interventional groups. The prevalence of early and late complications in two studied groups were not different significantly in two interventional groups (P > 0.05). Operation time was significantly shorter in inguinal repair techniques without opening the external oblique muscle fascia than the other studied technique (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The findings of our study indicated that though early and late complications of the two repair methods were similar, but the time of procedure was shorter in herniotomy without opening the external oblique muscle, which considered the superiority of this method than inguinal hernia repair with opening the external oblique muscle. PMID:26958052

  20. Recurrent incisional hernia, enterocutaneous fistula and loss of the substance of the abdominal wall: plastic with organic prosthesis, skin graft and VAC therapy. Clinical case.

    PubMed

    Nicodemi, Sara; Corelli, Sergio; Sacchi, Marco; Ricciardi, Edoardo; Costantino, Annarita; Di Legge, Pietro; Ceci, Francesco; Cipriani, Benedetta; Martellucci, Annunziata; Santilli, Mario; Orsini, Silvia; Tudisco, Antonella; Stagnitti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Surgical wounds dehiscence is a serious post-operatory complication, with an incidence between 0.4% and 3.5%. Mortality is more than 45%. Complex wounds treatment may require a multidisciplinary management. VAC Therapy could be an alternative treatment regarding complex wound. VAC therapy has been recently introduced on skin's graft tissue management reducing skin graft rejection. The use of biological prosthesis has been tested in a contaminated field, better than synthetic meshes, which often need to be removed. The Permacol is more resistant to degradation by proteases due to its cross-links. Surgery is still considered the best treatment for digestive fistula. A 58 years old obese woman come to our attention, she was operated for an abdominal hernia. She had a post-operatory entero-cutaneous fistula. She was submitted to bowel resection, the anastomosis has been tailored and the hernia of the abdominal wall has been repaired with biological mesh for managing such condition. She had a wound dehiscence with loss of substance and the exposure of the biological prosthesis, nearly 20 cm diameter. She was treated first with antibiotic therapy and simple medications. In addiction, antibiotic therapy was necessary late associated to 7 months with advanced medications allowed a small reduction's defect. Because of its, treatment went on for two more months using VAC therapy. Antibiotic's therapy was finally suspended. The VAC therapy allowed the reduction of the gap, between skin and subcutaneous tissue, and the defect's size preparing a suitable ground for the skin graft. The graft, managed with the vac therapy, was necessary to complete the healing process.

  1. Seroma in ventral incisional herniorrhaphy: incidence, predictors and outcome.

    PubMed

    Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Hur, Kwan; Hirter, Angie; Kim, Lawrence T; Thomas, Anthony; Berger, David H; Reda, Domenic; Itani, Kamal M F

    2009-11-01

    Factors leading to seroma following ventral incisional herniorrhaphy (VIH) are poorly understood. Between 2004 and 2006, patients were prospectively randomized at 4 Veterans Affairs hospitals to undergo laparoscopic or open VIH. Patients who developed seromas within 8 weeks postoperatively were compared with those who did not. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of seroma. Of 145 patients who underwent VIH, 24 (16.6%) developed seromas. Patients who underwent open VIH had more seromas than those who underwent laparoscopic VIH (23.3% vs 6.8%, P = .011). Seroma patients had hernias that were never spontaneously reducible (0% vs 21%, P = .015), had more abdominal incisions preoperatively (mean, 2.4 vs 1.8; P = .037), and were less likely to have drain catheters placed than those without seromas (30.0% vs 63.1%, P = .011). In multivariate analyses, open VIH predicted seroma (odds ratio, 5.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-18.8), as well as the specific hospital at which the procedure was performed. Spontaneous resolution occurred in 71% of seromas; 29% required aspiration. Procedural characteristics and hernia characteristics rather than patient comorbidities predicted seroma in VIH.

  2. Is laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair more effective than open repair?

    PubMed

    O, Aly; A, Green; M, Joy; H, Wong C; Al-Kandari A; S, Cheng; M, Malik

    2011-05-01

    To systematically review randomized controlled trials, (RCT) evidence comparing Lichtenstein to total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness. Case series. The study was conducted at University of Abderdeen, U.K. A comprehensive online literature search was undertaken using databases such as MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE and Springerlink. Studies were then shortlisted according to the selection criteria (RCT with over 100 subject and English language publications from 1995 onwards) and appraised using the SIGN Methodology Checklist. A metaanalysis of the data was also performed using RevMan software. Analysis of reported data shows that TEP has less postoperative pain and return to work than Lichtenstein method. Operation time is shown to be longer in the TEP but this difference is shortened with increasing surgeon experience. The meta-analysis of the data on complications shows that there are no significant differences between the two types of procedures. TEP causes more short-term recurrences which are attributed to the learning curve effect. Longterm recurrence rates on the other hand show no significant differences. At present TEP is slightly more expensive than Lichtenstein repair. Both TEP and Lichtenstein repair are clinically effective procedures. The choice between them should be made on a case-by-case basis; which depends on the patients' preference and characteristics such as age, work and health status.

  3. Laparoscopic Mesh Versus Open Preperitoneal Mesh Versus Conventional Technique for Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Bo; Hallerbäck, Bengt; Glise, Hans; Anesten, Bengt; Smedberg, Sam; Román, Jonas

    1999-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of the laparoscopic technique in hernia repair regarding time to full recovery and return to work, complications, recurrence rate, and economic aspects. Summary Background Data Several studies have shown advantages in terms of less pain and faster recovery after laparoscopic hernia repair, whereas others have not, and the cost-effectiveness has been questioned. The laparoscopic technique must be thoroughly compared with the open procedures before its true place in hernia surgery can be defined. Methods Six hundred thirteen male patients aged 40 to 75 years were randomized to the conventional procedure, preperitoneal mesh placed by the open technique, or laparoscopic preperitoneal mesh (TAPP). Follow-up was after 7 days, 8 weeks, and 1 year. Results Of 613 patients undergoing surgery, 604 (98.5%) were followed for 1 year. Patients who underwent TAPP gained full recovery after 18.4 days, compared with 24.2 days for open mesh (p < 0.001) and 26.4 days for the conventional procedure (p < 0.001). Patients who underwent TAPP returned to work after 14.7 days, compared with 17.7 days for open mesh (p = 0.05) and 17.9 days for the conventional procedure (p = 0.04). They also had significantly less restriction in physical activities after 7 days. The TAPP procedure was more expensive, mainly as a result of longer surgical time and equipment costs, even after compensation for earlier return to work. Complications were more common in the TAPP group, with a varying pattern between the groups. Four recurrences in the conventional, 11 in the open mesh, and 4 in the TAPP group were recorded after 1 year (p = n.s.). Conclusion The laparoscopic technique results in both shorter time to full recovery and shorter time to return to work, at the price of substantially increased costs. PMID:10450737

  4. Incarcerated Pediatric Hernias.

    PubMed

    Abdulhai, Sophia A; Glenn, Ian C; Ponsky, Todd A

    2017-02-01

    Indirect inguinal hernias are the most commonly incarcerated hernias in children, with a higher incidence in low birth weight and premature infants. Contralateral groin exploration to evaluate for a patent processus vaginalis or subclinical hernia is controversial, given that most never progress to clinical hernias. Most indirect inguinal hernias can be reduced nonoperatively. It is recommended to repair them in a timely fashion, even in premature infants. Laparoscopic repair of incarcerated inguinal hernia repair is considered a safe and effective alternative to conventional open herniorrhaphy. Other incarcerated pediatric hernias are extremely rare and may be managed effectively with laparoscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring a Third Confirmed Case of Hemoperitoneum following Open Inguinal Hernia Repair Caused by Sampson Artery Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Jordan; Jagtiani, Manoj; Schmelzer, David; Wolodiger, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Hemoperitoneum is a rare complication of open inguinal hernia repair. This is the third reported case of this complication attributed to the same bleeding source: Sampson's artery. Sampson's artery courses along the round ligament of the uterus in the inguinal canal of females, originating from the arcade formed between the uterine and ovarian arteries. Usually obliterated in postembryonic development, this artery can persist in some adult female patients. Disruption of Sampson's artery can lead to hemoperitoneum following ligation of the uterine round ligament during open inguinal hernia repair in females. This case report describes a third confirmed case of hemoperitoneum complicating an open inguinal hernia repair. We review all three reported cases to date and discuss the recurring signs, symptoms, epidemiologic factors, and diagnostic findings associated. Our review suggests that females of childbearing age, particularly those in the peripartum period, are most at risk of developing this rare complication. PMID:28487804

  6. Amyand’s hernia: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ivashchuk, Galyna; Cesmebasi, Alper; Sorenson, Edward P.; Blaak, Christa; Tubbs, Shane R.; Loukas, Marios

    2014-01-01

    Amyand’s hernia is defined as when the appendix is trapped within an inguinal hernia. While the incidence of this type of hernia is rare, the appendix may become incarcerated within Amyand’s hernia and lead to further complications such as strangulation and perforation. Incarceration of the appendix most commonly occurs within inguinal and femoral hernias, but may arise to a lesser extent in incisional and umbilical hernias. Incarcerated appendix has been reported in a variety of ventral abdominal and inguinal locations, yet its indistinct clinical presentation represents a diagnostic challenge. This paper reviews the literature on incarceration of the appendix within inguinal hernias and discusses current approaches to diagnosis and treatment of Amyand’s hernia and complications that may arise from incarceration of the appendix within the hernia. PMID:24473371

  7. Minimally Invasive vs Open Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Repair: Is There a Superior Approach?

    PubMed

    Putnam, Luke R; Tsao, Kuojen; Lally, Kevin P; Blakely, Martin L; Jancelewicz, Tim; Lally, Pamela A; Harting, Matthew T

    2017-04-01

    The minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approach for congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) repair remains controversial. Our objective was to compare outcomes and complications of the MIS and open approaches, with risk-stratification of patients based on defect size and key patient characteristics. The multinational CDH Study Group (CDHSG) registry was queried for the period from 2007 to 2015. Patient demographics and operative details, including the CDHSG Staging System defect size (A to D), were reviewed. Open cases consisted of laparotomy and thoracotomy; MIS repairs included laparoscopy and thoracoscopy. Outcomes included length of stay (LOS) for patients surviving to discharge, hernia recurrence, and adhesive small bowel obstruction (SBO) requiring surgery. Regression analyses were performed. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs were derived. A total of 3,067 CDH patients underwent open (n = 2,579; 84%) or MIS (n = 488; 16%) repair. Patients undergoing open repair were more likely to be diagnosed prenatally, be premature, have lower 5-minute Apgar scores, and have major cardiac anomalies (all p < 0.001). Among MIS repairs, 79% were low risk (size A and B) defects vs 50% among open repairs (p < 0.001). Patients undergoing MIS repair experienced shorter overall median LOS, higher recurrence rates, and fewer SBO. With multivariable regression adjusting for defect size and key patient characteristics, an MIS approach was significantly associated with decreased LOS (mean -13.4 days; 95% CI -18 to -8.8 days), increased recurrences (OR 3.10; 95% CI 1.91 to 5.04), and decreased SBO (OR 0.19; 95% CI 0.06 to 0.60). After risk-stratification of CDH patients, an MIS approach was independently associated with decreased LOS and SBO, but higher recurrence rates. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Early Wound Morbidity after Open Ventral Hernia Repair with Biosynthetic or Polypropylene Mesh.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sambit; Haskins, Ivy N; Huang, Li-Ching; Krpata, David M; Derwin, Kathleen A; Poulose, Benjamin K; Rosen, Michael J

    2017-10-01

    Recently introduced slow-resorbing biosynthetic and non-resorbing macroporous polypropylene meshes are being used in hernias with clean-contaminated and contaminated wounds. However, information about the use of biosynthetic meshes and their outcomes compared with polypropylene meshes in clean-contaminated and contaminated cases is lacking. Here we evaluate the use of biosynthetic mesh and polypropylene mesh in elective open ventral hernia repair (OVHR) and investigate differences in early wound morbidity after OVHR within clean-contaminated and contaminated cases. All elective, OVHR with biosynthetic mesh or uncoated polypropylene mesh from January 2013 through October 2016 were identified within the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative. Association of mesh type with 30-day wound events in clean-contaminated or contaminated wounds was investigated using a 1:3 propensity-matched analysis. Biosynthetic meshes were used in 8.5% (175 of 2,051) of elective OVHR, with the majority (57.1%) used in low-risk or comorbid clean cases. Propensity-matched analysis in clean-contaminated and contaminated cases showed no significant difference between biosynthetic mesh and polypropylene mesh groups for 30-day surgical site occurrences (20.7% vs 16.7%; p = 0.49) or unplanned readmission (13.8% vs 9.8%; p = 0.4). However, surgical site infections (22.4% vs 10.9%; p = 0.03), surgical site occurrences requiring procedural intervention (24.1% vs 13.2%; p = 0.049), and reoperation rates (13.8% vs 4.0%; p = 0.009) were significantly higher in the biosynthetic group. Biosynthetic mesh appears to have higher rates of 30-day wound morbidity compared with polypropylene mesh in elective OVHR with clean-contaminated or contaminated wounds. Additional post-market analysis is needed to provide evidence defining best mesh choices, location, and surgical technique for repairing contaminated ventral hernias. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc

  9. Should we abandon regional anesthesia in open inguinal hernia repair in adults?

    PubMed

    Bakota, B; Kopljar, M; Baranovic, S; Miletic, M; Marinovic, M; Vidovic, D

    2015-09-17

    Inguinal hernia repair is a common worldwide surgical procedure usually done in the outpatient setting. The purpose of this systematic review is to make an evidence-based meta-analysis to determine the possible benefits of regional (neuraxial block) anesthesia compared to general anesthesia in open inguinal hernia repair in adults. Cochrane Library, Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCI-EXPANDED, SCOPUS as well as trial registries, conference proceedings and reference lists were searched. Only randomized controlled trials (RCT) that compare neuraxial block (spinal or/and epidural) anesthesia (NABA) and general anesthesia (GA) were included. Main outcome measures were postoperative complications, urinary retention and postoperative pain. Seven RCTs were included in this review. A total of 308 patients were analyzed with 154 patients in each group. Overall complications were evenly distributed in NABA and in GA group [OR 1.17, 95 % CI (0.52-2.66)]. Urinary retention was statistically less frequent in GA group compared to NABA group [OR 0.25, 95 % CI (0.08-0.74)]. Movement-associated pain score 24 h after surgery was significantly lower in NABA group [SMD 5.59, 95 % CI (3.69-7.50)]. Time of first analgesia application was shorter in GA group [SMD 8.99, 95 % CI 6.10-11.89]. Compared to GA, NABA appears to be a more adequate technique in terms of postoperative pain control. However, when GA is applied, patients seem to have less voiding problems.

  10. Infection of laparoscopically inserted inguinal hernia repair mesh following subsequent emergency open surgery: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotopoulou, IG; Richardson, C; Gurunathan-Mani, S; Lagattolla, NRF

    2012-01-01

    We present two cases of laparoscopically inserted mesh for inguinal hernia repair that became infected following emergency open bowel surgery. We believe that there is an increased risk of infection due to the larger size of mesh used in the laparoscopic repair but also due to the patient not volunteering the information because of the minimally invasive nature of the procedure. PMID:22524902

  11. Quality of life and hernia development 5 years after open abdomen treatment with vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction.

    PubMed

    Petersson, U; Bjarnason, T; Björck, M; Montgomery, A; Rogmark, P; Svensson, M; Sörelius, K; Acosta, S

    2016-10-01

    To report incisional hernia (IH) incidence, abdominal wall (AW) discomfort and quality of life (QoL) 5 years after open abdomen treatment with vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM). Five-year follow-up of patients included in a prospective study 2006-2009. The protocol included physical examination, patient interview, chart review, questionnaires on abdominal wall and stoma complaints and the SF-36 questionnaire. Fifty-five (12 women, 43 men; median age 70 years) of 111 included patients were alive. Follow-up rate was 91 %. Cumulative IH incidence during the whole study was 62 %. One-third of the IHs was repaired. At 5-year follow-up 59 % of IHs were clinically detectable. AW symptoms were equivalent in patients with (15/23) and without (11/21) IH (p = 0.541). SF-36 scores were lower than population mean for component scores and all subscales except bodily pain. Patients with major co-morbidity had lower physical component score [31.6 (95 %, CI 25.6-37.4)] compared to those without [48.9 (95 %, CI 46.2-51.4)]. Major co-morbidity was not associated with IH (p = 0.56), AW symptoms (p = 0.54) or stoma (p = 0.10). Patients with IH or other AW symptoms had similar SF-36 results compared to those without, whereas patients with a stoma had >5 point lower mean scores for general health, social function and physical component score compared to those without. VAWCM treatment results in high incidence of IH. However, at five years, there was no detectable difference in abdominal wall complaints and QoL in patients with IH compared to those without. Lower QoL appeared mainly to be associated with the presence of major co-morbidity.

  12. Comparative Effectiveness of Two Ultrasound-Guided Regional Block Techniques for Surgical Anesthesia in Open Unilateral Inguinal Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Steffel, Lauren; Kim, T Edward; Howard, Steven K; Ly, Daphne P; Kou, Alex; King, Robert; Mariano, Edward R

    2016-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) and ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric (II/IH) nerve blocks have been described as analgesic adjuncts for inguinal hernia repair, but the efficacy of these techniques in providing intraoperative anesthesia, either individually or together, is not known. We designed this retrospective cohort study to test the hypothesis that combining TAP and II/IH nerve blocks ("double TAP" technique) results in greater accordance between the preoperative anesthetic plan and actual anesthetic technique provided when compared to TAP alone. Based on this study, double TAP may be preferred for patients undergoing open inguinal hernia repair who wish to avoid general anesthesia.

  13. European Hernia Society classification of parastomal hernias.

    PubMed

    Śmietański, M; Szczepkowski, M; Alexandre, J A; Berger, D; Bury, K; Conze, J; Hansson, B; Janes, A; Miserez, M; Mandala, V; Montgomery, A; Morales Conde, S; Muysoms, F

    2014-02-01

    A classification of parastomal hernias (PH) is needed to compare different populations described in various trials and cohort studies, complete the previous inguinal and ventral hernia classifications of the European Hernia Society (EHS) and will be integrated into the EuraHS database (European Registry of Abdominal Wall Hernias). Several members of the EHS board and invited experts gathered for 2 days to discuss the development of an EHS classification of PH. The discussions were based on a literature review and critical appraisal of existing classifications. The classification proposal is based on the PH defect size (small is ≤5 cm) and the presence of a concomitant incisional hernia (cIH). Four types were defined: Type I, small PH without cIH; Type II, small PH with cIH; Type III, large PH without cIH; and Type IV, large PH with cIH. In addition, the classification grid includes details about whether the hernia recurs after a previous PH repair or whether it is a primary PH. Clinical validation is needed in the future to assess if the classification allows us to differentiate the treatment strategy and if the classification impacts outcome in these different subgroups. A classification of PH divided into subgroups according to size and cIH was formulated with the aim of improving the ability to compare different studies and their results.

  14. Growth and trends in publications about abdominal wall hernias and the impact of a specific journal on herniology: a bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kulacoglu, H; Oztuna, D

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine the exact volume and growth pattern of articles on abdominal wall hernias, in particular the effect of the journal Hernia on publications about hernias. A PubMed search was performed for every year between 1965 and 2010, using the title words "inguinal hernia," "incisional hernia," and "umbilical hernia." Then, two consecutive 10-year periods were chosen for a systematic PubMed search, before and after 2001--the year in which Hernia began to be indexed in PubMed. The main keywords used were as follows: "inguinal hernia" "incisional hernia" "umbilical hernia" "mesh" "laparoscopic" and "experimental." The number of all articles indexed in PubMed increased 1.6-fold between the periods 1991-2000 and 2001-2010. The number of articles with the title word "inguinal hernia" increased 1.7-fold, whereas the rises for incisional and umbilical hernias were more prominent: 3.9- and 2.6-fold. Article titles with the combined keywords "hernia and mesh" and "hernia and laparoscopic" increased 2.8- and 2.4-fold. The most striking combined search was for "umbilical hernia and mesh" with a 20.5-fold rise. The percentage of articles published in the journal Hernia among all articles in all 25 selected journals, including Hernia was 30% on average. Hernia, Surgical Endoscopy and the British Journal of Surgery were the leading journals for publications for inguinal hernia in the last decade. Growth in hernia papers is greater than the overall growth in PubMed. Articles on incisional hernia increased faster than did those on inguinal and umbilical hernias. The establishment and indexing of Hernia decreased the proportion of hernia publications in other journals. The core journals for herniology are Hernia, Surgical Endoscopy, and the British Journal of Surgery.

  15. Antibiotic prophylaxis in open inguinal hernia repair: a literature review and summary of current knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Makarewicz, Wojciech; Ropel, Jerzy; Bobowicz, Maciej; Kąkol, Michał; Śmietański, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    More than 1 million inguinal hernia repairs are performed in Europe and the US annually. Although antibiotic prophylaxis is not required in clean, elective procedures, the routine use of implants (90% of inguinal hernia repairs are performed with mesh) makes the topic controversial. The European Hernia Society does not recommend routine antibiotic prophylaxis for elective inguinal hernia repairs. However, the latest randomized controlled trial, published by Mazaki et al., indicates that the use of prophylaxis is effective for the prevention of surgical site infection. Unnecessary prophylaxis contributes to the development of bacterial resistance and significantly increases healthcare costs. This review documents clinical trials on inguinal hernia repairs with mesh and summarizes the current knowledge. It also tries to solve certain problems, namely: what constitutes a real risk factor, late-onset infection, and how the “surgical environment” impacts on the need to use antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:27829934

  16. Laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. Femoral hernia could be repaired through the laparoscopic procedures for inguinal hernia. These procedures have clear anatomic view in the operation and preoperatively undiagnosed femoral hernia could be confirmed and treated. Lower recurrence ratio was reported in laparoscopic procedures compared with open procedures for repair of femoral hernia. The technical details of laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia, especially the differences to laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia are discussed in this article. PMID:27826574

  17. National Outcomes for Open Ventral Hernia Repair Techniques in Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ross, Samuel W; Oommen, Bindhu; Huntington, Ciara; Walters, Amanda L; Lincourt, Amy E; Kercher, Kent W; Augenstein, Vedra A; Heniford, B Todd

    2015-08-01

    Modern adjuncts to complex, open ventral hernia repair often include component separation (CS) and/or panniculectomy (PAN). This study examines nationwide data to determine how these techniques impact postoperative complications. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried from 2005 to 2013 for inpatient, elective open ventral hernia repairs (OVHR). Cases were grouped by the need for and type of concomitant advancement flaps: OVHR alone (OVHRA), OVHR with CS, OVHR with panniculectomy (PAN), or both CS and PAN (BOTH). Multivariate regression to control for confounding factors was conducted. There were 58,845 OVHR: 51,494 OVHRA, 5,357 CS, 1,617 PAN, and 377 BOTH. Wound complications (OVHRA 8.2%, CS 12.8%, PAN 14.4%, BOTH 17.5%), general complications (15.2%, 24.9%, 25.2%, 31.6%), and major complications (6.9%, 11.4%, 7.2%, 13.5%) were different between groups (P < 0.0001). There was no difference in mortality. Multivariate regression showed CS had higher odds of wound [odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-2.0], general (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.3-1.8), and major complications (OR 2.1, 95%, CI: 1.8-2.4), and longer length of stay by 2.3 days. PAN had higher odds of wound (OR 1.5, 95%, CI: 1.3-1.8) and general complications (OR 1.7, 95%CI: 1.5-2.0). Both CS and PAN had higher odds of wound (OR 2.2, 95%, CI: 1.5-3.2), general (OR 2.5, 95%, CI: 1.8-3.4), and major complications (OR 2.2, 95%CI: 1.4-3.4), and two days longer length of stay. In conclusion, patients undergoing OVHR that require CS or PAN have a higher independent risk of complications, which increases when the procedures are combined.

  18. Systemic and local collagen turnover in hernia patients.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Nadia A

    2016-07-01

    Hernia formation is a multifactorial disease involving important endogenous factors possibly affected by exogenous factors. Alterations in collagen composition seem to contribute to abdominal wall hernia formation, possibly related to increased collagen breakdown. The collagen composition appears altered in fascial tissue but also in skin biopsies, suggesting that the collagen alterations are systemic. More pronounced collagen alterations are found in patients with hernia recurrences. Hypothetically, primary inguinal hernias are formed due to a systemic predisposition to altered connective tissue, whereas impaired healing influences on the development of incisional hernias and hernia recurrences. The overall objective of this thesis was to investigate the collagen turnover systemically and locally in patients with primary inguinal hernia, multiple hernias and incisional hernia. In a systematic literature review, a total of 55 original articles were reviewed evaluating connective tissue alterations in patients with abdominal wall hernias. Patients with inguinal and incisional hernias exhibit a decreased type I to III collagen ratio in fascia and skin biopsies with the most pronounced alterations found in patients with direct inguinal hernia and hernia recurrence. An increased level of MMP-2 was reported in patients with inguinal hernias. In a nationwide study from the Danish Hernia Database, 92,283 patients with an inguinal hernia repair were identified from January 1998 until June 2010. A total of 843 patients were also registered with a ventral hernia repair. Direct (OR = 1.28 [95% C.I. 1.08-1.51]) and recurrent (OR = 1.76 [95% C.I. 1.39-2.23]) inguinal hernia repairs were significantly associated with ventral hernia repair compared to indirect inguinal hernia repair after adjustment for gender, age and surgical approach. In a multivariable subgroup analysis, direct and recurrent inguinal hernia repair were associated with primary ventral hernia surgery, whereas

  19. Single incision endoscopic surgery for lumbar hernia.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Norihiko; Shimizu, Satsuki; Shin, Hisato; Matsunoki, Aika; Watanabe, Go

    2011-01-01

    Single Incision Endoscopic Surgery (SIES) has emerged as a less invasive surgery among laparoscopic surgeries, and this approach for incisional hernia was reported recently. This is the first report of SIES for an incisional lumbar hernia. A 66-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our institution because of a left flank hernia that developed after left iliac crest bone harvesting. A 20-mm incision was created on the left side of the umbilicus and all three trocars (12, 5, and 5 mm) were inserted into the incision. The hernial defect was 14 × 9 cm and was repaired with intraperitoneal onlay mesh and a prosthetic graft. The postoperative course was uneventful. SIES for lumbar hernia offers a safe and effective outcome equivalent compared to laparoscopic surgery. In addition, SIES is less invasive and has a cosmetic benefit.

  20. Impact of the establishment of a specialty hernia referral center.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kristopher B; Belyansky, Igor; Dacey, Kristian T; Yurko, Yuliya; Augenstein, Vedra A; Lincourt, Amy E; Horton, James; Kercher, Kent W; Heniford, B Todd

    2014-12-01

    Creating a surgical specialty referral center requires a strong interest, expertise, and a market demand in that particular field, as well as some form of promotion. In 2004, we established a tertiary hernia referral center. Our goal in this study was to examine its impact on institutional volume and economics. The database of all hernia repairs (2004-2011) was reviewed comparing hernia repair type and volume and center financial performance. The ventral hernia repair (VHR) patient subset was further analyzed with particular attention paid to previous repairs, comorbidities, referral patterns, and the concomitant involvement of plastic surgery. From 2004 to 2011, 4927 hernia repairs were performed: 39.3% inguinal, 35.5% ventral or incisional, 16.2% umbilical, 5.8% diaphragmatic, 1.6% femoral, and 1.5% other. Annual billing increased yearly from 7% to 85% and averaged 37% per year. Comparing 2004 with 2011, procedural volume increased 234%, and billing increased 713%. During that period, there was a 2.5-fold increase in open VHRs, and plastic surgeon involvement increased almost 8-fold, (P = .004). In 2005, 51 VHR patients had a previous repair, 27.0% with mesh, versus 114 previous VHR in 2011, 58.3% with mesh (P < .0001). For VHR, in-state referrals from 2004 to 2011 increased 340% while out-of-state referrals jumped 580%. In 2011, 21% of all patients had more than 4 comorbidities, significantly increased from 2004 (P = .02). The establishment of a tertiary, regional referral center for hernia repair has led to a substantial increase in surgical volume, complexity, referral geography, and financial benefit to the institution. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Synchronous femoral hernias diagnosed during endoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Putnis, Soni; Wong, April; Berney, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    During totally extraperitoneal (TEP) endoscopic repair of inguinal hernias, it is possible to see the internal opening of the femoral canal. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence of synchronous femoral hernias found in patients undergoing TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repair. This was a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 362 consecutive patients who underwent 484 TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repairs during a 5-year period, May 2005 to May 2010. During surgery, both inguinal and femoral canal orifices were routinely inspected. The presence of unilateral or bilateral inguinal and femoral hernias was recorded and repaired accordingly. There were a total of 362 patients. More males (343, 95%) underwent a TEP hernia repair than females (19, 5%). There were more cases of unilateral (240/362, 66%) than bilateral (122/362, 34%) inguinal hernias. A total of 18 cases of synchronous femoral hernias were found during operation. There was a higher incidence of femoral hernia in females (7/19, 37%) compared to males (11/343, 3%) (P < 0.001). None of the femoral hernias were clinically detectable preoperatively. Females undergoing elective inguinal hernia repair are more likely to have a synchronous femoral hernia than males. We suggest that all women presenting with an inguinal hernia also have a formal assessment of the femoral canal. TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repair is an ideal approach as both inguinal and femoral orifices can be assessed and hernias repaired simultaneously during surgery.

  2. A case of a colocutaneous fistula: A rare complication of mesh migration into the sigmoid colon after open tension-free hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Al-Subaie, Saud; Al-Haddad, Mohanned; Al-Yaqout, Wadha; Al-Hajeri, Mufarrej; Claus, Christiano

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Lichtenstein technique is commonly used in inguinal hernia repair and a polypropylene mesh is the most frequently used mesh. Mesh migration into the colon has been rarely reported in the literature. Here we report a case of a colocutaneous fistula that developed following delayed mesh migration into the sigmoid colon. Presentation of case A 52-year-old man undergone Lichtenstein repair for left direct inguinal herniain 2008. Three years later, he presented complaining of rectal bleeding and concurrent bloody discharge from the hernia repair scar. Colonoscopy identified an internal fistulous orifice with intraluminal extrusion of the polypropylene mesh. Furthermore, abdominal ultrasound revealed a fistulous tract extending from the sigmoid colon to the anterior abdominal wall, and a fistulogram confirmed the findings. Open sigmoidectomy and resection of the abdominal wall with the fistula tract was performed, and BIO-A® tissue reinforcement meshwas placed. His postoperative course was unremarkable and was discharged on postoperative day 3. Discussion Mesh migration after mesh inguinal hernia repair is unpredictable. A previous report has presented complications related to prosthetics in hernia repair, such as infection, contraction, rejection, and, rarely, mesh migration.Mesh migration may occur as an early or late complication after hernioplasty. Conclusion During hernia repair, the surgeon should carefully check for a sliding hernia, which may contain the sigmoid colon within the sac, because failure to identify this hernia may lead to direct contact between the mesh and the colon, which may cause pressure necrosis and fistula formation followed by mesh migration. PMID:26209758

  3. Watchful waiting as a treatment strategy for patients with a ventral hernia appears to be safe.

    PubMed

    Kokotovic, D; Sjølander, H; Gögenur, I; Helgstrand, F

    2016-04-01

    Due to risks of postoperative morbidity and recurrence some patients with a ventral hernia are not offered surgical repair. There is limited data on the rate and consequences of a watchful waiting (WW) strategy for these patients. The objective of this cohort study was to analyse outcomes for patients with a ventral hernia who underwent watchful waiting, in terms of later requirement for hernia repair. All patients (≥18 years) electively referred to our out-patient clinic from 1 January 2009 to 1 July 2014 with incisional, umbilical or epigastric hernia were included. Information on patient characteristics and whether patients underwent WW or surgery was obtained from hospital files and the Danish National Patient Register. A 100% follow-up was obtained. The analyses comprised 569 patients with incisional hernia (WW = 58.1%) and 789 patients with umbilical/epigastric hernia (WW = 43.2%). Kaplan-Meier analyses estimated that the probability for patients who underwent watchful waiting to receive later surgical repair was 19 for incisional hernias and 16% for umbilical/epigastric hernias after 5 years. The probability of requiring emergency repair when in the WW group was 4% for both incisional and umbilical/epigastric hernias after 5 years. There were no significant differences in 30-day readmission, reoperation or mortality rates between the WW patients who later underwent elective hernia repair and patients who were initially offered surgery (p > 0.05), for both incisional and umbilical/epigastric hernias. Watchful waiting appears to be a safe strategy in the treatment of incisional, umbilical and epigastric hernias.

  4. Contemporary hernia smartphone applications (apps).

    PubMed

    Connor, K; Brady, R R W; de Beaux, A; Tulloh, B

    2014-08-01

    Smartphone technology and downloadable applications (apps) have created an unprecedented opportunity for access to medical information and healthcare-related tools by clinicians and their patients. Here, we review the current smartphone apps in relation to hernias, one of the most common operations worldwide. This article presents an overview of apps relating to hernias and discusses content, the presence of medical professional involvement and commercial interests. The most widely used smartphone app online stores (Google Play, Apple, Nokia, Blackberry, Samsung and Windows) were searched for the following hernia-related terms: hernia, inguinal, femoral, umbilical, incisional and totally extraperitoneal. Those with no reference to hernia or hernia surgery were excluded. 26 smartphone apps were identified. Only 9 (35 %) had named medical professional involvement in their design/content and only 10 (38 %) were reviewed by consumers. Commercial interests/links were evident in 96 % of the apps. One app used a validated mathematical algorithm to help counsel patients about post-operative pain. There were a relatively small number of apps related to hernias in view of the worldwide frequency of hernia repair. This search identified many opportunities for the development of informative and validated evidence-based patient apps which can be recommended to patients by physicians. Greater regulation, transparency of commercial interests and involvement of medical professionals in the content and peer-review of healthcare-related apps is required.

  5. Laparoscopic intraperitoneal polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) prosthetic patch repair of ventral hernia. Prospective comparison to open prefascial polypropylene mesh repair.

    PubMed

    DeMaria, E J; Moss, J M; Sugerman, H J

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic intraperitoneal polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) prosthetic patch (LIPP) repair of a ventral hernia is superior to open prefascial polypropylene mesh (OPPM) repair in a tertiary care university hospital in an urban environment. Data on 39 consecutive patients undergoing either LIPP repair (n = 21) or OPPM repair (n = 18) were compared. Findings showed that LIPP repair is characterized by less painful recovery and shorter hospital stay, with 90% of patients treated successfully as outpatients as compared with 7% in the OPPM group. The total facility costs for the LIPP repair ($8,273+/-$2,950) was significantly lower than for the OPPM repair ($12,461+/-$5,987) (p<0.05). Two serious delayed complications in the LIPP group were treated by reoperation (colocutaneous fistula, mesh infection), but the higher readmission costs in this group did not negate the overall cost advantage for LIPP repair. In the follow-up evaluation, 1 hernia recurrence was found in the LIPP repair group, and none in the OPPM group. Initial experience suggests that LIPP repair has advantages over OPPM repair in terms of decreased hospitalization, postoperative pain, and disability. Refinements in the technique to reduce complications may make LIPP repair the procedure of choice for repair of ventral hernias.

  6. Same day discharge, surgical training and early complications after open and laparoscopic repair of primary paraumbilical hernia.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, I; Willder, J M; Kumar, S

    2013-08-01

    The aims of this study were to compare same day discharges and early complications after open and laparoscopic primary paraumbilical hernia (PUH) repair, including the procedures performed by surgical trainees (STs). All patients who had open (suture or mesh) and laparoscopic repair of primary PUH in the Day Surgery Unit (DSU) between January 2007 and June 2009 were identified from the hospital database. The database was questioned regarding the grade of operating surgeon, type of surgical repair, day of admission and discharge from the DSU, and a patient's return to surgical services. Data were stored in Microsoft Excel(®) (TM 2007). Statistical significance was determined using Fisher's exact test. PUH was repaired in 337 patients: 252/337 (74.8 %) had open and 85/337 (25.2 %) had laparoscopic repair. Significantly, more patients were discharged home on the day of surgery after an open repair compared to the laparoscopic repair: open repair 187/252 (74.2 %), laparoscopic repair 35/85 (41.17 %), P = 0.0001. Overall early complications such as wound complications and hospital re-visits were similar in both groups: open repair 6.3 % (16/252), laparoscopic repair 11.7 % (10/85), P = 0.1554. STs performed 142/337 (42.1 %) of the PUH repairs with similar same day discharges from the DSU: STs 64.7 % (92/142), consultant surgeons 66.7 % (130/195), P = 0.7285. The difference in hernia recurrence between open repair 7/252 (2.78 %) and laparoscopic group 0/85 was not significant (P = 0.1985). Patients with PUH repair were more likely to go home on the day of surgery after open than after laparoscopic repair. This was not affected by the grade of the operating surgeon. Early complications were similar following open and laparoscopic repair of primary PUH.

  7. Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... The surgeon makes several small incisions in the abdomen that allow surgical tools into the openings to repair the hernia. Laparoscopic surgery can be performed with or without surgical mesh. Open Repair - The surgeon makes an incision near the ...

