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Sample records for open shortest path

  1. Shortest path and Schramm-Loewner Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Posé, N.; Schrenk, K. J.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    We numerically show that the statistical properties of the shortest path on critical percolation clusters are consistent with the ones predicted for Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLE) curves for κ = 1.04 ± 0.02. The shortest path results from a global optimization process. To identify it, one needs to explore an entire area. Establishing a relation with SLE permits to generate curves statistically equivalent to the shortest path from a Brownian motion. We numerically analyze the winding angle, the left passage probability, and the driving function of the shortest path and compare them to the distributions predicted for SLE curves with the same fractal dimension. The consistency with SLE opens the possibility of using a solid theoretical framework to describe the shortest path and it raises relevant questions regarding conformal invariance and domain Markov properties, which we also discuss. PMID:24975019

  2. Approximate Shortest Path Queries Using Voronoi Duals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honiden, Shinichi; Houle, Michael E.; Sommer, Christian; Wolff, Martin

    We propose an approximation method to answer point-to-point shortest path queries in undirected edge-weighted graphs, based on random sampling and Voronoi duals. We compute a simplification of the graph by selecting nodes independently at random with probability p. Edges are generated as the Voronoi dual of the original graph, using the selected nodes as Voronoi sites. This overlay graph allows for fast computation of approximate shortest paths for general, undirected graphs. The time-quality tradeoff decision can be made at query time. We provide bounds on the approximation ratio of the path lengths as well as experimental results. The theoretical worst-case approximation ratio is bounded by a logarithmic factor. Experiments show that our approximation method based on Voronoi duals has extremely fast preprocessing time and efficiently computes reasonably short paths.

  3. The role of convexity for solving some shortest path problems in plane without triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Phan Thanh; Hai, Nguyen Ngoc; Hoai, Tran Van

    2013-09-01

    Solving shortest path problems inside simple polygons is a very classical problem in motion planning. To date, it has usually relied on triangulation of the polygons. The question: "Can one devise a simple O(n) time algorithm for computing the shortest path between two points in a simple polygon (with n vertices), without resorting to a (complicated) linear-time triangulation algorithm?" raised by J. S. B. Mitchell in Handbook of Computational Geometry (J. Sack and J. Urrutia, eds., Elsevier Science B.V., 2000), is still open. The aim of this paper is to show that convexity contributes to the design of efficient algorithms for solving some versions of shortest path problems (namely, computing the convex hull of a finite set of points and convex rope on rays in 2D, computing approximate shortest path between two points inside a simple polygon) without triangulation on the entire polygons. New algorithms are implemented in C and numerical examples are presented.

  4. Two betweenness centrality measures based on Randomized Shortest Paths

    PubMed Central

    Kivimäki, Ilkka; Lebichot, Bertrand; Saramäki, Jari; Saerens, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces two new closely related betweenness centrality measures based on the Randomized Shortest Paths (RSP) framework, which fill a gap between traditional network centrality measures based on shortest paths and more recent methods considering random walks or current flows. The framework defines Boltzmann probability distributions over paths of the network which focus on the shortest paths, but also take into account longer paths depending on an inverse temperature parameter. RSP’s have previously proven to be useful in defining distance measures on networks. In this work we study their utility in quantifying the importance of the nodes of a network. The proposed RSP betweenness centralities combine, in an optimal way, the ideas of using the shortest and purely random paths for analysing the roles of network nodes, avoiding issues involving these two paradigms. We present the derivations of these measures and how they can be computed in an efficient way. In addition, we show with real world examples the potential of the RSP betweenness centralities in identifying interesting nodes of a network that more traditional methods might fail to notice. PMID:26838176

  5. Exact geodesics and shortest paths on polyhedral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Mukund; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Schwartz, Eric L

    2009-06-01

    We present two algorithms for computing distances along convex and non-convex polyhedral surfaces. The first algorithm computes exact minimal-geodesic distances and the second algorithm combines these distances to compute exact shortest-path distances along the surface. Both algorithms have been extended to compute the exact minimal-geodesic paths and shortest paths. These algorithms have been implemented and validated on surfaces for which the correct solutions are known, in order to verify the accuracy and to measure the run-time performance, which is cubic or less for each algorithm. The exact-distance computations carried out by these algorithms are feasible for large-scale surfaces containing tens of thousands of vertices, and are a necessary component of near-isometric surface flattening methods that accurately transform curved manifolds into flat representations.

  6. An improved Physarum polycephalum algorithm for the shortest path problem.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoge; Wang, Qing; Adamatzky, Andrew; Chan, Felix T S; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Deng, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Shortest path is among classical problems of computer science. The problems are solved by hundreds of algorithms, silicon computing architectures and novel substrate, unconventional, computing devices. Acellular slime mould P. polycephalum is originally famous as a computing biological substrate due to its alleged ability to approximate shortest path from its inoculation site to a source of nutrients. Several algorithms were designed based on properties of the slime mould. Many of the Physarum-inspired algorithms suffer from a low converge speed. To accelerate the search of a solution and reduce a number of iterations we combined an original model of Physarum-inspired path solver with a new a parameter, called energy. We undertook a series of computational experiments on approximating shortest paths in networks with different topologies, and number of nodes varying from 15 to 2000. We found that the improved Physarum algorithm matches well with existing Physarum-inspired approaches yet outperforms them in number of iterations executed and a total running time. We also compare our algorithm with other existing algorithms, including the ant colony optimization algorithm and Dijkstra algorithm. PMID:24982960

  7. An Improved Physarum polycephalum Algorithm for the Shortest Path Problem

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Adamatzky, Andrew; Chan, Felix T. S.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2014-01-01

    Shortest path is among classical problems of computer science. The problems are solved by hundreds of algorithms, silicon computing architectures and novel substrate, unconventional, computing devices. Acellular slime mould P. polycephalum is originally famous as a computing biological substrate due to its alleged ability to approximate shortest path from its inoculation site to a source of nutrients. Several algorithms were designed based on properties of the slime mould. Many of the Physarum-inspired algorithms suffer from a low converge speed. To accelerate the search of a solution and reduce a number of iterations we combined an original model of Physarum-inspired path solver with a new a parameter, called energy. We undertook a series of computational experiments on approximating shortest paths in networks with different topologies, and number of nodes varying from 15 to 2000. We found that the improved Physarum algorithm matches well with existing Physarum-inspired approaches yet outperforms them in number of iterations executed and a total running time. We also compare our algorithm with other existing algorithms, including the ant colony optimization algorithm and Dijkstra algorithm. PMID:24982960

  8. Multiple object tracking using the shortest path faster association algorithm.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhenghao; Liu, Heping; Liu, Huaping; Yang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    To solve the persistently multiple object tracking in cluttered environments, this paper presents a novel tracking association approach based on the shortest path faster algorithm. First, the multiple object tracking is formulated as an integer programming problem of the flow network. Then we relax the integer programming to a standard linear programming problem. Therefore, the global optimum can be quickly obtained using the shortest path faster algorithm. The proposed method avoids the difficulties of integer programming, and it has a lower worst-case complexity than competing methods but better robustness and tracking accuracy in complex environments. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm takes less time than other state-of-the-art methods and can operate in real time.

  9. Tree-based shortest-path routing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Y. H.; Ho, T. K.; Rad, A. B.; Lam, S. P. S.

    1998-12-01

    A tree-based shortest path routing algorithm is introduced in this paper. With this algorithm, every network node can maintain a shortest path routing tree topology of the network with itself as the root. In this algorithm, every node constructs its own routing tree based upon its neighbors' routing trees. Initially, the routing tree at each node has the root only, the node itself. As information exchanges, every node's routing tree will evolve until a complete tree is obtained. This algorithm is a trade-off between distance vector algorithm and link state algorithm. Loops are automatically deleted, so there is no count-to- infinity effect. A simple routing tree information storage approach and a protocol data until format to transmit the tree information are given. Some special issues, such as adaptation to topology change, implementation of the algorithm on LAN, convergence and computation overhead etc., are also discussed in the paper.

  10. ON THE ACCELERATION OF SHORTEST PATH CALCULATIONS IN TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    BAKER, ZACHARY K.; GOKHALE, MAYA B.

    2007-01-08

    Shortest path algorithms are a key element of many graph problems. They are used in such applications as online direction finding and navigation, as well as modeling of traffic for large scale simulations of major metropolitan areas. As the shortest path algorithms are an execution bottleneck, it is beneficial to move their execution to parallel hardware such as Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Hardware implementation is accomplished through the use of a small A core replicated on the order of 20 times on an FPGA device. The objective is to maximize the use of on-board random-access memory bandwidth through the use of multi-threaded latency tolerance. Each shortest path core is responsible for one shortest path calculation, and when it is finished it outputs its result and requests the next source from a queue. One of the innovations of this approach is the use of a small bubble sort core to produce the extract-min function. While bubble sort is not usually considered an appropriate algorithm for any non-trivial usage, it is appropriate in this case as it can produce a single minimum out of the list in O(n) cycles, whwere n is the number of elements in the vertext list. The cost of this min operation does not impact the running time of the architecture, because the queue depth for fetching the next set of edges from memory is roughly equivalent to the number of cores in the system. Additionally, this work provides a collection of simulation results that model the behavior of the node queue in hardware. The results show that a hardware queue, implementing a small bubble-type minimum function, need only be on the order of 16 elements to provide both correct and optimal paths. Because the graph database size is measured in the hundreds of megabytes, the Cray SRAM memory is insufficient. In addition to the A* cores, they have developed a memory management system allowing round-robin servicing of the nodes as well as virtual memory managed over the Hypertransport

  11. A Graph Search Heuristic for Shortest Distance Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, E

    2005-03-24

    This paper presents a heuristic for guiding A* search for finding the shortest distance path between two vertices in a connected, undirected, and explicitly stored graph. The heuristic requires a small amount of data to be stored at each vertex. The heuristic has application to quickly detecting relationships between two vertices in a large information or knowledge network. We compare the performance of this heuristic with breadth-first search on graphs with various topological properties. The results show that one or more orders of magnitude improvement in the number of vertices expanded is possible for large graphs, including Poisson random graphs.

  12. An Effective Evolutionary Approach for Bicriteria Shortest Path Routing Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Gen, Mitsuo

    Routing problem is one of the important research issues in communication network fields. In this paper, we consider a bicriteria shortest path routing (bSPR) model dedicated to calculating nondominated paths for (1) the minimum total cost and (2) the minimum transmission delay. To solve this bSPR problem, we propose a new multiobjective genetic algorithm (moGA): (1) an efficient chromosome representation using the priority-based encoding method; (2) a new operator of GA parameters auto-tuning, which is adaptively regulation of exploration and exploitation based on the change of the average fitness of parents and offspring which is occurred at each generation; and (3) an interactive adaptive-weight fitness assignment mechanism is implemented that assigns weights to each objective and combines the weighted objectives into a single objective function. Numerical experiments with various scales of network design problems show the effectiveness and the efficiency of our approach by comparing with the recent researches.

  13. Optimal Design of Pipeline Based on the Shortest Path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Fei-xue; Chen, Shi-yi

    Design and operation of long-distance pipeline are complex engineering tasks. Even small improvement in the design of a pipeline system can lead to substantial savings in capital. In this paper, graph theory was used to analyze the problem of pipeline optimal design. The candidate pump station locations were taken as the vertexes and the total cost of the pipeline system between the two vertexes corresponded to the edge weight. An algorithm recursively calling the Dijkstra algorithm was designed and analyzed to obtain N shortest paths. The optimal process program and the quasi-optimal process programs were obtained at the same time, which could be used in decision-making. The algorithm was tested by a real example. The result showed that it could meet the need of real application.

  14. A Hybrid Shortest Path Algorithm for Navigation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hsun-Jung; Lan, Chien-Lun

    2007-12-01

    Combined with Geographic Information System (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS), the vehicle navigation system had become a quite popular product in daily life. A key component of the navigation system is the Shortest Path Algorithm. Navigation in real world must face a network consists of tens of thousands nodes and links, and even more. Under the limited computation capability of vehicle navigation equipment, it is difficult to satisfy the realtime response requirement that user expected. Hence, this study focused on shortest path algorithm that enhances the computation speed with less memory requirement. Several well-known algorithms such as Dijkstra, A* and hierarchical concepts were integrated to build hybrid algorithms that reduce searching space and improve searching speed. Numerical examples were conducted on Taiwan highway network that consists of more than four hundred thousands of links and nearly three hundred thousands of nodes. This real network was divided into two connected sub-networks (layers). The upper layer is constructed by freeways and expressways; the lower layer is constructed by local networks. Test origin-destination pairs were chosen randomly and divided into three distance categories; short, medium and long distances. The evaluation of outcome is judged by actual length and travel time. The numerical example reveals that the hybrid algorithm proposed by this research might be tens of thousands times faster than traditional Dijkstra algorithm; the memory requirement of the hybrid algorithm is also much smaller than the tradition algorithm. This outcome shows that this proposed algorithm would have an advantage over vehicle navigation system.

  15. A bio-inspired method for the constrained shortest path problem.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongping; Lu, Xi; Zhang, Xiaoge; Wang, Qing; Deng, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The constrained shortest path (CSP) problem has been widely used in transportation optimization, crew scheduling, network routing and so on. It is an open issue since it is a NP-hard problem. In this paper, we propose an innovative method which is based on the internal mechanism of the adaptive amoeba algorithm. The proposed method is divided into two parts. In the first part, we employ the original amoeba algorithm to solve the shortest path problem in directed networks. In the second part, we combine the Physarum algorithm with a bio-inspired rule to deal with the CSP. Finally, by comparing the results with other method using an examples in DCLC problem, we demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method.

  16. Multiple Object Tracking Using K-Shortest Paths Optimization.

    PubMed

    Berclaz, Jérôme; Fleuret, François; Türetken, Engin; Fua, Pascal

    2011-09-01

    Multi-object tracking can be achieved by detecting objects in individual frames and then linking detections across frames. Such an approach can be made very robust to the occasional detection failure: If an object is not detected in a frame but is in previous and following ones, a correct trajectory will nevertheless be produced. By contrast, a false-positive detection in a few frames will be ignored. However, when dealing with a multiple target problem, the linking step results in a difficult optimization problem in the space of all possible families of trajectories. This is usually dealt with by sampling or greedy search based on variants of Dynamic Programming which can easily miss the global optimum. In this paper, we show that reformulating that step as a constrained flow optimization results in a convex problem. We take advantage of its particular structure to solve it using the k-shortest paths algorithm, which is very fast. This new approach is far simpler formally and algorithmically than existing techniques and lets us demonstrate excellent performance in two very different contexts.

  17. Algorithm for shortest path search in Geographic Information Systems by using reduced graphs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Puente, Rafael; Lazo-Cortés, Manuel S

    2013-01-01

    The use of Geographic Information Systems has increased considerably since the eighties and nineties. As one of their most demanding applications we can mention shortest paths search. Several studies about shortest path search show the feasibility of using graphs for this purpose. Dijkstra's algorithm is one of the classic shortest path search algorithms. This algorithm is not well suited for shortest path search in large graphs. This is the reason why various modifications to Dijkstra's algorithm have been proposed by several authors using heuristics to reduce the run time of shortest path search. One of the most used heuristic algorithms is the A* algorithm, the main goal is to reduce the run time by reducing the search space. This article proposes a modification of Dijkstra's shortest path search algorithm in reduced graphs. It shows that the cost of the path found in this work, is equal to the cost of the path found using Dijkstra's algorithm in the original graph. The results of finding the shortest path, applying the proposed algorithm, Dijkstra's algorithm and A* algorithm, are compared. This comparison shows that, by applying the approach proposed, it is possible to obtain the optimal path in a similar or even in less time than when using heuristic algorithms.

  18. A shortest path algorithm for satellite time-varying topological network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Liu, Zhongkan; Zhuang, Jun

    2005-11-01

    Mobile satellite network is a special time-varying network. It is different from the classical fixed network and other time-dependent networks which have been studied. Therefore some classical network theories, such as the shortest path algorithm, can not be applied to it availably. However, no study about its shortest path problem has been done. In this paper, based on the proposed model of satellite time-varying topological network, the classical shortest path algorithm of fixed network, such as the Dijkstra algorithm, is proved to be restrictive when it is applied in satellite network. Here, a novel shortest path algorithm for satellite time-varying topological network is given and optimized. Correlative simulation indicates that this algorithm can be effectively applied to the satellite time-varying topological network.

  19. Efficient shortest-path-tree computation in network routing based on pulse-coupled neural networks.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hong; Yi, Zhang; Yang, Simon X

    2013-06-01

    Shortest path tree (SPT) computation is a critical issue for routers using link-state routing protocols, such as the most commonly used open shortest path first and intermediate system to intermediate system. Each router needs to recompute a new SPT rooted from itself whenever a change happens in the link state. Most commercial routers do this computation by deleting the current SPT and building a new one using static algorithms such as the Dijkstra algorithm at the beginning. Such recomputation of an entire SPT is inefficient, which may consume a considerable amount of CPU time and result in a time delay in the network. Some dynamic updating methods using the information in the updated SPT have been proposed in recent years. However, there are still many limitations in those dynamic algorithms. In this paper, a new modified model of pulse-coupled neural networks (M-PCNNs) is proposed for the SPT computation. It is rigorously proved that the proposed model is capable of solving some optimization problems, such as the SPT. A static algorithm is proposed based on the M-PCNNs to compute the SPT efficiently for large-scale problems. In addition, a dynamic algorithm that makes use of the structure of the previously computed SPT is proposed, which significantly improves the efficiency of the algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effective and efficient performance of the proposed approach. PMID:23144039

  20. Efficient shortest-path-tree computation in network routing based on pulse-coupled neural networks.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hong; Yi, Zhang; Yang, Simon X

    2013-06-01

    Shortest path tree (SPT) computation is a critical issue for routers using link-state routing protocols, such as the most commonly used open shortest path first and intermediate system to intermediate system. Each router needs to recompute a new SPT rooted from itself whenever a change happens in the link state. Most commercial routers do this computation by deleting the current SPT and building a new one using static algorithms such as the Dijkstra algorithm at the beginning. Such recomputation of an entire SPT is inefficient, which may consume a considerable amount of CPU time and result in a time delay in the network. Some dynamic updating methods using the information in the updated SPT have been proposed in recent years. However, there are still many limitations in those dynamic algorithms. In this paper, a new modified model of pulse-coupled neural networks (M-PCNNs) is proposed for the SPT computation. It is rigorously proved that the proposed model is capable of solving some optimization problems, such as the SPT. A static algorithm is proposed based on the M-PCNNs to compute the SPT efficiently for large-scale problems. In addition, a dynamic algorithm that makes use of the structure of the previously computed SPT is proposed, which significantly improves the efficiency of the algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effective and efficient performance of the proposed approach.

  1. An Evaluation of Potentials of Genetic Algorithm in Shortest Path Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassany Pazooky, S.; Rahmatollahi Namin, Sh; Soleymani, A.; Samadzadegan, F.

    2009-04-01

    One of the most typical issues considered in combinatorial systems in transportation networks, is the shortest path problem. In such networks, routing has a significant impact on the network's performance. Due to natural complexity in transportation networks and strong impact of routing in different fields of decision making, such as traffic management and vehicle routing problem (VRP), appropriate solutions to solve this problem are crucial to be determined. During last years, in order to solve the shortest path problem, different solutions are proposed. These techniques are divided into two categories of classic and evolutionary approaches. Two well-known classic algorithms are Dijkstra and A*. Dijkstra is known as a robust, but time consuming algorithm in finding the shortest path problem. A* is also another algorithm very similar to Dijkstra, less robust but with a higher performance. On the other hand, Genetic algorithms are introduced as most applicable evolutionary algorithms. Genetic Algorithm uses a parallel search method in several parts of the domain and is not trapped in local optimums. In this paper, the potentiality of Genetic algorithm for finding the shortest path is evaluated by making a comparison between this algorithm and classic algorithms (Dijkstra and A*). Evaluation of the potential of these techniques on a transportation network in an urban area shows that due to the problem of classic methods in their small search space, GA had a better performance in finding the shortest path.

  2. Shortest Path Planning for a Tethered Robot or an Anchored Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.

    1999-02-22

    We consider the problem of planning shortest paths for a tethered robot with a finite length tether in a 2D environment with polygonal obstacles. We present an algorithm that runs in time O((k{sub 1} + 1){sup 2}n{sup 4}) and finds the shortest path or correctly determines that none exists that obeys the constraints; here n is the number obstacle vertices, and k{sub 1} is the number loops in the initial configuration of the tether. The robot may cross its tether but nothing can cross obstacles, which cause the tether to bend. The algorithm applies as well for planning a shortest path for the free end of an anchored cable.

  3. Dynamic shortest path association for multiple object tracking in video sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Zhenghao; Liu, Heping; Liu, Huaping; Zheng, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Persistently tracking multiple objects in cluttered environments is very challenging. We present a tracking association approach based on the shortest path faster algorithm. We first formulate the multiple object tracking as an integer programming problem of the flow network. Under this framework, the integer assumption is relaxed to a standard linear programming problem. Therefore, the global optimal solution can quickly be obtained using the fast dynamic shortest path algorithm, which highlights the dynamic programming characteristic of the shortest path, thus faster, algorithm. The proposed method avoids the difficulties of integer programming; more importantly, it has a lower worst-case complexity than competing methods but a better tracking accuracy and robustness in complex environments. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm takes less time than other methods and can operate in real time.

  4. The approach for shortest paths in fire succor based on component GIS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Zhao, Yong; Dai, K. W.

    2007-06-01

    Fire safety is an important issue for the national economy and people's living. Efficiency and exactness of fire department succor directly relate to safety of peoples' lives and property. Many disadvantages of the traditional fire system have been emerged in practical applications. The preparation of pumpers is guided by wireless communication or wire communication, so its real-time and accurate performances are much poorer. The information about the reported fire, such as the position, disaster and map, et al., for alarm and command was processed by persons, which slows the reaction speed and delays the combat opportunity. In order to solve these disadvantages, it has an important role to construct a modern fire command center based on high technology. The construction of modern fire command center can realize the modernization and automation of fire command and management. It will play a great role in protecting safety of peoples' lives and property. The center can enhance battle ability and can reduce the direct and indirect loss of fire damage at most. With the development of science technology, Geographic Information System (GIS) has becoming a new information industry for hardware production, software development, data collection, space analysis and counseling. With the popularization of computers and the development of GIS, GIS has gained increasing broad applications for its strong functionality. Network analysis is one of the most important functions of GIS, and the most elementary and pivotal issue of network analysis is the calculation of shortest paths. The shortest paths are mostly applied to some emergent systems such as 119 fire alarms. These systems mainly require that the computation time of the optimal path should be 1-3 seconds. And during traveling, the next running path of the vehicles should be calculated in time. So the implement of the shortest paths must have a high efficiency. In this paper, the component GIS technology was applied to

  5. Modeling shortest path selection of the ant Linepithema humile using psychophysical theory and realistic parameter values.

    PubMed

    von Thienen, Wolfhard; Metzler, Dirk; Witte, Volker

    2015-05-01

    The emergence of self-organizing behavior in ants has been modeled in various theoretical approaches in the past decades. One model explains experimental observations in which Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) selected the shorter of two alternative paths from their nest to a food source (shortest path experiments). This model serves as an important example for the emergence of collective behavior and self-organization in biological systems. In addition, it inspired the development of computer algorithms for optimization problems called ant colony optimization (ACO). In the model, a choice function describing how ants react to different pheromone concentrations is fundamental. However, the parameters of the choice function were not deduced experimentally but freely adapted so that the model fitted the observations of the shortest path experiments. Thus, important knowledge was lacking about crucial model assumptions. A recent study on the Argentine ant provided this information by measuring the response of the ants to varying pheromone concentrations. In said study, the above mentioned choice function was fitted to the experimental data and its parameters were deduced. In addition, a psychometric function was fitted to the data and its parameters deduced. Based on these findings, it is possible to test the shortest path model by applying realistic parameter values. Here we present the results of such tests using Monte Carlo simulations of shortest path experiments with Argentine ants. We compare the choice function and the psychometric function, both with parameter values deduced from the above-mentioned experiments. Our results show that by applying the psychometric function, the shortest path experiments can be explained satisfactorily by the model. The study represents the first example of how psychophysical theory can be used to understand and model collective foraging behavior of ants based on trail pheromones. These findings may be important for other

  6. Do People Use the Shortest Path? An Empirical Test of Wardrop’s First Principle

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shanjiang; Levinson, David

    2015-01-01

    Most recent route choice models, following either the random utility maximization or rule-based paradigm, require explicit enumeration of feasible routes. The quality of model estimation and prediction is sensitive to the appropriateness of the consideration set. However, few empirical studies of revealed route characteristics have been reported in the literature. This study evaluates the widely applied shortest path assumption by evaluating routes followed by residents of the Minneapolis—St. Paul metropolitan area. Accurate Global Positioning System (GPS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) data were employed to reveal routes people used over an eight to thirteen week period. Most people did not choose the shortest path. Using three weeks of that data, we find that current route choice set generation algorithms do not reveal the majority of paths that individuals took. Findings from this study may guide future efforts in building better route choice models. PMID:26267756

  7. A temporal ant colony optimization approach to the shortest path problem in dynamic scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feng; Li, Yanjun; Wu, Tie-Jun

    2010-02-01

    A large number of networks in the real world have a scale-free structure, and the parameters of the networks change stochastically with time. Searching for the shortest paths in a scale-free dynamic and stochastic network is not only necessary for the estimation of the statistical characteristics such as the average shortest path length of the network, but also challenges the traditional concepts related to the “shortest path” of a network and the design of path searching strategies. In this paper, the concept of shortest path is defined on the basis of a scale-free dynamic and stochastic network model, and a temporal ant colony optimization (TACO) algorithm is proposed for searching for the shortest paths in the network. The convergence and the setup for some important parameters of the TACO algorithm are discussed through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, validating the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  8. Task-parallel implementation of 3D shortest path raytracing for geophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroux, Bernard; Larouche, Benoît

    2013-04-01

    This paper discusses two variants of the shortest path method and their parallel implementation on a shared-memory system. One variant is designed to perform raytracing in models with stepwise distributions of interval velocity while the other is better suited for continuous velocity models. Both rely on a discretization scheme where primary nodes are located at the corners of cuboid cells and where secondary nodes are found on the edges and sides of the cells. The parallel implementations allow raytracing concurrently for different sources, providing an attractive framework for ray-based tomography. The accuracy and performance of the implementations were measured by comparison with the analytic solution for a layered model and for a vertical gradient model. Mean relative error less than 0.2% was obtained with 5 secondary nodes for the layered model and 9 secondary nodes for the gradient model. Parallel performance depends on the level of discretization refinement, on the number of threads, and on the problem size, with the most determinant variable being the level of discretization refinement (number of secondary nodes). The results indicate that a good trade-off between speed and accuracy is achieved with the number of secondary nodes equal to 5. The programs are written in C++ and rely on the Standard Template Library and OpenMP.

  9. Finding splitting lines for touching cell nuclei with a shortest path algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiangzhi; Wang, Peng; Sun, Changming; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Fugen; Meng, Cai

    2015-08-01

    A shortest path-based algorithm is proposed in this paper to find splitting lines for touching cell nuclei. First, an initial splitting line is obtained through the distance transform of a marker image and the watershed algorithm. The initial splitting line is then separated into different line segments as necessary, and the endpoint positions of these line segments are adjusted to the concave points on the contour. Finally, a shortest path algorithm is used to find the accurate splitting line between the starting-point and the end-point, and the final split can be achieved by the contour of the touching cell nuclei and the splitting lines. Comparisons of experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is effective for segmentation of different types of touching cell nuclei.

  10. Modeling the average shortest-path length in growth of word-adjacency networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulig, Andrzej; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław; OświÈ©cimka, Paweł

    2015-03-01

    We investigate properties of evolving linguistic networks defined by the word-adjacency relation. Such networks belong to the category of networks with accelerated growth but their shortest-path length appears to reveal the network size dependence of different functional form than the ones known so far. We thus compare the networks created from literary texts with their artificial substitutes based on different variants of the Dorogovtsev-Mendes model and observe that none of them is able to properly simulate the novel asymptotics of the shortest-path length. Then, we identify the local chainlike linear growth induced by grammar and style as a missing element in this model and extend it by incorporating such effects. It is in this way that a satisfactory agreement with the empirical result is obtained.

  11. Genetic Algorithm for Solving Fuzzy Shortest Path Problem in a Network with mixed fuzzy arc lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Iraj; Tajdin, Ali; Hassanzadeh, Reza; Mahdavi-Amiri, Nezam; Shafieian, Hosna

    2011-06-01

    We are concerned with the design of a model and an algorithm for computing a shortest path in a network having various types of fuzzy arc lengths. First, we develop a new technique for the addition of various fuzzy numbers in a path using α -cuts by proposing a linear least squares model to obtain membership functions for the considered additions. Then, using a recently proposed distance function for comparison of fuzzy numbers. we propose a new approach to solve the fuzzy APSPP using of genetic algorithm. Examples are worked out to illustrate the applicability of the proposed model.

  12. a Modified Genetic Algorithm for Finding Fuzzy Shortest Paths in Uncertain Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, A. A.; Delavar, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    In realistic network analysis, there are several uncertainties in the measurements and computation of the arcs and vertices. These uncertainties should also be considered in realizing the shortest path problem (SPP) due to the inherent fuzziness in the body of expert's knowledge. In this paper, we investigated the SPP under uncertainty to evaluate our modified genetic strategy. We improved the performance of genetic algorithm (GA) to investigate a class of shortest path problems on networks with vague arc weights. The solutions of the uncertain SPP with considering fuzzy path lengths are examined and compared in detail. As a robust metaheuristic, GA algorithm is modified and evaluated to tackle the fuzzy SPP (FSPP) with uncertain arcs. For this purpose, first, a dynamic operation is implemented to enrich the exploration/exploitation patterns of the conventional procedure and mitigate the premature convergence of GA technique. Then, the modified GA (MGA) strategy is used to resolve the FSPP. The attained results of the proposed strategy are compared to those of GA with regard to the cost, quality of paths and CPU times. Numerical instances are provided to demonstrate the success of the proposed MGA-FSPP strategy in comparison with GA. The simulations affirm that not only the proposed technique can outperform GA, but also the qualities of the paths are effectively improved. The results clarify that the competence of the proposed GA is preferred in view of quality quantities. The results also demonstrate that the proposed method can efficiently be utilized to handle FSPP in uncertain networks.

  13. Planning image-guided endovascular interventions: guidewire simulation using shortest path algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Singh, Vikas; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Noël, Peter B.; Xu, Jinhui

    2007-03-01

    Endovascular interventional procedures are being used more frequently in cardiovascular surgery. Unfortunately, procedural failure, e.g., vessel dissection, may occur and is often related to improper guidewire and/or device selection. To support the surgeon's decision process and because of the importance of the guidewire in positioning devices, we propose a method to determine the guidewire path prior to insertion using a model of its elastic potential energy coupled with a representative graph construction. The 3D vessel centerline and sizes are determined for a specified vessel. Points in planes perpendicular to the vessel centerline are generated. For each pair of consecutive planes, a vector set is generated which joins all points in these planes. We construct a graph representing these vector sets as nodes. The nodes representing adjacent vector sets are joined by edges with weights calculated as a function of the angle between the corresponding vectors (nodes). The optimal path through this weighted directed graph is then determined using shortest path algorithms, such as topological sort based shortest path algorithm or Dijkstra's algorithm. Volumetric data of an internal carotid artery phantom (Ø 3.5mm) were acquired. Several independent guidewire (Ø 0.4mm) placements were performed, and the 3D paths were determined using rotational angiography. The average RMS distance between the actual and the average simulated guidewire path was 0.7mm; the computation time to determine the path was 3 seconds. The ability to predict the guidewire path inside vessels may facilitate calculation of vessel-branch access and force estimation on devices and the vessel wall.

  14. An improved real-time endovascular guidewire position simulation using shortest path algorithm.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianpeng; Qu, Zhiyi; Qiu, Haiquan; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we propose a new graph-theoretical method to simulate guidewire paths inside the carotid artery. The minimum energy guidewire path can be obtained by applying the shortest path algorithm, such as Dijkstra's algorithm for graphs, based on the principle of the minimal total energy. Compared to previous results, experiments of three phantoms were validated, revealing that the first and second phantoms overlap completely between simulated and real guidewires. In addition, 95 % of the third phantom overlaps completely, and the remaining 5 % closely coincides. The results demonstrate that our method achieves 87 and 80 % improvements for the first and third phantoms under the same conditions, respectively. Furthermore, 91 % improvements were obtained for the second phantom under the condition with reduced graph construction complexity.

  15. An improved real-time endovascular guidewire position simulation using shortest path algorithm.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianpeng; Qu, Zhiyi; Qiu, Haiquan; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we propose a new graph-theoretical method to simulate guidewire paths inside the carotid artery. The minimum energy guidewire path can be obtained by applying the shortest path algorithm, such as Dijkstra's algorithm for graphs, based on the principle of the minimal total energy. Compared to previous results, experiments of three phantoms were validated, revealing that the first and second phantoms overlap completely between simulated and real guidewires. In addition, 95 % of the third phantom overlaps completely, and the remaining 5 % closely coincides. The results demonstrate that our method achieves 87 and 80 % improvements for the first and third phantoms under the same conditions, respectively. Furthermore, 91 % improvements were obtained for the second phantom under the condition with reduced graph construction complexity. PMID:26467345

  16. Performance of Thorup's Shortest Path Algorithm for Large-Scale Network Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakumoto, Yusuke; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Imase, Makoto

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of Thorup's algorithm by comparing it to Dijkstra's algorithm for large-scale network simulations. One of the challenges toward the realization of large-scale network simulations is the efficient execution to find shortest paths in a graph with N vertices and M edges. The time complexity for solving a single-source shortest path (SSSP) problem with Dijkstra's algorithm with a binary heap (DIJKSTRA-BH) is O((M+N)log N). An sophisticated algorithm called Thorup's algorithm has been proposed. The original version of Thorup's algorithm (THORUP-FR) has the time complexity of O(M+N). A simplified version of Thorup's algorithm (THORUP-KL) has the time complexity of O(Mα(N)+N) where α(N) is the functional inverse of the Ackerman function. In this paper, we compare the performances (i.e., execution time and memory consumption) of THORUP-KL and DIJKSTRA-BH since it is known that THORUP-FR is at least ten times slower than Dijkstra's algorithm with a Fibonaccii heap. We find that (1) THORUP-KL is almost always faster than DIJKSTRA-BH for large-scale network simulations, and (2) the performances of THORUP-KL and DIJKSTRA-BH deviate from their time complexities due to the presence of the memory cache in the microprocessor.

  17. A shortest-path graph kernel for estimating gene product semantic similarity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Existing methods for calculating semantic similarity between gene products using the Gene Ontology (GO) often rely on external resources, which are not part of the ontology. Consequently, changes in these external resources like biased term distribution caused by shifting of hot research topics, will affect the calculation of semantic similarity. One way to avoid this problem is to use semantic methods that are "intrinsic" to the ontology, i.e. independent of external knowledge. Results We present a shortest-path graph kernel (spgk) method that relies exclusively on the GO and its structure. In spgk, a gene product is represented by an induced subgraph of the GO, which consists of all the GO terms annotating it. Then a shortest-path graph kernel is used to compute the similarity between two graphs. In a comprehensive evaluation using a benchmark dataset, spgk compares favorably with other methods that depend on external resources. Compared with simUI, a method that is also intrinsic to GO, spgk achieves slightly better results on the benchmark dataset. Statistical tests show that the improvement is significant when the resolution and EC similarity correlation coefficient are used to measure the performance, but is insignificant when the Pfam similarity correlation coefficient is used. Conclusions Spgk uses a graph kernel method in polynomial time to exploit the structure of the GO to calculate semantic similarity between gene products. It provides an alternative to both methods that use external resources and "intrinsic" methods with comparable performance. PMID:21801410

  18. Finding the shortest path with PesCa: a tool for network reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Scardoni, Giovanni; Tosadori, Gabriele; Pratap, Sakshi; Spoto, Fausto; Laudanna, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis is of growing interest in several fields ranging from economics to biology. Several methods have been developed to investigate different properties of physical networks abstracted as graphs, including quantification of specific topological properties, contextual data enrichment, simulation of pathway dynamics and visual representation. In this context, the PesCa app for the Cytoscape network analysis environment is specifically designed to help researchers infer and manipulate networks based on the shortest path principle. PesCa offers different algorithms allowing network reconstruction and analysis starting from a list of genes, proteins and in general a set of interconnected nodes. The app is useful in the early stage of network analysis, i.e. to create networks or generate clusters based on shortest path computation, but can also help further investigations and, in general, it is suitable for every situation requiring the connection of a set of nodes that apparently do not share links, such as isolated nodes in sub-networks. Overall, the plugin enhances the ability of discovering interesting and not obvious relations between high dimensional sets of interacting objects. PMID:27781081

  19. Identification of novel thyroid cancer-related genes and chemicals using shortest path algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Peiwei; Li, Li-Peng; He, Yi-Chun; Gao, Ru-jian; Gao, Yu-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a typical endocrine malignancy. In the past three decades, the continued growth of its incidence has made it urgent to design effective treatments to treat this disease. To this end, it is necessary to uncover the mechanism underlying this disease. Identification of thyroid cancer-related genes and chemicals is helpful to understand the mechanism of thyroid cancer. In this study, we generalized some previous methods to discover both disease genes and chemicals. The method was based on shortest path algorithm and applied to discover novel thyroid cancer-related genes and chemicals. The analysis of the final obtained genes and chemicals suggests that some of them are crucial to the formation and development of thyroid cancer. It is indicated that the proposed method is effective for the discovery of novel disease genes and chemicals.

  20. A Shortest Dependency Path Based Convolutional Neural Network for Protein-Protein Relation Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Chanqin

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-the-art methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction are primarily based on kernel methods, and their performances strongly depend on the handcraft features. In this paper, we tackle PPI extraction by using convolutional neural networks (CNN) and propose a shortest dependency path based CNN (sdpCNN) model. The proposed method (1) only takes the sdp and word embedding as input and (2) could avoid bias from feature selection by using CNN. We performed experiments on standard Aimed and BioInfer datasets, and the experimental results demonstrated that our approach outperformed state-of-the-art kernel based methods. In particular, by tracking the sdpCNN model, we find that sdpCNN could extract key features automatically and it is verified that pretrained word embedding is crucial in PPI task. PMID:27493967

  1. A Shortest Dependency Path Based Convolutional Neural Network for Protein-Protein Relation Extraction.

    PubMed

    Hua, Lei; Quan, Chanqin

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-the-art methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction are primarily based on kernel methods, and their performances strongly depend on the handcraft features. In this paper, we tackle PPI extraction by using convolutional neural networks (CNN) and propose a shortest dependency path based CNN (sdpCNN) model. The proposed method (1) only takes the sdp and word embedding as input and (2) could avoid bias from feature selection by using CNN. We performed experiments on standard Aimed and BioInfer datasets, and the experimental results demonstrated that our approach outperformed state-of-the-art kernel based methods. In particular, by tracking the sdpCNN model, we find that sdpCNN could extract key features automatically and it is verified that pretrained word embedding is crucial in PPI task. PMID:27493967

  2. Identifying Gastric Cancer Related Genes Using the Shortest Path Algorithm and Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ying; Li, Li-Peng; Ren, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer, as one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide, causes about 800,000 deaths per year. Up to now, the mechanism underlying this disease is still not totally uncovered. Identification of related genes of this disease is an important step which can help to understand the mechanism underlying this disease, thereby designing effective treatments. In this study, some novel gastric cancer related genes were discovered based on the knowledge of known gastric cancer related ones. These genes were searched by applying the shortest path algorithm in protein-protein interaction network. The analysis results suggest that some of them are indeed involved in the biological process of gastric cancer, which indicates that they are the actual gastric cancer related genes with high probability. It is hopeful that the findings in this study may help promote the study of this disease and the methods can provide new insights to study various diseases. PMID:24729971

  3. A Shortest Dependency Path Based Convolutional Neural Network for Protein-Protein Relation Extraction.

    PubMed

    Hua, Lei; Quan, Chanqin

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-the-art methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction are primarily based on kernel methods, and their performances strongly depend on the handcraft features. In this paper, we tackle PPI extraction by using convolutional neural networks (CNN) and propose a shortest dependency path based CNN (sdpCNN) model. The proposed method (1) only takes the sdp and word embedding as input and (2) could avoid bias from feature selection by using CNN. We performed experiments on standard Aimed and BioInfer datasets, and the experimental results demonstrated that our approach outperformed state-of-the-art kernel based methods. In particular, by tracking the sdpCNN model, we find that sdpCNN could extract key features automatically and it is verified that pretrained word embedding is crucial in PPI task.

  4. Implantation of the global dynamic routing scheme in scale-free networks under the shortest path strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Haddou, N.; Ez-zahraouy, H.; Rachadi, A.

    2016-07-01

    The shortest path is a basic routing model which is still used in many systems. However, due to the low exploitation of the delivery capacity of peripheral nodes, the performance achieved by this policy is very limited. Starting from the fact that changing all network routers by others more robust is not practical, we propose the improvement of the capacity of a scale-free network under the shortest path strategy by the implantation of global dynamic routers. We have studied two targeting approaches to designate specific nodes to route the packets following the global dynamic protocol; one is based on node degree and the other on its betweenness. We show that we already exceed twice the capacity under the shortest path protocol with only 4% of global dynamic routers when we target nodes with high betweenness and 10% when we target nodes with high degrees. Moreover, the average travelling time remains low while the network capacity increases.

  5. The shortest path problem in the stochastic networks with unstable topology.

    PubMed

    Shirdel, Gholam H; Abdolhosseinzadeh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    The stochastic shortest path length is defined as the arrival probability from a given source node to a given destination node in the stochastic networks. We consider the topological changes and their effects on the arrival probability in directed acyclic networks. There is a stable topology which shows the physical connections of nodes; however, the communication between nodes does not stable and that is defined as the unstable topology where arcs may be congested. A discrete time Markov chain with an absorbing state is established in the network according to the unstable topological changes. Then, the arrival probability to the destination node from the source node in the network is computed as the multi-step transition probability of the absorption in the final state of the established Markov chain. It is assumed to have some wait states, whenever there is a physical connection but it is not possible to communicate between nodes immediately. The proposed method is illustrated by different numerical examples, and the results can be used to anticipate the probable congestion along some critical arcs in the delay sensitive networks.

  6. K-Shortest-Path-Based Evacuation Routing with Police Resource Allocation in City Transportation Networks

    PubMed Central

    He, Yunyue; Liu, Zhong; Shi, Jianmai; Wang, Yishan; Zhang, Jiaming; Liu, Jinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Emergency evacuation aims to transport people from dangerous places to safe shelters as quickly as possible. Police play an important role in the evacuation process, as they can handle traffic accidents immediately and help people move smoothly on roads. This paper investigates an evacuation routing problem that involves police resource allocation. We propose a novel k-th-shortest-path-based technique that uses explicit congestion control to optimize evacuation routing and police resource allocation. A nonlinear mixed-integer programming model is presented to formulate the problem. The model’s objective is to minimize the overall evacuation clearance time. Two algorithms are given to solve the problem. The first one linearizes the original model and solves the linearized problem with CPLEX. The second one is a heuristic algorithm that uses a police resource utilization efficiency index to directly solve the original model. This police resource utilization efficiency index significantly aids in the evaluation of road links from an evacuation throughput perspective. The proposed algorithms are tested with a number of examples based on real data from cities of different sizes. The computational results show that the police resource utilization efficiency index is very helpful in finding near-optimal solutions. Additionally, comparing the performance of the heuristic algorithm and the linearization method by using randomly generated examples indicates that the efficiency of the heuristic algorithm is superior. PMID:26226109

  7. K-Shortest-Path-Based Evacuation Routing with Police Resource Allocation in City Transportation Networks.

    PubMed

    He, Yunyue; Liu, Zhong; Shi, Jianmai; Wang, Yishan; Zhang, Jiaming; Liu, Jinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Emergency evacuation aims to transport people from dangerous places to safe shelters as quickly as possible. Police play an important role in the evacuation process, as they can handle traffic accidents immediately and help people move smoothly on roads. This paper investigates an evacuation routing problem that involves police resource allocation. We propose a novel k-th-shortest-path-based technique that uses explicit congestion control to optimize evacuation routing and police resource allocation. A nonlinear mixed-integer programming model is presented to formulate the problem. The model's objective is to minimize the overall evacuation clearance time. Two algorithms are given to solve the problem. The first one linearizes the original model and solves the linearized problem with CPLEX. The second one is a heuristic algorithm that uses a police resource utilization efficiency index to directly solve the original model. This police resource utilization efficiency index significantly aids in the evaluation of road links from an evacuation throughput perspective. The proposed algorithms are tested with a number of examples based on real data from cities of different sizes. The computational results show that the police resource utilization efficiency index is very helpful in finding near-optimal solutions. Additionally, comparing the performance of the heuristic algorithm and the linearization method by using randomly generated examples indicates that the efficiency of the heuristic algorithm is superior.

  8. K-Shortest-Path-Based Evacuation Routing with Police Resource Allocation in City Transportation Networks.

    PubMed

    He, Yunyue; Liu, Zhong; Shi, Jianmai; Wang, Yishan; Zhang, Jiaming; Liu, Jinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Emergency evacuation aims to transport people from dangerous places to safe shelters as quickly as possible. Police play an important role in the evacuation process, as they can handle traffic accidents immediately and help people move smoothly on roads. This paper investigates an evacuation routing problem that involves police resource allocation. We propose a novel k-th-shortest-path-based technique that uses explicit congestion control to optimize evacuation routing and police resource allocation. A nonlinear mixed-integer programming model is presented to formulate the problem. The model's objective is to minimize the overall evacuation clearance time. Two algorithms are given to solve the problem. The first one linearizes the original model and solves the linearized problem with CPLEX. The second one is a heuristic algorithm that uses a police resource utilization efficiency index to directly solve the original model. This police resource utilization efficiency index significantly aids in the evaluation of road links from an evacuation throughput perspective. The proposed algorithms are tested with a number of examples based on real data from cities of different sizes. The computational results show that the police resource utilization efficiency index is very helpful in finding near-optimal solutions. Additionally, comparing the performance of the heuristic algorithm and the linearization method by using randomly generated examples indicates that the efficiency of the heuristic algorithm is superior. PMID:26226109

  9. The shortest path problem in the stochastic networks with unstable topology.

    PubMed

    Shirdel, Gholam H; Abdolhosseinzadeh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    The stochastic shortest path length is defined as the arrival probability from a given source node to a given destination node in the stochastic networks. We consider the topological changes and their effects on the arrival probability in directed acyclic networks. There is a stable topology which shows the physical connections of nodes; however, the communication between nodes does not stable and that is defined as the unstable topology where arcs may be congested. A discrete time Markov chain with an absorbing state is established in the network according to the unstable topological changes. Then, the arrival probability to the destination node from the source node in the network is computed as the multi-step transition probability of the absorption in the final state of the established Markov chain. It is assumed to have some wait states, whenever there is a physical connection but it is not possible to communicate between nodes immediately. The proposed method is illustrated by different numerical examples, and the results can be used to anticipate the probable congestion along some critical arcs in the delay sensitive networks. PMID:27652102

  10. Shortest multiple disconnected path for the analysis of entanglements in two- and three-dimensional polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Martin

    2005-06-01

    We present an algorithm which returns a shortest path and related number of entanglements for a given configuration of a polymeric system in 2 or 3 dimensions. Rubinstein and Helfand, and later Everaers et al. introduced a concept to extract primitive paths for dense polymeric melts made of linear chains (a multiple disconnected multibead 'path'), where each primitive path is defined as a path connecting the (space-fixed) ends of a polymer under the constraint of non-interpenetration (excluded volume) between primitive paths of different chains, such that the multiple disconnected path fulfills a minimization criterion. The present algorithm uses geometrical operations and provides a—model independent—efficient approximate solution to this challenging problem. Primitive paths are treated as 'infinitely' thin (we further allow for finite thickness to model excluded volume), and tensionless lines rather than multibead chains, excluded volume is taken into account without a force law. The present implementation allows to construct a shortest multiple disconnected path (SP) for 2D systems (polymeric chain within spherical obstacles) and an optimal SP for 3D systems (collection of polymeric chains). The number of entanglements is then simply obtained from the SP as either the number of interior kinks, or from the average length of a line segment. Further, information about structure and potentially also the dynamics of entanglements is immediately available from the SP. We apply the method to study the 'concentration' dependence of the degree of entanglement in phantom chain systems. Program summaryTitle of program:Z Catalogue number:ADVG Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVG Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Silicon Graphics (Irix), Sun (Solaris), PC (Linux) Operating systems or monitors under which the

  11. Fast and accurate global multiphase arrival tracking: the irregular shortest-path method in a 3-D spherical earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guo-Jiao; Bai, Chao-Ying; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2013-09-01

    The traditional grid/cell-based wavefront expansion algorithms, such as the shortest path algorithm, can only find the first arrivals or multiply reflected (or mode converted) waves transmitted from subsurface interfaces, but cannot calculate the other later reflections/conversions having a minimax time path. In order to overcome the above limitations, we introduce the concept of a stationary minimax time path of Fermat's Principle into the multistage irregular shortest path method. Here we extend it from Cartesian coordinates for a flat earth model to global ray tracing of multiple phases in a 3-D complex spherical earth model. The ray tracing results for 49 different kinds of crustal, mantle and core phases show that the maximum absolute traveltime error is less than 0.12 s and the average absolute traveltime error is within 0.09 s when compared with the AK135 theoretical traveltime tables for a 1-D reference model. Numerical tests in terms of computational accuracy and CPU time consumption indicate that the new scheme is an accurate, efficient and a practical way to perform 3-D multiphase arrival tracking in regional or global traveltime tomography.