  8. The management of abdominal wall hernias – in search of consensus

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Kamil; Śmietański, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic repair is becoming an increasingly popular alternative in the treatment of abdominal wall hernias. In spite of numerous studies evaluating this technique, indications for laparoscopic surgery have not been established. Similarly, implant selection and fixation techniques have not been unified and are the subject of scientific discussion. Aim To assess whether there is a consensus on the management of the most common ventral abdominal wall hernias among recognised experts. Material and methods Fourteen specialists representing the boards of European surgical societies were surveyed to determine their choice of surgical technique for nine typical primary ventral and incisional hernias. The access method, type of operation, mesh prosthesis and fixation method were evaluated. In addition to the laparoscopic procedures, the number of tackers and their arrangement were assessed. Results In none of the cases presented was a consensus of experts obtained. Laparoscopic and open techniques were used equally often. Especially in the group of large hernias, decisions on repair methods were characterised by high variability. The technique of laparoscopic mesh fixation was a subject of great variability in terms of both method selection and the numbers of tackers and sutures used. Conclusions Recognised experts have not reached a consensus on the management of abdominal wall hernias. Our survey results indicate the need for further research and the inclusion of large cohorts of patients in the dedicated registries to evaluate the results of different surgical methods, which would help in the development of treatment algorithms for surgical education in the future. PMID:25960793

  9. Management of the open abdomen.

    PubMed

    Demetriades, Demetrios; Salim, Ali

    2014-02-01

    The open abdomen has become the standard of care in damage-control procedures, the management of intra-abdominal hypertension, and in severe intra-abdominal sepsis. This approach has saved many lives but has also created new problems, such as severe fluid and protein loss, nutritional problems, enteroatmospheric fistulas, fascial retraction with loss of abdominal domain, and development of massive incisional hernias. Early definitive closure is the basis of preventing or reducing the risk of these complications. The introduction of new techniques and materials for temporary and subsequent definitive abdominal closure has improved outcomes in this group of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Parastomal hernias -- clinical study of therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Târcoveanu, E; Vasilescu, A; Cotea, E; Vlad, N; Palaghia, M; Dănilă, N; Variu, M

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernias are parietal defects adjacent to the stomasite, after ileostomy and colostomy. Their incidence is variable and they are generally underestimated. Between 2001 and 2010 at the First Surgical Clinic Iasi, we treated 861 incisional hernias, of which there were 31 parastomal hernias in 26 patients (3%), 5 of which were recurrent parastomal hernias. Parastomal hernias have been explored clinically, through imaging and intraoperatively.Because our experience and literature review have demonstrated that a mesh repair is a safe procedure in the treatment of parastomal hernia, in 2010 we initiated a prospective randomized trial on the use of prophylactic polypropylene mesh at the time of stoma formation to reduce the risk of parastomal hernia. We enrolled in the study 20 patients with mesh implanted at the primary operation and 22 patients without mesh. The inclusion criteria were: patients with low rectal cancer, stage II-III, irradiated, obese, with a history of hernias, patients who do physical work. Most parastomal hernias were asymptomatic; only six cases with parastomal hernias required emergency surgical treatment. We performed local tissue repair in 16 cases (4 cases with recurrent parastomal hernia, stoma relocation in one case), sublay mesh repair in 15 cases (one case with recurrent parastomal hernia; stoma relocation in 5 cases). Postoperative morbidity registered included 4 wound infections (one case after mesh repair which required surgical reintervention) and stoma necrosis in one case with strangulation parastomal hernia with severe postoperative evolution and death. After local tissue repair recurrences were seen in 6 cases, after mesh repair we registered recurrence only in one case and no relapse after the relocation of the stoma. The patients with prophylactic mesh at the time of stoma formation to reduce the risk of parastomal hernia were followed for a median of 20 months(range 12 to 28 months) by clinical examination and ultrasound

  11. Medial Versus Traditional Approach to US-guided TAP Blocks for Open Inguinal Hernia Repair

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-30

    Abdominal Muscles/Ultrasonography; Adult; Ambulatory Surgical Procedures; Anesthetics, Local/Administration & Dosage; Ropivacaine/Administration & Dosage; Ropivacaine/Analogs & Derivatives; Hernia, Inguinal/Surgery; Humans; Nerve Block/Methods; Pain Measurement/Methods; Pain, Postoperative/Prevention & Control; Ultrasonography, Interventional

  12. Operation hernia: humanitarian hernia repairs in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sanders, D L; Kingsnorth, A N

    2007-10-01

    Ghana has a high incidence of inguinal hernias and the healthcare system is unable to deliver an adequate repair rate. This results in morbidity and mortality and has a knock-on effect on the local economy. A project has been set up to try and reduce the burden of these hernias by establishing Africa's first Hernia Centre. This is supported by structured visits by European surgeons to the centre. In October 2006, a team of four surgeons, two specialist registrars, one hernia nurse specialist, and three nurses was assembled in order to open the Hernia Centre, which will provide a base for the delivery of hernia services in the West of Ghana. A 2-year teaching programme has been formulated, tailored to the needs of local surgeons and nurses, with the aim of developing an integrated team that will initially deliver up to 50 hernia repairs each month. It is planned that the centre will be supported by structured periodic visits from surgeons and nurses based in Plymouth, the European Hernia Society, and any other volunteers wishing to support the link.

  13. Primary lumbar hernia: A rarely encountered hernia

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthy, Sharada; Suresh, H.B.; Anirudh, A.V.; Prakash Rozario, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar hernia is an uncommon abdominal wall hernia, making its diagnosis and management a challenge to the treating surgeon. Presentation may be misleading and diagnosis often missed. An imaging study forms an indispensable aid in the diagnosis and surgery is the only treatment option. Presentation of case A 42 year old male presented with history of pain in lower back of 4 years duration and was being treated symptomatically over 4 years with analgesics and physiotherapy. He had noticed a swelling over the left side of his mid-back and consequently on examination was found to have a primary acquired lumbar hernia arising from the deep superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt. Diagnosis was confirmed by Computed Tomographic imaging. Discussion A lumbar hernia may be primary or secondary with only about 300 cases of primary lumbar hernia reported in literature. Lumbar hernias manifest through two possible defects in the posterior abdominal wall, the superior being more common. Management remains surgical with various techniques emerging over the years. The patient at our center underwent an open sublay mesh repair with excellent outcome. Conclusion A surgeon may encounter a primary lumbar hernia perhaps once in his lifetime making it an interesting surgical challenge. Sound anatomical knowledge and adequate imaging are indispensable. Inspite of advances in minimally invasive surgery, it cannot be universally applied to patients with lumbar hernia and management requires a more tailored approach. PMID:26812667

  14. Comparison of Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa versus Polypropylene in Open Inguinal Hernia Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xin; Xiao, Dongdong; Wang, Wenyue; Song, Zhicheng; Yang, Zhi; Chen, Yuanwen; Gu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) with polypropylene in open inguinal hernia repair. Method Electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were used to compare patient outcomes for the two groups via meta-analysis. Result A total of 3 randomized controlled trials encompassing 200 patients were included in the meta-analysis. There was no significant difference in recurrence (P = 0.16), hematomas (P = 0.06), postoperative pain within 30 days (P = 0.45), or postoperative pain after 1 year (P = 0.12) between the 2 groups. The incidence of discomfort was significantly lower (P = 0.0006) in the SIS group. However, the SIS group experienced a significantly higher incidence of seroma (P = 0.03). Conclusions Compared to polypropylene, using SIS in open inguinal hernia repair is associated with a lower incidence of discomfort and a higher incidence of seroma. However, well-designed larger RCT studies with a longer follow-up period are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26252895

  15. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  16. A retrospective study of inguinal hernia in 35 dogs.

    PubMed

    Waters, D J; Roy, R G; Stone, E A

    1993-01-01

    Inguinal hernia was associated with trauma in five dogs and was considered nontraumatic in 30 dogs. There were 11 males, 13 intact females, and six spayed females with nontraumatic inguinal hernia. Six dogs had bilateral hernias. Five dogs were younger than 4 months at the time of diagnosis. In 11 older dogs with nontraumatic inguinal hernia, the hernias were identified less than 7 days before surgical repair; in 14 older dogs, the hernias had been recognized for 1 to 60 months. Clinical signs in dogs without small intestinal incarceration were usually limited to a visible or palpable mass without pain or systemic illness. Herniorrhaphy approaches included inguinal, midline with contralateral ring evaluation, and celiotomy with or without inguinal exposure. Fat and omentum were the most common hernial contents. Small intestine was within the hernias of 12 dogs. Six dogs had nonviable small intestine. Postoperative complications included two incisional infections, one incisional dehiscence, two cases of peritonitis and sepsis associated with bowel leakage after intestinal resection and anastomosis, and one hernia recurrence. The overall prevalence of postoperative complications was 17%, and the mortality rate was 3%. Vomiting for 2 to 6 days was predictive of nonviable small intestine. Dogs younger than 2 years were at 11 times greater risk for nonviable small intestine than dogs older than 2 years. Four of five dogs with nontraumatic inguinal hernia and nonviable small intestine were intact males, whereas none of 13 intact females were affected. Only one of 14 dogs with longstanding hernias had nonviable small intestine.

  17. Meta-analysis of self-gripping mesh (Progrip) versus sutured mesh in open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Pandanaboyana, Sanjay; Mittapalli, Devender; Rao, Ahsan; Prasad, Raj; Ahmad, Niaz

    2014-04-01

    This metaanalysis was designed to systematically analyse all published randomized controlled trials comparing self-gripping mesh (ProGrip) and sutured mesh to analyse early and long term outcomes for open inguinal hernia repair. A literature search was performed using the Cochrane Colorectal Cancer Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase and Science Citation Index Expanded. Randomized trials comparing self-gripping mesh with sutured mesh were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager Version 5.2 software. The primary outcome measures were hernia recurrence and chronic pain after operation. Secondary outcome measures included surgical time, wound complications and perioperative complications. Five randomized trials were identified as suitable, including 1170 patients. There was no significant difference between the two types of mesh repairs in perioperative complications, wound haematoma, chronic groin pain and hernia recurrence. Wound infection was lower in self gripping mesh group compared to sutured mesh but this was not statistically significant (risk ratio (RR) 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.30-1.06, P = 0.08). The duration of operation was significantly shorter with self-gripping mesh compared to sutured mesh with a mean difference of -5.48 min [-9.31, -1.64] Z = 2.80 (P = 0.005). Self-gripping mesh was associated with shorter operative time compared to sutured mesh. Both types of mesh repairs have comparable perioperative and long term outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Combination of Liechtenstein Repair with Herniorrhaphy in Open Inguinal Hernia Repair- A Prospective Observational Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Pukar, Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    Context: This study is about documentation of a technique which includes a combination of both hernioplasty and Herniorrhaphy, and its outcome in terms of recurrence rate and postoperative complications. It also compares the outcome of this method with routinely used techniques reported in the literature. Materials and Methods: LR with Herniorrhaphy was performed in the patients admitted with inguinal hernia under concerned surgeon. Their follow-up was assessed after 12 months. Incidences of recurrence rate and other postoperative complications like painful scar, atrophy of testis, urinary retention, hematoma, sinus and infection were noted and compared with other techniques of repair from published data. Statistical Analysis: was carried out by calculating the mean, standard deviation (SD), percentage and incidence rates. Results: LR with Herniorrhaphy performed in 475 patients showed recurrence rate of <<0.01% (n=1) and very low incidences of other postoperative complications like painful scar (0.01%, n=5), sinus (0%, n=0), atrophy of testis (0%, n=0), retention of urine (0.01%, n=6), hematoma (<<0.01%, n=1) and infection (0%, n=0); as compared to published data with different techniques. Conclusion: LR with Herniorrhaphy can be used for open inguinal hernia repair as the gold standard procedure as it has got low recurrence rate and other postoperative complications as compared to other techniques. However, the result of this study is based on the data from a single center, thus we recommend multicentric trials to test the efficacy of this technique. PMID:25478390

  19. Mortality after inpatient open ventral hernia repair: developing a risk stratification tool based on 55,760 operations.

    PubMed

    Basta, Marten N; Fischer, John P; Wink, Jason D; Kovach, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    The medical complexity of hernia patients imparts higher risk for complications, and mortality is a distinct reality. No study has stratified patients based on preoperative risk for open ventral hernia repair (VHR) specifically. We utilized the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to create a mortality risk stratification model following VHR. Patients undergoing open VHR were identified from American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program databases. Baseline variables correlated with mortality risk were entered into stepwise regression and bootstrap analysis. β-Coefficients were used to weigh each factor, yielding the risk assessment tool. A total of 55,760 patients were included with a mortality of 1.34%. Predictors of mortality included the following: functional status (odds ratio [OR] = 2.87), liver disease (OR = 3.61), malnutrition (OR = 1.43), age greater than 65 years (OR = 2.39), American Society of Anesthesiologists 4 or higher (OR = 2.90), systemic inflammation (OR = 1.99), and contamination (OR = 2.15). Patients were risk stratified into low risk (mortality .33%), moderate risk (mortality 1.86%), high risk (mortality 8.76%), and extreme risk groups (mortality 34.2%). Unplanned reoperations and medical complications increased across risk groups. The model demonstrated high discriminatory ability with a C-statistic value of .86. This study provides an accurate model to predict mortality risk specific to open VHR. The strongest predictors were American Society of Anesthesiologists, liver disease, functional status, and older age. This tool may inform clinical decision making to reduce complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute kidney injury after open ventral hernia repair: an analysis of the 2005-2012 ACS-NSQIP datasets.

    PubMed

    Chung, C U; Nelson, J A; Fischer, J P; Wink, J D; Serletti, J M; Kovach, S J

    2016-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious postoperative complication, negatively impacting mortality rates, extending length of stay, and raising hospital costs. The purpose of this study was to examine AKI following open ventral hernia repair (OVHR) using a large, heterogeneous database to determine the incidence and identify risk factors for this complication. Using the 2005-2012 ACS-NSQIP database, patients undergoing open ventral hernia repair were identified by CPT codes. Patients with acute kidney injury within 30 days of surgery were compared to controls by multivariate logistic regression across preoperative and intraoperative characteristics. Of 48,629 open ventral hernia repair patients identified in the dataset, AKI developed in 1.4% (681 patients). Multivariate logistic regression determined a number of factors associated with AKI. These include WHO Class III obesity (OR = 2.57, p < 0.001), history of cardiovascular disease (OR = 1.81, p < 0.001), diabetes (OR = 1.29, p = 0.028), hypoalbuminemia (OR = 1.42, p = 0.004), and chronic kidney disease (for a baseline GFR of 60-89 mL/min/1.73 m2, OR = 1.62, p = 0.001; for 30-59 mL/min/1.73 m2, OR = 2.25, p < 0.001; for 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m2, OR = 4.96, p < 0.001). Intraoperative factors include prolonged operative time (for ≥1 SD above the mean, OR = 1.68, p = 0.002; for ≥2SD above the mean, OR = 2.76, p < 0.001) and intraoperative transfusion (OR = 2.44, p < 0.001). Patients with a history of obesity, chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular history, diabetes, and hypoalbuminemia are at increased risk for AKI when undergoing OVHR. Intraoperative variables such as prolonged operative times and blood transfusions may also suggest increased risk. Preoperative identification of patients with these characteristics and perioperative hemodynamic stabilization are important first steps to minimize this complication.

  1. Incidence of abdominal wall hernias in patients undergoing aortic surgery for aneurysm or occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, D; Pitoulias, G; Papaziogas, B; Koutsias, S; Vretzakis, G; Argiriadou, H; Papaziogas, T

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of abdominal and incisional hernias in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) versus patients with aortoiliac occlusive disease (AOD). The study included retrospectively 121 patients, who underwent elective aortic surgery due to AAA (n = 63) or AOD (n = 58) in the period between January 1998 and January 2000. The patients were examined for the presence of abdominal hernias upon admission, as well as for the development of incisional hernias on follow-up. The incidence of inguinal hernias was significantly higher in the group AAA (21/6-33.3%) compared to the group with AOD (6/58-10.3%) (p < 0.01). The incidence of other abdominal wall hernias (umbilical, epigastric or miscellaneous hernias) was also significant higher in AAA group. Furthermore, the incidence of inguinal hernias was significantly higher in the subgroup of patients with an aneurysm diameter more than 6 cm (41.5% vs 18.2%, p < 0.05). The mean follow-up of the patients was 1.7 +/- 0.3 years. 7 cases of incisional hernia were noted in the AAA group (11.1%) and only 2 cases in the AOD group (3.4%) (p < 0.05). The size of the aneurysm had no influence on the incidence of incisional hernias in the AAA group. We conclude that there seems to be an increased incidence of abdominal wall hernias as well as postoperative incisional hernias in patients undergoing aortic surgery for aneurysm disease compared with aortoiliac occlusive disease.

  2. Hernia fibroblasts lack β-estradiol induced alterations of collagen gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Estrogens are reported to increase type I and type III collagen deposition and to regulate Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression. These proteins are reported to be dysregulated in incisional hernia formation resulting in a significantly decreased type I to III ratio. We aimed to evaluate the β-estradiol mediated regulation of type I and type III collagen genes as well as MMP-2 gene expression in fibroblasts derived from patients with or without history of recurrent incisional hernia disease. We compared primary fibroblast cultures from male/female subjects without/without incisional hernia disease. Results Incisional hernia fibroblasts (IHFs) revealed a decreased type I/III collagen mRNA ratio. Whereas fibroblasts from healthy female donors responded to β-estradiol, type I and type III gene transcription is not affected in fibroblasts from males or affected females. Furthermore β-estradiol had no influence on the impaired type I to III collagen ratio in fibroblasts from recurrent hernia patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that β-estradiol does not restore the imbaired balance of type I/III collagen in incisional hernia fibroblasts. Furthermore, the individual was identified as an independent factor for the β-estradiol induced alterations of collagen gene expression. The observation of gender specific β-estradiol-dependent changes of collagen gene expression in vitro is of significance for future studies of cellular response. PMID:17010202

  3. A new fixation-free 3D multilamellar preperitoneal implant for open inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Brescia, Antonio; Tomassini, Federico; Berardi, Giammauro; Pezzatini, Massimo; Cosenza, Umile Michele; Castiglia, Davide; Dall’Oglio, Anna; Salaj, Adelona; Gasparrini, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Summary Between September 2014 and December 2015, 32 patients with inguinal hernia were treated using a new 3D mesh in our department. This mesh is characterized by a multilamellar flower-shaped central core with a flat, large-pore polypropylene ovoid disk that has to be implanted preperitoneally. Compared with the traditional Lichtenstein procedure, we observed a shorter mean duration of surgery and a significantly lower mean visual analogue scale (VAS) postoperative pain score recorded immediately after the procedure in the 3D mesh group. The mean VAS score recoded after 4 and 8 postoperative days showed better results in the 3D mesh group than the control group. Moreover, there was reduced postoperative morbidity in the 3D mesh group than the control group, even if no patients experienced severe complications. PMID:28234593

  4. A rare case of Spigelian hernia combined with direct and indirect inguinal hernias.

    PubMed

    Kılıç, Murat Özgür; Değirmencioğlu, Gürkan; Dener, Cenap

    2017-01-01

    Spigelian hernia is a rare type of ventral hernias with nonspecific symptoms and signs. Therefore, its diagnosis is often difficult and requires more clinical attention. Although intermittent abdominal swelling and pain are the main symptoms, Spigelian hernias can be sometimes asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally at the operation. In some cases, these hernias can be associated with other abdominal wall hernias, therefore a detailed physical examination of the patients is necessary to avoid mistakes in diagnosis. Herein, we report an interesting and educational case of Spigelian hernia with accompanying ipsilateral both direct and indirect inguinal hernias in a male patient treated by open surgical repair with use of polypropylene mesh.

  5. Minimal Incision Scar-Less Open Umbilical Hernia Repair in Adults – Technical Aspects and Short-Term Results

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Sanoop K.; Kolathur, Najeeb Mohamed; Balakrishnan, Mahesh; Parakkadath, Arun Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is no gold standard technique for umbilical hernia (UH) repair. Conventional open UH repair often produces an undesirable scar. Laparoscopic UH repair requires multiple incisions beyond the umbilicus, specialized equipments, and expensive tissue separating mesh. We describe our technique of open UH repair utilizing a small incision. The technique was derived from our experience with single incision laparoscopy. We report the technical details and short-term results. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of the first 20 patients, who underwent minimal incision scar-less open UH repair, from June 2011 to February 2014. A single intra-umbilical curved incision was used to gain access to the hernia sac. Primary suture repair was performed for defects up to 2 cm. Larger defects were repaired using an onlay mesh. In patients with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or greater, onlay mesh hernioplasty was performed irrespective of the defect size. Results: A total of 20 patients, 12 males and 8 females underwent the procedure. Mean age was 50 (range 29–82) years. Mean BMI was 26.27 (range 20.0–33.1) kg/m2. Average size of the incision was 1.96 range (1.5–2.5) cm. Mesh hernioplasty was done in nine patients. Eleven patients underwent primary suture repair alone. There were no postoperative complications associated with this technique. Average postoperative length of hospital stay was 3.9 (range 2–10) days. Mean follow-up was 29.94 months (2 weeks to 2.78 years). On follow-up there was no externally visible scar in any of the patients. There were no recurrences on final follow-up. Conclusion: This technique provides a similar cosmetic effect as obtained from single port laparoscopy. It is easy to perform, safe, offers good cosmesis, does not require incisions beyond the umbilicus, and cost effective, with encouraging results on short-term follow-up. Further research is needed to assess the true potential of the technique and the long-term results. PMID

  6. Prospective study of single-stage repair of contaminated hernias using a biologic porcine tissue matrix: the RICH Study.

    PubMed

    Itani, Kamal M F; Rosen, Michael; Vargo, Daniel; Awad, Samir S; Denoto, George; Butler, Charles E

    2012-09-01

    In the presence of contamination, the repair of a ventral incisional hernia (VIH) is challenging. The presence of comorbidities poses an additional risk for postoperative wound events and hernia recurrence. To date, very few studies describe the outcomes of VIH repair in this high-risk population. A prospective, multicenter, single-arm, the Repair of Infected or Contaminated Hernias study was performed to study the clinical outcomes of open VIH repair of contaminated abdominal defects with a non-cross-linked, porcine, acellular dermal matrix, Strattice. Of 85 patients who consented to participate, 80 underwent open VIH repair with Strattice. Hernia defects were 'clean-contaminated' (n = 39), 'contaminated' (n = 39), or 'dirty' (n = 2), and the defects were classified as grade 3 (n = 60) or grade 4 (n = 20). The midline was restored, and primary closure was achieved in 64 patients; the defect was bridged in 16 patients. At 24 months, 53 patients (66%) experienced 95 wound events. There were 28 unique, infection-related events in 24 patients. Twenty-two patients experienced seromas, all but 5 of which were transient and required no intervention. No unanticipated adverse events occurred, and no tissue matrix required complete excision. There were 22 hernia (28%) recurrences by month 24. There was no correlation between infection-related events and hernia recurrence. The use of the intact, non-cross-linked, porcine, acellular dermal matrix, Strattice, in the repair of contaminated VIH in high-risk patients allowed for successful, single-stage reconstruction in >70% of patients followed for 24 months after repair. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  7. Vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction for open abdomen therapy - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Stefan; Björck, Martin; Petersson, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the literature on vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM) in open abdomen therapy. It was designed as systematic review of observational studies. A Pub Med, EMBASE and Cochrane search from 2007/01-2016/07 was performed combining the Medical Subject Headings "vacuum", "mesh-mediated fascial traction", "temporary abdominal closure", "delayed abdominal closure", "open abdomen", "abdominal compartment syndrome", "negative pressure wound therapy" or "vacuum assisted wound closure". Eleven original studies were found including patients numbering from 7 to 111. Six studies were prospective and five were retrospective. Nine studies were on mixed surgical (n = 9), vascular (n = 6) and trauma (n = 6) patients, while two were exclusively on vascular patients. The primary fascial closure rate per protocol varied from 80-100%. The time to closure of the open abdomen varied between 9-32 days. The entero-atmospheric fistula rate varied from 0-10.0%. The in-hospital survival rate varied from 57-100%. In the largest prospective study, the incisional hernia rate among survivors at 63 months of median follow-up was 54% (27/50), and 16 (33%) repairs out of 48 incisional hernias were performed throughout the study period. The study patients reported lower short form health survey (SF-36) scores than the mean reference population, mainly dependent on the prevalence of major co-morbidities. There was no difference in SF-36 scores or a modified ventral hernia pain questionnaire (VHPQ) at 5 years of follow up between those with versus those without incisional hernias. A high primary fascial closure rate can be achieved with the vacuum-assisted wound closure and meshmediated fascial traction technique in elderly, mainly non-trauma patients, in need of prolonged open abdomen therapy.

  8. Evaluation of port site hernias, chronic pain and recurrence rates after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: a monocentric long-term study.

    PubMed

    Liot, Emilie; Bréguet, Romain; Piguet, Valérie; Ris, Frédéric; Volonté, Francesco; Morel, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate hernia appearance at the trocar site after laparoscopic treatment of primary or incisional ventral hernias using an intraperitoneal prosthetic mesh. Chronic pain at the trocar site and primary hernia recurrence were also evaluated. Two-hundred and twenty-six consecutive patients who underwent a standardized laparoscopic hernia repair for primary or incisional ventral hernia at our centre between January 2000 and December 2008 were included. All patients had clinical and radiological examinations. Primary end points were port site hernia and the occurrence of chronic trocar site pain. Secondary end point was primary hernia recurrence. Seventy-eight patients were excluded: 6 declined to participate, 48 were unreachable, and 24 did not meet the inclusion criteria (nine underwent a single site laparoscopic approach, ten died of unrelated disease, three were unable to visit the hospital and two had relocated). After exclusion, 148 remained in our study. Mean follow-up was 49 ± 12.6 months. Mean age at the time of surgery was 60 years (range, 28-83) In total, 504 port sites were clinically and radiologically evaluated, and only one (0.02%) had secondary herniation. Three patients (2.0%) had a recurrent hernia, and 14 (9.5%) had developed chronic pain at time of assessment. Nine patients (6.1%) were re-operated for the recurrent hernia before the follow-up evaluation. The overall recurrence rate is, therefore, 8.1%. Only two minor complications and no major complications occurred after surgery. No mortality was observed. Laparoscopic repair for primary or incisional ventral hernias is a safe surgical approach, with low rates of hernia recurrence and a low morbidity rate. When fascial closure is maintained for 10 mm port sites, the incidence of port site hernias is very low. Five millimetre ports do not require closure.

  9. Some aspects of the epidemiology of external hernias in Kumasi, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ohene-Yeboah, M; Abantanga, F; Oppong, J; Togbe, B; Nimako, B; Amoah, M; Azorliade, R

    2009-10-01

    In our communities there are large numbers of longstanding external hernias that remain untreated. This paper describes the epidemiological characteristics of these hernias. The data is expected to provide guidelines for sustained national and international efforts to reduce the burden of hernia by performing large-scale elective hernia repairs. Between January 1998 and December 2007, a simple pro-forma was designed and used to record, in a prospective manner, the age, sex of patient and anatomical site of all external hernias seen and operated on both as emergencies and non-emergencies. These were patients who presented to a single general and paediatric surgeon at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana. A total of 2,506 patients were studied, of which 1,930 were male and 576 female, giving a male:female ratio of 3.4:1. Inguinal hernia was seen in 1,766 patients: 1,613 males and 153 females, a male:female ratio of 10.5:1. Children 4 years old or younger accounted for 20.9% of inguinal hernias. Femoral hernia was seen in 79 patients: 70 females and 9 males. These groin hernias were diagnosed in 1,845 patients, accounting for 73.6% of all patients. Incisional hernia was diagnosed in 380 patients (15.2%): 179 males and 201 females-a male:female ratio of 1:1.1. These two hernia types (groin and incisional) were seen in 2,225 patients, representing 88.8% of all the patients studied. All other hernias studied, including para-umbilical, umbilical and epigastric, were seen in 281 patients, representing 11.2% of the hernias studied. The epidemiology of external hernias seen and treated in our hospital is no different from that of hernias in other communities. Sustained efforts at elective repair will reduce the vast numbers of untreated accumulated hernias in our communities and thus prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality.

  10. Intra Peritoneal Polypropylene Mesh and Newer Meshes in Ventral Hernia Repair: What EBM Says?

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, H K; Lakshman, K

    2013-10-01

    Incisional hernias and other ventral hernias are common surgical problems. It is estimated that incisional hernia complicates about 2 % to 10 % of laparotomies. Ventral and incisional hernia repairs are among the common surgeries done by a general surgeon. It is proven beyond any doubt that suture repair of these hernias should not be done as recurrence rates are unacceptably high, some series reporting as high as 54 % on long-term follow-up. A prosthetic mesh should always be used in ventral hernia repair (VHR). Now, the polypropylene mesh (PPM) has become the prosthetic mesh of choice in the repair of hernias, including inguinal hernia. However, with the advent of laparoscopic repair where the mesh is placed intraperitoneally, concerns regarding safety of PPM are raised. Newer meshes are introduced, claiming lesser complication rate. Many types of newer meshes are available now. Newer meshes are invariably costlier than PPM by 15-20 times. Is this extra cost worth? We looked in to available literature for an answer.

  11. Design and implementation of the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative (AHSQC): improving value in hernia care.

    PubMed

    Poulose, B K; Roll, S; Murphy, J W; Matthews, B D; Todd Heniford, B; Voeller, G; Hope, W W; Goldblatt, M I; Adrales, G L; Rosen, M J

    2016-04-01

    Wide variation in care and costs exists regarding the management of abdominal wall hernias, with unproven benefit for many therapies. This work establishes a specialty society-based solution to improve the quality and value of care delivered to hernia patients during routine clinical management on a national scale. The Americas Hernia Society Quality Task Force was charged by the Americas Hernia Society leadership to develop an initiative that utilizes the concepts of continuous quality improvement (CQI). A disease-based registry was created to collect information for CQI incorporating real-time outcome reporting, patient reported outcomes, stakeholder engagement, and collaborative learning methods to form a comprehensive quality improvement effort. The Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative (AHSQC) was formed with the mission to provide health care professionals real-time information for maximizing value in hernia care. The initial disease areas selected for CQI were incisional and parastomal hernias with ten priorities encompassing the spectrum of care. A prospective registry was created with real-time analytic feedback to surgeons. A data assurance process was implemented to ensure maximal data quality and completeness. Four collaborative meetings per year were established to meet the goals of the AHSQC. As of the fourth quarter 2014, the AHSQC includes nearly 2377 patients at 38 institutions with 82 participating surgeons. The AHSQC has been established as a quality improvement initiative utilizing concepts of CQI. This ongoing effort will continually refine its scope and goals based on stakeholder input to improve care delivered to hernia patients.

  12. Interposition of the omentum and/or the peritoneum in the emergency repair of large ventral hernias with polypropylene mesh.

    PubMed

    Sorour, Magdy A

    2014-01-01

    Ventral and incisional hernias are common surgical problems and their repairs are among the common surgeries done by a general surgeon. Repair of a large ventral hernia is still associated with high postoperative morbidity and recurrence rates. No single approach to ventral hernia repair will be the best choice for all patients. Large ventral hernias are often better approached with open surgery but may still be problematic when the defect is too wide for primary fascial closure to be achieved, as this leaves mesh exposed, bridging the gap. Techniques for incisional hernia repair have evolved over many years, and the use of mesh has reduced recurrence rates dramatically. The use of polypropylene mesh is reported to be associated with long-term complications such as severe adhesions and enterocutaneous fistula, which occur more commonly if the mesh is applied intraperitoneally with direct contact of the serosal surface of the intestine. Composite meshes containing expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) have been used recently; their major drawbacks lie in their high cost, inferior handling characteristics, and poor incorporation into the tissues. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the safety and efficacy of prosthetic mesh repair in the emergency management of the incarcerated and/or strangulated inguinal and ventral hernias, however, surgeons remained reluctant to use prosthetics in such settings. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of placing the omentum and/or the peritoneum of the hernia sac as a protective layer over the viscera in the emergency repair of large ventral hernias using on-lay polypropylene mesh whenever complete tension-free closure of the abdominal wall was impossible. This study was carried out on all patients with large ventral hernia presented to the Gastrointestinal Surgery Unit, Main Alexandria University Hospital in an emergency situation during the period from October 2005 till October 2012

  13. Incisional endometriosis: diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Veda, P; Srinivasaiah, M

    2010-07-01

    Incisional endometriosis (IE) is a rare entity reported in 0.03-1.08% of women following obstetric or gynecologic surgeries. Most cases reported in literature have appeared after cesarean sections and were often clinically mistaken for hernia, abscess, suture granuloma or lipoma. We hereby report a case of IE following a second trimester hysterotomy, which was diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). Our patient was 26 years old, presenting with a mass over anterior abdominal wall, associated with incapacitating pain during each menstrual cycle. FNAC showed epithelial cells, stromal cells and hemosiderin laden macrophages. Based on the typical history, clinical and cytological features, the diagnosis of IE was established. Wide surgical excision was done and the resulting rectus sheath defect was repaired. Patient was followed for 6 months during which time she was symptom free. This article also reviews the spectrum of cytological features and the rare possibility of malignant transformation that can occur in IE.

  14. Long-term quality of life and functionality after ventral hernia mesh repair.

    PubMed

    Langbach, Odd; Bukholm, Ida; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Røkke, Ola

    2016-11-01

    The absence of recurrence and pain are important for good quality of life (QoL) after ventral hernia mesh repair. We wanted to study long-term outcome after laparoscopic (LVHR) and open ventral hernia mesh repair (OVHR) using validated scales to measure QoL and functional outcome. We conducted a single-center follow-up study of 194 consecutive patients after LVHR and OVHR between March 2000 and June 2010. Of these, 27 patients (13.9 %) died and 14 (7.2 %) failed to attend their follow-up appointment. Of 153 (78.9 %) patients who attended, 81 (52.9 %) patients had LVHR and 72 (47.1 %) patients had OVHR, including 11 conversions (surgery group). One hundred and twelve patients with non-recurrent ventral hernia were also enrolled consecutively as controls (non-surgery group). Quality of life was measured by the SF-36 short form questionnaire and functional outcome by the Activities Assessment Scale (AAS) with the revised Life Orientation Test to measure the influence of dispositional optimism on pain and functionality. Assessment of pain was done using a 100-mm visual analogue scale ruler anchored by word descriptors. Median time from hernia mesh repair to follow-up was 48 and 52 months after LVHR and OVHR, respectively. There were no long-term differences between LVHR and OVHR measured by SF-36 and AAS. Physical dimensions in SF-36: physical function, restrictions in physical function and bodily pain, were significantly better in the surgery group compared to the non-surgery group, but only for incisional hernia. Recurrence was associated with a significant reduction in QoL in all dimensions of SF-36 in both hernia repair cohorts. Chronic pain and impairment were closely related. Optimistic patients had less impairment than pessimistic patients. LVHR and OVHR reduce chronic pain and physical impairment and improve long-term QoL. Hernia recurrence and persistent pain reduce the beneficial effect of hernia surgery. Dispositional optimism can modulate Qo

  15. Increased use of surgical energy promotes methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in rabbits following open ventral hernia mesh repair.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Peress, Lilia; Cantu, Concepcion; Olsen, Randall J; Jenkins, Leslie; Cabrera, Fernando J; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Dunkin, Brian J

    2017-02-01

    Surgical energy has been widely implemented because of ease of use, effective hemostasis, and surgical dissection. Studies demonstrate its use to be an independent risk factor for postoperative wound infection. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most common bacteria found in postoperative mesh infection. No reports are available on the sequelae of surgical energy use for open ventral hernia repair (oVHR) with mesh. We hypothesized that increasing amounts of surgical energy will result in higher infectious burden after oVHR with composite multifilament polyester mesh (Parietex™ PCO). New Zealand rabbits underwent bridging oVHR with Parietex™ PCO and were divided into three surgical treatment groups: (1) scalpel alone, (2) 120 J of energy, and (3) 600 J of energy. The bioprosthesis was then inoculated with 10(5) colony-forming units of MRSA. Rabbits were survived for 7 days with daily physical examination. Complete blood count, basci metabolic panel, and blood cultures were performed on postoperative days one, four, and seven. Surviving rabbits were killed, and meshes explanted for MRSA colony counts. Rabbits receiving the most surgical energy developed signs and symptoms of severe sepsis and wound necrosis within 24 h. In comparison, rabbits receiving no surgical energy had significantly less MRSA recovered from explanted mesh, significantly less bacteremia, and fewer adhesions. Increased use of surgical energy promoted greater colonization, exaggerated septic response to bacterial contamination, and more severe adhesions. In the absence of devitalized tissue, rabbits can effectively limit bacterial contamination. These findings support the surgical principles of proper tissue handling and highlight the detrimental effects of indiscriminant surgical energy usage, thus emphasizing the importance of programs such as Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy.

  16. Abdominal cavity myolipoma presenting as an enlarging incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Moore, Mark O; Richardson, Michael L; Rubin, Brian P; Baird, Geoffrey S

    2006-01-01

    We present a case of an abdominal cavity myolipoma which herniated through a low transverse abdominal (Pfannenstiel) incision, and presented as an enlarging abdominal wall mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to surgery demonstrated an encapsulated solid tumor mass demonstrating fat signal and and increased T2-weighted signal. Postsurgical histological tissue diagnosis was myolipoma. Recognition of the intra- and extraperitoneal location of this abdominal tumor was essential for accurate surgical planning.

  17. Herniamed: an internet-based registry for outcome research in hernia surgery.

    PubMed

    Stechemesser, B; Jacob, D A; Schug-Paß, C; Köckerling, F

    2012-06-01

    Despite the high frequency of hernia surgery procedures and continuous improvements, thanks to new hernia meshes and fixation techniques, in Germany, for example, the recurrence rate and rate of chronic inguinal pain after inguinal surgery are more than 10% far too high. Introduction of a hernia register in Denmark led to a significant reduction in the recurrence rate. The aim of a hernia registry as an application-oriented outcome research tool is to monitor and evaluate (concomitant research) how the knowledge gleaned from evidence-based science is implemented in the everyday clinical setting and, ultimately, investigate its effectiveness (outcome research). The new Internet-based English- and German-language registry for the entire spectrum of inpatient and outpatient hernia surgery is designed to improve the quality of patient care and provide valid data on outcome research. Via the Internet, all relevant patient data (comorbidities, previous operations, staging, specific surgical technique, medical devices used, perioperative complications and follow-up data) can be entered into the registry database. The participating hospitals and surgeons can at any time view their own data by means of an evaluation statistics tool. The outcome research project Herniamed focuses on inguinal hernias, umbilical hernias, incisional hernias, epigastric hernias, parastomal hernias and hiatus hernias. The online-based outcome research registry meets the most stringent data protection criteria. With the Internet-based English- and German-language hernia register, a new instrument is now available for outcome research in hernia surgery.

  18. Mild Ptosis Correction with the Stitch Method During Incisional Double Fold Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Edward Ilho

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous methods exist for simultaneous correction of mild blepharoptosis during double eyelid surgery. These methods are generally categorized into either incisional (open) or non-incisional (suture) methods. The incisional method is commonly used for the creation of the double eyelid crease in patients with excessive or thick skin. However, concurrent open ptosis correction is often marred by the lengthy period of intraoperative adjustment, causing more swelling, a longer recovery time, and an increased risk of postoperative complications. Methods The authors have devised a new, minimally invasive technique to alleviate mild ptosis during incisional double eyelid surgery. The anterior lamella is approached through the incisional technique for the creation of a double eyelid while the posterior lamella, including Muller's and levator muscles, is approached with the suture method for Muller's plication and ptosis correction. Results The procedure described was utilized in 28 patients from June 2012 to August 2012. Postoperative asymmetry was noted in one patient who had severe preoperative conjunctival scarring. Otherwise, ptosis was corrected as planned in the rest of the cases and all of the patients were satisfied with their postoperative appearance and experienced no complications. Conclusions Our hybrid technique combines the benefits of both the incisional and suture methods, allowing for a predictable and easily reproducible correction of blepharoptosis with an aesthetically pleasing double eyelid. PMID:24511498

  19. Direct and recurrent inguinal hernias are associated with ventral hernia repair: a database study.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Nadia A; Sorensen, Lars T; Bay-Nielsen, Morten; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-02-01

    A systemically altered connective tissue metabolism has been demonstrated in patients with abdominal wall hernias. The most pronounced connective tissue changes are found in patients with direct or recurrent inguinal hernias as opposed to patients with indirect inguinal hernias. The aim of the present study was to assess whether direct or recurrent inguinal hernias are associated with an elevated rate of ventral hernia surgery. In the nationwide Danish Hernia Database, a cohort of 92,457 patients operated on for inguinal hernias was recorded from January 1998 until June 2010. Eight-hundred forty-three (0.91 %) of these patients underwent a ventral hernia operation between January 2007 and June 2010. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess an association between inguinal and ventral hernia repair. Direct (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.28 [95 % CI, 1.08-1.51]) and recurrent (OR = 1.76, [95 % CI, 1.39-2.23]) inguinal hernias were significantly associated with ventral hernia repair after adjustment for age, gender, and surgical approach (open or laparoscopic). Patients with direct and recurrent inguinal herniation are more prone to ventral hernia repair than patients with indirect inguinal herniation. This is the first study to show that herniogenesis is associated with type of inguinal hernia.

  20. Comparison of Conflicts of Interest among Published Hernia Researchers Self-Reported with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Open Payments Database.