  12. Spatially-global integration of closed, fragmented contours by finding the shortest-path in a log-polar representation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeKyu; Agrawal, Kunal; Li, Yunfeng; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2016-09-01

    Finding the occluding contours of objects in real 2D retinal images of natural 3D scenes is done by determining, which contour fragments are relevant, and the order in which they should be connected. We developed a model that finds the closed contour represented in the image by solving a shortest path problem that uses a log-polar representation of the image; the kind of representation known to exist in area V1 of the primate cortex. The shortest path in a log-polar representation favors the smooth, convex and closed contours in the retinal image that have the smallest number of gaps. This approach is practical because finding a globally-optimal solution to a shortest path problem is computationally easy. Our model was tested in four psychophysical experiments. In the first two experiments, the subject was presented with a fragmented convex or concave polygon target among a large number of unrelated pieces of contour (distracters). The density of these pieces of contour was uniform all over the screen to minimize spatially-local cues. The orientation of each target contour fragment was randomly perturbed by varying the levels of jitter. Subjects drew a closed contour that represented the target's contour on a screen. The subjects' performance was nearly perfect when the jitter-level was low. Their performance deteriorated as jitter-levels were increased. The performance of our model was very similar to our subjects'. In two subsequent experiments, the subject was asked to discriminate a briefly-presented egg-shaped object while maintaining fixation at several different positions relative to the closed contour of the shape. The subject's discrimination performance was affected by the fixation position in much the same way as the model's.

  13. Spatially-global integration of closed, fragmented contours by finding the shortest-path in a log-polar representation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeKyu; Agrawal, Kunal; Li, Yunfeng; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2016-09-01

    Finding the occluding contours of objects in real 2D retinal images of natural 3D scenes is done by determining, which contour fragments are relevant, and the order in which they should be connected. We developed a model that finds the closed contour represented in the image by solving a shortest path problem that uses a log-polar representation of the image; the kind of representation known to exist in area V1 of the primate cortex. The shortest path in a log-polar representation favors the smooth, convex and closed contours in the retinal image that have the smallest number of gaps. This approach is practical because finding a globally-optimal solution to a shortest path problem is computationally easy. Our model was tested in four psychophysical experiments. In the first two experiments, the subject was presented with a fragmented convex or concave polygon target among a large number of unrelated pieces of contour (distracters). The density of these pieces of contour was uniform all over the screen to minimize spatially-local cues. The orientation of each target contour fragment was randomly perturbed by varying the levels of jitter. Subjects drew a closed contour that represented the target's contour on a screen. The subjects' performance was nearly perfect when the jitter-level was low. Their performance deteriorated as jitter-levels were increased. The performance of our model was very similar to our subjects'. In two subsequent experiments, the subject was asked to discriminate a briefly-presented egg-shaped object while maintaining fixation at several different positions relative to the closed contour of the shape. The subject's discrimination performance was affected by the fixation position in much the same way as the model's. PMID:26241462

  14. Spatially-global integration of closed, fragmented contours by finding the shortest-path in a log-polar representation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, TaeKyu; Agrawal, Kunal; Li, Yunfeng; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Finding the occluding contours of objects in real 2D retinal images of natural 3D scenes is done by determining, which contour fragments are relevant, and the order in which they should be connected. We developed a model that finds the closed contour represented in the image by solving a shortest path problem that uses a log-polar representation of the image; the kind of representation known to exist in area V1 of the primate cortex. The shortest path in a log-polar representation favors the smooth, convex and closed contours in the retinal image that have the smallest number of gaps. This approach is practical because finding a globally-optimal solution to a shortest path problem is computationally easy. Our model was tested in four psychophysical experiments. In the first two experiments, the subject was presented with a fragmented convex or concave polygon target among a large number of unrelated pieces of contour (distracters). The density of these pieces of contour was uniform all over the screen to minimize spatially-local cues. The orientation of each target contour fragment was randomly perturbed by varying the levels of jitter. Subjects drew a closed contour that represented the target’s contour on a screen. The subjects’ performance was nearly perfect when the jitter-level was low. Their performance deteriorated as jitter-levels were increased. The performance of our model was very similar to our subjects’. In two subsequent experiments, the subject was asked to discriminate a briefly-presented egg-shaped object while maintaining fixation at several different positions relative to the closed contour of the shape. The subject’s discrimination performance was affected by the fixation position in much the same way as the model’s. PMID:26241462

  15. Finding the biased-shortest path with minimal congestion in networks via linear-prediction of queue length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Ren, Gang; Liu, Yang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a biased-shortest path method with minimal congestion. In the method, we use linear-prediction to estimate the queue length of nodes, and propose a dynamic accepting probability function for nodes to decide whether accept or reject the incoming packets. The dynamic accepting probability function is based on the idea of homogeneous network flow and is developed to enable nodes to coordinate their queue length to avoid congestion. A path strategy incorporated with the linear-prediction of the queue length and the dynamic accepting probability function of nodes is designed to allow packets to be automatically delivered on un-congested paths with short traveling time. Our method has the advantage of low computation cost because the optimal paths are dynamically self-organized by nodes in the delivering process of packets with local traffic information. We compare our method with the existing methods such as the efficient path method (EPS) and the optimal path method (OPS) on the BA scale-free networks and a real example. The numerical computations show that our method performs best for low network load and has minimum run time due to its low computational cost and local routing scheme.

  16. Identifying New Candidate Genes and Chemicals Related to Prostate Cancer Using a Hybrid Network and Shortest Path Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fei; Zhou, You; Wang, Meng; Yang, Jing; Wu, Kai; Lu, Changhong; Kong, Xiangyin; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the male prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. Because prostate cancer cells may spread to other parts of the body and can influence human reproduction, understanding the mechanisms underlying this disease is critical for designing effective treatments. The identification of as many genes and chemicals related to prostate cancer as possible will enhance our understanding of this disease. In this study, we proposed a computational method to identify new candidate genes and chemicals based on currently known genes and chemicals related to prostate cancer by applying a shortest path approach in a hybrid network. The hybrid network was constructed according to information concerning chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions. Many of the obtained genes and chemicals are associated with prostate cancer. PMID:26504486

  17. A Shortest-Path-Based Method for the Analysis and Prediction of Fruit-Related Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fangchu; Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Biologically, fruits are defined as seed-bearing reproductive structures in angiosperms that develop from the ovary. The fertilization, development and maturation of fruits are crucial for plant reproduction and are precisely regulated by intrinsic genetic regulatory factors. In this study, we used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model organism and attempted to identify novel genes related to fruit-associated biological processes. Specifically, using validated genes, we applied a shortest-path-based method to identify several novel genes in a large network constructed using the protein-protein interactions observed in Arabidopsis thaliana. The described analyses indicate that several of the discovered genes are associated with fruit fertilization, development and maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27434024

  18. New Bounds for Old Algorithms: On the Average-Case Behavior of Classic Single-Source Shortest-Paths Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Ulrich; Negoescu, Andrei; Weichert, Volker

    Despite disillusioning worst-case behavior, classic algorithms for single-source shortest-paths (SSSP) like Bellman-Ford are still being used in practice, especially due to their simple data structures. However, surprisingly little is known about the average-case complexity of these approaches. We provide new theoretical and experimental results for the performance of classic label-correcting SSSP algorithms on graph classes with non-negative random edge weights. In particular, we prove a tight lower bound of Ω(n 2) for the running times of Bellman-Ford on a class of sparse graphs with O(n) nodes and edges; the best previous bound was Ω(n 4/3 - ɛ ). The same improvements are shown for Pallottino's algorithm. We also lift a lower bound for the approximate bucket implementation of Dijkstra's algorithm from Ω(n logn / loglogn) to Ω(n 1.2 - ɛ ). Furthermore, we provide an experimental evaluation of our new graph classes in comparison with previously used test inputs.

  19. Predicting the continuum between corridors and barriers to animal movements using Step Selection Functions and Randomized Shortest Paths.

    PubMed

    Panzacchi, Manuela; Van Moorter, Bram; Strand, Olav; Saerens, Marco; Kivimäki, Ilkka; St Clair, Colleen C; Herfindal, Ivar; Boitani, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The loss, fragmentation and degradation of habitat everywhere on Earth prompts increasing attention to identifying landscape features that support animal movement (corridors) or impedes it (barriers). Most algorithms used to predict corridors assume that animals move through preferred habitat either optimally (e.g. least cost path) or as random walkers (e.g. current models), but neither extreme is realistic. We propose that corridors and barriers are two sides of the same coin and that animals experience landscapes as spatiotemporally dynamic corridor-barrier continua connecting (separating) functional areas where individuals fulfil specific ecological processes. Based on this conceptual framework, we propose a novel methodological approach that uses high-resolution individual-based movement data to predict corridor-barrier continua with increased realism. Our approach consists of two innovations. First, we use step selection functions (SSF) to predict friction maps quantifying corridor-barrier continua for tactical steps between consecutive locations. Secondly, we introduce to movement ecology the randomized shortest path algorithm (RSP) which operates on friction maps to predict the corridor-barrier continuum for strategic movements between functional areas. By modulating the parameter Ѳ, which controls the trade-off between exploration and optimal exploitation of the environment, RSP bridges the gap between algorithms assuming optimal movements (when Ѳ approaches infinity, RSP is equivalent to LCP) or random walk (when Ѳ → 0, RSP → current models). Using this approach, we identify migration corridors for GPS-monitored wild reindeer (Rangifer t. tarandus) in Norway. We demonstrate that reindeer movement is best predicted by an intermediate value of Ѳ, indicative of a movement trade-off between optimization and exploration. Model calibration allows identification of a corridor-barrier continuum that closely fits empirical data and demonstrates that RSP

  20. Identification of novel candidate drivers connecting different dysfunctional levels for lung adenocarcinoma using protein-protein interactions and a shortest path approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Jiang, Yang; Zheng, Mingyue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Tumors are formed by the abnormal proliferation of somatic cells with disordered growth regulation under the influence of tumorigenic factors. Recently, the theory of “cancer drivers” connects tumor initiation with several specific mutations in the so-called cancer driver genes. According to the differentiation of four basic levels between tumor and adjacent normal tissues, the cancer drivers can be divided into the following: (1) Methylation level, (2) microRNA level, (3) mutation level, and (4) mRNA level. In this study, a computational method is proposed to identify novel lung adenocarcinoma drivers based on dysfunctional genes on the methylation, microRNA, mutation and mRNA levels. First, a large network was constructed using protein-protein interactions. Next, we searched all of the shortest paths connecting dysfunctional genes on different levels and extracted new candidate genes lying on these paths. Finally, the obtained candidate genes were filtered by a permutation test and an additional strict selection procedure involving a betweenness ratio and an interaction score. Several candidate genes remained, which are deemed to be related to two different levels of cancer. The analyses confirmed our assertions that some have the potential to contribute to the tumorigenesis process on multiple levels. PMID:27412431

  1. Identification of Influenza A/H7N9 Virus Infection-Related Human Genes Based on Shortest Paths in a Virus-Human Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The recently emerging Influenza A/H7N9 virus is reported to be able to infect humans and cause mortality. However, viral and host factors associated with the infection are poorly understood. It is suggested by the “guilt by association” rule that interacting proteins share the same or similar functions and hence may be involved in the same pathway. In this study, we developed a computational method to identify Influenza A/H7N9 virus infection-related human genes based on this rule from the shortest paths in a virus-human protein interaction network. Finally, we screened out the most significant 20 human genes, which could be the potential infection related genes, providing guidelines for further experimental validation. Analysis of the 20 genes showed that they were enriched in protein binding, saccharide or polysaccharide metabolism related pathways and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. We also compared the results with those from human rhinovirus (HRV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by the same method. It was indicated that saccharide or polysaccharide metabolism related pathways might be especially associated with the H7N9 infection. These results could shed some light on the understanding of the virus infection mechanism, providing basis for future experimental biology studies and for the development of effective strategies for H7N9 clinical therapies. PMID:24955349

  2. Understanding and applying open-path optical sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virag, Peter; Kricks, Robert J.

    1999-02-01

    During the last 10 years, open-path air monitors have evolved to yield reliable and effective measurements of single and multiple compounds on a real-time basis. To many individuals within the optical remote sensing community, the attributes of open-path and its the potential uses seem unlimited. Then why has the market has been stagnant for the last few years? The reason may center on how open-path information is applied and how well the end user understands that information. We constantly try to compare open-path data to risk/health or safety levels that are based for use at a single point and for a specific averaging period often far longer than a typical open-path data point. Often this approach is perceived as putting a square peg in a round hole. This perception may be well founded, as open-path data at times may need to go through extensive data manipulation and assumptions before it can be applied. This paper will review pervious open-path monitoring programs and their success in applying the data collected. We will also look at how open-path data is being currently used, some previous pitfalls in data use, alternate methods of data interpretation, and how open-path data can be best practically applied to fit current needs.

  3. Fire opens path to advanced heating

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, J.

    1995-01-01

    Eleven months after the Shed Restaurant in Stowe, VT was consumed by fire, a brand new Shed is opening for business. Heating the new structure is an innovative application of advanced oilfired heating technology - three tandem units in series (Energy Kinetics` System 2000) which will provide all the heat and hot water necessary for the beautiful 13,000 sq. ft., three-floor building, which includes three second floor apartments. In the case of The Shed, the triple tandem will heat the 7500 square foot main floor, which includes the restaurant and bar; the 3000-square foot second story including the three apartments and the 2500-square foot basement/store room, while also providing hot water for both the restaurant/bar and the apartments. The heating system is described.

  4. Completely automated open-path FT-IR spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric analysis by open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP/FT-IR) spectrometry has been possible for over two decades but has not been widely used because of the limitations of the software of commercial instruments. In this paper, we describe the current state-of-the-art of the hardware and s...

  5. Open Path Trace Gas Laser Sensors for UAV Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadman, S.; Mchale, L.; Rose, C.; Yalin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Novel trace gas sensors based on open-path Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy (CRDS) are being developed to enable remote and mobile deployments including on small unmanned aerial systems (UAS). Relative to established closed-path CRDS instruments, the use of open-path configurations allows removal of the bulky and power hungry vacuum and flow system, potentially enabling lightweight and low power instruments with high sensitivity. However, open path operation introduces new challenges including the need to maintain mirror cleanliness, mitigation of particle optical effects, and the need to measure spectral features that are relatively broad. The present submission details open-path CRDS instruments for ammonia and methane and their planned use in UAS studies. The ammonia sensor uses a quantum cascade laser at 10.3 mm in a configuration in which the laser frequency is continuously swept and a trigger circuit and acousto-optic modulator (AOM) extinguish the light when the laser is resonant with the cavity. Ring-down signals are measured with a two-stage thermoelectrically cooled MCT photodetector. The cavity mirrors have reflectivity of 0.9995 and a noise equivalent absorption of 1.5 ppb Hz-1/2 was demonstrated. A first version of the methane sensor operated at 1.7um with a telecom diode laser while the current version operates at 3.6 um with an interband cascade laser (stronger absorption). We have performed validation measurements against known standards for both sensors. Compact optical assemblies are being developed for UAS deployment. For example, the methane sensor head will have target mass of <4 kg and power draw <40 W. A compact single board computer and DAQ system is being designed for sensor control and signal processing with target mass <1 kg and power draw <10 W. The sensor size and power parameters are suitable for UAS deployment on both fixed wing and rotor style UAS. We plan to deploy the methane sensor to measure leakage and emission of methane from

  6. An advanced open-path atmospheric monitor design

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.; Suhre, D.; Mech, S.

    1996-05-01

    The conceptual design of an open-path atmospheric monitor combines an acousto-optic tunable filter for emission spectroscopy (3-14 {mu}m) with a mid-IR (4.6-5.4 {mu}m) for absorption spectroscopy. It utilizes mostly commercially available components, covers a large area ({approximately}4 km radius), measures the distance to any reflecting object, can take measurements along any line-of-sight, and is eye safe. Of twenty test pollutants it is to detect, the concentrations of all twenty will be measurable via emission spectroscopy and ten by the more sensitive absorption spectroscopy.

  7. TATP stand-off detection with open path: FTIR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, C.; Pohl, T.; Weber, K.; Vogel, A.; van Haren, G.; Schweikert, W.

    2012-10-01

    TATP is a very easy to synthesize [9], sensitive, high explosive [10] and high volatile explosive [1, 3, 7] with great absorption in the IR Spectra [4, 5, 6]. In this project we detect TATP gas traces with open path FTIR - techniques. The first project phase was to construct and build a heatable multi-reflection cell with adjustable optical path length and a heatable intake to evaporate solid TATP samples. In this cell reference TATP - spectra were collected under controlled conditions with a Bruker FTIR system (Typ OPAG 33). The next step was to find out how the TATP gas will be diluted in the ambient air and validate some physical properties which are described inconsistently in literature e.g. evaporation rates. We constructed a special double - T shaped chamber with stabile air conditions. In this chamber the dispersion kinetics of the TATP vapour could be tested. It turned out that the TATP vapours has the tendency to drop down. Therefore the highest TATP - concentrations were measured below the TATP sample. During the investigation for this study it turned out, that some materials scrub the TATP- vapour out of the air, e.g. Metals, fabric, leather. In the second phase of the project successful open path FTIR- measurements were taken in ambient air and will be continued with different system configurations of the OPAG 33 to lower the detection limits. Also successful measurements were taken in indoor ambient air with a Hyper spectral camera (passive FTIR with array sensor) to detect TATP in solid and gaseous phase. This technique allows detecting TATP and identifying the TATP source. The poster shows some selected results of the continued research.

  8. APPLYING OPEN-PATH OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-dispersive infrared absorption has been used to measure gaseous emissions for both stationary and mobile sources. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used for stationary sources as both extractive and open-path methods. We have applied the open-path method for bo...

  9. Open-path cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for atmospheric ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadman, Soran; Rose, Charles; Yalin, Azer P.

    2016-07-01

    An open-path cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) sensor has been developed for measurement of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) and represents the first use of open-path CRDS in the mid-infrared region. The sensor uses a continuous-wave distributed feedback quantum cascade laser at 10.33 μm to target strong absorption features. The optical cavity is constructed with two high-reflectivity mirrors ( R = 0.9995). The open-path configuration removes inlet effects, which are very challenging for closed-path instruments, and can be enabling for compact, low-power designs. Sensor performance was validated in the laboratory by measuring known concentrations in a closed-path configuration. The open-path configuration was validated by comparison against a commercial closed-path CRDS instrument for outdoor measurements at a small feed lot. Ammonia concentrations from the two instruments showed good agreement with slope of 0.990 ( R 2 = 0.92), for 5-min averages. The precision of the open-path instrument was found from Allan variance studies as 1.2 ppb (2-σ) for 3-s measurement durations.

  10. Assessment of Hydrogen Sulfide Minimum Detection Limits of an Open Path Tunable Diode Laser

    EPA Science Inventory

    During June 2007, U.S. EPA conducted a feasibility study to determine whether the EPA OTM 10 measurement approach, also known as radial plume mapping (RPM), was feasible. A Boreal open-path tunable diode laser (OP-TDL) to collect path-integrated hydrogen sulfide measurements alon...

  11. Rapid Swept-Wavelength External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser for Open Path Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-07-01

    A rapidly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser system is used for open path sensing. The system permits acquisition of transient absorption spectra over a 125 cm-1 tuning range in less than 0.01 s.

  12. Zero Density of Open Paths in the Lorentz Mirror Model for Arbitrary Mirror Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Atahualpa S.; Sanders, David P.

    2014-09-01

    We show, incorporating results obtained from numerical simulations, that in the Lorentz mirror model, the density of open paths in any finite box tends to 0 as the box size tends to infinity, for any mirror probability.

  13. Chirped laser dispersion spectroscopy for remote open-path trace-gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Nikodem, Michal; Wysocki, Gerard

    2012-11-28

    In this paper we present a prototype instrument for remote open-path detection of nitrous oxide. The sensor is based on a 4.53 μm quantum cascade laser and uses the chirped laser dispersion spectroscopy (CLaDS) technique for molecular concentration measurements. To the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of open-path laser-based trace-gas detection using a molecular dispersion measurement. The prototype sensor achieves a detection limit down to the single-ppbv level and exhibits excellent stability and robustness. The instrument characterization, field deployment performance, and the advantages of applying dispersion sensing to sensitive trace-gas detection in a remote open-path configuration are presented.

  14. Long open path Fourier transform spectroscopy measurements of greenhouse gases in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, David; Pöhler, Denis; Schmidt, Stefan; Hammer, Samuel; Vardag, Sanam; Levin, Ingeborg; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric composition measurements are an important tool to quantify local and regional emissions and sinks of greenhouse gases. But how representative are in situ measurements at one point in an inhomogeneous environment? Open path Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTS) measurements potentially offer spatial averaging and continuous measurements of several trace gases (including CO2, CH4, CO and N2O) simultaneously in the same airmass. Spatial averaging over kilometre scales is a better fit to the finest scale atmospheric models becoming available, and helps bridge the gap between models and in situ measurements. With what precision, accuracy and reliability can such measurements be made? Building on our pooled experience in ground-level open path Fourier transform spectroscopy and TCCON solar FTS in the infrared (Wollongong) and long path DOAS techniques in the UV-visible (Heidelberg), we set up a new type of open path measurement system across a 1.5 km one-way path in urban Heidelberg, Germany, using FTS in the near infrared. Direct open-atmosphere measurements of trace gases CO2, CH4, CO and N2O as well as O2 were retrieved from several absorption bands between 4000 and 8000 cm-1 (2.5 - 1.25 micron). At one end of the path an in situ FTIR analyser simultaneously collected well calibrated measurements of the same species for comparison with the open path-integrated measurements. The measurements ran continuously from June - November 2014. We introduce the open path FTS measurement system and present an analysis of the results, including assessment of precision, accuracy relative to co-incident in situ measurements, reliability, and avenues for further improvements and extensions. Short term precision of the open path measurement of CO2 was better than 1 ppm for 5 minute averages and thus sufficient for studies in urban and other non-background environments. Measurement bias relative to calibrated in situ measurements was stable across the measurement period. The

  15. Portable open-path chemical sensor using a quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, Paul; Lwin, Maung; Huntley, Reuven; Chhabra, Amandeep; Moshary, Fred; Gross, Barry; Ahmed, Samir

    2009-05-01

    Remote sensing of enemy installations or their movements by trace gas detection is a critical but challenging military objective. Open path measurements over ranges of a few meters to many kilometers with sensitivity in the parts per million or billion regime are crucial in anticipating the presence of a threat. Previous approaches to detect ground level chemical plumes, explosive constituents, or combustion have relied on low-resolution, short range Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), or low-sensitivity near-infrared differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). As mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources have improved in cost and performance, systems based on QCL's that can be tailored to monitor multiple chemical species in real time are becoming a viable alternative. We present the design of a portable, high-resolution, multi-kilometer open path trace gas sensor based on QCL technology. Using a tunable (1045-1047cm-1) QCL, a modeled atmosphere and link-budget analysis with commercial component specifications, we show that with this approach, accuracy in parts per billion ozone or ammonia can be obtained in seconds at path lengths up to 10 km. We have assembled an open-path QCL sensor based on this theoretical approach at City College of New York, and we present preliminary results demonstrating the potential of QCLs in open-path sensing applications.

  16. Shortest recurrence periods of novae

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mariko; Saio, Hideyuki; Hachisu, Izumi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-10-01

    Stimulated by the recent discovery of the 1 yr recurrence period nova M31N 2008-12a, we examined the shortest recurrence periods of hydrogen shell flashes on mass-accreting white dwarfs (WDs). We discuss the mechanism that yields a finite minimum recurrence period for a given WD mass. Calculating the unstable flashes for various WD masses and mass accretion rates, we identified a shortest recurrence period of about two months for a non-rotating 1.38 M {sub ☉} WD with a mass accretion rate of 3.6 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. A 1 yr recurrence period is realized for very massive (≳ 1.3 M {sub ☉}) WDs with very high accretion rates (≳ 1.5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). We revised our stability limit of hydrogen shell burning, which will be useful for binary evolution calculations toward Type Ia supernovae.

  17. Chirped laser dispersion spectroscopy for laser-based hydrogen sulfide detection in open-path conditions.

    PubMed

    Nikodem, Michał

    2016-05-16

    In this paper the design and characterization of a near-IR Chirped Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy (CLaDS)-based setup for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) detection is reported. This system can be implemented for open-path sensing also in standoff configuration. Target transition selection, system noise and detection limit are discussed and characterized. Furthermore, the cross-interference with other molecules is analyzed. CLaDS-based detection is shown to be highly immune to background carbon dioxide changes, which is a critical issue in accurate open-path sensing of hydrogen sulfide.

  18. OPEN PATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR ACQUISITION OF FUGITIVE EMISSION FLUX DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. EPA has developed a gorund-based optical remote sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transfor...

  19. INVESTIGATION OF OPEN-PATH FTIR FOR FAST DEPLOYMENT EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO CHEMICAL THREATS AND ACCIDENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed a series of experiments to determine the tradeoff in detection sensitivity for implementing design features for an Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared (OP-FTIR) chemical analyzer that would be quick to deploy under emergency response conditions. The fast-deplo...

  20. PARTICULATE MATTER MEASUREMENTS USING OPEN-PATH FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FT1R) spectroscopy is an accepted technology for measuring gaseous air contaminants. OP-FT1R absorbance spectra acquired during changing aerosols conditions reveal related changes in very broad baseline features. Usually, this shearing of ...

  1. OLiMPS. OpenFlow Link-layer MultiPath Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Harvey B.; Barczyk, Artur; Bredel, Michael

    2014-11-17

    The OLiMPS project’s goal was the development of an OpenFlow controller application allowing load balancing over multiple switched paths across a complex network topology. The second goal was to integrate the controller with Dynamic Circuit Network systems such as ESnet’s OSCARS. Both goals were achieved successfully, as laid out in this report.

  2. OPEN-PATH FTIR MEASUREMENTS OF NOX AND OTHER DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a demonstration of the feasibility of using an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) monitoring technique to address the across-road characterization of diesel vehicle emissions of criteria pollutants and hazardous air pollutants. Four sets of ...

  3. Novel In-situ Calibrations for Open-path Ammonia Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Miller, D. J.; Khan, M. A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    As a major gas phase precursor of fine particulate matter, ammonia plays an important role in the nitrogen cycle. However, its concentration is rather poorly quantified due to various measurement challenges. Open-path detection addresses the sampling issue caused by surface affinity of ammonia and greatly simplifies the sensor design. We have developed an open-path ammonia sensor using a quantum cascade (QC) laser at 9.06 μm. The sensor has been deployed in 2010 CALNEX campaign in Bakersfield, CA and locally in Princeton in July 2011. The sensor achieved a field detection limit of 1 ppbv ammonia at 1 Hz. Open-path measurements avoid the common sampling problems and biases for ammonia, but ultimately one needs to enclose the open-path system for calibration. To this end, an off-line spectroscopic method to calibrate the ammonia signal was successfully used in CALNEX using ethylene, a stable, relatively inert gas. Ethylene occurs at ambient pptv atmospheric mixing ratios and does thus not cause interference at ambient conditions. However, at much higher concentrations used to calibrate, ethylene exhibits a significant absorption feature that is just offset spectrally from the ammonia absorption feature but comparable in size and thus can serve as a reference absorption signal for ammonia. The open-path QC ammonia measurements intercompared well with ion chromatography measurements in the 5-35 ppbv range. Line shape parameters of both ammonia and ethylene were measured experimentally to confirm the spectroscopic reference calibration technique, and the results were within 10% of HITRAN values over a range of 265-300 K and 10-1000 hPa. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) is used in the sensor to enhance the sensitivity as a baseline-free sensing technique. A numerical model was developed to simulate and validate the WMS signals with the experimental spectroscopic data. Model simulations indicate that the 2f WMS signal magnitude for ammonia is largely invariant to

  4. Open-path atmospheric transmission for a diode-pumped cesium laser.

    PubMed

    Rice, Christopher A; Lott, Gordon E; Perram, Glen P

    2012-12-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy device was developed to study atmospheric propagation for emerging high-energy laser weapons. The cesium diode-pumped alkali laser operates near 895 nm in the vicinity of several water-vapor absorption lines. Temperature, pressure, and water vapor concentration were determined for 150 m and 1 km open paths with statistical errors of ∼0.2%. Comparison with meteorological instruments yields agreement for the 1 km path to within 0.6% for temperature, 3.7% for pressure, and 2.4% for concentration. PMID:23207380

  5. Open-path atmospheric transmission for a diode-pumped cesium laser.

    PubMed

    Rice, Christopher A; Lott, Gordon E; Perram, Glen P

    2012-12-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy device was developed to study atmospheric propagation for emerging high-energy laser weapons. The cesium diode-pumped alkali laser operates near 895 nm in the vicinity of several water-vapor absorption lines. Temperature, pressure, and water vapor concentration were determined for 150 m and 1 km open paths with statistical errors of ∼0.2%. Comparison with meteorological instruments yields agreement for the 1 km path to within 0.6% for temperature, 3.7% for pressure, and 2.4% for concentration.

  6. Early detection of combustible gas leaks using open path infrared (IR) gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, Edward; Baliga, Shankar

    2012-06-01

    Open path IR gas detectors are a mainstay in the oil and gas industry. They are used in a variety of instances to identify gas accumulations or monitor gas cloud migrations. In offshore installations, open path optical gas detectors are used to monitor drilling and production operations, crude oil separation, compression, and exhaust and ventilation systems. Because they can monitor a perimeter or fence line, they are ideally suited for detecting gas in open facilities, where point gas detectors would be difficult or expensive to deploy. Despite their widespread use, open path optical gas detectors are rarely employed to detect low level concentrations of combustible gases. Standard models are typically set to alarm at 50% LEL-m (50% LEL extended over one meter), providing sufficiently early warning when gas accumulations occur. Nevertheless, in cases in which a combustible gas is diluted quickly, such as ventilation exhaust ducting, it may be necessary to set the detector to alarm at the lowest predictable level. Further, interest in low level infrared gas detection has been growing as gases such as CH4 and CO2 are greenhouse gases. The present paper describes a mid-wave infrared (MWIR) open path system designed to detect combustible and carbon dioxide gas leaks in the parts-per-million-meter (ppm-m or mg/cm2). The detector has been installed in offshore platforms and large onshore facilities to detect a variety of flammable gases and vapors. Advantages and limitations of the system are presented. False alarm immunity and resilience to atmospheric interferences are also discussed.

  7. Feasibility study of detection of hazardous airborne pollutants using passive open-path FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Dubowski, Y.; Jahn, C.; Schäfer, K.; Gerl, G.; Linker, R.

    2010-04-01

    In recent years open-path FTIR systems (active and passive) have demonstrated great potential and success for monitoring air pollution, industrial stack emissions, and trace gas constituents in the atmosphere. However, most of the studies were focused mainly on monitoring gaseous species and very few studies have investigated the feasibility of detecting bio-aerosols and dust by passive open-path FTIR measurements. The goal of the present study was to test the feasibility of detecting a cloud of toxic aerosols by a passive mode open-path FTIR. More specifically, we are focusing on the detection of toxic organophosphorous nerve agents for which we use Tri-2-ethyl-hexyl-phosphate as a model compound. We have determined the compounds' optical properties, which were needed for the radiative calculations, using a procedure developed in our laboratory. In addition, measurements of the aerosol size distribution in an airborne cloud were performed, which provided the additional input required for the radiative transfer model. This allowed simulation of the radiance signal that would be measured by the FTIR instrument and hence estimation of the detection limit of such a cloud. Preliminary outdoor measurements have demonstrated the possibility of detecting such a cloud using two detection methods. However, even in a simple case consisting of the detection of a pure airborne cloud, detection is not straightforward and reliable identification of the compound would require more advanced methods than simple correlation with spectral library.

  8. Open path atmospheric spectroscopy using room temperature operated pulsed quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Taslakov, M; Simeonov, V; van den Bergh, H

    2006-04-01

    We report the application of a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser for 5.8 km long open path spectroscopic monitoring of ozone, water vapor and CO(2). The thermal chirp during a 140 or 200 ns long excitation pulse is used for fast wavelength scanning. The fast wavelength scanning has the advantage of the measured spectra not being affected by atmospheric turbulence, which is essential for long open path measurements. An almost linear tuning of about 0.6 and 1.2 cm(-1) is achieved, respectively. Lines from the nu(3) vibrational band of the ozone spectra centered at 1,031 and 1,049 cm(-1) is used for ozone detection by differential absorption. The lowest column densities (LCD) for ozone of the order of 0.3 ppmm retrieved from the absorption spectra for averaging times less than 20s are better then the LCD value of 2 ppmm measured with UV DOAS systems. The intrinsic haze immunity of mid-IR laser sources is an additional important advantage of mid-IR open path spectroscopy, compared with standard UV-vis DOAS. The third major advantage of the method is the possibility to measure more inorganic and organic atmospheric species compared to the UV-vis DOAS.

  9. Long-range open-path greenhouse gas monitoring using mid-infrared laser dispersion spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghestani, Nart; Brownsword, Richard; Weidmann, Damien

    2015-04-01

    Accurate and sensitive methods of monitoring greenhouse gas (GHG) emission over large areas has become a pressing need to deliver improved estimates of both human-made and natural GHG budgets. These needs relate to a variety of sectors including environmental monitoring, energy, oil and gas industry, waste management, biogenic emission characterization, and leak detection. To address the needs, long-distance open-path laser spectroscopy methods offer significant advantages in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity, compactness and cost effectiveness. Path-integrated mixing ratio measurements stemming from long open-path laser spectrometers can provide emission mapping when combined with meteorological data and/or through tomographic approaches. Laser absorption spectroscopy is the predominant method of detecting gasses over long integrated path lengths. The development of dispersion spectrometers measuring tiny refractive index changes, rather than optical power transmission, may offer a set of specific advantages1. These include greater immunity to laser power fluctuations, greater dynamic range due to the linearity of dispersion, and ideally a zero baseline signal easing quantitative retrievals of path integrated mixing ratios. Chirped laser dispersion spectrometers (CLaDS) developed for the monitoring of atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide will be presented. Using quantum cascade laser as the source, a minimalistic and compact system operating at 7.8 μm has been developed and demonstrated for the monitoring of atmospheric methane over a 90 meter open path2. Through full instrument modelling and error propagation analysis, precision of 3 ppm.m.Hz-0.5 has been established (one sigma precision for atmospheric methane normalized over a 1 m path and 1 s measurement duration). The system was fully functional in the rain, sleet, and moderate fog. The physical model and system concept of CLaDS can be adapted to any greenhouse gas species. Currently we are

  10. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS AROUND A CONCENTRATED SWINE PRODUCTION FACILITY USING OPEN-PATH FTIR SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP/FTIR) spectrometry was used to measure the concentrations of ammonia, methane, and other atmospheric gasses around an integrated industrial swine production facility in eastern North Carolina. Several single-path measurements were made ove...

  11. Quality-assurance procedures and measurements for open-path FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douard, Mathilde; Zeutzius-Reitz, Juergen; Lamp, Torsten; Ropertz, Alexander; Weber, Konradin

    1997-05-01

    Infrared Fourier transform open-path spectroscopy becomes a more and more well-known method to monitor air pollution. Several companies are even selling instruments especially devoted to this application. Numerous campaigns have delivered interesting information and proved the usefulness of the technique. However the results still suffer from a certain mistrust. Reliability, reproducibility, stability are for instance not yet well defined. In order to fill this lack, we have performed a set of test measurements which could be carried out on any FTIR long-path system. This quality assurance protocol includes the determination of noise, return signal stability, detection limits, precision and accuracy. The procedure to estimate each of these parameters is described. The feasibility and relevance of these measurements have been tested on both monostatic and bistatic set-ups. Both instruments have been studied over a period of several months. Many of the parameters can be calculated without doing extra measurements and were evaluated whenever the instruments were in use. To determine parameters such accuracy and precision, series of spectra were especially acquired. This shows the possibility to better quantify the performance of open-path FTIR spectrometers. Further improvements are also suggested.

  12. Scientific collaboration networks. II. Shortest paths, weighted networks, and centrality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E.

    2001-07-01

    Using computer databases of scientific papers in physics, biomedical research, and computer science, we have constructed networks of collaboration between scientists in each of these disciplines. In these networks two scientists are considered connected if they have coauthored one or more papers together. Here we study a variety of nonlocal statistics for these networks, such as typical distances between scientists through the network, and measures of centrality such as closeness and betweenness. We further argue that simple networks such as these cannot capture variation in the strength of collaborative ties and propose a measure of collaboration strength based on the number of papers coauthored by pairs of scientists, and the number of other scientists with whom they coauthored those papers.

  13. Spreading paths in partially observed social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Christakis, Nicholas A.

    2012-03-01

    Understanding how and how far information, behaviors, or pathogens spread in social networks is an important problem, having implications for both predicting the size of epidemics, as well as for planning effective interventions. There are, however, two main challenges for inferring spreading paths in real-world networks. One is the practical difficulty of observing a dynamic process on a network, and the other is the typical constraint of only partially observing a network. Using static, structurally realistic social networks as platforms for simulations, we juxtapose three distinct paths: (1) the stochastic path taken by a simulated spreading process from source to target; (2) the topologically shortest path in the fully observed network, and hence the single most likely stochastic path, between the two nodes; and (3) the topologically shortest path in a partially observed network. In a sampled network, how closely does the partially observed shortest path (3) emulate the unobserved spreading path (1)? Although partial observation inflates the length of the shortest path, the stochastic nature of the spreading process also frequently derails the dynamic path from the shortest path. We find that the partially observed shortest path does not necessarily give an inflated estimate of the length of the process path; in fact, partial observation may, counterintuitively, make the path seem shorter than it actually is.

  14. Eddy Covariance Measurements of Methane Flux Using an Open-Path Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G.; Anderson, T.; Zona, D.; Schedlbauer, J.; Anderson, D.; Eckles, R.; Hastings, S.; Ikawa, H.; McDermitt, D.; Oberbauer, S.; Oechel, W.; Riensche, B.; Starr, G.; Sturtevant, C.; Xu, L.

    2008-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas with a warming potential of about 23 times that of carbon dioxide over a 100-year cycle (Houghton et al., 2001). Measurements of methane fluxes from the terrestrial biosphere have mostly been made using flux chambers, which have many advantages, but are discrete in time and space and may disturb surface integrity and air pressure. Open-path analyzers offer a number of advantages for measuring methane fluxes, including undisturbed in- situ flux measurements, spatial integration using the Eddy Covariance approach, zero frequency response errors due to tube attenuation, confident water and thermal density terms from co-located fast measurements of water and sonic temperature, and remote deployment due to lower power demands in the absence of a pump. The prototype open-path methane analyzer is a VCSEL (vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser)-based instrument. It employs an open Herriott cell and measures levels of methane with RMS noise below 6 ppb at 10 Hz sampling in controlled laboratory environment. Field maintenance is minimized by a self-cleaning mechanism to keep the lower mirror free of contamination. Eddy Covariance measurements of methane flux using the prototype open-path methane analyzer are presented for the period between 2006 and 2008 in three ecosystems with contrasting weather and moisture conditions: (1) Fluxes over a short-hydroperiod sawgrass wetland in the Florida Everglades were measured in a warm and humid environment with temperatures often exceeding 25oC, variable winds, and frequent heavy dew at night; (2) Fluxes over coastal wetlands in an Arctic tundra were measured in an environment with frequent sub-zero temperatures, moderate winds, and ocean mist; (3) Fluxes over pacific mangroves in Mexico were measured in an environment with moderate air temperatures high winds, and sea spray. Presented eddy covariance flux data were collected from a co-located prototype open-path methane analyzer, LI-7500, and

  15. Open-path FTIR measurement of criteria pollutants and other ambient species in an industrial city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagann, Robert H.; Wang, C. D.; Chang, King L.; Lu, Chung H.

    1999-02-01

    Recent improvements in signal processing techniques for Open- Path FTIR (OP-FTIR) have resulted in a dramatic reduction of detection limits for infrared active chemicals including ambient species. These lower detection limits opens the open- path FTIR technology to new applications involving monitoring and analyzing ambient air in urban settings. To test application of OP-FTIR technology to urban applications, an RAM2000TM system was used over a seven-day period to measure ambient air-quality in an urban-industrial environment. Several of the ambient species which are ozone precursors and referred to as criteria pollutants in Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990, have poor OP-FTIR detection limits because of overlap of their infrared absorption by very strong water vapor lines. Due to the high detection limits for sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, OP- FTIR has not been the technology of choice for measuring air quality in urban environments. In the present test, we were particularly interested in the improvements in the detection limits of the criteria pollutants, ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. Improvement in these detection limits will greatly increase the suitability of using OP-FTIR for measuring urban air quality and for measurement programs relating to the USEPA tropospheric ozone- photochemistry studies.

  16. Imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for 3D cloud profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Carlson, David; Evans, Thomas; Schundler, Elizabeth; Todd, Lori; Mottus, Kathleen

    2009-05-01

    OPTRA is developing an imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared (I-OP-FTIR) spectrometer for 3D profiling of chemical and biological agent simulant plumes released into test ranges and chambers. An array of I-OP-FTIR instruments positioned around the perimeter of the test site, in concert with advanced spectroscopic algorithms, enables real time tomographic reconstruction of the plume. The approach is intended as a referee measurement for test ranges and chambers. This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) effort combines the instrumentation and spectroscopic capabilities of OPTRA, Inc. with the computed tomographic expertise of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

  17. Comparing laser-based open- and closed-path gas analyzers to measure methane fluxes using the eddy covariance method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detto, M.; Verfaillie, J.; Anderson, F.; Xu, L.; Baldocchi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Closed- and open-path methane gas analyzers are used in eddy covariance systems to compare three potential methane emitting ecosystems in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (CA, USA): a rice field, a peatland pasture and a restored wetland. The study points out similarities and differences of the systems in field experiments and data processing. The closed-path system, despite a less intrusive placement with the sonic anemometer, required more care and power. In contrast, the open-path system appears more versatile for a remote and unattended experimental site. Overall, the two systems have comparable minimum detectable limits, but synchronization between wind speed and methane data, air density corrections and spectral losses have different impacts on the computed flux covariances. For the closed-path analyzer, air density effects are less important, but the synchronization and spectral losses may represent a problem when fluxes are small or when an undersized pump is used. For the open-path analyzer air density corrections are greater, due to spectroscopy effects and the classic Webb-Pearman-Leuning correction. Comparison between the 30-min fluxes reveals good agreement in terms of magnitudes between open-path and closed-path flux systems. However, the scatter is large, as consequence of the intensive data processing which both systems require. ?? 2011.

  18. Improving the convergence of closed and open path integral molecular dynamics via higher order Trotter factorization schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Alejandro; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2011-08-01

    Higher order factorization schemes are developed for path integral molecular dynamics in order to improve the convergence of estimators for physical observables as a function of the Trotter number. The methods are based on the Takahashi-Imada and Susuki decompositions of the Boltzmann operator. The methods introduced improve the averages of the estimators by using the classical forces needed to carry out the dynamics to construct a posteriori weighting factors for standard path integral molecular dynamics. The new approaches are straightforward to implement in existing path integral codes and carry no significant overhead. The Suzuki higher order factorization was also used to improve the end-to-end distance estimator in open path integral molecular dynamics. The new schemes are tested in various model systems, including an ab initio path integral molecular dynamics calculation on the hydrogen molecule and a quantum water model. The proposed algorithms have potential utility for reducing the cost of path integral molecular dynamics calculations of bulk systems.

  19. Measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural sites using open-path optical remote sensing method.

    PubMed

    Ro, Kyoung S; Johnson, Melvin H; Varma, Ravi M; Hashmonay, Ram A; Hunt, Patrick

    2009-08-01

    Improved characterization of distributed emission sources of greenhouse gases such as methane from concentrated animal feeding operations require more accurate methods. One promising method is recently used by the USEPA. It employs a vertical radial plume mapping (VRPM) algorithm using optical remote sensing techniques. We evaluated this method to estimate emission rates from simulated distributed methane sources. A scanning open-path tunable diode laser was used to collect path-integrated concentrations (PICs) along different optical paths on a vertical plane downwind of controlled methane releases. Each cycle consists of 3 ground-level PICs and 2 above ground PICs. Three- to 10-cycle moving averages were used to reconstruct mass equivalent concentration plum maps on the vertical plane. The VRPM algorithm estimated emission rates of methane along with meteorological and PIC data collected concomitantly under different atmospheric stability conditions. The derived emission rates compared well with actual released rates irrespective of atmospheric stability conditions. The maximum error was 22 percent when 3-cycle moving average PICs were used; however, it decreased to 11% when 10-cycle moving average PICs were used. Our validation results suggest that this new VRPM method may be used for improved estimations of greenhouse gas emission from a variety of agricultural sources.

  20. TDLAS-based open-path laser hygrometer using simple reflective foils as scattering targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Ebert, V.

    2012-11-01

    We present a new, very simple to use and very easy to align, inexpensive, robust, mono-static optical hygrometer based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) that makes use of very inexpensive reflective foils as scattering targets at the distant side of the absorption path. Various alternative foils as scattering targets were examined concerning their reflective behaviour and their suitability for TDLAS applications. Using a micro prismatic reflection tape as the optimum scattering target we determined absolute water vapour concentrations employing open path TDLAS. With the reflection tape being in a distance of 75 cm to 1 m (i.e., absorption path lengths between 1.5 and 2 m) we detected ambient H2O concentrations of up to 12,300 ppmv with detectivities of 1 ppm which corresponds to length and bandwidth normalized H2O detection limits of up to 0.9 ppmv m/ sqrt {{Hz}} , which is only a factor of 2 worse than our previous bi-static TDLAS setups (Hunsmann, Appl. Phys. B 92:393-401, 1). This small sensitivity disadvantage is well compensated for by the simplicity of the spectrometer setup and particularly by its extreme tolerance towards misalignment of the scattering target.

  1. Field evaluation of a transportable open-path FTIR spectrometer for real-time air monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ross, Kiley R; Todd, Lori A

    2002-02-01

    To effectively and accurately evaluate human exposures to chemicals, it is important to quantify mixtures of chemicals in air, at low levels, and in real time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in the field, a prototype of a new transportable instrument that can fill an important gap in methods available to industrial hygienists. This instrument is a cross between extractive and open-path Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometers and measures chemicals passively and in real time in the vicinity of the breathing zone. The spectrometer has a folded optical path that can be enclosed, similar to an extractive system. The enclosure can be removed, enabling the optical path to be open to the atmosphere; thus, the instrument could be operated as an open-path spectrometer. A field study was conducted in three different occupational settings, including a prosthodontics dental laboratory, a surgery recovery area, and a cytology laboratory. Chemicals that were identified and quantified included methyl methacrylate, nitrous oxide, xylene isomers, toluene, and ethanol. Simultaneous side-by-side sampling was conducted with the prototype instrument and recognized National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) analytical methods. The distinct infrared "fingerprint" of each chemical made identification and quantification of multiple chemicals possible with the prototype instrument. This attribute allowed the industrial hygienist to quantify short-term exposures and ceiling levels, correlate work practices with concentration levels, evaluate the effectiveness of engineering controls, and identify the presence of unexpected compounds. There was no significant difference between the mean time-weighted averages (TWAs) of the prototype instrument and traditional methods (p > 0.03). Regression analysis found good correlation between the two methods with no significant differences between the slope and unity and between the y-intercept and zero (p > 0.03). The

  2. Quantum cascade laser open-path system for remote sensing of trace gases in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Anna P. M.; Liu, Peter Q.; Yeung, June K.; Corrigan, Paul; Baeck, Mary Lynn; Wang, Zifa; Day, Timothy; Smith, James A.

    2010-11-01

    Exploiting several key characteristics of quantum cascade (QC) lasers, including wide tunability and room-temperature operation, the Quantum Cascade Laser Open-Path System (QCLOPS) was designed for the detection of a range of trace gases and for field deployment in urban environments. Tunability over a wavelength range from 9.3 to 9.8 μm potentially provides the capability for monitoring ozone, ammonia, and carbon dioxide, a suite of trace gases important for air quality and regional climate applications in urban environments. The 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China drew attention to air quality problems in urban environments. Prior to and during the Olympic games, regional air quality modifications through factory shutdowns, car restrictions, and construction halts in Beijing and its surrounding areas created a unique test bed for new sensor technologies such as the QCLOPS sensor. We report the design of this novel, open-path air quality sensor and the results of both laboratory tests and field trials during the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China.

  3. Evaluation of open-path FTIR spectrometers for monitoring multiple chemicals in air.

    PubMed

    Farhat, S K; Todd, L A

    2000-12-01

    There has been mounting interest in the use of open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers for occupational and environmental air monitoring. Although this technology is gaining acceptance in the environmental field, there has not yet been a comprehensive assessment of instrument performance and the analytical limitations of this method have not been thoroughly delineated. Unlike extractive FTIR spectrometers, calibration of OP-FTIR spectrometer systems presents unique problems because the optical beam is exposed to the atmosphere. Therefore, it is difficult to get an adequate clean background and perform evaluation tests used by extractive instruments. One solution to the problem of evaluating an open-path system is to place a sample cell directly in the path of the infrared beam. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of a specially designed external calibration cell as a tool for laboratory and field evaluation of the accuracy of OP-FTIR spectrometers and to investigate various commonly used instrument performance parameters such as root mean square (RMS) noise, return intensity, instrument precision, and detector saturation. These performance parameters were measured to see if they could be used to predict whether an instrument is operating correctly. Six instruments from the same manufacturer were evaluated with a prototype calibration cell using NIST traceable sulfur hexafluoride, n-hexane, and cyclohexane. Reference concentrations generated in the calibration cell were compared with OP-FTIR spectrometer measured concentrations measured through the cell. Excellent correlation and slopes were obtained for all three chemicals. The instrument performance measures could not be used to predict accuracy. The external calibration cell shows promise as a method of validating the operation of an OP-FTIR spectrometer for quality assurance and for quality control. PMID:11141603

  4. Imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for 3D cloud profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Mansur, David J.; Engel, James R.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Todd, Lori; Mottus, Kathleen

    2008-04-01

    OPTRA and University of North Carolina are developing an imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared (I-OP-FTIR) spectrometer for 3D profiling of chemical and biological agent simulant plumes released into test ranges and chambers. An array of I-OP-FTIR instruments positioned around the perimeter of the test site, in concert with advanced spectroscopic algorithms, enables real time tomographic reconstruction of the plume. The approach will be considered as a candidate referee measurement for test ranges and chambers. This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) effort combines the instrumentation and spectroscopic capabilities of OPTRA, Inc. with the computed tomographic expertise of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In this paper, we summarize progress to date and overall system performance projections based on the instrument, spectroscopy, and tomographic reconstruction accuracy. We then present a preliminary optical design of the I-OP-FTIR.

  5. Imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for 3D cloud profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Carlson, David; Evans, Thomas; Schundler, Elizabeth; Todd, Lori; Mottus, Kathleen

    2010-04-01

    OPTRA has developed an imaging open-path Fourier transform infrared (I-OP-FTIR) spectrometer for 3D profiling of chemical and biological agent simulant plumes released into test ranges and chambers. An array of I-OP-FTIR instruments positioned around the perimeter of the test site, in concert with advanced spectroscopic algorithms, enables real time tomographic reconstruction of the plume. The approach is intended as a referee measurement for test ranges and chambers. This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) effort combines the instrumentation and spectroscopic capabilities of OPTRA, Inc. with the computed tomographic expertise of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In this paper, we summarize the design and build and detail system characterization and test of a prototype I-OP-FTIR instrument. System characterization includes radiometric performance and spectral resolution. Results from a series of tomographic reconstructions of sulfur hexafluoride plumes in a laboratory setting are also presented.

  6. Open Path Tracer Measurements of Methane Emissions from Free Ranging Cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, D. W.; Tonini, M.; Bryant, G. R.; Eckard, R.; Grainger, C.; McGinn, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    This paper addresses the need for more accurate and representative measurements of methane emissions from cattle in their natural environments. Improved measurements are or will be required to quantify methane emissions for national greenhouse gas budgets and future carbon trading schemes, and to assess the effectiveness of proposed mitigation strategies. We describe measurements of methane emissions from free- ranging cattle grazing in their natural outdoor environments in Australia and New Zealand. We employ a novel tracer method in which nitrous oxide is released at a known rate from fenceline tubing or canisters attached to individual cows, and the mixing ratios of methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide are measured continuously and simultaneously downwind by open path FTIR spectroscopy. Correlations between methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide can be used to infer the herd-average methane flux directly. Measurements will be compared with the more conventional SF6 ruminal tracer technique.

  7. Tool Path Design of Incremental Open-Die Disk Forging Using Physical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Uk; Yang, Dong-Yol

    A small-batch product of large-sized parts is usually manufactured using incremental open-die forging. In order to control the overall change in the shape of a part, it is essential to be able to predict the shape changes that occur during each step. This paper addresses shape changes of a material according to the forging path. Rapid prediction of metal flows for continuing incremental deformation using theoretical methods is difficult. Accordingly, instead of a theoretical approach, an experiment that tests the tendency of the metal flow for development of forming processes is required. For the sake of convenience, simulative experiments are carried out using plasticine at room temperature. In present study, the tool movement is dominant parameters to with respect to changing the shape of the workpiece.

  8. An Open-Path Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Simultaneous Measurement of Methane And Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, D. M.; Adkins, E. M.; Wilson, E. L.; Miller, J. H. H.

    2014-12-01

    In a collaboration between NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, and George Washington University a study of the feedbacks to climate change caused by thawing permafrost has been initiated. An array of ground experiments at three unique permafrost sites will record permafrost depth, structure, meteorological data, and emissions of key greenhouse gases during a springtime permafrost thaw. Ground data will be linked to climate models and landscape structure from satellite imagery to gauge the magnitude of the feedbacks. GWU will deploy an open path instrument for independent measurement of ground-level carbon dioxide and methane. For several decades, our laboratory has developed diode laser absorption techniques using mid-infrared diode lasers as well as cavity- enhanced absorption measurements using near-infrared source. In the current project, we will continue to develop a system for open path measurements that builds on our past experience with deployment of multi-laser, multi species sensors. Spectral simulations suggest that at ambient levels of CO2 and CH4 (390 and 2 ppmV, respectively) we will observe extinction coefficients of ≈ 10-4 m-1 or ≈ 1% absorption over a 200 m path. Prior work in our laboratory suggests that a SNR in excess of 100 will be achievable at these absorption levels using wavelength-modulation techniques. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy entails applying a small amplitude modulation (on the order of the width of a spectral feature) to a laser's emitted frequency as it tunes through a spectrum. This is readily accomplished with near infrared telecom lasers whose frequency can be swept by varying the injection current going into the laser at fixed temperature. By sampling the detector's signal at a multiple of the modulation frequency, the resulting signal takes on the appearance of the spectrum's derivative. Typically, this is accomplished using a lock-in amplifier. To avoid the power burden of this

  9. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in open-path configuration for the analysis of distant objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallé, B.; Mauchien, P.; Maurice, S.

    2007-08-01

    A review of recent results on stand-off Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis and applications is presented. Stand-off LIBS was suggested for elemental analysis of materials located in environments where any physical access was not possible but optical access could be envisaged. This review only refers to the use of the open-path LIBS configuration in which the laser beam and the returning plasma light are transmitted through the atmosphere. It does not present the results obtained with a transportation of the laser pulses to the target through an optical fiber. Open-path stand-off LIBS has mainly been used with nanosecond laser pulses for solid sample analysis at distances of tens of meters. Liquid samples have also been analyzed at distances of a few meters. The distances achievable depend on many parameters including the laser characteristics (pulse energy and power, beam divergence, spatial profile) and the optical system used to focus the pulses at a distance. A large variety of laser focusing systems have been employed for stand-off analysis comprising refracting or reflecting telescope. Efficient collection of the plasma light is also needed to obtain analytically useful signals. For stand-off LIBS analysis, a lens or a mirror is required to increase the solid angle over which the plasma light can be collected. The light collection device can be either at an angle from the laser beam path or collinear with the optical axis of the system used to focus the laser pulses on the target surface. These different configurations have been used depending on the application such as rapid sorting of metal samples, identification of material in nuclear industry, process control and monitoring in metallurgical industry, applications in future planetary missions, detection of environmental contamination or cleaning of objects of cultural heritage. Recent stand-off analyses of metal samples have been reported using femtosecond laser pulses to extend LIBS

  10. Path querying system on mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xing; Wang, Yifei; Tian, Yuan; Wu, Lun

    2006-01-01

    Traditional approaches to path querying problems are not efficient and convenient under most circumstances. A more convenient and reliable approach to this problem has to be found. This paper is devoted to a path querying solution on mobile devices. By using an improved Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm and a natural language translating module, this system can help people find the shortest path between two places through their cell phones or other mobile devices. The chosen path is prompted in text of natural language, as well as a map picture. This system would be useful in solving best path querying problems and have potential to be a profitable business system.

  11. PLANE-INTEGRATED OPEN-PATH FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROMETRY METHODOLOGY FOR ANAEROBIC SWINE LAGOON EMISSION MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of ammonia and methane from an anaerobic lagoon at a swine animal feeding operation were evaluated five times over a period of two years. The plane-integrated (PI) open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (OP-FTIR) methodology was used to transect the plume at ...

  12. Low-power, open-path mobile sensing platform for high-resolution measurements of greenhouse gases and air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Lei; Sun, Kang; Miller, David J.; Pan, Dan; Golston, Levi M.; Zondlo, Mark A.

    2015-04-01

    A low-power mobile sensing platform has been developed with multiple open-path gas sensors to measure the ambient concentrations of greenhouse gases and air pollutants with high temporal and spatial resolutions over extensive spatial domains. The sensing system consists of four trace gas sensors including two custom quantum cascade laser-based open-path sensors and two LICOR open-path sensors to measure CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, NH3, and H2O mixing ratios simultaneously at 10 Hz. In addition, sensors for meteorological and geolocation data are incorporated into the system. The system is powered by car batteries with a low total power consumption (~200 W) and is easily transportable due to its low total mass (35 kg). Multiple measures have been taken to ensure robust performance of the custom, open-path sensors located on top of the vehicle where the optics are exposed to the harsh on-road environment. The mobile sensing system has been integrated and installed on top of common passenger vehicles and participated in extensive field campaigns (>400 h on-road time with >18,000 km total distance) in both the USA and China. The simultaneous detection of multiple trace gas species makes the mobile sensing platform a unique and powerful tool to identify and quantify different emission sources through mobile mapping.

  13. Mapping Atmospheric Ammonia Emissions Using a Mobile Quantum Cascade Laser-based Open-path Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Miller, D. J.; Khan, M. A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor to atmospheric fine particulate matter, with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. Despite the importance of atmospheric ammonia, its spatial/temporal variation is poorly characterized, and the knowledge of its sources, sinks, and transport is severely limited. Existing measurements suggest that traffic exhaust may provide significant amounts of ammonia in urban areas, which cause greater impacts on particulate matter formation and urban air quality. To capture the spatial and temporal variation of ammonia emissions, a portable, low power sensor with high time resolution is necessary. We have developed a portable open-path ammonia sensor with a detection limit of 0.5 ppbv ammonia for 1 s measurements. The sensor has a power consumption of about 60 W and is capable of running on a car battery continuously for 24 hours. An additional laser has been coupled to the sensor to yield concurrent N2O and CO measurements as tracers for determining various sources. The overall sensor prototype fits on a 60 cm × 20 cm aluminum breadboard. Roadside measurements indicated NH3/CO emission ratios of 4.1±5.4 ppbv/ppmv from a fleet of 320 vehicles, which agree with existing on-ramp measurements. Urban measurements in the Baltimore and Washington, DC metropolitan areas have shown significant ammonia mixing ratios concurrent with carbon monoxide levels from the morning and evening rush hours. On-road measurements of our open-path sensor have also been performed continuously from the Midwest to Princeton, NJ including urban areas such as Pittsburgh, tunnels, and relatively clean conditions. The emission ratios of ammonia against CO and/or CO2 help identify the sources and amounts of both urban and agricultural ammonia emissions. Preliminary data from both spatial mapping, monitoring, and vehicle exhaust measurements suggest that urban ammonia emissions from fossil fuel combustion are significant and may provide an

  14. Constraining atmospheric ammonia emissions through new observations with an open-path, laser-based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kang

    As the third most abundant nitrogen species in the atmosphere, ammonia (NH3) is a key component of the global nitrogen cycle. Since the industrial revolution, humans have more than doubled the emissions of NH3 to the atmosphere by industrial nitrogen fixation, revolutionizing agricultural practices, and burning fossil fuels. NH3 is a major precursor to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which has adverse impacts on air quality and human health. The direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcings currently constitute the largest uncertainties for future climate change predictions. Gas and particle phase NH3 eventually deposits back to the Earth's surface as reactive nitrogen, leading to the exceedance of ecosystem critical loads and perturbation of ecosystem productivity. Large uncertainties still remain in estimating the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of NH3 emissions from all sources and over a range of scales. These uncertainties in emissions also propagate to the deposition of reactive nitrogen. To improve our understanding of NH3 emissions, observational constraints are needed from local to global scales. The first part of this thesis is to provide quality-controlled, reliable NH3 measurements in the field using an open-path, quantum cascade laser-based NH3 sensor. As the second and third part of my research, NH3 emissions were quantified from a cattle feedlot using eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements, and the similarities between NH3 turbulent fluxes and those of other scalars (temperature, water vapor, and CO2) were investigated. The fourth part involves applying a mobile laboratory equipped with the open-path NH3 sensor and other important chemical/meteorological measurements to quantify fleet-integrated NH3 emissions from on-road vehicles. In the fifth part, the on-road measurements were extended to multiple major urban areas in both the US and China in the context of five observation campaigns. The results significantly improved current urban NH3

  15. Effects of Particles on Trace-Gas Measurement Using Open-Path Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchale, L.; Shadman, S.; Yalin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Open-path Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy offers many potential advantages over traditional closed-path configurations for the measurement of atmospheric trace gasses. Removal of the vacuum pump and flow system may enable more compact instruments suitable for remote and mobile deployments as well as real time measurement of 'sticky' gases. However, open path operation introduces new challenges including exposure of high reflectivity mirrors to ambient air and aerosols, the need to measure wider (pressure broadened) spectral peaks and possible signal interferences due to optical extinction by aerosol particles in the cavity laser beam. The present submission focuses on the effects of aerosol particles on open-path CRDS using a near-infrared (1742 nm) methane gas measurement system as a test bed. A simple purge enclosure system was developed to prevent aerosol deposition on the cavity high-reflectors. The purge uses ambient air pulled in with a micro-pump through a hepa filter and maintained mirror reflectivity R>0.99996 over 100 hours of use in the presence of high aerosol loading. Optical extinction due to ambient aerosols can change the cavity loss and influence the recorded ring-down times. We observed relatively large fluctuations due to supermicron particles and a near-constant baseline shift due to smaller submicron particles. The fluctuations correspond to absorption on the order of 10-8-10-7 cm-1, comparable to the amplitude of the targeted methane absorption features, causing significant interference. Simple software filter approaches were developed to counter these fluctuations without a priori knowledge of the ambient aerosols. The filters exploit the statistical distribution of signals as well as the expected absorption lineshape. Using these filters, noise-equivalent sensitivities within a factor of ~3 of closed-path systems were obtained (4x10-10cm-1Hz-1/2). Outdoor open-path measurements were validated with side-by-side measurements with a commercial

  16. Prediction of enhanced solvent-induced enantioselectivity for a ring opening with a bifurcating reaction path

    DOE PAGES

    Carpenter, Barry K.; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Glowacki, David R.

    2014-12-11

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the deazetisation and ring opening of meso-2,3-difluoro-2,3-dimethyldiazocyclopropane in three solvents: CHCl3, CHFClBr and CH3CH(OH)CF3 (TFIPA). In this study, the achiral reactant leads to enantiomeric allene products, and the question addressed in the study is whether either of the chiral, enantiomerically pure solvents can induce significant enantiomeric excess in the products. The direct dynamics calculations use an empirical valence bond potential for the solute, with empirical parameters optimised against M06-2X/cc-pVTZ density functional results. The results reveal that the exothermic N2 loss and ring opening promote transient strong solvent–solute interactions within the first ~100 fsmore » of the reaction. Because of the bifurcating reaction path, these interactions occur at time when the “decision” about which enantiomer of the product to form has yet to be made (at least for many of the trajectories). Hence, it is possible in principle that the solvent could exert a larger-than-normal influence on the course of the reaction. In fact, the results reveal no such effect for CHFClBr but do predict that TFIPA should induce 15.2 ± 2.1% enantiomeric excess. This is roughly an order of magnitude larger than solvent-induced enantiomeric excesses found experimentally in reactions where the conversion of reactant(s) to enantiomeric products occur over separate transition states.« less

  17. Prediction of enhanced solvent-induced enantioselectivity for a ring opening with a bifurcating reaction path

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Barry K.; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Glowacki, David R.

    2014-12-11

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the deazetisation and ring opening of meso-2,3-difluoro-2,3-dimethyldiazocyclopropane in three solvents: CHCl3, CHFClBr and CH3CH(OH)CF3 (TFIPA). In this study, the achiral reactant leads to enantiomeric allene products, and the question addressed in the study is whether either of the chiral, enantiomerically pure solvents can induce significant enantiomeric excess in the products. The direct dynamics calculations use an empirical valence bond potential for the solute, with empirical parameters optimised against M06-2X/cc-pVTZ density functional results. The results reveal that the exothermic N2 loss and ring opening promote transient strong solvent–solute interactions within the first ~100 fs of the reaction. Because of the bifurcating reaction path, these interactions occur at time when the “decision” about which enantiomer of the product to form has yet to be made (at least for many of the trajectories). Hence, it is possible in principle that the solvent could exert a larger-than-normal influence on the course of the reaction. In fact, the results reveal no such effect for CHFClBr but do predict that TFIPA should induce 15.2 ± 2.1% enantiomeric excess. This is roughly an order of magnitude larger than solvent-induced enantiomeric excesses found experimentally in reactions where the conversion of reactant(s) to enantiomeric products occur over separate transition states.

  18. Latest on Mobile Methane Measurements with Fast Open-Path Technology: Experiences, Opportunities & Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, George; Anderson, Tyler; Ediger, Kevin; von Fischer, Joseph; Gioli, Beniamino; Ham, Jay; Hupp, Jason; Kohnert, Katrin; Larmanou, Eric; Levy, Peter; Polidori, Andrea; Pikelnaya, Olga; Price, Eric; Sachs, Torsten; Serafimovich, Andrei; Zondlo, Mark; Zulueta, Rommel

    2016-04-01

    Methane plays a critical role in the radiation balance, chemistry of the atmosphere, and air quality. The major sources of methane include agricultural and natural production, landfill emissions, oil and gas development sites, and natural gas distribution networks in rural and urban environments. The majority of agricultural and natural methane production occurs in areas with little infrastructure or easily available grid power (e.g., rice fields, arctic and boreal wetlands, tropical mangroves, etc.) Past approaches for direct measurements of methane fluxes relied on fast closed-path analyzers, which typically require powerful pumps and grid power. Power and labor demands may be among the key reasons why such methane fluxes were often measured at locations with good infrastructure and grid power, and not necessarily with high methane production. Landfill methane emissions were traditionally assessed via point-in-time measurements taken at monthly or longer time intervals using techniques such as the trace plume method, the mass balance method, etc. These are subject to large uncertainties because of the snapshot nature of the measurements, while the changes in emission rates are continuous due to ongoing landfill development, changes in management practices, and the barometric pumping phenomenon. Installing a continuously operating flux station in the middle of an active landfill requires a low-power approach with no cables stretching across the landfill. The majority of oil and gas and urban methane emission happens via variable-rate point sources or diffused spots in topographically challenging terrains, such as street tunnels, elevated locations at water treatment plants, vents, etc. Locating and measuring methane emissions from such sources is challenging when using traditional micrometeorological techniques, and requires development of novel approaches. In 2010, a new lightweight high-speed high-resolution open-path technology was developed with the goal of

  19. [Open-path online monitoring of ambient atmospheric CO2 based on laser absorption spectrum].

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Kan, Rui-Feng; Xia, Hui; Geng, Hui; Ruan, Jun; Wang, Min; Cui, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Wen-Qing

    2009-01-01

    With the conjunction of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technology (TDLAS) and the open long optical path technology, the system designing scheme of CO2 on-line monitoring based on near infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technology was discussed in detail, and the instrument for large-range measurement was set up. By choosing the infrared absorption line of CO2 at 1.57 microm whose line strength is strong and suitable for measurement, the ambient atmospheric CO2 was measured continuously with a 30 s temporal resolution at an suburb site in the autumn of 2007. The diurnal atmospheric variations of CO2 and continuous monitoring results were presented. The results show that the variation in CO2 concentration has an obvious diurnal periodicity in suburb where the air is free of interference and contamination. The general characteristic of diurnal variation is that the concentration is low in the daytime and high at night, so it matches the photosynthesis trend. The instrument can detect gas concentration online with high resolution, high sensitivity, high precision, short response time and many other advantages, the monitoring requires no gas sampling, the calibration is easy, and the detection limit is about 4.2 x 10(-7). It has been proved that the system and measurement project are feasible, so it is an effective method for gas flux continuous online monitoring of large range in ecosystem based on TDLAS technology.

  20. Estimating drift of airborne pesticides during orchard spraying using active Open Path FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-10-01

    The use of pesticides is important to ensure food security around the world. Unfortunately, exposure to pesticides is harmful to human health and the environment. This study suggests using active Open Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for monitoring and characterizing pesticide spray drift, which is one of the transfer mechanisms that lead to inhalation exposure to pesticides. Experiments were conducted in a research farm with two fungicides (Impulse and Bogiron), which were sprayed in the recommended concentration of ∼0.1%w in water, using a tractor-mounted air-assisted sprayer. The ability to detect and characterize the pesticide spray drift was tested in three types of environments: fallow field, young orchard, and mature orchard. During all spraying experiments the spectral signature of the organic phase of the pesticide solution was identified. Additionally, after estimating the droplets' size distribution using water sensitive papers, the OP-FTIR measurements enabled the estimation of the droplets load in the line of sight.

  1. Advances in data processing for open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry of greenhouse gases.

    PubMed

    Shao, Limin; Griffiths, Peter R; Leytem, April B

    2010-10-01

    The automated quantification of three greenhouse gases, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide, in the vicinity of a large dairy farm by open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP/FT-IR) spectrometry at intervals of 5 min is demonstrated. Spectral pretreatment, including the automated detection and correction of the effect of interrupting the infrared beam, is by a moving object, and the automated correction for the nonlinear detector response is applied to the measured interferograms. Two ways of obtaining quantitative data from OP/FT-IR data are described. The first, which is installed in a recently acquired commercial OP/FT-IR spectrometer, is based on classical least-squares (CLS) regression, and the second is based on partial least-squares (PLS) regression. It is shown that CLS regression only gives accurate results if the absorption features of the analytes are located in very short spectral intervals where lines due to atmospheric water vapor are absent or very weak; of the three analytes examined, only ammonia fell into this category. On the other hand, PLS regression works allowed what appeared to be accurate results to be obtained for all three analytes.

  2. Use of an open-path FTIR sensor at Camacari Petrochemical Complex--Bahia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Neuza; Couto, Elizabeth d. R.; Kagann, Robert H.

    1995-05-01

    CETREL--Empresa de Protecao Ambiental, is an environmental engineering company, which is owned by the member companies in the Camacari Petrochemical Complex, the largest petrochemical complex in Brazil. CETREL operates a centralized waste treatment plant, treatment and disposal facilities, an incineration unit, groundwater monitoring and air quality monitoring networks. The air monitoring network was designed based on mathematical modeling, and the results showed that the monoitoring of hydrocarbons is important not just within the complex but also at the area surrounding the complex. There are presently no regulations for hydrocarbons in Brazil, however they are monitored due to concerns about health problems arising from human exposure. The network has eight multiparameter monitoring stations, located at the villages nearby, where hydrocarbons are sampled with Summa canisters and subsequently analyzed with a GC/MS, using a Cryogenic trap at the interface. The open-path FTIR is used to monitor at the individual plants and in the areas in between because it is more efficient and costs less than it would to attempt to achieve the same level of coverage using the canisters. Ten locations were selected based on mathematical modeling and knowledge of the likely emission sources. Since August 1993, there have been five different measurement campaigns.

  3. Detection and quantification of water-based aerosols using active open-path FTIR.

    PubMed

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-04-28

    Aerosols have a leading role in many eco-systems and knowledge of their properties is critical for many applications. This study suggests using active Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for quantifying water droplets and solutes load in the atmosphere. The OP-FTIR was used to measure water droplets, with and without solutes, in a 20 m spray tunnel. Three sets of spraying experiments generated different hydrosols clouds: (1) tap water only, (2) aqueous ammonium sulfate (0.25-3.6%wt) and (3) aqueous ethylene glycol (0.47-2.38%wt). Experiment (1) yielded a linear relationship between the shift of the extinction spectrum baseline and the water load in the line-of-sight (LOS) (R(2) = 0.984). Experiment (2) also yielded a linear relationship between the integrated extinction in the range of 880-1150 cm(-1) and the ammonium sulfate load in the LOS (R(2) = 0.972). For the semi-volatile ethylene glycol (experiment 3), present in the gas and condense phases, quantification was much more complex and two spectral approaches were developed: (1) according to the linear relationship from the first experiment (determination error of 8%), and (2) inverse modeling (determination error of 57%). This work demonstrates the potential of the OP-FTIR for detecting clouds of water-based aerosols and for quantifying water droplets and solutes at relatively low concentrations.

  4. Detection and quantification of water-based aerosols using active open-path FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols have a leading role in many eco-systems and knowledge of their properties is critical for many applications. This study suggests using active Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for quantifying water droplets and solutes load in the atmosphere. The OP-FTIR was used to measure water droplets, with and without solutes, in a 20 m spray tunnel. Three sets of spraying experiments generated different hydrosols clouds: (1) tap water only, (2) aqueous ammonium sulfate (0.25–3.6%wt) and (3) aqueous ethylene glycol (0.47–2.38%wt). Experiment (1) yielded a linear relationship between the shift of the extinction spectrum baseline and the water load in the line-of-sight (LOS) (R2 = 0.984). Experiment (2) also yielded a linear relationship between the integrated extinction in the range of 880–1150 cm‑1 and the ammonium sulfate load in the LOS (R2 = 0.972). For the semi-volatile ethylene glycol (experiment 3), present in the gas and condense phases, quantification was much more complex and two spectral approaches were developed: (1) according to the linear relationship from the first experiment (determination error of 8%), and (2) inverse modeling (determination error of 57%). This work demonstrates the potential of the OP-FTIR for detecting clouds of water-based aerosols and for quantifying water droplets and solutes at relatively low concentrations.

  5. Development of open-path interband cascade laser-based ethane sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golston, L.; Pan, D.; Caulton, D.; Tao, L.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present development of an open-path, fast response, laser spectrometer for sensing atmospheric ethane on ground-based and mobile laboratory platforms. A 3336.8 nm interband cascade laser probes a fundamental infrared absorption band for sensitivity to ethane under ambient conditions, as enabled by employing wavelength modulation spectroscopy. Simultaneous measurement of methane on an adjacent line corrects for cross-sensitivity with ethane in the air-broadened second harmonic spectrum. The sensor has an average power consumption of 20 W with an optical pathlength of 60 m and has been mounted alongside CO2 and CH4 analyzers on our mobile laboratory. With a noise equivalent absorbance of 2 x 10-5, precision and sensitivity are expected to be better than 1 ppbv, comparable to background levels away from localized ethane sources. Results are presented using the sensor for identification of fugitive methane leakage from natural gas production in the Marcellus Shale, helping to exclude other potentially collocated sources including wetlands and small-scale animal feeding operations. Ethane is applied as a highly effective tracer for distinguishing biologically produced methane from the thermogenic methane of interest. For medium- to high- emitting wells, we also obtain information about natural gas composition. Finally, performance of the instrument for measuring ethane and methane under varying regimes (enhancement over ambient atmospheric levels, methane/ethane ratios) is discussed along with future applications enabled by the reduced power and weight specifications and 10 Hz time response.

  6. Transient absorption in pumped Yb fibers opens a path to photodarkening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetschke, S.; Schwuchow, A.; Unger, S.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the strong absorption change appearing in ytterbium (Yb)-doped silica simultaneously with Yb3+ excitation and vanishing immediately after pump power switch-off. The transient absorption peaks below 300 nm for all the investigated host glass compositions. It extends at least to 500 nm for samples with aluminum codoping or without any codoping and is therefore supposed to constitute the first step needed to enable photodarkening (PD). Our observations indicate that defect complexes including one Yb3+ ion can be activated stepwise. Firstly, their original absorption spectrum is shifted by the energy of the Yb3+ excitation. Secondly, this transient absorption opens the path to the generation of PD color centers by pump photons or energy transfer from neighboring excited Yb3+ ions. In samples codoped with phosphorous only, we found transient absorption of comparable strength but limited to the wavelength range below 350 nm. Thus, the second step of activation seems to be inhibited, which might be an explanation for the consistently observed low PD effects in this fiber type.

  7. Open-path FTIR spectroscopy of magma degassing processes during eight lava fountains on Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spina, Alessandro; Burton, Mike; Allard, Patrick; Alparone, Salvatore; Muré, Filippo

    2015-03-01

    In June-July 2001 a series of 16 discrete lava fountain paroxysms occurred at the Southeast summit crater (SEC) of Mount Etna, preceding a 28-day long violent flank eruption. Each paroxysm was preceded by lava effusion, growing seismic tremor and a crescendo of Strombolian explosive activity culminating into powerful lava fountaining up to 500 m in height. During 8 of these 16 events we could measure the chemical composition of the magmatic gas phase (H2O, CO2, SO2, HCl, HF and CO), using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometry at ∼1-2 km distance from SEC and absorption spectra of the radiation emitted by hot lava fragments. We show that each fountaining episode was characterized by increasingly CO2-rich gas release, with CO2/SO2 and CO2/HCl ratios peaking in coincidence with maxima in seismic tremor and fountain height, whilst the SO2/HCl ratio showed a weak inverse relationship with respect to eruption intensity. Moreover, peak values in both CO2/SO2 ratio and seismic tremor amplitude for each paroxysm were found to increase linearly in proportion with the repose interval (2-6 days) between lava fountains. These observations, together with a model of volatile degassing at Etna, support the following driving process. Prior to and during the June-July 2001 lava fountain sequence, the shallow (∼2 km) magma reservoir feeding SEC received an increasing influx of deeply derived carbon dioxide, likely promoted by the deep ascent of volatile-rich primitive basalt that produced the subsequent flank eruption. This CO2-rich gas supply led to gas accumulation and overpressure in SEC reservoir, generating a bubble foam layer whose periodical collapse powered the successive fountaining events. The anti-correlation between SO2/HCl and eruption intensity is best explained by enhanced syn-eruptive degassing of chlorine from finer particles produced during more intense magma fragmentation.

  8. Open-path FTIR spectroscopy of magma degassing processes during eight lava fountains on Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spina, Alessandro; Burton, Mike; Allard, Patrick; Alparone, Salvatore; Murè, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    In June-July 2001 a series of 16 discrete lava fountain paroxysms occurred at the Southeast summit crater (SEC) of Mount Etna, preceding a 28-day long violent flank eruption. Each paroxysm was preceded by lava effusion, growing seismic tremor and a crescendo of Strombolian explosive activity culminating into powerful lava fountaining up to 500m in height. During 8 of these 16 events we could measure the chemical composition of the magmatic gas phase (H2O, CO2, SO2, HCl, HF and CO), using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometry at ˜1-2km distance from SEC and absorption spectra of the radiation emitted by hot lava fragments. We show that each fountaining episode was characterized by increasingly CO2-rich gas release, with CO2/SO2and CO2/HCl ratios peaking in coincidence with maxima in seismic tremor and fountain height, whilst the SO2/HCl ratio showed a weak inverse relationship with respect to eruption intensity. Moreover, peak values in both CO2/SO2ratio and seismic tremor amplitude for each paroxysm were found to increase linearly in proportion with the repose interval (2-6 days) between lava fountains. These observations, together with a model of volatile degassing at Etna, support the following driving process. Prior to and during the June-July 2001 lava fountain sequence, the shallow (˜2km) magma reservoir feeding SEC received an increasing influx of deeply derived carbon dioxide, likely promoted by the deep ascent of volatile-rich primitive basalt that produced the subsequent flank eruption. This CO2-rich gas supply led to gas accumulation and overpressure in SEC reservoir, generating a bubble foam layer whose periodical collapse powered the successive fountaining events. The anti-correlation between SO2/HCl and eruption intensity is best explained by enhanced syn-eruptive degassing of chlorine from finer particles produced during more intense magma fragmentation.

  9. Detection and quantification of water-based aerosols using active open-path FTIR

    PubMed Central

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Aerosols have a leading role in many eco-systems and knowledge of their properties is critical for many applications. This study suggests using active Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for quantifying water droplets and solutes load in the atmosphere. The OP-FTIR was used to measure water droplets, with and without solutes, in a 20 m spray tunnel. Three sets of spraying experiments generated different hydrosols clouds: (1) tap water only, (2) aqueous ammonium sulfate (0.25–3.6%wt) and (3) aqueous ethylene glycol (0.47–2.38%wt). Experiment (1) yielded a linear relationship between the shift of the extinction spectrum baseline and the water load in the line-of-sight (LOS) (R2 = 0.984). Experiment (2) also yielded a linear relationship between the integrated extinction in the range of 880–1150 cm−1 and the ammonium sulfate load in the LOS (R2 = 0.972). For the semi-volatile ethylene glycol (experiment 3), present in the gas and condense phases, quantification was much more complex and two spectral approaches were developed: (1) according to the linear relationship from the first experiment (determination error of 8%), and (2) inverse modeling (determination error of 57%). This work demonstrates the potential of the OP-FTIR for detecting clouds of water-based aerosols and for quantifying water droplets and solutes at relatively low concentrations. PMID:27121498

  10. Low Cost Open-Path Instrument for Monitoring Surface Carbon Dioxide at Sequestration Sites Phase I SBIR Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Sheng

    2012-10-02

    Public confidence in safety is a prerequisite to the success of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage for any program that intends to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. In that regard, this project addresses the security of CO2 containment by undertaking development of what is called an open path device to measure CO2 concentrations near the ground above a CO2 storage area.

  11. Transmission quantification for open path Fourier transform spectroscopy with temperature compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crampton, Robert Stiles

    This dissertation contains analyses of new methods for determining the concentration and temperature of atmospheric gases from the data generated by an open-path Fourier transform (OP-FTIR) spectrometer. The concept of FTIR and the subset OP-FTIR are explained in terms of the physical instrumentation and the traditional Beer-Lambert Law based absorbance quantification. The important problems of background collection and water vapor interference with target gas features are also introduced. The process of synthetic spectrum generation is the foundation for this work and is described in detail. The inputs that are required to model the physics of the absorption of infrared radiation by small molecules are explained. The effects that each input has on the final spectrum as recorded by the OP-FTIR are also discussed at length. Also described is the modeling of the optics of the OP-FTIR instrument. Particular attention is paid to the temperature effects on the spectrum of the most important atmospheric infrared absorber, water vapor. A method is explained that is successful at determining the atmospheric temperature along the beam by using two water vapor absorption lines (3281 cm-1 and 3283 cm-1) in the single beam spectrum that have opposite and strong temperature dependencies. The regression model is based on synthetic data created with the HI-TRAN database and shows good agreement with field data. Lastly a new way to quantify gases from the single beam spectrum of the OP-FTIR is introduced and tested. This method contrasts with traditional absorbance based methods and avoids the pitfalls associated with the background spectrum. The input spectra are divided into two arrays. One of these arrays is associated with the points in wave-number space where the target gas has less absorbance and the second array contains information about the points where the target gas absorbs most. A series of reference transmittance spectra are divided from the input spectra and the

  12. APPLICATION OF STANDARDIZED QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES TO OPEN-PATH FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED DATA COLLECTED AT A CONCENTRATED SWINE PRODUCTION FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP/FT-IR) spectrometry was used to measure the concentrations of ammonia, methane, and other atmospheric eases at a concentrated swine production facility. A total of 2200 OP/FT-IR spectra were acquired along nine different monitoring paths d...

  13. Emission source strengths of gasoline-filling processes determined by open-path spectroscopic techniques and inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Klaus; Stockhause, Martina; Hoffmann, Herbert; Sedlmaier, Achim; Emeis, Stefan M.

    1998-12-01

    Up to now emission source strengths of diffuse and heterogenous emission of important VOCs are not well known especially from gas stations and gasoline tank farms. To estimate the total emission of these sources non-intrusive measurements were performed by a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system to determine the path- integrated concentrations of exhaust compounds downwind of the source through the whole exhaust plume. Simultaneously, the meteorological parameters were measured for modeling the dispersion of the plume inversely to obtain the emission source strengths of these compounds. The emissions by road traffic were determined by an additional open-path DOAS measurement. Measurement campaigns were performed during different wether conditions and at different sources which were characterized by well defined and easy air flow conditions. The emission source strengths were calculated with the Gaussian model PAL. The determined total emission of gas stations with gasoline vapor recovery system are about 20 mg benzene per kg refueled gasoline and the emission from refueling activities vary between 1 and 9 benzene per kg refueled gasoline depending on the technical behavior of the gasoline vapor recovery system. These values which were found from measurements during times with a and without refueling activities show a high amount of diffuse emissions. The emission rates from a gasoline taken farm were measured on an open path through the middle of that area and a maximum of 8 (mu) g/(m2s) was determined.

  14. On the application of Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy to measure aerosols: Observations of water droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Hashmonay, R.A.; Yost, M.G.

    1999-04-01

    This paper proposes the application of Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy to measure aerosols. A preliminary experiment conducted in a standard shower chamber generated a condensed water aerosol cloud. The OP-FTIR beam acquired spectra through the cloud of water droplets. The authors matched calculated extinction spectra to measured extinction in the spectral range between 500 and 5,000 wavenumbers by using Mie theory for spherical particles. The results indicate that size distribution parameters may be retrieved from OP-FTIR spectra acquired over a 1 km optical path with reasonable detection limits on the order of 10 {micro}g{center_dot}m{sup {minus}3} for aerosols with optical properties equivalent to water.

  15. Spin-orbit-path hybrid Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entanglement and open-destination teleportation with multiple degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lixiang; She Weilong

    2011-03-15

    We propose a scheme to generate hybrid Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entanglement where multiple photons are entangled in different degrees of freedom of spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), and path (linear momentum). The generation involves mapping the preliminary OAM entanglement of photon pairs onto their spin-orbit and spin-path degrees of freedom, respectively. Based on the hybrid GHZ entanglement, we demonstrate an open-destination teleportation with multiples degrees of freedom, via which a spin state of a single photon is teleported onto a superposition of multiple photons with the postselection technique and the original information could be read out at any photon in individual spin, OAM, or the linear-momentum state. Our scheme holds promise for asymmetric optical quantum network.

  16. Propagating Spectroscopic Effects through WPL Terms when Using a Fast Laser-Based Open-Path CH4 Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, George; McDermitt, Dayle; Anderson, Tyler; Komissarov, Anatoly

    2013-04-01

    may be why these instruments are often deployed at locations with infrastructure and grid power, and not where the gas is produced. Open-path gas analyzers can require very low-power (e.g., 5-10 Watts), permitting solar-powered deployments, cost-effectively permitting an addition of a single new gas measurement to the present array of CO2 and H2O measurements, and avoiding attenuation of gas fluctuations in the intake tube. These features enable long-term deployments of permanent, portable or mobile open-path flux stations at remote locations with high production of the gas of interest. However, in open-path analyzers, density and spectroscopic effects cannot be neglected. Here we propose a new way to account for spectroscopic effects due to fast fluctuations in air temperature, water vapor and pressure in the same manner as Webb et al. (1980) proposed a way of accounting for respective density effects. Since both density effects and spectroscopic effects are known from Gas Laws and HITRAN, respectively, they can be incorporated into the WPL correction. We use an example of a fast open-path CH4 gas analyzer, the LI-7700, yet the proposed approach would also apply to any closed-path design where fluctuations in temperature, water vapor and pressure are not fully eliminated.

  17. Methodology for Augmenting Existing Paths with Additional Parallel Transects

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, John E.

    2013-09-30

    Visual Sample Plan (VSP) is sample planning software that is used, among other purposes, to plan transect sampling paths to detect areas that were potentially used for munition training. This module was developed for application on a large site where existing roads and trails were to be used as primary sampling paths. Gap areas between these primary paths needed to found and covered with parallel transect paths. These gap areas represent areas on the site that are more than a specified distance from a primary path. These added parallel paths needed to optionally be connected together into a single path—the shortest path possible. The paths also needed to optionally be attached to existing primary paths, again with the shortest possible path. Finally, the process must be repeatable and predictable so that the same inputs (primary paths, specified distance, and path options) will result in the same set of new paths every time. This methodology was developed to meet those specifications.

  18. An Application of Self-Organizing Map for Multirobot Multigoal Path Planning with Minmax Objective.

    PubMed

    Faigl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Self-Organizing Map (SOM) for the Multiple Traveling Salesman Problem (MTSP) with minmax objective is applied to the robotic problem of multigoal path planning in the polygonal domain. The main difficulty of such SOM deployment is determination of collision-free paths among obstacles that is required to evaluate the neuron-city distances in the winner selection phase of unsupervised learning. Moreover, a collision-free path is also needed in the adaptation phase, where neurons are adapted towards the presented input signal (city) to the network. Simple approximations of the shortest path are utilized to address this issue and solve the robotic MTSP by SOM. Suitability of the proposed approximations is verified in the context of cooperative inspection, where cities represent sensing locations that guarantee to "see" the whole robots' workspace. The inspection task formulated as the MTSP-Minmax is solved by the proposed SOM approach and compared with the combinatorial heuristic GENIUS. The results indicate that the proposed approach provides competitive results to GENIUS and support applicability of SOM for robotic multigoal path planning with a group of cooperating mobile robots. The proposed combination of approximate shortest paths with unsupervised learning opens further applications of SOM in the field of robotic planning. PMID:27340395

  19. An Application of Self-Organizing Map for Multirobot Multigoal Path Planning with Minmax Objective

    PubMed Central

    Faigl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Self-Organizing Map (SOM) for the Multiple Traveling Salesman Problem (MTSP) with minmax objective is applied to the robotic problem of multigoal path planning in the polygonal domain. The main difficulty of such SOM deployment is determination of collision-free paths among obstacles that is required to evaluate the neuron-city distances in the winner selection phase of unsupervised learning. Moreover, a collision-free path is also needed in the adaptation phase, where neurons are adapted towards the presented input signal (city) to the network. Simple approximations of the shortest path are utilized to address this issue and solve the robotic MTSP by SOM. Suitability of the proposed approximations is verified in the context of cooperative inspection, where cities represent sensing locations that guarantee to “see” the whole robots' workspace. The inspection task formulated as the MTSP-Minmax is solved by the proposed SOM approach and compared with the combinatorial heuristic GENIUS. The results indicate that the proposed approach provides competitive results to GENIUS and support applicability of SOM for robotic multigoal path planning with a group of cooperating mobile robots. The proposed combination of approximate shortest paths with unsupervised learning opens further applications of SOM in the field of robotic planning. PMID:27340395

  20. Wave-particle interaction in parallel transport of long mean-free-path plasmas along open field magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zehua; Tang, Xianzhu

    2012-03-01

    A tokamak fusion reactor dumps a large amount of heat and particle flux to the divertor through the scrape-off plasma (SOL). Situation exists either by necessity or through deliberate design that the SOL plasma attains long mean-free-path along large segments of the open field lines. The rapid parallel streaming of electrons requires a large parallel electric field to maintain ambipolarity. The confining effect of the parallel electric field on electrons leads to a trap/passing boundary in the velocity space for electrons. In the normal situation where the upstream electron source populates both the trapped and passing region, a mechanism must exist to produce a flux across the electron trap/passing boundary. In a short mean-free-path plasma, this is provided by collisions. For long mean-free-path plasmas, wave-particle interaction is the primary candidate for detrapping the electrons. Here we present simulation results and a theoretical analysis using a model distribution function of trapped electrons. The dominating electromagnetic plasma instability and the associated collisionless scattering, that produces both particle and energy fluxes across the electron trap/passing boundary in velocity space, are discussed.

  1. Near-infrared open-path measurement of CO₂ concentration in the urban atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hayato; Manago, Naohiro; Kuriyama, Kenji; Kuze, Hiroaki

    2015-06-01

    Average concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been measured over a path length of 5.1 km in the lower troposphere by the method of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) using a near-infrared light source based on amplified spontaneous emission. The analysis of CO2 absorption intensity around 1575 nm observed during 10 days over the Chiba city area has revealed that the CO2 concentration varied in the range of around 360-450 ppmv, with presumable influence of air mass advection from nearby industrial facilities. In addition, a good correlation has been found in relative humidity values between the DOAS and meteorological station data. As a whole, the present result indicates the usefulness of such a DOAS approach for measuring the concentration of CO2 averaged over an optical path of a few kilometers in the lower troposphere. PMID:26030559

  2. Openness to Experience and Night-Sky Watching Interest as Predictors of Reading for Pleasure: Path Analysis of a Mediation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, William E.

    2010-01-01

    The relation between reading for pleasure, night-sky watching interest, and openness to experience were examined in a sample of 129 college students. Results of a path analysis examining a mediation model indicated that the influence of night-sky interest on reading for pleasure was not mediated by the broad personality domain openness to…

  3. Evaluation of an open-path fourier-transform infrared spectrometer for monitoring vehicle emissions over a suburban roadway intersection

    SciTech Connect

    Einfield, W.