    PubMed

    Olavarria, Oscar A; Holihan, Julie L; Cherla, Deepa; Perez, Cristina A; Kao, Lillian S; Ko, Tien C; Liang, Mike K

    2017-05-01

    Many healthcare providers have financial interests and relationships with healthcare companies. To maintain transparency, investigators are expected to disclose their conflicts of interest (COIs). Recently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services developed the Open Payment database of COIs reported by industry. We hypothesize that there is discordance between industry-reported and physician self-reported COIs in ventral hernia publications. PubMed was searched for ventral hernia studies accepted for publication between June 2013 and October 2015 and published by authors from the US. Conflicts of interest were defined as payments received as honoraria, consulting fees, compensation for serving as faculty or as a speaker at a venue, research funding payments, or having ownerships/partnerships in companies. Conflicts of interest disclosed on the published articles were compared with the financial relationships in the Open Payments database. A total of 100 studies were selected with 497 participating authors. Information was available from the Open Payments database for 245 (49.2%) authors, of which 134 (26.9%) met the definition for COI. When comparing COIs disclosed by authors and data in the Open Payments database, 81 (16.3%) authors had at least 1 COI but did not declare any, 35 (7.0%) authors had COIs other than what they declared, and 20 (4.0%) declared a COI not listed in the Open Payments database, for a combined discordance rate of 27.3%. There is substantial discordance between self-reported COI in published articles compared with those in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Open Payments database. Additional studies are needed to determine the reasons for these differences, as COI can influence the validity of the design, conduct, and results of a study. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bladder hernia.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Massimiliano; De Luca, Francesco

    2006-06-01

    Bladder hernia is a rare condition, but crural herniation of the bladder into the scrotum is very rare. A case of bladder hernia presenting with urological symptoms is described. A 71-year-old man presented to the urological ward complaining for persistent frequency and nocturia associated with loss offorce and decrease of caliber of the urinary stream and the presence of a large mass of the right scrotum. An IVP (intra venous pyelography) showed a large herniation of the bladder through the right inguinal canal into the scrotum. An inguinal incision was made and a crural hernia was identified. The hernia sac, containing bowel and bladder, was dissectedfreefrom the spermatic cord and the testis and the hernia defect was repaired.

  2. Impact of hernias on peritoneal dialysis technique survival and residual renal function.

    PubMed

    Balda, Sagrario; Power, Albert; Papalois, Vassilios; Brown, Edwina

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of hernias and their surgical or conservative management on peritoneal dialysis (PD) technique survival and residual renal function. This 10-year single-center retrospective case-control study (January 2001 - January 2011) compared patient survival, PD technique survival, and residual renal function in patients with a history of abdominal hernias and in a control cohort matched for age and PD vintage. Of 73 hernias identified in 63 patients (mean age: 55 years; 63% men), umbilical hernias were the most frequent (40%), followed by inguinal (33%), incisional, and epigastric hernias. Some hernias were surgically repaired before (n = 10) or at the time of PD catheter insertion (n = 11), but most (71%) were diagnosed and managed after initiation of PD. Overall, 49 of 73 (67%) hernias were treated surgically. In 53% of subjects, early postoperative dialysis was not needed; only 7 patients required temporary hemodialysis. The occurrence of a hernia and its treatment did not significantly affect residual renal function. After a hernia diagnosis or repair, 86% of patients were able to continue with PD. ♢ The incidence of abdominal hernia and hernia management in patients on PD do not significantly influence residual renal function or PD technique survival. Timely management of hernias is advisable and does not preclude continuation with PD as a dialysis modality.

  3. Epigastric Hernia.

    PubMed

    Suarez Acosta, Carlos Enrique; Romero Fernandez, Esperanza; Calvo Manuel, Elpidio

    2015-08-01

    Epigastric hernia is a common condition, mostly asymptomatic although sometimes their unusual clinical presentation still represents a diagnostic dilemma for clinician. The theory of extra tension in the epigastric region by the diaphragm is the most likely theory of epigastric hernia formation. A detailed history and clinical examination in our thin, elderly male patient who presented with abdominal pain and constipation of 5 days of evolution was crucial in establishing a diagnosis. Noninvasive radiologic modalities such as ultrasonographic studies in the case of our patient can reliably confirm the diagnosis of epigastric hernia.

  4. [Diaphragmatic hernia].

    PubMed

    Osmak, Liliana; Cougard, Patrick

    2003-10-15

    A diaphragmatic hernia is the protrusion of abdominal contents into the thoracic cavity, via a hole in the diaphragm, which either presence or size is abnormal. Congenital hernias are rare and often diagnosed at birth. Adults are diagnosed accidentally. Symptoms can be digestive or respiratory, and the risk of volvulus calls for surgery. Diaphragmatic ruptures are seen more often, and are a consequence of violent thoraco-abdominal trauma, or penetrating wound. They should be treated surgically in emergency, but the operation can be delayed if they are not diagnosed at once. Videosurgery has been used more and more often recently to treat diaphragmatic hernias.

  5. Surgery for Type III-IV hiatal hernia: anatomical recurrence and global results after elective treatment of short oesophagus with open and minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Lugaresi, Marialuisa; Mattioli, Benedetta; Daddi, Niccolò; Di Simone, Massimo Pierluigi; Perrone, Ottorino; Mattioli, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    Type III-IV hiatal hernia (HH) is associated with a true short oesophagus in more than 50% of cases; dedicated treatment of this condition might be appropriate to reduce the recurrence rate after surgery. A case series of patients receiving surgery for Type III-IV hernia was examined for short oesophagus, and the results were analysed. From 1980 to 1994, 60 patients underwent an open surgical approach, and the position of the oesophago-gastric junction was visually localized; from 1995 to 2013, 48 patients underwent a minimally invasive approach, and the oesophago-gastric junction was objectively localized using a laparoscopic-endoscopic method. The patients underwent a timed clinical-instrumental follow-up that included symptoms assessment, barium swallow and endoscopy. The results were considered to be excellent in the absence of symptoms and oesophagitis; good, if symptoms occurred two to four times a month in the absence of oesophagitis; fair, if symptoms occurred two to four times a week in the presence of hyperaemia, oedema and/or microscopic oesophagitis; and poor, if symptoms occurred on a daily basis in the presence of any grade of endoscopic oesophagitis, HH of any size or type, or the need for antireflux medical therapy. The follow-up time was calculated from the time of surgery to the last complete follow-up. Among the open surgery patients, 78% underwent abdominal fundoplication, 10% the Belsey Mark IV procedure, 8% laparotomic Collis-Nissen fundoplication and 3% the Pearson operation. Among the minimally invasive surgery patients, 44% underwent a laparoscopic floppy Nissen procedure and 56% a left thoracoscopic Collis-laparoscopic Nissen procedure. The postoperative mortality and complication rates were 1.6% (1/60) and 15% for open surgery and 4.1% (2/48) and 12.5% for minimally invasive surgery. A total of 105 patients were followed up for a median period of 96 months. Five relapses occurred after open surgery (5/59, 8%) and two after minimally

  6. Primary prevascular and retropsoas hernias: incidence of rare abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Powell, B S; Lytle, N; Stoikes, N; Webb, D; Voeller, G

    2015-06-01

    To describe the incidence and treatment of prevascular and retropsoas hernias in a large-volume general surgery practice. Femoral hernias are considered uncommon with an incidence between 2 and 8 % of groin hernias. There are no large studies describing the subtypes of femoral hernias or retropsoas hernias, and therefore no reported incidence or standardized treatment recommendations for these hernias exist. This study is a retrospective review of all patients undergoing total extraperitoneal (TEP) laparoscopic herniorrhaphy between August 1993 and December 2011. A single surgeon performed all the repairs. Demographics and patient outcomes were reported. 2,436 patients underwent 3,242 TEP repairs. The subtypes were: indirect 1,523 (46.9 %), direct 1,473 (45.4 %), femoral 156 (4.8 %), obturator 35 (1.1 %), prevascular 25 (0.77 %), Spigelian 20 (0.61 %), retropsoas 3 (0.09 %). Prevascular hernias accounted for 16 % of femoral hernias. Patients with prevascular hernias had a mean age of 70.3 years and were all male. 13 of the 25 patients (52 %) with prevascular hernias had other associated defects and four (16 %) of the patients had prevascular hernias as a recurrence from a prior hernia operation. There were three patients with retropsoas hernias that only would not have been seen from an anterior open approach. There are no intraoperative complications or known recurrences from this study group. Prevascular and retropsoas hernias are uncommon, but have a higher incidence than previously believed. Prevascular hernias tend to be associated with older age and other defects. The diagnosis and management of these hernias are readily achieved using the laparoscopic TEP approach.

  7. Femoral hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or strain. Sometimes, the first symptoms are: Sudden groin pain Abdominal pain Nausea Vomiting This may mean that ... present with the hernia. If you feel sudden pain in your groin, a piece of intestine may be stuck in ...

  8. Hiatal hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... discomfort are due to the upward flow of stomach acid, air, or bile. ... prevent complications. Treatments may include: Medicines to control stomach acid Surgery to repair the hiatal hernia and prevent ...

  9. Umbilical Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... complicated umbilical hernia with liver cirrhosis and ascites. International Journal of Surgery. 2014;12:181. Cameron JL, et al. In: Current Surgical Therapy. 11th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; ...

  10. Obturator hernia: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sanjeev R.; Punamiya, Aditya R.; Naniwadekar, Ramchandra G.; Janugade, Hemant B.; Chotai, Tejas D.; Vimal Singh, T.; Natchair, Arafath

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Obturator hernia is an extremely rare type of hernia with relatively high mortality and morbidity. Its early diagnosis is challenging since the signs and symptoms are non specific. PRESENTATION OF CASE Here in we present a case of 70 years old women who presented with complaints of intermittent colicky abdominal pain and vomiting. Plain radiograph of abdomen showed acute dilatation of stomach. Ultrasonography showed small bowel obstruction at the mid ileal level with evidence of coiled loops of ileum in pelvis. On exploration, Right Obstructed Obturator hernia was found. The obstructed Intestine was reduced and resected and the obturator foramen was closed with simple sutures. Postoperative period was uneventful. DISCUSSION Obturator hernia is a rare pelvic hernia and poses a diagnostic challenge. Obturator hernia occurs when there is protrusion of intra-abdominal contents through the obturator foramen in the pelvis. The signs and symptoms are non specific and generally the diagnosis is made during exploration for the intestinal obstruction, one of the four cardinal features. Others are pain on the medial aspect of thigh called as Howship Rombergs sign, repeated attacks of Intestinal Obstruction and palpable mass on the medial aspect of thigh. CONCLUSION Obturator hernia is a rare but significant cause of intestinal obstruction especially in emaciated elderly woman and a diagnostic challenge for the Doctors. CT scan is valuable to establish preoperative diagnosis. Surgery either open or laproscopic, is the only treatment. The need for the awareness is stressed and CT scan can be helpful. PMID:23708307

  11. Histological effects of occlusive dressing on healing of incisional skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoto; Kiyosawa, Tomoharu

    2014-12-01

    Occlusive dressing is widely accepted and used to manage skin ulcers. However, with respect to its application to incisional wounds, most studies have been conducted about the clinical effects on incisional healing of surgical sites. Studies of the histological effects of occlusive dressing for incisional wounds have been few. The aim of this study was to clarify the histological effects of occlusive dressings on healing of incisional skin wounds. Rat dorsal skin was incised down to the panniculus and sutured immediately. Dressing types included 2-octyl cyanoacrylate and hydrocolloid materials as occlusive dressings and no-dressing as the open therapy. Histological examination and dermoscopic observation were performed 1, 2, 4 and 7 days after surgery. The findings from each dressing type were compared. In the open therapy group, the upper portion of the edge of incision was necrosed minimally and finally healed with wide scar formation. However, in the occlusive dressing groups, micronecrosis of the incision edge seen in the no-dressing group was not observed, healing was more rapid and the remaining scar was finer. Occlusive dressing can prevent micronecrosis of the incision edge, resulting in rapid and excellent healing. This study shows that the efficacy of and supports the use of occlusive dressing in incisional wound management.

  12. Laparoscopic repair of recurrent hernias.

    PubMed

    Felix, E L; Michas, C A; McKnight, R L

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of a laparoscopic approach to recurrent inguinal hernia repair which dissected the entire inguinal floor and repaired all potential areas of recurrence without producing tension. Both a transabdominal preperitoneal and a totally extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach were utilized. Ninety recurrent hernias were repaired in 81 patients. The patients had 26 indirect, 36 direct, and 26 pantaloon recurrent hernias of which eight had a femoral component. In all but one patient the primary operations were open anterior repairs. The median follow-up was 14 months, ranging from 1 to 28 months. Patients returned to normal activities in an average of 1 week. The only recurrence observed was in the one patient whose primary repair was laparoscopic. When the entire inguinal floor of the recurrent hernia was redissected and buttressed with mesh, early recurrence was eliminated and recovery was shortened.

  13. Anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Fei; Liu, Jia-Lin

    2016-10-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is performed more and more nowadays. The anatomy of these procedures is totally different from traditional open procedures because they are performed from different direction and in different space. The important anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair will be discussed in this article.

  14. Anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is performed more and more nowadays. The anatomy of these procedures is totally different from traditional open procedures because they are performed from different direction and in different space. The important anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair will be discussed in this article. PMID:27826575

  15. Transabdominal preperitoneal laparoscopic approach for incarcerated inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuo; Zhang, Guangyong; Jin, Cuihong; Cao, Jinxin; Zhu, Yilin; Shen, Yingmo; Wang, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the efficacy, key technical points, and complication management of the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach for incarcerated inguinal hernia repair. Seventy-three patients with incarcerated inguinal hernias underwent TAPP surgery in our department between Jan 2010 and Dec 2015. A retrospective review was performed by analyzing the perioperative data from these patients. The operation was successfully completed in all 73 patients. Operation time was 54.0 ± 18.8 minutes (range, 35–100 minutes). Length of stay was 3.9 ± 1.1 days (range, 3–9 days). There was 1 case of incisional infection, 32 cases of seroma, and 3 cases of postoperative pain during follow-up. All patients recovered after the appropriate treatment. No recurrence or fistula was observed. The TAPP approach represents a safe and effective technique for incarcerated inguinal hernia repair because of its potential in assessment of hernia content and decreasing incisional infection rate. However, it requires experienced surgeons to ensure safety with special attention paid to the key technical points as well as complication management. PMID:28033260

  16. Hernias (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually required within a few days to prevent development of another incarcerated hernia. The most serious type of hernia is a strangulated hernia, in which the normal blood supply is cut off from the trapped tissue. ...

  17. Female 'groin' hernia: totally extraperitoneal (TEP) endoscopic repair seems the most appropriate treatment modality.

    PubMed

    Schouten, N; Burgmans, J P J; van Dalen, T; Smakman, N; Clevers, G J; Davids, P H P; Verleisdonk, E J M M; Elias, S G; Simmermacher, R K J

    2012-08-01

    About 30% of all female 'groin' hernias are femoral hernias, although often only diagnosed during surgery. A Lichtenstein repair though, as preferred treatment modality according to guidelines, would not diagnose and treat femoral hernias. Totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair, however, offers the advantage of being an appropriate modality for the diagnosis and subsequent treatment of both inguinal and femoral hernias. TEP therefore seems an appealing surgical technique for women with groin hernias. This study included all female patients ≥ 18 years operated for a groin hernia between 2005 and 2009. A total of 183 groin hernias were repaired in 164 women. TEP was performed in 85% of women; the other 24 women underwent an open anterior (mesh) repair. Peroperatively, femoral hernias were observed in 23% of patients with primary hernias and 35% of patients with recurrent hernias. There were 30 cases (18.3%) of an incorrect preoperative diagnosis. Peroperatively, femoral hernias were observed in 17.3% of women who were diagnosed with an inguinal hernia before surgery. In addition, inguinal hernias were found in 24.0% of women who were diagnosed with a femoral hernia preoperatively. After a follow-up of 25 months, moderate to severe (VAS 4-10) postoperative pain was reported by 8 of 125 patients (6.4%) after TEP and 5 of 23 patients (21.7%) after open hernia repair (P = 0.03). Five patients had a recurrent hernia, two following TEP (1.4%) and three following open anterior repair (12.5%, P = 0.02). Two of these three patients presented with a femoral recurrence after a previous repair of an inguinal hernia. Femoral hernias are common in women with groin hernias, but not always detected preoperatively; this argues for the use of a preperitoneal approach. TEP hernia repair combines the advantage of a peroperative diagnosis and subsequent appropriate treatment with the known good clinical outcomes.

  18. [Prospects of hernia and abdominal wall surgery in China].

    PubMed

    Tang, J X; Huang, L; Li, S J; Hu, X C

    2017-01-01

    In recent 20 years, hernia and abdominal wall surgery has made great progress in China. However, what we've done still leaves much to be desired. Related guidelines of hernia disease had been conducted, but China is short of multi-center, prospective, and large-sample research evidence. These guidelines are still with low evidence level, and contents need additional modified to well meet Chinese real situation. In terms of treatment of inguinal and abdominal wall incisional hernia, some consensus has been reached from certain key issues globally, but further exploration are still needed. To stand at top of the world, we are a long distance. We should not only strengthen training and quality control but also establish patient registration system and overall management process.

  19. [Hernia surgery in urology: part 1: inguinal, femoral and umbilical hernias - fundamentals of clinical diagnostics and treatment].

    PubMed

    Franz, T; Schwalenberg, T; Dietrich, A; Müller, J; Stolzenburg, J-U

    2013-05-01

    Hernias are a common occurrence with correspondingly huge clinical and economic impacts on the healthcare system. The most common forms of hernia which need to be diagnosed and treated in routine urological work are inguinal and umbilical hernias. With the objective of reconstructing and stabilizing the inguinal canal there are the possibilities of open and minimally invasive surgery and both methods can be performed with suture or mesh repair. Indications for surgery of umbilical hernias are infrequent although this is possible with little effort under local anesthesia. This article presents an overview of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical symptoms, diagnostics and therapy of inguinal, femoral and umbilical hernias.

  20. Treatment of abdominal wall hernia with suture, or polypropylene, or collagen prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Diego Paim Carvalho; Santos, Clarissa; Hubner, Pablo Nelson do Valle; Furtado, Thiago de Almeida; Petroianu, Andy; Figueiredo, Luiza Ohasi de; Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo

    2016-06-01

    To develop an experimental model for incisional hernias and to compare morphological and functional aspects of hernia repairs by suture, polypropylene mesh and collagen mesh. A defect measuring 7cm x 2cm was created in the anterior abdominal of 28 New Zealand male rabbits, divided into four groups (n = 7): (1) control, (2) suture of the anterior sheath of the rectus abdominal muscle, (3) setting of polypropylene mesh, and (4) setting of collagen mesh. On the 90th postoperative day, the animals were examined to verify the presence of incisional hernia. Samples of abdominal wall and scar were collected for histological study. Incisional hernia was identified in 85.7% of the control group, 57.1% of the suture group, 42.9% of the collagen mesh group, and none in the polypropylene mesh group (p = 0.015). Mesh exposure could be identified in 71.4% of the animals in group 3 and in no animal in group 4 (p = 0.021). The polypropylene mesh is effective in the treatment of abdominal wall defects, causing an intense inflammatory reaction. The collagen mesh is biocompatible, producing a minimal inflammatory reaction, but fails in the treatment of abdominal wall defects.

  1. Fibrin Sealant: A Review of the History, Biomechanics, and Current Applications for Prosthetic Fixation in Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jefferson Tyler; Webb, David L; Stoikes, Nathaniel F N; Voeller, Guy R

    2015-11-01

    The role of surgical adhesives in hernia repair has continued to evolve. The purpose of this chapter is to review the role of fibrin sealant and its application in general surgery for mesh fixation, specifically the history, biomechanics, and clinical utilization. The utilization of fibrin sealant for repair of groin hernias, both open and laparoscopic, ventral hernias, and hiatal hernias will be discussed.

  2. Direct inguinal hernias and anterior surgical approach are risk factors for female inguinal hernia recurrences.

    PubMed

    Burcharth, Jakob; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Bisgaard, Thue; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the risk of recurrence after direct and indirect inguinal hernia operation in a large-scale female population and to establish the relationship between the type of hernia at the primary and recurrent procedure. Using data from the Danish Hernia Database (DHDB), a cohort was generated: all females operated on electively for a primary inguinal hernia by either Lichtenstein’s technique or laparoscopy from 1998 to 2012. Within this prospectively collected cohort, the hernia type at the primary procedure (direct inguinal hernia (DIH), indirect inguinal hernia (IIH), combination hernia), the hernia type at the recurrent procedure (DIH, IIH, combination hernia, femoral hernia), anesthesia type, and time from primary procedure to reoperation were registered. A total of 5,893 females with primary elective inguinal hernia operation on in the study period (61 % IIH, 37 % DIH, 2 % combined hernias) were included with a median follow-up time of 72 months (range 0 to 169). A total of 305 operations for suspected recurrences were registered (61 % inguinal recurrences, 38 % femoral recurrences, 1 % no hernias), which corresponded to an overall reoperation rate of 5.2 %. All femoral recurrences occurred after a previous open anterior operation. The crude reoperation rate after primary DIH operation was 11.0 %, 3.0 % after primary IIH operation and 0.007 % after combined hernia operation (p < 0.001). The multivariate adjusted analysis found that DIH at primary operation was a substantial risk factor for recurrence with a hazard ratio of 3.1 (CI 95 % 2.4–3.9) compared with IIH at primary operation (p < 0.001), and that laparoscopic operation gave a lower risk of recurrence with a hazard ratio of 0.57 (CI 95 % 0.43–0.75) compared with Lichtenstein’s technique (p < 0.001). The risk of femoral recurrence was correlated to operation for DIH with a hazard ratio of 2.4 (CI 95 % 1.7–3.5) compared with operation for IIH. In a

  3. Sutureless onlay hernia repair: a review of 97 patients.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Charles P; Stoikes, Nathaniel F; Webb, David L; Voeller, Guy R

    2016-08-01

    Repair of large ventral/incisional (V/I) hernias is a common problem. Outside of recurrence, other factors such as wound complications and mesh infection can create significant morbidity. Chevrel described the premuscular repair and later modified it by using glue over the midline closure. We previously described our onlay technique using fibrin glue alone in a small case series. The aim of this study is to review the largest case series of sutureless onlay V/I hernia repair whereby mesh is fixated with fibrin glue alone for complex ventral hernias, and how the technique has evolved. All patients who underwent onlay V/I hernia repair over a 3-year period were reviewed. Patient demographics, operative details, complications, and follow-up were reviewed. In total, 97 patients were included. 54.6 % were female, with a mean age of 57.3 years. Mean BMI was 32.2. 23(23.7 %) patients had diabetes. 90 (92.8 %) of the operations were for incisional hernias, 3 (3.1 %) primary ventral hernias, 2 (2.1 %) flank hernias, and 2 (2 %) complex abdominal wall reconstruction. 88 (90.7 %) of the cases were performed on an elective basis. 77 (77.3 %) cases were classified as clean, 21 (21.6 %) clean-contaminated, and 1 (1.0 %) contaminated. The mean defect size was 150 cm(2). Mean follow-up was 386 days, and maximum was 3.1 years. There were 21 (21.6 %) seromas, 4 (4.1 %) wound infections, 7 (7.4 %) had skin necrosis, and 9 (9.3 %) required re-operation due to a complication. At 3 years, there have been no recurrences or mesh explants. The sutureless onlay V/I hernia repair with fibrin glue fixation has proven to be durable with a comparable complication profile to other techniques. The most common sequela, seroma, is easily managed in the outpatient setting. This sutureless technique is an effective option for onlay hernia repair that may provide several advantages over traditional suture techniques.

  4. Perineal hernia repair in dogs.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J J

    1984-05-01

    Old male Collies, Pekingese , Boxers and Boston Terriers are predisposed to perineal hernia. Recurrence is often related to poor surgical technic in the initial repair. With the anesthetized dog in sternal recumbency and the tail tied forward, a curvilinear skin incision is made over the hernia, from the tail base to the midline, ventral to the anus. The hernial sac is opened and its contents reduced. Five stainless-steel sutures are preplaced in the muscles and ligaments of the perineal diaphragm and tied from top to bottom. In cases of failure of the ventral aspect of the repair, the internal obturator muscle can be elevated from the ischial table and used to cover the ventral aspect of the hernia. Postoperative complications are related to infection, self-trauma and straining.

  5. Trends in open abdominal surgery in the United States-Observations from 9,950,759 discharges using the 2009-2013 National Inpatient Sample (NIS) datasets.

    PubMed

    Carney, Martin J; Weissler, Jason M; Fox, Justin P; Tecce, Michael G; Hsu, Jesse Y; Fischer, John P

    2017-08-01

    Incisional hernia (IH) represents a complex and costly surgical complication. We aim to address trends in open surgery to better understand potential drivers of hernia risk. Using the 2009-2013 NIS, a cross-sectional review of hospital discharges associated with an open abdominal surgery was performed. Between 2009 and 2013, there were nearly 10 million discharges associated with an open abdominal surgery. Overall, there were 2,140,616 patients receiving open surgery in 2009, decreasing to 1,760,549 in 2013 (18% decrease, p < 0.001). Open hernia procedures increased from 37,325 patients in 2009 to 41,845 in 2013 (12% increase, p = 0.001). The most prevalent comorbidities within this population included uncomplicated hypertension (25.26%), chronic pulmonary diseases (13.52%), obesity (10.24%), uncomplicated diabetes (11.06%), and depression (10.72%). Our analysis allowed for a unique view of surgical trends, health care population dynamics, and an opportunity to use evidence-driven analytics in the understanding of IH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Esophageal hiatal hernia in three exotic felines--Lynx lynx, Puma concolore, Panthera leo.

    PubMed

    Hettlich, Bianca F; Hobson, H Phil; Ducoté, Julie; Fossum, Theresa W; Johnson, James H

    2010-03-01

    Hiatal hernia was diagnosed in three exotic felines-lynx (Lynx lynx), cougar (Puma concolore), and lion (Panthera leo). All cats had a history of anorexia. Thoracic and abdominal radiographs showed evidence of a soft tissue mass within the caudal mediastinum suggestive of a hiatal hernia in all animals. A barium esophagram was performed in one case. All animals underwent thoracic or abdominal surgery for hernia reduction. Surgical procedures included: intercostal thoracotomy with herniorrhaphy and esophagopexy (lynx and cougar), and incisional gastropexy (lion). Concurrent surgical procedures performed were gastrotomy for gastric foreign body removal and jejunostomy tube placement. Clinical signs related to the hiatal hernia disappeared after surgery and recurrence of signs was not reported for the time of follow-up.

  7. Spontaneous Transomental Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hun

    2016-01-01

    A transomental hernia through the greater or lesser omentum is rare, accounting for approximately 4% of internal hernias. Transomental hernias are generally reported in patients aged over fifty. In such instances, acquired transomental hernias are usual, are commonly iatrogenic, and result from surgical interventions or from trauma or peritoneal inflammation. In rare cases, such as the one described in this study, internal hernias through the greater or lesser omentum occur spontaneously as the result of senile atrophy without history of surgery, trauma, or inflammation. A transomental hernia has a high postoperative mortality rate of 30%, and emergency diagnosis and treatment are critical. We report a case of a spontaneous transomental hernia of the small intestine causing intestinal obstruction. An internal hernia with strangulation of the small bowel in the lesser sac was suspected from the image study. After an emergency laparotomy, a transomental hernia was diagnosed. PMID:26962535

  8. [Inguinal hernia repair by the tension free technique of Lichtenstein].

    PubMed

    Prywiński, S; Zomrowski, L; Kapała, A; Mackiewicz, Z

    1997-01-01

    Failure rate in standard groin hernia repair varies from 3 to 10%. Polypropylene mesh implantation based on Lichtenstein "tension free" method in 1986 year reduced the failure rate to less than 1%. From Feb. '95 to Dec.'96, 115 patients were operated on with 127 groin hernias repair. The average age of patients was 58 years 52 direct hernias, 74 indirect hernias and 1 pantaloon hernia have been diagnosed in examined material, 101 primary repairs and 26 repairs of recurrent hernia have been performed. The operations were performed in subarachnoid anaesthesia--66 patients, in general anaesthesia--11 patients in local anaesthesia--38 patients. After having opened the inguinal canal estimated the type of its wall defect. In case of direct hernia the sac usually was invaginated by absorbing suture. In case of indirect hernia sac was cut and peritoneal cavity left opened. The patch made of polypropylene monofilament mesh (size 6 x 8 cm) was sewn with "tension free" method under spermatic funiculus. As a complication 6 patients had haematomas in operating wounds. Four of the patients had wound infections. One of these patients was operated again and the patch was removed. The patients had no recurrence of hernia during the previous 10.6 months of observation. We haven't confirmed recurrence in examined material, yet it was too short time to estimate the efficiency of repair. The proposed way of groin hernia repair is easy and simple in every-day surgery practice.

  9. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in High Risk Patients Undergoing Panniculectomy: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-03

    Complications Wounds; Negative Pressure Wound Therapy; Wound Healing Delayed; Incisional; Panniculectomy; Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy; Incisional Vac; Wound Vac; Obese; Renal Failure; Kidney Transplant; Complications; Wound Healing Complication

  10. Novel wound management system reduction of surgical site morbidity after ventral hernia repairs: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Soares, Kevin C; Baltodano, Pablo A; Hicks, Caitlin W; Cooney, Carisa M; Olorundare, Israel O; Cornell, Peter; Burce, Karen; Eckhauser, Frederic E

    2015-02-01

    Prophylactic incisional negative-pressure wound therapy use after ventral hernia repairs (VHRs) remains controversial. We assessed the impact of a modified negative-pressure wound therapy system (hybrid-VAC or HVAC) on outcomes of open VHR. A 5-year retrospective analysis of all VHRs performed by a single surgeon at a single institution compared outcomes after HVAC versus standard wound dressings. Multivariable logistic regression compared surgical site infections, surgical site occurrences, morbidity, and reoperation rates. We evaluated 199 patients (115 HVAC vs 84 standard wound dressing patients). Mean follow-up was 9 months. The HVAC cohort had lower surgical site infections (9% vs 32%, P < .001) and surgical site occurrences (17% vs 42%, P = .001) rates. Rates of major morbidity (19% vs 31%, P = .04) and 90-day reoperation (5% vs 14%, P = .02) were lower in the HVAC cohort. The HVAC system is associated with optimized outcomes following open VHR. Prospective studies should validate these findings and define the economic implications of this intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Laparoscopic Repair of Incidentally Found Spigelian Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Nickloes, Todd; Mancini, Greg; Solla, Julio A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A Spigelian hernia is a rare type of hernia that occurs through a defect in the anterior abdominal wall adjacent to the linea semilunaris. Estimation of its incidence has been reported as 0.12% of all abdominal wall hernias. Traditionally, the method of repair has been an open approach. Herein, we discuss a series of laparoscopic repairs. Methods: Case series and review of the literature. Cases: Three patients are presented. All were evaluated and taken to surgery initially for a different disease process, and all were incidentally found to have a spigelian hernia. These patients underwent laparoscopic repair of their hernias; 2 were repaired intraperitoneally and one was repaired totally extraperitoneally. Two patients initially underwent a mesh repair, while the third had an attempted primary repair. Conclusions: There is evidence that supports the use of laparoscopy for both diagnosis and repair of spigelian hernias. There are also reports of successful repairs both primarily and with mesh. In our experience with the preceding 3 patients, we found that laparoscopic repair of incidentally discovered spigelian hernias is a viable option, and we also found that implantation of mesh, when possible, resulted in satisfactory results and no recurrence. PMID:21902949

  12. Management of strangulated abdominal wall hernias with mesh; early results

    PubMed Central

    Ozbagriacik, Mustafa; Bas, Gurhan; Basak, Fatih; Sisik, Abdullah; Acar, Aylin; Kudas, Ilyas; Yucel, Metin; Ozpek, Adnan; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surgery for abdominal wall hernias is a common procedure in general surgery practice. The main causes of delay for the operation are comorbid problems and patient unwillingness, which eventually, means that some patients are admitted to emergency clinics with strangulated hernias. In this report, patients who admitted to the emergency department with strangulated adominal wall hernias are presented together with their clinical management. METHODS: Patients who admitted to our clinic between January 2009 and November 2011 and underwent emergency operation were included in the study retrospectively. Demographic characteristics, hernia type, length of hospital stay, surgical treatment and complications were assessed. RESULTS: A total 81 patients (37 female, 44 male) with a mean age of 52.1±17.64 years were included in the study. Inguinal, femoral, umbilical and incisional hernias were detected in 40, 26, 9 and 6 patients respectively. Polypropylene mesh was used in 75 patients for repair. Primary repair without mesh was used in six patients. Small bowel (n=10; 12.34%), omentum (n=19; 23.45%), appendix (n=1; 1.2%) and Meckel’s diverticulum (n=1; 1.2%) were resected. Median length of hospital stay was 2 (1–7) days. Surgical site infection was detected in five (6.2%) patients. No significant difference was detected for length of hospital stay and surgical site infection in patients who had mesh repair (p=0.232 and 0.326 respectively). CONCLUSION: The need for bowel resection is common in strangulated abdominal wall hernias which undergo emergency operation. In the present study, an increase of morbidity was seen in patients who underwent bowel resection. No morbidity was detected related to the usage of prosthetic materials in repair of hernias. Hence, we believe that prosthetic materials can be used safely in emergency cases. PMID:28058336

  13. Inguinal hernia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Inguinal hernia is the result of an organ, usually bowel, protruding through a weak point or tear in the thin muscular abdominal wall. Inguinal hernias can restrict blood supply to the bowel herniated ...

  14. Umbilical hernia repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100105.htm Umbilical hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hernia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  15. Retrosternal (Morgagni) diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lojszczyk–Szczepaniak, Anna; Komsta, Renata; Debiak, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the case of a shih tzu puppy, in which a rare congenital Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed. The diagnosis was based on abdominal and thoracic radiographs, including a contrast study of the gastrointestinal tract, which revealed a co-existing umbilical hernia. Both hernias were repaired by surgery. PMID:22294795

  16. Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair Using Memory-Ring Mesh: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Akihisa; Takao, Yoshimune

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair using a memory-ring patch (Polysoft™ mesh). Patients and Methods. Between April 2010 and March 2013, a total of 76 inguinal hernias underwent TAPP repair using Polysoft mesh in 67 adults under general anesthesia. Three different senior resident surgeons performed TAPP repair under the instruction of a specialist surgeon. Nine patients had bilateral hernias. The 76 hernias included 37 indirect inguinal hernias, 29 direct hernias, 1 femoral hernia, 1 pantaloon hernia (combined direct/indirect inguinal hernia), and 8 recurrent hernias after open anterior hernia repair. The immediate postoperative outcomes as well as the short-term outcomes (mainly recurrence and incidence of chronic pain) were studied. Results. There was no conversion from TAPP repair to anterior open repair. The mean operation time was 109 minutes (range, 40–132) for unilateral hernia repair. Scrotal seroma was diagnosed at the operation site in 5 patients. No patient had operation-related orchitis, testicle edema, trocar site infection, or chronic pain during follow-up. Conclusions. The use of Polysoft mesh for TAPP inguinal hernia repair does not seem to adversely affect the quality of repair. The use of this mesh is therefore feasible and safe and may reduce postoperative pain. PMID:27635414

  17. Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair Using Memory-Ring Mesh: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Takeshi; Nomura, Tsutomu; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Matsuda, Akihisa; Takao, Yoshimune; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair using a memory-ring patch (Polysoft™ mesh). Patients and Methods. Between April 2010 and March 2013, a total of 76 inguinal hernias underwent TAPP repair using Polysoft mesh in 67 adults under general anesthesia. Three different senior resident surgeons performed TAPP repair under the instruction of a specialist surgeon. Nine patients had bilateral hernias. The 76 hernias included 37 indirect inguinal hernias, 29 direct hernias, 1 femoral hernia, 1 pantaloon hernia (combined direct/indirect inguinal hernia), and 8 recurrent hernias after open anterior hernia repair. The immediate postoperative outcomes as well as the short-term outcomes (mainly recurrence and incidence of chronic pain) were studied. Results. There was no conversion from TAPP repair to anterior open repair. The mean operation time was 109 minutes (range, 40-132) for unilateral hernia repair. Scrotal seroma was diagnosed at the operation site in 5 patients. No patient had operation-related orchitis, testicle edema, trocar site infection, or chronic pain during follow-up. Conclusions. The use of Polysoft mesh for TAPP inguinal hernia repair does not seem to adversely affect the quality of repair. The use of this mesh is therefore feasible and safe and may reduce postoperative pain.

  18. Management of a large abdominal aortic aneurysm in conjunction with a massive inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Wartman, Sarah M; Woo, Karen; Brewer, Michael; Weaver, Fred A

    2017-04-04

    The majority of inguinal hernias that are concomitant with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are clinically insignificant. However, management of AAA associated with a complex hernia can be challenging. We report a case of a 72-year-old male with a 7 cm AAA and a massive inguinal hernia involving loss of abdominal domain. Using a multidisciplinary approach, a staged hybrid endovascular and open repair of the AAA was performed followed by hernia repair.

  19. Laparoscopic management of Spigelian hernia.

    PubMed

    Novell, F; Sanchez, G; Sentis, J; Visa, J; Novell, J; Novell Costa, F

    2000-12-01

    Spigelian hernia (SH) is an uncommon abdominal wall hernia. Its clinical symptoms are not characteristic, and the preoperative diagnosis is often difficult because SH can simulate the symptoms of more classical lower quadrant abdominal diseases. We report a case of SH in an 80-year-old woman that was complicated by incarceration and diagnosed by physical examination and ultrasound. At the time of presentation, she had an abdominal mass that was soft and occasionally painful, and aggravated by movements that increase intraabdominal pressure. Laparoscopic examination of the abdominal cavity identified the incarcerate jejunum ansae. The defect was a large opening in the peritoneum along the lateral margin of the rectus abdominis muscle. After dissection of the intestinal adhesions, a prosthetic polypropylene mesh was introduced and fixed with staples into the lateral abdominal wall. There were no postoperative complications. We conclude that the laparoscopic approach is a feasible alternative to the conventional open technique that is easy, safe, and allows excellent operative visualization.