    1997-05-01

    The ability of an open-path, fourier-transform infrared spectrometer to detect vehicle exhaust emissions approximately 3 meters above the roadway surface at a busy Albuquerque suburban intersection was evaluated in this study. Multiple measurements of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were carried out over pathlengths up to 100 meters during the morning commute period on multiple days in the summer of 1993. The carbon monoxide to fuel carbon ratio was computed from all spectral data in order to derive a vehicle fleet average ratio. The data were determined to be normally distributed with an overall carbon monoxide-fuel carbon ratio of 0.15. The 95% confidence interval about the mean was {+-} 0.009. Day-to-day variation of the mean ratio was determined to be on the order of 3%. The results indicate that anticipated reductions in carbon monoxide emissions following the implementation of a winter-season oxygenated fuel program could be reliably detected with an open-path fourier transform spectrometer. The periodic use of such an instrument may offer a cost-effective means of generating a city-wide carbon monoxide emission budget for vehicles sources.

  4. Timing finger opening in overarm throwing based on a spatial representation of hand path.

    PubMed

    Hore, Jon; Watts, Sherry

    2005-06-01

    Previous studies on overarm throwing have suggested that throwing accuracy depends on a precise central timing mechanism. In the present study, we investigated an alternative hypothesis: that central control of finger opening is based on an internal positional representation of handpath. Angular positions of each segment of the middle finger, thumb, and arm were recorded with the search-coil technique as subjects made slow, medium, and fast throws at a target 3.1 m away. Onset of ball release from the hand was strongly correlated with extension at the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIJ). The velocity of this finger joint opening varied with the speed of the throw. In agreement with the hypothesis, at a fixed hand angular position in space, there was no difference across subjects in the amplitude of extension at the PIJ for throws of different speeds. That is, for these two parameters, a fast throw was the same as a slow throw that was sped-up. This occurred irrespective of whether the trunk was constrained (sitting throws) or unconstrained (standing throws). No equivalent relation was found between extension at the PIJ and elbow extension. These findings support the idea that precisely timed finger opening in overarm throwing depends, not on a central timing controller that triggers a step-like (ballistic) finger opening at the right moment in throws of different speeds, but on a central spatial controller that matches angular positions of finger opening to the intended handpath.

  5. A Path Analysis of Educator Perceptions of Open Educational Resources Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Hope

    2014-01-01

    Open educational resources (OER) are making their way into a variety of educational contexts from formal lesson planning to just in time learning. Educators and training professionals have been recognized as an important audience for these materials. The concepts of "self-efficacy" and "outcome judgment" from social cognitive…

  6. An open path H2O/CO2 gas analyzer for eddy correlation systems: theory and design.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Gary

    2002-09-01

    A fast response, open path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy H2O/CO2 gas analyzer suitable for eddy correlation concentration measurements in near surface turbulent environments is presented. The turbulent temperature characteristics, analysis theory, analysis methods, design structure and specifications of this dual laser analyzer are described. A fiber connected optical head with folded optical path is used to extend the resolution to ppb levels for H2O at 1.3964 microm and CO2 at 2.014 microm. The Fourier (discrete cosine) transform absorbance ratio analysis methods are outlined along with the modifications for temperature and pressure measurements in turbulent flows. Synthesis of the reference absorbance function using measured temperature, pressure and the Hitran parameters is extended with incorporation of the Hitran parameters n, gamma temperature exponent and E'', lower state energy. Additionally, the mole fraction equation developed for this Hitran model is presented and an absolute calibration technique is outlined along with methods of calibration retention. Simulation results on mole fraction estimations and errors are presented for synthetic temperature and laser noise processes and are used to verify the specifications. PMID:12353686

  7. Design and performance considerations of cat's-eye retroreflectors for use in open-path Fourier-transform-infrared spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert L.; Griffiths, Peter R.

    2002-10-01

    A ray-tracing analysis of cat's-eye retroreflectors for use in active open-path Fourier-transform-infrared (OP/FT-IR) spectrometry and the results of testing f/0.5 and f/1.75 cat's-eye retroreflectors built in our laboratory with a commercial active OP/FT-IR spectrometer are presented. The ray-tracing model is based on the optical characteristics of a commercial single-telescope monostatic OP/FT-IR spectrometer and explores trends in cat's-eye behavior in practical but rigorous field conditions encountered during transportable outdoor use. All mirrors modeled are paraboloids for which the focal ratios of the primary mirror are f/0.5, f/1.75, and f/3. The effect of the focal ratio of the primary mirror, the focal length of the secondary mirror, and the off-axis alignment of the primary and the secondary mirror have been evaluated as a function of path length, including variable input-beam divergence, between the spectrometer and the cat's-eye. The paraboloidal mirrors comprising the primary and secondary of the cat's-eye retroreflectors tested were made in our laboratory by spin casting liquid epoxy-graphite composite mixtures followed by in situ polymerization with no postpolishing.

  8. Evaluation of a micrometeorological mass balance method employing an open-path laser for measuring methane emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, R. L.; Denmead, O. T.; Harper, L.; McBain, M.; Massé, D.; Kaharabata, S.

    In trials of a mass balance method for measuring methane (CH 4) emissions, sonic anemometers and an open-path laser were used to measure the transport of CH 4 released from a ground-level source across a downwind face 50 m long and 6 m high. Release rates matched emissions expected from dairy herds of 2 to 40 cows. The long laser path permitted inferences from measurements in only two planes, one upwind and one downwind, while the fast-response instruments allowed calculation of instantaneous horizontal fluxes rather than fluxes calculated from mean wind speeds and mean concentrations. The detection limit of the lasers was 0.02 ppmv, with the separation between the transmitters and reflectors being about 50 m. The main conclusions from the 23 trials were: (1) Emissions calculated from mean wind speeds and concentrations overestimated the true emissions calculated from instantaneous measurements by 5%. (2) Because of small changes in methane concentration, the minimum sample size in animal trials would be 10 dairy cows, producing about 40 mg CH 4 s -1. (3) For release rates greater than 40 mg CH 4 s -1 and with sufficient replication, the technique could detect a change in production rate of 9% ( P<=0.05). (4) Attention to perceived weaknesses in the present technique should help towards detecting changes of 5%.

  9. Nitrous Oxide Emission Flux Measurements for Ecological Systems with an Open-Path Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Cavigelli, M. A.; Gelfand, I.; Zenone, T.; Cui, M.; Miller, D. J.; Khan, M. A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The ambient concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O), the fourth most abundant greenhouse gas, is rapidly increasing with emissions from both natural and anthropogenic sources [1]. Soil and aquatic areas are important sources and sinks for N2O due to complicated biogenic processes. However, N2O emissions are poorly constrained in space and time, despite its importance to global climate change and ozone depletion. We report our recent N2O emission measurements with an open-path quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based sensor for ecological systems. The newly emergent QCLs have been used to build compact, sensitive trace gas sensors in the mid-IR spectral region. A compact open-path QCL based sensor was developed to detect atmospheric N2O and CO at ~ 4.5 μm using wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) to achieve a sensitivity of 0.26 ppbv of N2O and 0.24 ppbv of CO in 1 s with a power consumption of ~50 W [2]. This portable sensor system has been used to perform N2O emission flux measurement both with a static flux chamber and on an eddy covariance (EC) flux tower. In the flux chamber measurements, custom chambers were used to host the laser sensor, while gas samples for gas chromatograph (GC) were collected at the same time in the same chamber for validation and comparison. Different soil treatments have been applied in different chambers to study the relationship between N2O emission and the amount of fertilizer (and water) addition. Measurements from two methods agreed with each other (95% or higher confidence interval) for emission flux results, while laser sensor gave measurements with a much high temporal resolution. We have also performed the first open-path eddy covariance N2O flux measurement at Kellogg research station, Michigan State University for a month in June, 2012. Our sensor was placed on a 4-meter tower in a corn field and powered by batteries (connected with solar panels). We have observed the diurnal cycle of N2O flux. During this deployment, an inter

  10. Evaluating open-path FTIR spectrometer data using different quantification methods, libraries, and background spectra obtained under varying environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    Studies were performed to evaluate the accuracy of open-path Fourier Transform Infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers using a 35 foot outdoor exposure chamber in Pittsboro, North Carolina. Results obtained with the OP-FTIR spectrometer were compared to results obtained with a reference method (a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector, GC-FID). Concentration results were evaluated in terms of the mathematical methods and spectral libraries used for quantification. In addition, the research investigated the effect on quantification of using different backgrounds obtained at various times during the day. The chemicals used in this study were toluene, cyclohexane, and methanol; and these were evaluated over the concentration range of 5-30 ppm.

  11. Installation effects on multi-path ultrasonic flow meters: The {open_quote}ULTRAFLOW{close_quote} project

    SciTech Connect

    Bloemendaal, K. van; Kam, P.M.A. van der

    1995-12-31

    {open_quote}ULTRAFLOW{close_quote} was a Joint Industry Project aimed at establishing the effect of installation conditions on multi-path ultrasonic flow meters. An extensive test series was performed at 5 test facilities on 6 inch and 12 inch meters operating on natural gas at pressures from 10 to 60 bar. All test facilities and procedures are reviewed by an independent international Quality Assessment Team, comprising experts from legal metrological authorities, to ensure that the work was appropriate to support International Standards activity. This paper is a condensed version of the projects final report describing the project and test results. The tests in ideal flow conditions pay attention to meter stability and effects of signal averaging and pressure. From the error shifts in the tests with upstream disturbances (1 or 2 bends, step changes in pipe diameter and pressure reduction) values for uncertainties due to the presence of these disturbances are proposed.

  12. Analysis and demonstration of atmospheric methane monitoring by mid-infrared open-path chirped laser dispersion spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Daghestani, Nart S; Brownsword, Richard; Weidmann, Damien

    2014-12-15

    Atmospheric methane concentration levels were detected using a custom built laser dispersion spectrometer in a long open-path beam configuration. The instrument is driven by a chirped distributed feedback mid-infrared quantum cascade laser centered at ~1283.46 cm-1 and covers intense rotational-vibrational transitions from the fundamental ν4 band of methane. A full forward model simulating molecular absorption and dispersion profiles, as well as instrumental noise, is demonstrated. The instrument's analytical model is validated and used for quantitative instrumental optimization. The temporal evolution of atmospheric methane mixing ratios is retrieved using a fitting algorithm based on the model. Full error propagation analysis on precision gives a normalized sensitivity of ~3 ppm.m.Hz-0.5 for atmospheric methane. PMID:25607487

  13. Computing the Length of the Shortest Telomere in the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao Duc, K.; Holcman, D.

    2013-11-01

    The telomere length can either be shortened or elongated by an enzyme called telomerase after each cell division. Interestingly, the shortest telomere is involved in controlling the ability of a cell to divide. Yet, its dynamics remains elusive. We present here a stochastic approach where we model this dynamics using a Markov jump process. We solve the forward Fokker-Planck equation to obtain the steady state distribution and the statistical moments of telomere lengths. We focus specifically on the shortest one and we estimate its length difference with the second shortest telomere. After extracting key parameters such as elongation and shortening dynamics from experimental data, we compute the length of telomeres in yeast and obtain as a possible prediction the minimum concentration of telomerase required to ensure a proper cell division.

  14. COMPARISON OF AN INNOVATIVE NONLINEAR ALGORITHM TO CLASSICAL LEAST SQUARES FOR ANALYZING OPEN-PATH FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTRA COLLECTED AT A CONCENTRATED SWINE PRODUCTION FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP/FTIR) spectrometry was used to measure the concentrations of ammonia, methane, and other atmospheric gases at an integrated swine production facility. The concentration-pathlength products of the target gases at this site often exceeded th...

  15. VALIDATION OF A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING POLLUTION EMISSION RATES FROM AREA SOURCES USING OPEN-PATH FTIR SEPCTROSCOPY AND DISPERSION MODELING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a methodology developed to estimate emissions factors for a variety of different area sources in a rapid, accurate, and cost effective manner. he methodology involves using an open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer to measure concentrations o...

  16. [Study on the measurement of ambient ammonia in urban area based on open-path DOAS technique].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Xie, Pin-hua; Qin, Min; Ling, Liu-yi; Ye, Cong-lei; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2012-02-01

    As a key role in the acid-deposition and the generation of secondary particle matter (PM), measurement of the concentration of atmospheric ammonia in urban area has been attracting the scientists' interests nowadays. After studying the special absorption features of ammonia in short UV wavelength range, detailed concernful issues were put forward in the present paper. The decision of using xenon lamp as the light source was made after the evaluation of measurement of light spectroscopy. Retrieval wavelength band for NH3 was fixed from 204 to 214 nm and optimal method of deducting other interferential gases was also shown. A home-made open-path DOAS (OP-DOAS) system was set up for the measurement of the concentration of atmospheric NH3. The detection limit of such system was calculated with the typical noise level as low as 0.33 microg x m(-3) with the optical path 228 m. Through field experiment in Guangzhou city, such a system can be competent for the online and high time-resolution monitoring of the concentration of atmospheric ammonia. With a significant diurnal variation, the atmospheric ammonia changed from 0.83 to 3.11 microg x m(-3) with the mean value 1.59 microg x m(-3). The representative character of the diurnal variation is that the concentration of NH3 peaks during night while drops to bottom in the daytime. After the error analysis procedure, typical measurement accuracy of such OP-DOAS system was within 10%. PMID:22512193

  17. Open Innovation Drug Discovery (OIDD): a potential path to novel therapeutic chemical space.

    PubMed

    Alvim-Gaston, Maria; Grese, Timothy; Mahoui, Abdelaziz; Palkowitz, Alan D; Pineiro-Nunez, Marta; Watson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The continued development of computational and synthetic methods has enabled the enumeration or preparation of a nearly endless universe of chemical structures. Nevertheless, the ability of this chemical universe to deliver small molecules that can both modulate biological targets and have drug-like physicochemical properties continues to be a topic of interest to the pharmaceutical industry and academic researchers alike. The chemical space described by public, commercial, in-house and virtual compound collections has been interrogated by multiple approaches including biochemical, cellular and virtual screening, diversity analysis, and in-silico profiling. However, current drugs and known chemical probes derived from these efforts are contained within a remarkably small volume of the predicted chemical space. Access to more diverse classes of chemical scaffolds that maintain the properties relevant for drug discovery is certainly needed to meet the increasing demands for pharmaceutical innovation. The Lilly Open Innovation Drug Discovery platform (OIDD) was designed to tackle barriers to innovation through the identification of novel molecules active in relevant disease biology models. In this article we will discuss several computational approaches towards describing novel, biologically active, drug-like chemical space and illustrate how the OIDD program may facilitate access to previously untapped molecules that may aid in the search for innovative pharmaceuticals.

  18. Rapid, optical measurement of the atmospheric pressure on a fast research aircraft using open-path TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, B.; Afchine, A.; Ebert, V.

    2014-11-01

    Because of the high travel speed, the complex flow dynamics around an aircraft, and the complex dependency of the fluid dynamics on numerous airborne parameters, it is quite difficult to obtain accurate pressure values at a specific instrument location of an aircraft's fuselage. Complex simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can in theory computationally "transfer" pressure values from one location to another. However, for long flight patterns, this process is inconvenient and cumbersome. Furthermore, these CFD transfer models require a local experimental validation, which is rarely available. In this paper, we describe an integrated approach for a spectroscopic, calibration-free, in-flight pressure determination in an open-path White cell on an aircraft fuselage using ambient, atmospheric water vapour as the "sensor species". The presented measurements are realised with the HAI (Hygrometer for Atmospheric Investigations) instrument, built for multiphase water detection via calibration-free TDLAS (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy). The pressure determination is based on raw data used for H2O concentration measurement, but with a different post-flight evaluation method, and can therefore be conducted at deferred time intervals on any desired flight track. The spectroscopic pressure is compared in-flight with the static ambient pressure of the aircraft avionic system and a micro-mechanical pressure sensor, located next to the open-path cell, over a pressure range from 150 to 800 hPa, and a water vapour concentration range of more than 3 orders of magnitude. The correlation between the micro-mechanical pressure sensor measurements and the spectroscopic pressure measurements shows an average deviation from linearity of only 0.14% and a small offset of 9.5 hPa. For the spectroscopic pressure evaluation we derive measurement uncertainties under laboratory conditions of 3.2 and 5.1% during in-flight operation on the HALO airplane. Under

  19. Atmospheric ammonia monitoring near Beijing National Stadium from July to October in 2008 by open-path TDLAS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Wenqing; Kan, Ruifeng; Xia, Hui

    2009-07-01

    Gaseous ammonia is the most abundant alkaline trace gas in the atmosphere. As ammonia plays an important role in acid deposition and aerosol formation, it influences the regional air quality and atmospheric visibility. TDLAS (Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy)is a method to obtain the spectroscopy of single molecule absorption line in the characteristic absorption spectrum region as the characteristic of the distributed feed back (DFB) diode laser with narrow linewidth and tunability, which makes it possible to detect trace-gas qualitatively or quantificationally. The NH3 in-situ monitoring instrument based on TDLAS and long open path technology have been developed combining with wavelength modulation and harmonic detection techniques to obtain the necessary detection sensitivity. This instrument has been used to measure atmospheric NH3 concentration at an urban site near Beijing National Stadium from July to October in 2008, especially in the period of Beijing Olympics and Paralympics. The continuously monitoring results show that the atmospheric NH3 concentration variation has an obvious diurnal periodicity in the urban of Beijing. First of all, the general diurnal variation rule is the concentration decreased to the minimum in the daytime, and then increased to the maximum at night. Moreover, the NH3 peak concentration decreased obviously at the beginning of the Beijing Olympics then it kept descending during the Paralympics. The obtained maximum of NH3 is between 20.31μg/m3~ 48.54μg/m3 with the daily average concentration between 12.6μg/m3~27.5μg/m3. During these three months, Air Quality Assurance Scheme for the Olympics (AQASO) was implemented through the joint actions of Beijing Municipal Government and the five neighboring provinces/municipalities in north China. The measures such as auto restriction and plant ejection-decreasing are carried out in Beijing. In conclusion, the open-path TDLAS instrument is suitable for atmospheric trace

  20. Rapid, optical measurement of the atmospheric pressure on a fast research aircraft using open-path TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, B.; Afchine, A.; Ebert, V.

    2014-05-01

    Because of the high travel speed, the complex flow dynamics around an aircraft and the complex dependency of the fluid dynamics on numerous airborne parameters, it is quite difficult to obtain accurate pressure values at a specific instrument location of an aircraft's fuselage. Complex simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can in theory computationally "transfer" pressure values from one location to another. However, for long flight patterns, this process is inconvenient and cumbersome. Furthermore these CFD transfer models require a local experimental validation, which is rarely available. In this paper, we describe an integrated approach for a spectroscopic, calibration-free, in-flight pressure determination in an open-path White cell on an aircraft fuselage using ambient, atmospheric water vapour as the "sensor species". The presented measurements are realized with the HAI (Hygrometer for Atmospheric Investigations) instrument, built for multiphase water detection via calibration-free TDLAS (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy). The pressure determination is based on raw data used for H2O concentration measurement, but with a different post-flight evaluation method, and can therefore be conducted at deferred time intervals on any desired flight track. The spectroscopic pressure is compared in-flight with the static ambient pressure of the aircraft avionic system and a micro-mechanical pressure sensor, located next to the open-path cell, over a pressure range from 150 hPa to 800 hPa, and a water vapour concentration range of more than three orders of magnitude. The correlation between the micro-mechanical pressure sensor measurements and the spectroscopic pressure measurements show an average deviation from linearity of only 0.14% and a small offset of 9.5 hPa. For the spectroscopic pressure evaluation we derive measurement uncertainties under laboratory conditions of 3.2% and 5.1% during in flight operation on the HALO airplane

  1. Link prediction based on path entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhongqi; Pu, Cunlai; Yang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Information theory has been taken as a prospective tool for quantifying the complexity of complex networks. In this paper, first we study the information entropy or uncertainty of a path using the information theory. After that, we apply the path entropy to the link prediction problem in real-world networks. Specifically, we propose a new similarity index, namely Path Entropy (PE) index, which considers the information entropies of shortest paths between node pairs with penalization to long paths. Empirical experiments demonstrate that PE index outperforms the mainstream of link predictors.

  2. Nonlinear multi-agent path search method based on OFDM communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masatoshi; Igarashi, Yusuke; Tanaka, Mamoru

    This paper presents novel shortest paths searching system based on analog circuit analysis which is called sequential local current comparison method on alternating-current (AC) circuit (AC-SLCC). Local current comparison (LCC) method is a path searching method where path is selected in the direction of the maximum current in a direct-current (DC) resistive circuit. Since a plurality of shortest paths searching by LCC method can be done by solving the current distribution on the resistive circuit analysis, the shortest path problem can be solved at supersonic speed. AC-SLCC method is a novel LCC method with orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) communication on AC circuit. It is able to send data with the shortest path and without major data loss, and this suggest the possibility of application to various things (especially OFDM communication techniques).

  3. Active standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using hard-target backscattered light using an open-path quantum cascade laser sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-05-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentrations. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using a quantum cascade laser open-path system that retrieves path-averaged concentrations by collecting the backscattered light from a remote hard target. It is a true standoff system and differs from other open-path systems that are deployed as point samplers or long-path transmission systems that use retroreflectors. The measured absorption spectra are obtained using a thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB quantum cascade laser at ~7.7 µm wavelength range with ~200 ns pulse width. Making fast time resolved observations, the system simultaneously realizes high spectral resolution and range to the target, resulting in path-averaged concentration retrieval. The system performs measurements at high speed ~15 Hz and sufficient range (up to 45 m, ~148 feet) achieving an uncertainty of 3.1 % and normalized sensitivity of 3.3 ppm m Hz-1/2 for N2O and 9.3 % and normalized sensitivity of 30 ppm m Hz-1/2 for CH4 with a 0.31 mW average power QCL. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile or multidirectional search and remote detection of gas leaks.

  4. Measurement of fugitive volatile organic compound emissions from a petrochemical tank farm using open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Fu; Wu, Tzong-gang; Hashmonay, Ram A.; Chang, Shih-Ying; Wu, Yu-Syuan; Chao, Chun-Ping; Hsu, Cheng-Ping; Chase, Michael J.; Kagann, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Fugitive emission of air pollutants is conventionally estimated based on standard emission factors. The Vertical Radial Plume Mapping (VRPM) technique, as described in the US EPA OTM-10, is designed to measure emission flux by directly monitoring the concentration of the plume crossing a vertical plane downwind of the site of interest. This paper describes the evaluation results of implementing VRPM in a complex industrial setting (a petrochemical tank farm). The vertical plane was constructed from five retroreflectors and an open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The VRPM configuration was approximately 189.2 m in width × 30.7 m in height. In the accompanying tracer gas experiment, the bias of the VRPM estimate was less than 2% and its 95% confidence interval contained the true release rate. Emission estimates of the target VOCs (benzene, m-xylene, o-xylene, p-xylene, and toluene) ranged from 0.86 to 2.18 g s-1 during the 14-day field campaign, while estimates based on the standard emission factors were one order of magnitude lower, possibly leading to an underestimation of the impact of these fugitive emissions on air quality and human health. It was also demonstrated that a simplified 3-beam geometry (i.e., without one dimensional scanning lines) resulted in higher uncertainties in the emission estimates.

  5. Locating sources of hazardous gas emissions using dual pollution rose plots and open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lung-Yu; Shie, Ruei-Hou; Lu, Chia-Jung

    2014-01-30

    A new approach employing two pollution rose plots to locate the sources of multiple hazardous gas emissions was proposed and tested in an industrial area. The data used for constructing the pollution rose plots were obtained from two side-by-side measurements of open-path Fourier Transform Infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers during one week of continuous analysis on the rooftop of a semiconductor plant. Hazardous gases such as CF4, C2F6, CH3OH, NH3, NO2, and SF6 were found and quantified at the ppb level by both OP-FTIR measurement sites. The data of the top 20% highest concentrations and associated wind directions were used to construct the pollution rose plots. Pollution source probability contours for each compound were constructed using the probability-product of directional probability from two pollution rose plots. Hot spots for SF6, CF4, NO2, and C2F6 pointed to the stack area of the plant, but the sources of CH3OH and NH3 were found outside of this plant. The influences of parameters for this approach such as the variation in wind direction, lower limit concentration threshold and the nearby buildings were discussed.

  6. Continuous field measurements of δD in water vapor by open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianshu

    2012-12-01

    The stable isotopes in atmospheric water vapor contain rich information on the hydrologic cycles and gaseous exchange processes between biosphere and atmosphere. About one-week field experiment was conducted to continuously measure the isotope composition of water vapor in ambient air using an open-path FTIR system. Mixing ratios of H2 16O and HD16O were measured simultaneously. Analysis of water vapor isotopes revealed that the variations of H2 16O and HD16O were highly related. Mixing ratios of both isotopes varied considerably on a daily timescale or between days, with no obvious diurnal cycle, whereas the deuterium isotopic [delta]D showed clear diel cycle. The results illustrated that the correlation between [delta]D and H2O mixing ratio was relatively weak, which was also demonstrated by the Keeling plot analysis with the whole data. Yet the further Keeling analysis on a daily timescale displayed more obvious linear relationship between [delta]D and the total H2O concentration. All daily isotopic values of evapotranspiration source were obtained, with the range between -113.93±10.25‰ and -245.63±17.61‰ over the observation period.

  7. Path similarity skeleton graph matching.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiang; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a novel framework to for shape recognition based on object silhouettes. The main idea is to match skeleton graphs by comparing the shortest paths between skeleton endpoints. In contrast to typical tree or graph matching methods, we completely ignore the topological graph structure. Our approach is motivated by the fact that visually similar skeleton graphs may have completely different topological structures. The proposed comparison of shortest paths between endpoints of skeleton graphs yields correct matching results in such cases. The skeletons are pruned by contour partitioning with Discrete Curve Evolution, which implies that the endpoints of skeleton branches correspond to visual parts of the objects. The experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to produce correct results in the presence of articulations, stretching, and occlusion.

  8. Results of first field tests of the improved open-path and enclosed models of CO2 and H2O flux measurements systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begashaw, Israel; Fratini, Gerardo; Griessbaum, Frank; Kathilankal, James; Xu, Liukang; Franz, Daniela; Joseph, Everett; Larmanou, Eric; Miller, Scott; Papale, Dario; Sabbatini, Simone; Sachs, Torsten; Sakai, Ricardo; McDermitt, Dayle; Burba, George

    2016-04-01

    In 2014-2015, improved open-path and enclosed-path flux measurement systems were developed, based on established LI-7500A and LI-7200 gas analyzer models, with the focus on improving stability in the presence of contamination, refining temperature control and compensation, and providing more accurate gas concentration measurements. In addition to optical and electronic redesign, both systems incorporate automated on-site flux calculations using EddyPro® software run by a weatherized remotely-accessible microcomputer, SmartFlux 2, with fully digital inputs. The ultimate goal of such development was to reduce errors in CO2 and H2O hourly fluxes and in long-term carbon and water budgets. Field tests of both systems were conducted over six periods, each 5-14 months long, at 6 sites with diverse environments, setups, and types of contamination, using 26 gas analyzers. The open-path LI-7500RS system performed significantly better than the original LI-7500A model in terms of contamination-related drifts in mean concentrations. Improvements in CO2 drifts were strong, with RS models often drifting few-to-tens of times less than the original. Improvements in H2O contamination-related drifts were particularly significant, with modified models often drifting many tens of times less than the original. The enclosed-path LI-7200RS system performed substantially better than the original LI-7200 in terms of the drifts in H2O, sometimes drifting few-to-tens of times less than the original. Improvements in CO2 contamination-related drifts were modest, being similar or just a bit better than the original. Results from field tests suggest that both RS systems can help improve flux data coverage and potentially reduce site maintenance: (i) Frequency of cleaning and site visits for service and maintenance should decrease, especially for the open-path design (ii) Amount of highest quality data with smallest error bars on fluxes is expected to increase for both open-path and enclosed-path

  9. Parallel transport of long mean-free-path plasma along open magnetic field lines: Parallel heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Zehua; Tang Xianzhu

    2012-06-15

    In a long mean-free-path plasma where temperature anisotropy can be sustained, the parallel heat flux has two components with one associated with the parallel thermal energy and the other the perpendicular thermal energy. Due to the large deviation of the distribution function from local Maxwellian in an open field line plasma with low collisionality, the conventional perturbative calculation of the parallel heat flux closure in its local or non-local form is no longer applicable. Here, a non-perturbative calculation is presented for a collisionless plasma in a two-dimensional flux expander bounded by absorbing walls. Specifically, closures of previously unfamiliar form are obtained for ions and electrons, which relate two distinct components of the species parallel heat flux to the lower order fluid moments such as density, parallel flow, parallel and perpendicular temperatures, and the field quantities such as the magnetic field strength and the electrostatic potential. The plasma source and boundary condition at the absorbing wall enter explicitly in the closure calculation. Although the closure calculation does not take into account wave-particle interactions, the results based on passing orbits from steady-state collisionless drift-kinetic equation show remarkable agreement with fully kinetic-Maxwell simulations. As an example of the physical implications of the theory, the parallel heat flux closures are found to predict a surprising observation in the kinetic-Maxwell simulation of the 2D magnetic flux expander problem, where the parallel heat flux of the parallel thermal energy flows from low to high parallel temperature region.

  10. Open-path Emission Factors Derived from DOAS and FTIR Measurements in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, E.; Grutter, M.; Galle, B.; Mellqvist, J.; Samuelsson, J.; Knighton, B.; Jobson, B. T.; Volkamer, R.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    Mobile sources are responsible for about 50% of VOC (volatile organic compounds) and about 70% of NOx emissions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). A novel approach has been developed to derive emission factors for mobile sources that are representative of the overall vehicle fleet, using collocated open-path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements. Measurements were recorded at two sites within the MCMA: (1) research-grade DOAS and FTIR systems were operated at the Mexican National Research and Training Center (CENICA) in Iztapalapa, (2) a research grade FTIR was operated at La Merced. In addition, point-sampling with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was performed on the same location and the calibration standards for the PTR-MS and the DOAS instruments were cross-calibrated. The DOAS measured speciated aromatic hydrocarbons, including benzene, toluene, m-xylene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene (and mono-substituted alkylbenzenes), benzaldehyde, phenol, and p-cresol. The DOAS detection of aromatic hydrocarbons in the UV/vis spectral range between 250 to 310 nm suffers from the interference of molecular oxygen, and a novel approach is being presented that enables measurement of absolute concentrations of the above species. Further, HONO, NO2, SO2 and HCHO were measured at longer wavelengths. In combination with FTIR measurements of CO, CO2, NO, HCHO, ethylene, ethene, and total alkane, average emission factors for NOx, SO2 and numerous hydrocarbons were derived and scaled with fuel sales data to estimate total emissions of the vehicle fleet in the MCMA. The advantages and limitations of this low-cost emission inventory for mobile sources are decsribed.

  11. INNOVATIVE APPROACH FOR MEASURING AMMONIA AND METHANE FLUXES FROM A HOG FARM USING OPEN-PATH FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a new approach to quantify emissions from area air pollution sources. The approach combines path-integrated concentration data acquired with any path-integrated optical remote sensing (PI-ORS) technique and computed tomography (CT) technique. In this study, an...

  12. FIELD EVALUATION OF A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING GASEOUS FLUXES FROM AREA SOURCES USING OPEN-PATH FTIR

    EPA Science Inventory


    The paper gives preliminary results from a field evaluation of a new approach for quantifying gaseous fugitive emissions of area air pollution sources. The approach combines path-integrated concentration data acquired with any path-integrated optical remote sensing (PI-ORS) ...

  13. FIELD EVALUATION OF A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING GASEOUS FLUXES FROM AREA SOURCES USING OPEN-PATH FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes preliminary results from a field experiment designed to evaluate a new approach to quantifying gaseous fugitive emissions from area air pollution sources. The new approach combines path-integrated concentration data acquired with any path-integrated optical re...

  14. Homing strategies of the Australian desert ant Melophorus bagoti. I. Proportional path-integration takes the ant half-way home.

    PubMed

    Narendra, Ajay

    2007-05-01

    Highly evolved eusocial insects such as ants return from a food source to their nest by the shortest possible distance. This form of navigation, called path-integration, involves keeping track of the distance travelled and the angles steered on the outbound journey, which then aids in the computation of the shortest return distance. In featureless terrain, ants rely on the path integrator to travel the entire distance to return to the nest, whereas in landmark-rich habitats ants are guided by visual cues and in the absence of the visual cues homing ants rely on the path integrator to travel only an initial 10-60 cm of the homebound distance. The functioning of the path integrator in a habitat of intermediate landmark density is unknown. The findings reported here show that when the outward journey is on a familiar foraging area, and the inward journey is on an unfamiliar area, the Australian route-following desert ant Melophorus bagoti relies on the path integrator and consistently travels half the distance of the outward trip. However, when both the outward and inward trips are performed in plain and featureless channels, which blocks the distinct terrestrial visual cues, ants travel the entire distance accurately. A similar half-way abbreviation of the home vector occurs when the ant's outward trip is in an L-shaped channel and the homeward trip is over an open and unfamiliar region. The ecological significance of these new findings is discussed.

  15. A Dynamic Programming Approach to Identifying the Shortest Path in Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazlollahtabar, Hamed

    2008-01-01

    E-learning has been widely adopted as a promising solution by many organizations to offer learning-on-demand opportunities to individual employees (learners) in order to reduce training time and cost. While successful information systems models have received much attention among researchers, little research has been conducted to assess the success…

  16. Using multiple calibration sets to improve the quantitative accuracy of partial least squares (PLS) regression on open-path fourier transform infrared (OP/FT-IR) spectra of ammonia over wide concentration ranges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A technique of using multiple calibration sets in partial least squares regression (PLS) was proposed to improve the quantitative determination of ammonia from open-path Fourier transform infrared spectra. The spectra were measured near animal farms, and the path-integrated concentration of ammonia...

  17. Field measurements of trace gases emitted by prescribed fires in southeastern U.S. pine forests using an open-path FTIR system

    SciTech Connect

    Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Mendoza, Albert; Johnson, Timothy J.; Cameron, Melanie; Griffith, David WT; Paton-Walsh, C.; Weise, David; Reardon, James; Yokelson, Robert J.

    2014-01-08

    We report trace-gas emission factors from three pine-understory prescribed fires in South Carolina, U.S. measured during the fall of 2011. The fires were an attempt to simulate high-intensity burns and the fuels included mature pine stands not frequently subjected to prescribed fire that were lit following a sustained period of drought. In this work we focus on the emission factor measurements made using a fixed open-path gas analyzer Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) system. We compare these emission factors with those measured using a roving, point sampling, land-based FTIR and an airborne FTIR that were deployed on the same fires. We also compare to emission factors measured by a similar open-path FTIR system deployed on savanna fires in Africa. The data suggest that the method in which the smoke is sampled can strongly influence the relative abundance of the emissions that are observed. The airborne FTIR probed the bulk of the emissions, which were lofted in the convection column and the downwind chemistry while the roving ground-based point sampling FTIR measured the contribution of individual residual smoldering combustion fuel elements scattered throughout the burn site. The open-path FTIR provided a fixed path-integrated sample of emissions produced directly upwind mixed with emissions that were redirected by wind gusts, or right after ignition and before the adjacent plume achieved significant vertical development. It typically probed two distinct combustion regimes, “flaming-like” (immediately after adjacent ignition) and “smoldering-like”, denoted “early” and “late”, respectively. The calculated emission factors from open-path measurements were closer to the airborne than to the point measurements, but this could vary depending on the calculation method or from fire to fire given the changing MCE and dynamics over the duration of a typical burn. The emission factors for species whose emissions are not highly fuel dependent (e.g. CH4 and

  18. Multiple Manifold Clustering Using Curvature Constrained Path

    PubMed Central

    Babaeian, Amir; Bayestehtashk, Alireza; Bandarabadi, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    The problem of multiple surface clustering is a challenging task, particularly when the surfaces intersect. Available methods such as Isomap fail to capture the true shape of the surface near by the intersection and result in incorrect clustering. The Isomap algorithm uses shortest path between points. The main draw back of the shortest path algorithm is due to the lack of curvature constrained where causes to have a path between points on different surfaces. In this paper we tackle this problem by imposing a curvature constraint to the shortest path algorithm used in Isomap. The algorithm chooses several landmark nodes at random and then checks whether there is a curvature constrained path between each landmark node and every other node in the neighborhood graph. We build a binary feature vector for each point where each entry represents the connectivity of that point to a particular landmark. Then the binary feature vectors could be used as a input of conventional clustering algorithm such as hierarchical clustering. We apply our method to simulated and some real datasets and show, it performs comparably to the best methods such as K-manifold and spectral multi-manifold clustering. PMID:26375819

  19. Conformational change path between closed and open forms of C2 domain of coagulation factor V on a two-dimensional free-energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sangwook; Lee, Chang Jun; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2009-04-01

    We test a hypothesis that the closed form of the C2 domain of coagulation factor V is more stable than the open form in an aqueous environment using a two-dimensional free-energy calculation with a simple dielectric solvent model. Our result shows that while the free-energy difference between two forms is small, favoring the closed form, a two-dimensional free-energy surface (FES) reveals that a transition state (1.53 kcal/mol) exists between the two conformations. By mapping the one-dimensional order parameter ΔQ onto the two-dimensional FES, we search the conformational change path with the highest Boltzmann weighting factor between the closed and open form of the factor V C2 domain. The predicted transition path from the closed to open form is not that of simple side chain movements, but instead concerted movements of several loops. We also present a one-dimensional free-energy profile using a collective order parameter, which in a coarse manner locates the energy barriers found on the two-dimensional FES.

  20. Increasing the quantitative credibility of open-path Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic data, with focus on several properties of the background spectrum.

    PubMed

    Shao, Limin; Wang, Wanping; Griffiths, Peter R; Leytem, April B

    2013-03-01

    The choice of the type of background spectrum affects the credibility of open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP/FT-IR) data, and consequently, the quality of data analysis. We systematically investigated several properties of the background spectrum. The results show that a short-path background measured with the lowest amplifier gain could significantly reduce noise in the calculated absorbance spectrum, by at least 30% in our case. We demonstrated that by using a short-path background, data analysis is more resistant to interferences such as wavenumber shift or resolution alteration that occurs as a consequence of aging hardware or misalignment. We discussed a systematic error introduced into quantitative analyses by the short-path background and developed a procedure to correct that error. With this correction approach, a short-path background established five years ago was still found to be valid. By incorporating these findings into the protocol for quantitative analysis, we processed the measurements with two OP/FT-IR instruments set up side by side in the vicinity of a large dairy farm, to monitor NH3, CH4, and N2O. The two sets of calculated concentrations showed high agreement with each other. The findings of our investigations are helpful to atmospheric monitoring practitioners of OP/FT-IR spectroscopy and could also be a reference for future amendments to the protocols outlined in the guidelines of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the American Society for Testing and Materials, and the European Committee for Standardization.

  1. Fast-response CO2 mixing-ratio measurement with an open-path gas analyzer for eddy-flux applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, I.

    2014-12-01

    Infra-red gas analyzers operate on the principle of light absorption and measure the density of the gas in the sensing path. To account for density fluctuations caused by barometric pressure, thermal expansion and contraction, and water-vapor dilution, flux calculations using CO2 density measurements need to be corrected for sensible and latent heat transfer (also known as WPL corrections). In contrast, these corrections are not required if the flux calculation involves CO2 mixing ratio relative to dry air. Historically, CO2 mixing ratio measurements have been available only for analyzers with a closed-path where temperature fluctuations in the air sample are attenuated in the intake tubing to a level that they are adequately measured by a contact thermometer. Open-path gas analyzers are not able to make in situ CO2 mixing-ratio measurements because of the unavailability of a reliable, accurate and fast-response air-temperature sensor in the optical path. A newly developed eddy-flux system integrates an aerodynamic open-path gas analyzer with a sonic anemometer where the sensing volumes of the two instruments coincide. Thus the system has the ability to provide temporally and spatially synchronized fast-response measurements of the 3D wind vector, sonically derived air temperature, CO2 and water vapor densities. When these measurements are combined with a fast-response static pressure measurement an instantaneous in-situ CO2 mixing ratio can be calculated on-line, eliminating the need for density corrections in post-processing. In this study fluxes computed from CO2 mixing-ratio are compared to WPL corrected fluxes using CO2 density. Results from a field inter-comparison with an aspirated temperature probe suggest that accurate, fast response air temperature can be derived from humidity-corrected speed of sound measurements. Biases due to heat exchange with the analyzer surface are evaluated by comparing atmospheric sensible heat flux measurements with a

  2. Mobile mapping and eddy covariance flux measurements of NH3 emissions from cattle feedlots with a portable laser-based open-path sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Pan, D.; Golston, L.; Stanton, L. G.; Ham, J. M.; Shonkwiler, K. B.; Nash, C.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the dominant alkaline species in the atmosphere and an important compound in the global nitrogen cycle. There is a large uncertainty in NH3 emission inventory from agriculture, which is the largest source of NH3, including livestock farming and fertilizer applications. In recent years, a quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based open-path sensor has been developed to provide high-resolution, fast-response and high-sensitivity NH3 measurements. It has a detection limit of 150 pptv with a sample rate up to 20 Hz. This sensor has been integrated into a mobile platform mounted on the roof of a car to perform measurement of multiple trace gases. We have also used the sensor for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. The mobile sensing method provides high spatial resolution and fast mapping of measured gases. Meanwhile, the EC flux method offers accurate flux measurements and resolves the diurnal variability of NH3emissions. During the DISCOVER-AQ and FRAPPÉ field campaigns in 2014, this mobile platform was used to study NH3 emissions from cattle feedlot near Fort Morgan, Colorado. This specific feedlot was mapped multiple times in different days to study the variability of its plume characteristics. At the same time, we set up another open-path NH3 sensor with LICOR open-path sensors to perform EC flux measurements of NH3, CH4 and CO2 simultaneously in the same cattle feedlot as shown in Fig. 1. NH3/CH4 emission flux ratio show a strong temperature dependence from EC flux measurements. The median value of measured NH3 and CH4 emission flux ratio is 0.60 ppmv/ppmv. In contrast, the median value of ΔNH3/ΔCH4 ratios measured from mobile platform is 0.53 ppmv/ppmv for the same farm. The combination of mobile mapping and EC flux measurements with the same open-path sensors greatly improves understanding of NH3 emissions both spatially and temporally.

  3. Compact and portable open-path sensor for simultaneous measurements of atmospheric N2O and CO using a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lei; Sun, Kang; Khan, M Amir; Miller, David J; Zondlo, Mark A

    2012-12-17

    A compact and portable open-path sensor for simultaneous detection of atmospheric N(2)O and CO has been developed with a 4.5 μm quantum cascade laser (QCL). An in-line acetylene (C(2)H(2)) gas reference cell allows for continuous monitoring of the sensor drift and calibration in rapidly changing field environments and thereby allows for open-path detection at high precision and stability. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) is used to detect simultaneously both the second and fourth harmonic absorption spectra with an optimized dual modulation amplitude scheme. Multi-harmonic spectra containing atmospheric N(2)O, CO, and the reference C(2)H(2) signals are fit in real-time (10 Hz) by combining a software-based lock-in amplifier with a computationally fast numerical model for WMS. The sensor consumes ~50 W of power and has a mass of ~15 kg. Precision of 0.15 ppbv N(2)O and 0.36 ppbv CO at 10 Hz under laboratory conditions was demonstrated. The sensor has been deployed for extended periods in the field. Simultaneous N(2)O and CO measurements distinguished between natural and fossil fuel combustion sources of N(2)O, an important greenhouse gas with poorly quantified emissions in space and time.

  4. [Use of open-path TDL technique and the backward Lagrangian stochastic model to monitor ammonia emission from summer maize field].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Liang; Zhu, An-Ning; Zhang, Jia-Bao; Zhang, Yu-Jun; He, Ying; Wang, Li-Ming; Chen, Xiao-Min; Chen, Wen-Chao

    2012-11-01

    The backward Lagrangian stochastic dispersion model in conjunction with open-path tunable diode absorption spectroscopy was used to quantify ammonia emissions from farmland based on the high-temporal resolution data, aiming to provide innovative achievements to diagnose patterns of ammonia flux. The results indicate that the bLS dispersion technique using open-path lasers to measure atmospheric ammonia concentrations is suitable for determining ammonia emissions from farmland continuously, especially for characterizing diurnal characteristics of NH3 emissions. The ammonia emissions have a significant diurnal pattern with two emission peaks from urea applied to maize on a calcareous sandy loam fluvo-aquic soil in the North China Plain. We believe that the first peak starting at approximately 9:00 am is due to NH3 absorbed by the dew re-emission at night as the dew evaporates. The maximum of ammonia flux at 14:00 corresponds to the peak of soil temperature and solar radiation. The ammonia emission increased rapidly, but the duration of emission peaks lasted approximately 4 d. Cumulative NH3 emission was 25.3% of the applied N over the entire measurement period. The NH3 emissions measured with bLS dispersion technique and venting method had certain difference. PMID:23387189

  5. Path Finder

    SciTech Connect

    Rigdon, J. Brian; Smith, Marcus Daniel; Mulder, Samuel A

    2014-01-07

    PathFinder is a graph search program, traversing a directed cyclic graph to find pathways between labeled nodes. Searches for paths through ordered sequences of labels are termed signatures. Determining the presence of signatures within one or more graphs is the primary function of Path Finder. Path Finder can work in either batch mode or interactively with an analyst. Results are limited to Path Finder whether or not a given signature is present in the graph(s).

  6. Open-path TDL-Spectrometry for a Tomographic Reconstruction of 2D H2O-Concentration Fields in the Soil-Air-Boundary-Layer of Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Anne; Wagner, Steven; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2013-04-01

    The melting of permafrost soils in arctic regions is one of the effects of climate change. It is recognized that climatically relevant gases are emitted during the thawing process, and that they may lead to a positive atmospheric feedback [1]. For a better understanding of these developments, a quantification of the gases emitted from the soil would be required. Extractive sensors with local point-wise gas sampling are currently used for this task, but are hampered due to the complex spatial structure of the soil surface, which complicates the situation due to the essential need for finding a representative gas sampling point. For this situation it would be much preferred if a sensor for detecting 2D-concentration fields of e.g. water vapor, (and in the mid-term also for methane or carbon dioxide) directly in the soil-atmosphere-boundary layer of permafrost soils would be available. However, it also has to be kept in mind that field measurements over long time periods in such a harsh environment require very sturdy instrumentation preferably without the need for sensor calibration. Therefore we are currently developing a new, robust TDLAS (tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy)-spectrometer based on cheap reflective foils [2]. The spectrometer is easily transportable, requires hardly any alignment and consists of industrially available, very stable components (e.g. diode lasers and glass fibers). Our measurement technique, open path TDLAS, allows for calibration-free measurements of absolute H2O concentrations. The static instrument for sampling open-path H2O concentrations consists of a joint sending and receiving optics at one side of the measurement path and a reflective element at the other side. The latter is very easy to align, since it is a foil usually applied for traffic purposes that retro-reflects the light to its origin even for large angles of misalignment (up to 60°). With this instrument, we achieved normalized detection limits of up to 0

  7. Time-multiplexed open-path TDLAS spectrometer for dynamic, sampling-free, interstitial H2 18O and H2 16O vapor detection in ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnreich, B.; Wagner, S.; Habig, J. C.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Ebert, V.

    2015-04-01

    An advanced in situ diode laser hygrometer for simultaneous, sampling-free detection of interstitial H2 16O and H2 18O vapor was developed and tested in the aerosol interaction and dynamics in atmosphere (AIDA) cloud chamber during dynamic cloud formation processes. The spectrometer to measure isotope-resolved water vapor concentrations comprises two rapidly time-multiplexed DFB lasers near 1.4 and 2.7 µm and an open-path White cell with 227-m absorption path length and 4-m mirror separation. A dynamic water concentration range from 2.6 ppb to 87 ppm for H2 16O and 87 ppt to 3.6 ppm for H2 18O could be achieved and was used to enable a fast and direct detection of dynamic isotope ratio changes during ice cloud formation in the AIDA chamber at temperatures between 190 and 230 K. Relative changes in the H2 18O/H2 16O isotope ratio of 1 % could be detected and resolved with a signal-to-noise ratio of 7. This converts to an isotope ratio resolution limit of 0.15 % at 1-s time resolution.