  20. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  1. Perioperative and long-term results after left pancreatectomy: a single-institution, non-randomized, comparative study between open and laparoscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Butturini, Giovanni; Partelli, Stefano; Crippa, Stefano; Malleo, Giuseppe; Rossini, Roberto; Casetti, Luca; Melotti, Gian Luigi; Piccoli, Micaela; Pederzoli, Paolo; Bassi, Claudio

    2011-09-01

    Laparoscopic left pancreatic resections are being increasingly performed. In this study, we provide a nonrandomized comparison between laparoscopic and open left pancreatectomy (OLP) for benign and borderline tumors, focusing on both perioperative and long-term results. Demographic, pathologic, and perioperative details from patients who underwent laparoscopic and OLP between 1999 and 2006 were retrieved from our database and analyzed. Long-term results, including resume to full-time work, occurrence of incisional hernias, and incidence of exocrine and endocrine insufficiency also were evaluated. A total of 116 patients were included in the analysis; 43 (37.1%) were managed laparoscopically and 73 (62.9%) underwent the open procedure. There were no significant differences regarding clinical and pathological data. All of the resections attempted laparoscopically were completed. The rate of splenic preservation was significantly higher in the laparoscopic group (P = 0.0001). Postoperative outcomes were similar between the two groups. Longitudinal comparison between two time periods (1999-June 2004 vs. July 2004-2006) showed that pancreatic fistula and hospital stay significantly diminished over time in the laparoscopic group (P = 0.04 and P = 0.004, respectively). Median follow-up was 53 months. The incidence of exocrine insufficiency and incisional hernias was significantly higher after open resections (both P = 0.05). After hospital discharge, median time to resume full-time work was 6 weeks in the open group and 3 weeks after laparoscopic resections (P < 0.0001). Laparoscopy also resulted as an independent factor for an early resume to full-time activities in the multivariate analysis (P < 0.0001). Laparoscopic left pancreatectomy is a safe procedure for benign and borderline tumors, with similar perioperative outcomes compared with the open procedure. In the long term, the laparoscopic approach is likely to be superior thanks to a more rapid resume

  2. Doxycycline administration improves fascial interface in hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Tharappel, Job C; Bower, Curtis E; Whittington Harris, Jennifer; Ramineni, Sandeep K; Puleo, David A; Roth, J Scott

    2014-08-01

    Despite improvements in ventral hernia repair techniques, their recurrence rates are unacceptably high. Increased levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and reduced collagen-1 to -3 ratios are implicated in incisional hernia formation. We have recently shown doxycycline treatment for 4 wk after hernia repair reduced MMP levels, significantly increased collagen-1 to -3 ratios, and increased tensile strength of repaired interface fascia. However, this increase was not statistically significant. In this study, we extended treatment duration to determine whether this would impact the tensile strength of the repaired interface fascia. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent incision hernia creation and subsequent repair with polypropylene mesh. The animals received either saline (n = 16) or doxycycline (n = 16) beginning from 1 day before hernia repair until the end of survival time of 6 wk (n = 16) or 12 wk (n = 16). Tissue samples were investigated for MMPs and collagen subtypes using Western blot procedures, and tensiometric analysis was performed. At both 6 and 12 wk after hernia repair, the tensiometric strength of doxycycline-treated mesh to fascia interface (MFI) tissue showed a statistically significant increase when compared with untreated control MFI. In both groups, collagen-1, -2, and -3 ratios were remarkably increased in doxycycline-treated MFI. At 6 wk, the doxycycline-treated MFI group showed a significant decrease in MMP-2, an increase in MMP-3, and no change in MMP-9. At 12 wk, MMP-9 showed a remarkable reduction, whereas MMP-2 and -3 protein levels increased in the doxycycline-treated MFI group. Doxycycline administration results in significantly improved strength of repaired fascial interface tissue along with a remarkable increase in collagen-1, -2, and -3 ratios. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Treating and Preventing Sports Hernias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close ‹ Back to Healthy Living Treating and Preventing Sports Hernias If you play ice hockey, tennis or ... for the most commonly misdiagnosed groin pain—a sports hernia. A sports hernia often results from overuse ...

  4. Parastomal hernia repair. An update.

    PubMed

    Wara, P

    2011-04-01

    Repair of parastomal hernia remains controversial. Open suture repair of the fascial defect or stoma resiting are both associated with high morbidity and unacceptably high recurrence rates and are no longer recommended for routine use. Mesh repair appears to provide the best results. Following the first anectodal reports there are accumulating evidence that laparoscopic mesh repair is feasible and has a promising potential in the management of parastomal hernia. Two laparoscopic techniques have emerged, the use of a mesh with a slit and a central keyhole and a mesh without a slit, the latter often termed as a modified Sugarbaker. Published series, however, are observational and often with a short length of follow-up. Most series suffer from small sample size and controlled trials are lacking. The limited data, therefore, make it difficult to draw conclusions. At present none of the methods of open or laparoscopic mesh repair has proved superior. In spite of this laparoscopic repair has gained increasing acceptance. A polypropylene based mesh with an anti-adhesive layer covering the visceral side seems to be applicable using the keyhole technique with a slit as well as the modified Sugarbaker technique. A PTFE mesh should preferably be used with the modified Sugarbaker technique. If a PTFE mesh is used with the keyhole technique parastomal hernia is likely to recur.

  5. Fibrin sealing versus stapling of hernia meshes in an onlay model in the rat.

    PubMed

    Petter-Puchner, Alexander H; Fortelny, R; Mittermayr, R; Ohlinger, W; Redl, H

    2005-12-01

    Incisional and inguinal hernia repair are among the most common procedures of general surgery. Mesh fixation by means of staples or sutures may lead to severe complications. The use of fibrin sealant (FS) has been suggested as alternative, but data on biocompatibility and adhesive strength of FS in combination with macroporous meshes is limited. Ventral hernia (n = 8 per group) was treated in rats in onlay technique with two types of meshes, fibrin sealed or stapled. TI-Mesh (TMxl) extralight and VYPROII (VPII) were tested 17 days post op. No failure in mechanical tests (tensile and burst strength) occurred in sealed or stapled meshes. Histology revealed equally good tissue integration and neovascularization in all groups. Fibrin sealant yields excellent fixation in experimental hernia repair. This rat model is suitable for testing meshes and fixation techniques.

  6. Outcomes of robot-assisted versus laparoscopic repair of small-sized ventral hernias.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y Julia; Huynh, Desmond; Nguyen, Scott; Chin, Edward; Divino, Celia; Zhang, Linda

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the outcomes of the da Vinci robot-assisted laparoscopic hernia repair of small-sized ventral hernias with circumferential suturing of the mesh compared to the traditional laparoscopic repair with trans-fascial suturing. A retrospective review was conducted of all robot-assisted umbilical, epigastric and incisional hernia repairs performed at our institution between 2013 and 2015 compared to laparoscopic umbilical or epigastric hernia repairs. Patient characteristics, operative details and postoperative complications were collected and analyzed using univariate analysis. Three primary minimally invasive fellowship trained surgeons performed all of the procedures included in the analysis. 72 patients were identified during the study period. 39 patients underwent robot- assisted repair (21 umbilical, 14 epigastric, 4 incisional), and 33 patients laparoscopic repair (27 umbilical, 6 epigastric). Seven had recurrent hernias (robot: 4, laparoscopic: 3). There were no significant differences in preoperative characteristics between the two groups. Average operative time was 156 min for robot-assisted repair and 65 min for laparoscopic repair (p < 0.0001). The average defect size was significantly larger for the robot group [3.07 cm (1-9 cm)] than that for the laparoscopic group [2.02 cm (0.5-5 cm)] (p < 0.0001), although there was no significant difference in the average size of mesh used (13 vs. 13 cm). There was no difference in patients requiring postoperative admission or length of stay between the two groups. The mean duration of follow-up was 47 days. There was no difference in complication rate during this time, and no recurrences were reported. There are no significant differences in terms of safety and early efficacy when comparing small-sized ventral hernias repaired using the robot-assisted technique versus the standard laparoscopic repair.

  7. Bochdalek's hernia in adults.

    PubMed

    Bujanda, L; Larrucea, I; Ramos, F; Muñoz, C; Sánchez, A; Fernández, I

    2001-02-01

    Bochdalek's hernia is a congenital hernia of the diaphragm, which is manifested in the early years of life. Its diagnosis is difficult and is based on barium studies. We present an adult patient with Bochdalek's hernia who exhibited a gastric volvulus. The patient had a history of intermittent abdominal pains. In this article, we analyze the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, laying special emphasis on the importance of early diagnosis in the prevention of complications.

  8. The impact of healthcare rationing on elective and emergency hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Orchard, M R; Wright, J A; Kelly, A; McCabe, D J; Hewes, J

    2016-06-01

    In 2011 the local clinical commissioning group introduced a policy restricting funding for elective hernia repairs. Anecdotally, it was felt that this resulted in an increased number of emergency hernia repairs in our trust. Our primary objective was to assess whether this was actually the case. Our secondary objective was to quantify the risks of non-elective hernia repair. We performed a retrospective cohort study, analysing all hernia surgeries performed between 2010 and 2013. The data were obtained from the trust Patient Information System. A total of 2556 patients underwent repair of inguinal, umbilical, incisional, femoral or ventral hernias over this time. As the policy intended, the number of elective hernia repairs reduced from 857 over 12 months before the funding restrictions to 606 in the same period afterwards (p < 0.001). Over the same time period, however, a significant rise in total emergency hernia repairs was demonstrated, increasing from 98 to 150 (p < 0.001). 30-day readmission rates also increased from 5.1 % before the policy introduction to 8.5 % afterwards (p = 0.006). In our data, the rate of bowel resection rises from 0.97 to 12.9 % for emergency operation compared to elective hernia repair (p < 0.001), while the median length of stay rises from less than 24 h to 3 days. Our data suggest that the funding restrictions introduced in 2011 were followed by a statistically significant and unintended increase in emergency hernia repairs in our trust, with associated increased risks to patient safety.

  9. Technical refinement of mini-laparoscopic hernia repair in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Y-C; Da Lin, C; Chueh, S-C

    2015-08-01

    In large, long-term series of laparoscopic pediatric groin hernia repairs, the recurrence rate is commonly higher compared with the open herniotomy. Thus, we refined our laparoscopic technique from a simple hernia sac ligation into combined posterior wall repair for pediatric groin hernias. Between March 2010 and March 2013, 41 consecutive infants and children with primary inguinal hernia were treated surgically with our refined mini-laparoscopic hernia technique. The mean patient age was 4.5 years. Before hernia repair, there were synchronous bilateral hernias in 4 (9.7 %), left inguinal hernias in 14 (34.2 %) and right inguinal hernias in 23 (56.1 %). The mini-laparoscopic hernia repair was carried out with three 3.5 mm trocar ports including 3 mm telescope and 3 mm instruments. Totally 61 repairs were performed. The mean follow-up period was 12 months. The mean operation time was 45 min. None of the repaired groin hernias had a recurrence or procedure-related complication during the period of follow-up. None of them experienced a chronic pain postoperatively. To date there was no scrotal or testicular complication detected by regular ultrasonographic follow-up. Our refined laparoscopic technique is a safe and effective method in the management of groin hernias in infants and children with a minimal early recurrence rate.

  10. Comparative radiographic analysis of changes in the abdominal wall musculature morphology after open posterior component separation or bridging laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Gayan S; Krpata, David M; Hicks, Caitlin W; Criss, Cory N; Gao, Yue; Rosen, Michael J; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2014-03-01

    Large ventral hernias are known to induce atrophic changes to the anterior abdominal wall musculature. We have shown that anterior component separation with external oblique (EO) release, with resultant reconstruction of the midline, results in hypertrophy of the rectus muscle (RM), internal oblique (IO), and transversus abdominis (TA). We aimed to compare and contrast the impact of posterior component separation with transversus abdominis release (TAR) and bridging laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) on the muscles of the abdominal wall. Preoperative and at least 6-month postoperative CT scans were analyzed for patients undergoing TAR with midline reconstruction and LVHR without midline reconstruction. A change in the measured area of each abdominal wall muscle was used as the determinant of hypertrophy or atrophy. The areas of the RM, EO, IO, and TA were measured at the L3 to L4 level through the axial plane. Twenty-five consecutive patients with pre- and postoperative images were analyzed in each group. In the TAR group, the RA, EO, and IO demonstrated significant increases in area. In the LVHR group, no muscles demonstrated any significant changes. Similar to anterior component separation, hernia repair with TAR results in hypertrophy of the rectus abdominis muscle. In addition, we found that TAR was associated with hypertrophy of both external and internal oblique muscles. Bridging repair during LVHR, on the other hand, did not result in any significant changes in any of the abdominal muscles. Our findings provide clear radiologic evidence that re-creation of the midline by means of the TAR leads to improved anatomy of the abdominal wall, in addition to positive compensatory changes of the lateral abdominal wall musculature. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acquired Abdominal Intercostal Hernia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tripodi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Acquired abdominal intercostal hernia (AAIH) is a rare disease phenomenon where intra-abdominal contents reach the intercostal space directly from the peritoneal cavity through an acquired defect in the abdominal wall musculature and fascia. We discuss a case of a 51-year-old obese female who arrived to the emergency room with a painful swelling between her left 10th rib and 11th rib. She gave a history of a stab wound to the area 15 years earlier. A CT scan revealed a fat containing intercostal hernia with no diaphragmatic defect. An open operative approach with a hernia patch was used to repair this hernia. These hernias are difficult to diagnose, so a high clinical suspicion and thorough history and physical exam are important. This review discusses pathogenesis, clinical presentation, complications, and appropriate treatment strategies of AAIH. PMID:25197605

  12. Sports hernia and femoroacetabular impingement in athletes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Munegato, Daniele; Bigoni, Marco; Gridavilla, Giulia; Olmi, Stefano; Cesana, Giovanni; Zatti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between sports hernias and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in athletes. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched for articles relating to sports hernia, athletic pubalgia, groin pain, long-standing adductor-related groin pain, Gilmore groin, adductor pain syndrome, and FAI. The initial search identified 196 studies, of which only articles reporting on the association of sports hernia and FAI or laparoscopic treatment of sports hernia were selected for systematic review. Finally, 24 studies were reviewed to evaluate the prevalence of FAI in cases of sports hernia and examine treatment outcomes and evidence for a common underlying pathogenic mechanism. RESULTS: FAI has been reported in as few as 12% to as high as 94% of patients with sports hernias, athletic pubalgia or adductor-related groin pain. Cam-type impingement is proposed to lead to increased symphyseal motion with overload on the surrounding extra-articular structures and muscle, which can result in the development of sports hernia and athletic pubalgia. Laparoscopic repair of sports hernias, via either the transabdominal preperitoneal or extraperitoneal approach, has a high success rate and earlier recovery of full sports activity compared to open surgery or conservative treatment. For patients with FAI and sports hernia, the surgical management of both pathologies is more effective than sports pubalgia treatment or hip arthroscopy alone (89% vs 33% of cases). As sports hernias and FAI are typically treated by general and orthopedic surgeons, respectively, a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis and treatment is recommended for optimal treatment of patients with these injuries. CONCLUSION: The restriction in range of motion due to FAI likely contributes to sports hernias; therefore, surgical treatment of both pathologies represents an optimal therapy. PMID:26380829

  13. Staged hernia repair preceded by gastric bypass for the treatment of morbidly obese patients with complex ventral hernias.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, W L; Polhill, J L; Chen, A Y; Kuwada, T S; Gersin, K S; Getz, S B; Kercher, K W; Heniford, B T

    2008-10-01

    Obesity may be the most predominant risk factor for recurrence following ventral hernia repair. This is secondary to significantly increased intra-abdominal pressures, higher rates of wound complications, and the technical difficulties encountered due to obesity. Medically managed weight loss prior to surgery is difficult. One potential strategy is to provide a surgical means to correct patient weight prior to hernia repair. After institutional review board approval, we reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent gastric bypass surgery prior to the definitive repair of a complex ventral hernia at our medical center. Twenty-seven morbidly obese patients with an average of 3.7 (range 1-10) failed ventral hernia repairs underwent gastric bypass prior to definitive ventral hernia repair. Twenty-two of the gastric bypasses were open operations and five were laparoscopic. The patients' average pre-bypass body mass index (BMI) was 51 kg/m2 (range 39-69 kg/m2), which decreased to an average of 33 kg/m2 (range 25-37 kg/m2) at the time of hernia repair at a mean of 1.3 years (range 0.9-3.1 years) after gastric bypass. Seven patients had hernia repair at the same time as their gastric bypass (four sutured, three biologic mesh), all of which recurred. Of the 27 patients, 19 had an open hernia repair and eight had a laparoscopic repair. Panniculectomy was performed concurrently in 15 patients who had an open repair. Prior to formal hernia repair, one patient required an urgent operation to repair a hernia incarceration and a small-bowel obstruction 11 months after gastric bypass. The average hernia and mesh size was 203 cm2 (range 24-1,350 cm2) and 1,040 cm2 (range 400-2,700 cm2), respectively. There have been no recurrences at an average follow-up of 20 months (range 2 months-5 years). Gastric bypass prior to staged ventral hernia repair in morbidly obese patients with complex ventral hernias is a safe and definitive method to effect weight loss and facilitate a

  14. Does the Use of Incisional Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy Prevent Mastectomy Flap Necrosis in Immediate Expander-Based Breast Reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Young; Park, Sun-June; Bang, Sa-Ik; Mun, Goo-Hyun; Pyon, Jai-Kyong

    2016-09-01

    Mastectomy flap necrosis is one of the most common and significant complications in immediate expander-based breast reconstruction. Negative-pressure wound therapy is widely used for open wounds but is not commonly used for closed incisional wounds. However, the postoperative use of incisional negative-pressure wound therapy is demonstrated to reduce complication rates. The authors evaluate the incidence of mastectomy flap necrosis in patients with incisional negative-pressure wound therapy after immediate expander-based breast reconstruction compared with the incidence in patients with conventional dressing. A retrospective review was conducted to identify patients who underwent immediate expander-based breast reconstruction between January of 2010 and February of 2015 at a single institution. Patients were divided into a conventional dressing group and an incisional negative-pressure wound therapy group. Patient demographics, intraoperative findings, and complications were compared between the two groups. A total of 228 breasts (206 patients) were included in this study. Of these, the incisional negative-pressure wound therapy group included 45 breasts (44 patients) and the conventional dressing group included 183 breasts (162 patients). The incisional negative-pressure wound therapy group had a lower overall complication rate (11.1 percent versus 27.9 percent; p = 0.019), overall mastectomy flap necrosis rate (8.9 percent versus 23.5 percent; p = 0.030), and major mastectomy flap necrosis rate (2.2 percent versus 13.7 percent; p = 0.031) compared with the conventional dressing group. Incisional negative-pressure wound therapy reduced the incidence of mastectomy flap necrosis. This simple and reliable dressing technique can be effective in preventing mastectomy flap necrosis in immediate expander-based breast reconstruction. Therapeutic, III.

  15. Current options in local anesthesia for groin hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Kulacoglu, Hakan; Alptekin, Alp

    2011-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common procedures in general surgery. All anesthetic methods can be used in inguinal hernia repairs. Local anesthesia for groin hernia repair had been introduced at the very beginning of the last century, and gained popularity following the success reports from the Shouldice Hospital, and the Lichtenstein Hernia Institute. Today, local anesthesia is routinely used in specialized hernia clinics, whereas its use is still not a common practice in general hospitals, in spite of its proven advantages and recommendations by current hernia repair guidelines. In this review, the technical options for local anaesthesia in groin hernia repairs, commonly used local anaesthetics and their doses, potential complications related to the technique are evaluated. A comparison of local, general and regional anesthesia methods is also presented. Local anaesthesia technique has a short learning curve requiring simple training. It is easy to learn and apply, and its use is in open anterior repairs a nice way for health care economics. Local anesthesia has been shown to have certain advantages over general and regional anesthesia in inguinal hernia repairs. It is more economic and requires a shorter time in the operating room and shorter stay in the institution. It causes less postoperative pain, requires less analgesic consumption; avoids nausea, vomiting, and urinary retention. Patients can mobilize and take oral liquids and solid foods much earlier. Most importantly, local anesthesia is the most suitable type of anesthesia in elder, fragile patients and patients with ASA II-IV scores.

  16. Efficacy of a proton pump inhibitor given in the early postoperative period to relieve symptoms of hiatal hernia after open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Hata, Mitsumasa; Shiono, Motomi; Sekino, Hisakuni; Furukawa, Hidekazu; Sezai, Akira; Iida, Mitsuru; Yoshitake, Isamu; Hattori, Tsutomu; Wakui, Shinji; Taoka, Makoto; Negishi, Nanao; Sezai, Yukiyasu

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a proton pump inhibitor, we retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent gastric fiberscopy (GFS) in the early phase after cardiac surgery. The subjects were 103 patients who underwent GFS for poor appetite, gastric pain, heartburn, or hematemesis after cardiac surgery. We divided the patients into two groups: group I consisted of 49 patients who received an H2-receptor antagonist (ranitidine hydrochloride 300 mg/day), and group II consisted of 54 patients who received a proton pump inhibitor (PPI; sodium rabeprazole 10 mg/day) as prophylactic treatment. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) disease was compared in the two groups. Gastric fiberscopy confirmed that 82.5% of the patients had type I hiatal hernia. The incidences of gastric pain and heartburn were significantly higher in group I (12.2% and 83.7%) than in group II (0% and 37.0%). Moreover, gastric bleeding occurred in two patients from group I, one [corrected] of whom died of coagulopathy. The incidences of hemorrhagic gastritis, active ulcer, and reflux esophagitis were significantly higher in group I than in group II, at 22.4%, 22.4%, and 24.5% vs 1.9%, 0%, and 7.4%. Early postcardiotomy GFS confirmed a high incidence of type I hiatal hernia. However, the proton pump inhibitor given in the early postoperative period proved more effective than the H2-receptor antagonist for relieving GI symptoms and preventing upper GI disorders after cardiac surgery.

  17. [Diagnosis and surgical therapy of hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Koch, O O; Köhler, G; Antoniou, S A; Pointner, R

    2014-08-01

    Using the usual diagnostic tools like barium swallow examination, endoscopy, and manometry, we are able to diagnose a hiatal hernia, but it is not possible to predict the size of the hernia opening or, respectively, the size of the hiatal defect. At least a correlation can be expected if the gastroesophageal junction is endoscopically assessed in a retroflexed position, and graded according to Hill. So far, it is not possible to come to a clear conclusion how the hiatal closure during hiatal hernia repair should be performed. There is no consensus on using a mesh, and when using a mesh which type or shape should be used. Further studies including long-term results on this issue are necessary. However, it seems obvious to make the decision depending on certain conditions found during operation, and not on preoperative findings.

  18. Grynfelt hernia: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cesar, D; Valadão, M; Murrahe, R J

    2012-02-01

    Back lumbar hernia is a rare abdominal wall defect that usually presents spontaneously after trauma or lumbar surgery or, less frequently, during infancy (congenital). Few reports have been published in the literature describing primary lumbar hernia. A general surgeon will have the opportunity to repair only one or a few lumbar hernia cases in his/her lifetime. We report a case of a healthy 50-year-old man, with no previous surgeries or history of trauma, who presented to the outpatient department with abdominal discomfort, pain, and a sensation of a growing mass on his lower left back for 4 years. CT scan of the abdomen showed a mass in the left posterolateral abdominal wall. Specifically, a herniation of retroperitoneal fat between the erector spinae muscle group and internal oblique muscles through aponeurosis of the transversalis muscle (Grynfeltt hernia). The patient underwent a small lumbotomy, polypropylene mesh was placed and he recovered well. Although many techniques have been described for the surgical management of such hernias, none of them can be recommended as the preferred method. Our impression, however, is that the open approach, with a small lumbotomy, seems to be easy, safe and presents good postoperative recovery.

  19. Parastomal hernias after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia, defined as an "incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma", is a frequent complication after conduit urinary diversion that can negatively impact quality of life and present a clinically significant problem for many patients. Parastomal hernia (PH) rates may be as high as 65% and while many patients are asymptomatic, in some series up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to pain, leakage, ostomy appliance problems, urinary obstruction, and rarely bowel obstruction or strangulation. Local tissue repair, stoma relocation, and mesh repairs have been performed to correct PH, however, long-term results have been disappointing with recurrence rates of 30%–76% reported after these techniques. Due to high recurrence rates and the potential morbidity of PH repair, efforts have been made to prevent PH development at the time of the initial surgery. Randomized trials of circumstomal prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have shown significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication profiles. We have placed prophylactic mesh at the time of ileal conduit creation in patients at high risk for PH development and found it to be safe and effective in reducing the PH rates over the short-term. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors associated with its development, and the use of prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion with the intent of reducing PH rates. PMID:27437533

  20. [The carcinogenic potential of biomaterials in hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Ghadimi, B M; Langer, C; Becker, H

    2002-08-01

    The implantation of meshes to correct inguinal as well as incisional hernias is widely used in the U.S.A. and Western Europe. The short and long term results of meshes are convincing concerning complications, recurrence rate and patient's comfort. On the other hand side some scientific groups discuss the possibility of malignant tumor development due to implanted meshes. In fact, experimental models exist which demonstrate that soft tissue sarcomas can be induced in mice and rats by implanting artificial materials such as synthetics or metal. Beside millions of hernia repairs using meshes worldwide no patient has been reported with a soft tissue tumor until today. The analyses of molecular markers of proliferation, of apoptosis as well as the modulation of heat shock proteins seem not to prove the carcinogenic potential of meshes. In conclusion, there are no data so far indicating a real risk for humans to develop malignant tumors due to implanted meshes. Therefore we further propagate the implantation of meshes in hernia repair in adult patients.

  1. Laparoscopic ventral hernia meshplasty with "double-breasted" fascial closure of hernial defect: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Brij B; Agarwal, Sneh; Gupta, Manish K; Mishra, Ashish; Mahajan, Krishan C

    2008-04-01

    Absence of recurrence, seroma, and pain eludes the laparoscopic surgeon managing ventral and incisional hernias. Multifactorial etiology (i.e., obesity, comorbidity, and dyscollagenemia) is a challenge. Surgeons have risen to this challenge by providing laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR). Stability of mesh in a standard LVHR is attributed to Pascal's Principle (PP). PP, based upon concentration of forces at the point of least resistance, has been classically applied in hydraulic jacks to move large masses. Application of PP in LVHR is thus misplaced where the hernial defect becomes a point of concentration of intra-abdominal forces. This makes the mesh inherently unstable. For a stable mesh aided by PP, benefits of defect closure needed to be explored. Between January 2000 and December 2004, 30 nonsmoker patients with incisional, primary ventral, and recurrent ventral hernias were operated on. Laparoscopic closure of the defect augmented with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM), as done in standard LVHR, was preformed. Thirty patients with 34 defects of a mean "closed defect" length of 5.7 cm (range, 3-10) were operated on. Mean operative time was 90 minutes (range, 75-110). There were no conversions, visceral injury, postoperative visible bulge, or seroma. No painkiller except Paracetamol was required. There was no recurrence in a mean follow-up of 58 months (range, 26-84). Restored abdominal contour was achieved by all the patients. Closure of hernial defect augmented with IPOM is a safe, patient friendly, and scientific way of doing LVHR.

  2. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: a community hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Saiz, A A; Willis, I H; Paul, D K; Sivina, M

    1996-05-01

    From October 1993 to April 1994, laparoscopic ventral hernia repair was performed on 10 patients, all of whom had a history of failed ventral hernia repair and at least two prior ventral hernia repair procedures. Patients presented with complaints of abdominal discomfort, painful mass at the hernia site, or vague abdominal discomfort. No operative deaths occurred. Two patients had minor complications: a seroma at the repair site, which resolved spontaneously, and a superficial wound infection at a trochar site, which responded to an oral cephalosporin. Six patients were discharged within 24 hours of surgery and one patient was operated on as an outpatient and discharged the same day. Follow-up of all patients ranged from 10 to 17 months. No evidence of hernia recurrence has been noted. Some recurrent ventral hernias are amenable to laparoscopic repair, and this technique may be preferable in some patients, especially those who have had an earlier failed open repair with mesh. We do not advocate use of our technique for the first repair of a ventral hernia. Long-term follow-up is still needed to determine recurrence rates compared with conventional open techniques.

  3. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman’s active sports life. Sportsman’s hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman’s hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman’s hernia at our hospital between 2011–2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  4. The Burnia: Laparoscopic Sutureless Inguinal Hernia Repair in Girls.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Nathan M; Puentes, Maria C; Leopold, Rodrigo; Ortega, Mabel; Godoy-Lenz, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in children is in evolution. Multiple methods of passing the suture around the peritoneum at the level of the internal inguinal ring exist. Cauterization of the peritoneum at the internal ring is thought to increase scarring and decrease recurrence. We have employed a sutureless, cautery only, laparoscopic single port repair of inguinal hernias and patent processus vaginalis (PPV) in girls. After institutional ethical review was obtained, a retrospective review of sutureless laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs in girls by 4 surgeons at separate institutions was performed. Patient demographics, intraoperative findings, and postoperative outcomes were recorded and analyzed. The technique involves an umbilical 30° camera and either a separate 3 mm stab incision in the midclavicular line or a 3 mm Maryland grasper placed next to the camera, and the distal most portion of the hernia sac is grasped and pulled into the abdomen and cauterized obliterating the sac. Eighty inguinal hernias were repaired using this technique in 67 girls between July 2009 and September 2015. The ages and weights ranged from 1 month to 16 years and from 2 to 69 kg, respectively. There was one conversion to open approach because an incarcerated ovary was too close to the ring. A single umbilical incision was utilized in 85%. Fifty-seven percent patients had hernias on the right whereas 42% had hernias on the left. Of the patients with presumed unilateral hernias, 22 patients were found to have PPV and were treated through the same incisions, 17/22 were found during a contralateral hernia surgery and 5/22 were found incidentally during appendectomy. Average operative time for unilateral and bilateral hernias was 22 minutes (5-38 minutes) and 31 minutes (11-65 minutes), respectively. No patient required a hospital stay because of the hernia repair. At an average of 25 months follow-up (1.6-75 months), there were no recurrences. The only complication was

  5. Laparoscopic Hernia: Umbilical-Pubis Length Versus Technical Difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Pierre; Kassir, Radwan; Atger, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic hernia repair is more difficult than open hernia repair. The totally extraperitoneal procedure with 3 trocars on the midline is more comfortable for the surgeon. We studied the impact of the length between the umbilicus and the pubis on the totally extraperitoneal procedure (95 hernias operated on in 70 patients). This length did not influence the totally extraperitoneal procedure in this study. Background: The laparoscopic repair of hernias is considered to be difficult especially for the totally extra-peritoneal technique (TEP) due to a limited working space and different appreciation of the usual anatomical landmarks seen through an anterior approach. The aim of our study has been to answer a question: does the umbilical-pubic distance, which influences the size of the mesh, affect the TEP technique used in the treatment of inguinal hernias? Methods: From January 2001 to May 2011, the umbilical-pubic (UP) distance was measured with a sterile ruler graduated in centimeters in all patients who underwent a symptomatic inguinal hernia by the TEP technique in two hernia surgery centers. The sex, age, BMI, hernia type, UP distance, operation time, hospital stay and complications were prospectively examined based on the medical records. Results: Seventy patients underwent 95 inguinal hernia repairs by the TEP technique. The umbilical-pubic distance average was 14 cm (10 to 22) and a 25 kg/m2 (16–30) average concerning the body mass index (BMI). Seventy percent of patients were treated on an outpatient basis. The postoperative course was very simple. There was no recurrence of hernia within this early postoperative period. Conclusion: The umbilical-pubic distance had no influence on the production of TEP with 3 trocars on the midline in this study. PMID:25392661

  6. Obturator hernia - MRI image.

    PubMed

    Vitone, Louis; Joel, Abraham; Masters, Andrew; Lea, Simon

    2013-08-01

    Obturator hernia although considered a rare entity is the most frequently encountered pelvic floor hernia. Since the first published report in the 18th century, their unusual and unfamiliar clinical presentation still represents a diagnostic dilemma for the modern day clinician. A detailed history and clinical examination in our thin, elderly female patient who presented with intermittent small bowel obstruction and symptoms of right obturator nerve compression with a positive Howship-Romberg sign was crucial in establishing a diagnosis. Sophisticated radiologic modalities such as MRI as shown below in the case of our patient can reliably confirm the diagnosis of obturator hernia.

  7. Recurrent groin hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P. J.; Leach, R. D.; Ellis, Harold

    1981-01-01

    One hundred consecutive recurrences following repair of inguinal hernias have been studied; 62 were direct, 30 indirect, 7 pantaloon and one a femoral hernia. Half the indirect recurrences occurred within a year of repair and probably represented failure to detect a small indirect sac. Later indirect recurrences probably represented failure to repair the internal ring. Nine of the direct hernias were medial funicular recurrences and represented failure to anchor the darn medially. The rest of the direct recurrences were attributable to tissue insufficiency and could probably have been averted by larger tissue bites. Recurrences following inguinal herniorrhaphy remain an all too common problem but can be reduced by meticulous surgical technique. PMID:7339602

  8. First human use of hybrid synthetic/biologic mesh in ventral hernia repair: a multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Bittner, James G; El-Hayek, Kevin; Strong, Andrew T; LaPinska, Melissa Phillips; Yoo, Jin S; Pauli, Eric M; Kroh, Matthew

    2017-07-19

    Mesh options for reinforcement of ventral/incisional hernia (VIH) repair include synthetic or biologic materials. While each material has known advantages and disadvantages, little is understood about outcomes when these materials are used in combination. This multicenter study reports on the first human use of a novel synthetic/biologic hybrid mesh (Zenapro(®) Hybrid Hernia Repair Device) for VIH repair. This prospective, multicenter post-market clinical trial enrolled consecutive adults who underwent elective VIH repair with hybrid mesh placed in the intraperitoneal or retromuscular/preperitoneal position. Patients were classified as Ventral Hernia Working Group (VHWG) grades 1-3 and had clean or clean-contaminated wounds. Outcomes of ventral and incisional hernia were compared using appropriate parametric tests. In all, 63 patients underwent VIH repair with hybrid mesh. Most were females (54.0%), had a mean age of 54.8 ± 10.9 years and mean body mass index of 34.5 ± 7.8 kg/m(2), and classified as VHWG grade 2 (87.3%). Most defects were midline (92.1%) with a mean area of 106 ± 155 cm(2). Cases were commonly classified as clean (92.1%) and were performed laparoscopically (60.3%). Primary fascial closure was achieved in 82.5% with 28.2% requiring component separation. Mesh location was frequently intraperitoneal (69.8%). Overall, 39% of patients available for follow-up at 12 months suffered surgical site events, which were generally more frequent after incisional hernia repair. Of these, seroma (23.7%) was most common, but few (8.5%) required procedural intervention. Other surgical site events that required procedural intervention included hematoma (1.7%), wound dehiscence (1.7%), and surgical site infection (3.4%). Recurrence rate was 6.8% (95% CI 2.2-16.6%) at 12-months postoperatively. Zenapro(®) Hybrid Hernia Repair Device is safe and effective in VHWG grade 1-2 patients with clean wounds out to 12 months. Short-term outcomes and recurrence

  9. Trocar site hernia after laparoscopic colectomy: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Pamela, Delmonaco; Roberto, Cirocchi; Francesco, La Mura; Umberto, Morelli; Carla, Migliaccio; Vincenzo, Napolitano; Stefano, Trastulli; Eriberto, Farinella; Daniele, Giuliani; Angelo, Desol; Diego, Milani; Micol Sole, Di Patrizi; Alessandro, Spizzirri; Maurizio, Bravetti; Vito, Sciannameo; Nicola, Avenia; Francesco, Sciannameo

    2011-01-01

    Background. Trocar Site Hernia (TSH) is defined as an incisional hernia which occurs after minimally invasive surgery on the trocar incision site.In 2004 Tonouchi classified trocar site hernias into 3 types: Early onset type; Late onset type; Special type. Case Report. We report the case of a 76-year old woman that underwent an emergency explorative laparotomy on the 10th p.o. day after a laparoscopic left hemicolectomy. Surgery showed a small bowel herniation through the 12 mm trocar incision site; the intestinal loop appeared necrotic and had to be resected, and the hernia orifice was repaired. We carried out a review of literature about this topic. Discussion. The clinical onset of a trocar site hernia is usually early, occurring within the 30th post operative day and it is caused by the omentum or small bowel entrapment into the trocar orifice. The clinical presentation is insidious, with progression to an acute abdomen, and an emergency surgical approach is often required. Conclusions. TSH is a severe complication of operative laparoscopy especially with large-bore trocar ports. The incidence of TSH resulting from our review ranges from 0.007% to 22% with an average of 1.85%. Prevention of TSH appears to be more effective when trocar insertion through the abdominal wall is tangential, the closure of both the fascia and the peritoneum is performed if the incision is greater than 7 mm, the suture of extra umbilical port site is performed under laparoscopic vision.

  10. Robotic repair of a large abdominal intercostal hernia: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Stephani C; Singh, Tejinder P

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal intercostal hernia is an uncommon phenomenon, reported in few case reports and small case series. If left untreated, it can lead to strangulation and visceral ischemia. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate surgical intervention are thus critical to prevent resulting morbidity. We present a 50-year-old woman with a large abdominal intercostal hernia after an open nephrectomy. She underwent a successful robotic repair of the hernia with mesh placement. Through the presentation, we would like to raise awareness of intercostal hernia as a complication of open nephrectomy and significance of early diagnosis in avoiding potential morbidity. We also performed a review of literature especially focusing on acquired abdominal intercostal hernia secondary to prior surgery. Although intercostal hernias can be difficult to repair secondary to the size and location, adequate visualization and surgical planning are critical to successful repair.

  11. Hiatal hernia repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100028.htm Hiatal hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on ... Overview The esophagus runs through the diaphragm to the stomach. It functions to carry food from the mouth ...

  12. Ventral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Philadelphia. PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:539-545. Nagle AP, Soper NJ. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. In: Khatri ... Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players ...

  13. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some hernia repairs are performed using a small telescope known as a laparoscope. If your surgeon has ... in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). Laparoscopic repair offers a ...

  14. Diaphragmatic hernia repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100014.htm Diaphragmatic hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview The chest cavity includes the heart and lungs. The abdominal cavity includes the liver, the stomach, ...

  15. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine to relax you . Your surgeon makes a cut (incision) in your groin area. The hernia is ... wall. At the end of the repair, the cuts are stitched closed. In laparascopic surgery: The surgeon ...

  16. Recurrent inguinal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Postlethwait, R W

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of 584 operations for recurrent inguinal hernia was made in an attempt to determine the cause of the recurrence based on the anatomic findings. The recurrence was indirect in 300, direct in 241, and various other in 43 operations. The causes of the indirect recurrences appeared to be an unrecognized hernia, incomplete dissection or improper ligation of the sac, failure to narrow the cord, or inadequate reconstruction of the internal ring. No cause for the diffuse direct recurrences was apparent. Of the 241 hernias in Hesselbach's triangle, 144 were small localized defects, usually (112) just lateral to the symphysis. These were considered to be caused by the cutting action of a suture placed under tension. On the basis of these findings, suggestions are made for primary inguinal hernia operations. PMID:4073990

  17. A modified Chevrel technique for ventral hernia repair: long-term results of a single centre cohort.

    PubMed

    Mommers, E H H; Leenders, B J M; Leclercq, W K G; de Vries Reilingh, T S; Charbon, J A

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the short- and long-term results after a modified Chevrel technique for midline incisional hernia repair, regarding surgical technique, hospital stay, wound complications, recurrence rate, and postoperative quality of life. These results will be compared to the literature derived reference values regarding the original and modified Chevrel techniques. In this large retrospective, single surgeon, single centre cohort all modified Chevrel hernia repairs between 2000 and 2012 were identified. Results were obtained by reviewing patients' medical charts. Postoperative quality of life was measured using the Carolina Comfort Scale. A multi-database literature search was conducted to compare the results of our series to the literature based reference values. One hundred and fifty-five patients (84 male, 71 female) were included. Eighty patients (52%) had a large incisional hernia (width ≥ 10 cm) according the definition of the European Hernia Society. Fourteen patients (9%) underwent a concomitant procedure. Median length-of-stay was 5 days. Within 30 days postoperative 36 patients (23.2%) had 39 postoperative complications of which 30 were mild (CDC I-II), and nine severe (CDC III-IV). Thirty-one surgical site occurrences were observed in thirty patients (19.4%) of which the majority were seroma (16 patients 10.3%). There was no hernia-related mortality during follow-up. Recurrence rate was 1.8% after a median follow-up of 52 months (12-128 months). Postoperative quality of life was rated excellent. The modified Chevrel technique for midline ventral hernias results in a moderate complication rate, low recurrence rate and high rated postoperative quality of life.

  18. Single centre observational study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the Proceed™ Ventral Patch to repair small ventral hernias.