  8. Reconstruction of passive open-path FTIR ambient spectra using meteorological measurements and its application for detection of aerosol cloud drift.

    PubMed

    Kira, Oz; Dubowski, Yael; Linker, Raphael

    2015-07-27

    Remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols is of great importance to public and environmental health. This research promotes a simple way of detecting an aerosol cloud using a passive Open Path FTIR (OP-FTIR) system, without utilizing radiative transfer models and without relying on an artificial light source. Meteorological measurements (temperature, relative humidity and solar irradiance), and chemometric methods (multiple linear regression and artificial neural networks) together with previous cloud-free OP-FTIR measurements were used to estimate the ambient spectrum in real time. The cloud detection process included a statistical comparison between the estimated cloud-free signal and the measured OP-FTIR signal. During the study we were able to successfully detect several aerosol clouds (water spray) in controlled conditions as well as during agricultural pesticide spraying in an orchard.

  9. Detection of chemical agents in the atmosphere by open-path FT-IR spectroscopy under conditions of background interference: I. High-frequency flashes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Limin; Roske, Christopher W; Griffiths, Peter R

    2010-06-01

    Open-path FT-IR spectra were measured while fireworks were emitting smoke and incandescent particles into the infrared beam. These conditions were designed to simulate the appearance of smoke and explosions in a battlefield. Diethyl ether was used to simulate the vapor-phase spectra of G agents such as sarin. The measured interferograms were corrected by a high-pass filter and were rejected when interfering features were of such high frequency that they could not be removed by application of this filter. The concentration of diethyl ether was calculated correctly by partial least squares regression in the absence of fireworks but significant errors were encountered when the spectra of the oxide particles were not included in the calibration set. Target factor analysis allowed the presence of the analyte to be detected even when the incandescent particles were present in the beam.

  10. Open-path quantum cascade laser-based system for simultaneous remote sensing of methane, nitrous oxide, and water vapor using chirped-pulse differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Paulo; Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Methane and Nitrous Oxide are long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere with significant global warming effects. We report on application of chirped-pulsed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) to simultaneous measurements of these trace gases in both open-path fence-line and backscatter systems. The intra-pulse thermal frequency chip in a QCL can be time resolved and calibrated to allow for high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral window of the chip, which for a DFB-QCL can be reach ~2cm-1 for a 500 nsec pulse. The spectral line-shape of the output from these lasers are highly stable from pulse to pulse over long period of time (> 1 day), and the system does not require frequent calibrations.

  11. Field measurements of trace gases emitted by prescribed fires in southeastern US pine forests using an open-path FTIR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, S. K.; Burling, I. R.; Mendoza, A.; Johnson, T. J.; Cameron, M.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Weise, D. R.; Reardon, J.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report trace-gas emission factors from three pine-understory prescribed fires in South Carolina, US measured during the fall of 2011. The fires were more intense than many prescribed burns because the fuels included mature pine stands not subjected to prescribed fire in decades that were lit following an extended drought. Emission factors were measured with a fixed open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) system that was deployed on the fire control lines. We compare these emission factors to those measured with a roving, point sampling, land-based FTIR and an airborne FTIR deployed on the same fires. We also compare to emission factors measured by a similar OP-FTIR system deployed on savanna fires in Africa. The data suggest that the method used to sample smoke can strongly influence the relative abundance of the emissions that are observed. The majority of fire emissions were lofted in the convection column and were sampled by the airborne FTIR. The roving, ground-based, point sampling FTIR measured the contribution of individual residual smoldering combustion fuel elements scattered throughout the burn site. The OP-FTIR provided a ~ 30 m path-integrated sample of emissions transported to the fixed path via complex ground-level circulation. The OP-FTIR typically probed two distinct combustion regimes, "flaming-like" (immediately after adjacent ignition and before the adjacent plume achieved significant vertical development) and "smoldering-like." These two regimes are denoted "early" and "late", respectively. The path-integrated sample of the ground-level smoke layer adjacent to the fire from the OP-FTIR provided our best estimate of fire-line exposure to smoke for wildland fire personnel. We provide a table of estimated fire-line exposures for numerous known air toxics based on synthesizing results from several studies. Our data suggest that peak exposures are more likely to challenge permissible exposure limits for wildland fire personnel than shift

  12. Field measurements of trace gases emitted by prescribed fires in southeastern US pine forests using an open-path FTIR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, S. K.; Burling, I. R.; Mendoza, A.; Johnson, T. J.; Cameron, M.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Weise, D. R.; Reardon, J.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2013-07-01

    We report trace-gas emission factors from three pine-understory prescribed fires in South Carolina, US measured during the fall of 2011. The fires were more intense than many prescribed burns because the fuels included mature pine stands not subjected to prescribed fire in decades that were lit following an extended drought. The emission factors were measured with a fixed open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) system that was deployed on the fire control lines. We compare these emission factors to those measured with a roving, point sampling, land-based FTIR and an airborne FTIR that were deployed on the same fires. We also compare to emission factors measured by a similar OP-FTIR system deployed on savanna fires in Africa. The data suggest that the method used to sample smoke can strongly influence the relative abundance of the emissions that are observed. The majority of the fire emissions were lofted in the convection column and they were sampled by the airborne FTIR along with the downwind chemistry. The roving, ground-based, point sampling FTIR measured the contribution of actively located individual residual smoldering combustion fuel elements scattered throughout the burn site. The OP-FTIR provided a ~30 m path-integrated sample of emissions transported to the fixed path via complex ground-level circulation. The OP-FTIR typically probed two distinct combustion regimes, "flaming-like" (immediately after adjacent ignition and before the adjacent plume achieved significant vertical development) and "smoldering-like." These two regimes are denoted "early" and "late", respectively. The emission factors from all three systems were plotted versus modified combustion efficiency and for some species (e.g. CH4 and CH3OH) they fit a single trend suggesting that the different emission factors for these species were mainly due to the specific mix of flaming and smoldering that each system sampled. For other species, the different fuels sampled also likely

  13. A proof of principle spheromak experiment: The next step on a recently opened path to economical fusion power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, Thomas; Marklin, George; Nelson, Brian; Sutherland, Derek; HIT Team Team

    2013-10-01

    A proof of principle experiment to study closed-flux energy confinement of a spheromak sustained by imposed dynamo current drive is described. A two-fluid validated NIMROD code has simulated closed-flux sustainment on a stable spheromak using imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD), demonstrating that dynamo current drive is compatible with closed flux. (submitted for publication and see adjacent poster.(spsap)) HIT-SI, a = 0.25 m, has achieved 90 kA of toroidal current, current gains of nearly 4, and operation from 5.5 kHz to 68 kHz, demonstrating the robustness of the method.(spsap) Finally, a reactor design study using fusion technology developed for ITER and modern nuclear technology shows a design that is economically superior to coal.(spsap) The spheromak reactor and development path are about a factor of 10 less expensive than that of the tokamak/stellarator. These exciting results justify a proof of principle (PoP) confinement experiment of a spheromak sustained by IDCD. Such an experiment (R = 1.5 m, a = 1 m, Itor = 3 . 2 MA, n = 4e19/m3, T = 3 keV) is described in detail.

  14. Curved paths in raptor flight: Deterministic models.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, John W

    2006-10-21

    Two deterministic models for flight of Peregrine Falcons and possibly other raptors as they approach their prey are examined mathematically. Both models make two assumptions. The first, applicable to both models, is that the angle of sight between falcon and prey is constant, consistent with observations that the falcon keeps its head straight during flight and keeps on course by use of the deep foveal region in its eye which allows maximum acuity at an angle of sight of about 45 degrees . The second assumption for the first model (conical spiral), is that the initial direction of flight determines the overall path. For the second model (flight constrained to a tilted plane), a parameter that fixes the orientation of the plane is required. A variational calculation also shows that the tilted plane flight path is the shortest total path, and, consequently, the conical spiral is another shortest total path. Numerical calculations indicate that the flight paths for the two models are very similar for the experimental conditions under which observations have been made. However, the angles of flight and bank differ significantly. More observations are needed to investigate the applicability of the two models.

  15. An Open-Path Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Measurement of Greenhouse Gases at the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research Site near Fairbanks, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, D. M.; Adkins, E. M.; Miller, J. H. H.

    2015-12-01

    Permafrost makes up one-quarter of the Earth's terrestrial surface and, as global temperatures continue to increase, it is at risk of thawing. Thawing permafrost has the potential to release twice the amount of carbon than is currently in the atmosphere. A multi-year field campaign has begun in collaboration with the University of Alaska - Fairbanks, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and our group at George Washington University to study carbon feedbacks during a springtime thaw at the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Here we present initial results from our near-infrared open-path instrument for the detection of ambient concentrations of carbon dioxide (in subsequent field campaigns a second channel for methane detection will be added). The optics launch-box portion of the instrument couples a near-infrared distributed feedback laser operating near 1605 nm for carbon detection with a visible laser for alignment purposes. The outgoing beam is directed through a 3.2-mm hole in a parabolic mirror and the launch-box is oriented using a two axis, alt-azi telescope mount so that the beam will hit the retroreflector target at a set distance downfield. The beam then retraces the path back to the launch-box where the light is collected on the surface of the parabolic mirror and focused onto a multi-mode fiber for detection. Using a National Instruments data acquisition system we are able to collect 500 scans per second which allows for long-term data averaging and subsequently increases the signal-to-noise ratio of our signal. The entire system has the ability to run on less than 40 W of power. In June 2015, the instrument was deployed to a thermokarst collapse scar bog in the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest. With a 90 meter total pathlength we were able to resolve carbon dioxide absorption signals on the order of 0.5%.

  16. On the importance of high-frequency air-temperature fluctuations for spectroscopic corrections of open-path carbon dioxide flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Helbig, Manuel; Sonnentag, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    A growing number of studies report systematic differences in CO2 flux estimates obtained with the two main types of gas analyzers: compared to eddy-covariance systems based on closed-path (CP) gas analyzers, systems with open-path (OP) gas analyzers systematically overestimate CO2 uptake during daytime periods with high positive sensible heat fluxes, while patterns for differences in nighttime CO2 exchange are less obvious. These biases have been shown to correlate with the sign and the magnitude of the sensible heat flux and to introduce large uncertainties when calculating annual CO2 budgets. In general, CP and OP gas analyzers commonly used to measure the CO2 density in the atmosphere operate on the principle of infrared light absorption approximated by Beer-Lambert's law. Non-dispersive interference-based optical filter elements are used to select spectral bands with strong attenuation of light transmission, characteristic to the gas of interest. The intensity of the light passing through the optical sensing path depends primarily on the amount of absorber gas in the measurement volume. Besides the density of the gas, barometric pressure and air temperature are additional factors affecting the strength and the half-width of the absorption lines. These so-called spectroscopic effects are accounted for by measuring barometric pressure and air temperature in the sensing path and scaling the light-intensity measurements before applying the calibration equation. This approach works well for CP gas analyzers with an intake tube that acts as a low-pass filter on fast air-temperature fluctuations. Low-frequency response temperature sensors in the measurement cell are therefore sufficient to account for spectroscopic temperature effects. In contrast, OP gas analyzers are exposed to high-frequency air-temperature fluctuations associated with the atmospheric surface-layer turbulent heat exchange. If not corrected adequately, these fast air-temperature variations can cause

  17. Path ANalysis

    2007-07-14

    The PANL software determines path through an Adversary Sequence Diagram (ASD) with minimum Probability of Interruption, P(I), given the ASD information and data about site detection, delay, and response force times. To accomplish this, the software generates each path through the ASD, then applies the Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption (EASI) methodology for calculating P(I) to each path, and keeps track of the path with the lowest P(I). Primary use is for training purposes duringmore » courses on physical security design. During such courses PANL will be used to demonstrate to students how more complex software codes are used by the US Department of Energy to determine the most-vulnerable paths and, where security needs improvement, how such codes can help determine physical security upgrades.« less

  18. Path ANalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Mark K.

    2007-07-14

    The PANL software determines path through an Adversary Sequence Diagram (ASD) with minimum Probability of Interruption, P(I), given the ASD information and data about site detection, delay, and response force times. To accomplish this, the software generates each path through the ASD, then applies the Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption (EASI) methodology for calculating P(I) to each path, and keeps track of the path with the lowest P(I). Primary use is for training purposes during courses on physical security design. During such courses PANL will be used to demonstrate to students how more complex software codes are used by the US Department of Energy to determine the most-vulnerable paths and, where security needs improvement, how such codes can help determine physical security upgrades.

  19. Use of open-path FTIR and inverse dispersion technique to quantify gaseous nitrogen loss from an intensive vegetable production site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei; Suter, Helen; Lam, Shu Kee; Sun, Jianlei; Chen, Deli

    2014-09-01

    An open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopic technique in combination with a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) dispersion model (WindTrax) can be used to simultaneously measure gaseous emissions of N2O, NH3, CH4 and CO2. We assessed the capability of this technique for measuring NH3 and N2O emissions following the application of calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2), Nitrophoska (NPK) and chicken manure on a celery farm at Boneo, Victoria, during April and May 2013. We found that the OP-FTIR/WindTrax method was able to measure the diurnal variation in NH3 flux from the field site following application of chicken manure with measured emissions ranging from approximately 0.1-9.8 kg NH3-N ha-1 day-1. The OP-FTIR/WindTrax method also detected a diurnal variation in N2O flux of 1.5-6.2 kg N2O-N ha-1 day-1 and N2O flux increased in response to application of the Ca(NO3)2. We concluded that the OP-FTIR/WindTrax technique can quantify gaseous N loss from vegetable production systems.

  20. Dynamic real-time monitoring of chloroform in an indoor swimming pool air using open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, M-J; Duh, J-M; Shie, R-H; Weng, J-H; Hsu, H-T

    2016-06-01

    This study used open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy to continuously assess the variation in chloroform concentrations in the air of an indoor swimming pool. Variables affecting the concentrations of chloroform in air were also monitored. The results showed that chloroform concentrations in air varied significantly during the time of operation of the swimming pool and that there were two peaks in chloroform concentration during the time of operation of the pool. The highest concentration was at 17:30, which is coincident with the time with the highest number of swimmers in the pool in a day. The swimmer load was one of the most important factors influencing the chloroform concentration in the air. When the number of swimmers surpassed 40, the concentrations of chloroform were on average 4.4 times higher than the concentration measured without swimmers in the pool. According to the results of this study, we suggest that those who swim regularly should avoid times with highest number of swimmers, in order to decrease the risk of exposure to high concentrations of chloroform. It is also recommended that an automatic mechanical ventilation system is installed to increase the ventilation rate during times of high swimmer load.

  1. A critical examination of stoichiometric and path-finding approaches to metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Planes, Francisco J; Beasley, John E

    2008-09-01

    Advances in the field of genomics have enabled computational analysis of metabolic pathways at the genome scale. Singular attention has been devoted in the literature to stoichiometric approaches, and path-finding approaches, to metabolic pathways. Stoichiometric approaches make use of reaction stoichiometry when trying to determine metabolic pathways. Stoichiometric approaches involve elementary flux modes and extreme pathways. In contrast, path-finding approaches propose an alternative view based on graph theory in which reaction stoichiometry is not considered. Path-finding approaches use shortest path and k-shortest path concepts. In this article we give a critical overview of the theory, applications and key research challenges of stoichiometric and path-finding approaches to metabolic pathways. PMID:18436574

  2. Inter-Domain Redundancy Path Computation Methods Based on PCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Rie; Oki, Eiji; Shiomoto, Kohei

    This paper evaluates three inter-domain redundancy path computation methods based on PCE (Path Computation Element). Some inter-domain paths carry traffic that must be assured of high quality and high reliability transfer such as telephony over IP and premium virtual private networks (VPNs). It is, therefore, important to set inter-domain redundancy paths, i. e. primary and secondary paths. The first scheme utilizes an existing protocol and the basic PCE implementation. It does not need any extension or modification. In the second scheme, PCEs make a virtual shortest path tree (VSPT) considering the candidates of primary paths that have corresponding secondary paths. The goal is to reduce blocking probability; corresponding secondary paths may be found more often after a primary path is decided; no protocol extension is necessary. In the third scheme, PCEs make a VSPT considering all candidates of primary and secondary paths. Blocking probability is further decreased since all possible candidates are located, and the sum of primary and secondary path cost is reduced by choosing the pair with minimum cost among all path pairs. Numerical evaluations show that the second and third schemes offer only a few percent reduction in blocking probability and path pair total cost, while the overheads imposed by protocol revision and increase of the amount of calculation and information to be exchanged are large. This suggests that the first scheme, the most basic and simple one, is the best choice.

  3. N2O fluxes over a corn field from an open-path, laser-based eddy covariance system and static chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, L.; Pan, D.; Gelfand, I.; Abraha, M.; Moyer, R.; Poe, A.; Sun, K.; Robertson, P.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gase. Although many efforts have been paid to N2O emissions, the spatial and temporal variability of N2O emissions still subject to large uncertainty. Application of the eddy covariance method for N2O emissions research would allow continuous ecosystem level flux measurements. The caveat, however, is need for high precision and high frequency measurements in field. In this study, an open-path, quantum cascade-laser-based eddy covariance N2O sensor has been deployed nearly continuously since May 2015 over a corn field at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station site in SW Michigan. The field precision of the N2O sensor was assessed to be 0.1 ppbv at 10 Hz, and the total consumption was ~ 40 W, allowing the system to be powered solely by solar panels. The stability of the sensor under different temperature and humidity was tested within an environmental chamber. Spectroscopic experiments and cospectra analyses were carried out to study specific corrections associated with the sensor for eddy covariance techniques, including the line broadening effect due to water vapor and high frequency flux attenuation owning to sample path averaging. Ogive analyses indicated that the high-frequency N2O flux loss due to various damping effects was comparable to those of the CO2 flux. The detection limit of flux was estimated to be 0.3 ng N s-1 m-2 with a flux averaging interval of 30 minutes. The results from the EC system were also compared with ground measurements by standard static chambers (SC). Overall, more than 150 individual chamber measurements were taken within the footprint of the EC system. We found good correlation between the EC and SC methods given the spatiotemporal differences between the two techniques (R2 = 0.75). Both methods detected increased emissions during afternoon as compared to morning and night hours. Differences between EC and SC were also studied by investigating spatial variability with a

  4. An Open-Path Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Measurement of Greenhouse Gases at the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research Site near Fairbanks, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, D. Michelle; Adkins, Erin; Miller, Houston

    2016-04-01

    Permafrost makes up one-quarter of the Earth's terrestrial surface and, as global temperatures continue to increase, it is at risk of thawing. Thawing permafrost has the potential to release twice the amount of carbon than is currently in the atmosphere. A multi-year field campaign has begun in collaboration with the University of Alaska - Fairbanks, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and our group at George Washington University to study carbon feedbacks during a springtime thaw at the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Here we present initial results from our near-infrared open-path instrument for the detection of ground-level concentrations of carbon dioxide (in subsequent field campaigns a second channel for methane detection will be added). The optics launch-box portion of the instrument couples a near-infrared distributed feedback laser operating near 1605 nm for carbon dioxide detection with a visible laser for alignment purposes. The outgoing beam is directed through a 3.2-mm hole in a parabolic mirror and the launch-box is oriented using a two axis, alt-azi telescope mount so that the beam will hit the retroreflector target at a set distance downfield. The beam then retraces the path back to the launch-box where the light is collected on the surface of the parabolic mirror and focused onto a multi-mode fiber for detection. Using a National Instruments data acquisition system we are able to collect 500 scans per second which allows for long-term data averaging and subsequently increases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of our signal. In June 2015, the instrument was deployed to a thermokarst collapse scar bog in the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest. With a 90 meter total pathlength we were able to resolve carbon dioxide absorption signals on the order of 0.5% utilizing direct-absorption spectroscopy. We also present the lab-scale implementation of wavelength modulation spectroscopy to increase the sensitivity of our

  5. An Open-Path Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Measurement of Greenhouse Gases at the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research Site near Fairbanks, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, D. Michelle; Adkins, Erin; Miller, Houston

    2016-04-01

    Permafrost makes up one-quarter of the Earth's terrestrial surface and, as global temperatures continue to increase, it is at risk of thawing. Thawing permafrost has the potential to release twice the amount of carbon than is currently in the atmosphere. A multi-year field campaign has begun in collaboration with the University of Alaska - Fairbanks, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and our group at George Washington University to study carbon feedbacks during a springtime thaw at the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Here we present initial results from our near-infrared open-path instrument for the detection of ground-level concentrations of carbon dioxide (in subsequent field campaigns a second channel for methane detection will be added). The optics launch-box portion of the instrument couples a near-infrared distributed feedback laser operating near 1605 nm for carbon dioxide detection with a visible laser for alignment purposes. The outgoing beam is directed through a 3.2-mm hole in a parabolic mirror and the launch-box is oriented using a two axis, alt-azi telescope mount so that the beam will hit the retroreflector target at a set distance downfield. The beam then retraces the path back to the launch-box where the light is collected on the surface of the parabolic mirror and focused onto a multi-mode fiber for detection. Using a National Instruments data acquisition system we are able to collect 500 scans per second which allows for long-term data averaging and subsequently increases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of our signal. In June 2015, the instrument was deployed to a thermokarst collapse scar bog in the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest. With a 90 meter total pathlength we were able to resolve carbon dioxide absorption signals on the order of 0.5% utilizing direct-absorption spectroscopy. We also present the lab-scale implementation of wavelength modulation spectroscopy to increase the sensitivity of our

  6. Tracing path-guided apparent motion in human primary visual cortex V1.

    PubMed

    Akselrod, Michel; Herzog, Michael H; Öğmen, Haluk

    2014-08-14

    Vision is a constructive process. For example, a square, flashed at two distinct locations one after the other, appears to move smoothly between the two locations rather than as two separate flashes (apparent motion). Apparent motion is usually perceived along the shortest path between locations. Previous studies have shown that retinotopic activity in V1 correlates well with the subjective filling-in in apparent motion. If V1 activity truly reflects illusory motion, it should flexibly reflect filling-in of any path, subjectively perceived. Here, we used a path-guided apparent motion paradigm in which a faint cue, presented in addition to the squares, leads to a curved illusory motion path. We found retinotopic activity in V1 to reflect the illusory filling-in of the curved path, similarly to filling-in with linear, shortest paths. Moreover, our results show that activity along the linear path was less selective to stimulus conditions than the activity along the curved path. This finding may be interpreted as V1 activity representing a small subset of infinitely many possible solutions to ambiguous stimuli, whilst giving more weight to the shortest path/energy solution.

  7. New emission factors for Australian vegetation fires measured using open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy - Part 2: Australian tropical savanna fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. E. L.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Meyer, C. P.; Cook, G. D.; Maier, S. W.; Russell-Smith, J.; Wooster, M. J.; Yates, C. P.

    2014-10-01

    Savanna fires contribute approximately 40-50% of total global annual biomass burning carbon emissions. Recent comparisons of emission factors from different savanna regions have highlighted the need for a regional approach to emission factor development, and better assessment of the drivers of the temporal and spatial variation in emission factors. This paper describes the results of open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopic field measurements at 21 fires occurring in the tropical savannas of the Northern~Territory, Australia, within different vegetation assemblages and at different stages of the dry season. Spectra of infrared light passing through a long (22-70 m) open-path through ground-level smoke released from these fires were collected using an infrared lamp and a field-portable FTIR system. The IR spectra were used to retrieve the mole fractions of 14 different gases present within the smoke, and these measurements used to calculate the emission ratios and emission factors of the various gases emitted by the burning. Only a handful of previous emission factor measures are available specifically for the tropical savannas of Australia and here we present the first reported emission factors for methanol, acetic acid, and formic acid for this biome. Given the relatively large sample size, it was possible to study the potential causes of the within-biome variation of the derived emission factors. We find that the emission factors vary substantially between different savanna vegetation assemblages; with a majority of this variation being mirrored by variations in the modified combustion efficiency (MCE) of different vegetation classes. We conclude that a significant majority of the variation in the emission factor for trace gases can be explained by MCE, irrespective of vegetation class, as illustrated by variations in the calculated methane emission factor for different vegetation classes using data sub-set by different combustion efficiencies

  8. New emission factors for Australian vegetation fires measured using open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy - Part 2: Australian tropical savanna fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. E. L.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Meyer, C. P.; Cook, G. D.; Maier, S. W.; Russell-Smith, J.; Wooster, M. J.; Yates, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    Savanna fires contribute approximately 40-50% of total global annual biomass burning carbon emissions. Recent comparisons of emission factors from different savanna regions have highlighted the need for a regional approach to emission factor development, and better assessment of the drivers of the temporal and spatial variation in emission factors. This paper describes the results of open-path Fourier Transform Infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopic field measurements at twenty-one fires occurring in the tropical savannas of the Northern Territory, Australia, within different vegetation assemblages and at different stages of the dry season. Spectra of infrared light passing through a long (22-70 m) open-path through ground-level smoke released from these fires were collected using an infrared lamp and a field-portable FTIR system. The IR spectra were used to retrieve the mole fractions of fourteen different gases present within the smoke, and these measurements used to calculate the emission ratios and emission factors of the various gases emitted by the burning. Only a handful of previous emission factor measures are available specifically for the tropical savannas of Australia and here we present the first reported emission factors for methanol, acetic acid, and formic acid for this biome. Given the relatively large sample size, it was possible to study the potential causes of the within-biome variation of the derived emission factors. We find that the emission factors vary substantially between different savanna vegetation assemblages; with a majority of this variation being mirrored by variations in the modified combustion efficiency (MCE) of different vegetation classes. We conclude that a significant majority of the variation in the emission factor for trace gases can be explained by MCE, irrespective of vegetation class, as illustrated by variations in the calculated methane emission factor for different vegetation classes using data subsetted by different

  9. A two-laser beam technique for improving the sensitivity of low frequency open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (OP-TDLAS) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Isra'a. Lateef

    Open path tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (OP-TDLAS) is a promising technique that is proposed for detecting low concentrations of possible biogenic gases on Mars. This technique determines the concentration of a gas by measuring the amount of laser light absorbed by molecules at a specific wavelength that is characteristic of those molecules. One of the major factors limiting sensitivity in the OP-TDLAS systems is noise. At low modulation frequencies, 1/f noise usually dominates. This 1/f noise is minimized in many spectroscopy systems by use of high frequency techniques. However, these methods use complex instruments that include reference cells and other devices for calibration, making them relatively large and bulky. We have built a spectroscopy system for space applications that requires small, low mass and low power instrumentation, making the high frequency techniques unsuitable. This work explores a new technique that uses a two-laser beam to reduce the affect of 1/f noise and increase the signal strength for measurements made at lower frequencies. The two lasers are excited at slightly different frequencies. An algorithm is used to estimate the total noise in the second harmonic from the combined spectra of both lasers. This noise is subtracted from the signal to give a more accurate measurement of gas concentration. The error in estimation of 1/f noise is negligible as it corresponds to noise level made at much higher frequencies. Experimental results using ammonia gas and two lasers operating at 500 and 510 Hz respectively shows that this technique reduces the effect of 1/f noise by 1/3 its normal value. Furthermore, the error in estimation of gas concentration is also reduced.

  10. Challenges in atmospheric monitoring of areal emission sources - an Open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopic experience report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetze, C.; Sauer, U.; Dietrich, P.

    2015-12-01

    Reliable detection and assessment of near-surface CO2 emissions from natural or anthropogenic sources require the application of various monitoring tools at different spatial scales. Especially, optical remote sensing tools for atmospheric monitoring have the potential to measure integrally CO2 emissions over larger scales (> 10.000m2). Within the framework of the MONACO project ("Monitoring approach for geological CO2 storage sites using a hierarchical observation concept"), an integrative hierarchical monitoring concept was developed and validated at different field sites with the aim to establish a modular observation strategy including investigations in the shallow subsurface, at ground surface level and the lower atmospheric boundary layer. The main aims of the atmospheric monitoring using optical remote sensing were the observation of the gas dispersion in to the near-surface atmosphere, the determination of maximum concentration values and identification of the main challenges associated with the monitoring of extended emission sources with the proposed methodological set up under typical environmental conditions. The presentation will give an overview about several case studies using the integrative approach of Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (OP FTIR) in combination with in situ measurements. As a main result, the method was validated as possible approach for continuous monitoring of the atmospheric composition, in terms of integral determination of GHG concentrations and to identify target areas which are needed to be investigated more in detail. Especially the data interpretation should closely consider the micrometeorological conditions. Technical aspects concerning robust equipment, experimental set up and fast data processing algorithms have to be taken into account for the enhanced automation of atmospheric monitoring.

  11. A two-laser beam technique for improving the sensitivity of low frequency open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (OP-TDLAS) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Israa L.; Anderson, Gary T.; Chen, Youhua

    2013-09-01

    Open path tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (OP-TDLAS) is a promising technique to detect low concentrations of possible biogenic gases on Mars. This technique finds the concentration of a gas by measuring the amount of laser light absorbed by gaseous molecules at a specific wavelength. One of the major factors limiting sensitivity in the TDLAS systems operating at low modulation frequencies is 1/f noise. 1/f noise is minimized in many spectroscopy systems by the use of high frequency modulation techniques. However, these techniques require complex instruments that include reference cells and other devices for calibration, making them relatively large and bulky. We are developing a spectroscopy system for space applications that requires small, low mass and low power instrumentation, making the high frequency techniques unsuitable. This paper explores a new technique using two-laser beam to reduce the affect of 1/f noise and increase the signal strength for measurements made at lower frequencies. The two lasers are excited at slightly different frequencies. An algorithm is used to estimate the noise in the second harmonic from the combined spectra of both lasers. This noise is subtracted from the signal to give a more accurate measurement of gas concentration. The error in estimation of 1/f noise is negligible as it corresponds to noise level made at much higher frequencies. Simulation results using ammonia gas and two lasers operating at 500 and 510 Hz respectively shows that this technique is able to decrease the error in estimation of gas concentration to 1/6 its normal value.

  12. Route choices of transport bicyclists: a comparison of actually used and shortest routes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite evidence that environmental features are related to physical activity, the association between the built environment and bicycling for transportation remains a poorly investigated subject. The aim of the study was to improve our understanding of the environmental determinants of bicycling as a means of transportation in urban European settings by comparing the spatial differences between the routes actually used by bicyclists and the shortest possible routes. Methods In the present study we examined differences in the currently used and the shortest possible bicycling routes, with respect to distance, type of street, and environmental characteristics, in the city of Graz, Austria. The objective measurement methods of a Global Positioning System (GPS) and a Geographic Information System (GIS) were used. Results Bicycling routes actually used were significantly longer than the shortest possible routes. Furthermore, the following attributes were also significantly different between the used route compared to the shortest possible route: Bicyclists often used bicycle lanes and pathways, flat and green areas, and they rarely used main roads and crossings. Conclusion The results of the study support our hypothesis that bicyclists prefer bicycle pathways and lanes instead of the shortest possible routes. This underlines the importance of a well-developed bicycling infrastructure in urban communities. PMID:24597725

  13. Metabolic PathFinding: inferring relevant pathways in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Croes, Didier; Couche, Fabian; Wodak, Shoshana J; van Helden, Jacques

    2005-07-01

    Our knowledge of metabolism can be represented as a network comprising several thousands of nodes (compounds and reactions). Several groups applied graph theory to analyse the topological properties of this network and to infer metabolic pathways by path finding. This is, however, not straightforward, with a major problem caused by traversing irrelevant shortcuts through highly connected nodes, which correspond to pool metabolites and co-factors (e.g. H2O, NADP and H+). In this study, we present a web server implementing two simple approaches, which circumvent this problem, thereby improving the relevance of the inferred pathways. In the simplest approach, the shortest path is computed, while filtering out the selection of highly connected compounds. In the second approach, the shortest path is computed on the weighted metabolic graph where each compound is assigned a weight equal to its connectivity in the network. This approach significantly increases the accuracy of the inferred pathways, enabling the correct inference of relatively long pathways (e.g. with as many as eight intermediate reactions). Available options include the calculation of the k-shortest paths between two specified seed nodes (either compounds or reactions). Multiple requests can be submitted in a queue. Results are returned by email, in textual as well as graphical formats (available in http://www.scmbb.ulb.ac.be/pathfinding/).

  14. Challenging of path planning algorithms for autonomous robot in known environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, R. N.; Irwan, N.; Zuraida, Raja Lailatul; Shaharum, Umairah; Hanafi@Omar, Hafiz Mohd

    2014-06-01

    Most of the mobile robot path planning is estimated to reach its predetermined aim through the shortest path and avoiding the obstacles. This paper is a survey on path planning algorithms of various current research and existing system of Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV) where their challenging issues to be intelligent autonomous robot. The focuses are some short reviews on individual papers for UGV in the known environment. Methods and algorithms in path planning for the autonomous robot had been discussed. From the reviews, we obtained that the algorithms proposed are appropriate for some cases such as single or multiple obstacles, static or movement obstacle and optimal shortest path. This paper also describes some pros and cons for every reviewed paper toward algorithms improvement for further work.

  15. Transition paths of Met-enkephalin from Markov state modeling of a molecular dynamics trajectory.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rahul; Cukier, Robert I

    2014-03-20

    Conformational states and their interconversion pathways of the zwitterionic form of the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin (MetEnk) are identified. An explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory is used to construct a Markov state model (MSM) based on dihedral space clustering of the trajectory, and transition path theory (TPT) is applied to identify pathways between open and closed conformers. In the MD trajectory, only four of the eight backbone dihedrals exhibit bistable behavior. Defining a conformer as the string XXXX with X = "+" or "-" denoting, respectively, positive or negative values of a given dihedral angle and obtaining the populations of these conformers shows that only four conformers are highly populated, implying a strong correlation among these dihedrals. Clustering in dihedral space to construct the MSM finds the same four bistable dihedral angles. These state populations are very similar to those found directly from the MD trajectory. TPT is used to obtain pathways, parametrized by committor values, in dihedral state space that are followed in transitioning from closed to open states. Pathway costs are estimated by introducing a kinetics-based procedure that orders pathways from least (shortest) to greater cost paths. The least costly pathways in dihedral space are found to only involve the same XXXX set of dihedral angles, and the conformers accessed in the closed to open transition pathways are identified. For these major pathways, a correlation between reaction path progress (committors) and the end-to-end distance is identified. A dihedral space principal component analysis of the MD trajectory shows that the first three modes capture most of the overall fluctuation, and pick out the same four dihedrals having essentially all the weight in those modes. A MSM based on root-mean-square backbone clustering was also carried out, with good agreement found with dihedral clustering for the static information, but with results that differ

  16. Effects of biased CO2 flux measurements by open-path sensors on the interpretation of CO2 flux dynamics at contrasting ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, Manuel; Humphreys, Elyn; Bogoev, Ivan; Quinton, William L.; Wischnweski, Karoline; Sonnentag, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Long-term measurements of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) are conducted across a global network of flux tower sites. These sites are characterised by varying climatic and vegetation conditions, but also differ in the type of CO2/H2O gas analyser used to obtain NEE. Several studies have observed a systematic bias in measured NEE when comparing open-path (OP) and closed-path (CP) sensors with consistently more negative daytime NEE measurements when using OP sensors, both during the growing and non-growing season. A surface heating correction has been proposed in the literature, but seems not to be universally applicable. Systematic biases in NEE measurements are particularly problematic for synthesis papers and inter-comparison studies between sites where the 'true' NEE is small compared to the potential instrument bias. For example, NEE estimates for boreal forest sites derived from OP sensors show large, ecologically unreasonable winter CO2 uptake. To better understand the causes and the magnitude of this potential bias, we conducted a sensor inter-comparison study at the Mer Bleue peatland near Ottawa, ON, Canada. An eddy covariance system with a CP (LI7000 & GILL R3-50) and an OP sensor (EC150 & CSAT3A) was used. Measurements were made between September 2012 and January 2013 and covered late summer, fall, and winter conditions. Flux calculations were made as consistently as possible to minimise differences due to differing processing procedures (e.g. spectral corrections). The latent (LE, slope of orthogonal linear regression of LEOP on LECP: 1.02 ± 0.01 & intercept: -0.2 ± 0.6 W m-2 and sensible heat fluxes (H, slope of HCSAT3A on HGILL: 0.96 ± 0.01 & intercept: 0.1 ± 0.03 W m-2) did not show any significant bias. However, a significant bias was apparent in the NEE measurements (slope of NEEOP on NEECP: 1.36 ± 0.02 & intercept: -0.1 ± 0.05). The differences between NEEOP and NEECP were linearly related to the magnitude of HCSAT3A with a slope of -0

  17. Trace gas emissions from the production and use of domestic biofuels in Zambia measured by open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertschi, Isaac T.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Ward, Darold E.; Christian, Ted J.; Hao, Wei Min

    2003-07-01

    Domestic biomass fuels (biofuels) were recently estimated to be the second largest source of carbon emissions from global biomass burning. Wood and charcoal provide approximately 90% and 10% of domestic energy in tropical Africa. In September 2000, we used open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy to quantify 18 of the most abundant trace gases emitted by wood and charcoal cooking fires and an earthen charcoal-making kiln in Zambia. These are the first in situ measurements of an extensive suite of trace gases emitted by tropical biofuel burning. We report emission ratios (ER) and emission factors (EF) for (in order of abundance) carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), acetic acid (CH3COOH), methanol (CH3OH), formaldehyde (HCHO), ethene (C2H4), ammonia (NH3), acetylene (C2H2), nitric oxide (NO), ethane (C2H6), phenol (C6H5OH), propene (C3H6), formic acid (HCOOH), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), hydroxyacetaldehyde (HOCH2CHO), and furan (C4H4O). Compared to previous work, our emissions of organic acids and NH3 are 3-6.5 times larger. Another significant finding is that reactive oxygenated organic compounds account for 70-80% of the total nonmethane organic compounds (NMOC). For most compounds, the combined emissions from charcoal production and charcoal burning are larger than the emissions from wood fires by factors of 3-10 per unit mass of fuel burned and ˜2 per unit energy released. We estimate that Zambian savanna fires produce more annual CO2, HCOOH, and NOx than Zambian biofuel use by factors of 2.5, 1.7, and 5, respectively. However, biofuels contribute larger annual emissions of CH4, CH3OH, C2H2, CH3COOH, HCHO, and NH3 by factors of 5.1, 3.9, 2.7, 2.4, 2.2, and 2.0, respectively. Annual CO and C2H4 emissions are approximately equal from both sources. Coupling our data with recent estimates of global biofuel consumption implies that global biomass burning emissions for several compounds are significantly larger than previously

  18. Spatial variability of ammonia and methane dairy emissions in the Central Valley, California with open-path mobile measurements during NASA DISCOVER-AQ 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. J.; Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) is an important fine aerosol gas-phase precursor, with implications for regional air quality and climate change. Atmospheric methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, with high uncertainties in the partitioning of various emission sources. Ammonia and methane agricultural emissions are highly variable in space and time and are highly uncertain, with a lack of widespread, in-situ measurements. We characterize the spatial variability of dairy livestock emissions by performing high resolution (5 Hz), in-situ, on-road mobile measurements of NH3, CH4, CO2, N2O, CO and H2O simultaneously with open-path sensors mounted on a passenger vehicle. This suite of multiple trace gas measurements allows for emission ratio calculations and separation of agricultural, petrochemical and combustion emission signatures. Mobile measurements were performed in the Tulare County dairy farm region (~120 dairy farms sampled downwind) in the Central Valley, California during NASA DISCOVER-AQ in winter 2013. We calculate the ΔNH3/ΔCH4 and ΔNH3/ΔCO2 emission ratios for each dairy farm sampled downwind. Emission plumes from individual farms are isolated based on known dairy farm locations and high resolution (1 km) surface wind field simulations. Background concentrations are subtracted to calculate the emission ratios. We find high spatial variability of ammonia and methane concentrations, with localized maximums of >1 ppmv NH3 downwind of individual dairy farms. The spatial extent of individual farm emission plumes are evaluated for NH3, CH4 and CO2, which all show well-defined enhancements localized to the dairy farms near the roadside (typical sampling proximity of ≤ 50 m). The NH3 concentrations are correlated with the distance from each dairy farm. The observed median concentration within 100 m downwind of the dairy farms is 63 ppbv NH3, with the 95th percentile at 417 ppbv NH3 and decreases to background conditions at ~500 m distance downwind. The

  19. Eddy covariance measurements of NH3 fluxes over a natural grass land with an open-path quantum cascade laser-based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, D.; Benedict, K. B.; Ham, J. M.; Prenni, A. J.; Schichtel, B. A.; Collett, J. L., Jr.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    NH3 is an important component of the bio-atmospheric N cycle with implications for regional air quality, human and ecosystem health degradation, and global climate change. However, measuring NH3 flux is challenging, requiring a sensor with high sensitivity (sub-ppbv), fast response time and the capability to account for NH3 adsorption effects. In this study, we address these issues with an open-path quantum-cascade-based sensor for eddy covariance (EC) measurements. Previously, our EC NH3 sensor was deployed over a feedlot in Colorado in 2013 and 2014, and the results showed the potential of the sensor to measure NH3 emissions from agricultural sources. In the summer of 2015, the sensor was installed at a remote monitoring site in Rocky Mountain National Park to measure NH3 flux over a natural grass land. During the deployment, the precision of the sensor was about 0.15 ppbv at 10 Hz, and the detection limit of the flux was estimated to be 0.7±0.5 ng NH3/s/m2. The cospectra of the NH3 flux closely resembled those of CO2 flux and sensible heat flux measured by a LI-7500 CO2 analyzer and a CSAT3 sonic anemometer. The ogive analyses indicated that the loss of NH3 fluxes due to various damping effects was about 15%. Examining initial results from a few days of measurement, the measured NH3 fluxes appear to have a strong diurnal pattern with local emissions during afternoon, a pattern not previously reported for remote grass land. The pattern is consistent with background NH3 concentration measured by PICARRO NH3 analyzer, although summertime afternoon concentration increases at the site have previously been associated with upslope transport from urban and agricultural regions to the east. The results demonstrate the sensor's capability to measure NH3 flux in low NH3 conditions and also show that more measurements are needed to investigate spatial and temporal variability of NH3 flux.

  20. Path optimization with limited sensing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sung Ha Kim, Seong Jun Zhou, Haomin

    2015-10-15

    We propose a computational strategy to find the optimal path for a mobile sensor with limited coverage to traverse a cluttered region. The goal is to find one of the shortest feasible paths to achieve the complete scan of the environment. We pose the problem in the level set framework, and first consider a related question of placing multiple stationary sensors to obtain the full surveillance of the environment. By connecting the stationary locations using the nearest neighbor strategy, we form the initial guess for the path planning problem of the mobile sensor. Then the path is optimized by reducing its length, via solving a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), while maintaining the complete scan of the environment. Furthermore, we use intermittent diffusion, which converts the ODEs into stochastic differential equations (SDEs), to find an optimal path whose length is globally minimal. To improve the computation efficiency, we introduce two techniques, one to remove redundant connecting points to reduce the dimension of the system, and the other to deal with the entangled path so the solution can escape the local traps. Numerical examples are shown to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Tapped-Hole Vent Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Long helical vent path cools and releases hot pyrotechnical gas that exits along its spiraling threads. Current design uses 1/4-28 threads with outer diameter of stud reduced by 0.025 in. (0.62 mm). To open or close gassampler bottle, pyrotechnic charges on either one side or other of valve cylinder are actuated. Gases vented slowly over long path are cool enough to present no ignition hazard. Vent used to meter flow in refrigeration, pneumaticcontrol, and fluid-control systems by appropriately adjusting size and length of vent path.

  2. On the path-dependence of the open-cell voltage of a galvanic cell involving a ternary or multinary compound with multiple mobile ionic species under multiple chemical potential gradients.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Han-Ill; Martin, Manfred

    2010-11-28

    It is well known that the open-cell voltage (U) of a galvanic cell involving a binary compound, or a multinary compound with a single kind of mobile ionic species, is a state property under a gradient of chemical potential of the mobile component. It is not so transparent, however, whether U is still a state property when involving a ternary or multinary compound with two or more kinds of mobile ions under multiple chemical potential gradients of those mobile components. We clarify this issue with a multinary oxide that conducts oxide ions, protons and electron holes and is exposed to the chemical potential gradients of both water and oxygen. We show that U is path- and history-dependent, and manifests itself along the diffusion paths of the two mobile components H and O under given boundary conditions.

  3. Field determination of biomass burning emission ratios and factors via open-path FTIR spectroscopy and fire radiative power assessment: headfire, backfire and residual smouldering combustion in African savannahs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, M. J.; Freeborn, P. H.; Archibald, S.; Oppenheimer, C.; Roberts, G. J.; Smith, T. E. L.; Govender, N.; Burton, M.; Palumbo, I.

    2011-02-01

    Biomass burning emissions factors are vital to quantifying trace gases releases from vegetation fires. Here we evaluate emissions factors for a series of savannah fires in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa using ground-based open path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and an infrared lamp separated by 150-250 m distance. Molecular abundances along the extended open path are retrieved using a spectral forward model coupled to a non-linear least squares fitting approach. We demonstrate derivation of trace gas column amounts for horizontal paths transecting the width of the advected plume, and find, for example, that CO mixing ratio changes of ~0.001 μmol mol-1 (~10 ppbv) can be detected across the relatively long optical paths used here. We focus analysis on five key compounds whose production is preferential during the pyrolysis (CH2O), flaming (CO2) and smoldering (CO, CH4, NH3) fire phases. We demonstrate that well constrained emissions ratios for these gases to both CO2 and CO can be derived for the backfire, headfire and residual smouldering combustion stages of these savannah fires, from which stage-specific emission factors can then be calculated. Headfires and backfires in general show similar emission ratios and emission factors, but those of the residual smouldering combustion stage can differ substantially (e.g., ERCH4/CO2 up to ~7 times higher than for the flaming stages). The timing of each fire stage was identified via airborne optical and thermal IR imagery and ground-observer reports, with the airborne IR imagery also used to derive estimates of fire radiative energy, thus allowing the relative amount of fuel burned in each stage to be calculated and the "fire averaged" emission ratios and emission factors to be determined. The derived "fire averaged" emission ratios are dominated by the headfire contribution, since the vast majority of the fuel is burned in this stage. Our fire averaged emission ratios and factors for CO2 and CH4

  4. Deterministic Agent-Based Path Optimization by Mimicking the Spreading of Ripples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Ming; Leeson, Mark S; Di Paolo, Ezequiel A; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Inspirations from nature have contributed fundamentally to the development of evolutionary computation. Learning from the natural ripple-spreading phenomenon, this article proposes a novel ripple-spreading algorithm (RSA) for the path optimization problem (POP). In nature, a ripple spreads at a constant speed in all directions, and the node closest to the source is the first to be reached. This very simple principle forms the foundation of the proposed RSA. In contrast to most deterministic top-down centralized path optimization methods, such as Dijkstra's algorithm, the RSA is a bottom-up decentralized agent-based simulation model. Moreover, it is distinguished from other agent-based algorithms, such as genetic algorithms and ant colony optimization, by being a deterministic method that can always guarantee the global optimal solution with very good scalability. Here, the RSA is specifically applied to four different POPs. The comparative simulation results illustrate the advantages of the RSA in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. Thanks to the agent-based and deterministic features, the RSA opens new opportunities to attack some problems, such as calculating the exact complete Pareto front in multiobjective optimization and determining the kth shortest project time in project management, which are very difficult, if not impossible, for existing methods to resolve. The ripple-spreading optimization principle and the new distinguishing features and capacities of the RSA enrich the theoretical foundations of evolutionary computation.

  5. Intercomparing CO2 amounts from dispersion modeling, 1.6 μm differential absorption lidar and open path FTIR at a natural CO2 release at Caldara di Manziana, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queißer, M.; Granieri, D.; Burton, M.; La Spina, A.; Salerno, G.; Avino, R.; Fiorani, L.

    2015-04-01

    We intercompare results of three independent approaches to quantify a vented CO2 release at a strongly non-uniform CO2 Earth degassing at Caldara di Manziana, central Italy. An integrated path differential absorption lidar prototype and a commercial open path FTIR system were measuring column averaged CO2 concentrations in parallel at two different paths. An Eulerian gas dispersion model simulated 3-D CO2 concentration maps in the same area, using in situ CO2 flux input data acquired at 152 different points. Local processes the model does not account for, such as small-scale and short-lived wind eddies, govern CO2 concentrations in the instrument measurement paths. The model, on the other hand, also considers atmospheric effects that are out of the field of view of the instruments. Despite this we find satisfactory agreement between modeled and measured CO2 concentrations under certain meteorological conditions. Under these conditions the results suggest that an Eulerian dispersion model and optical remote sensing can be used as an integrated, complementary monitoring approach for CO2 hazard or leakage assessment. Furthermore, the modeling may assist in evaluating CO2 sensing surveys in the future. CO2 column amounts from differential absorption lidar are in line with those from FTIR for both paths with a mean residual of the time series of 44 and 34 ppm, respectively. This experiment is a fundamental step forward in the deployment of the differential absorption lidar prototype as a highly portable active remote sensing instrument probing vented CO2 emissions, including volcanoes.

  6. Minimum-Risk Path Finding by an Adaptive Amoebal Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Iima, Makoto; Ueda, Tetsuo; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Saigusa, Tetsu; Tero, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Ryo; Showalter, Kenneth

    2007-08-01

    When two food sources are presented to the slime mold Physarum in the dark, a thick tube for absorbing nutrients is formed that connects the food sources through the shortest route. When the light-avoiding organism is partially illuminated, however, the tube connecting the food sources follows a different route. Defining risk as the experimentally measurable rate of light-avoiding movement, the minimum-risk path is exhibited by the organism, determined by integrating along the path. A model for an adaptive-tube network is presented that is in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  7. Going against the flow: finding the optimal path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Julian

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of finding the optimum path of a boat traversing a straight in a current. The path of the shortest time is found using the calculus of variations with the constraint that the boat must land directly opposite to its starting point. We compare the optimal trajectory with that where the boat's local orientation is always directed to the arrival point. When analytical solutions cannot be found we use numerical methods. The level of the exposition is suitable for advanced undergraduate students, graduate students and general physicists.

  8. Double global optimum genetic algorithm-particle swarm optimization-based welding robot path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuewu; Shi, Yingpan; Ding, Dongyan; Gu, Xingsheng

    2016-02-01

    Spot-welding robots have a wide range of applications in manufacturing industries. There are usually many weld joints in a welding task, and a reasonable welding path to traverse these weld joints has a significant impact on welding efficiency. Traditional manual path planning techniques can handle a few weld joints effectively, but when the number of weld joints is large, it is difficult to obtain the optimal path. The traditional manual path planning method is also time consuming and inefficient, and cannot guarantee optimality. Double global optimum genetic algorithm-particle swarm optimization (GA-PSO) based on the GA and PSO algorithms is proposed to solve the welding robot path planning problem, where the shortest collision-free paths are used as the criteria to optimize the welding path. Besides algorithm effectiveness analysis and verification, the simulation results indicate that the algorithm has strong searching ability and practicality, and is suitable for welding robot path planning.

  9. Analyzing methods for path mining with applications in metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Tagore, Somnath; Chowdhury, Nirmalya; De, Rajat K

    2014-01-25

    Metabolomics is one of the key approaches of systems biology that consists of studying biochemical networks having a set of metabolites, enzymes, reactions and their interactions. As biological networks are very complex in nature, proper techniques and models need to be chosen for their better understanding and interpretation. One of the useful strategies in this regard is using path mining strategies and graph-theoretical approaches that help in building hypothetical models and perform quantitative analysis. Furthermore, they also contribute to analyzing topological parameters in metabolome networks. Path mining techniques can be based on grammars, keys, patterns and indexing. Moreover, they can also be used for modeling metabolome networks, finding structural similarities between metabolites, in-silico metabolic engineering, shortest path estimation and for various graph-based analysis. In this manuscript, we have highlighted some core and applied areas of path-mining for modeling and analysis of metabolic networks. PMID:24230973

  10. Trajectory Generation and Path Planning for Autonomous Aerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Shivanjli; Kulczycki, Eric A.; Elfes, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents global path planning algorithms for the Titan aerobot based on user defined waypoints in 2D and 3D space. The algorithms were implemented using information obtained through a planner user interface. The trajectory planning algorithms were designed to accurately represent the aerobot's characteristics, such as minimum turning radius. Additionally, trajectory planning techniques were implemented to allow for surveying of a planar area based solely on camera fields of view, airship altitude, and the location of the planar area's perimeter. The developed paths allow for planar navigation and three-dimensional path planning. These calculated trajectories are optimized to produce the shortest possible path while still remaining within realistic bounds of airship dynamics.

  11. Calculating Least Risk Paths in 3d Indoor Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanclooster, A.; De Maeyer, Ph.; Fack, V.; Van de Weghe, N.

    2013-08-01

    Over the last couple of years, research on indoor environments has gained a fresh impetus; more specifically applications that support navigation and wayfinding have become one of the booming industries. Indoor navigation research currently covers the technological aspect of indoor positioning and the modelling of indoor space. The algorithmic development to support navigation has so far been left mostly untouched, as most applications mainly rely on adapting Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm to an indoor network. However, alternative algorithms for outdoor navigation have been proposed adding a more cognitive notion to the calculated paths and as such adhering to the natural wayfinding behaviour (e.g. simplest paths, least risk paths). These algorithms are currently restricted to outdoor applications. The need for indoor cognitive algorithms is highlighted by a more challenged navigation and orientation due to the specific indoor structure (e.g. fragmentation, less visibility, confined areas…). As such, the clarity and easiness of route instructions is of paramount importance when distributing indoor routes. A shortest or fastest path indoors not necessarily aligns with the cognitive mapping of the building. Therefore, the aim of this research is to extend those richer cognitive algorithms to three-dimensional indoor environments. More specifically for this paper, we will focus on the application of the least risk path algorithm of Grum (2005) to an indoor space. The algorithm as proposed by Grum (2005) is duplicated and tested in a complex multi-storey building. The results of several least risk path calculations are compared to the shortest paths in indoor environments in terms of total length, improvement in route description complexity and number of turns. Several scenarios are tested in this comparison: paths covering a single floor, paths crossing several building wings and/or floors. Adjustments to the algorithm are proposed to be more aligned to the

  12. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  13. Optimization of transport protocols with path-length constraints in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasco, José J.; de La Lama, Marta S.; López, Eduardo; Boettcher, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    We propose a protocol optimization technique that is applicable to both weighted and unweighted graphs. Our aim is to explore by how much a small variation around the shortest-path or optimal-path protocols can enhance protocol performance. Such an optimization strategy can be necessary because even though some protocols can achieve very high traffic tolerance levels, this is commonly done by enlarging the path lengths, which may jeopardize scalability. We use ideas borrowed from extremal optimization to guide our algorithm, which proves to be an effective technique. Our method exploits the degeneracy of the paths or their close-weight alternatives, which significantly improves the scalability of the protocols in comparison to shortest-path or optimal-path protocols, keeping at the same time almost intact the length or weight of the paths. This characteristic ensures that the optimized routing protocols are composed of paths that are quick to traverse, avoiding negative effects in data communication due to path-length increases that can become specially relevant when information losses are present.

  14. Constrained motion control on a hemispherical surface: path planning.

    PubMed

    Berman, Sigal; Liebermann, Dario G; McIntyre, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Surface-constrained motion, i.e., motion constraint by a rigid surface, is commonly found in daily activities. The current work investigates the choice of hand paths constrained to a concave hemispherical surface. To gain insight regarding paths and their relationship with task dynamics, we simulated various control policies. The simulations demonstrated that following a geodesic path (the shortest path between 2 points on a sphere) is advantageous not only in terms of path length but also in terms of motor planning and sensitivity to motor command errors. These stem from the fact that the applied forces lie in a single plane (that of the geodesic path). To test whether human subjects indeed follow the geodesic, and to see how such motion compares to other paths, we recorded movements in a virtual haptic-visual environment from 11 healthy subjects. The task comprised point-to-point motion between targets at two elevations (30° and 60°). Three typical choices of paths were observed from a frontal plane projection of the paths: circular arcs, straight lines, and arcs close to the geodesic path for each elevation. Based on the measured hand paths, we applied k-means blind separation to divide the subjects into three groups and compared performance indicators. The analysis confirmed that subjects who followed paths closest to the geodesic produced faster and smoother movements compared with the others. The "better" performance reflects the dynamical advantages of following the geodesic path and may also reflect invariant features of control policies used to produce such a surface-constrained motion.

  15. Zr4+ doping in Li4Ti5O12 anode for lithium-ion batteries: open Li+ diffusion paths through structural imperfection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Geun; Park, Min-Sik; Hwang, Soo Min; Heo, Yoon-Uk; Liao, Ting; Sun, Ziqi; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Ki Jae; Jeong, Goojin; Kim, Young-Jun; Kim, Jung Ho; Dou, Shi Xue

    2014-05-01

    One-dimensional nanomaterials have short Li(+) diffusion paths and promising structural stability, which results in a long cycle life during Li(+) insertion and extraction processes in lithium rechargeable batteries. In this study, we fabricated one-dimensional spinel Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) nanofibers using an electrospinning technique and studied the Zr(4+) doping effect on the lattice, electronic structure, and resultant electrochemical properties of Li-ion batteries (LIBs). Accommodating a small fraction of Zr(4+) ions in the Ti(4+) sites of the LTO structure gave rise to enhanced LIB performance, which was due to structural distortion through an increase in the average lattice constant and thereby enlarged Li(+) diffusion paths rather than changes to the electronic structure. Insulating ZrO2 nanoparticles present between the LTO grains due to the low Zr(4+) solubility had a negative effect on the Li(+) extraction capacity, however. These results could provide key design elements for LTO anodes based on atomic level insights that can pave the way to an optimal protocol to achieve particular functionalities.

  16. Mobile system for open-path trace gas detection in the mid-infrared using a Raman-shifted Cr:LiSAF source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamsley, Paula R.; Weimer, Carl S.; Applegate, Jeffrey T.; Beaton, Stuart P.; Beyer, Brian S.

    1999-10-01

    Many trace atmospheric gas constituents have optical absorption bands in the 2 - 5 micrometers atmospheric transmission window. Remote sensing of these compounds is possible with an appropriate laser source. We use stimulated Raman scattering in hydrogen to shift pulsed, Cr:LiSAF laser emission from the near infrared to this mid-infrared band. Injection seeding the oscillator with a spectrally narrow, low-power diode laser produces a tunable, spectroscopic grade source. We have combined this laser source with transmitting and receiving optics in order to make double- ended, long-path DIAL measurements. For example, we are able to detect ambient levels of water and methane and trace levels of ethane over a two mile, round-trip path. Spectral control is critical for making these measurements for several reasons. First, the DIAL technique requires a spectrally narrow source to tune across the narrow absorption bands of molecules with absorption features in the 2 - 5 micrometers band. Second, good spectral control allows species-specific detection when there are target species with closely spaced absorption features. Third, strong water vapor and CO2 absorption bands are common throughout the 2 - 5 micrometers band causing large fluctuations in the background transmission. Good spectral control enables species specific detection within this highly variable transmission background.

  17. Analyzing the applicability of the least risk path algorithm in indoor space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanclooster, A.; Viaene, P.; Van de Weghe, N.; Fack, V.; De Maeyer, Ph.

    2013-11-01

    Over the last couple of years, applications that support navigation and wayfinding in indoor environments have become one of the booming industries. However, the algorithmic support for indoor navigation has so far been left mostly untouched, as most applications mainly rely on adapting Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm to an indoor network. In outdoor space, several alternative algorithms have been proposed adding a more cognitive notion to the calculated paths and as such adhering to the natural wayfinding behavior (e.g. simplest paths, least risk paths). The need for indoor cognitive algorithms is highlighted by a more challenged navigation and orientation due to the specific indoor structure (e.g. fragmentation, less visibility, confined areas…). Therefore, the aim of this research is to extend those richer cognitive algorithms to three-dimensional indoor environments. More specifically for this paper, we will focus on the application of the least risk path algorithm of Grum (2005) to an indoor space. The algorithm as proposed by Grum (2005) is duplicated and tested in a complex multi-story building. Several analyses compare shortest and least risk paths in indoor and in outdoor space. The results of these analyses indicate that the current outdoor least risk path algorithm does not calculate less risky paths compared to its shortest paths. In some cases, worse routes have been suggested. Adjustments to the original algorithm are proposed to be more aligned to the specific structure of indoor environments. In a later stage, other cognitive algorithms will be implemented and tested in both an indoor and combined indoor-outdoor setting, in an effort to improve the overall user experience during navigation in indoor environments.

  18. Inferring propagation paths for sparsely observed perturbations on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Massucci, Francesco Alessandro; Wheeler, Jonathan; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Joven, Jorge; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Guimerà, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In a complex system, perturbations propagate by following paths on the network of interactions among the system’s units. In contrast to what happens with the spreading of epidemics, observations of general perturbations are often very sparse in time (there is a single observation of the perturbed system) and in “space” (only a few perturbed and unperturbed units are observed). A major challenge in many areas, from biology to the social sciences, is to infer the propagation paths from observations of the effects of perturbation under these sparsity conditions. We address this problem and show that it is possible to go beyond the usual approach of using the shortest paths connecting the known perturbed nodes. Specifically, we show that a simple and general probabilistic model, which we solved using belief propagation, provides fast and accurate estimates of the probabilities of nodes being perturbed.

  19. Egocentric path integration models and their application to desert arthropods.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Tobias; Rost, Martin; Alt, Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    Path integration enables desert arthropods to find back to their nest on the shortest track from any position. To perform path integration successfully, speeds and turning angles along the preceding outbound path have to be measured continuously and combined to determine an internal global vector leading back home at any time. A number of experiments have given an idea how arthropods might use allothetic or idiothetic signals to perceive their orientation and moving speed. We systematically review the four possible model descriptions of mathematically precise path integration, whereby we favour and elaborate the hitherto not used variant of egocentric cartesian coordinates. Its simple and intuitive structure is demonstrated in comparison to the other models. Measuring two speeds, the forward moving speed and the angular turning rate, and implementing them into a linear system of differential equations provides the necessary information during outbound route, reorientation process and return path. In addition, we propose several possible types of systematic errors that can cause deviations from the correct homeward course. Deviations have been observed for several species of desert arthropods in different experiments, but their origin is still under debate. Using our egocentric path integration model we propose simple error indices depending on path geometry that will allow future experiments to rule out or corroborate certain error types.

  20. Spaces of paths and the path topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Robert J.

    2016-09-01

    The natural topology on the space of causal paths of a space-time depends on the topology chosen on the space-time itself. Here we consider the effect of using the path topology on space-time instead of the manifold topology, and its consequences for how properties of space-time are reflected in the structure of the space of causal paths.

  1. VLBI Observations of the Shortest Orbital Period Black Hole X-Ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paragi, Zsolt; Belloni, Tomaso M.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Miller-Jones, James

    The X-ray transient MAXI J1659-152 was discovered by Swift/BAT and it was initially identified as a GRB. Soon its Galactic origin and binary nature were established. There exists a wealth of multi-wavelength monitoring data for this source, providing a great coverage of the full X-ray transition in this candidate black hole binary system. We obtained two epochs of EVN/e-VLBI and four epochs of VLBA data of MAXI J1659-152 which show evidence for some extended emission in the early phases but -against expectations- no major collimated ejecta during the accretion disk state transition. This might be related to the fact that, with a red dwarf donor star, MAXI J1659-152 is the shortest orbital period black hole X-ray binary system.

  2. A Multilevel Probabilistic Beam Search Algorithm for the Shortest Common Supersequence Problem

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, José E.

    2012-01-01

    The shortest common supersequence problem is a classical problem with many applications in different fields such as planning, Artificial Intelligence and especially in Bioinformatics. Due to its NP-hardness, we can not expect to efficiently solve this problem using conventional exact techniques. This paper presents a heuristic to tackle this problem based on the use at different levels of a probabilistic variant of a classical heuristic known as Beam Search. The proposed algorithm is empirically analysed and compared to current approaches in the literature. Experiments show that it provides better quality solutions in a reasonable time for medium and large instances of the problem. For very large instances, our heuristic also provides better solutions, but required execution times may increase considerably. PMID:23300667

  3. A multilevel probabilistic beam search algorithm for the shortest common supersequence problem.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, José E

    2012-01-01

    The shortest common supersequence problem is a classical problem with many applications in different fields such as planning, Artificial Intelligence and especially in Bioinformatics. Due to its NP-hardness, we can not expect to efficiently solve this problem using conventional exact techniques. This paper presents a heuristic to tackle this problem based on the use at different levels of a probabilistic variant of a classical heuristic known as Beam Search. The proposed algorithm is empirically analysed and compared to current approaches in the literature. Experiments show that it provides better quality solutions in a reasonable time for medium and large instances of the problem. For very large instances, our heuristic also provides better solutions, but required execution times may increase considerably.

  4. Field determination of biomass burning emission ratios and factors via open-path FTIR spectroscopy and fire radiative power assessment: headfire, backfire and residual smouldering combustion in African savannahs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, M. J.; Freeborn, P. H.; Archibald, S.; Oppenheimer, C.; Roberts, G. J.; Smith, T. E. L.; Govender, N.; Burton, M.; Palumbo, I.

    2011-11-01

    Biomass burning emissions factors are vital to quantifying trace gas release from vegetation fires. Here we evaluate emissions factors for a series of savannah fires in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa using ground-based open path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and an IR source separated by 150-250 m distance. Molecular abundances along the extended open path are retrieved using a spectral forward model coupled to a non-linear least squares fitting approach. We demonstrate derivation of trace gas column amounts for horizontal paths transecting the width of the advected plume, and find for example that CO mixing ratio changes of ~0.01 μmol mol-1 [10 ppbv] can be detected across the relatively long optical paths used here. Though FTIR spectroscopy can detect dozens of different chemical species present in vegetation fire smoke, we focus our analysis on five key combustion products released preferentially during the pyrolysis (CH2O), flaming (CO2) and smoldering (CO, CH4, NH3) processes. We demonstrate that well constrained emissions ratios for these gases to both CO2 and CO can be derived for the backfire, headfire and residual smouldering combustion (RSC) stages of these savannah fires, from which stage-specific emission factors can then be calculated. Headfires and backfires often show similar emission ratios and emission factors, but those of the RSC stage can differ substantially. The timing of each fire stage was identified via airborne optical and thermal IR imagery and ground-observer reports, with the airborne IR imagery also used to derive estimates of fire radiative energy (FRE), allowing the relative amount of fuel burned in each stage to be calculated and "fire averaged" emission ratios and emission factors to be determined. These "fire averaged" metrics are dominated by the headfire contribution, since the FRE data indicate that the vast majority of the fuel is burned in this stage. Our fire averaged emission ratios and factors

  5. News CERN Celebration: CERN marks 20 years of the Web Workshops: Physics Teachers' Day aired live on Web Teacher Programme: Physics Teachers at CERN 2009 leaves attendees thirsty for more GIREP: Registration open for GIREP '09 Science and Creationism: Telegraph headline leads readers down wrong path Recruitment: Is recession proving to be good news for science teaching? Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    CERN Celebration: CERN marks 20 years of the Web Workshops: Physics Teachers' Day aired live on Web Teacher Programme: Physics Teachers at CERN 2009 leaves attendees thirsty for more GIREP: Registration open for GIREP '09 Science and Creationism: Telegraph headline leads readers down wrong path Recruitment: Is recession proving to be good news for science teaching? Forthcoming Events

  6. Continuous in-situ methane measurements at paddy fields in a rural area of India with poor electric infrastructure, using a low-cost instrument based on open-path near-IR laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidemori, T.; Matsumi, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Kawasaki, M.; Sasago, H.; Takahashi, K.; Imasu, R.; Takeuchi, W.; Adachi, M.; Machida, T.; Terao, Y.; Nomura, S.; Dhaka, S. K.; Singh, J.

    2015-12-01

    In southeast and south Asia, the previous satellite observations suggest that the methane emission from rice paddies is significant and important source of methane during rainy season. Since it is difficult to measure methane stably and continuously at rural areas such as the paddy fields in terms of infrastructures and maintenances, there are large uncertainties in quantitative estimation of methane emission in these areas and there are needs for more certification between satellite and ground based measurements. To measure methane concentrations continuously at difficult situations such as the center of paddy fields and wetlands, we developed the continuous in-situ measurement system, not to look for your lost keys under the streetlight. The methane gas sensor is used an open-path laser based measurement instrument (LaserMethane, ANRITSU CORPORATION), which can quickly and selectively detect average methane concentrations on the optical path of the laser beam. The developed system has the power supply and telecommunication system to run the laser gas sensor in rural areas with poor electricity infrastructure.The methane measurement system was installed at paddy fields of Sonepat, Haryana on the north of Delhi in India and has been operated from the end of 2014. The air sampling along with our measurement has been carried out once a week during daytime to calibrate the laser instrument. We found that the seasonal variation of methane concentrations was different from the satellite observations and there were significant diurnal variations, which it was difficult to detect from occasional air samplings. We will present details of the measurement system and recent results of continuous methane measurements in India.

  7. Collision-free path planning in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky medium assisted by a cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew; de Lacy Costello, Benjamin

    2002-09-01

    We offer a new approach to computing a shortest collision-free path in a space containing obstacles, using an experimental chemical processor, based on the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. The chemical processor was then coupled via optical links with a two-dimensional cellular automaton (CA) processor. In the BZ chemical processor obstacles are represented by sites of local stimulation generated by an array of silver wires. Circular excitation waves are generated which travel through the medium and approximate a scalar distance-to-obstacle field. The field is taken as the initial configuration of the CA processor, which calculates a tree of 'many-sources-one-destination' shortest paths using wave spreading in a discrete excitable medium. We describe a hybrid (experimental chemical and software based) parallel processor (with parallel inputs and outputs) which uses the principles of wave-based computing in both the physical and computational levels of its architecture.

  8. Collision-free path planning in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky medium assisted by a cellular automaton.

    PubMed

    Adamatzky, Andrew; de Lacy Costello, Benjamin

    2002-10-01

    We offer a new approach to computing a shortest collision-free path in a space containing obstacles, using an experimental chemical processor, based on the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. The chemical processor was then coupled via optical links with a two-dimensional cellular automaton (CA) processor. In the BZ chemical processor obstacles are represented by sites of local stimulation generated by an array of silver wires. Circular excitation waves are generated which travel through the medium and approximate a scalar distance-to-obstacle field. The field is taken as the initial configuration of the CA processor, which calculates a tree of 'many-sources-one-destination' shortest paths using wave spreading in a discrete excitable medium. We describe a hybrid (experimental chemical and software based) parallel processor (with parallel inputs and outputs) which uses the principles of wave-based computing in both the physical and computational levels of its architecture.

  9. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  10. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  11. Research on Taxiway Path Optimization Based on Conflict Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hang; Jiang, Xinxin

    2015-01-01

    Taxiway path planning is one of the effective measures to make full use of the airport resources, and the optimized paths can ensure the safety of the aircraft during the sliding process. In this paper, the taxiway path planning based on conflict detection is considered. Specific steps are shown as follows: firstly, make an improvement on A * algorithm, the conflict detection strategy is added to search for the shortest and safe path in the static taxiway network. Then, according to the sliding speed of aircraft, a time table for each node is determined and the safety interval is treated as the constraint to judge whether there is a conflict or not. The intelligent initial path planning model is established based on the results. Finally, make an example in an airport simulation environment, detect and relieve the conflict to ensure the safety. The results indicate that the model established in this paper is effective and feasible. Meanwhile, make comparison with the improved A*algorithm and other intelligent algorithms, conclude that the improved A*algorithm has great advantages. It could not only optimize taxiway path, but also ensure the safety of the sliding process and improve the operational efficiency. PMID:26226485

  12. Research on Taxiway Path Optimization Based on Conflict Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hang; Jiang, Xinxin

    2015-01-01

    Taxiway path planning is one of the effective measures to make full use of the airport resources, and the optimized paths can ensure the safety of the aircraft during the sliding process. In this paper, the taxiway path planning based on conflict detection is considered. Specific steps are shown as follows: firstly, make an improvement on A * algorithm, the conflict detection strategy is added to search for the shortest and safe path in the static taxiway network. Then, according to the sliding speed of aircraft, a time table for each node is determined and the safety interval is treated as the constraint to judge whether there is a conflict or not. The intelligent initial path planning model is established based on the results. Finally, make an example in an airport simulation environment, detect and relieve the conflict to ensure the safety. The results indicate that the model established in this paper is effective and feasible. Meanwhile, make comparison with the improved A*algorithm and other intelligent algorithms, conclude that the improved A*algorithm has great advantages. It could not only optimize taxiway path, but also ensure the safety of the sliding process and improve the operational efficiency.

  13. Research on Taxiway Path Optimization Based on Conflict Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hang; Jiang, Xinxin

    2015-01-01

    Taxiway path planning is one of the effective measures to make full use of the airport resources, and the optimized paths can ensure the safety of the aircraft during the sliding process. In this paper, the taxiway path planning based on conflict detection is considered. Specific steps are shown as follows: firstly, make an improvement on A * algorithm, the conflict detection strategy is added to search for the shortest and safe path in the static taxiway network. Then, according to the sliding speed of aircraft, a time table for each node is determined and the safety interval is treated as the constraint to judge whether there is a conflict or not. The intelligent initial path planning model is established based on the results. Finally, make an example in an airport simulation environment, detect and relieve the conflict to ensure the safety. The results indicate that the model established in this paper is effective and feasible. Meanwhile, make comparison with the improved A*algorithm and other intelligent algorithms, conclude that the improved A*algorithm has great advantages. It could not only optimize taxiway path, but also ensure the safety of the sliding process and improve the operational efficiency. PMID:26226485

  14. Nonclassical paths in quantum interference experiments.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Rahul; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Aninda; Sinha, Supurna; Sinha, Urbasi

    2014-09-19

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly equal to the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well-known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption that is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from nonclassical paths in quantum interference experiments that provide a measurable deviation from a naive application of the superposition principle. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these nonclassical paths is difficult to present. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence. PMID:25279612

  15. Nonclassical paths in quantum interference experiments.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Rahul; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Aninda; Sinha, Supurna; Sinha, Urbasi

    2014-09-19

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly equal to the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well-known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption that is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from nonclassical paths in quantum interference experiments that provide a measurable deviation from a naive application of the superposition principle. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these nonclassical paths is difficult to present. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence.

  16. Nonclassical Paths in Quantum Interference Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Rahul; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Aninda; Sinha, Supurna; Sinha, Urbasi

    2014-09-01

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly equal to the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well-known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption that is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from nonclassical paths in quantum interference experiments that provide a measurable deviation from a naive application of the superposition principle. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these nonclassical paths is difficult to present. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence.

  17. From the (1B) Spectroscopic State to the Photochemical Product of the Ultrafast Ring-Opening of 1,3-Cyclohexadiene: A Spectral Observation of the Complete Reaction Path.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Christine C; Zhang, Yao; Saita, Kenichiro; Kirrander, Adam; Weber, Peter M

    2015-08-20

    All stages of the electrocyclic ring-opening of 1,3-cyclohexadiene (CHD) were observed by time-resolved photoionization-photoelectron spectroscopy. Spectra of the 1B state, previously unobserved using time-resolved methods, were obtained upon optical excitation using ultrashort laser pulses at 4.60 or 4.65 eV, followed by ionization with pulses at 3.81, 3.85, and 4.10 eV, revealing a 1B lifetime of 30 fs. In an experiment using 3.07 eV probe photons and a 4.69 eV pump, we observed a time-sequenced progression of Rydberg states that includes s, p, and d states of the series n = 3 to 6. The sequentiality of the Rydberg signals points to an ionization mechanism that captures the molecule on different points along the reaction path in 2A. A dynamic fit of the Rydberg signals, coupled with MS-CASPT2 calculations, reveals that as the wavepacket moves down the potential energy surface it acquires kinetic energy at a rate of 28 eV/ps before reaching the conical intersection to the 1A ground state. During the reaction, the terminal carbon atoms separate at a speed of 16 Å/ps. A deconvolution of the Rydberg signals from a broad feature assigned to structurally disperse 1,3,5-hexatriene (HT) shows the formation of the open-chain hexatriene structure with an onset 142 fs after the initial absorption of a pump photon. The experimental observations are discussed in the context of recent ultrafast X-ray scattering experiments and theoretical quantum dynamics simulations. PMID:26192201

  18. Toward stand-off open-path measurements of NO and NO(2) in the sub-parts per million meter range using quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in the intra-pulse absorption mode.

    PubMed

    Reidl-Leuthner, Christoph; Lendl, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    Two thermoelectrically cooled mid-infrared distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers operated in pulsed mode have been used for the quasi-simultaneous determination of NO and NO2 in the sub-parts per million meter (sub-ppm-m) range. Using a beam splitter, the beams of the two lasers were combined and sent to a retro-reflector. The returned light was recorded with a thermoelectrically cooled mercury cadmium telluride detector with a rise time of 4 ns. Alternate operation of the lasers with pulse lengths of 300 ns and a repetition rate of 66 kHz allowed quasi-simultaneous measurements. During each pulse the laser temperature increased, causing a thermal chirp of the laser line of up to 1.3 cm(-1). These laser chirps were sufficient to scan rotational bands of NO centered at 1902 cm(-1) and NO2 located at 1632 cm(-1). In that way an absorption spectrum could be recorded from a single laser pulse. Currently achieved limits of detection are 600 parts per billion meter (ppb-m) for NO and 260 ppb-m for NO2 using signal averaging over 1 min. This work presents the first steps toward a portable stand-off, open-path instrument that uses thermoelectrically cooled detector and lasers.

  19. Vervet monkeys use paths consistent with context-specific spatial movement heuristics.

    PubMed

    Teichroeb, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Animal foraging routes are analogous to the computationally demanding "traveling salesman problem" (TSP), where individuals must find the shortest path among several locations before returning to the start. Humans approximate solutions to TSPs using simple heuristics or "rules of thumb," but our knowledge of how other animals solve multidestination routing problems is incomplete. Most nonhuman primate species have shown limited ability to route plan. However, captive vervets were shown to solve a TSP for six sites. These results were consistent with either planning three steps ahead or a risk-avoidance strategy. I investigated how wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) solved a path problem with six, equally rewarding food sites; where site arrangement allowed assessment of whether vervets found the shortest route and/or used paths consistent with one of three simple heuristics to navigate. Single vervets took the shortest possible path in fewer than half of the trials, usually in ways consistent with the most efficient heuristic (the convex hull). When in competition, vervets' paths were consistent with different, more efficient heuristics dependent on their dominance rank (a cluster strategy for dominants and the nearest neighbor rule for subordinates). These results suggest that, like humans, vervets may solve multidestination routing problems by applying simple, adaptive, context-specific "rules of thumb." The heuristics that were consistent with vervet paths in this study are the same as some of those asserted to be used by humans. These spatial movement strategies may have common evolutionary roots and be part of a universal mental navigational toolkit. Alternatively, they may have emerged through convergent evolution as the optimal way to solve multidestination routing problems. PMID:26668734

  20. Information Spread of Emergency Events: Path Searching on Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongzhi; Wu, Tunan

    2014-01-01

    Emergency has attracted global attentions of government and the public, and it will easily trigger a series of serious social problems if it is not supervised effectively in the dissemination process. In the Internet world, people communicate with each other and form various virtual communities based on social networks, which lead to a complex and fast information spread pattern of emergency events. This paper collects Internet data based on data acquisition and topic detection technology, analyzes the process of information spread on social networks, describes the diffusions and impacts of that information from the perspective of random graph, and finally seeks the key paths through an improved IBF algorithm. Application cases have shown that this algorithm can search the shortest spread paths efficiently, which may help us to guide and control the information dissemination of emergency events on early warning. PMID:24600323

  1. Information spread of emergency events: path searching on social networks.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weihui; Hu, Hongzhi; Wu, Tunan; Dai, Yonghui

    2014-01-01

    Emergency has attracted global attentions of government and the public, and it will easily trigger a series of serious social problems if it is not supervised effectively in the dissemination process. In the Internet world, people communicate with each other and form various virtual communities based on social networks, which lead to a complex and fast information spread pattern of emergency events. This paper collects Internet data based on data acquisition and topic detection technology, analyzes the process of information spread on social networks, describes the diffusions and impacts of that information from the perspective of random graph, and finally seeks the key paths through an improved IBF algorithm. Application cases have shown that this algorithm can search the shortest spread paths efficiently, which may help us to guide and control the information dissemination of emergency events on early warning.

  2. Spatial self-reference systems and shortest-route behavior in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Rieser, J J; Heiman, M L

    1982-04-01

    2 experiments were conducted concerning the development of spatial orientation during the second year of life. Both experiments were focused on oriented search for a hidden target object in the absence of landmarks, which can be accomplished by relating one's movements to knowledge of a target's location. In experiment 1, 18-month-olds were tested to examine the precision with which they use information for the direction and magnitude of self-movement to keep track of the target location. Although the toddlers' search behavior was imprecise, the results showed that they appropriately modulated their search behavior according to the directions and magnitudes of their previous movements away from the hidden target. Experiment 2 was designed to determine whether toddlers can go beyond the information directly experienced in previous routes of travel to infer the shortest route to a hidden target. The results indicated that the 18-month-old and the highly selected 14-month-old subjects can perform spatial inferences of this type. The mechanisms through which these spatial abilities develop are discussed.

  3. GED Revision Opens Path to Higher Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The General Educational Development program, or GED, is undergoing the biggest revamping in its 69-year history, driven by mounting recognition that young adults' future success depends on getting more than a high-school-level education. Potent forces have converged to stoke the GED's redesign. A labor market that increasingly seeks some…

  4. OPEN PATH OPTICAL SENSING OF PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the concepts behind recent developments in optical remote sensing (ORS) and the results from experiments. Airborne fugitive and fine particulate matter (PM) from various sources contribute to exceedances of state and federal PM and visibility standards. Recent...

  5. The universal path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Dreyer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Path integrals calculate probabilities by summing over classical configurations of variables such as fields, assigning each configuration a phase equal to the action of that configuration. This paper defines a universal path integral, which sums over all computable structures. This path integral contains as sub-integrals all possible computable path integrals, including those of field theory, the standard model of elementary particles, discrete models of quantum gravity, string theory, etc. The universal path integral possesses a well-defined measure that guarantees its finiteness. The probabilities for events corresponding to sub-integrals can be calculated using the method of decoherent histories. The universal path integral supports a quantum theory of the universe in which the world that we see around us arises out of the interference between all computable structures.

  6. NLTT 5306: the shortest period detached white dwarf+brown dwarf binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, P. R.; Saglia, R. P.; Burleigh, M. R.; Marsh, T. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Lawrie, K.; Cappetta, M.; Girven, J.; Napiwotzki, R.

    2013-03-01

    We have spectroscopically confirmed a brown dwarf mass companion to the hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf NLTT 5306. The white dwarf's atmospheric parameters were measured using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and X-shooter spectroscopy as Teff = 7756 ± 35 K and log(g) = 7.68 ± 0.08, giving a mass for the primary of MWD = 0.44 ± 0.04 M⊙ at a distance of 71 ± 4 pc with a cooling age of 710 ± 50 Myr. The existence of the brown dwarf secondary was confirmed through the near-infrared arm of the X-shooter data and a spectral type of dL4-dL7 was estimated using standard spectral indices. Combined radial velocity measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, X-shooter and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's High Resolution Spectrograph of the white dwarf give a minimum mass of 56 ± 3 MJup for the secondary, confirming the substellar nature. The period of the binary was measured as 101.88 ± 0.02 min using both the radial velocity data and i'-band variability detected with the Isaac Newton Telescope. This variability indicates `day' side heating of the brown dwarf companion. We also observe Hα emission in our higher resolution data in phase with the white dwarf radial velocity, indicating that this system is in a low level of accretion, most likely via a stellar wind. This system represents the shortest period white dwarf+brown dwarf binary and the secondary has survived a stage of common envelope evolution, much like its longer period counterpart, WD 0137-349. Both systems likely represent bona fide progenitors of cataclysmic variables with a low-mass white dwarf and a brown dwarf donor.

  7. AH Cam: A metal-rich RR Lyrae star with the shortest known Blazhko period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Horace A.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Lee, Kevin M.; Williams, Jeffrey; Silbermann, N. A.; Bolte, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of 746 new V-band observations of the RR Lyrae star AH Cam obtained during 1989 - 1992 clearly show that its light curve cannot be described by a single period. In fact, at first glance, the Fourier spectrum of the photometry resembles that of a double-mode pulsator, with peaks at a fundamental period of 0.3686 d and an apparent secondary period of 0.2628 d. Nevertheless, the dual-mode solution is a poor fit to the data. Rather, we believe that AH Cam is a single-mode RR Lyrae star undergoing the Blazhko effect: periodic modulation of the amplitude and shape of its light curve. What was originally taken to be the period of the second mode is instead the 1-cycle/d alias of a modulation sidelobe in the Fourier spectrum. The data are well described by a modulation period of just under 11 d, which is the shortest Blazhko period reported to date in the literature and confirms the earlier suggestion by Goranskii. A low-resolution spectrum of AH Cam indicates that it is relatively metal rich, with delta-S less than or = 2. Its high metallicity and short modulation period may provide a critical test of at least one theory for the Blazhko effect. Moskalik's internal resonance model makes specific predictions of the growth rate of the fundamental model vs fundamental period. AH Cam falls outside the regime of other known Blazhko variables and resonance model predictions, but these are appropriate for metal-poor RR Lyrae stars. If the theory matches the behavior of AH Cam for a metal-rich stellar model, this would bolster the resonance hypothesis.

  8. Effects of land-use history, fertilization, and precipitation on short-term N2O emissions from agricultural soils using open-path eddy flux N2O and static chamber methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, I.; Cui, M.; Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Tang, J.; Zondlo, M. A.; Robertson, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas with an atmospheric lifetime of ~ 120 years and a global warming potential ~300 times that of CO2. Atmospheric N2O concentrations have increased from ~270 ppbv during pre-industrial times to ~330 ppbv today. Anthropic emissions are a major source of atmospheric N2O and about half of global anthropic emissions are from the agricultural sector. N2Oemissions from soils exhibit high spatial and temporal variability. Estimation of N2O emissions from agricultural soils is particularly challenging because N2O fluxes are affected by fertilizer type and application rates, land-use history and management, as well as soil biological activity. We studied ecosystem level N2O emissions from agricultural lands using a combination of static chamber methods and continuous N2O exchange measured by a quantum cascade laser-based, open-path analyzer coupled with an eddy-covariance system. We also compared N2O emissions between different static chamber methods, using both laboratory-based gas chromatography (GC) and an in situ quantum cascade (QC) laser for N2O analyses. Finally, we compared emissions estimated by the two static chamber methods to those estimated by eddy-covariance. We examined pre- and post- fertilization N2O fluxes from soils in two no-till continuous corn fields with distinct land-use histories: one field converted from permanent grassland (CRP-C) and the other from conventional corn-soybean rotation (AGR-C). Both fields were fertilized with ~160 kg urea-N ha-1. We compared N2O emissions from these fields to those from an unmanaged grassland (REF). In addition, we examined the potential effect of post-fertilization precipitation on N2O emissions by applying 50 mm of artificial rainfall to the static chambers at all three locations. Measurements of N2O emissions using both GC and QC laser methods with static chambers were in good agreement (R2 = 0.96). Even though average soil N2O fluxes before fertilization were low

  9. An optimal estimate for electric fields on the shortest line segment between two spherical insulators in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, KiHyun

    2016-07-01

    We consider a gradient estimate for a conductivity problem whose inclusions are two neighboring insulators in three dimensions. When inclusions with an extreme conductivity (insulators or perfect conductors) are closely located, the gradient can be concentrated in between inclusions and then becomes arbitrarily large as the distance between inclusions approaches zero. The gradient estimate in between insulators in three dimensions has been regarded as a challenging problem, while the optimal blow-up rates in terms of the distance were successfully obtained for the other extreme conductivity problems in two and three dimensions, and are attained on the shortest line segment between inclusions. In this paper, we establish upper and lower bounds of gradients on the shortest line segment between two insulating unit spheres in three dimensions. These bounds present the optimal blow-up rate of gradient on the line segment which is substantially different from the rates in the other problems.

  10. Path entanglement of continuous-variable quantum microwaves.

    PubMed

    Menzel, E P; Di Candia, R; Deppe, F; Eder, P; Zhong, L; Ihmig, M; Haeberlein, M; Baust, A; Hoffmann, E; Ballester, D; Inomata, K; Yamamoto, T; Nakamura, Y; Solano, E; Marx, A; Gross, R

    2012-12-21

    Path entanglement constitutes an essential resource in quantum information and communication protocols. Here, we demonstrate frequency-degenerate entanglement between continuous-variable quantum microwaves propagating along two spatially separated paths. We combine a squeezed and a vacuum state using a microwave beam splitter. Via correlation measurements, we detect and quantify the path entanglement contained in the beam splitter output state. Our experiments open the avenue to quantum teleportation, quantum communication, or quantum radar with continuous variables at microwave frequencies.

  11. Path entanglement of continuous-variable quantum microwaves.

    PubMed

    Menzel, E P; Di Candia, R; Deppe, F; Eder, P; Zhong, L; Ihmig, M; Haeberlein, M; Baust, A; Hoffmann, E; Ballester, D; Inomata, K; Yamamoto, T; Nakamura, Y; Solano, E; Marx, A; Gross, R

    2012-12-21

    Path entanglement constitutes an essential resource in quantum information and communication protocols. Here, we demonstrate frequency-degenerate entanglement between continuous-variable quantum microwaves propagating along two spatially separated paths. We combine a squeezed and a vacuum state using a microwave beam splitter. Via correlation measurements, we detect and quantify the path entanglement contained in the beam splitter output state. Our experiments open the avenue to quantum teleportation, quantum communication, or quantum radar with continuous variables at microwave frequencies. PMID:23368439

  12. MAXI J1659-152: the shortest orbital period black-hole transient in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuulkers, E.; Kouveliotou, C.; Belloni, T.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Chenevez, J.; Díaz Trigo, M.; Homan, J.; Ibarra, A.; Kennea, J. A.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Ness, J.-U.; Parmar, A. N.; Pollock, A. M. T.; van den Heuvel, E. P. J.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2013-04-01

    MAXI J1659-152 is a bright X-ray transient black-hole candidate binary system discovered in September 2010. We report here on MAXI, RXTE, Swift, and XMM-Newton observations during its 2010/2011 outburst. We find that during the first one and a half week of the outburst the X-ray light curves display drops in intensity at regular intervals, which we interpret as absorption dips. About three weeks into the outbursts, again drops in intensity are seen. These dips have, however, a spectral behaviour opposite to that of the absorption dips, and are related to fast spectral state changes (hence referred to as transition dips). The absorption dips recur with a period of 2.414 ± 0.005 h, which we interpret as the orbital period of the system. This implies that MAXI J1659-152 is the shortest period black-hole candidate binary known to date. The inclination of the accretion disk with respect to the line of sight is estimated to be 65-80°. We propose the companion to the black-hole candidate to be close to an M5 dwarf star, with a mass and radius of about 0.15-0.25 M⊙ and 0.2-0.25 R⊙, respectively. We derive that the companion had an initial mass of about 1.5 M⊙, which evolved to its current mass in about 5-6 billion years. The system is rather compact (orbital separation of ≳1.33 R⊙), and is located at a distance of 8.6 ± 3.7 kpc, with a height above the Galactic plane of 2.4 ± 1.0 kpc. The characteristics of short orbital period and high Galactic scale height are shared with two other transient black-hole candidate X-ray binaries, i.e., XTE J1118+480 and Swift J1735.5-0127. We suggest that all three are kicked out of the Galactic plane into the halo, rather than being formed in a globular cluster. Table 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. A priori least expected time paths in fuzzy, time-variant transportation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Gao, Ziyou; Yang, Lixing

    2016-02-01

    Dynamics and fuzziness are two significant characteristics of real-world transportation networks. To capture these two features theoretically, this article proposes the concept of a fuzzy, time-variant network characterized by a series of time-dependent fuzzy link travel times. To find an effective route guidance for travelers, the expected travel time is specifically adopted as an evaluation criterion to assess the route generation process. Then the shortest path problem is formulated as a multi-objective 0-1 optimization model for finding the least expected time path over the considered time horizon. Different from the shortest path problem in dynamic and random networks, an efficient method is proposed in this article to calculate the fuzzy expected travel time for each given path. A tabu search algorithm is designed for the problem to generate the best solution under the framework of linear weighted methods. Finally, two numerical experiments are performed to verify the effectiveness and efficiency of the model and algorithm.

  14. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Wheeler, David R.; Simonson, Robert J.

    2010-09-21

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  15. A Path to Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegemoller, William; Stegemoller, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    The path taken and the turns made as a turtle traces a polygon are examined to discover an important theorem in geometry. A unique tool, the Angle Adder, is implemented in the investigation. (Contains 9 figures.)

  16. A Comparison of Heuristic and Human Performance on Open Versions of the Traveling Salesperson Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, James N.; Chronicle, Edward P.; Ormerod, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    We compared the performance of three heuristics with that of subjects on variants of a well-known combinatorial optimization task, the Traveling Salesperson Problem (TSP). The present task consisted of finding the shortest path through an array of points from one side of the array to the other. Like the standard TSP, the task is computationally…

  17. The lawnmower problem and other geometric path covering problems

    SciTech Connect

    Fekete, S.; Arkin, E.; Mitchell, J.

    1994-12-31

    We discuss the Lawnmower Problem: Given a polygonal region, find the shortest closed path along which we have to move a given object (typically a square or a circle), such that any point of the region will be covered by the object for some position of it movement. In another version of the problem, known as the Milling Problem, the object has to stay within the region at all times. Practical motivations for considering the Lawnmower Problem come from manufacturing (spray painting, quality control), geography (aerial surveys), optimization (tour planning for a large number of clients with limited mobility), and gardening. The Milling Problem has gained attention by its importance for NC pocket machining. We show that both problems are NP-hard and discuss approximation methods for various versions of the problem.

  18. Advisory Algorithm for Scheduling Open Sectors, Operating Positions, and Workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloem, Michael; Drew, Michael; Lai, Chok Fung; Bilimoria, Karl D.

    2012-01-01

    Air traffic controller supervisors configure available sector, operating position, and work-station resources to safely and efficiently control air traffic in a region of airspace. In this paper, an algorithm for assisting supervisors with this task is described and demonstrated on two sample problem instances. The algorithm produces configuration schedule advisories that minimize a cost. The cost is a weighted sum of two competing costs: one penalizing mismatches between configurations and predicted air traffic demand and another penalizing the effort associated with changing configurations. The problem considered by the algorithm is a shortest path problem that is solved with a dynamic programming value iteration algorithm. The cost function contains numerous parameters. Default values for most of these are suggested based on descriptions of air traffic control procedures and subject-matter expert feedback. The parameter determining the relative importance of the two competing costs is tuned by comparing historical configurations with corresponding algorithm advisories. Two sample problem instances for which appropriate configuration advisories are obvious were designed to illustrate characteristics of the algorithm. Results demonstrate how the algorithm suggests advisories that appropriately utilize changes in airspace configurations and changes in the number of operating positions allocated to each open sector. The results also demonstrate how the advisories suggest appropriate times for configuration changes.