    PubMed

    Bontinck, J; Kyle-Leinhase, I; Pletinckx, P; Vergucht, V; Beckers, R; Muysoms, F

    2014-10-01

    There is evidence that mesh repair for primary umbilical hernias results in less recurrences and similar wound complication rates compared to tissue repair. In recent years, several mesh devices for the repair of small ventral hernias have been developed, but some reports have been published on serious complications and adverse effects encountered with those mesh devices. The Proceed™ Ventral Patch (PVP™) is a partially absorbable lightweight polypropylene mesh. We introduced PVP™ in our department in April 2009 and collected patient data and outcome in an observational study of 101 consecutive patients until December 2011 (Clinical.Trials.gov: NCT01307696). In addition to the routine control 3 weeks postoperative, prospective follow-up included a questionnaire, clinical investigation and ultrasound after 12 months. The study included 91 primary (76 umbilical/15 epigastric) and 10 incisional ventral hernias (including 6 trocar hernias). In all patients a PVP™ with a diameter of 6.4 cm was used. Wound problems were the most frequent complication (n = 18). Follow-up of at least 12 months was achieved in 98 patients (97 %) and the mean follow-up time was 15.9 months. Follow-up by clinical examination diagnosed a recurrence in 11/92 patients (12.0 %). Only four patients were aware of their recurrent hernia, the seven others reported no problems in the questionnaire. The additional ultrasound performed did not reveal recurrences that were not already diagnosed by clinical examination. In five patients a reoperation for repair of the recurrence was performed (reoperation rate 5/98 = 5.1 %). Hernia defect size (p = 0.032) and type of hernia (p = 0.029) were found to be a significant risk factors for development of a recurrent hernia (Fisher's exact test). Hernia size was a significant risk factor both in a univariate (p = 0.005) and in a multivariate Cox model (p = 0.017). Incisional hernia was of borderline significance in a univariate (p

  19. Bilateral Hernias in the Female

    PubMed Central

    Glassow, Frank

    1969-01-01

    An experience with 216 bilateral hernias in female patients is reviewed. The condition is rare, occurring only once in every 250 patients admitted for a hernia repair. Bilateral primary indirect inguinal hernias were the most frequent type. Bilateral primary femoral hernias were quite rare while bilateral primary direct inguinal hernias were even more uncommon. Other rare bilateral combinations are briefly described. The incidence in children is given. Etiological factors are discussed, emphasizing the strong posterior wall of the inguinal canal in females. Two per cent of patients developed a recurrent hernia; one per cent of hernias recurred. No recurrence following a bilateral primary indirect inguinal hernia repair and no “femoral” recurrence following inguinal repair were recorded. PMID:5348491

  20. Evidence based medicine and surgical approaches for colon cancer: Evidences, benefits and limitations of the laparoscopic vs open resection

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzon, Laura; La Torre, Marco; Ziparo, Vincenzo; Montebelli, Francesco; Mercantini, Paolo; Balducci, Genoveffa; Ferri, Mario

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To report a meta-analysis of the studies that compared the laparoscopic with the open approach for colon cancer resection. METHODS: Forty-seven manuscripts were reviewed, 33 of which employed for meta-analysis according to the PRISMA guidelines. The results were differentiated according to the study design (prospective randomized trials vs case-control series) and according to the tumor’s location. Outcome measures included: (1) short-term results (operating times, blood losses, bowel function recovery, post-operative pain, return to the oral intake, complications and hospital stay); (2) oncological adequateness (number of nodes harvested in the surgical specimens); and (3) long-term results (including the survivals’ rates and incidence of incisional hernias) and (4) costs. RESULTS: Meta-analysis of trials provided evidences in support of the laparoscopic procedures for a several short-term outcomes including: a lower blood loss, an earlier recovery of the bowel function, an earlier return to the oral intake, a shorter hospital stay and a lower morbidity rate. Opposite the operating time has been confirmed shorter in open surgery. The same trend has been reported investigating case-control series and cancer by sites, even though there are some concerns regarding the power of the studies in this latter field due to the small number of trials and the small sample of patients enrolled. The two approaches were comparable regarding the mean number of nodes harvested and long-term results, even though these variables were documented reviewing the literature but were not computable for meta-analysis. The analysis of the costs documented lower costs for the open surgery, however just few studies investigated the incidence of post-operative hernias. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy is superior for the majority of short-term results. Future studies should better differentiate these approaches on the basis of tumors’ location and the post-operative hernias. PMID:24707154

  1. Made in Italy for hernia: the Italian history of groin hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Negro, Paolo; Gossetti, Francesco; Ceci, Francesca; D'Amore, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The history of groin hernia surgery is as long as the history of surgery. For many centuries doctors, anatomists and surgeons have been devoted to this pathology, afflicting the mankind throughout its evolution. Since ancient times the Italian contribution has been very important with many representative personalities. Authors, investigators and pioneers are really well represented. Every period (the classic period, the Middle Age, the Renaissance and the post-Renaissance) opened new perspectives for a better understanding. During the 18th century, more information about groin anatomy, mainly due to Antonio Scarpa, prepared the Bassini revolution. Edoardo Bassini developed the first modern anatomically based hernia repair. This procedure spread worldwide becoming the most performed surgical technique. After World War II synthetic meshes were introduced and a new era has begun for hernia repair, once again with the support of Italian surgeons, first of all Ermanno Trabucco. But Italian contribution extends also to educational, with the first national school for abdominal wall surgery starting in Rome, and to Italian participation and support in international scientific societies. Authors hereby wish to resume this long history highlighting the "made in Italy" for groin hernia surgery. Bassini, Groin hernia, History, Prosthetic repair.

  2. Inguinal hernia repair: are the results from a general hospital comparable to those from dedicated hernia centres?

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Kai Xiong; Lo, Hong Yee; Neo, Jun Xiang Andy; Appasamy, Vijayan; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We aimed to report the outcomes of inguinal hernia repair performed at Tan Tock Seng Hospital and compare them with those performed at dedicated hernia centres. METHODS We retrospectively analysed the medical records and telephone interviews of 520 patients who underwent inguinal hernia repair in 2010. RESULTS The majority of the patients were male (498 [95.8%] men vs. 22 [4.2%] women). The mean age was 59.9 ± 15.7 years. Most patients (n = 445, 85.6%) had unilateral hernias (25.8% direct, 64.3% indirect, 9.9% pantaloon). The overall recurrence rate was 3.8%, with a mean time to recurrence of 12.0 ± 8.6 months. Risk factors for recurrence included contaminated wounds (odds ratio [OR] 50.325; p = 0.004), female gender (OR 8.757; p = 0.003) and pantaloon hernias (OR 5.059; p = 0.013). Complication rates were as follows: chronic pain syndrome (1.2%), hypoaesthesia (5.2%), wound dehiscence (0.4%), infection (0.6%), haematoma/seroma (4.8%), urinary retention (1.3%) and intraoperative visceral injury (0.6%). Most procedures were open repairs (67.7%), and laparoscopic repair constituted 32.3% of all the inguinal hernia repairs. Open repairs resulted in longer operating times than laparoscopic repairs (86.6 mins vs. 71.6 mins; p < 0.001), longer hospital stays (2.7 days vs. 0.7 days; p = 0.020) and a higher incidence of post-repair hypoaesthesia (6.8% vs. 1.8%; p = 0.018). However, there were no significant differences in recurrence or other complications between open and laparoscopic repair. CONCLUSION A general hospital with strict protocols and teaching methodologies can achieve inguinal hernia repair outcomes comparable to those of dedicated hernia centres. PMID:24763834

  3. Gastric dilatation and volvulus in a brachycephalic dog with hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Aslanian, M E; Sharp, C R; Garneau, M S

    2014-10-01

    A brachycephalic dog was presented with an acute onset of retching and abdominal discomfort. The dog had a chronic history of stertor and exercise intolerance suggestive of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome. Radiographs were consistent with a Type II hiatal hernia. The dog was referred and within hours of admission became acutely painful and developed tympanic abdominal distension. A right lateral abdominal radiograph confirmed gastric dilatation and volvulus with herniation of the pylorus through the hiatus. An emergency exploratory coeliotomy was performed, during which the stomach was derotated, and an incisional gastropexy, herniorrhaphy and splenectomy were performed. A staphylectomy was performed immediately following the exploratory coeliotomy. The dog recovered uneventfully. Gastric dilatation and volvulus is a potentially life-threatening complication that can occur in dogs with Type II hiatal hernia and should be considered a surgical emergency. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  4. Simultaneous laparoscopic management of Morgagni hernia and cholelithiasis: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Vikal Chandra

    2015-07-01

    Morgagni hernia is a rare type of diaphragmatic hernia. Though in the past, it has been dealt with an open approach, nowadays laparoscopic management is a favored approach. However, there are few controversies in this scenario. We present here two females of Aryan ethnicity, one 55 and another 45 years old, who presented with pain at upper abdomen and retrosternal chest pain; on investigations were found to have cholelithiasis along with Morgagni hernia which were managed via the laparoscopic approach in the same sitting. Repair of Morgagni hernia also via the minimally invasive technique can be offered to the patients like that for cholelithiasis.

  5. Twelve years of experience treating Spigelian hernia.

    PubMed

    Polistina, Francesco A; Garbo, Greta; Trevisan, Paolo; Frego, Mauro

    2015-03-01

    A Spigelian hernia (SH) is an acquired ventral hernia that most commonly occurs in the Spigelian belt. Patients may experience pain or a bulge in the abdominal area, but in most cases there are no symptoms. If left untreated the hernia may become strangulated, which could lead to bowel obstruction. We reviewed 28 surgical patients with SH between January 2002 and December 2013. We evaluated the incidence of complications, recurrences, and the length of hospital stay with comorbidities, body mass index, clinical presentation, and operative techniques. The 28 patients included 10 males and 18 females, with a mean age of 67 years. Seven patients (26.9%) received emergency operations, and the remaining patients received elective operations. An "open-direct" operative approach was used in 16 cases and a laparoscopic approach in 12. The overall complication rate was 7.6% and the recurrence rate was 3.8% with a median follow-up of 3 years. The median hospital stay was 1 day (range, 1-7). Only the presence of local complications at diagnosis showed a significant impact on length of hospital stay. None of the considered variables had a significant impact on hernia recurrence. No differences were noted among the operative techniques, wound infections, complications rate, and length of hospital stay. Laparoscopy seems to cause more early postoperative pain that reverses in about 2 weeks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Day-case laparoscopic hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Evans, D S; Ghaneh, P; Khan, I M

    1996-10-01

    Some 114 patients (median age 52 years) underwent laparoscopic hernia repair as a day-case procedure. Twenty-one patients had bilateral and 11 recurrent hernias. Some 113 patients underwent transabdominal preperitoneal mesh repair but one required conversion to open operation. Mean operating time was 24 min for unilateral and 38 min for bilateral repair. In an operating session of 3.5 h, up to five patients (mean 4.4) underwent surgery and as many as seven hernias were repaired. More than 10 per cent of patients were found to have a previously undiagnosed hernia on the opposite side. A total of 111 patients were discharged home on the day of surgery. Major complications included one omental bleed and one small bowel obstruction. Seroma was the commonest minor complication and occurred in 7 per cent of patients. More than 35 per cent of patients needed no postoperative analgesia. To date there has been one recurrence (follow-up range 2-18 months).

  7. Lichtenstein, prolene hernia system, and UltraPro Hernia System for primary inguinal hernia repair: one-year outcome of a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, J; Nygren, J; Thorell, A

    2012-06-01

    The optimal technique for open inguinal hernia repair is yet to be determined. Three hundred and nine male patients [median of 60 years (range, 31-75)] undergoing primary open inguinal hernia repair in local anesthesia and day-care surgery were randomly allocated to operation with the Lichtenstein technique (L), Prolene Hernia System (PHS), or UltraPro Hernia System (UHS). [Median (IQR)] There were no differences in operating time [47 (40-58) vs. 50 (40-57) and 50 (42-56) min in groups L, PHS, and UHS, respectively], intra- or postoperative complications, time until return to normal workload (8 (4-14) vs. 9 (4-14), and 8 (4-14) days) or occurrence of chronic pain at 12 months (15 vs. 12, and 13 patients). Self-reported physical quality of life (SF-36) was reduced compared to matched controls preoperatively and increased similarly to levels not different from controls in all groups at 12 months postoperatively. There was one recurrence in each group during the follow-up period. The Lichtenstein technique, PHS, and UHS seem all acceptable approaches for open inguinal hernia repair in local anesthesia and day-care surgery regarding perioperative course, rehabilitation, complications, recurrence rates, development of chronic groin pain, and improvement in quality of life after 12 months. However, due to reduced costs and lack of need for the exploration of the preperitoneal space, the Lichtenstein technique should be recommended as first choice.

  8. Single-Port Laparoscopic Parastomal Hernia Repair with Modified Sugarbaker Technique

    PubMed Central

    Turingan, Isidro; Zajkowska, Marta; Tran, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Laparoscopic parastomal hernia repair with modified Sugarbaker technique has become increasingly the operation of choice because of its low recurrence rates. This study aimed to assess feasibility, safety, and efficiency of performing the same operation with single-incision laparoscopic surgery. Materials and Methods: All patients referred from March 2010 to February 2013 were considered for single-port laparoscopic repair with modified Sugarbaker technique. A SILS port (Covidien, Norwalk, Connecticut, USA) was used together with conventional straight dissecting instruments and a 5.5- mm/52-cm/30° laparoscope. Important technical aspects include modified dissection techniques, namely, “inline” and “chopsticks” to overcome loss of triangulation, insertion of a urinary catheter into an ostomy for ostomy limb identification, safe adhesiolysis by avoiding electocautery, saline -jet dissection to demarcate tissue planes, dissection of an entire laparotomy scar to expose incidental incisional hernias, adequate mobilization of an ostomy limb for lateralization, and wide overlapping of defect with antiadhesive mesh. Results: Of 6 patients, 5 underwent single-port laparoscopic repair, and 1 (whose body mass index [BMI] of 39.4 kg/m2 did not permit SILS port placement) underwent multiport repair. Mean defect size was 10 cm, and mean mesh size was 660 cm2 with 4 patients having incidental incisional hernias repaired by the same mesh. Mean operation time was 270 minutes, and mean hospital stay was 4 days. Appliance malfunction ceased immediately, and pain associated with parastomal hernia disappeared. There was no recurrence with a follow-up of 2 to 36 months. Conclusion: Compared with multiport repair, single-port laparoscopic parastomal repair with modified Sugarbaker technique is safe and efficient, and it may eventually become the standard of care. PMID:24680140

  9. Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. The procedures include intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair, transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair and total extraperitoneal (TEP) repair. These procedures have totally different anatomic point of view, process and technical key points from open operations. The technical details of these operations are discussed in this article, also the strategies of treatment for some special conditions. PMID:27867954

  10. Abdominal wall integrity after open abdomen: long-term results of vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM).

    PubMed

    Willms, A; Schaaf, S; Schwab, R; Richardsen, I; Bieler, D; Wagner, B; Güsgen, C

    2016-12-01

    The open abdomen has become a standard technique in the management of critically ill patients undergoing surgery for severe intra-abdominal conditions. Negative pressure and mesh-mediated fascial traction are commonly used and achieve low fistula rates and high fascial closure rates. In this study, long-term results of a standardised treatment approach are presented. Fifty-five patients who underwent OA management for different indications at our institution from 2006 to 2013 were enrolled. All patients were treated under a standardised algorithm that uses a combination of vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction. Structured follow-up assessments were offered to patients and included a medical history, a clinical examination and abdominal ultrasonography. The data obtained were statistically analysed. The fascial closure rate was 74 % in an intention-to-treat analysis and 89 % in a per-protocol analysis. The fistula rate was 1.8 %. Thirty-four patients attended follow-up. The median follow-up was 46 months (range 12-88 months). Incisional hernias developed in 35 %. Patients with hernias needed more operative procedures (10.3 vs 3.4, p = 0.03) than patients without hernia formation. A Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) of 31.1 was calculated. Patients with symptomatic hernias (NAS of 2-10) had a significantly lower mean POSAS score (p = 0.04). Vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM) seem to result in low complication rates and high fascial closure rates. Abdominal wall reconstruction, which is a challenging and complex procedure and causes considerable patient discomfort, can thus be avoided in the majority of cases. Available results are based on studies involving only a small number of cases. Multi-centre studies and registry-based data are therefore needed to validate these findings.

  11. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  12. Anterior preperitoneal repair of extremely large inguinal hernias: An alternative technique☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Koning, Giel G.; Vriens, Patrick W.H.E.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Standard open anterior inguinal hernia repair is nowadays performed using a soft mesh to prevent recurrence and to minimalize postoperative chronic pain. To further reduce postoperative chronic pain, the use of a preperitoneal placed mesh has been suggested. In extremely large hernias, the lateral side of the mesh can be insufficient to fully embrace the hernial sac. We describe the use of two preperitoneal placed meshes to repair extremely large hernias. This ‘Butterfly Technique’ has proven to be useful. Hernias were classified according to hernia classification of the European Hernia Society (EHS) during operation. Extremely large indirect hernias were repaired by using two inverted meshes to cover the deep inguinal ring both medial and lateral. Follow up was at least 6 months. VAS pain score was assessed in all patients during follow up. Outcomes of these Butterfly repairs were evaluated. Medical drawings were made to illustrate this technique. A Total of 689 patients underwent anterior hernia repair 2006–2008. PRESENTATION OF CASE Seven male patients (1%) presented with extremely large hernial sacs. All these patients were men. Mean age 69.9 years (range: 63–76), EHS classifications of hernias were all unilateral. Follow up was at least 6 months. Recurrence did not occur after repair. Chronic pain was not reported. Discussion Open preperitoneal hernia repair of extremely large hernias has not been described. The seven patients were trated with this technique uneventfully. No chronic pain occurred. CONCLUSION The Butterfly Technique is an easy and safe alternative in anterior preperitoneal repair of extremely large inguinal hernias. PMID:22288042

  13. Management of Septic Open Abdomen in a Morbid Obese Patient with Enteroatmospheric Fistula by Using Standard Abdominal Negative Pressure Therapy in Conjunction with Intrarectal One

    PubMed Central

    Yetisir, Fahri; Salman, A. Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Özer, Mehmet; Aygar, Muhittin; Osmanoglu, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Management of open abdomen (OA) with enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF) in morbid obese patient with comorbid disease is challenging. We would like to report the management of septic OA in morbid obese patient with EAF which developed after strangulated recurrent giant incisional hernia repair. We would also like to emphasize, in this case, the conversion of EAF to ileostomy by the help of second Negative Pressure Therapy (NPT) on ostomy side, and the chance of new EAF occurrence was reduced with intrarectal NPT. Case Presentation. 62-year-old morbid obese woman became an OA patient with EAF after strangulated recurrent giant hernia. EAF was converted to ostomy with pezzer drain by the help of second NPT on ostomy. Colonic distention was reduced with the third NPT application via rectum. Abdominal reapproximation anchor (ABRA) system was used for delayed abdominal closure. Conclusions. Using the 2nd NPT on ostomy side may help in the maturation of the ostomy created in a difficult condition in an open abdomen. Using the 3rd NPT through rectum may decrease the chance of EAF formation by reducing the pressure difference between intraluminal pressure and extraluminal pressure in hollow viscera. PMID:26779360

  14. Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal Hernia Repair Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Erin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has become increasingly popular as an alternative to open surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal procedure with the use of staple fixation and polypropylene mesh. Methods: A retrospective chart review examined outcomes of 1240 laparoscopic hernia operations in 783 patients, focusing on intraoperative and early postoperative complications, pain, and time until return to work and normal physical activities. Results: There were no intraoperative complications in this series; 106 patients experienced early postoperative complications across 8 evaluated categories: urinary retention (4.1%), seroma (3.0%), testicular/hemiscrotal swelling (1.9%), testicular atrophy (0%), hydrocele (0.6%), mesh infection (0.1%), and neurological symptoms (transient, 1.0%; persistent, 0.2%). Patients used an average of 5.6 Percocet pills after the procedure, and mean times until return to work and normal activities, including their routine exercise regimen, were 3.0 and 3.8 days, respectively. Conclusion: Complication rates and convalescence times were considered equivalent or superior to those found in other studies assessing both laparoscopic and open techniques. The usage of multiple Endostaples did not result in increased neurologic complications in the early postoperative period when compared with findings in the literature. In the hands of an experienced surgeon, total extraperitoneal repair is a safe, effective alternative to open inguinal hernia repair. PMID:27493471

  15. Abdominal hernias: Radiological features

    PubMed Central

    Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

  16. Transvaginal Repair of a Large Chronic Porcine Ventral Hernia with Synthetic Mesh Using NOTES

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ben; Whang, Susan H.; Bachman, Sharon L.; Andres Astudillo, J.; Sporn, Emanuel; Miedema, Brent W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Ventral incisional hernias still remain a common surgical problem. We tested the feasibility of transvaginal placement of a large synthetic mesh to repair a porcine hernia. Methods: Seven pigs were used in this survival model. Each animal had creation of a 5-cm hernia defect and underwent a transvaginal repair of the defect with synthetic mesh. A single colpotomy was made using a 12-cm trocar for an overtube. The mesh was cut to size and placed through the trocar. A single-channel gastroscope with an endoscopic atraumatic grasper was used for grasping sutures. Further fascial sutures were placed every 5cm. Results: Mesh repair was feasible in all 7 animals. Mean operative time was 133 minutes. Technical difficulties were encountered. No gross contamination was seen at the time of necropsy. However, 5 animals had positive mesh cultures; 7 had positive cultures in the rectouterine space in enrichment broth or on direct culture. Conclusion: Transvaginal placement of synthetic mesh to repair a large porcine hernia using NOTES is challenging but feasible. Future studies need to be conducted to develop better techniques and determine the significance of mesh contamination. PMID:20932375

  17. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Incisional Biopsy in the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sara; Forman, Michael; Sadow, Peter M; August, Meredith

    2016-05-01

    To determine the accuracy of incisional biopsy examination to diagnose oral lesions. This retrospective cohort study was performed to determine the concordance rate between incisional biopsy examination and definitive resection diagnosis for different oral lesions. The study sample was derived from the population of patients who presented to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA) from January 2005 through December 2012. Inclusion criteria were the diagnosis of an oral lesion from an incisional biopsy examination, subsequent diagnosis from the definitive resection of the same lesion, and complete clinical and pathologic patient records. The predictor variables were the origin and size of the lesion. The primary outcome variable was concordance between the provisional incisional biopsy diagnosis and definitive pathologic resection diagnosis. The secondary outcome variable was type of biopsy error for the discordant cases. Incisional biopsy errors were assessed and grouped into 5 categories: 1) sampling error; 2) insufficient tissue for diagnosis; 3) presence of inflammation making diagnosis difficult; 4) artifact; and 5) pathologist discordance. A total of 272 patients met the inclusion criteria. The study sample had a mean age of 47.4 years and 55.7% were women. Of these cases, 242 (88.9%) were concordant when comparing the biopsy and final resection pathology reports. At histologic evaluation, 60.0% of discordant findings were attributed to sampling error, 23.3% to pathologist discrepancy, 13.3% to insufficient tissue provided in the biopsy specimen, and 3.4% to inflammation obscuring diagnosis. Overall, concordant cases had a larger average biopsy volume (1.53 cm(3)) than discordant cases (0.42 cm(3)). The data collected indicate an 88.9% diagnostic concordance with final pathologic results for incisional oral biopsy diagnoses. Sixty percent of discordance was attributed to sampling error when sampled

  18. Very long-term outcome of catheter ablation of post-incisional atrial tachycardia: Role of incisional and non-incisional scar.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gong-Bu; Hu, Ji-Qiang; Guo, Xiao-Gang; Liu, Xu; Yang, Jian-du; Sun, Qi; Ma, Jian; Ouyang, Fei-Fan; Zhang, Shu

    2016-02-15

    The arrhythmogenicity of right atrial (RA) incisional scar after cardiac surgery could result in atrial tachycardia (AT). Radiofrequency catheter ablation is effective in the treatment of such tachycardia. However, data regarding long-term outcomes are limited. A total of 105 patients with prior RA incision who underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation of AT were included. In the first procedure, electroanatomic mapping (EAM) revealed a total of 139 ATs in 105 patients, including 88 cavotricuspid isthmus dependent atrial flutters (IDAFs), 5 mitral annulus reentrant tachycardias (MARTs), 44 intra-atrial reentrant tachycardias (IARTs) and 2 focal ATs (FATs). AT was successfully eliminated in 101 (96.1%) patients. During a mean follow-up period of 90 ± 36 months, recurrent AT was observed in 23 patients and 21 underwent a second ablation. A total of 23 ATs were identified in redo procedures including 4 IDAFs, 2 MARTs, 12 IARTs and 5 FATs. The time to recurrence was significantly different among various AT types. Acute success was achieved in 20 of 23 redo procedures. Taking a total of 21 patients presenting atrial fibrillation during follow-up into account, 85 patients (81.9%) were in sinus rhythm. No complications except for a case of RA compartmentation occurred. RA incisional scar played an essential role in promoting both IDAF and IART, while non-incisional scar contributed to a substantial rate of late recurrent AT in forms of both macroreentry and small reentry. Catheter ablation using EAM system resulted in a high success rate during long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Internal supravesical hernia repaired via the anterior approach alone: A case report.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Masaki; Honjo, Soichiro; Sakamoto, Teruhisa; Tokuyasu, Naruo; Arai, Yosuke; Amisaki, Masataka; Uchinaka, Ei; Kurisu, Yasuro; Takahashi, Sadamu; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nagai, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki

    2017-08-24

    Internal supravesical hernia is one of the rarest types of inguinal hernia. The hernial orifice is surrounded by the transverse vesical fold, median umbilical fold, and medial umbilical fold. A 75-year-old male presented with lower abdominal pain and nausea. Plain abdominal CT showed that the bladder was suppressed by small bowel near the left internal inguinal ring. A part of the small bowel wall seemed to be inlaid, and so the patient was diagnosed with a strangulated left inguinal hernia. The hernia repair operation was performed via the anterior approach. There was no internal hernial sac found, but there was a walnut-sized mass in the properitoneal space. A diagnosis was made intraoperatively of internal supravesical hernia with strangulated small bowel. Small bowel resection and hernial orifice closure were performed. Although internal supravesical hernia can present with distinctive CT findings, preoperative diagnosis is extremely difficult. Internal supravesical hernia in previous reports has been repaired via open laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery; however, we successfully repaired this intraoperatively-diagnosed internal supravesical hernia by the anterior approach alone. The patient with internal supravesical hernia diagnosed intraoperatively could be treated via the anterior approach alone successfully. Depending on the situation, the anterior approach can be an option. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. A new type of internal hernia after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Paroz, A; Calmes, J M; Romy, S; Giusti, V; Suter, M

    2009-04-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) is currently the most common bariatric procedure. One of its late complications is the development of internal hernia, which can lead to acute intestinal obstruction or recurrent colicky abdominal pain. The aim of this paper is to present a new, unusual, and so far not reported type of internal hernia. A common computerized database is maintained for all patients undergoing bariatric surgery in our departments. The charts of patients with the diagnosis of internal hernia were reviewed. Three patients were identified who developed acute intestinal obstruction due to an internal hernia located between the jejunojejunostomy and the end of the biliopancreatic limb, directly between two jejunal limbs with no mesentery involved. Another seven patients with intermittent colicky abdominal pain, re-explored for the suspicion of internal hernia, were found to also have an open window of the same location apart from a hernia at one of the typical hernia sites. Since this gap is systematically closed during RYGBP, no other patient has been observed with this problem. Even very small defects can lead to the development of internal hernias after RYGBP. Patients with suggestive symptoms must be explored. Closure of the jejunojejunal defect with nonabsorbable sutures prevents the development of an internal hernia between the jejunal loops at the jejunojejunostomy.

  1. Hiatus hernia and heartburn

    PubMed Central

    Gillison, E. W.; Capper, W. M.; Airth, G. R.; Gibson, M. J.; Bradford, I.

    1969-01-01

    The symptoms in a group of 80 patients with a pure sliding hiatus hernia were investigated using the pyloric regulation test (Capper, Airth, and Kilby, 1966). It was found that there was a high correlation between the symptoms of heartburn and the reflux of duodenal barium into the stomach. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:5810968

  2. Sports Hernia (Athletic Pubalgia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury. A sports hernia is a strain or tear of any so tissue (muscle, tendon, ligament) in the lower abdomen or groin ... sports activity. In some patients the tissues will tear again during sports and ... that attaches the inner thigh muscles to the pubis is cut. The tendon will ...

  3. Umbilical hernia repair in pregnant patients: review of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Haskins, I N; Rosen, M J; Prabhu, A S; Amdur, R L; Rosenblatt, S; Brody, F; Krpata, D M

    2017-07-22

    Umbilical hernias present commonly during pregnancy secondary to increased intra-abdominal pressure. As a result, umbilical hernia incarceration or strangulation may affect pregnant females. The purpose of this study is to detail the operative management and 30-day outcomes of umbilical hernias in pregnant patients using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). All female patients undergoing umbilical hernia repair during pregnancy were identified within the ACS-NSQIP. Preoperative patient variables, intraoperative variables, and 30-day patient morbidity and mortality outcomes were investigated using a variety of statistical tests. A total of 126 pregnant patients underwent umbilical hernia repair from 2005 to 2014; 73 (58%) had incarceration or strangulation at the time of surgical intervention. The majority of patients (95%) underwent open umbilical hernia repair. Superficial surgical site infection was the most common morbidity in patients undergoing open umbilical hernia repair. Based on review of the ACS-NSQIP database, the incidence of umbilical hernia repair during pregnancy is very low; however, the majority of patients required repair for incarceration of strangulation. When symptoms develop, these hernias can be repaired with minimal 30-day morbidity to the mother. Additional studies are needed to determine the long-term recurrence rate of umbilical hernia repairs performed in pregnant patients and the effects of surgical intervention and approach on the fetus.

  4. Current practices of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: a population-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Trevisonno, M; Kaneva, P; Watanabe, Y; Fried, G M; Feldman, L S; Andalib, A; Vassiliou, M C

    2015-10-01

    The selection of a laparoscopic approach for inguinal hernias varies among surgeons. It is unclear what is being done in actual practice. The purpose of this study was to report practice patterns for treatment of inguinal hernias among Quebec surgeons, and to identify factors that may be associated with the choice of operative approach. We studied a population-based cohort of patients who underwent an inguinal hernia repair between 2007 and 2011 in Quebec, Canada. A generalized linear model was used to identify predictors associated with the selection of a laparoscopic approach. 49,657 inguinal hernias were repaired by 478 surgeons. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (LIHR) was used in 8 % of all cases. LIHR was used to repair 28 % of bilateral hernias, 10 % of recurrent hernias, 6 % of unilateral hernias, and 4 % of incarcerated hernias. 268 (56 %) surgeons did not perform any laparoscopic repairs, and 11 (2 %) surgeons performed more than 100 repairs. These 11 surgeons performed 61 % of all laparoscopic cases. Patient factors significantly associated with having LIHR included younger age, fewer comorbidities, bilateral hernias, and recurrent hernias. An open approach is favored for all clinical scenarios, even for situations where published guidelines recommend a laparoscopic approach. Surgeons remain divided on the best technique for inguinal hernia repair: while more than half never perform LIHR, the small proportion who perform many use the technique for a large proportion of their cases. There appears to be a gap between the best practices put forth in guidelines and what surgeons are doing in actual practice. Identification of barriers to the broader uptake of LIHR may help inform the design of educational programs to train those who have the desire to offer this technique for certain cases, and have the volume to overcome the learning curve.

  5. De Garengeot's Hernia: Two Case Reports with Correct Preoperative Identification of the Vermiform Appendix in the Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Muhammad Rafiz; Nnajiuba, Henry; Samlalsingh, Suzette; Ojo, Akinyede

    2016-01-01

    We present two cases of incarcerated de Garengeot's hernia. This anatomical phenomenon is thought to occur in as few as 0.5% of femoral hernia cases and is a rare cause of acute appendicitis. Risk factors include a long pelvic appendix, abnormal embryological bowel rotation, and a large mobile caecum. In earlier reports operative treatment invariably involves simultaneous appendicectomy and femoral hernia repair. Both patients were correctly diagnosed preoperatively with computed tomography (CT). Both had open femoral hernia repair, one with appendectomy and one with the appendix left in situ. Both patients recovered without complications. Routine diagnostic imaging modalities such as ultrasonography and standard CT have previously shown little success in identifying de Garengeot's hernia preoperatively. We believe this to be the first documented case of CT with concurrent oral and intravenous contrast being used to confidently and correctly diagnose de Garengeot's hernia prior to surgery. We hope that this case report adds to the growing literature on this condition, which will ultimately allow for more detailed case-control studies and systematic reviews in order to establish gold-standard diagnostic studies and optimal surgical management in future. PMID:28070438

  6. Sports Hernia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The minimal repair technique for sports hernias repairs only the weak area of the posterior abdominal wall along with decompressing the genitofemoral nerve. This technique has been shown to return athletes to competition rapidly. This study compares the clinical outcomes of the minimal repair technique with the traditional modified Bassini repair. Hypothesis: Athletes undergoing the minimal repair technique for a sports hernia would return to play more rapidly compared with athletes undergoing the traditional modified Bassini repair. Methods: A retrospective study of 28 patients who underwent sports hernia repair at the authors’ institution was performed. Fourteen patients underwent the modified Bassini repair, and a second group of 14 patients underwent the minimal repair technique. The 2 groups were compared with respect to time to return to sport, return to original level of competition, and clinical outcomes. Results: Patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at a median of 5.6 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks), which was significantly faster compared with the modified Bassini repair group, with a median return of 25.8 weeks (range, 4-112 weeks; P = 0.002). Thirteen of 14 patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at their previous level, while 9 of 14 patients in the Bassini group were able to return to their previous level of sport (P = 0.01). Two patients in each group had recurrent groin pain. One patient in the minimal repair group underwent revision hernia surgery for recurrent pain, while 1 patient in the Bassini group underwent hip arthroscopy for symptomatic hip pain. Conclusion: The minimal repair technique allows athletes with sports hernias to return to play faster than patients treated with the modified Bassini. PMID:24427419

  7. Primary fascial closure with laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duyen H; Nguyen, Mylan T; Askenasy, Erik P; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    2014-12-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) has grown in popularity. Typically, this procedure is performed with a mesh bridge technique that results in high rates of seroma, eventration (bulging), and patient dissatisfaction. In an effort to avoid these complications, there is growing interest in the role of laparoscopic primary fascial closure with intraperitoneal mesh placement. This systematic review evaluated the outcomes of closure of the central defect during LVHR. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane databases, and Embase was conducted using PRISMA guidelines. MINORS was used to assess the methodologic quality. Primary outcome was hernia recurrence. Secondary outcomes were surgical-site infection, seroma formation, bulging, and patient-centered items (satisfaction, chronic pain, functional status). Eleven studies were identified, eight of which were case series (level 4 data). Three comparative studies examined the difference between closure and nonclosure of the fascial defect during laparoscopic ventral incisional hernia repairs (level 3 and 4 data). These studies suggested that primary fascial closure (n = 138) compared to nonclosure (n = 255) resulted in lower recurrence rates (0-5.7 vs. 4.8-16.7 %) and seroma formation rates (5.6-11.4 vs. 4.3-27.8 %). Follow-up periods for both groups were similar (1-108 months). Only one study evaluated patient function and clinical bulging. It showed better outcomes with primary fascial closure. Closure of the central defect during LVHR resulted in less recurrence, bulging, and seroma than nonclosure. Patients with closure were more satisfied with the results and had better functional status. The quality of the data was poor, however. A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the role of closure of the central defect during LVHR is warranted.

  8. Obesity increases the odds of acquiring and incarcerating noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Lau, Briana; Kim, Hanjoo; Haigh, Philip I; Tejirian, Talar

    2012-10-01

    The current data available describing the relationship of obesity and abdominal wall hernias is sparse. The objective of this study was to investigate the current prevalence of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias and their correlation with body mass index (BMI) and other demographic risk factors. Patients with umbilical, incisional, ventral, epigastric, or Spigelian hernias with or without incarceration were identified using the regional database for 14 hospitals over a 3-year period. Patients were stratified based on their BMI. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to distinguish other significant risk factors associated with the hernias. Of 2,807,414 patients, 26,268 (0.9%) had one of the specified diagnoses. Average age of the patients was 52 years and 61 per cent were male. The majority of patients had nonincarcerated umbilical hernias (74%). Average BMI was 32 kg/m2. Compared with patients with a normal BMI, the odds of having a hernia increased with BMI: BMI of 25 to 29.9 kg/m2 odds ratio (OR) 1.63, BMI of 30 to 39.9 kg/m2 OR 2.62, BMI 40 to 49.9 kg/m2 OR 3.91, BMI 50 to 59.9 kg/m2 OR 4.85, and BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 OR 5.17 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years was associated with a higher risk for having a hernia (OR, 2.12; 95% [CI], 2.07 to 2.17), whereas female gender was associated with a lower risk (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.55). Those with incarcerated hernias had a higher average BMI (32 kg/m2 vs 35 kg/m2; P<0.0001). Overall, BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 showed an increased chance of incarceration, and a BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 had the highest chance of incarceration, OR 12.7 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years and female gender were also associated with a higher risk of incarceration (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.59 and OR, 1.80; CI, 1.45 to 2.24). Increasing BMI and increasing age are associated with a higher prevalence and an increased risk of incarceration of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

  9. Contemporary thoughts on the management of Spigelian hernia.

    PubMed

    Webber, V; Low, C; Skipworth, R J E; Kumar, S; de Beaux, A C; Tulloh, B

    2017-06-01

    Spigelian hernias are said to be a rare condition of the elderly population, usually arising below the arcuate line. Local experience has led us to challenge these commonly held beliefs. Operations for Spigelian hernia from 2006-2016 were identified from the Edinburgh Lothian Surgical Audit computerised database and case notes were reviewed. One hundred and one patients underwent surgery for 107 Spigelian hernias in the 10-year period. The female-to-male ratio was 2:1. Ages ranged from 32 to 88 with a median of 64 years. Sixty-five operations were done open and 42 were laparoscopic. Twelve of the 27 for which the precise anatomic location was recorded were situated above the arcuate line. Twenty-nine hernias had small defects and comprised interstitial fat only with no peritoneal sac. Ages in this group ranged from 32 to 80 (median = 48 years). All presented with intermittent local pain and/or swelling, although in three patients the hernias were impalpable. Those three also underwent ultrasound, CT and/or laparoscopy, but the hernias were only identified after open surgical exploration. The remaining 78 cases had peritoneal sacs of varying size with defects up to 9 cm across, and all were identified on imaging and/or laparoscopy. Ages ranged from 38 to 88 (median = 67 years; p < 0.01). Eighteen patients presented as emergencies and all were in this group. Spigelian hernias may be more common than we think and are probably under-diagnosed. They commonly arise above the arcuate line. We describe three clinical stages: Stage 1 hernias are those without peritoneal sacs and tend to arise in younger patients, can be difficult to diagnose and may not seen at laparoscopy. Stages 2 and 3 hernias arise in older patients, do have peritoneal sacs, are visible at laparoscopy and are more likely to present as emergencies. Stage three hernias are too large for laparoscopic repair. The differences between stages likely reflect the natural history of the condition, which

  10. [Morgagni hernia causing cardiac tamponade].