  19. Sampling diffusive transition paths

    SciTech Connect

    F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

    2006-10-12

    We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

  20. Path efficiency of ant foraging trails in an artificial network.

    PubMed

    Vittori, Karla; Talbot, Grégoire; Gautrais, Jacques; Fourcassié, Vincent; Araújo, Aluizio F R; Theraulaz, Guy

    2006-04-21

    In this paper we present an individual-based model describing the foraging behavior of ants moving in an artificial network of tunnels in which several interconnected paths can be used to reach a single food source. Ants lay a trail pheromone while moving in the network and this pheromone acts as a system of mass recruitment that attracts other ants in the network. The rules implemented in the model are based on measures of the decisions taken by ants at tunnel bifurcations during real experiments. The collective choice of the ants is estimated by measuring their probability to take a given path in the network. Overall, we found a good agreement between the results of the simulations and those of the experiments, showing that simple behavioral rules can lead ants to find the shortest paths in the network. The match between the experiments and the model, however, was better for nestbound than for outbound ants. A sensitivity study of the model suggests that the bias observed in the choice of the ants at asymmetrical bifurcations is a key behavior to reproduce the collective choice observed in the experiments. PMID:16199059

  1. Counting paths in digraphs

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Blair D; Seymour, Dr. Paul Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Say a digraph is k-free if it has no directed cycles of length at most k, for k {element_of} Z{sup +}. Thomasse conjectured that the number of induced 3-vertex directed paths in a simple 2-free digraph on n vertices is at most (n-1)n(n+1)/15. We present an unpublished result of Bondy proving there are at most 2n{sup 3}/25 such paths, and prove that for the class of circular interval digraphs, an upper bound of n{sup 3}/16 holds. We also study the problem of bounding the number of (non-induced) 4-vertex paths in 3-free digraphs. We show an upper bound of 4n{sup 4}/75 using Bondy's result for Thomasse's conjecture.

  2. Mobile transporter path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1990-01-01

    The use of a genetic algorithm (GA) for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the space station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Specifically, double crossover, greedy crossover, and tournament selection techniques are examined. Additionally, the use of local optimization techniques working in concert with the GA are also explored. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research.

  3. Coherence-path duality relations for N paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillery, Mark; Bagan, Emilio; Bergou, Janos; Cottrell, Seth

    2016-05-01

    For an interferometer with two paths, there is a relation between the information about which path the particle took and the visibility of the interference pattern at the output. The more path information we have, the smaller the visibility, and vice versa. We generalize this relation to a multi-path interferometer, and we substitute two recently defined measures of quantum coherence for the visibility, which results in two duality relations. The path information is provided by attaching a detector to each path. In the first relation, which uses an l1 measure of coherence, the path information is obtained by applying the minimum-error state discrimination procedure to the detector states. In the second, which employs an entropic measure of coherence, the path information is the mutual information between the detector states and the result of measuring them. Both approaches are quantitative versions of complementarity for N-path interferometers. Support provided by the John Templeton Foundation.

  4. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  5. Triggered plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C W

    1988-02-23

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  6. Gas path seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Johnson, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A gas path seal suitable for use with a turbine engine or compressor is described. A shroud wearable or abradable by the abrasion of the rotor blades of the turbine or compressor shrouds the rotor bades. A compliant backing surrounds the shroud. The backing is a yieldingly deformable porous material covered with a thin ductile layer. A mounting fixture surrounds the backing.

  7. An Unplanned Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, Lynn M.; Sterenberg, Gladys Y.; Long, Julie S.

    2013-01-01

    The authors elucidate what they saw as three important challenges to overcome along the path to becoming elementary school mathematics teacher leaders: marginal interest in math, low self-confidence, and teaching in isolation. To illustrate how these challenges were mitigated, they focus on the stories of two elementary school teachers--Laura and…

  8. A load-balance path selection algorithm in automatically swiched optical network (ASON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Lu, Yueming; Ji, Yuefeng

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, a novel load-balance algorithm is proposed to provide an approach to optimized path selection in automatically swiched optical network (ASON). By using this algorithm, improved survivability and low congestion can be achieved. The static nature of current routing algorithms, such as OSPF or IS-IS, has made the situation worse since the traffic is concentrated on the "least-cost" paths which causes the congestion for some links while leaving other links lightly loaded. So, the key is to select suitable paths to balance the network load to optimize network resource utilization and traffic performance. We present a method to provide the capability to control traffic engineering so that the carriers can define their own strategies for optimizations and apply them to path selection for dynamic load balancing. With considering load distribution and topology information, capacity utilization factor is introduced into Dijkstra (shortest path selection) for path selection to achieve balancing traffic over network. Routing simulations have been done over mesh networks to compare the two different algorithms. With the simulation results, a conclusion can be made on the performance of different algorithms.

  9. Nonadiabatic transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, M. C.; Corcelli, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) is combined with transition path sampling (TPS) to produce a new method called nonadiabatic path sampling (NAPS). The NAPS method is validated on a model electron transfer system coupled to a Langevin bath. Numerically exact rate constants are computed using the reactive flux (RF) method over a broad range of solvent frictions that span from the energy diffusion (low friction) regime to the spatial diffusion (high friction) regime. The NAPS method is shown to quantitatively reproduce the RF benchmark rate constants over the full range of solvent friction. Integrating FSSH within the TPS framework expands the applicability of both approaches and creates a new method that will be helpful in determining detailed mechanisms for nonadiabatic reactions in the condensed-phase.

  10. Four paths of competition

    SciTech Connect

    Studness, C.M.

    1995-05-01

    The financial community`s focus on utility competition has been riveted on the proceedings now in progress at state regulatory commissions. The fear that something immediately damaging will come out of these proceedings seems to have diminished in recent months, and the stock market has reacted favorably. However, regulatory developments are only one of four paths leading to competition; the others are the marketplace, the legislatures, and the courts. Each could play a critical role in the emergence of competition.

  11. PATHS groundwater hydrologic model

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.; Schur, J.A.

    1980-04-01

    A preliminary evaluation capability for two-dimensional groundwater pollution problems was developed as part of the Transport Modeling Task for the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP). Our approach was to use the data limitations as a guide in setting the level of modeling detail. PATHS Groundwater Hydrologic Model is the first level (simplest) idealized hybrid analytical/numerical model for two-dimensional, saturated groundwater flow and single component transport; homogeneous geology. This document consists of the description of the PATHS groundwater hydrologic model. The preliminary evaluation capability prepared for WISAP, including the enhancements that were made because of the authors' experience using the earlier capability is described. Appendixes A through D supplement the report as follows: complete derivations of the background equations are provided in Appendix A. Appendix B is a comprehensive set of instructions for users of PATHS. It is written for users who have little or no experience with computers. Appendix C is for the programmer. It contains information on how input parameters are passed between programs in the system. It also contains program listings and test case listing. Appendix D is a definition of terms.

  12. A new efficient optimal path planner for mobile robot based on Invasive Weed Optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Prases K.; Parhi, Dayal R.

    2014-12-01

    Planning of the shortest/optimal route is essential for efficient operation of autonomous mobile robot or vehicle. In this paper Invasive Weed Optimization (IWO), a new meta-heuristic algorithm, has been implemented for solving the path planning problem of mobile robot in partially or totally unknown environments. This meta-heuristic optimization is based on the colonizing property of weeds. First we have framed an objective function that satisfied the conditions of obstacle avoidance and target seeking behavior of robot in partially or completely unknown environments. Depending upon the value of objective function of each weed in colony, the robot avoids obstacles and proceeds towards destination. The optimal trajectory is generated with this navigational algorithm when robot reaches its destination. The effectiveness, feasibility, and robustness of the proposed algorithm has been demonstrated through series of simulation and experimental results. Finally, it has been found that the developed path planning algorithm can be effectively applied to any kinds of complex situation.

  13. Benefit of adaptive FEC in shared backup path protected elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Dai, Hua; Wang, Chao; Li, Yongcheng; Bose, Sanjay K; Shen, Gangxiang

    2015-07-27

    We apply an adaptive forward error correction (FEC) allocation strategy to an Elastic Optical Network (EON) operated with shared backup path protection (SBPP). To maximize the protected network capacity that can be carried, an Integer Linear Programing (ILP) model and a spectrum window plane (SWP)-based heuristic algorithm are developed. Simulation results show that the FEC coding overhead required by the adaptive FEC scheme is significantly lower than that needed by a fixed FEC allocation strategy resulting in higher network capacity for the adaptive strategy. The adaptive FEC allocation strategy can also significantly outperform the fixed FEC allocation strategy both in terms of the spare capacity redundancy and the average FEC coding overhead needed per optical channel. The proposed heuristic algorithm is efficient and not only performs closer to the ILP model but also does much better than the shortest-path algorithm. PMID:26367673

  14. Benefit of adaptive FEC in shared backup path protected elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Dai, Hua; Wang, Chao; Li, Yongcheng; Bose, Sanjay K; Shen, Gangxiang

    2015-07-27

    We apply an adaptive forward error correction (FEC) allocation strategy to an Elastic Optical Network (EON) operated with shared backup path protection (SBPP). To maximize the protected network capacity that can be carried, an Integer Linear Programing (ILP) model and a spectrum window plane (SWP)-based heuristic algorithm are developed. Simulation results show that the FEC coding overhead required by the adaptive FEC scheme is significantly lower than that needed by a fixed FEC allocation strategy resulting in higher network capacity for the adaptive strategy. The adaptive FEC allocation strategy can also significantly outperform the fixed FEC allocation strategy both in terms of the spare capacity redundancy and the average FEC coding overhead needed per optical channel. The proposed heuristic algorithm is efficient and not only performs closer to the ILP model but also does much better than the shortest-path algorithm.

  15. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decision maker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its

  16. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decisionmaker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its content

  17. Portage and Path Dependence*

    PubMed Central

    Bleakley, Hoyt; Lin, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We examine portage sites in the U.S. South, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwest, including those on the fall line, a geomorphological feature in the southeastern U.S. marking the final rapids on rivers before the ocean. Historically, waterborne transport of goods required portage around the falls at these points, while some falls provided water power during early industrialization. These factors attracted commerce and manufacturing. Although these original advantages have long since been made obsolete, we document the continuing importance of these portage sites over time. We interpret these results as path dependence and contrast explanations based on sunk costs interacting with decreasing versus increasing returns to scale. PMID:23935217

  18. JAVA PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehhtz, Peter

    2005-01-01

    JPF is an explicit state software model checker for Java bytecode. Today, JPF is a swiss army knife for all sort of runtime based verification purposes. This basically means JPF is a Java virtual machine that executes your program not just once (like a normal VM), but theoretically in all possible ways, checking for property violations like deadlocks or unhandled exceptions along all potential execution paths. If it finds an error, JPF reports the whole execution that leads to it. Unlike a normal debugger, JPF keeps track of every step how it got to the defect.

  19. Broadband Phase Spectroscopy over Turbulent Air Paths.

    PubMed

    Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Rieker, Gregory B; Baumann, Esther; Swann, William C; Sinclair, Laura C; Kofler, Jon; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R

    2015-09-01

    Broadband atmospheric phase spectra are acquired with a phase-sensitive dual-frequency-comb spectrometer by implementing adaptive compensation for the strong decoherence from atmospheric turbulence. The compensation is possible due to the pistonlike behavior of turbulence across a single spatial-mode path combined with the intrinsic frequency stability and high sampling speed associated with dual-comb spectroscopy. The atmospheric phase spectrum is measured across 2 km of air at each of the 70,000 comb teeth spanning 233  cm(-1) across hundreds of near-infrared rovibrational resonances of CO(2), CH(4), and H(2)O with submilliradian uncertainty, corresponding to a 10(-13) refractive index sensitivity. Trace gas concentrations extracted directly from the phase spectrum reach 0.7 ppm uncertainty, demonstrated here for CO(2). While conventional broadband spectroscopy only measures intensity absorption, this approach enables measurement of the full complex susceptibility even in practical open path sensing.

  20. Broadband Phase Spectroscopy over Turbulent Air Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Rieker, Gregory B.; Baumann, Esther; Swann, William C.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Kofler, Jon; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R.

    2015-09-01

    Broadband atmospheric phase spectra are acquired with a phase-sensitive dual-frequency-comb spectrometer by implementing adaptive compensation for the strong decoherence from atmospheric turbulence. The compensation is possible due to the pistonlike behavior of turbulence across a single spatial-mode path combined with the intrinsic frequency stability and high sampling speed associated with dual-comb spectroscopy. The atmospheric phase spectrum is measured across 2 km of air at each of the 70 000 comb teeth spanning 233 cm-1 across hundreds of near-infrared rovibrational resonances of CO2 , CH4 , and H2O with submilliradian uncertainty, corresponding to a 10-13 refractive index sensitivity. Trace gas concentrations extracted directly from the phase spectrum reach 0.7 ppm uncertainty, demonstrated here for CO2 . While conventional broadband spectroscopy only measures intensity absorption, this approach enables measurement of the full complex susceptibility even in practical open path sensing.

  1. Cornered Quadtrees/Octrees and Multiple Gateways Between Each Two Nodes; A Structure for Path Planning in 2D and 3D Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namdari, Mohammad Hasan; Hejazi, Seyed Reza; Palhang, Maziar

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, modified versions of quadtree/octree, as structures used in path planning, are proposed which we call them cornered quadtree/octree. Also a new method of creating paths in quadtrees/octrees, once quadrants/octants to be passed are determined, is proposed both to improve traveled distance and path smoothness. In proposed modified versions of quadtree/octree, four corner cells of quadrants and eight corner voxels of octants are also considered as nodes of the graph to be searched for finding the shortest path. This causes better quadrant/octant selection during graph search relative to simple quadtrees and octrees. On the other hand, after that all quadrants/octants are determined, multiple gateways are nominated between each two selected nodes and path is constructed by passing through the gateway which its selection leads in shorter and smoother path. Proposed structures in this paper alongside the utilized path construction approach, creates better paths in terms of path length than those created if simple trees are used, somehow equal to the quality of the achieved paths by framed trees, meanwhile interestingly, consumed time and memory in our proposed method are closer to the used time and memory if simple trees are used.

  2. Real-time robot path planning based on a modified pulse-coupled neural network model.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hong; Yang, Simon X; Willms, Allan R; Yi, Zhang

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a modified pulse-coupled neural network (MPCNN) model for real-time collision-free path planning of mobile robots in nonstationary environments. The proposed neural network for robots is topologically organized with only local lateral connections among neurons. It works in dynamic environments and requires no prior knowledge of target or barrier movements. The target neuron fires first, and then the firing event spreads out, through the lateral connections among the neurons, like the propagation of a wave. Obstacles have no connections to their neighbors. Each neuron records its parent, that is, the neighbor that caused it to fire. The real-time optimal path is then the sequence of parents from the robot to the target. In a static case where the barriers and targets are stationary, this paper proves that the generated wave in the network spreads outward with travel times proportional to the linking strength among neurons. Thus, the generated path is always the global shortest path from the robot to the target. In addition, each neuron in the proposed model can propagate a firing event to its neighboring neuron without any comparing computations. The proposed model is applied to generate collision-free paths for a mobile robot to solve a maze-type problem, to circumvent concave U-shaped obstacles, and to track a moving target in an environment with varying obstacles. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated through simulation and comparison studies.

  3. Chemotaxis can take plant-parasitic nematodes to the source of a chemo-attractant via the shortest possible routes.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andy M; Dutta, Tushar K; Curtis, Rosane H C; Powers, Stephen J; Gaur, Hari S; Kerry, Brian R

    2011-04-01

    It has long been recognized that chemotaxis is the primary means by which nematodes locate host plants. Nonetheless, chemotaxis has received scant attention. We show that chemotaxis is predicted to take nematodes to a source of a chemo-attractant via the shortest possible routes through the labyrinth of air-filled or water-filled channels within a soil through which the attractant diffuses. There are just two provisos: (i) all of the channels through which the attractant diffuses are accessible to the nematodes and (ii) nematodes can resolve all chemical gradients no matter how small. Previously, this remarkable consequence of chemotaxis had gone unnoticed. The predictions are supported by experimental studies of the movement patterns of the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne incognita and Meloidogyne graminicola in modified Y-chamber olfactometers filled with Pluronic gel. By providing two routes to a source of the attractant, one long and one short, our experiments, the first to demonstrate the routes taken by nematodes to plant roots, serve to test our predictions. Our data show that nematodes take the most direct route to their preferred hosts (as predicted) but often take the longest route towards poor hosts. We hypothesize that a complex of repellent and attractant chemicals influences the interaction between nematodes and their hosts.

  4. V753 MON: A UNIQUE CLOSE BINARY JUST AFTER THE EVOLUTIONARY STAGE WITH THE SHORTEST PERIOD DURING MASS TRANSFER

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Zhang, J.; Wang, J.-J.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, E. G.; Li, L.-J.; He, J.-J.

    2013-08-15

    We discovered that the O-C curve of V753 Mon shows an upward parabolic change while undergoing a cyclic variation with a period of 13.5 yr. The upward parabolic change reveals a long-term period increase at a rate of P-dot = +7.8 x 10{sup -8} days yr{sup -1}. Photometric solutions determined using the Wilson-Devinney method confirm that V753 Mon is a semi-detached binary system where the slightly less massive, hotter component star is transferring mass to the more massive one. This is in agreement with the long-term increase of the orbital period. The increase of the orbital period, the mass ratio very close to unity, and the semi-detached configuration with a less massive lobe-filling component all suggest that V753 Mon is on a key evolutionary stage just after the evolutionary stage with the shortest period during mass transfer. The results in this paper will shed light on the formation of massive contact binaries and the evolution of binary stars. The cyclic oscillation in the O-C diagram indicates that V753 Mon may be a triple system containing an extremely cool stellar companion that may play an important role for the formation and evolution in the binary system.

  5. Detailed Broadband Study of the Shortest Orbital Period Black-hole Binary Maxi J1659-152

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Horst, Alexander Jonathan; Kouveliotou, C.; Paragi, Z.; Linford, J. D.; Taylor, G. B.; Kuulkers, E.; Curran, P. A.; Gorosabel, J.; Guziy, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Belloni, T.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.

    2011-09-01

    MAXI J1659-152 is a hard X-ray source discovered by Swift and MAXI. Optical spectroscopy showed that this source is an X-ray binary, and X-ray timing observations classified it as a black-hole candidate. Based on recurring dips in the X-ray light curves, the source was established as the shortest period black-hole binary candidate known to date, with a period of 2.4 hours. Here we present our results from the broadband follow-up campaign we initiated after the source discovery. We obtained densely sampled light curves over two orders of magnitude in radio frequencies, in the UV/optical bands, and at X- and gamma-ray energies. This enabled us to construct broadband spectral energy distributions with very good spectral coverage at many epochs, covering the various X-ray states of MAXI J1659-152 during its outburst. Very Long Baseline Interferomety observations provide constraints on the size of the radio emitting jet, which, combined with the modeling results of the broadband spectra, present a comprehensive picture of the outburst from this new X-ray binary.

  6. New Paths of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smutny, Joan Franklin

    2011-01-01

    While resources for the gifted are not abundant, many schools do offer classes, programs, services, and/or clubs that broaden student learning beyond the curriculum. What can educators do to expand the horizons of gifted children--to open their minds to new worlds of knowledge and understanding? Programs for gifted students, particularly those…

  7. 757 Path Loss Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Kent; Huffman, Mitch; Eppic, Brian; White, Harrison

    2005-01-01

    Path Loss Measurements were obtained on three (3) GPS equipped 757 aircraft. Systems measured were Marker Beacon, LOC, VOR, VHF (3), Glide Slope, ATC (2), DME (2), TCAS, and GPS. This data will provide the basis for assessing the EMI (Electromagnetic Interference) safety margins of comm/nav (communication and navigation) systems to portable electronic device emissions. These Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) include all devices operated in or around the aircraft by crews, passengers, servicing personnel, as well as the general public in the airport terminals. EMI assessment capability is an important step in determining if one system-wide PED EMI policy is appropriate. This data may also be used comparatively with theoretical analysis and computer modeling data sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center and others.

  8. Interactive cutting path analysis programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, J. M.; Williams, D. S.; Colley, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The operation of numerically controlled machine tools is interactively simulated. Four programs were developed to graphically display the cutting paths for a Monarch lathe, Cintimatic mill, Strippit sheet metal punch, and the wiring path for a Standard wire wrap machine. These programs are run on a IMLAC PDS-ID graphic display system under the DOS-3 disk operating system. The cutting path analysis programs accept input via both paper tape and disk file.

  9. PathVisio 3: An Extendable Pathway Analysis Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Kutmon, Martina; van Iersel, Martijn P.; Bohler, Anwesha; Kelder, Thomas; Nunes, Nuno; Pico, Alexander R.; Evelo, Chris T.

    2015-01-01

    PathVisio is a commonly used pathway editor, visualization and analysis software. Biological pathways have been used by biologists for many years to describe the detailed steps in biological processes. Those powerful, visual representations help researchers to better understand, share and discuss knowledge. Since the first publication of PathVisio in 2008, the original paper was cited more than 170 times and PathVisio was used in many different biological studies. As an online editor PathVisio is also integrated in the community curated pathway database WikiPathways. Here we present the third version of PathVisio with the newest additions and improvements of the application. The core features of PathVisio are pathway drawing, advanced data visualization and pathway statistics. Additionally, PathVisio 3 introduces a new powerful extension systems that allows other developers to contribute additional functionality in form of plugins without changing the core application. PathVisio can be downloaded from http://www.pathvisio.org and in 2014 PathVisio 3 has been downloaded over 5,500 times. There are already more than 15 plugins available in the central plugin repository. PathVisio is a freely available, open-source tool published under the Apache 2.0 license (http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0). It is implemented in Java and thus runs on all major operating systems. The code repository is available at http://svn.bigcat.unimaas.nl/pathvisio. The support mailing list for users is available on https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/wikipathways-discuss and for developers on https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/wikipathways-devel. PMID:25706687

  10. PathVisio 3: an extendable pathway analysis toolbox.

    PubMed

    Kutmon, Martina; van Iersel, Martijn P; Bohler, Anwesha; Kelder, Thomas; Nunes, Nuno; Pico, Alexander R; Evelo, Chris T

    2015-02-01

    PathVisio is a commonly used pathway editor, visualization and analysis software. Biological pathways have been used by biologists for many years to describe the detailed steps in biological processes. Those powerful, visual representations help researchers to better understand, share and discuss knowledge. Since the first publication of PathVisio in 2008, the original paper was cited more than 170 times and PathVisio was used in many different biological studies. As an online editor PathVisio is also integrated in the community curated pathway database WikiPathways. Here we present the third version of PathVisio with the newest additions and improvements of the application. The core features of PathVisio are pathway drawing, advanced data visualization and pathway statistics. Additionally, PathVisio 3 introduces a new powerful extension systems that allows other developers to contribute additional functionality in form of plugins without changing the core application. PathVisio can be downloaded from http://www.pathvisio.org and in 2014 PathVisio 3 has been downloaded over 5,500 times. There are already more than 15 plugins available in the central plugin repository. PathVisio is a freely available, open-source tool published under the Apache 2.0 license (http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0). It is implemented in Java and thus runs on all major operating systems. The code repository is available at http://svn.bigcat.unimaas.nl/pathvisio. The support mailing list for users is available on https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/wikipathways-discuss and for developers on https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/wikipathways-devel.

  11. Handbook of Feynman Path Integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosche, Christian, Steiner, Frank

    The Handbook of Feynman Path Integrals appears just fifty years after Richard Feynman published his pioneering paper in 1948 entitled "Space-Time Approach to Non-Relativistic Quantum Mechanics", in which he introduced his new formulation of quantum mechanics in terms of path integrals. The book presents for the first time a comprehensive table of Feynman path integrals together with an extensive list of references; it will serve the reader as a thorough introduction to the theory of path integrals. As a reference book, it is unique in its scope and will be essential for many physicists, chemists and mathematicians working in different areas of research.

  12. Path Models of Vocal Emotion Communication

    PubMed Central

    Bänziger, Tanja; Hosoya, Georg; Scherer, Klaus R.

    2015-01-01

    We propose to use a comprehensive path model of vocal emotion communication, encompassing encoding, transmission, and decoding processes, to empirically model data sets on emotion expression and recognition. The utility of the approach is demonstrated for two data sets from two different cultures and languages, based on corpora of vocal emotion enactment by professional actors and emotion inference by naïve listeners. Lens model equations, hierarchical regression, and multivariate path analysis are used to compare the relative contributions of objectively measured acoustic cues in the enacted expressions and subjective voice cues as perceived by listeners to the variance in emotion inference from vocal expressions for four emotion families (fear, anger, happiness, and sadness). While the results confirm the central role of arousal in vocal emotion communication, the utility of applying an extended path modeling framework is demonstrated by the identification of unique combinations of distal cues and proximal percepts carrying information about specific emotion families, independent of arousal. The statistical models generated show that more sophisticated acoustic parameters need to be developed to explain the distal underpinnings of subjective voice quality percepts that account for much of the variance in emotion inference, in particular voice instability and roughness. The general approach advocated here, as well as the specific results, open up new research strategies for work in psychology (specifically emotion and social perception research) and engineering and computer science (specifically research and development in the domain of affective computing, particularly on automatic emotion detection and synthetic emotion expression in avatars). PMID:26325076

  13. THE SHORTEST PERIOD sdB PLUS WHITE DWARF BINARY CD-30 11223 (GALEX J1411-3053)

    SciTech Connect

    Vennes, S.; Kawka, A.; Nemeth, P.; O'Toole, S. J.; Burton, D.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the discovery of the shortest period binary comprising a hot subdwarf star (CD-30 11223, GALEX J1411-3053) and a massive unseen companion. Photometric data from the All Sky Automated Survey show ellipsoidal variations of the hot subdwarf primary and spectroscopic series revealed an orbital period of 70.5 minutes. The large velocity amplitude suggests the presence of a massive white dwarf in the system (M{sub 2}/M{sub Sun} {approx}> 0.77) assuming a canonical mass for the hot subdwarf (0.48 M{sub Sun }), although a white dwarf mass as low as 0.75 M{sub Sun} is allowable by postulating a subdwarf mass as low as 0.44 M{sub Sun }. The amplitude of ellipsoidal variations and a high rotation velocity imposed a high-inclination to the system (i {approx}> 68 Degree-Sign ) and, possibly, observable secondary transits (i {approx}> 74 Degree-Sign ). At the lowest permissible inclination and assuming a subdwarf mass of {approx}0.48 M{sub Sun }, the total mass of the system reaches the Chandrasekhar mass limit at 1.35 M{sub Sun} and would exceed it for a subdwarf mass above 0.48 M{sub Sun }. The system should be considered, like its sibling KPD 1930+2752, a candidate progenitor for a Type Ia supernova. The system should become semi-detached and initiate mass transfer within Almost-Equal-To 30 Myr.

  14. Reconfigurable data path processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohoe, Gregory (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A reconfigurable data path processor comprises a plurality of independent processing elements. Each of the processing elements advantageously comprising an identical architecture. Each processing element comprises a plurality of data processing means for generating a potential output. Each processor is also capable of through-putting an input as a potential output with little or no processing. Each processing element comprises a conditional multiplexer having a first conditional multiplexer input, a second conditional multiplexer input and a conditional multiplexer output. A first potential output value is transmitted to the first conditional multiplexer input, and a second potential output value is transmitted to the second conditional multiplexer output. The conditional multiplexer couples either the first conditional multiplexer input or the second conditional multiplexer input to the conditional multiplexer output, according to an output control command. The output control command is generated by processing a set of arithmetic status-bits through a logical mask. The conditional multiplexer output is coupled to a first processing element output. A first set of arithmetic bits are generated according to the processing of the first processable value. A second set of arithmetic bits may be generated from a second processing operation. The selection of the arithmetic status-bits is performed by an arithmetic-status bit multiplexer selects the desired set of arithmetic status bits from among the first and second set of arithmetic status bits. The conditional multiplexer evaluates the select arithmetic status bits according to logical mask defining an algorithm for evaluating the arithmetic status bits.

  15. Collabortive Authoring of Walden's Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanling; Bogen II, Paul Logasa; Pogue, Daniel; Furuta, Richard Keith; Shipman, Frank Major

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a prototype of an authoring tool to allow users to collaboratively build, annotate, manage, share and reuse collections of distributed resources from the World Wide Web. This extends on the Walden’s Path project’s work to help educators bring resources found on the World Wide Web into a linear contextualized structure. The introduction of collaborative authoring feature fosters collaborative learning activities through social interaction among participants, where participants can coauthor paths in groups. Besides, the prototype supports path sharing, branching and reusing; specifically, individual participant can contribute to the group with private collections of knowledge resources; paths completed by group can be shared among group members, such that participants can tailor, extend, reorder and/or replace nodes to have sub versions of shared paths for different information needs.

  16. Hard paths, soft paths or no paths? Cross-cultural perceptions of water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutich, A.; White, A. C.; White, D. D.; Larson, K. L.; Brewis, A.; Roberts, C.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examine how development status and water scarcity shape people's perceptions of "hard path" and "soft path" water solutions. Based on ethnographic research conducted in four semi-rural/peri-urban sites (in Bolivia, Fiji, New Zealand, and the US), we use content analysis to conduct statistical and thematic comparisons of interview data. Our results indicate clear differences associated with development status and, to a lesser extent, water scarcity. People in the two less developed sites were more likely to suggest hard path solutions, less likely to suggest soft path solutions, and more likely to see no path to solutions than people in the more developed sites. Thematically, people in the two less developed sites envisioned solutions that involve small-scale water infrastructure and decentralized, community-based solutions, while people in the more developed sites envisioned solutions that involve large-scale infrastructure and centralized, regulatory water solutions. People in the two water-scarce sites were less likely to suggest soft path solutions and more likely to see no path to solutions (but no more likely to suggest hard path solutions) than people in the water-rich sites. Thematically, people in the two water-rich sites seemed to perceive a wider array of unrealized potential soft path solutions than those in the water-scarce sites. On balance, our findings are encouraging in that they indicate that people are receptive to soft path solutions in a range of sites, even those with limited financial or water resources. Our research points to the need for more studies that investigate the social feasibility of soft path water solutions, particularly in sites with significant financial and natural resource constraints.

  17. Hard paths, soft paths or no paths? Cross-cultural perceptions of water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutich, A.; White, A. C.; Roberts, C. M.; White, D. D.; Larson, K. L.; Brewis, A.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we examine how development status and water scarcity shape people's perceptions of "hard path" and "soft path" water solutions. Based on ethnographic research conducted in four semi-rural/peri-urban sites (in Bolivia, Fiji, New Zealand, and the US), we use content analysis to conduct statistical and thematic comparisons of interview data. Our results indicate clear differences based on development status and, to a lesser extent, water scarcity. People in less developed sites were more likely to suggest hard path solutions, less likely to suggest soft path solutions, and more likely to see no path to solutions than people in more developed sites. Thematically, people in less developed sites envisioned solutions that involve small-scale water infrastructure and decentralized, community based solutions, while people in more developed sites envisioned solutions that involve large-scale infrastructure and centralized, regulatory water solutions. People in water-scarce sites were less likely to suggest soft path solutions and more likely to see no path to solutions (but no more likely to suggest hard path solutions) than people in water-rich sites. Thematically, people in water-rich sites seemed to perceive a wider array of unrealized potential soft path solutions than those in water-scarce sites. On balance, our findings are encouraging in that they indicate that people are receptive to soft path solutions in a range of sites, even those with limited financial or water resources. Our research points to the need for more studies that investigate the social feasibility of soft path water solutions, particularly in sites with significant financial and natural resource constraints.

  18. Integrated flight path planning system and flight control system for unmanned helicopters.

    PubMed

    Jan, Shau Shiun; Lin, Yu Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the design of an integrated navigation and guidance system for unmanned helicopters. The integrated navigation system comprises two systems: the Flight Path Planning System (FPPS) and the Flight Control System (FCS). The FPPS finds the shortest flight path by the A-Star (A*) algorithm in an adaptive manner for different flight conditions, and the FPPS can add a forbidden zone to stop the unmanned helicopter from crossing over into dangerous areas. In this paper, the FPPS computation time is reduced by the multi-resolution scheme, and the flight path quality is improved by the path smoothing methods. Meanwhile, the FCS includes the fuzzy inference systems (FISs) based on the fuzzy logic. By using expert knowledge and experience to train the FIS, the controller can operate the unmanned helicopter without dynamic models. The integrated system of the FPPS and the FCS is aimed at providing navigation and guidance to the mission destination and it is implemented by coupling the flight simulation software, X-Plane, and the computing software, MATLAB. Simulations are performed and shown in real time three-dimensional animations. Finally, the integrated system is demonstrated to work successfully in controlling the unmanned helicopter to operate in various terrains of a digital elevation model (DEM).

  19. The graph-theoretic minimum energy path problem for ionic conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Ippei

    2015-10-01

    A new computational method was developed to analyze the ionic conduction mechanism in crystals through graph theory. The graph was organized into nodes, which represent the crystal structures modeled by ionic site occupation, and edges, which represent structure transitions via ionic jumps. We proposed a minimum energy path problem, which is similar to the shortest path problem. An effective algorithm to solve the problem was established. Since our method does not use randomized algorithm and time parameters, the computational cost to analyze conduction paths and a migration energy is very low. The power of the method was verified by applying it to α-AgI and the ionic conduction mechanism in α-AgI was revealed. The analysis using single point calculations found the minimum energy path for long-distance ionic conduction, which consists of 12 steps of ionic jumps in a unit cell. From the results, the detailed theoretical migration energy was calculated as 0.11 eV by geometry optimization and nudged elastic band method. Our method can refine candidates for possible jumps in crystals and it can be adapted to other computational methods, such as the nudged elastic band method. We expect that our method will be a powerful tool for analyzing ionic conduction mechanisms, even for large complex crystals.

  20. Integrated Flight Path Planning System and Flight Control System for Unmanned Helicopters

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Shau Shiun; Lin, Yu Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the design of an integrated navigation and guidance system for unmanned helicopters. The integrated navigation system comprises two systems: the Flight Path Planning System (FPPS) and the Flight Control System (FCS). The FPPS finds the shortest flight path by the A-Star (A*) algorithm in an adaptive manner for different flight conditions, and the FPPS can add a forbidden zone to stop the unmanned helicopter from crossing over into dangerous areas. In this paper, the FPPS computation time is reduced by the multi-resolution scheme, and the flight path quality is improved by the path smoothing methods. Meanwhile, the FCS includes the fuzzy inference systems (FISs) based on the fuzzy logic. By using expert knowledge and experience to train the FIS, the controller can operate the unmanned helicopter without dynamic models. The integrated system of the FPPS and the FCS is aimed at providing navigation and guidance to the mission destination and it is implemented by coupling the flight simulation software, X-Plane, and the computing software, MATLAB. Simulations are performed and shown in real time three-dimensional animations. Finally, the integrated system is demonstrated to work successfully in controlling the unmanned helicopter to operate in various terrains of a digital elevation model (DEM). PMID:22164029

  1. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends... completed; and (1) The takeoff path must be based on the procedures prescribed in § 23.45; (2) The...

  2. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends... completed; and (1) The takeoff path must be based on the procedures prescribed in § 23.45; (2) The...

  3. Pathways with PathWhiz

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Allison; Jewison, Timothy; Su, Yilu; Liang, Yongjie; Knox, Craig; Maciejewski, Adam; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S.

    2015-01-01

    PathWhiz (http://smpdb.ca/pathwhiz) is a web server designed to create colourful, visually pleasing and biologically accurate pathway diagrams that are both machine-readable and interactive. As a web server, PathWhiz is accessible from almost any place and compatible with essentially any operating system. It also houses a public library of pathways and pathway components that can be easily viewed and expanded upon by its users. PathWhiz allows users to readily generate biologically complex pathways by using a specially designed drawing palette to quickly render metabolites (including automated structure generation), proteins (including quaternary structures, covalent modifications and cofactors), nucleic acids, membranes, subcellular structures, cells, tissues and organs. Both small-molecule and protein/gene pathways can be constructed by combining multiple pathway processes such as reactions, interactions, binding events and transport activities. PathWhiz's pathway replication and propagation functions allow for existing pathways to be used to create new pathways or for existing pathways to be automatically propagated across species. PathWhiz pathways can be saved in BioPAX, SBGN-ML and SBML data exchange formats, as well as PNG, PWML, HTML image map or SVG images that can be viewed offline or explored using PathWhiz's interactive viewer. PathWhiz has been used to generate over 700 pathway diagrams for a number of popular databases including HMDB, DrugBank and SMPDB. PMID:25934797

  4. Linear polymers in disordered media: The shortest, the longest, and the mean self-avoiding walk on percolation clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Hans-Karl; Stenull, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Long linear polymers in strongly disordered media are well described by self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on percolation clusters and a lot can be learned about the statistics of these polymers by studying the length distribution of SAWs on percolation clusters. This distribution encompasses 2 distinct averages, viz., the average over the conformations of the underlying cluster and the SAW conformations. For the latter average, there are two basic options, one being static and one being kinetic. It is well known for static averaging that if the disorder of the underlying medium is weak, this disorder is redundant in the sense the renormalization group; i.e., differences to the ordered case appear merely in nonuniversal quantities. Using dynamical field theory, we show that the same holds true for kinetic averaging. Our main focus, however, lies on strong disorder, i.e., the medium being close to the percolation point, where disorder is relevant. Employing a field theory for the nonlinear random resistor network in conjunction with a real-world interpretation of the corresponding Feynman diagrams, we calculate the scaling exponents for the shortest, the longest, and the mean or average SAW to 2-loop order. In addition, we calculate to 2-loop order the entire family of multifractal exponents that governs the moments of the the statistical weights of the elementary constituents (bonds or sites of the underlying fractal cluster) contributing to the SAWs. Our RG analysis reveals that kinetic averaging leads to renormalizability whereas static averaging does not, and hence, we argue that the latter does not lead to a well-defined scaling limit. We discuss the possible implications of this finding for experiments and numerical simulations which have produced widespread results for the exponent of the average SAW. To corroborate our results, we also study the well-known Meir-Harris model for SAWs on percolation clusters. We demonstrate that the Meir-Harris model leads back up to

  5. Initial Studies Toward Real-Time Transmission Path Rating

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ruchi; Diao, Ruisheng; Cai, Niannian; Huang, Zhenyu; Tuck, Brian; Guo, Xinxin

    2012-07-26

    Demand continues to increase while transmission line construction is being constrained by multiple factors— economic, environmental, and political. Effective and efficient utilization of transmission lines is thus of great importance in an open access environment. Large blocks of power are transferred from areas with inexpensive generation to heavy load demand areas or areas with high generation costs. This results in some transmission paths being loaded closer to their path ratings, which limits further power transfer between areas. Traditionally, rating of important paths was determined off line by assuming the worst-case study scenario; once determined, it could be used for years. With increasing uncertainty arising from rapid growth of renewable energy and smart technologies, path rating studies are needed in near-real time to account for the latest system status and support a reliable and economic power grid. This paper adopts a simplified procedure based on standards of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) to determine total transfer capability (TTC) or transfer limit for the purpose of demonstrating the benefits and necessity of real-time path rating. Initial studies are conducted to compute TTC of a two-area test system and a 39-bus test system. Results indicate that path rating can be significantly affected by loading conditions, generator schedules, system topology and other factors.

  6. Heuristically optimal path scanning for high-speed multiphoton circuit imaging.

    PubMed

    Sadovsky, Alexander J; Kruskal, Peter B; Kimmel, Joseph M; Ostmeyer, Jared; Neubauer, Florian B; MacLean, Jason N

    2011-09-01

    Population dynamics of patterned neuronal firing are fundamental to information processing in the brain. Multiphoton microscopy in combination with calcium indicator dyes allows circuit dynamics to be imaged with single-neuron resolution. However, the temporal resolution of fluorescent measures is constrained by the imaging frequency imposed by standard raster scanning techniques. As a result, traditional raster scans limit the ability to detect the relative timing of action potentials in the imaged neuronal population. To maximize the speed of fluorescence measures from large populations of neurons using a standard multiphoton laser scanning microscope (MPLSM) setup, we have developed heuristically optimal path scanning (HOPS). HOPS optimizes the laser travel path length, and thus the temporal resolution of neuronal fluorescent measures, using standard galvanometer scan mirrors. Minimizing the scan path alone is insufficient for prolonged high-speed imaging of neuronal populations. Path stability and the signal-to-noise ratio become increasingly important factors as scan rates increase. HOPS addresses this by characterizing the scan mirror galvanometers to achieve prolonged path stability. In addition, the neuronal dwell time is optimized to sharpen the detection of action potentials while maximizing scan rate. The combination of shortest path calculation and minimization of mirror positioning time allows us to optically monitor a population of neurons in a field of view at high rates with single-spike resolution, ∼ 125 Hz for 50 neurons and ∼ 8.5 Hz for 1,000 neurons. Our approach introduces an accessible method for rapid imaging of large neuronal populations using traditional MPLSMs, facilitating new insights into neuronal circuit dynamics.

  7. Measurements of isocenter path characteristics of the gantry rotation axis with a smartphone application

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefer, H. Peters, S.; Plasswilm, L.; Ingulfsen, N.; Kluckert, J.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: For stereotactic radiosurgery, the AAPM Report No. 54 [AAPM Task Group 42 (AAPM, 1995)] requires the overall stability of the isocenter (couch, gantry, and collimator) to be within a 1 mm radius. In reality, a rotating system has no rigid axis and thus no isocenter point which is fixed in space. As a consequence, the isocenter concept is reviewed here. It is the aim to develop a measurement method following the revised definitions. Methods: The mechanical isocenter is defined here by the point which rotates on the shortest path in the room coordinate system. The path is labeled as “isocenter path.” Its center of gravity is assumed to be the mechanical isocenter. Following this definition, an image-based and radiation-free measurement method was developed. Multiple marker pairs in a plane perpendicular to the assumed gantry rotation axis of a linear accelerator are imaged with a smartphone application from several rotation angles. Each marker pair represents an independent measuring system. The room coordinates of the isocenter path and the mechanical isocenter are calculated based on the marker coordinates. The presented measurement method is by this means strictly focused on the mechanical isocenter. Results: The measurement result is available virtually immediately following completion of measurement. When 12 independent measurement systems are evaluated, the standard deviations of the isocenter path points and mechanical isocenter coordinates are 0.02 and 0.002 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The measurement is highly accurate, time efficient, and simple to adapt. It is therefore suitable for regular checks of the mechanical isocenter characteristics of the gantry and collimator rotation axis. When the isocenter path is reproducible and its extent is in the range of the needed geometrical accuracy, it should be taken into account in the planning process. This is especially true for stereotactic treatments and radiosurgery.

  8. Heuristically optimal path scanning for high-speed multiphoton circuit imaging.

    PubMed

    Sadovsky, Alexander J; Kruskal, Peter B; Kimmel, Joseph M; Ostmeyer, Jared; Neubauer, Florian B; MacLean, Jason N

    2011-09-01

    Population dynamics of patterned neuronal firing are fundamental to information processing in the brain. Multiphoton microscopy in combination with calcium indicator dyes allows circuit dynamics to be imaged with single-neuron resolution. However, the temporal resolution of fluorescent measures is constrained by the imaging frequency imposed by standard raster scanning techniques. As a result, traditional raster scans limit the ability to detect the relative timing of action potentials in the imaged neuronal population. To maximize the speed of fluorescence measures from large populations of neurons using a standard multiphoton laser scanning microscope (MPLSM) setup, we have developed heuristically optimal path scanning (HOPS). HOPS optimizes the laser travel path length, and thus the temporal resolution of neuronal fluorescent measures, using standard galvanometer scan mirrors. Minimizing the scan path alone is insufficient for prolonged high-speed imaging of neuronal populations. Path stability and the signal-to-noise ratio become increasingly important factors as scan rates increase. HOPS addresses this by characterizing the scan mirror galvanometers to achieve prolonged path stability. In addition, the neuronal dwell time is optimized to sharpen the detection of action potentials while maximizing scan rate. The combination of shortest path calculation and minimization of mirror positioning time allows us to optically monitor a population of neurons in a field of view at high rates with single-spike resolution, ∼ 125 Hz for 50 neurons and ∼ 8.5 Hz for 1,000 neurons. Our approach introduces an accessible method for rapid imaging of large neuronal populations using traditional MPLSMs, facilitating new insights into neuronal circuit dynamics. PMID:21715667

  9. Scattering theory with path integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfelder, R.

    2014-03-15

    Starting from well-known expressions for the T-matrix and its derivative in standard nonrelativistic potential scattering, I rederive recent path-integral formulations due to Efimov and Barbashov et al. Some new relations follow immediately.

  10. Path planning for mobile robots based on visibility graphs and A* algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Juan D.; Martínez S., Fernando; Martínez S., Fredy H.

    2015-07-01

    One of most worked issues in the last years in robotics has been the study of strategies to path planning for mobile robots in static and observable conditions. This is an open problem without pre-defined rules (non-heuristic), which needs to measure the state of the environment, finds useful information, and uses an algorithm to select the best path. This paper proposes a simple and efficient geometric path planning strategy supported in digital image processing. The image of the environment is processed in order to identify obstacles, and thus the free space for navigation. Then, using visibility graphs, the possible navigation paths guided by the vertices of obstacles are produced. Finally the A* algorithm is used to find a best possible path. The alternative proposed is evaluated by simulation on a large set of test environments, showing in all cases its ability to find a free collision plausible path.

  11. Discrete Coherent State Path Integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchioro, Thomas L., II

    1990-01-01

    The quantum theory provides a fundamental understanding of the physical world; however, as the number of degrees of freedom rises, the information required to specify quantum wavefunctions grows geometrically. Because basis set expansions mirror this geometric growth, a strict practical limit on quantum mechanics as a numerical tool arises, specifically, three degrees of freedom or fewer. Recent progress has been made utilizing Feynman's Path Integral formalism to bypass this geometric growth and instead calculate time -dependent correlation functions directly. The solution of the Schrodinger equation is converted into a large dimensional (formally infinite) integration, which can then be attacked with Monte Carlo techniques. To date, work in this area has concentrated on developing sophisticated mathematical algorithms for evaluating the highly oscillatory integrands occurring in Feynman Path Integrals. In an alternative approach, this work demonstrates two formulations of quantum dynamics for which the number of mathematical operations does not scale geometrically. Both methods utilize the Coherent State basis of quantum mechanics. First, a localized coherent state basis set expansion and an approximate short time propagator are developed. Iterations of the short time propagator lead to the full quantum dynamics if the coherent state basis is sufficiently dense along the classical phase space path of the system. Second, the coherent state path integral is examined in detail. For a common class of Hamiltonians, H = p^2/2 + V( x) the path integral is reformulated from a phase space-like expression into one depending on (q,dot q). It is demonstrated that this new path integral expression contains localized damping terms which can serve as a statistical weight for Monte Carlo evaluation of the integral--a process which scales approximately linearly with the number of degrees of freedom. Corrections to the traditional coherent state path integral, inspired by a

  12. Eddy covariance measurements in complex terrain with a new fast response, closed-path analyzer: spectral characteristics and cross-system comparisons

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, a new class of enclosed, closed-path gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance applications has come to market, designed to combine the advantages of traditional closed-path systems (small density corrections, good performance in poor weather) and open-path syst...

  13. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  14. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 75753, December 2, 2011. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends from a standing start to a point...

  15. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  16. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  17. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and commuter category airplanes, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends...

  18. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  19. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff path. 23.57 Section 23.57... path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum weight and commuter category airplanes, the takeoff path is as follows: (a) The takeoff path extends...

  20. 14 CFR 25.111 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff path. 25.111 Section 25.111... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.111 Takeoff path. (a) The takeoff path... and VFTO is reached, whichever point is higher. In addition— (1) The takeoff path must be based on...

  1. Long-path Atmospheric Measurements Using Dual Frequency Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, K.; Truong, G. W.; Waxman, E.; Baumann, E.; Giorgetta, F.; Rieker, G. B.; Sinclair, L.; Swann, W.; Coddington, I.; Newbury, N.