    PubMed

    S Breinig; Paranon, S; Le Mandat, A; Galinier, P; Dulac, Y; Acar, P

    2010-10-01

    Morgagni hernia is a rare malformation (3% of diaphragmatic hernias). This hernia is usually asymptomatic in children. We report on a case revealed by an unusual complication. Severe cyanosis was due to right-to-left atrial shunt through the foramen ovale assessed by 2D echocardiography. Diagnosis of the Morgagni hernia was made with CT scan. The intrathoracic liver compressed the right chambers of the heart causing tamponade. Cardiac compression was reversed after surgery and replacement of the liver in the abdomen. Six months after the surgery, the infant was symptom-free with normal size right chambers of the heart.

  11. Bilateral Inguinal Hernias Containing Ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Basrur, Gurudutt Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Inguinal hernias are rare in females. The authors report a case of bilateral inguinal hernias in a 10-year-old female. On exploration, the patient was found to be having a sliding hernia containing incarcerated ovary as contents on both sides. Peroperatively the contents were reduced, the sac was transfixed at its base and the redundant sac was excised. The repair of this form of hernias is more difficult because of adhesions between the contents and the wall of the sac and risk of damage during dissection. A description of this clinical presentation in the pre operative assessment and operative management are discussed in this report. PMID:25918632

  12. Higher postoperative pain and increased morphine consumption follow pre- rather than post-incisional single dose epidural morphine.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, I; White, I; Ekstein, M P; Brill, S; Chazan, S; Ogorek, D; Ben-Abraham, R; Amar, E; Weinbroum, A A

    2011-04-01

    Neuraxial administration of morphine is an effective way of controlling postoperative pain and reducing analgesic consumption. Some animal models have demonstrated that preemptive administration of neuraxial narcotics reduces pain, while others have revealed the contrary. In addition, there have been no consistent results in clinical settings. This double-blind, randomized study compared the effects of pre- vs. post-incisional administration of neuraxial morphine on postoperative pain perception and analgesic requirements over 48 hours following laparotomy for open colectomy under standardized general anesthesia. Twenty patients received epidural morphine (3 mg) before the incision and saline after wound closure (MO1 group), and twenty patients received epidural saline before the incision and morphine after wound closure (MO2 group). Postoperatively, all patients received morphine boluses (1.5 mg) via intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) and rescue doses of intramuscular diclofenac (75 mg) every 6 hours, as needed. MO1 patients used significantly (P<0.05) more morphine than the MO2 group during the first 24 postoperative hours and activated the PCA device more frequently throughout the 48-hour study period. The MO1 group was characterized by significantly (P<0.05) higher self-rated pain scores than the MO2 group throughout the study. The self-rated levels of sedation and satisfaction of the MO2 patients were also consistently better (P<0.05) than those of the MO1 patients, especially during the second postoperative day. Pre-incisional epidural morphine in patients undergoing open colonic surgery under general anesthesia was associated with more postoperative pain, a greater need for analgesics, and poorer patient satisfaction compared to post-incisional morphine administration.

  13. Right-sided diaphragmatic rupture after repair of a large Morgagni hernia.

    PubMed

    Schiergens, T S; Koch, J G; Khalil, P N; Graser, A; Zügel, N P; Jauch, K-W; Kleespies, A

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of a combination of primary and secondary diaphragmatic hernia in a 63-year male patient. For progressive dyspnea and palpitations caused by a large and symptomatic Morgagni hernia resulting in a right-sided enterothorax, an open tension-free mesh repair was performed. The postoperative course was complicated by a secondary hepatothorax through a spontaneous rupture of the right diaphragm. Primary mesh repair of the Morgagni hernia, however, proved to be sufficient. This recurrent herniation might be a consequence of (1) preexisting atrophy of the right diaphragm caused by disposition and/or long-term diaphragmatic dysfunction due to the large hernia, combined with (2) further thinning out of the diaphragm by intraoperative hernia sac resection, and (3) postoperative increase of intra-abdominal pressure.

  14. The laparoscopic approach for repair of indirect inguinal hernias in infants and children

    PubMed Central

    Juang, David; Fraser, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Repair of an indirect inguinal hernia is one of the most common operations performed around the world by pediatric surgeons. Until the last 15 years, most inguinal hernia repairs were performed using an inguinal crease incision and extraperitoneal ligation of the patent processes vaginalis. However, since 2000, the laparoscopic approach has gained popularity and there have been increasing descriptions about various techniques for laparoscopic hernia (LH) repair. At our institution, we have transitioned the majority of inguinal hernia repairs to the laparoscopic approach. In this article, we will describe the technique that is utilized at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri (USA) and express our thoughts on the current debate regarding laparoscopic versus open inguinal hernia repair in infants and children. PMID:27867843

  15. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  16. Inguinal hernia repair: anaesthesia, pain and convalescence.

    PubMed

    Callesen, Torben

    2003-08-01

    Elective surgical repair of an inguinal or femoral hernia is one of the most common surgical procedures. The treatment, however, presents several challenges regarding anaesthesia for the procedure, the postoperative analgesic therapy and convalescence, as well as planning of the procedure. Local, general, and regional anaesthesia are all used for hernia repair, but to different degrees, primarily depending on traditions and whether the institution has specific interest in hernia surgery. Thus, the use of local anaesthesia varies from a few percent in Sweden, 18% in Denmark and up to almost 100% in specialised institutions, dedicated to hernia surgery. The feasibility of local anaesthesia is high, as judged by the rate of conversion to general anaesthesia (< 1%), although intraoperative pain is quite common. The generally low rate of serious complications does not allow firm conclusions, but the rate of less serious complications is lower by local anaesthesia, compared to other anaesthetic techniques. Of special interest is, that the rate of urinary retention can be eliminated by the use of local anaesthesia. Local anaesthesia results, in comparative studies, in a higher degree of patient satisfaction than other anaesthetic techniques. Local anaesthesia also facilitates faster mobilisation and earlier discharge/fulfilment of discharge criteria from post anaesthetic care units than other anaesthetic techniques. Pain after hernia repair is more pronounced at mobilisation or coughing than during rest, and younger patients seem to have more pain than older patients. The pain ceases over time, and it is most pronounced the day after surgery, where two thirds have moderate or severe pain during activity, while one third still have moderate or severe pain after one week, and approximately 10% after 4 weeks. Pain after laparoscopic surgery is less pronounced than after open surgery, while different open repair techniques do not exhibit significant differences. Postoperative

  17. Laparoscopic Repair of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satendra; Afaque, Yusuf; Bhartia, Abhishek Kumar; Bhartia, Vishnu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background, Aims, and Objectives. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia typically presents in childhood but in adults is extremely rare entity. Surgery is indicated for symptomatic and asymptomatic patients who are fit for surgery. It can be done by laparotomy, thoracotomy, thoracoscopy, or laparoscopy. With the advent of minimal access techniques, the open surgical repair for this hernia has decreased and results are comparable with early recovery and less hospital stay. The aim of this study is to establish that laparoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a safe and effective modality of surgical treatment. Materials and Methods. A retrospective study of laparoscopic diaphragmatic hernia repair done during May 2011 to Oct 2014. Total n = 13 (M/F: 11/2) cases of confirmed diaphragmatic hernia on CT scan, 4 cases Bochdalek hernia (BH), 8 cases of left eventration of the diaphragm (ED), and one case of right-sided eventration of the diaphragm (ED) were included in the study. Largest defect found on the left side was 15 × 6 cm and on the right side it was 15 × 8 cm. Stomach, small intestine, transverse colon, and omentum were contents in the hernial sac. The contents were reduced with harmonic scalpel and thin sacs were usually excised. The eventration was plicated and hernial orifices were repaired with interrupted horizontal mattress sutures buttressed by Teflon pieces. A composite mesh was fixed with nonabsorbable tackers. All patients had good postoperative recovery and went home early with normal follow-up and were followed up for 2 years. Conclusion. The laparoscopic repair is a safe and effective modality of surgical treatment for congenital diaphragmatic hernia in experienced hands. PMID:28074156

  18. The feasibility of laparoscopic management of incarcerated obturator hernia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Yilin; Shen, Yingmo; Liu, Sujun; Wang, Minggang; Zhao, Xuefei; Nie, Yusheng; Chen, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Obturator hernia (OH), a rare cause of acute small bowel obstruction, requires immediate surgical intervention to prevent serious complications and mortality. We assessed the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic surgery in patients with incarcerated OH presenting with acute abdomen in an emergency setting. Data pertaining to patients diagnosed with incarcerated OH between 2011 and April 2015 at our hospital were reviewed. Patients' characteristics, operation details and postoperative outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. All ten patients diagnosed with incarcerated obturator hernia during the reference period were females (average age 72.1 ± 11.8 years; average weight 44.1 ± 6.9 kg; average body mass index 17.8 ± 2.1 kg/m(2); average operating time 63 ± 15 min; average hospital stay 6.2 ± 6.6 days). Twelve occult hernias, including six contralateral OHs, two ipsilateral femoral hernias and two bilateral femoral hernias were detected in six patients (60 %), which were simultaneously repaired after laparoscopic exploration. Nine patients (90 %) were successfully treated with synthetic mesh by laparoscopic technique. Only one case required intraoperative conversion to open surgery due to strangulated intestine with perforation. Wound infection was reported in one patient who had undergone bowel resection, but with an eventual complete recovery. Postoperative period was uneventful in the other nine patients. No recurrence or complications were reported on follow-up (mean duration of follow-up: 6-54 months). In this study, laparoscopic technique was associated with a reduced duration of hospital stay and fewer complications. In addition to being a safe and minimally invasive strategy, it allowed for simultaneous diagnosis and treatment of occult hernias during the same procedure. The approach may be a better option for the treatment of incarcerated OH and occult hernias in selected patients.

  19. Laparoscopic treatment of Spiegel hernia by total extraperitoneal (TEP) approach.

    PubMed

    Filip, S; Dragomirescu, C; Copăescu, C

    2014-01-01

    Spiegelian hernia is a rare type of ventral abdominal hernia. Surgical treatment is recommended due to the high risk of complications. Laparoscopic treatment is preferred to open repair, by means of intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal mesh placement, either by transperitoneal(TAPP) or by total extraperitoneal (TEP) approach. Total extraperitoneal approach is rarely reported in the literature. To evaluate the results of laparoscopic repair of Spiegelhernia by total extraperitoneal approach. We prospectively studied the patients operated on for Spiegel hernia between October 2009 and March 2013 by laparoscopic TEP approach at Ponderas Hospital. Data regarding symptoms, sex, preoperative work-up,surgical technique, hospital stay and outcome of the procedure were analysed. Follow-up of the patients was achieved at 1week, 1 month, 6 months and yearly postoperatively and patients were evaluated for recurrence, chronic pain, mesh infection, time to reinsertion to normal activities and overall patient satisfaction score. We have treated 4 patients with Spiegel hernia by laparoscopic TEP repair, with mean age 55.25 years (range 50-64), sex ratio 1 (2 2); all patients were symptomatic, all cases had left sided hernias, the surgical intervention was elective in all cases. Mean hospital stay was 1.5 days (range1- 2 days). There was only one postoperative complication ina patient with asymptomatic seroma, with remission in 1 month. There were no recurrences, no mesh infection, no chronic pain or other morbidity at a mean follow-up of 25 months (range 12-53 months). The overall satisfaction score was maximal (5) in all cases. Spiegelian hernias are rare but surgery is mandatory because of the risk of complications like incarceration and strangulation. In the presented experience, laparoscopic total extraperitoneal approach proved to be an efficient technique,reproducible, with excellent results for Spiegel hernia treated electively. Celsius.

  20. Laparoscopic hernioplasty of hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Hua, Rong; He, Kai; Shen, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is a good choice for surgical treatment of hiatal hernia because of its mini-invasive nature and intraperitoneal view and operating angle. This article will talk about the surgical procedures, technical details, precautions and complications about laparoscopic hernioplasty of hiatal hernia. PMID:27761447

  1. [Repair in situ of parastomal hernia with modified sublay-keyhole technique].

    PubMed

    Fei, Yang; Li, Jiye; Yao, Sheng

    2011-09-01

    no recurrence was observed during additional follow-up of 15 months. No parastomal hernia recurrence or incisional hernia occurred in the other 10 patients. Modified Sublay-Keyhole technique is an effective procedure for reconstruction of abdominal wall in patients with parastomal hernia for low recurrence incidence and less complications. But the long-term effectiveness needs further follow-up.

  2. Current options in inguinal hernia repair in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Kulacoglu, H

    2011-01-01

    Inguinal hernia is a very common problem. Surgical repair is the current approach, whereas asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic hernias may be good candidate for watchful waiting. Prophylactic antibiotics can be used in centers with high rate of wound infection. Local anesthesia is a suitable and economic option for open repairs, and should be popularized in day-case setting. Numerous repair methods have been described to date. Mesh repairs are superior to "nonmesh" tissue-suture repairs. Lichtenstein repair and endoscopic/laparoscopic techniques have similar efficacy. Standard polypropylene mesh is still the choice, whereas use of partially absorbable lightweight meshes seems to have some advantages. PMID:22435019

  3. Combined usage with intraperitoneal and incisional ropivacaine reduces pain severity after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan-Shu; Guan, Feng; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain is the main obstacle for safely rapid recovery of patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). In this study, we systemically evaluated the analgesic efficacy of intraperitoneal and incisional ropivacaine injected at the end of the LC. A total of 160 patients, scheduled for elective LC, were allocated into four groups. Group Sham received intraperitoneal and incisional normal saline (NS). Group IC received incisional ropivacaine and intraperitoneal NS. Group IP received incisional NS and intraperitoneal ropivacaine. Group ICP received intraperitoneal and incisional ropivacaine. At the end of the surgery, ropivacaine was injected into the surgical bed through the right subcostal port and infiltrated at the four ports. Dynamic pain by a visual analogue scale (VAS) and cumulative morphine consumption at 2 h, 6 h, 24 h, and 48 h postoperatively, as well as incidence of side-effects over 48 h after LC was recorded. Compared with those in group Sham, the time of post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) stay, dynamic VAS score (VAS-D) 2 h and 6 h postoperatively, cumulative morphine consumption 6 h and 24 h postoperatively, and incidence of nausea and vomiting 48 h after LC in group IC and ICP were less (P<0.05). Furthermore, intraperitoneal and incisional ropivacaine exerts more powerful analgesic effect than single usage with intraperitoneal or incisional ropivacaine (P<0.05). No patients exhibited signs of local anesthetic toxicity. In conclusion, intraperitoneal and incisional ropivacaine might facilitate PACU transfer and effectively and safely reduce pain intensity after LC.

  4. Two case reports of perineal hernia after laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection with a proposed modification to the operative technique

    PubMed Central

    Ewan, LC; Charleston, PJ

    2014-01-01

    Perineal hernia is a rare complication following laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (APR) for rectal cancer. We present two case reports of perineal hernia following laparoscopic APR and discuss their management. We suggest that they developed because the pelvic peritoneum was left open during laparoscopic APR and propose that closure of the pelvic peritoneum should be routine in this operation. PMID:24780656

  5. Internal hernias: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Salar, O; El-Sharkawy, A M; Singh, R; Speake, W

    2013-06-01

    Hernias are very familiar to a core surgical trainee in the setting of clinics and the surgical assessment unit. By definition, a hernia is an abnormal protrusion of a viscus from one compartment to another. In clinic, they are visible lumps, exhibiting a cough reflex often with a well definable history making them readily identifiable. In the acute setting, they are the third commonest cause of small bowel obstruction in the developed world. Ventral and inguinal hernias account for the majority of these with only a small proportion due to internal hernias. This article aims to educate the core surgical trainee on the anatomy and distinguishing clinical features of these rare but important types of internal abdominal hernias.

  6. Mesh materials and hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Elango, Santhini; Perumalsamy, Sakthivel; Ramachandran, Krishnakumar; Vadodaria, Ketankumar

    2017-01-01

    Hernia incidence has been observed since ancient time. Advancement in the medical textile industry came up with the variety of mesh materials to repair hernia, but none of them are without complications including recurrence of hernia. Therefore individuals once developed with the hernia could not lead a healthy and comfortable life. This drawn attention of surgeons, patients, researchers and industry to know the exact mechanism behind its development, complications and recurrence. Recent investigations highlighted the role of genetic factors and connective tissue disorders being the reason for the development of hernia apart from the abnormal pressure that is known to develop during other disease conditions. This review discusses different mesh materials, their advantages and disadvantages and their biological response after its implantation. PMID:28840830

  7. Vesicocutaneous fistula after sliding hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Varun; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sureka, Sanjoy

    2016-01-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias are usually direct inguinal hernias containing various abdominal viscera. The incidence of bladder forming a part of an inguinal hernia, called as “scrotal cystocele,” is 1–4%. The risk of bladder injury is as high as 12% when repairing this type of hernia. This case report emphasizes this aspect in a 65-year-old man who presented with urinary leak through the scrotal wound following right inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26941501

  8. Initial outcomes of laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair with mesh.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, Alana; Vu, Steven; Armstrong, Chris; Smith, Brian R; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2013-10-01

    The use of mesh in laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair (LHR) may reduce the risk of late hernia recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate initial outcomes and recurrence rate of 92 patients who underwent LHR reinforced with a synthetic bioabsorbable mesh. Surgical approaches included LHR and Nissen fundoplication (n = 64), LHR without fundoplication (n = 10), reoperative LHR (n = 9), LHR with a bariatric operation (n = 6), and emergent LHR (n = 3). The mean length of hospital stay was 2 ± 3 days (range, 1 to 30 days). There were no conversions to open laparotomy and no intraoperative complications. One of 92 patients (1.1%) required intensive care unit stay. The 90-day mortality was zero. Minor complications occurred in 3.3 per cent, major complications in 2.2 per cent, and late complications in 5.5 per cent of patients. There were no perforations or early hernia recurrence. The 30-day reoperation rate was 1.1 per cent. For patients with available 1-year follow-up, the overall recurrence rate was 18.5 per cent with a mean follow-up of 30 months (range, 12 to 51 months). LHR repair with mesh is associated with low perioperative morbidity and no mortality. The use of bioabsorbable mesh appears to be safe with no early hiatal hernia recurrence or late mesh erosion. Longer follow-up is needed to determine the long-term rate of hernia recurrence associated with LHR with mesh.

  9. Sciatic hernia clinically mimicking obturator hernia, missed by ultrasonography: case report.

    PubMed

    Rather, Shiraz Ahmad; Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Parray, Fazal Q; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Asrar, Syed

    2011-05-01

    Sciatic hernia is a rare pelvic floor hernia that occurs through the greater or lesser sciatic foramen. Sciatic hernias often present as pelvic pain, particularly in women, and diagnosis can be difficult. Sciatic hernia is one of the rarest forms of internal hernia, which can present as signs and symptoms of small bowel obstruction, swelling in the respective gluteal region or pelvic pain. Transabdominal and transgluteal operative approaches, including laparoscopic repair, have been reported. We present a case of left-sided sciatic hernia with incarcerated small bowel as its contents. The hernia was missed by ultrasonography and plain abdominal radiography, but the clinical features were suggestive of an obturator hernia.

  10. Long-term quality of life after hernioplasty using a Prolene hernia system in adult inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Yener, O; Aksoy, F; Güzel, P; Bölük, S; Dağ, E; Atak, T

    2012-02-01

    Most surgeons favour the use of a mesh for open inguinal hernia repair as it has a low recurrence rate. Procedures used most frequently are the Lichtenstein method, mesh plug repair and the Prolene hernia system (PHS). The choice of technique may be influenced by effects on postoperative pain and quality of life. In this retrospective study, results from inguinal hernia repair with the PHS in a regional training hospital were analysed. Thirty primary inguinal hernias were treated with PHS. The primary endpoint was the recurrence rate. Secondary endpoints were short-term and long-term complications. Pain was evaluated by use of a visual analog scale (VAS, 0-100), and a short-form 36-item questionnaire was used to assess postoperation quality of life. All patients visited the outpatient clinic for a physical examination (100% follow up). After a median follow up of 8 years, one patient was diagnosed with recurrent herniation (3.3%). Three self-limited wound discharge (10%), and one haematoma needing surgical evacuation (3.3%) were diagnosed. Two patients (6.6%) suffered from persistent pain (VAS > 40). Average VAS score was 21 (0-80) 8 years after surgery. In a regional training hospital, primary inguinal hernias were treated with low recurrence and few complications by use of the PHS.

  11. Endoscopic incisional therapy for benign esophageal strictures: Technique and results.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Jayanta; Dhaka, Narendra; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-12-25

    Benign esophageal strictures refractory to the conventional balloon or bougie dilatation may be subjected to various adjunctive modes of therapy, one of them being endoscopic incisional therapy (EIT). A proper delineation of the stricture anatomy is a prerequisite. A host of electrocautery and mechanical devices may be used, the most common being the use of needle knife, either standard or insulated tip. The technique entails radial incision and cutting off of the stenotic rim. Adjunctive therapies, to prevent re-stenosis, such as balloon dilatation, oral or intralesional steroids or argon plasma coagulation can be used. The common strictures where EIT has been successfully used are Schatzki's rings (SR) and anastomotic strictures (AS). Short segment strictures (< 1 cm) have been found to have the best outcome. When compared with routine balloon dilatation, EIT has equivalent results in treatment naïve cases but better long term outcome in refractory cases. Anecdotal reports of its use in other types of strictures have been noted. Post procedure complications of EIT are mild and comparable to dilatation therapy. As of the current evidence, incisional therapy can be used for management of refractory AS and SR with relatively short stenosis (< 1 cm) with good safety profile and acceptable long term patency.

  12. Endoscopic incisional therapy for benign esophageal strictures: Technique and results

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Jayanta; Dhaka, Narendra; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Benign esophageal strictures refractory to the conventional balloon or bougie dilatation may be subjected to various adjunctive modes of therapy, one of them being endoscopic incisional therapy (EIT). A proper delineation of the stricture anatomy is a prerequisite. A host of electrocautery and mechanical devices may be used, the most common being the use of needle knife, either standard or insulated tip. The technique entails radial incision and cutting off of the stenotic rim. Adjunctive therapies, to prevent re-stenosis, such as balloon dilatation, oral or intralesional steroids or argon plasma coagulation can be used. The common strictures where EIT has been successfully used are Schatzki’s rings (SR) and anastomotic strictures (AS). Short segment strictures (< 1 cm) have been found to have the best outcome. When compared with routine balloon dilatation, EIT has equivalent results in treatment naïve cases but better long term outcome in refractory cases. Anecdotal reports of its use in other types of strictures have been noted. Post procedure complications of EIT are mild and comparable to dilatation therapy. As of the current evidence, incisional therapy can be used for management of refractory AS and SR with relatively short stenosis (< 1 cm) with good safety profile and acceptable long term patency. PMID:26722613

  13. Laparoscopic Pediatric Inguinal Hernia Repair: Overview of "True Herniotomy" Technique and Review of Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Feehan, Brendan P; Fromm, David S

    2017-05-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most commonly performed operations in the pediatric population. While the majority of pediatric surgeons routinely use laparoscopy in their practices, a relatively small number prefer a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair over the traditional open repair. This article provides an overview of the three port laparoscopic technique for inguinal hernia repair, as well as a review of the current evidence with respect to visualization and identification of hernias, recurrence rates, operative times, complication rates, postoperative pain, and cosmesis. The laparoscopic repair presents a viable alternative to open repair and offers a number of benefits over the traditional approach. These include superior visualization of the relevant anatomy, ability to assess and repair a contralateral hernia, lower rates of metachronous hernia, shorter operative times in bilateral hernia, and the potential for lower complication rates and improved cosmesis. This is accomplished without increasing recurrence rates or postoperative pain. Further research comparing the different approaches, including standardization of techniques and large randomized controlled trials, will be needed to definitively determine which is superior. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  14. Sonographic imaging of Spigelian hernias

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Lubiński, Jan; Bojko, Stefania; Gałdyńska, Maria; Bernatowicz, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work was to present clinical material referring to rarely occurring abdominal cavity hernias in semilunar line – Spigelian hernias diagnosed with the help of ultrasound. Material and methods In the period from 1995 to 2001 785 anterior abdominal wall hernias were diagnosed including 11 Spigelian hernias (1.4%) diagnosed in 10 patients (7 women and 3 men) aged from 38 to 65 years old (average age 48). Eight patients complained of spastic pain in abdomen, in 5 of them it was accompanied by bloating and sometimes loud peristalsis. All the patients had been observing the mentioned symptoms from 2 to 5 years. Each of them had had colonoscopy and abdominal cavity ultrasound examination performed, some of them even three times. In 3 women with uterine fibroid the uterus was removed which did not eliminate the symptoms. The ultrasound examination of the abdominal integument was performed mainly with the use of linear transducers of the frequency of 7–12 MHz; in obese patients also convex transducers were used (3,5–6 MHz). Each examination of abdominal integument included the assessment of the following areas: linea alba from xiphoid process to pubic symphysis including umbilicus, both semilunar lines from costal margins to pubic bones, and also inguinal areas. Moreover, all types of postoperative scars were examined. Each hernia was assessed in terms of size (the greatest dimension), hernia sac contents, width of the ring and reducibility under the compression of the transducer. Moreover, cough test and Valsalva's maneuver were performed. Generally, the examination was performed in a standing position. Results In 9 patients hernias were localized unilaterally, in one patient bilaterally. In 7 cases the hernia sac contained small bowel, in 2 cases the preperitoneal and omental fat, and in 2 cases preperitoneal fat only. Eight patients presenting with clinical symptoms underwent operative repair. Conclusion Ultrasound examination is beneficial in

  15. Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal (TEP) Inguinal Hernia Repair Using 3-dimensional Mesh Without Mesh Fixation.

    PubMed

    Aliyazicioglu, Tolga; Yalti, Tunc; Kabaoglu, Burcak

    2017-08-01

    Approximately one fifth of patients suffer from inguinal pain after laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair. There is existing literature suggesting that the staples used to fix the mesh can cause postoperative inguinal pain. In this study, we describe our experience with laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia surgery using 3-dimensional mesh without mesh fixation, in our institution. A total of 300 patients who had undergone laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair with 3-dimensional mesh in VKV American Hospital, Istanbul from November 2006 to November 2015 were studied retrospectively. Using the hospital's electronic archive, we studied patients' selected parameters, which are demographic features (age, sex), body mass index, hernia locations and types, duration of operations, preoperative and postoperative complications, duration of hospital stays, cost of surgery, need for analgesics, time elapsed until returning to daily activities and work. A total of 300 patients underwent laparoscopic TEP hernia repair of 437 inguinal hernias from November 2006 to November 2015. Of the 185 patients, 140 were symptomatic. Mean duration of follow-up was 48 months (range, 6 to 104 mo). The mean duration of surgery was 55 minutes for bilateral hernia repair, and 38 minutes for unilateral hernia repair. The mean duration of hospital stay was 0.9 day. There was no conversion to open surgery. In none of the cases the mesh was fixated with either staples or fibrin glue. Six patients (2%) developed seroma that were treated conservatively. One patient had inguinal hernia recurrence. One patient had preperitoneal hematoma. One patient operated due to indirect right-sided hernia developed right-sided hydrocele. One patient had wound dehiscence at the umbilical port entry site. Chronic pain developed postoperatively in 1 patient. Ileus developed in 1 patient. Laparoscopic TEP inguinal repair with 3-dimensional mesh without mesh fixation can be performed as safe as

  16. Unusual Diaphragmatic Hernias Mimicking Cardiac Masses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si Hun; Kim, Myoung Gun; Kim, Su Ji; Moon, Jeonggeun; Kang, Woong Chol; Shin, Mi-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Hiatal hernia and Morgagni hernia are sorts of diaphragmatic hernias that are rarely detected on transthoracic echocardiography. Although echocardiographic findings have an important role for differential diagnosis of cardiac masses, we often might overlook diaphragmatic hernia. We report three cases of diaphragmatic hernias having specific features. The first case is huge hiatal hernia that encroaches left atrium with internal swirling flow on transthoracic echocardiography. The second case is a hiatal hernia that encroaches on both atria, incidentally detected on preoperative echocardiography. The third case is Morgagni hernia which encroaches on the right atrium only. So, we need to consider possibility of diaphragmatic hernia when we find a cardiac mass with specific echocardiographic features. PMID:26140154

  17. Incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia--differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Bukvić, Nado; Versić, Ana Bosak; Bacić, Giordano; Gusić, Nadomir; Nikolić, Harry; Bukvić, Frane

    2014-12-01

    The incarceration of diaphragmatic hernia is very rare. We present a case of a four-year-old girl who developed the incarceration of left-sided diaphragmatic hernia, who, until then, was completely asymptomatic. This incarceration of the hernia represented a surgical emergency presenting as obstructive ileus and a severe respiratory distress which developed from what appeared to be full health. During a brief pre-operative examination a number of differential diagnoses were suggested. Along with the laboratory blood analysis (complete blood count and acid-base balance) a plain thoracic and abdominal radiography was done (babygram). After that, through an inserted nasal-gastric tube, barium meal of the upper gastrointestinal tract was done, showing abdominal organs in the left half of the thorax and a significant shift of the mediastinum to the right. With an urgent upper medial laparotomy we accessed the abdominal cavity and made the correct diagnosis. An opening was shown in the rear part of the left hemi-diaphragm with thickened and edematous edges, approx. 6 cm in diameter with incarcerated content. The incarcerated abdominal organs (stomach, transversal colon, small intestine and spleen) gradually moved into the abdominal cavity. The opening was closed with nonresorptive sutures (TiCron) size 2-0 with aprevious control and ventilated expansion of the well-developed left lung. In postoperative course the acid-base balance quickly recovered, as well as the general state of the patient and radiography showed a good expansion and lucency of the lung parenchyma and a return of the mediastinum into the middle part of the thorax.

  18. Umbilical hernias: the cost of waiting.

    PubMed

    Strosberg, David S; Pittman, Matthew; Mikami, Dean

    2017-02-01

    Umbilical hernias are well described in the literature, but its impact on health care is less understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of non-operative management of umbilical hernias on cost, work absenteeism, and resource utilization. The Truven Health Database, consisting of 279 employers and over 3000 hospitals, was reviewed for all umbilical hernia patients, aged 18-64 who were enrolled in health plans for 12 months prior to surgery and 12 months after surgery. Patients were excluded if they had a recurrence or had been offered a "no surgery" approach within 1 year of the index date. The remaining patients were separated into surgery (open or laparoscopic repair) or no surgery (NS). Post-cost analysis at 90 and 365 days and estimated days off from work were reviewed for each group. The non-surgery cohort had a higher proportion of females and comorbidity index. Adjusted analysis showed significantly higher 90 and 365 costs for the surgery group (p < 0.0001), though the cost difference did decrease over time. NS group had significantly higher estimated days of health-care utilization at both the 90 (1.99 vs. 3.58 p < 0.0001) and 365 (8.69 vs. 11.04 p < 0.0001) day post-index mark. A subgroup analysis demonstrated laparoscopic repair had higher costs compared to open primarily due to higher index procedure costs (p < 0.05). Though the financial costs were found to be higher in the surgery group, the majority of these were due to the surgery itself. Significantly higher days of health-care utilization and estimated days off work were experienced in the NS group. It is our belief that early operative intervention will lead to decreased costs and resource utilization.

  19. Laparoscopic repair of parastomal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; He, Kai; Hua, Rong; Shen, Qiwei

    2017-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the most common long-term complications after abdominal ostomy. Surgical treatment for parastomal hernia is the only cure but a fairly difficult field because of the problems of infection, effects, complications and recurrence. Laparoscopic repair operations are good choices for Parastomal hernia because of their mini-invasive nature and confirmed effects. There are several major laparoscopic procedures for parastomal hernioplasty. The indications, technical details and complications of them will be introduced and discussed in this article. PMID:28251124

  20. Effects of subcutaneous drain for the prevention of incisional SSI in high-risk patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takaaki; Tabe, Yuichi; Yajima, Reina; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the risk of incisional surgical site infection (SSI) increases with obesity and that the most useful predictor of incisional SSI is the thickness of subcutaneous fat. Based on this finding, we have recently attempted a closure technique in surgery for the obese in which a subcutaneous drain is inserted for the prevention of incisional SSI. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of a subcutaneous drain for preventing incisional SSI in patients undergoing colorectal surgery who are at high risk for incisional SSI. Seventy-nine patients who underwent colorectal resection with high risk for incisional SSI, including patients with obesity (thick subcutaneous fat tissue, >20 mm) and those undergoing emergency operations, were enrolled in this study. The clinical features of these cases with or without a subcutaneous drain were reviewed, and statistical analysis was performed. In these high-risk cases, the overall incidence of incisional SSI was 27.8%. The incidences of incisional SSI in these cases with or without a subcutaneous drain were 14.3% and 38.6%, respectively. Our results suggest that subcutaneous drains are effective for preventing incisional SSI in patients with thick subcutaneous fat in colorectal surgery. Therefore, incisional SSI surveillance for obese patients should be performed separately, which should lead to a further reduction in incisional SSIs.

  1. Polypropylene-based composite mesh versus standard polypropylene mesh in the reconstruction of complicated large abdominal wall hernias: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Kassem, M I; El-Haddad, H M

    2016-10-01

    To compare polypropylene mesh positioned onlay supported by omentum and/or peritoneum versus inlay implantation of polypropylene-based composite mesh in patients with complicated wide-defect ventral hernias. This was a prospective randomized study carried out on 60 patients presenting with complicated large ventral hernia in the period from January 2012 to January 2016 in the department of Gastrointestinal Surgery unit and Surgical Emergency of the Main Alexandria University Hospital, Egypt. Large hernia had an abdominal wall defect that could not be closed. Patients were divided into two groups of 30 patients according to the type of mesh used to deal with the large abdominal wall defect. The study included 38 women (63.3 %) and 22 men (37.7 %); their mean age was 46.5 years (range, 25-70). Complicated incisional hernia was the commonest presentation (56.7 %).The operative and mesh fixation times were longer in the polypropylene group. Seven wound infections and two recurrences were encountered in the propylene group. Mean follow-up was 28.7 months (2-48 months). Composite mesh provided, in one session, satisfactory results in patients with complicated large ventral hernia. The procedure is safe and effective in lowering operative time with a trend of low wound complication and recurrence rates.

  2. Subcuticular absorbable suture with subcutaneous drainage system prevents incisional SSI after hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Eiji; Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Takeishi, Kazuki; Matsuyama, Ayumi; Tsutsui, Shin-Ichi; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shirabe, Ken; Ishida, Teruyoshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2012-07-01

    The effectiveness of subcuticular absorbable suture with subcutaneous drainage to decrease the risk of postoperative incisional surgical site infection (SSI) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients was evaluated. A total of 149 patients with HCC who underwent hepatectomy (Hx) were retrospectively investigated. Patients were divided into two groups: the patients with subcuticular suture combined with subcutaneous drainage (the drainage group; 61 patients) and the patients with nylon suture without subcutaneous drainage (the nylon group; 88 patients). After the operations, the complication rate of postoperative incisional SSI was analyzed and compared between the two groups. In the drainage group the rate of incisional SSI was significantly lower compared to the nylon group: 14-3 % (p = 0.033), respectively. Patients with incisional SSI needed significantly longer postoperative hospital care than the patients without incisional SSI: 28 versus 15 days (p < 0.005). Multivariate analysis revealed that subcuticular absorbable suture with subcutaneous drainage significantly reduced the occurrence of incisional SSI (odds ratio; 0.15; p = 0.034). We have demonstrated that the subcuticular suture with subcutaneous drainage is effective in preventing incisional SSI in patients undergoing Hx for HCC.

  3. Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in the Management of High-Grade Ventral Hernia Repairs.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Unda, Nelson; Soares, Kevin C; Azoury, Saïd C; Baltodano, Pablo A; Hicks, Caitlin W; Burce, Karen K; Cornell, Peter; Cooney, Carisa M; Eckhauser, Frederic E

    2015-11-01

    Despite improved operative techniques, open ventral hernia repair (VHR) surgery in high-risk, potentially contaminated patients remains challenging. As previously reported by our group, the use of a modified negative-pressure wound therapy system (hybrid-VAC or HVAC) in patients with grade 2 hernias is associated with lower surgical site occurrence (SSO) and surgical site infection (SSI) rates. Accordingly, the authors aim to evaluate whether the HVAC would similarly improve surgical site outcomes following VHR in patients with grade 3 hernias. A 4-year retrospective review (2011-2014) was conducted of all consecutive, modified ventral hernia working group (VHWG) grade 3 hernia repairs with HVAC closure performed by a single surgeon (FEE) at a single institution. Operative data and 90-day outcomes were evaluated. Overall outcomes (e.g., recurrence, reoperation, mortality) were reviewed for the study group. A total of 117 patients with an average age of 56.7 ± 11.9 years were classified as grade 3 hernias and underwent open VHR with subsequent HVAC closure. Fifty patients were male (42.7 %), the mean BMI was 35.2 (±9.5), and 60.7 % had a history of prior hernia repair. The average fascial defect size was 201.5 (±167.3) cm(2) and the mean length of stay was 14.2 (±9.3) days. Ninety-day outcomes showed an SSO rate of 20.7 % and an SSI rate of 5.2 %. The overall hernia recurrence rate was 4.2 % (n=6) with a mean follow-up of 11 ± 7.3 months. Modified VHWG grade 3 ventral hernias are associated with significant morbidity. In our series utilizing the HVAC system after VHR, the observed rate of SSO and SSI compared favorably to reported series. Further prospective cost-effective studies are warranted to validate these findings.

  4. Feasibility study of hernia surgery in a general practice setting

    PubMed Central

    Dhumale, Raj

    2004-01-01

    Background: In the early 1990s, waiting times for some surgical procedures and opinions for such routine problems as groin hernia repair were unacceptably long. General practitioners with a special interest (GPwSIs) in general surgery may improve this, but little evidence exists as to whether such service developments may improve efficiency and effectiveness of care. Aims: To reduce the waiting time by offering a surgical service from a general practice setting without compromising on quality and safety of patient care. Design of study: Feasibility study. Setting: One general practice and the patient population of northwest Norfolk. Methods: A GPwSI whose special interest was in general surgery started offering a surgical service, including open hernia repair, from a purpose-built operating theatre within general practice premises. Results: Four thousand, nine hundred and sixty-five surgical procedures, including 286 inguinal hernia repairs, were performed. Quality and safety of patient care were not compromised and the waiting time was reduced from 18 months to 4 months. Conclusion: It is feasible to perform open inguinal hernia repairs in a general practice setting. PMID:15296560

  5. [The significance of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of inguinal hernia and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis].

    PubMed

    Muensterer, O J

    2014-12-01

    Inguinal hernia repair and pyloromyotomy are among the most common operations performed on children. In the last two decades minimally invasive surgery has been employed for an increasing number of these procedures. This review describes the development of the techniques involved, and their current role in therapy. A systematic review of the paediatric surgical literature since 1990 was performed on laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair and pyloromyotomy. Relevant publications were summarised. The first laparoscopic pyloromyotomy was described in 1991, the first laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in children was published in 1998. The learning curve for both procedures is initially steep and reaches a plateau only after about 20 to 30 cases. Both randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses are available comparing the laparoscopic and open techniques for both procedures. The advantages of laparoscopic versus open pyloromyotomy include faster recovery and shorter hospital stay, at similar complication rates. The operation times of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair are shorter in bilateral cases, while the complication rate again is similar. However, the incidence of metachronous contralateral inguinal hernia is lower after laparoscopic repair. Laparoscopic pyloromyotomy and paediatric inguinal hernia repair require special skills. As a minimum, a surgeon's first 20 cases should therefore be performed under competent supervision. Besides resulting in smaller scars, both procedures have concrete advantages and the same complication rates compared to the open techniques. Therefore, both operations can be regarded as the current gold standard. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Incisional block with bupivacaine for analgesia after celiotomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Savvas, Ioannis; Papazoglou, Lysimachos G; Kazakos, George; Anagnostou, Tilemahos; Tsioli, Vassiliki; Raptopoulos, Dimitris

    2008-01-01

    A blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed to evaluate the postoperative analgesic effect of preoperative infiltration of the incision site with bupivacaine in dogs undergoing celiotomy. Sixty dogs were randomly allocated into four groups: preoperative bupivacaine, postoperative bupivacaine, preoperative saline, and postoperative saline. All dogs were premedicated with acepromazine and meperidine; then they were anesthetized with thiopentone and isoflurane. Each group received either bupivacaine or normal saline before midline incision or just before skin closure. After surgery, pain scores were assigned using a numerical rating scale. Preoperative bupivacaine was associated with significantly lower pain scores and a significantly lower need for opioid administration. The authors conclude that a preoperative incisional block with bupivacaine seems to be a useful adjunct for controlling pain after celiotomy in dogs.

  7. Peripheral and spinal GABAergic regulation of incisional pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Reichl, Sylvia; Augustin, Mirjam; Zahn, Peter K; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther M

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of spinal GABAergic inhibition is demonstrated to contribute to pathologic chronic pain states. We investigated spinal and peripheral GABAergic regulation of incisional pain in rats. We found that intrathecal but not peripheral administration of muscimol (GABA-A receptor agonist) and baclofen (GABA-B receptor agonist) reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia after plantar incision in rats. Nonevoked pain behavior after incision was unaffected by these agonists. Similarly, nociception in unincised rats was not reduced by the same dose of agonists. Thus, GABA-A and GABA-B receptors are involved in mediating incision-induced hyperalgesia (but not nonevoked pain). Intrathecal and systemic application of L-838,417, a subtype-selective benzodiazepine site agonist (α2, α3, α5), reduced mechanical and heat hyperalgesia after incision, indicating a role of these subunits in mediating incision-induced hyperalgesia. Interestingly, the effects of all agonists were more intense and prolonged on the day after surgery than on the day of incision. Similarly, spinally administered GABA-A and GABA-B antagonists increased pain behavior, again with a greater effect 1 day after incision. One possible explanation for this finding might be that an incision modulates GABA-mediated inhibition 1 day after incision. However, expression of GABA-A receptor subunits α2 and α3 and GABA-B receptor subunits within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord were unchanged after incision, indicating that receptor expression cannot explain a possible modulation of GABAergic inhibition after incision. Thus, other mechanisms need to be considered. In conclusion, GABA-A and GABA-B receptors are promising targets for postoperative, incisional pain in humans.

  8. Laparoscopic Repair of Inguinal Hernia Using Surgisis Mesh and Fibrin Sealant

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant is an effective long-term treatment for repair of inguinal hernia. This case series involved 38 adult patients with 51 inguinal hernias treated in a primary care center. Methods: Between December 2002 and May 2005, 38 patients with 45 primary and 6 recurrent inguinal hernias were treated with laparoscopic repair by the total extra-peritoneal mesh placement (TEP) technique using Surgisis mesh secured into place with fibrin sealant. Postoperative complications, incidence of pain, and recurrence were recorded, as evaluated at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 1 year, and with a follow-up questionnaire and telephone interview conducted in May and June 2005. Results: The operations were successfully performed on all patients with no complications or revisions to an open procedure. Average follow-up was 13 months (range, 1 to 30). One hernia recurred (second recurrence of unilateral direct hernia), indicating a 2% recurrence rate. Conclusions: Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant can be effectively used to treat primary, recurrent, direct, indirect, and bilateral inguinal hernias in adults without complications and minimal recurrence within 1-year of follow-up. PMID:17575758

  9. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  10. Milestones in the history of hernia surgery: prosthetic repair.

    PubMed

    Read, Raymond C

    2004-02-01

    Billroth (1878) envisaged prostheses before Bassini's sutured cure (1887). Phelps (1894) reinforced with silver coils. Metals were replaced by plastic (Aquaviva 1944). Polypropylene (Usher 1962), resisting infection, became popular. Usher instituted tensionless, overlapping preperitoneal repair. Spermatic cord was parietalized, to obviate keyholing. Stoppa (1969) championed the sutureless Cheatle-Henry approach encasing the peritoneum. His technique, "La grande prosthese de renforcement du sac visceral" (GPRVS), was adopted by laparoscopists. Newman (1980) and Lichtenstein (1986) pioneered subaponeurotic positioning. Kelly (1898) inserted a plug into the femoral canal; Lichtenstein and Shore (1974) followed. Gilbert (1987) plugged the internal ring, and Robbins and Rutkow (1993) treated all groin herniae thus. Incisional herniation has been controlled by prefascial, retrorectus prosthetic placement (Rives-Flament 1973). ePTFE (Sher et al. 1980) is useful intraperitoneally, since it evokes few adhesions. Here, laparoscopy (Ger 1982) is competitive. Beginning in 1964 (Wirtschafter and Bentley), experimental and clinical studies have shown herniation may be associated with aging and genetic or acquired (smoking, etc.) systemic disease of connective tissue. These data, with prospective trials, all but mandate tensionless prosthetic repair.

  11. Lymphoma Diagnosed at Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Veal, David R; Hammill, Chet W

    2010-01-01

    Tumors presenting in the inguinal hernia sac are considered to be extremely rare, with the more common neoplasms metastasizing from the gastrointestinal tract, ovary and prostate. We report the case of Mantle cell lymphoma identified in the inguinal hernia sac following hernia repair. While the hernia sac appeared normal to the surgeon, evaluation by the pathologist showed subtle gross irregularities, with subsequent histologic and immunochemical diagnosis of Mantle cell lymphoma. Twelve previous cases of a lymphoma diagnosed during hernia repair have been described in the English literature. This is the first report of Mantle cell lymphoma found in the hernia sac. This case illustrates the value of routine microscopic evaluation of hernia sacs found from inguinal/femoral herniorrhaphies, as it may be the primary presentation of an asymptomatic metastatic lymphoma. Additionally, it underscores the importance of the surgeon's role in screening hernia sacs if the practice of submitting only macroscopically abnormal specimens for microscopic evaluation is adopted. PMID:20358722

  12. Intraarticular tramadol plus pericapsular incisional bupivacaine provides better analgesia than intraarticular plus pericapsular incisional bupivacaine after outpatient arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Beyzadeoglu, Tahsin; Yilmaz, Cemil; Bekler, Halil; Gokce, Alper; Sayin, Murat M

    2007-05-01

    Postoperative analgesic effects of intraarticular tramadol plus periarticular bupivacaine, and intraarticular plus periarticular bupivacaine injections after day-case arthroscopic partial meniscectomy were compared. Seventy-four ASA I/II patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, performed by a single surgeon under general anesthesia were assigned in a randomized, double-blinded manner into two groups: Group TB (n = 41) received intraarticular 100 mg of tramadol in 20 ml normal saline and periarticular incisional injection of 10 ml bupivacaine 0.5%. Group BB (n = 33) received intraarticular 20 ml 0.25% and periarticular incisional 10 ml 0.5% bupivacaine injections. The injections were performed immediately after the portal closures. Pain was assessed with visual analog scale (VAS) at 0, 15, 30 min and at 1, 2, 4 h at rest and active 90 degrees knee flexion by a blinded observer. The first additional analgesic requirement time was recorded. The patients were discharged the same day with a prescription for paracetamol as required, up to six tablets a day and questioned for analgesic use and pain score at 24 h. VAS scores at rest at 15, 30 min and at movement at 0, 15, 30 min were lower in group TB (P < 0.05). First time requiring additional analgesia was lower in group TB (17.1 +/- 21.9, 33.8 +/- 26.6) (P < 0.05) and total paracetamol dose at the end of 24 h was 1.2 +/- 1.5 g in group BB and 0.9 +/- 1.3 g in group TB (P < 0.05). Intraarticular tramadol plus periarticular bupivacaine combination provides better pain relief and less analgesic requirement following arthroscopic outpatient partial meniscectomy surgery.

  13. Suture versus preperitoneal polypropylene mesh for elective umbilical hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Berger, Rachel L; Li, Linda T; Hicks, Stephanie C; Liang, Mike K

    2014-12-01

    Repair of primary ventral hernias (PVH) such as umbilical hernias is a common surgical procedure. There is a paucity of risk-adjusted data comparing suture versus mesh repair of these hernias. We compared preperitoneal polypropylene (PP) repair versus suture repair for elective umbilical hernia repair. A retrospective review of all elective open PVH repairs at a single institution from 2000-2010 was performed. Only patients with suture or PP repair of umbilical hernias were included. Univariate analysis was conducted and propensity for treatment-adjusted multivariate logistic regression. There were 442 elective open PVH repairs performed; 392 met our inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 126 (32.1%) had a PP repair and 266 (67.9%) underwent suture repair. Median (range) follow-up was 60 mo (1-143). Patients who underwent PP repair had more surgical site infections (SSIs; 19.8% versus 7.9%, P < 0.01) and seromas (14.3% versus 4.1%, P < 0.01). There was no difference in recurrence (5.6% versus 7.5%, P = 0.53). On propensity score-adjusted multivariate analysis, we found that body mass index (odds ratio [OR], 1.10) and smoking status (OR, 2.3) were associated with recurrence. Mesh (OR, 2.34) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (OR, 1.95) were associated with SSI. Only mesh (OR, 3.41) was associated with seroma formation. Although there was a trend toward more recurrence with suture repair in our study, this was not statistically significant. Mesh repair was associated with more SSI and seromas. Further prospective randomized controlled trial is needed to clarify the role of suture and mesh repair in PVH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Preperitoneal Surgery Using a Self-Adhesive Mesh for Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Oguntodu, Olakunle F.; Rodriguez, Francisco; Rassadi, Roozbeh; Haley, Michael; Shively, Cynthia J.; Dzandu, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia repair with mesh has been reported to result in improved patient outcomes. However, there are few published data on the use of a totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach. The purpose of this study was to present our experience and evaluate early outcomes of TEP inguinal hernia repair with self-adhesive mesh. Methods: This cohort study was a retrospective review of patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernial repair from April 4, 2010, through July 22, 2014. Data assessed were age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hernia repair indications, hernia type, pain, paresthesia, occurrence (bilateral or unilateral), recurrence, and patient satisfaction. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Results: Six hundred forty patients underwent laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia surgery with self-adhesive mesh. The average age was 56 years, nearly all were men (95.8%), and the mean BMI was 26.2 kg/m2. Cases involved primary hernia more frequently than recurrent hernia (94% vs 6%; P < .05). After surgery, 92% of the patients reported no more than minimal pain, <1% reported paresthesia, and 0.2% had early recurrence. There were 7 conversions to an open procedure. The patients had no adverse reactions to anesthesia and no bladder injury. Postoperative acute pain or recurrence was not explained by demographics, BMI, or preoperative pain. There were significant associations of hernia side, recurrence, occurrence, and sex with composite end points. Nearly all patients (98%) were satisfied with the outcome. Conclusion: The use of self-adhesive, Velcro-type mesh in laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair is associated with reduced pain; low rates of early recurrence, infection, and hematoma; and improved patient satisfaction. PMID:25587212

  15. Laparoscopic Totally Extraperitoneal Groin Hernia Repair Using a Self-Gripping Mesh: Clinical Results of 235 Primary and Recurrent Groin Hernias.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, John; Choi, Vincent; Hepburn, Kirsten; Hawkins, Will; Loi, Ken

    2015-11-01

    Compared with open surgery, laparoscopic groin hernia repair has been shown to significantly reduce postoperative pain. However, chronic pain remains a problem with the laparoscopic approach, affecting approximately 10% of patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes following the use of Parietex ProGrip™ (Covidien, Dublin, Ireland) self-gripping mesh during laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal groin hernia repair. Data were collected prospectively from 145 male and 15 female patients with 235 inguinal hernias. All patients underwent repair by the laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal approach using Parietex ProGrip mesh. During follow-up ranging from 5 to 24 months, complications, pain score, patient satisfaction, and recurrence were analyzed. All patients were discharged on the day of surgery or the next morning. There were no immediate complications or returns to the operating room. Delayed postoperative complications included minor bruising to the genital region (3 cases), hematoma/seroma (1 case), and wound infection (1 case). The mean follow-up was 15 months, at which time there were no reports of hernia recurrence and 99% of patients were satisfied with their hernia repair. One patient (0.63%) reported severe pain (numeric rating scale score of >7), and 4 patients (2.5%) reported intermittent mild pain on exertion. The results of this study suggest that the use of a self-gripping mesh during the laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal approach is a promising and effective technique for repairing both primary and recurrent inguinal hernias.

  16. Laparoscopic repair of adult Bochdalek's hernia

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Musharraf; Hajini, Firdoos Farooq; Ganguly, Pavitra; Bukhari, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Bochdalek's hernia is a type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia occurring in approximately 1 in 2200–12 500 live births. It is considered to be extremely rare in adults and poses a diagnostic challenge. We present a case of a young man who was diagnosed as a case of congenital Bochdalek's hernia and underwent laparoscopic mesh repair. PMID:23761496

  17. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A hernia...

  18. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A hernia...

  19. Sliding indirect hernia containing both ovaries.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Carol L

    2005-09-01

    Although sliding indirect inguinal hernias containing the ipsilateral ovary and fallopian tube are not uncommon in infant girls, sliding hernias containing both ovaries are rare. This report describes a large indirect inguinal hernia in a 1-year-old infant girl that contained the left uterine fundus, left bladder ear, as well as both ovaries and fallopian tubes.

  20. Changes in the Frequencies of Abdominal Wall Hernias and the Preferences for Their Repair: A Multicenter National Study From Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Şeker, Gaye; Kulacoglu, Hakan; Öztuna, Derya; Topgül, Koray; Akyol, Cihangir; Çakmak, Atıl; Karateke, Faruk; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren; Gürer, Ahmet; Zerbaliyev, Elbrus; Seker, Duray; Yorgancı, Kaya; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydın, İbrahim; Ensari, Cemal; Bilecik, Tuna; Kahraman, İzzettin; Reis, Erhan; Kalaycı, Murat; Canda, Aras Emre; Demirağ, Alp; Kesicioğlu, Tuğrul; Malazgirt, Zafer; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Terzi, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common problem in the general population. A Western estimate reveals that the lifetime risk of developing a hernia is about 2%.1–3 As a result, hernia repairs likely comprise the most frequent general surgery operations. More than 20 million hernias are estimated to be repaired every year around the world.4 Numerous repair techniques have been described to date however tension-free mesh repairs are widely used today because of their low hernia recurrence rates. Nevertheless, there are some ongoing debates regarding the ideal approach (open or laparoscopic),5,6 the ideal anesthesia (general, local, or regional),7,8 and the ideal mesh (standard polypropylene or newer meshes).9,10 PMID:25216417

  1. Factors associated with early recurrence after congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Luke R; Gupta, Vikas; Tsao, Kuojen; Davis, Carl F; Lally, Pamela A; Lally, Kevin P; Harting, Matthew T

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify patient and treatment characteristics associated with early (in hospital) hernia recurrence after congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) repair. Data from the Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Study Group registry were queried from 2007 to 2015. Recurrence of the diaphragmatic hernia after initial repair and prior to death or discharge was determined at the time of reoperation. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approaches included laparoscopy or thoracoscopy, and open approaches consisted of laparotomy or thoracotomy. Multivariate regression analysis was performed. Of 3984 patients, 3332 (84%) underwent CDH repair. 76 (2.3%) patients had an early recurrence. The rate of recurrence was less variable over time for patients undergoing laparotomy vs thoracoscopy (range: 1.1-3.7% vs 1.7-8.9% annually). Timing of repair, whether performed after, during, or before ECMO did not significantly alter recurrence rates (0% vs 4.2% vs 3.0%, p=0.116). Larger defect size (C: OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.2-15.4; D: OR 7.1, 95% CI 1.7-29.1) and an MIS approach (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.7-6.0) were the only independent predictors of recurrence. Larger defect size and an MIS approach were associated with higher rates of early recurrence, while ECMO use and timing of repair with ECMO were not. Treatment study. II. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Surgical treatment of para-oesophageal hiatal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, M. L.; Duffy, J. P.; Beggs, F. D.; Salama, F. D.; Knowles, K. R.; Morgan, W. E.

    2001-01-01

    The development of laparoscopic antireflux surgery has stimulated interest in laparoscopic para-oesophageal hiatal hernia repair. This review of our practice over 10 years using a standard transthoracic technique was undertaken to establish the safety and effectiveness of the open technique to allow comparison. Sixty patients with para-oesophageal hiatal hernia were operated on between 1989 and 1999. There were 38 women and 22 men with a median age of 69.5 years. There were 47 elective and 13 emergency presentations. Operation consisted of a left thoracotomy, hernia reduction and crural repair. An antireflux procedure was added in selected patients. There were no deaths among the elective cases and one among the emergency cases. Median follow-up time was 19 months. There was one recurrence (1.5%). Seven patients (12%) required a single oesophagoscopy and dilatation up to 2 years postoperatively but have been asymptomatic since. Two patients (3%) developed symptomatic reflux which has been well controlled on proton-pump inhibitors. Transthoracic para-oesophageal hernia repair can be safely performed with minimal recurrence. PMID:11777134

  3. Grynfeltt Hernia: A Deceptive Lumbar Mass with a Lipoma-Like Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Zadeh, Jonathan R.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Patel, Chetan; Kozol, Robert; Lopez-Viego, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    The Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia is a rare posterior abdominal wall defect that allows for the herniation of retro- and intraperitoneal structures through the upper lumbar triangle. While this hernia may initially present as a small asymptomatic bulge, the defect typically enlarges over time and can become symptomatic with potentially serious complications. In order to avoid that outcome, it is advisable to electively repair Grynfeltt hernias in patients without significant contraindications to surgery. Due to the limited number of lumbar hernioplasties performed, there has not been a large study that definitively identifies the best repair technique. It is generally accepted that abdominal hernias such as these should be repaired by tension-free methods. Both laparoscopic and open techniques are described in modern literature with unique advantages and complications for each. We present the case of an unexpected Grynfeltt hernia diagnosed following an attempted lipoma resection. We chose to perform an open repair involving a combination of fascial approximation and dual-layer polypropylene mesh placement. The patient's recovery was uneventful and there has been no evidence of recurrence at over six months. Our goal herein is to increase awareness of upper lumbar hernias and to discuss approaches to their surgical management. PMID:26697256

  4. Para-oesophageal and parahiatal hernias in an Asian acute care tertiary hospital: an underappreciated surgical condition

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ye Xin; Ong, Lester Wei Lin; Lee, June; Wong, Andrew Siang Yih

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The prevalence of hiatal hernias and para-oesophageal hernias (PEHs) is lower in Asian populations than in Western populations. Progressive herniation can result in giant PEHs, which are associated with significant morbidity. This article presents the experience of an Asian acute care tertiary hospital in the management of giant PEH and parahiatal hernia. METHODS Surgical records dated between January 2003 and January 2013 from the Department of Surgery, Changi General Hospital, Singapore, were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Ten patients underwent surgical repair for giant PEH or parahiatal hernia during the study period. Open surgery was performed for four patients with giant PEH who presented emergently, while elective laparoscopic repair was performed for six patients with either giant PEH or parahiatal hernia (which were preoperatively diagnosed as PEH). Anterior 180° partial fundoplication was performed in eight patients, and mesh reinforcement was used in six patients. The electively repaired patients had minimal or no symptoms during presentation. Gastric volvulus was observed in five patients. There were no cases of mortality. The median follow-up duration was 16.3 months. There were no cases of mesh erosion, complaints of dysphagia or recurrence of PEH in all patients. CONCLUSION Giant PEH and parahiatal hernia are underdiagnosed in Asia. Most patients with giant PEH or parahiatal hernia are asymptomatic; they often present emergently or are incidentally diagnosed. Although surgical outcomes are favourable even with a delayed diagnosis, there should be greater emphasis on early diagnosis and elective repair of these hernias. PMID:26778633

  5. Giant congenital diaphragmatic hernia in an adult

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bochdalek hernia is the most common type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. It appears frequently in infants but rarely in adults. We present the case of a 50-year-old female han patient with tremendous left-sided congenital posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek hernia) who also has a pair of supernumerary breasts and pulmonary hypoplasia of the lower-left lobe. The patient had an experience of misdiagnosis and she was treated for bronchitis for one year until being admitted to our hospital. This case study emphasizes the rare presentation of Bochdalek hernia in adults and the necessity of high clinical attention to similar cases. PMID:24512974

  6. An Unusual Trocar Site Hernia after Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Trocar site hernias are rare complications after laparoscopic surgery but most commonly occur at larger trocar sites placed at the umbilicus. With increased utilization of the laparoscopic approach the incidence of trocar site hernia is increasing. We report a case of a trocar site hernia following an otherwise uncomplicated robotic prostatectomy at a 12 mm right lower quadrant port. The vermiform appendix was incarcerated within the trocar site hernia. Subsequent appendectomy and primary repair of the hernia were performed without complication. PMID:27648335

  7. Pneumatic positioning and mesh fixation in laparoscopic ventral/incisional hernia repair. New surgical technique and a new device.

    PubMed

    Darecchio, Antonio; Bocchi, Paolo; Kukleta, Jan F

    2015-01-01

    Oggetto di questa pubblicazione è la descrizione di una nuova tecnica chirurgica per la riparazione videolaparoscopica di laparoceli ed ernie della parete addominale anteriore. Tale tecnica è strettamente dipendente dall’utilizzo di un nuovo strumento pneumatico per il posizionamento della protesi. Attualmente esistono in commercio svariati tipi di protesi intraperitoneali con valide caratteristiche strutturali. Tuttavia lo scoglio concettuale rimane sui metodi e sui mezzi di fissaggio delle protesi. I mezzi meccanici di qualsiasi conformazione per il fatto stesso di essere dei mezzi meccanici (spirali metalliche ancorette e viti) espongono al pericolo di danno iatrogeno le strutture vascolari nervose che possono incontrare nel loro percorso. La nuova tecnica proposta mira alla perfetta distensione delle protesi per utilizzo intraperitoneale ed ai loro ottimale fissaggio con adesivo chirurgico in condizioni di sicurezza per le strutture circostanti. Tale tecnica è stata eseguita su cadavere di suino* con protesi intraperitoneali di poliestere-gel-collageno e cyanoacrylate come adesivo chirurgico ma non è esclusa la fattibilità con altri tipi di colle, di protesi, protesi auto-adesive già esistenti in commercio o che potrebbero essere appositamente prodotte.

  8. Laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias: a Canadian experience

    PubMed Central

    Boushey, Robin P.; Moloo, Husein; Burpee, Stephen; Schlachta, Christopher M.; Poulin, Eric C.; Haggar, Fatima; Trottier, Daniel C.; Mamazza, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Background The surgical approach to paraesophageal hernias (PEH) has changed with the advent of laparoscopic techniques. Variation in both perioperative outcomes and hernia recurrence rates are reported in the literature. We sought to evaluate the short-and intermediate-term outcomes with laparoscopic PEH repair. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients having laparoscopic repair of PEH between June 1998 and September 2002. We included patients with more than 120 days of follow-up. Results A total of 58 patients with a mean age of 60.4 (standard deviation [SD] 15.0) years had a laparoscopic procedure to repair a primary PEH, as well as adequate follow-up, during the study period. The types of PEH included type II (n = 13), III (n = 44) and IV (n = 1). The most common symptoms were epigastric pain (57%), dysphagia (40%), heartburn (31%) and vomiting (28%). Associated procedures included 56 (96%) Nissen fundoplications and 2 (4%) gastropexies. We closed all crural defects either with or without pledgets, and 2 patients required the use of mesh. There was 1 conversion to open surgery owing to intraoperative bleeding secondary to a consumptive coagulopathy; we observed no other major intraoperative emergencies. Minor or major complications occurred in 15 patients (26%). Late postoperative complications included 1 umbilical hernia. The mean length of stay in hospital was 3.8 (SD 2.5) days. After surgery, 19 patients were completely asymptomatic, and the majority of the remaining patients (83%) described marked symptom improvement. Upper gastrointestinal series performed in symptomatic patients in the postoperative setting identified 5 recurrent paraesophageal hernias (8.6%) and 5 small sliding hernias (9%). Conclusion Laparoscopic repair of PEH is associated with improved long-term symptom relief, low morbidity and acceptable recurrence rates when performed in an experienced centre. PMID:18841230

  9. Cost of ventral hernia repair using biologic or synthetic mesh.

    PubMed

    Totten, Crystal F; Davenport, Daniel L; Ward, Nicholas D; Roth, J Scott

    2016-06-15

    Patients undergoing ventral hernia repair (VHR) with biologic mesh (BioM) have higher hospital costs compared with synthetic mesh (SynM). This study compares 90-d pre- and post-VHR hospital costs (180-d) among BioM and SynM based on infection risk. This retrospective National Surgical Quality Improvement Program study matched patient perioperative risk with resource utilization cost for a consecutive series of VHR repairs. Patient infection risks, clinical and financial outcomes were compared in unmatched SynM (n = 303) and BioM (n = 72) groups. Propensity scores were used to match 35 SynM and BioM pairs of cases with similar infection risk for outcomes analysis. BioM patients in the unmatched group were older with higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) and wound classification, and they more frequently underwent open repairs for recurrent hernias. Wound surgical site infections were more frequent in unmatched BioM patients (P = 0.001) as were 180-d costs ($43.8k versus $14.0k, P < 0.001). Propensity matching resulted in 31 clean cases. In these low-risk patients, wound occurrences and readmissions were identical, but 180-d costs remained higher ($31.8k versus $15.5k, P < 0.001). There were no differences in hospital 180-d diagnostic, emergency room, intensive care unit, floor, pharmacy, or therapeutic costs. However, 180-d operating room services and supply costs were higher in the BioM group ($21.1k versus $7.1k, P < 0.001). BioM is used more commonly in hernia repairs involving higher wound class and ASA scores and recurrent hernias. Clinical outcomes after low-risk VHRs are similar; SynM utilization in low-risk hernia repairs was more cost-effective. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Upper Eyelid Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing With Incisional Blepharoplasty.

    PubMed

    Kotlus, Brett S; Schwarcz, Robert M; Nakra, Tanuj

    2016-01-01

    Laser resurfacing, performed at the same time as blepharoplasty, has most commonly been applied to the lower eyelid skin but can effectively be used on the upper eyelid to reduce rhytidosis and improve skin quality. The authors evaluate the safety and efficacy of this procedure. Fractional CO2 laser resurfacing was performed in conjunction with incisional upper blepharoplasty. The ultrapulsed laser energy was applied to the sub-brow skin, the upper medial canthal skin, and the pretarsal skin in 30 patients. Photos were obtained preoperatively and at 3 months. All patients demonstrated reduction in upper eyelid rhytidosis without any serious complications. Independent rhytidosis grading (0-4) showed a mean improvement of 42%. One patient experienced wound dehiscence that satisfactorily resolved without intervention. Upper eyelid laser resurfacing is effective and can be safely performed at the same time as upper blepharoplasty. This approach reduces or eliminates the need for medial incisions to address medial canthal skin redundancy and rhytidosis and it directly treats upper eyelid wrinkles on residual eyelid and infra-brow skin during blepharoplasty.

  11. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: a prospective evaluation at Eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Vikal Chandra; Sood, Shasank; Bhattarai, Bal Krishna; Agrawal, Chandra Shekhar; Adhikary, Shailesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inguinal hernias have been treated traditionally with open methods of herniorrhaphy or hernioplasty. But the trends have changed in the last decade with the introduction of minimal access surgery. Methods This study was a prospective descriptive study in patients presenting to Surgery Department of B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal with reducible inguinal hernias from January 2011 to June 2012. All patients >18 years of age presenting with inguinal hernias were given the choice of laparoscopic repair or open repair. Those who opted for laparoscopic repair were included in the study. Results There were 50 patients, age ranged from 18 to 71 years with 34 being median age at presentation. In 41 patients, totally extraperitoneal repair was attempted. Of these, 2 (4%) repairs were converted to transabdominal repair and 2 to open mesh repair (4%). In 9 patients, transabdominal repair was done. The median total hospital stay was 4 days (range 3-32 days), the mean postoperative stay was 3.38±3.14 days (range 2-23 days), average time taken for full ambulation postoperatively was 2.05±1.39 days (range 1-10 days), and median time taken to return for normal activity was 5 days (range 2-50 days). One patient developed recurrence (2%). None of the patients who had laparoscopic repair completed complained of neuralgias in the follow-up. Conclusion Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias could be contemplated safely both via totally extra peritoneal as well as transperitoneal route even in our setup of a developing country with modifications. PMID:25170385

  12. Effect of prosthetic material on adhesion formation after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Borrazzo, E C; Belmont, M F; Boffa, D; Fowler, D L

    2004-05-01

    Intraperitoneal placement of prosthetic mesh causes adhesion formation after laparoscopic incisional hernia repair. A prosthesis that prevents or reduces adhesion formation is desirable. In this study, 21 pigs were randomized to receive laparoscopic placement of plain polypropylene mesh (PPM), expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), or polypropylene coated on one side with a bioresorbable adhesion barrier (PPM/HA/CMC). The animals were sacrificed after 28 days and evaluated for adhesion formation. Mean area of adhesion formation was 14% (SD+/-15) in the PPM/HA/CMC group, 40% (SD+/-17) in the PPM group, and 41% (SD+/-39) in the ePTFE group. The difference between PPM/HA/CMC and PPM was significant ( P=0.013). A new visceral layer of mesothelium was present in seven out of seven PPM/HA/CMC cases, six out of seven PPM cases, and two out of seven ePTFE cases. Thus, laparoscopic placement of PPM/HA/CMC reduces adhesion formation compared to other mesh types used for laparoscopic ventral hernia repairs.

  13. The increased cost of ventral hernia recurrence: a cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Davila, D G; Parikh, N; Frelich, M J; Goldblatt, M I

    2016-12-01

    Over 300,000 ventral hernia repairs (VHRs) are performed each year in the US. We sought to assess the economic burden related to ventral hernia recurrences with a focused comparison of those with the initial open versus laparoscopic surgery. The Premier Alliance database from 2009 to 2014 was utilized to obtain patient demographics and comorbid indices, including the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Total hospital cost and resource expenses during index laparoscopic and open VHRs and subsequent recurrent repairs were also obtained. The sample was separated into laparoscopic and open repair groups from the initial operation. Adjusted and propensity score matched cost outcome data were then compared amongst groups. One thousand and seventy-seven patients were used for the analysis with a recurrence rate of 3.78 %. For the combined sample, costs were significantly higher during recurrent hernia repair hospitalization ($21,726 versus $19,484, p < 0.0001). However, for index laparoscopic repairs, both the adjusted total hospital cost and department level costs were similar during the index and the recurrent visit. The costs and resource utilization did not go up due to recurrence, even though these patients had greater severity during the recurrent visit (CCI score 0.92 versus 1.06; p = 0.0092). Using a matched sample, the total hospital recurrence cost was higher for the initial open group compared to laparoscopic group ($14,520 versus $12,649; p = 0.0454). Based on our analysis, need for recurrent VHR adds substantially to total hospital costs and resource utilization. Following initial laparoscopic repair, however, the total cost of recurrent repair is not significantly increased, as it is following initial open repair. When comparing the initial laparoscopic repair versus open, the cost of recurrence was higher for the prior open repair group.

  14. A national trainee-led audit of inguinal hernia repair in Scotland.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, S; Robertson, A G; Robson, A J; Richards, C H; Nicholson, G A; Mittapalli, D

    2015-10-01

    This audit assessed inguinal hernia surgery in Scotland and measured compliance with British Hernia Society Guidelines (2013), specifically regarding management of bilateral and recurrent inguinal hernias. It also assessed the feasibility of a national trainee-led audit, evaluated regional variations in practise and gauged operative exposure of trainees. A prospective audit of adult inguinal hernia repairs across every region in Scotland (30 hospitals in 14 NHS boards) over 2-weeks was co-ordinated by the Scottish Surgical Research Group (SSRG). 235 patients (223 male, median age 61) were identified and 96 % of cases were elective. Anaesthesia was 91 % general, 5 % spinal and 3 % local. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered in 18 %. Laparoscopic repair was used in 33 % (30 % trainee-performed). Open repair was used in 67 % (42 % trainee-performed). Elective primary bilateral hernia repairs were laparoscopic in 97 % while guideline compliance for an elective recurrence was 77 %. For elective primary unilateral hernias, the use of laparoscopic repair varied significantly by region (South East 43 %, North 14 %, East 7 % and West 6 %, p < 0.001) as did repair under local anaesthesia for open cases (North 21 %, South East 4 %, West 2 % and East 0 %, p = 0.001). Trainees independently performed 9 % of procedures. There were no significant differences in trainee or unsupervised trainee operator rates between laparoscopic and open cases. Mean hospital stay was 0.7-days with day case surgery performed in 69 %. This trainee-lead audit provides a contemporary view of inguinal hernia surgery in Scotland. Increased compliance on recurrent cases appears indicated. National re-audit could ensure improved adherence and would be feasible through the SSRG.

  15. Subcutaneous extraperitoneal repair of ventral hernias: a biological basis for fascial transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, E E

    1975-01-01

    Two fundamental biological differences between normal fascia and scar tissue are rate of collagen turnover and physical weave of collagen subunits. Both factors account for unsatisfactory results following ventral hernia repair unless scar tissue is excised and normal fiscia used. Removal of scar and identification of normal fascia often require extensive dissection, entrance into the peritoneal cavity, and sometimes requires lysis of intestinal adhesions with occasional injury to bowel. Simple imbrication of the hernia sac, as in treatment of a direct inguinal hernia, without excision usually results in recurrence of the hernia because of remodeling and attenuation of scar tissue. A new procedure, based upon the technique of direct inguinal hernia repair without opening peritoneum, has been performed on 12 patients with large ventral hernias. The procedures, performed entirely in a subcutaneous plane, involves imbrication of scar, transfer of a massive fascial onlay graft, and use of an internal stent. Patients have been followed for one to 5 years; there have been no recurrences. Inductive influence of the fascial transplant has been measured in two patients; a tenfold increase in net collagen synthesis and deposition occurs for at least one year following transplantation of fascia to an imbricated scar recipient area. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1130886

  16. Liquid-injection for preperitoneal dissection of transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal [corrected] hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Mizota, Tomoko; Watanabe, Yusuke; Madani, Amin; Takemoto, Norihiro; Yamada, Hidehisa; Poudel, Saseem; Miyasaka, Yuji; Kurashima, Yo

    2015-03-01

    The creation of an adequate peritoneal flap during laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair, while avoiding injuring surrounding structures can be technically challenging. Liquid infiltration of the preperitoneal space can help facilitate dissection and avoid inadvertent injuries. We describe a novel technique for TAPP inguinal hernia repair using liquid-injection for preperitoneal [corrected] dissection and report our initial experience. TAPP inguinal hernia repair using a liquid-injection technique during preperitoneal dissection was performed by a single surgical resident without prior TAPP repair experience from July 2013 to January 2014. After trocar placement, 60 mL of 0.3 % lidocaine with 1:300,000 dilution of epinephrine was injected percutaneously using a blunt needle under laparoscopic visualization into the preperitoneal space to assist with the dissection and parietalization of the vas deferens, spermatic vessels, and epigastric vessels. The initial peritoneal incision is performed at the lateral side of the inguinal canal, followed by blunt dissection of the preperitoneal space. Eleven patients (median age: 69; 8 male) with a total of 12 inguinal hernias underwent a TAPP repair using a liquid-injection preperitoneal dissection technique. Ten patients had unilateral hernias (4 indirect, 6 direct), and one patient had bilateral direct hernias. The median operative time, median injection time, and median dissection time were 116, 3.5, and 42 min, respectively. Estimated blood loss was less than 10 mL for all cases. No intraoperative injuries, conversions to open repair, or 30-day postoperative complications occurred. There were no hernia recurrences after a median follow-up of 143 days. Our preliminary experience suggests that liquid-injection to assist preperitoneal dissection during TAPP inguinal hernia repair appears to be safe and feasible. This novel method facilitates the dissection of spermatic cord structures, and

  17. Diaphragmatic hernia: an unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neha; Fernandes, Roland; Thakrar, Amit; Rozati, Hamoun

    2013-01-01

    A 53-year-old lady presented to A&E with a 3-day history of severe epigastric pain and vomiting. This was preceded by a 3-month history of generalised abdominal discomfort, early satiety and increasing shortness of breath. A CT scan showed a left-sided posterior diaphragmatic defect. Urgent repair of the hernia showed herniation of three-quarter of the stomach, half of the transverse colon, the 13 cm spleen and the pancreas in the chest. There were no postoperative complications. Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are known to be a complication of major trauma. However, the patient in this case report presented acutely, after mild physical trauma related to using a rowing machine. This exercise, when not performed correctly can raise intra-abdominal pressure. It is plausible that this trauma, although mild, was sufficient in causing the lady's diaphragmatic hernia. This case would suggest that the trauma required to cause a diaphragmatic hernia need not be as severe as originally thought. PMID:23616319

  18. Minilaparoscopy For Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Malcher, Flavio; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti; Araujo, Guilherme D. E.; Silva, José Antônio Da Cunha E.; Rao, Prashanth; Iglesias, Antonio Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Inguinal hernia repair is among the most common procedures performed worldwide and the laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach is a recognized and effective surgical technique. Although technically advantageous because of the option of no mesh fixation and no need for creation of a peritoneal flap resulting, in less postoperative pain and faster recovery, TEP has not achieved the popularity it deserves, mainly because of its complexity and steep learning curve. Minilaparoscopy was first described in the 1990s and has recently gained significantly from better instrumentation that may increase TEP's effectiveness and acceptance. We performed a prospective study, to analyze the outcomes of minilaparoscopy in pain and operative time when compared to the conventional laparoscopic technique in hernia repair. Methods: Fifty-eight laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs were performed: 36 by traditional laparoscopic technique and 22 by minilaparoscopic instruments (mini). A study protocol was applied prospectively for data collection. Variables analyzed were early postoperative pain (at hour 6 after procedure), pain at discharge, use of on-demand analgesics, and operative time. Results: The mini group presented reduced early postoperative pain and operative time. The present study also suggests less postoperative pain at discharge with mini procedures, although this difference was not statistically significant. No difference between the groups regarding on-demand use of analgesics was found. Conclusions: This study corroborates findings in previously published papers that have shown the feasibility of minilaparoscopy in laparoscopic TEP hernia repair and its benefits regarding postoperative pain, operative time, and aesthetic outcomes. PMID:27777499

  19. Pain and compression neuropathy in primary inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Wright, R; Born, D E; D'Souza, N; Hurd, L; Gill, R; Wright, D

    2017-08-17

    Enlargement of the ilioinguinal nerve at the external inguinal ring is observed in 34% of patients undergoing primary open inguinal herniorrhaphy; in 88% of patients it occurs at the fascial edge where the hernia mushrooms with abdominal pressure. Compression neuropathy occurs near many anatomical nerve constriction sites and is associated with enlargement of the peripheral nerve accompanied by sensory changes. In this prospective study, Carolina Comfort Scale (CCS) questionnaire data was collected for 35 primary hernia repairs. Each patient underwent primary inguinal herniorrhaphy that included ilioinguinal neurectomy. All nerves were sampled proximal to the external inguinal ring. Any nerves with grossly increased overall diameter to any degree distal to the external ring were additionally sampled in the thickened portions. A neuropathologist performed histologic evaluation of the H&E-stained cross sections. Paired comparison of proximal and distal nerves revealed a greater overall diameter and greater measured nerve-specific diameter in distal nerve segments. Nerves with increased overall diameter were also found to have a statistically significant positive correlation with four of eight pain measures. Additionally, increased nerve-specific diameter correlates with increased pain on four of eight pain values, but age effect on nerve diameter blunts this finding. Increased preoperative CCS pain values in primary open inguinal hernia are significantly correlated with gross enlargement of the overall diameter and nerve-specific diameter of the ilioinguinal nerve beyond the external inguinal ring. This is consistent with a compression neuropathy.

  20. Evaluation of Composite Mesh for Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Jim F.; Agee, Neal; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Heath, Jessica J.; Lau, Kwan N.; McKillop, Iain H.; Sindram, David; Martinie, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Composite mesh prostheses incorporate the properties of multiple materials for ventral hernia repair. This study evaluated a polypropylene/ePTFE composite mesh with a novel internal polydioxanone (PDO) absorbable ring. Methods: Composite mesh was placed intraperitoneally in 16 pigs through an open laparotomy and explanted at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Intraabdominal adhesions were measured laparoscopically. Host tissue in-growth was assessed histologically and tensiometrically. Degradation of the internal PDO ring component was also measured tensiometrically. Appropriate statistical tests were used, and P≤.05 indicated significance. Results: No adhesions were formed in 50% of the grafts explanted at 8 weeks and 25% of grafts explanted at 12 weeks. There were significantly more vascular structures at 8 weeks, 73.5±28, compared with 2 weeks, 6.75±2 (P≤.01). The T-peel force at the mesh-host tissue interface was not significantly different among time points. The absorbable PDO ring underwent complete degradation by 12 weeks. Conclusions: This composite mesh was associated with minimal intraabdominal adhesions, progressive in-growth of host tissues, and complete degradation of a novel internal PDO ring that aided mesh positioning. This composite hernia mesh showed a favorable performance in a porcine model of open ventral hernia repair. PMID:21985713

  1. Two Different Surgical Approaches for Strangulated Obturator Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Sze Li, Siow; Kenneth Kher Ti, Voon

    2012-01-01

    Obturator hernia is a rare condition that may present in an acute or subacute setting in correlation with the degree of small-bowel obstruction. Pre-operative diagnosis is difficult, as symptoms are often non-specific. A high index of suspicion should be maintained for emaciated elderly women with small-bowel obstruction without a previous abdominal operation and a positive Howship–Romberg sign. When diagnosis is in doubt, computed tomography scan of the abdomen and the pelvis (if available) or laparotomy should be performed immediately, as high mortality rate is related to the perforation of gangrenous bowels. We present 2 cases of strangulated obturator hernia, managed differently with both open and laparoscopic approaches. The diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography scan is highlighted followed by a brief literature review with an emphasis placed on surgical management. PMID:22977378

  2. Incidental Non-Inguinals Hernias in Totally Extra-Peritoneal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Old, OJ; Kulkarni, SR; Hardy, TJ; Slim, FJ; Emerson, LG; Bulbulia, RA; Whyman, MR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Totally extra-peritoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair allows identification and repair of incidental non-inguinal groin hernias. We assessed the prevalence of incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair and identified the risk factors for incidental hernias. Materials and Methods Consecutive patients undergoing TEP repair from May 2005 to November 2012 were the study cohort. Inspection for ipsilateral femoral, obturator and rarer varieties of hernia was undertaken during TEP repair. Patient characteristics and operative findings were recorded on a prospectively collected database. Results A total of 1,532 TEP repairs were undertaken in 1,196 patients. Ninety-three patients were excluded due to incomplete data, leaving 1,103 patients and 1,404 hernias for analyses (1,380 male; 802 unilateral and 301 bilateral repairs; median age, 59 years). Among the 37 incidental hernias identified (2.6% of cases), the most common type of incidental hernia was femoral (n=32, 2.3%) followed by obturator (n=2, 0.1%). Increasing age was associated with an increased risk of incidental hernia, with a significant linear trend (p<0.01). The risk for patients >60 years of age was 4.0% vs 1.4% for those aged <60 years (p<0.01). Incidental hernias were found in 29.2% of females vs 2.2% of males, (p<0.0001). Risk of incidental hernia in those with a recurrent inguinal hernia was 3.0% vs 2.6% for primary repair (p=0.79). Conclusions Incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair were found in 2.6% of cases and, though infrequent, could cause complications if left untreated. The risk of incidental hernia increased with age and was significantly higher in patients aged >60 years and in females. PMID:25723688

  3. Incidental non-inguinals hernias in totally extra-peritoneal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Old, O J; Kulkarni, S R; Hardy, T J; Slim, F J; Emerson, L G; Bulbulia, R A; Whyman, M R; Poskitt, K R

    2015-03-01

    Totally extra-peritoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair allows identification and repair of incidental non-inguinal groin hernias. We assessed the prevalence of incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair and identified the risk factors for incidental hernias. Consecutive patients undergoing TEP repair from May 2005 to November 2012 were the study cohort. Inspection for ipsilateral femoral, obturator and rarer varieties of hernia was undertaken during TEP repair. Patient characteristics and operative findings were recorded on a prospectively collected database. A total of 1,532 TEP repairs were undertaken in 1,196 patients. Ninety-three patients were excluded due to incomplete data, leaving 1,103 patients and 1,404 hernias for analyses (1,380 male; 802 unilateral and 301 bilateral repairs; median age, 59 years). Among the 37 incidental hernias identified (2.6% of cases), the most common type of incidental hernia was femoral (n=32, 2.3%) followed by obturator (n=2, 0.1%). Increasing age was associated with an increased risk of incidental hernia, with a significant linear trend (p<0.01). The risk for patients >60 years of age was 4.0% vs 1.4% for those aged <60 years (p<0.01). Incidental hernias were found in 29.2% of females vs 2.2% of males, (p<0.0001). Risk of incidental hernia in those with a recurrent inguinal hernia was 3.0% vs 2.6% for primary repair (p=0.79). Incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair were found in 2.6% of cases and, though infrequent, could cause complications if left untreated. The risk of incidental hernia increased with age and was significantly higher in patients aged >60 years and in females.

  4. Acute management of a unilateral incarcerated Spigelian hernia in a patient with bilateral Spigelian hernias.

    PubMed

    Vannahme, M; Monkhouse, S J W

    2013-09-01

    Spigelian hernias were first described by Joseph Klinkosch in the 18th century, and have since posed a diagnostic and surgical problem owing to their non-specific presentation and rarity. While the management of unilateral hernias is fairly well described in today's literature, bilateral Spigelian hernias are very rare. We describe the emergency management of a patient with bilateral Spigelian hernias, diagnosed on computed tomography.

  5. Occult hernias detected by laparoscopic totally extra-peritoneal inguinal hernia repair: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Dulucq, J-L; Wintringer, P; Mahajna, A

    2011-08-01

    One distinct advantage of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is the opportunity for clear visualization of the direct, indirect, femoral, obturator and other groin spaces. The aim of this study was to examine/assess the potential of the laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair method in detecting unexpected additional hernias. Patients who underwent an elective inguinal hernia repair, in the department of abdominal surgery at the institute of laparoscopic surgery (ILS, Bordeaux, France) between September 2003 and July 2005 were enrolled prospectively in the study. The patients' demographic data, operative, postoperative course and outpatient follow-up were studied. A total of 337 laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs were performed in 263 patients. Of these, 189 patients had unilateral hernia (109 right and 80 left) and 74 patients had bilateral hernias. Indirect hernias were the most common, followed by direct and then femoral hernias. There were 218 male patients and 45 female patients with a mean age of 60 ± 15 years. There were 44 unexpected hernias: 6 spegilian hernias, 19 obturator hernias and another 19 femoral hernias. Two patients were converted to transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) due to surgical difficulties. There were no major intraoperative complications in all patients except for three cases of bleeding arising from the inferior epigastric artery. Only one patient had postoperative bleeding and was re-operated on several hours after the hernia repair. No recurrence occurred in the present series. The laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair approach allows viewing of the entire myopectineal orifice, facilitating repair of any unexpected hernias and thereby reducing the chance of recurrence.

  6. Isolated medial incisional approach to subtalar and talonavicular arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Weinraub, Glenn M; Schuberth, John M; Lee, Michael; Rush, Shannon; Ford, Lawrence; Neufeld, Jason; Yu, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Triple arthrodesis is commonly used to correct complex deformity with hindfoot valgus. The authors use an isolated medial incisional approach for subtalar and talonavicular joint arthrodesis to correct hindfoot deformity, including high degrees of hindfoot valgus. To assess outcomes achieved with this approach, we reviewed the records of 45 patients from the practices of 5 surgeons. Independent variables evaluated included patient age, primary pathology, use of biologic agents, operative time, time to union, and complications. The median patient age was 57 years (range, 14-78 years). Pathology leading to fusion included 27 (60%) posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, 6 (13.3%) tarsal coalition, 7 (5.5%) degenerative joint disease, 2 (4.4%) rheumatoid arthritis, and 1 (2.2%) each, with Charcot neuroarthropathy, multiple sclerosis, and poliomyelitis. Orthobiological materials were used in 27 (60.0%) of the patients. The median duration of surgery was 87 minutes (range, 65-164 minutes), and the median time to successful arthrodesis was 8 weeks (range, 6-20 weeks). A complication was observed in 6 (13.3%) of the patients, including 1 each of the following: painful calcaneal-cuboid joint, talar fracture, incision dehiscence, poor exposure that required abandonment of the procedure, elevated first ray, and painful fixation. None of the patients experienced a nonunion or an adverse event related to the medial neurovascular structures. Based on our experience with the procedure, the single medial-incision subtalar and talonavicular joint arthrodesis is a useful alternative to triple arthrodesis for the correction of hindfoot valgus deformity. Copyright 2010 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Groin hernia subtypes are associated in patients with bilateral hernias: a 14-year nationwide epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Burcharth, Jakob; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the relation between groin hernia subtypes in patients operated for bilateral hernias. With data from the Danish Hernia Database, we identified all patients operated for primary groin hernias from 1998 to 2012. Within this cohort all patients that were bilaterally operated were analyzed. Risk factors for bilateral groin hernia operation as well as the relationship between groin hernia subtypes bilaterally, were analyzed using multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis and Kappa statistics. A total of 108, 775 persons with primary groin hernia repair (89.9% males) were registered, and of those were 12,041 persons operated bilaterally (94.9% males). Females and males operated for a unilaterally direct inguinal hernia (DIH) had increased Hazard Ratios (HR) of 3.85 (CI 95% 2.14-6.19) and 4.46 (CI 95% 2.57-7.88) of being contralaterally operated for a DIH. Females and males operated for a unilaterally indirect inguinal hernia (IIH) had HRs of 6.93 (CI 95% 3.66-13.11) and 1.89 (CI95% 1.24-2.88) for being contralaterally operated for an IIH. The same tendency was seen for femoral hernias. All hernia subtypes were bilaterally associated in both genders and the hernia subtypes could be localized manifestations of generalized conditions or inheritable traits instead of localized defects.

  8. Minimally invasive surgical technique integrating multiple procedures with large specimen extraction via inguinal hernia orifice

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Vishnu R.; Ahmed, Leaque

    2015-01-01

    While laparoscopic surgery can be performed using small skin incisions, any resected specimen must still be able to fit through these opening. For procedures, such as cholecystectomies and appendectomies, this is not usually a problem; however, for large specimens such as bowel or large tumors, this becomes problematic. Currently, the standard technique is to attempt piecemeal removal of the specimen or enlarge one of the laparoscopic incisions, effectively creating a mini laparotomy. Creating a larger incision adds many of the drawbacks of open laparotomy and should be avoided whenever possible. In this article, we present a new technique of combining the repair of an inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia with a duodenal tumor resection in order to extract the specimen through the inguinal hernia orifice. PMID:26703927

  9. Repair of a bowel-containing, scrotal hernia with incarceration contributed by femorofemoral bypass graft

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Schouten, Jonathan A.; Itani, Kamal M. F.

    2017-01-01

    The rising use of endovascular techniques utilizing femoral artery access may increase the frequency with which surgeons face the challenge of hernia repair in reoperative groins—which may or may not include a vascular graft. We present a case where a vascular graft contributed to an acute presentation and complicated dissection, and review the literature. A 67-year-old man who had undergone prior endovascular aneurysm repair via open bilateral femoral artery access and concomitant prosthetic femorofemoral bypass, presented with an incarcerated, scrotal inguinal hernia. The graft with its associated fibrosis contributed to the incarceration by compressing the inguinal ring. Repair was undertaken via an open, anterior approach with tension-free, Lichtenstein herniorraphy after releasing graft-associated fibrosis. Repair of groin hernias in this complex setting requires careful surgical planning, preparation for potential vascular reconstruction and meticulous technique to avoid bowel injury in the face of a vascular conduit and mesh. PMID:28069880

  10. Amyand's hernia in infant: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, V D; Kumar, V; Srivastava, P; Gangopadhyaya, A N

    2009-01-01

    The chance of vermiform appendix lying with in a hernial sac is 1% or less and is known as Amyand's hernia and it is very rare in infant and neonate. Till date, only twenty cases had been reported in English literature. We are reporting a rare case of Amyand's hernia where appendix was present in right inguinal sac of non-obstructed inguinal hernia in a seven month old male infant during operation. The appendectomy was done along with right inguinal herniotomy. In most of the reported cases, appendix was inflamed or perforated, expect in one case where appendix was not inflamed but patient presented with inguinal hernia. This case is reported because of the rarity of Amyand's hernia in infant, the appendix was not inflamed, hernia was not obstructed, and whether in such types of cases appendix should be preserved or not.

  11. Microlaparoscopic hernia repair in children: initial experiences.

    PubMed

    Turial, Salmai; Saied, Ahmad; Schier, Felix

    2011-12-01

    This study reports the authors' experience with the exclusive use of 2-mm instrument sets and small diameter scopes in 100 children undergoing microlaparoscopic herniorrhaphy. This prospective study was designed as a pilot feasibility study; all data related to patients and procedures were prospectively collected. A pneumoperitoneum was established, and 1.7 to 2 mm 0° or 30° scopes were introduced for visualization. Exclusively 2-mm instruments were used. This study included 100 children (aged 15 days to 11 years, median age 2.3 years) undergoing microlaparoscopic hernia repair. A total of 140 hernias were treated. The average operative time for the microlaparoscopically experienced surgeon was 16 minutes for bilateral inguinal hernia and 12 minutes for unilateral hernias. All procedures were completed microlaparoscopically. Hernia recurrence was observed in 2 patients. Based on the authors' early experience, it is found that microlaparoscopic hernia repair in children seems to be a safe and feasible procedure.

  12. Right Inguinal Hernia Encompassing the Uterus, Right Ovary and Fallopian Tube in an Elderly Female: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Makino, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Hirakata, Atsushi; Akagi, Ichiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Uchida, Eiichi; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The uterus, ovary, and fallopian tube are rarely present in an inguinal hernia. We report on an operation to treat just such a rare condition for a right inguinal hernia. An 87-year-old Japanese woman was admitted with swelling in the right inguinal region and a purulent discharge from the vagina. Vital signs were stable, but the mobile mass was irreducible. Computed tomography of the abdomen indicated uterine tissue in a right inguinal hernia. We diagnosed an inguinal hernia with an incarcerated uterus and performed surgery on that basis. An incision approximately 6 cm long was made in the skin above the swollen area to open the inguinal sac, disclosing a tumor enveloped by a hernial sac. Opening the hernial sac revealed the prolapsed uterus, the fallopian tube, and the right ovary. Because no ischemic change was noted, the incarcerated uterus was returned to the abdominal cavity, and the hernial opening was closed with the onlay mesh technique. The posterior wall of the inguinal canal was found to have prolapsed laterally to the inferior epigastric artery, resulting in an external inguinal hernia. This case demonstrates that careful attention must be paid to inguinal hernias in female patients because the uterus, ovary, and fallopian tube may be involved.

  13. [Inguinofemoral hernia: multicenter study of surgical techniques].

    PubMed

    Porrero, José L; Sánchez-Cabezudo, Carlos; Bonachía, Oscar; López-Buenadicha, Adolfo; Sanjuánbenito, Alfonso; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2005-07-01

    The present study was performed by the Spanish Association of surgeons through its abdominal wall and sutures section. The aim was to determine the current situation of inguinofemoral hernias in Spain and was based on an anonymous multicenter study with the participation of various national hospitals. Fifty general surgery departments in distinct surgical centers throughout Spain responded to an anonymous survey in 2000. The survey gathered data on anesthetic features, surgical techniques and complications in the treatment of inguinofemoral hernias. Sixty-six percent of hospital centers had a specific abdominal wall unit and 24% performed laparoscopic hernia surgery. Prosthetic techniques (especially Lichtenstein) were the most frequently used in the treatment of primary inguinal hernia (72%) and recurrent hernia (100%). The most frequently used prosthetic material was polypropylene mesh (76%). Only 28% of the departments surveyed performed anatomic techniques in the repair of primary inguinal hernia (Shouldice and Bassini). The most frequent treatment for femoral hernia was the Lichtenstein "plug" (78%). Sixty-eight percent of the centers surveyed performed regional anesthesia, 18% used general anesthesia and only 14% used local anesthesia with sedation. Severe complications were found in 20% of departments. Clinical postoperative follow-up was performed in 96% of the centers and telephone follow-up was used in 4%. The recurrence rate was 1.2% for primary inguinal hernia, 2.7% for recurrent inguinal hernia and 0.3% for femoral hernia. In Spain the most commonly used surgical technique in the treatment of inguinal hernia is Lichtenstein hernioplasty under spinal anesthesia and with polypropylene prosthesis. The Lichtenstein plug is the most commonly used technique in the treatment of femoral hernia.

  14. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal approach for recurrent inguinal hernia: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Aly; Hokkam, Emad N.; Ellabban, Goda M.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The repair of the recurrent hernia is a daunting task because of already weakened tissues and distorted anatomy. Open posterior preperitoneal approach gives results far superior to those of the anterior approach. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair is an evolving technique associated with advantages of a minimally invasive approach. The present work aimed at comparing these three approaches for repair of recurrent inguinal hernia regarding complications and early recurrence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 180 patients were divided randomly into three equal groups: A, B, and C. Group A patients were subjected to open posterior preperitoneal approach , those of group B were subjected to transinguinal anterior tension-free repair and group C patients were subjected to TAPP. The primary end point was recurrence and the secondary end points were time off from work, postoperative pain, scrotal swelling, and wound infections. RESULTS: The mean hospital stay, the mean time to return to work and the mean time off from work were less in group C then A and B. Chronic postoperative pain was observed in eight patients in group A (13.33%), in 18 patients in group B (30%) and six patients in group C (10%). The overall complication rate was 19.7% in both groups A and C and 34.36% in group B. CONCLUSION: In recurrent inguinal hernia, the laparoscopic and open posterior approaches are equally effective in term of operative outcome. The open preperitoneal hernia repair is inexpensive, has a low recurrence rate. Postoperative recovery is short and postoperative pain is minimal. This approach gives results far superior to those of the commonly used anterior approach. However, while laparoscopic hernia repair requires a lengthy learning curve and is difficult to learn and perform, it has advantages of less post-operative pain, early recovery with minimal hospital stay, low post-operative complications and recurrence. Trial

  15. Laparoscopic Versus Open Gastric Bypass: A Randomized Study of Outcomes, Quality of Life, and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ninh T.; Goldman, Charles; Rosenquist, C. John; Arango, Andres; Cole, Carol J.; Lee, Steven J.; Wolfe, Bruce M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes, quality of life (QOL), and costs of laparoscopic and open gastric bypass (GBP). Summary Background Data Laparoscopic GBP has been reported to be a safe and effective approach for the treatment of morbid obesity. The authors performed a prospective randomized trial to compare outcomes, QOL, and costs of laparoscopic GBP with those of open GBP. Methods From May 1999 to March 2001, 155 patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 to 60 kg/m2 were randomly assigned to undergo laparoscopic (n = 79) or open (n = 76) GBP. The two groups were similar in age, sex ratio, mean BMI, and comorbidities. Main outcome measures included operative time, estimated blood loss, length of hospital stay, operative complications, percentage of excess body weight loss, and time to return to activities of daily living and work. Changes in QOL were assessed using the SF-36 Health Survey and the bariatric analysis of reporting outcome system (BAROS). Operative and hospital costs of the two operations were also compared. Results There were no deaths in either group. Mean operative time was longer for laparoscopic GBP than for open GBP, but operative blood loss was less. Two (2.5%) of the 79 patients in the laparoscopic group required conversion to laparotomy. Median length of hospital stay was shorter for laparoscopic GBP patients (3 vs 4 days). The rate of postoperative anastomotic leak was similar between groups. Wound-related complications such as infection (10.5 vs 1.3%) and incisional hernia (7.9 vs 0%) were more common after open GBP; late anastomotic stricture was less frequent after open GBP (2.6 vs 11.4%). Time to return to activities of daily living and work were shorter after laparoscopic GBP than after open GBP. Weight loss at 1 year was similar between groups. Preoperative SF-36 scores were similar between groups; however, at 1 month after surgery, laparoscopic patients had better physical conditioning, social functioning, general health, and less

  16. Inguinal hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... This repair can be done with open or laparoscopic surgery. You and your surgeon can discuss which type ... the repair, the cuts are stitched closed. In laparoscopic surgery: The surgeon makes three to five small cuts ...

  17. Clinical importance of duodenal recesses with special reference to internal hernias

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Kum Kum; Kakar, Arun; Aggarwal, Satish; Aggrawal, Anil; Kakar, Smita; Borkar, Nitinkumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The detailed knowledge of the peritoneal recesses has great significance with respect to internal hernias. The recesses are usually related to rotation and adhesion of abdominal viscera to the posterior abdominal wall and/or the presence of retroperitoneal vessels which raises the serosal fold. The duodenal recesses are usually related to the 3rd and 4th parts of the duodenum. Internal hernias with respect to these recesses are difficult to diagnose clinically and usually noticed at the time of laparotomy. So, the knowledge of these recesses can be valuable to abdominal surgeons. Material and methods The present study was conducted in 100 cases including 10 cadavers, 45 post mortem cases and 45 cases undergoing laparotomy. Results We found superior and inferior duodenal recesses in 28% and 52% respectively, paraduodenal in 12%, mesentericoparietal in 3%, retroduodenal in 2% and duodenojejunal in 18% of cases. Two abnormal duodenojejunal recesses were found, one on the right (instead of the left) of the abdominal aorta, and in the other the opening was directed upwards instead of downwards. The incidence of internal hernias was 3%. Conclusions Thus it was observed that there is low incidence of superior and inferior duodenal recesses, and high incidence of paraduodenal recess. The abnormal recesses might be due to malrotation of the gut. In laparotomy cases, the internal hernia was noticed when the abdomen was opened for intestinal obstruction. The incidence of internal hernia was found to be high. PMID:28144266

  18. Acute Scrotum Caused by Hernia Sac Torsion.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Shinji; Aoki, Katsuya; Shimada, Keiji; Samma, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    A 9-year-old boy was referred to us with an acute pain attack of the left scrotal contents. Ultrasonography showed a normal blood supply to the left testis, suggesting an incarcerated left inguinal hernia. Surgical exploration did not demonstrate an incarcerated left inguinal hernia. After exploration of the left testis, a dark red pedunculated cystic mass, separate from the left testis, was found to be twisted. Immunohistochemical studies of the excised cyst demonstrated torsion of the hernia sac of the peritoneum. In conclusion, we encountered a case of acute scrotum which was probably caused by torsion of the hernia sac.

  19. Acute pancreatitis secondary to incarcerated paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed

    Kafka, N J; Leitman, I M; Tromba, J

    1994-05-01

    Paraesophageal hiatus hernia can be a morbid and even lethal condition. Although many complications from this entity have been described, they almost always involve gastric incarceration and its related complications. Occasionally, the transverse colon or spleen may be involved in the hernia, causing additional symptoms. An unusual case of paraesophageal hiatus hernia involving incarceration of the pylorus, proximal duodenum, and pancreatic head is described. The patient's presentation, operative management, and perioperative course are discussed to emphasize the importance of early elective repair of paraesophageal hiatus hernia before the development of such occurrences.

  20. The management of boys under 3 months of age with an inguinal hernia and ipsilateral palpable undescended testis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Naomi J; Davidson, Joseph R; Major, Christina; Durkin, Natalie; Tan, Yew-Wei; Jobson, Matthew; Ade-Ajayi, Niyi; Hall, Nigel J; Bouhadiba, Nordeen

    2017-07-01

    The optimal management for boys under 3 months of age with an indirect inguinal hernia (IIH) and ipsilateral palpable undescended testis (IPUDT) is unknown. We aimed to: 1) determine the current practice for managing these boys across the UK, and 2) compare outcomes of different treatment strategies. We undertook two studies. Firstly, we completed a National Survey of all surgeons on the British Association of Paediatric Surgeons email list in 2014. Subsequently, we undertook a multi-centre, retrospective, 10-year (2005-2015) review across 4 pediatric surgery centers of boys under 3months of age with concomitant IIH and IPUDT. Primary outcome was testicular atrophy. Secondary outcomes included need for subsequent orchidopexy, testicular ascent and hernia recurrence. Data are presented as median (range). Chi-squared test and multivariate binomial logistic regression analysis were used for analysis; p<0.05 was considered significant. Survey: Consultant practice varies widely across the UK, with a tendency towards performing concurrent orchidopexy at the time of herniotomy under 3 months of age. Concurrent orchidopexy is favored less in cases where the hernia is symptomatic. Case Series Review: Forty-one boys with 43 concomitant IIH and IPUDT were identified, and all included. 32 (74%) hernias were reducible, 11 (26%) were symptomatic requiring urgent or emergency repair. Post-conceptual age at surgery was 45weeks (36-65). Primary operations included: 29 (67%) open hernia repair and standard orchidopexy, 8 (19%) open hernia repair with future orchidopexy if required, 4 (9%) laparoscopic hernia repair with future orchidopexy if required, 2 (5%) open hernia repair and suturing of the testis to the inverted scrotum without scrotal incision. Variation in atrophy rate between different surgical approaches did not reach statistical significance (p=0.42). Overall atrophy rate was 18%. If hernia repair alone was undertaken (8 open and 4 laparoscopic), the testis did not

  1. Laparoscopic features and repair of a combined left Spigelian hernia and left Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Chamary, S L; Chamary, V L

    2015-03-01

    Both Spigelian and Morgagni hernias cause serious morbidity so early diagnosis and timely treatment are necessary. These two types of hernia are more commonly found on the right side of patients. They are rare individually in adults and even rarer in combination. So far, an association between the two hernias has only been reported on the right. We describe the first case of a Spigelian hernia and a Morgagni hernia in a 62-year-old woman, both occurring on the left side. Our accompanying video describes several laparoscopic features that will help lead to early detection and diagnosis.

  2. Laparoscopic Features and Repair of a Combined left Spigelian Hernia and left Morgagni Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Chamary, SL

    2015-01-01

    Both Spigelian and Morgagni hernias cause serious morbidity so early diagnosis and timely treatment are necessary. These two types of hernia are more commonly found on the right side of patients. They are rare individually in adults and even rarer in combination. So far, an association between the two hernias has only been reported on the right. We describe the first case of a Spigelian hernia and a Morgagni hernia in a 62-year-old woman, both occurring on the left side. Our accompanying video describes several laparoscopic features that will help lead to early detection and diagnosis. PMID:25723678

  3. Magnetic Resonance–Visible Meshes for Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Pallwein-Prettner, Leo; Koch, Oliver Owen; Luketina, Ruzica Rosalia; Lechner, Michael; Emmanuel, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the first human use of magnetic resonance–visible implants for intraperitoneal onlay repair of incisional hernias regarding magnetic resonance presentability. Methods: Ten patients were surgically treated with intraperitoneally positioned superparamagnetic flat meshes. A magnetic resonance investigation with a qualified protocol was performed on postoperative day 1 and at 3 months postoperatively to assess mesh appearance and demarcation. The total magnetic resonance–visible mesh surface area of each implant was calculated and compared with the original physical mesh size to evaluate potential reduction of the functional mesh surfaces. Results: We were able to show a precise mesh demarcation, as well as accurate assessment of the surrounding tissue, in all 10 cases. We documented a significant decrease in the magnetic resonance–visualized total mesh surface area after release of the pneumoperitoneum compared with the original mesh size (mean, 190 cm2 vs 225 cm2; mean reduction of mesh area, 35 cm2; P < .001). At 3 months postoperatively, a further reduction of the surface area due to significant mesh shrinkage could be observed (mean, 182 cm2 vs 190 cm2; mean reduction of mesh area, 8 cm2; P < .001). Conclusion: The new method of combining magnetic resonance imaging and meshes that provide enhanced signal capacity through direct integration of iron particles into the polyvinylidene fluoride base material allows for detailed mesh depiction and quantification of structural changes. In addition to a significant early postoperative decrease in effective mesh surface area, a further considerable reduction in size occurred within 3 months after implantation. PMID:25848195

  4. Quality of life and outcomes for femoral hernia repair: does laparoscopy have an advantage?

    PubMed

    Cox, T C; Huntington, C R; Blair, L J; Prasad, T; Heniford, B T; Augenstein, V A

    2017-02-01

    Due to their relative scarcity and to limit single-center bias, multi-center data are needed to study femoral hernias. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes and quality of life (QOL) following laparoscopic vs. open repair of femoral hernias. The International Hernia Mesh Registry was queried for femoral hernia repairs. Laparoscopic vs. open techniques were assessed for outcomes and QOL, as quantified by the Carolinas Comfort Scale (CCS), preoperatively and at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Outcomes were evaluated using the standard statistical analysis. A total of 80 femoral hernia repairs were performed in 73 patients: 37 laparoscopic and 43 open. There was no difference in mean age (54.7 ± 14.6 years), body mass index (24.2 ± 3.8 kg/m(2)), gender (60.3 % female), or comorbidities (p > 0.05). The hernias were recurrent in 21 % of the cases with an average of 1.23 ± 0.6 prior repairs (p > 0.1). Preoperative CCS scores were similar for both groups and indicated that 59.7 % of patients reported pain and 46.4 % had movement limitations (p > 0.05). Operative time was equivalent (47.2 ± 21.2 vs. 45.9 ± 14.8 min, p = 0.82). There was no difference in postoperative complications, with an overall 8.2 % abdominal wall complications rate (p > 0.05). The length of stay was shorter in the laparoscopic group (0.5 ± 0.6 vs. 1.3 ± 1.6 days, p = 0.02). Follow-up was somewhat longer in the open group (23.8 ± 10.2 vs. 17.3 ± 10.9 months, p = 0.02). There was one recurrence, which was in the laparoscopic group (3.1 vs. 0 %, p = 0.4). QOL outcomes at all time points demonstrated no difference for pain, movement limitation, or mesh sensation. Postoperative QOL scores improved for both groups when compared to preoperative scores. In this prospective international multi-institution study of 80 femoral hernia repairs, no difference was found for operative times, long-term outcomes, or QOL in the treatment of femoral

  5. Large hiatal hernia in infancy with right intrathoracic stomach along with left sided morgagni hernia.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Uzma; Mazhar, Naveed; Zameer, Shahla

    2014-11-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a very common intrathoracic fetal anomaly with Morgagni hernia typically seen on right side anteriorly and Bochdalek hernia on left side posteriorly, because of the protective effects of liver and heart on either side respectively. Hiatal hernias range from herniation of a small portion of stomach into thoracic cavity to herniation of entire stomach into the left thoracic cavity. Very rarely the herniated stomach has been reported in the right thoracic cavity. Early diagnosis and treatment of all diaphragmatic hernias is essential to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality. We present a very rare and interesting case of an 18 months old baby girl with reverse scenarios. She had a large hiatal hernia with right intrathoracic stomach along with a left sided Morgagni hernia in combination.

  6. [Diagnosis of hernia using peritoneography].

    PubMed

    Wrazidlo, W; Karl, E L; Koch, K

    1989-06-01

    Peritoneography was performed in 1200 patients with ill-defined complaints concerning the abdominal wall, the groin or the pelvic floor. The purpose was to exclude or demonstrate the presence of a hernia. Amongst 750 patients, abnormalities were found in 53.5%. The examination was also carried out post-operatively in order to demonstrate possible recurrences which were not clinically obvious. Amongst 450 patients, a recurrence or a contra lateral hernia was demonstrated in 44%. These results show that a recurrence can only be demonstrated or excluded with certainty by means of peritoneography. The radiological examination is technically straightforward, can be carried out in a few minutes on an out patient basis and is simple for the patient.

  7. Designing a ventral hernia staging system.

    PubMed

    Petro, C C; O'Rourke, C P; Posielski, N M; Criss, C N; Raigani, S; Prabhu, A S; Rosen, M J

    2016-02-01

    The absence of a standardized classification scheme for ventral hernias hinders comparisons within the literature, indirectly delaying meaningful discussions regarding technique. We aimed to generate a comprehensive staging system that stratifies patients by risk of developing wound morbidity and hernia recurrence. Our prospective database of all ventral hernia repairs (2006-2013) was reviewed with no exclusion based on technique or prosthetic. The presence of patient comorbidities, contamination and hernia dimensions-width/location on computed topography-was evaluated to identify variables most closely associated with surgical site occurrence (SSO) and recurrence. Predicted odds ratios and relative hazards, for SSO and recurrence, respectively, were used to partition patients into stages corresponding with increasing levels of risk. Hernia width (OR 2.24, HR 1.73) and the presence of contamination (OR 1.81, HR 2.04) were most significantly associated with increased risk of SSO and recurrence, while hernia location and the presence of comorbidities were not. Stage I hernias are <10 cm/clean and associated with low SSO and recurrence risk. Stage II hernias are 10-20 cm/clean or <10 cm contaminated and carry an intermediate risk of SSO and recurrence. Stage III hernias are either ≥10/contaminated or any hernia ≥20 cm, and these are associated with high SSO and recurrence risk. Stages I-III carry a concordance index of 0.67 for SSO and 0.61 for recurrence. Hernia width and wound class can be used to stratify patients into stages (I-III) with increasing risk of wound morbidity and recurrence. This can be the foundation for future inclusion and exclusion criteria.

  8. First Case Report of Acute Renal Failure After Mesh-Plug Inguinal Hernia Repair in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Ardita, Vincenzo; Zerbo, Domenico; Caglià, Pietro; Palmucci, Stefano; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute renal failure due to ureter compression after a mesh-plug inguinal repair in a kidney transplant recipient has not been previously reported to our knowledge. A 62-year-old man, who successfully underwent kidney transplantation from a deceased donor 6 years earlier, was admitted for elective repair of a direct inguinal hernia. The patient underwent an open mesh-plug repair of the inguinal hernia with placement of a plug in the preperitoneal space. We did not observe the transplanted ureter and bladder during dissection of the inguinal canal. Immediately after surgery, the patient became anuric, and a graft sonography demonstrated massive hydronephrosis. The serum creatinine level increased rapidly, and the patient underwent an emergency reoperation 8 hours later. During surgery, we did not identify the ureter but, immediately after plug removal, urine output increased progressively. We completed the hernia repair using the standard technique, without plug interposition, and the postoperative course was uneventful with complete resolution of graft dysfunction 3 days later. Furthermore, we reviewed the clinical features of complications related to inguinal hernia surgery. An increased risk of urological complications was reported recently in patients with a previous prosthetic hernia repair undergoing kidney transplantation, mainly due to the mesh adhesion to surrounding structures, making the extraperitoneal dissection during the transplant surgery very challenging. Moreover, older male kidney transplant recipients undergoing an inguinal hernia repair may be at higher risk of graft dysfunction due to inguinal herniation of a transplanted ureter. Mesh-plug inguinal hernia repair is a safe surgical technique, but this unique case suggests that kidney transplant recipients with inguinal hernia may be at higher risk of serious urological complications. Surgeons must be aware of the graft and ureter position before proceeding with hernia repair. A prompt

  9. Morgagni hernia: A rare case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Pattnaik, Manoj Kumar; Sahoo, Sarada Prasanna; Panigrahy, Sameer Kumar; Nayak, Kalyani Bala

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernias (MHs) are rare and constitute about 2% of all diaphragmatic hernias. Although uncommon, it has potential for considerable morbidity if the diagnosis is missed. An elderly woman with known history of chronic asthma and constipation presented to us with vague right-sided chest pain. General physical examination was unremarkable and coincidentally diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus. Chest roentgenogram posteroanterior view revealed a right paracardiac opacity and right lateral view showed the opacity in the peridiaphragmatic area of anterior mediastinum. Computed tomographic scan of the chest and abdomen revealed a right-sided MH containing omental fat. Standard right posterolateral thoracotomy was done, and there was a rent at the medial end of the xiphoid process with hernia sac containing the omentum, which was compressing adjacent lungs and heart. The sac was opened; redundant omentum was resected, and rent closed with intercostal muscle with prolene. MH being rare must be addressed with appropriate investigation to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. PMID:27578938

  10. Prediction of contralateral inguinal hernias in children: a prospective study of 357 unilateral inguinal hernias.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, M; Sugito, K; Kawashima, H; Goto, S; Kaneda, H; Furuya, T; Hosoda, T; Masuko, T; Ohashi, K; Inoue, M; Ikeda, T; Tomita, R; Koshinaga, T

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we established a pre-operative risk scoring system to predict contralateral inguinal hernia in children with unilateral inguinal hernias. The current study aimed to verify the usefulness of our pre-operative scoring system. This was a prospective study of patients undergoing unilateral inguinal hernia repair from 2006 to 2009 at a single institution. Gender, age at initial operation, birth weight, initial operation side, and the pre-operative risk score were recorded. We analyzed the incidence of contralateral inguinal hernia, risk factors, and the usefulness of our pre-operative risk scoring system. The follow-up period was 36 months. We used forward multiple logistic regression analysis to predict contralateral hernia. Of the 372 patients who underwent unilateral hernia repair, 357 (96.0 %) were completely followed-up for 36 months, and 23 patients (6.4 %) developed a contralateral hernia. Left-sided hernia (OR = 5.5, 95 %, CI = 1.3-24.3, p = 0.023) was associated with an increased risk of contralateral hernia. The following covariates were not associated with contralateral hernia development: gender (p = 0.702), age (p = 0.215), and birth weight (p = 0.301). The pre-operative risk score (cut-off point = 4.5) of the patients with a contralateral hernia was significantly higher, compared with the patients without a contralateral hernia using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (p = 0.024). Using multivariate analysis, we confirmed usefulness of our pre-operative scoring system and initial side of the inguinal hernia, together, for the prediction of contralateral inguinal hernia in children.

  11. Left Sided Hydro-pneumothorax in a Operated Case of Left Diaphragmatic Hernia Repair: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Hombalkar, Narendra Narayan; Dalvi, Santosh Bhimrao; Gurav, Prakash Dattatray

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia in adults often presents with overlapping respiratory and abdominal symptoms. They may be simple diaphragmatic eventrations or undiagnosed Bochdalek’s hernias or may even be of post traumatic variety. Diaphragmatic hernias may be asymptomatic, present only with respiratory symptoms, or may present with obstruction and strangulation of involved bowel loops with faeco-pneumothorax. The index case was operated for open diaphragmatic hernia repair six years back and admitted for breathlessness with absence of abdominal signs and symptoms. Patient subsequently developed hydro-pneumothorax during conservative management. Emergency laparotomy revealed a gastric ulcer which perforated into the left ches