    2015-12-01

    Dual frequency comb (DFC) spectroscopy is a new technique that combines broad spectral bandwidth, high spectral resolution, rapid data acquisition, and high sensitivity. In addition, unlike standard Fourier-transform spectroscopy, it has an almost ideal instrument lineshape function and does not require recalibration. These features make DFC spectroscopy well suited for accurate measurements of multiple species simultaneously. We have recently demonstrated DFC-based open-path measurements of several greenhouse gases in the 1.6-1.67 μm (6250-6000 cm-1) spectral region with 2 km of path length [Rieker et al, 2014]. This initial demonstration used laboratory-based lasers and achieved a sensitivity of 2.3 ppbv for CH4, 1 ppmv for CO2, and <1 ppmv for H2O and HDO with 5 minute measurement times. We are currently developing a portable system that will cover a wider spectral region (about 1.3-2.1 μm or 7700-4750 cm-1) with improved sensitivity. In this talk, we will provide an introduction to dual frequency comb spectroscopy and then discuss ongoing improvements to the open-path system. G. B. Rieker, F. R. Giorgetta, W. C. Swann, J. Kofler, A. M. Zolot, L. C. Sinclair, E. Baumann, C. Cromer, G. Petron, C. Sweeney, P. P. Tans, I. Coddington, and N. R. Newbury (2014), Frequency-comb-based remote sensing of greenhouse gases over kilometer air paths, Optica, 1(5), 290-298.

  2. Balanced Paths in Colored Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Alessandro; Faella, Marco; Mogavero, Fabio; Murano, Aniello

    We consider finite graphs whose edges are labeled with elements, called colors, taken from a fixed finite alphabet. We study the problem of determining whether there is an infinite path where either (i) all colors occur with the same asymptotic frequency, or (ii) there is a constant which bounds the difference between the occurrences of any two colors for all prefixes of the path. These two notions can be viewed as refinements of the classical notion of fair path, whose simplest form checks whether all colors occur infinitely often. Our notions provide stronger criteria, particularly suitable for scheduling applications based on a coarse-grained model of the jobs involved. We show that both problems are solvable in polynomial time, by reducing them to the feasibility of a linear program.

  3. Speckle Imaging Over Horizontal Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, C J

    2002-05-21

    Atmospheric aberrations reduce the resolution and contrast in surveillance images recorded over horizontal or slant paths. This paper describes our recent horizontal and slant path imaging experiments of extended scenes as well as the results obtained using speckle imaging. The experiments were performed with an 8-inch diameter telescope placed on either a rooftop or hillside and cover ranges of interest from 0.5 km up to 10 km. The scenery includes resolution targets, people, vehicles, and other structures. The improvement in image quality using speckle imaging is dramatic in many cases, and depends significantly upon the atmospheric conditions. We quantify resolution improvement through modulation transfer function measurement comparisons.

  4. Multiple paths in complex tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, Eugene; Wiegand, Thomas; Mark, Gloria

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between utility judgments of subtask paths and the utility of the task as a whole was examined. The convergent validation procedure is based on the assumption that measurements of the same quantity done with different methods should covary. The utility measures of the subtasks were obtained during the performance of an aircraft flight controller navigation task. Analyses helped decide among various models of subtask utility combination, whether the utility ratings of subtask paths predict the whole tasks utility rating, and indirectly, whether judgmental models need to include the equivalent of cognitive noise.

  5. Simplified optical correlation-domain reflectometry without reference path.

    PubMed

    Shizuka, Makoto; Hayashi, Neisei; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-05-20

    We develop a simplified configuration for optical correlation-domain reflectometry (OCDR) without an explicit reference path. Instead, the Fresnel-reflected light generated at the distal open end of the sensing fiber is exploited as a reference light. After the fundamental demonstration, the optimal incident power is found to be approximately 8 dBm. We also show that the loss near the distal end should not be applied, unlike in the case of Brillouin-based OCDR. PMID:27411116

  6. 3. Aerial view of turnpike path showing realignment of 1917. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Aerial view of turnpike path showing realignment of 1917. Modernized Orange Turnpike visible running diagonally up from lower left to open area where it veers to the west around the Migel Estate. The beginning of the realignment is located by the cluster of white trailers. Original alignment visible as a row of trees cutting through the base landscape. View looking northwest. - Orange Turnpike, Parallel to new Orange Turnpike, Monroe, Orange County, NY

  7. Path Similarity Analysis: A Method for Quantifying Macromolecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Seyler, Sean L.; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, M. F.; Beckstein, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Diverse classes of proteins function through large-scale conformational changes and various sophisticated computational algorithms have been proposed to enhance sampling of these macromolecular transition paths. Because such paths are curves in a high-dimensional space, it has been difficult to quantitatively compare multiple paths, a necessary prerequisite to, for instance, assess the quality of different algorithms. We introduce a method named Path Similarity Analysis (PSA) that enables us to quantify the similarity between two arbitrary paths and extract the atomic-scale determinants responsible for their differences. PSA utilizes the full information available in 3N-dimensional configuration space trajectories by employing the Hausdorff or Fréchet metrics (adopted from computational geometry) to quantify the degree of similarity between piecewise-linear curves. It thus completely avoids relying on projections into low dimensional spaces, as used in traditional approaches. To elucidate the principles of PSA, we quantified the effect of path roughness induced by thermal fluctuations using a toy model system. Using, as an example, the closed-to-open transitions of the enzyme adenylate kinase (AdK) in its substrate-free form, we compared a range of protein transition path-generating algorithms. Molecular dynamics-based dynamic importance sampling (DIMS) MD and targeted MD (TMD) and the purely geometric FRODA (Framework Rigidity Optimized Dynamics Algorithm) were tested along with seven other methods publicly available on servers, including several based on the popular elastic network model (ENM). PSA with clustering revealed that paths produced by a given method are more similar to each other than to those from another method and, for instance, that the ENM-based methods produced relatively similar paths. PSA applied to ensembles of DIMS MD and FRODA trajectories of the conformational transition of diphtheria toxin, a particularly challenging example, showed that

  8. Perceived Shrinkage of Motion Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinico, Michele; Parovel, Giulia; Casco, Clara; Anstis, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    We show that human observers strongly underestimate a linear or circular trajectory that a luminous spot follows in the dark. At slow speeds, observers are relatively accurate, but, as the speed increases, the size of the path is progressively underestimated, by up to 35%. The underestimation imposes little memory load and does not require…

  9. Thinking on the Write Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2007-01-01

    The present paper underscores the importance of the cognitive orientation of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students in their success in writing courses. A few suggestions are made as to how EFL teachers can put their students on the right cognitive path in their writings.

  10. Career Paths in Environmental Sciences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Career paths, current and future, in the environmental sciences will be discussed, based on experiences and observations during the author's 40 + years in the field. An emphasis will be placed on the need for integrated, transdisciplinary systems thinking approaches toward achie...

  11. Career Paths of Academic Deans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Mimi; Gonzales, Mary Jo

    This paper examines various career paths leading to deanship and considers the implications of the findings for women and minorities who aspire to this position. The paper is part of a larger study of academic deanship conducted by the Center for Academic Leadership at Washington State University between October 1996 and January 1997. Data for the…

  12. Employer Resource Manual. Project Path.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Karen R.; Del George, Eve

    Project Path at Illinois' College of DuPage was established to provide pre-employment training and career counseling for disabled students. To encourage the integration of qualified individuals with disabilities into the workplace, the project compiled this resource manual for area businesses, providing tips for interacting with disabled people…

  13. An advanced open path atmospheric pollution monitor for large areas

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.; Suhre, D.; Mani, S.

    1996-12-31

    Over 100 million gallons of radioactive and toxic waste materials generated in weapon materials production are stored in 322 tanks buried within large areas at DOE sites. Toxic vapors occur in the tank headspace due to the solvents used and chemical reactions within the tanks. To prevent flammable or explosive concentration of volatile vapors, the headspace are vented, either manually or automatically, to the atmosphere when the headspace pressure exceeds preset values. Furthermore, 67 of the 177 tanks at the DOE Hanford Site are suspected or are known to be leaking into the ground. These underground storage tanks are grouped into tank farms which contain closely spaced tanks in areas as large as 1 km{sup 2}. The objective of this program is to protect DOE personnel and the public by monitoring the air above these tank farms for toxic air pollutants without the monitor entering the tanks farms, which can be radioactive. A secondary objective is to protect personnel by monitoring the air above buried 50 gallon drums containing moderately low radioactive materials but which could also emit toxic air pollutants.

  14. OpenEIS Algorithms

    2013-07-29

    The OpenEIS Algorithm package seeks to provide a low-risk path for building owners, service providers and managers to explore analytical methods for improving building control and operational efficiency. Users of this software can analyze building data, and learn how commercial implementations would provide long-term value. The code also serves as a reference implementation for developers who wish to adapt the algorithms for use in commercial tools or service offerings.

  15. Enzymatic reaction paths as determined by transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Jean Emily

    Enzymes are biological catalysts capable of enhancing the rates of chemical reactions by many orders of magnitude as compared to solution chemistry. Since the catalytic power of enzymes routinely exceeds that of the best artificial catalysts available, there is much interest in understanding the complete nature of chemical barrier crossing in enzymatic reactions. Two specific questions pertaining to the source of enzymatic rate enhancements are investigated in this work. The first is the issue of how fast protein motions of an enzyme contribute to chemical barrier crossing. Our group has previously identified sub-picosecond protein motions, termed promoting vibrations (PVs), that dynamically modulate chemical transformation in several enzymes. In the case of human heart lactate dehydrogenase (hhLDH), prior studies have shown that a specific axis of residues undergoes a compressional fluctuation towards the active site, decreasing a hydride and a proton donor--acceptor distance on a sub-picosecond timescale to promote particle transfer. To more thoroughly understand the contribution of this dynamic motion to the enzymatic reaction coordinate of hhLDH, we conducted transition path sampling (TPS) using four versions of the enzymatic system: a wild type enzyme with natural isotopic abundance; a heavy enzyme where all the carbons, nitrogens, and non-exchangeable hydrogens were replaced with heavy isotopes; and two versions of the enzyme with mutations in the axis of PV residues. We generated four separate ensembles of reaction paths and analyzed each in terms of the reaction mechanism, time of barrier crossing, dynamics of the PV, and residues involved in the enzymatic reaction coordinate. We found that heavy isotopic substitution of hhLDH altered the sub-picosecond dynamics of the PV, changed the favored reaction mechanism, dramatically increased the time of barrier crossing, but did not have an effect on the specific residues involved in the PV. In the mutant systems

  16. Integrating two-dimensional paths: do desert ants process distance information in the absence of celestial compass cues?

    PubMed

    Ronacher, B; Westwig, E; Wehner, R

    2006-09-01

    When performing foraging trips desert ants of the genus Cataglyphis continuously process and update a ;home vector' that enables them to return to their nest on the shortest route. This capacity of path integration requires two types of information: (i) information about the travelling directions, and (ii) odometric information about the distances travelled in a particular direction. We have investigated how these two necessary pieces of information interact within the path integration processor. The specific question is: how do the ants process distance information if there is no simultaneous input from the sky compass available. Ants were trained to forage in a ;Z'-shaped channel system, the three segments of which joined at right angles. Individual animals were transferred from the feeder to a test field where their homing paths could be observed. In the crucial tests the middle segment of the maze was covered by orange Perspex that did not transmit the UV part of the spectrum, and thus precluded the perception of polarization patterns. Changes of the ant's processing of odometric information within this channel segment directly translate into a change in homing direction on the test field. The results indicate that the odometric information about travelling distance is largely ignored for path integration if there is no simultaneous input from the sky-view-based compass. They further show that idiothetic information cannot adequately substitute for the polarization compass to infer travelling directions.

  17. Robust Flight Path Determination for Mars Precision Landing Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Kohen, Hamid

    1997-01-01

    This paper documents the application of genetic algorithms (GAs) to the problem of robust flight path determination for Mars precision landing. The robust flight path problem is defined here as the determination of the flight path which delivers a low-lift open-loop controlled vehicle to its desired final landing location while minimizing the effect of perturbations due to uncertainty in the atmospheric model and entry conditions. The genetic algorithm was capable of finding solutions which reduced the landing error from 111 km RMS radial (open-loop optimal) to 43 km RMS radial (optimized with respect to perturbations) using 200 hours of computation on an Ultra-SPARC workstation. Further reduction in the landing error is possible by going to closed-loop control which can utilize the GA optimized paths as nominal trajectories for linearization.

  18. Automatic selection of switching paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B. A.

    A unique solution is presented to the problem of switching path selection through an analog switch complex. Known as the ROUTER, the software package performs a dynamic allocation of switching paths at the time that an analog signal connection is required. The ROUTER also chooses the type of relay that is appropriate to the signal being transmitted. Different types of switches are furnished for small signal, RF, video, power, or logic signals. Devices using a multiple number of leads, such as synchros or resolvers, are switched as a single unit. The algorithm used by the ROUTER is based on a tree search and connection technique. The interconnections of the hardware switches and devices are described by a connection matrix as a set of data structures. Each node of the switching complex is described in terms of its connectivity and attributes.

  19. Path entanglement of surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakonas, James S.; Mitskovets, Anna; Atwater, Harry A.

    2015-02-01

    Metals can sustain traveling electromagnetic waves at their surfaces supported by the collective oscillations of their free electrons in unison. Remarkably, classical electromagnetism captures the essential physics of these ‘surface plasma’ waves using simple models with only macroscopic features, accounting for microscopic electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions with a single, semi-empirical damping parameter. Nevertheless, in quantum theory these microscopic interactions could be important, as any substantial environmental interactions could decohere quantum superpositions of surface plasmons, the quanta of these waves. Here we report a measurement of path entanglement between surface plasmons with 95% contrast, confirming that a path-entangled state can indeed survive without measurable decoherence. Our measurement suggests that elastic scattering mechanisms of the type that might cause pure dephasing in plasmonic systems must be weak enough not to significantly perturb the state of the metal under the experimental conditions we investigated.

  20. Squeezed states and path integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daubechies, Ingrid; Klauder, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The continuous-time regularization scheme for defining phase-space path integrals is briefly reviewed as a method to define a quantization procedure that is completely covariant under all smooth canonical coordinate transformations. As an illustration of this method, a limited set of transformations is discussed that have an image in the set of the usual squeezed states. It is noteworthy that even this limited set of transformations offers new possibilities for stationary phase approximations to quantum mechanical propagators.

  1. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.

    1998-06-30

    This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE`s national strategy, the Richland Operations Office`s Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established.

  2. Path optimization for oil probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, O'Neil; Rahmes, Mark; Blue, Mark; Peter, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    We discuss a robust method for optimal oil probe path planning inspired by medical imaging. Horizontal wells require three-dimensional steering made possible by the rotary steerable capabilities of the system, which allows the hole to intersect multiple target shale gas zones. Horizontal "legs" can be over a mile long; the longer the exposure length, the more oil and natural gas is drained and the faster it can flow. More oil and natural gas can be produced with fewer wells and less surface disturbance. Horizontal drilling can help producers tap oil and natural gas deposits under surface areas where a vertical well cannot be drilled, such as under developed or environmentally sensitive areas. Drilling creates well paths which have multiple twists and turns to try to hit multiple accumulations from a single well location. Our algorithm can be used to augment current state of the art methods. Our goal is to obtain a 3D path with nodes describing the optimal route to the destination. This algorithm works with BIG data and saves cost in planning for probe insertion. Our solution may be able to help increase the energy extracted vs. input energy.

  3. Copper foil provides uniform heat sink path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, I. E., Jr.; Schreihans, F. A.

    1966-01-01

    Thermal path prevents voids and discontinuities which make heat sinks in electronic equipment inefficient. The thermal path combines the high thermal conductivity of copper with the resiliency of silicone rubber.

  4. Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 71 NIST Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) for use in quantitative surface analyses by AES and XPS.

  5. Time optimal paths for high speed maneuvering

    SciTech Connect

    Reister, D.B.; Lenhart, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical results have completely solved the problem of determining the minimum length path for a vehicle with a minimum turning radius moving from an initial configuration to a final configuration. Time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle are a subset of the minimum length paths. This paper uses the Pontryagin maximum principle to find time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle. The time optimal paths consist of sequences of axes of circles and straight lines. The maximum principle introduces concepts (dual variables, bang-bang solutions, singular solutions, and transversality conditions) that provide important insight into the nature of the time optimal paths. We explore the properties of the optimal paths and present some experimental results for a mobile robot following an optimal path.

  6. Multiple Paths to Encephalization and Technical Civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzman, David; Middendorf, George

    2011-12-01

    We propose consideration of at least two possible evolutionary paths for the emergence of intelligent life with the potential for technical civilization. The first is the path via encephalization of homeothermic animals; the second is the path to swarm intelligence of so-called superorganisms, in particular the social insects. The path to each appears to be facilitated by environmental change: homeothermic animals by decreased climatic temperature and for swarm intelligence by increased oxygen levels.

  7. Critical Path-Based Thread Placement for NUMA Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Su, C Y; Li, D; Nikolopoulos, D S; Grove, M; Cameron, K; de Supinski, B R

    2011-11-01

    Multicore multiprocessors use a Non Uniform Memory Architecture (NUMA) to improve their scalability. However, NUMA introduces performance penalties due to remote memory accesses. Without efficiently managing data layout and thread mapping to cores, scientific applications, even if they are optimized for NUMA, may suffer performance loss. In this paper, we present algorithms and a runtime system that optimize the execution of OpenMP applications on NUMA architectures. By collecting information from hardware counters, the runtime system directs thread placement and reduces performance penalties by minimizing the critical path of OpenMP parallel regions. The runtime system uses a scalable algorithm that derives placement decisions with negligible overhead. We evaluate our algorithms and runtime system with four NPB applications implemented in OpenMP. On average the algorithms achieve between 8.13% and 25.68% performance improvement compared to the default Linux thread placement scheme. The algorithms miss the optimal thread placement in only 8.9% of the cases.

  8. Evaluation of the Learning Path Specification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Jose; Berlanga, Adriana J.; Koper, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Flexible lifelong learning requires that learners can compare and select learning paths that best meet individual needs, not just in terms of learning goals, but also in terms of planning, costs etc. To this end a learning path specification was developed, which describes both the contents and the structure of any learning path, be it formal,…

  9. Performance Analysis of Path Planning Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhirui; Li, Shuanghong; Zhang, Ying; Du, Qiaoling

    Ant colony system (ACS) algorithm was applied to the path planning for the robot. In the same working environment, path planning based on MAKLINK graph theory and Voronoi diagram were simulated and compared. MAKLINK graph theory is appropriate to apply to precise searching in small-scale district, and Voronoi diagram is suitable for fast path planning in a large area.

  10. enviPath – The environmental contaminant biotransformation pathway resource

    PubMed Central

    Wicker, Jörg; Lorsbach, Tim; Gütlein, Martin; Schmid, Emanuel; Latino, Diogo; Kramer, Stefan; Fenner, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database and Pathway Prediction System (UM-BBD/PPS) has been a unique resource covering microbial biotransformation pathways of primarily xenobiotic chemicals for over 15 years. This paper introduces the successor system, enviPath (The Environmental Contaminant Biotransformation Pathway Resource), which is a complete redesign and reimplementation of UM-BBD/PPS. enviPath uses the database from the UM-BBD/PPS as a basis, extends the use of this database, and allows users to include their own data to support multiple use cases. Relative reasoning is supported for the refinement of predictions and to allow its extensions in terms of previously published, but not implemented machine learning models. User access is simplified by providing a REST API that simplifies the inclusion of enviPath into existing workflows. An RDF database is used to enable simple integration with other databases. enviPath is publicly available at https://envipath.org with free and open access to its core data. PMID:26582924

  11. enviPath--The environmental contaminant biotransformation pathway resource.

    PubMed

    Wicker, Jörg; Lorsbach, Tim; Gütlein, Martin; Schmid, Emanuel; Latino, Diogo; Kramer, Stefan; Fenner, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database and Pathway Prediction System (UM-BBD/PPS) has been a unique resource covering microbial biotransformation pathways of primarily xenobiotic chemicals for over 15 years. This paper introduces the successor system, enviPath (The Environmental Contaminant Biotransformation Pathway Resource), which is a complete redesign and reimplementation of UM-BBD/PPS. enviPath uses the database from the UM-BBD/PPS as a basis, extends the use of this database, and allows users to include their own data to support multiple use cases. Relative reasoning is supported for the refinement of predictions and to allow its extensions in terms of previously published, but not implemented machine learning models. User access is simplified by providing a REST API that simplifies the inclusion of enviPath into existing workflows. An RDF database is used to enable simple integration with other databases. enviPath is publicly available at https://envipath.org with free and open access to its core data. PMID:26582924

  12. Equity for open-access journal publishing.

    PubMed

    Shieber, Stuart M

    2009-08-01

    Open-access journals, which provide access to their scholarly articles freely and without limitations, are at a systematic disadvantage relative to traditional closed-access journal publishing and its subscription-based business model. A simple, cost-effective remedy to this inequity could put open-access publishing on a path to become a sustainable, efficient system. PMID:19652697

  13. Extracting contours of oval-shaped objects by Hough transform and minimal path algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tleis, Mohamed; Verbeek, Fons J.

    2014-04-01

    Circular and oval-like objects are very common in cell and micro biology. These objects need to be analyzed, and to that end, digitized images from the microscope are used so as to come to an automated analysis pipeline. It is essential to detect all the objects in an image as well as to extract the exact contour of each individual object. In this manner it becomes possible to perform measurements on these objects, i.e. shape and texture features. Our measurement objective is achieved by probing contour detection through dynamic programming. In this paper we describe a method that uses Hough transform and two minimal path algorithms to detect contours of (ovoid-like) objects. These algorithms are based on an existing grey-weighted distance transform and a new algorithm to extract the circular shortest path in an image. The methods are tested on an artificial dataset of a 1000 images, with an F1-score of 0.972. In a case study with yeast cells, contours from our methods were compared with another solution using Pratt's figure of merit. Results indicate that our methods were more precise based on a comparison with a ground-truth dataset. As far as yeast cells are concerned, the segmentation and measurement results enable, in future work, to retrieve information from different developmental stages of the cell using complex features.

  14. The diagnostic path, a useful visualisation tool in virtual microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Thomas; Niepage, Sonja; Leuthold, Thomas; Saeger, Kai; Schluns, Karsten; Hufnagl, Peter; Kayser, Klaus; Dietel, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    Background The Virtual Microscopy based on completely digitalised histological slide. Concerning this digitalisation many new features in mircoscopy can be processed by the computer. New applications are possible or old, well known techniques of image analyses can be adapted for routine use. Aims A so called diagnostic path observes in the way of a professional sees through a histological virtual slide combined with the text information of the dictation process. This feature can be used for image retrieval, quality assurance or for educational purpose. Materials and methods The diagnostic path implements a metadata structure of image information. It stores and processes the different images seen by a pathologist during his "slide viewing" and the obtained image sequence ("observation path"). Contemporary, the structural details of the pathology reports were analysed. The results were transferred into an XML structure. Based on this structure, a report editor and a search function were implemented. The report editor compiles the "diagnostic path", which is the connection from the image viewing sequence ("observation path") and the oral report sequence of the findings ("dictation path"). The time set ups of speech and image viewing serve for the link between the two sequences. The search tool uses the obtained diagnostic path. It allows the user to search for particular histological hallmarks in pathology reports and in the corresponding images. Results The new algorithm was tested on 50 pathology reports and 74 attached histological images. The creation of a new individual diagnostic path is automatically performed during the routine diagnostic process. The test prototype experienced an insignificant prolongation of the diagnosis procedure (oral case description and stated diagnosis by the pathologist) and a fast and reliable retrieval, especially useful for continuous education and quality control of case description and diagnostic work. Discussion The Digital

  15. Characterizing the Evolutionary Path(s) to Early Homo

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Lauren; Roseman, Charles C.; Cheverud, James M.; Ackermann, Rebecca R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that the transition from Australopithecus to Homo was characterized by evolutionary innovation, resulting in the emergence and coexistence of a diversity of forms. However, the evolutionary processes necessary to drive such a transition have not been examined. Here, we apply statistical tests developed from quantitative evolutionary theory to assess whether morphological differences among late australopith and early Homo species in Africa have been shaped by natural selection. Where selection is demonstrated, we identify aspects of morphology that were most likely under selective pressure, and determine the nature (type, rate) of that selection. Results demonstrate that selection must be invoked to explain an Au. africanus—Au. sediba—Homo transition, while transitions from late australopiths to various early Homo species that exclude Au. sediba can be achieved through drift alone. Rate tests indicate that selection is largely directional, acting to rapidly differentiate these taxa. Reconstructions of patterns of directional selection needed to drive the Au. africanus—Au. sediba—Homo transition suggest that selection would have affected all regions of the skull. These results may indicate that an evolutionary path to Homo without Au. sediba is the simpler path and/or provide evidence that this pathway involved more reliance on cultural adaptations to cope with environmental change. PMID:25470780

  16. Relations between Coherence and Path Information.

    PubMed

    Bagan, Emilio; Bergou, János A; Cottrell, Seth S; Hillery, Mark

    2016-04-22

    We find two relations between coherence and path information in a multipath interferometer. The first builds on earlier results for the two-path interferometer, which used minimum-error state discrimination between detector states to provide the path information. For visibility, which was used in the two-path case, we substitute a recently defined l_{1} measure of quantum coherence. The second is an entropic relation in which the path information is characterized by the mutual information between the detector states and the outcome of the measurement performed on them, and the coherence measure is one based on relative entropy.

  17. Attention trees and semantic paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Christian; Pieroni, Goffredo G.; Pieroni, Laura

    2007-02-01

    In the last few decades several techniques for image content extraction, often based on segmentation, have been proposed. It has been suggested that under the assumption of very general image content, segmentation becomes unstable and classification becomes unreliable. According to recent psychological theories, certain image regions attract the attention of human observers more than others and, generally, the image main meaning appears concentrated in those regions. Initially, regions attracting our attention are perceived as a whole and hypotheses on their content are formulated; successively the components of those regions are carefully analyzed and a more precise interpretation is reached. It is interesting to observe that an image decomposition process performed according to these psychological visual attention theories might present advantages with respect to a traditional segmentation approach. In this paper we propose an automatic procedure generating image decomposition based on the detection of visual attention regions. A new clustering algorithm taking advantage of the Delaunay- Voronoi diagrams for achieving the decomposition target is proposed. By applying that algorithm recursively, starting from the whole image, a transformation of the image into a tree of related meaningful regions is obtained (Attention Tree). Successively, a semantic interpretation of the leaf nodes is carried out by using a structure of Neural Networks (Neural Tree) assisted by a knowledge base (Ontology Net). Starting from leaf nodes, paths toward the root node across the Attention Tree are attempted. The task of the path consists in relating the semantics of each child-parent node pair and, consequently, in merging the corresponding image regions. The relationship detected in this way between two tree nodes generates, as a result, the extension of the interpreted image area through each step of the path. The construction of several Attention Trees has been performed and partial

  18. Evaluation of guidewire path reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Noël, Peter B; Ionita, Ciprian N; Dmochowski, Jacek

    2008-05-01

    The number of minimally invasive vascular interventions is increasing. In these interventions, a variety of devices are directed to and placed at the site of intervention. The device used in almost all of these interventions is the guidewire, acting as a monorail for all devices which are delivered to the intervention site. However, even with the guidewire in place, clinicians still experience difficulties during the interventions. As a first step toward understanding these difficulties and facilitating guidewire and device guidance, we have investigated the reproducibility of the final paths of the guidewire in vessel phantom models on different factors: user, materials and geometry. Three vessel phantoms (vessel diameters approximately 4 mm) were constructed having tortuousity similar to the internal carotid artery from silicon tubing and encased in Sylgard elastomer. Several trained users repeatedly passed two guidewires of different flexibility through the phantoms under pulsatile flow conditions. After the guidewire had been placed, rotational c-arm image sequences were acquired (9 in. II mode, 0.185 mm pixel size), and the phantom and guidewire were reconstructed (512(3), 0.288 mm voxel size). The reconstructed volumes were aligned. The centerlines of the guidewire and the phantom vessel were then determined using region-growing techniques. Guidewire paths appear similar across users but not across materials. The average root mean square difference of the repeated placement was 0.17 +/- 0.02 mm (plastic-coated guidewire), 0.73 +/- 0.55 mm (steel guidewire) and 1.15 +/- 0.65 mm (steel versus plastic-coated). For a given guidewire, these results indicate that the guidewire path is relatively reproducible in shape and position.

  19. Communication path for extreme environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C. (Inventor); Betts, Bradley J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and systems for using one or more radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs), or other suitable signal transmitters and/or receivers, to provide a sensor information communication path, to provide location and/or spatial orientation information for an emergency service worker (ESW), to provide an ESW escape route, to indicate a direction from an ESW to an ES appliance, to provide updated information on a region or structure that presents an extreme environment (fire, hazardous fluid leak, underwater, nuclear, etc.) in which an ESW works, and to provide accumulated thermal load or thermal breakdown information on one or more locations in the region.

  20. Multiple order common path spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbury, Amy B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dispersive spectrometer. The spectrometer allows detection of multiple orders of light on a single focal plane array by splitting the orders spatially using a dichroic assembly. A conventional dispersion mechanism such as a defraction grating disperses the light spectrally. As a result, multiple wavelength orders can be imaged on a single focal plane array of limited spectral extent, doubling (or more) the number of spectral channels as compared to a conventional spectrometer. In addition, this is achieved in a common path device.

  1. Gibbs Ensembles of Nonintersecting Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, Alexei; Shlosman, Senya

    2010-01-01

    We consider a family of determinantal random point processes on the two-dimensional lattice and prove that members of our family can be interpreted as a kind of Gibbs ensembles of nonintersecting paths. Examples include probability measures on lozenge and domino tilings of the plane, some of which are non-translation-invariant. The correlation kernels of our processes can be viewed as extensions of the discrete sine kernel, and we show that the Gibbs property is a consequence of simple linear relations satisfied by these kernels. The processes depend on infinitely many parameters, which are closely related to parametrization of totally positive Toeplitz matrices.

  2. Path integration: effect of curved path complexity and sensory system on blindfolded walking.

    PubMed

    Koutakis, Panagiotis; Mukherjee, Mukul; Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Blanke, Daniel J; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2013-02-01

    Path integration refers to the ability to integrate continuous information of the direction and distance traveled by the system relative to the origin. Previous studies have investigated path integration through blindfolded walking along simple paths such as straight line and triangles. However, limited knowledge exists regarding the role of path complexity in path integration. Moreover, little is known about how information from different sensory input systems (like vision and proprioception) contributes to accurate path integration. The purpose of the current study was to investigate how sensory information and curved path complexity affect path integration. Forty blindfolded participants had to accurately reproduce a curved path and return to the origin. They were divided into four groups that differed in the curved path, circle (simple) or figure-eight (complex), and received either visual (previously seen) or proprioceptive (previously guided) information about the path before they reproduced it. The dependent variables used were average trajectory error, walking speed, and distance traveled. The results indicated that (a) both groups that walked on a circular path and both groups that received visual information produced greater accuracy in reproducing the path. Moreover, the performance of the group that received proprioceptive information and later walked on a figure-eight path was less accurate than their corresponding circular group. The groups that had the visual information also walked faster compared to the group that had proprioceptive information. Results of the current study highlight the roles of different sensory inputs while performing blindfolded walking for path integration.

  3. Path Integration: Effect of Curved Path Complexity and Sensory System on Blindfolded Walking

    PubMed Central

    Koutakis, Panagiotis; Mukherjee, Mukul; Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Blanke, Daniel J.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Path integration refers to the ability to integrate continuous information of the direction and distance travelled by the system relative to the origin. Previous studies have investigated path integration through blindfolded walking along simple paths such as straight line and triangles. However, limited knowledge exists regarding the role of path complexity in path integration. Moreover, little is known about how information from different sensory input systems (like vision and proprioception) contributes to accurate path integration. The purpose of the current study was to investigate how sensory information and curved path complexity affect path integration. Forty blindfolded participants had to accurately reproduce a curved path and return to the origin. They were divided into four groups that differed in the curved path, circle (simple) or figure-eight (complex), and received either visual (previously seen) or proprioceptive (previously guided) information about the path before they reproduced it. The dependent variables used were average trajectory error, walking speed, and distance travelled. The results indicated that (a) both groups that walked on a circular path and both groups that received visual information produced greater accuracy in reproducing the path. Moreover, the performance of the group that received proprioceptive information and later walked on a figure-eight path was less accurate than their corresponding circular group. The groups that had the visual information also walked faster compared to the group that had proprioceptive information. Results of the current study highlight the roles of different sensory inputs while performing blindfolded walking for path integration. PMID:22840893

  4. Cumulative slant path rain attenuation associated with COMSTAR beacon at 28.56 GHz for Wallops Island, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, J.

    1978-01-01

    Yearly, monthly, and time of day fade statistics are presented and characterized. A 19.04 GHz yearly fade distribution, corresponding to a second COMSTAR beacon frequency, is predicted using the concept of effective path length, disdrometer, and rain rate results. The yearly attenuation and rain rate distributions follow with good approximation log normal variations for most fade and rain rate levels. Attenuations were exceeded for the longest and shortest periods of times for all fades in August and February, respectively. The eight hour time period showing the maximum and minimum number of minutes over the year for which fades exceeded 12 db were approximately between 1600 to 2400, and 0400 to 1200 hours, respectively. In employing the predictive method for obtaining the 19.04 GHz fade distribution, it is demonstrated theoretically that the ratio of attenuations at two frequencies is minimally dependent of raindrop size distribution providing these frequencies are not widely separated.

  5. Integrated assignment and path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphey, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    A surge of interest in unmanned systems has exposed many new and challenging research problems across many fields of engineering and mathematics. These systems have the potential of transforming our society by replacing dangerous and dirty jobs with networks of moving machines. This vision is fundamentally separate from the modern view of robotics in that sophisticated behavior is realizable not by increasing individual vehicle complexity, but instead through collaborative teaming that relies on collective perception, abstraction, decision making, and manipulation. Obvious examples where collective robotics will make an impact include planetary exploration, space structure assembly, remote and undersea mining, hazardous material handling and clean-up, and search and rescue. Nonetheless, the phenomenon driving this technology trend is the increasing reliance of the US military on unmanned vehicles, specifically, aircraft. Only a few years ago, following years of resistance to the use of unmanned systems, the military and civilian leadership in the United States reversed itself and have recently demonstrated surprisingly broad acceptance of increasingly pervasive use of unmanned platforms in defense surveillance, and even attack. However, as rapidly as unmanned systems have gained acceptance, the defense research community has discovered the technical pitfalls that lie ahead, especially for operating collective groups of unmanned platforms. A great deal of talent and energy has been devoted to solving these technical problems, which tend to fall into two categories: resource allocation of vehicles to objectives, and path planning of vehicle trajectories. An extensive amount of research has been conducted in each direction, yet, surprisingly, very little work has considered the integrated problem of assignment and path planning. This dissertation presents a framework for studying integrated assignment and path planning and then moves on to suggest an exact

  6. Random paths and current fluctuations in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2014-07-15

    An overview is given of recent advances in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics about the statistics of random paths and current fluctuations. Although statistics is carried out in space for equilibrium statistical mechanics, statistics is considered in time or spacetime for nonequilibrium systems. In this approach, relationships have been established between nonequilibrium properties such as the transport coefficients, the thermodynamic entropy production, or the affinities, and quantities characterizing the microscopic Hamiltonian dynamics and the chaos or fluctuations it may generate. This overview presents results for classical systems in the escape-rate formalism, stochastic processes, and open quantum systems.

  7. The path to adaptive microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolper, John C.; Biercuk, Michael J.

    2006-05-01

    Scaling trends in microsystems are discussed frequently in the technical community, providing a short-term perspective on the future of integrated microsystems. This paper looks beyond the leading edge of technological development, focusing on new microsystem design paradigms that move far beyond today's systems based on static components. We introduce the concept of Adaptive Microsystems and outline a path to realizing these systems-on-a-chip. The role of DARPA in advancing future components and systems research is discussed, and specific DARPA efforts enabling and producing adaptive microsystems are presented. In particular, we discuss efforts underway in the DARPA Microsystems Technology Office (MTO) including programs in novel circuit architectures (3DIC), adaptive imaging and sensing (AFPA, VISA, MONTAGE, A-to-I) and reconfigurable RF/Microwave devices (SMART, TFAST, IRFFE).

  8. Path integral simulations for nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumway, John

    2007-10-01

    As computer circuits shrink, devices are entering the nanoscale regime and quantum physics is becoming important. The biggest barrier to further decreases in size and increases in clock speed is excessive heat generation. Some physicists are proposing that many-body correlated quantum states of electrons may be exploited to make more energy efficient switches. In our research we are developing new simulation techniques to study highly correlated electron states in realistic device geometries and finite temperatures. The simulations are based on Feynman path integrals, which cast quantum statistical mechanics as a sum over worldlines, a mathematically equivalent alternative Schroedinger's differetial equation. Using Monte Carlo sampling on dozens to hundreds of electrons, we can simulate properties of an interacting electron fluid in a nanowire. Linear response theory relates fluctuations about equilibrium to conductivity. This gives us a new perspective on quantum phenomena, including quantized conductance steps and spin-charge separation.

  9. The Logic Behind Feynman's Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Álvarez, Edgardo T.

    The classical notions of continuity and mechanical causality are left in order to reformulate the Quantum Theory starting from two principles: (I) the intrinsic randomness of quantum process at microphysical level, (II) the projective representations of symmetries of the system. The second principle determines the geometry and then a new logic for describing the history of events (Feynman's paths) that modifies the rules of classical probabilistic calculus. The notion of classical trajectory is replaced by a history of spontaneous, random and discontinuous events. So the theory is reduced to determining the probability distribution for such histories accordingly with the symmetries of the system. The representation of the logic in terms of amplitudes leads to Feynman rules and, alternatively, its representation in terms of projectors results in the Schwinger trace formula.

  10. Counting paths with Schur transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Pablo; Kemp, Garreth; Véliz-Osorio, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    In this work we explore the structure of the branching graph of the unitary group using Schur transitions. We find that these transitions suggest a new combinatorial expression for counting paths in the branching graph. This formula, which is valid for any rank of the unitary group, reproduces known asymptotic results. We proceed to establish the general validity of this expression by a formal proof. The form of this equation strongly hints towards a quantum generalization. Thus, we introduce a notion of quantum relative dimension and subject it to the appropriate consistency tests. This new quantity finds its natural environment in the context of RCFTs and fractional statistics; where the already established notion of quantum dimension has proven to be of great physical importance.

  11. Extracting Critical Path Graphs from MPI Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M

    2005-07-27

    The critical path is one of the fundamental runtime characteristics of a parallel program. It identifies the longest execution sequence without wait delays. In other words, the critical path is the global execution path that inflicts wait operations on other nodes without itself being stalled. Hence, it dictates the overall runtime and knowing it is important to understand an application's runtime and message behavior and to target optimizations. We have developed a toolset that identifies the critical path of MPI applications, extracts it, and then produces a graphical representation of the corresponding program execution graph to visualize it. To implement this, we intercept all MPI library calls, use the information to build the relevant subset of the execution graph, and then extract the critical path from there. We have applied our technique to several scientific benchmarks and successfully produced critical path diagrams for applications running on up to 128 processors.

  12. Flexible-Path Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B.; Adler, M.; Alkalai, L.; Burdick, G.; Coulter, D.; Jordan, F.; Naderi, F.; Graham, L.; Landis, R.; Drake, B.; Hoffman, S.; Grunsfeld, J.; Seery, B. D.

    2010-01-01

    In the fourth quarter of 2009 an in-house, multi-center NASA study team briefly examined "Flexible Path" concepts to begin understanding characteristics, content, and roles of potential missions consistent with the strategy proposed by the Augustine Committee. We present an overview of the study findings. Three illustrative human/robotic mission concepts not requiring planet surface operations are described: assembly of very large in-space telescopes in cis-lunar space; exploration of near Earth objects (NEOs); exploration of Mars' moon Phobos. For each, a representative mission is described, technology and science objectives are outlined, and a basic mission operations concept is quantified. A fourth type of mission, using the lunar surface as preparation for Mars, is also described. Each mission's "capability legacy" is summarized. All four illustrative missions could achieve NASA's stated human space exploration objectives and advance human space flight toward Mars surface exploration. Telescope assembly missions would require the fewest new system developments. NEO missions would offer a wide range of deep-space trip times between several months and two years. Phobos exploration would retire several Marsclass risks, leaving another large remainder set (associated with entry, descent, surface operations, and ascent) for retirement by subsequent missions. And extended lunar surface operations would build confidence for Mars surface missions by addressing a complementary set of risks. Six enabling developments (robotic precursors, ISS exploration testbed, heavy-lift launch, deep-space-capable crew capsule, deep-space habitat, and reusable in-space propulsion stage) would apply across multiple program sequence options, and thus could be started even without committing to a specific mission sequence now. Flexible Path appears to be a viable strategy, with meaningful and worthy mission content.

  13. Esophagectomy - open

    MedlinePlus

    Trans-hiatal esophagectomy; Trans-thoracic esophagectomy; En bloc esophagectomy; Removal of the esophagus - open; Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy, Blunt esophagectomy; Esophageal cancer - esophagectomy - open; Cancer of the esophagus - esophagectomy - open

  14. OpenMM accelerated MMTK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Kevin P.; Constable, Steve; Faruk, Nabil F.; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we provide an interface developed to link the Molecular Modelling toolkit (MMTK) with OpenMM in order to take advantage of the fast evaluation techniques of OpenMM. This interface allows MMTK scripts using the Langevin dynamics integrator, for both classical and path integral simulations, to be executed on a variety of hardware including graphical processing units via OpenMM. The interface has been developed using Python and Cython to take advantage of the high level abstraction thanks to the MMTK and OpenMM software packages. We have tested the interface on a number of systems to observe which systems benefit most from the acceleration libraries of OpenMM.

  15. Geodesics on path spaces and double category

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saikat

    2016-09-01

    Let M be a Riemannian manifold and 𝒫M be the space of all smooth paths on M. We describe geodesics on path space 𝒫M. Normal neighborhoods on 𝒫M have been discussed. We identify paths on M under “back-track” equivalence. Under this identification, we show that if M is complete, then geodesics on the path space yield a double category. This double category has a natural interpretation in terms of the worldsheets generated by freely moving (without any external force) strings.

  16. A note on the path interval distance.

    PubMed

    Coons, Jane Ivy; Rusinko, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The path interval distance accounts for global congruence between locally incongruent trees. We show that the path interval distance provides a lower bound for the nearest neighbor interchange distance. In contrast to the Robinson-Foulds distance, random pairs of trees are unlikely to be maximally distant from one another under the path interval distance. These features indicate that the path interval distance should play a role in phylogenomics where the comparison of trees on a fixed set of taxa is becoming increasingly important. PMID:27040521

  17. A note on the path interval distance.

    PubMed

    Coons, Jane Ivy; Rusinko, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The path interval distance accounts for global congruence between locally incongruent trees. We show that the path interval distance provides a lower bound for the nearest neighbor interchange distance. In contrast to the Robinson-Foulds distance, random pairs of trees are unlikely to be maximally distant from one another under the path interval distance. These features indicate that the path interval distance should play a role in phylogenomics where the comparison of trees on a fixed set of taxa is becoming increasingly important.

  18. Multiple path length dual polarization interferometry.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Paul D; Swann, Marcus J; Waigh, Thomas A; Schedin, Fred; Lu, Jian R

    2009-06-22

    An optical sensor for quantitative analysis of ultrathin films and adsorbed layers is described. Quantification of both layer thickness and refractive index (density) can be made for in situ and ex-situ coated films. With the use of two polarizations, in situ measurements are made via one path length in a young's interferometer arrangement while ex-situ measurements use multiple path lengths. The multiple path length young's interferometer arrangement is embodied in a solid state waveguide configuration called the multiple path length dual polarization interferometer (MPL-DPI). The technique is demonstrated with ultrathin layers of poly(methylmethacrylate) and human serum albumin.

  19. The shortest isoform of C/EBPβ, liver inhibitory protein (LIP), collaborates with Evi1 to induce AML in a mouse BMT model.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Okochi, Naoko; Yoshimi, Akihide; Sato, Tomohiko; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Kumano, Keiki; Taoka, Kazuki; Satoh, Yumiko; Shinohara, Akihito; Tsuruta, Takako; Masuda, Akiko; Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka; Takahashi, Koki; Kitaura, Jiro; Kitamura, Toshio; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2013-05-16

    Ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Evi1) is one of the master regulators in the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome. High expression of Evi1 is found in 10% of patients with AML and indicates a poor outcome. Several recent studies have indicated that Evi1 requires collaborative factors to induce AML. Therefore, the search for candidate factors that collaborate with Evi1 in leukemogenesis is one of the key issues in uncovering the mechanism of Evi1-related leukemia. Previously, we succeeded in making a mouse model of Evi1-related leukemia using a bone marrow transplantation (BMT) system. In the Evi1-induced leukemic cells, we identified frequent retroviral integrations near the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) gene and overexpression of its protein. These findings imply that C/EBPβ is a candidate gene that collaborates with Evi1 in leukemogenesis. Cotransduction of Evi1 and the shortest isoform of C/EBPβ, liver inhibitory protein (LIP), induced AML with short latencies in a mouse BMT model. Overexpression of LIP alone also induced AML with longer latencies. However, excision of all 3 isoforms of C/EBPβ (LAP*/LAP/LIP) did not inhibit the development of Evi1-induced leukemia. Therefore, isoform-specific intervention that targets LIP is required when we consider C/EBPβ as a therapeutic target.

  20. Characterization of the nuclear matrix targeting sequence (NMTS) of the BPV1 E8/E2 protein--the shortest known NMTS.

    PubMed

    Sankovski, Eve; Karro, Kristiina; Sepp, Mari; Kurg, Reet; Ustav, Mart; Abroi, Aare

    2015-01-01

    Technological advantages in sequencing and proteomics have revealed the remarkable diversity of alternative protein isoforms. Typically, the localization and functions of these isoforms are unknown and cannot be predicted. Also the localization signals leading to particular subnuclear compartments have not been identified and thus, predicting alternative functions due to alternative subnuclear localization is limited only to very few subnuclear compartments. Knowledge of the localization and function of alternative protein isoforms allows for a greater understanding of cellular complexity. In this article, we characterize a short and well-defined signal targeting the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E8/E2 protein to the nuclear matrix. The targeting signal comprises the peptide coded by E8 ORF, which is spliced together with part of the E2 ORF to generate the E8/E2 mRNA. Localization to the nuclear matrix correlates well with the transcription repression activities of E8/E2; a single point mutation directs the E8/E2 protein into the nucleoplasm, and transcription repression activity is lost. Our data prove that adding as few as ˜10 amino acids by alternative transcription/alternative splicing drastically alters the function and subnuclear localization of proteins. To our knowledge, E8 is the shortest known nuclear matrix targeting signal. PMID:26218798

  1. The shortest isoform of dystrophin (Dp40) interacts with a group of presynaptic proteins to form a presumptive novel complex in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Tozawa, Takenori; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Tando, So; Umekage, Masafumi; Dai, Hongmei; Hosoi, Hajime; Fushiki, Shinji

    2012-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) causes cognitive impairment in one third of the patients, although the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Recent studies showed that mutations in the distal part of the dystrophin gene correlate well with the cognitive impairment in DMD patients, which is attributed to Dp71. The study on the expression of the shortest isoform, Dp40, has not been possible due to the lack of an isoform specific antibody. Dp40 has the same promoter as that found in Dp71 and lacks the normal C-terminal end of Dp427. In the present study, we have raised polyclonal antibody against the N-terminal sequence common to short isoforms of dystrophin, including Dp40, and investigated the expression pattern of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Affinity chromatography with this antibody and the consecutive LC-MS/MS analysis on the interacting proteins revealed that Dp40 was abundantly expressed in synaptic vesicles and interacted with a group of presynaptic proteins, including syntaxin1A and SNAP25, which are involved in exocytosis of synaptic vesicles in neurons. We thus suggest that Dp40 may form a novel protein complex and play a crucial role in presynaptic function. Further studies on these aspects of Dp40 function might provide more insight into the molecular mechanisms of cognitive impairment found in patients with DMD. PMID:22258561

  2. Making the Stranger's Path Familiar: Environmental Communication that Turns Access into Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Clifford

    2005-01-01

    Visitors to the FDR Memorial in Washington, D.C., enter the area through ceremonial openings: from the pathway around the reflecting pond of the Jefferson Memorial, or across a small shaded plaza reached from a roadway parallel to the Potomac River. The FDR Memorial itself cannot be seen at the start of either of these paths. It is out there…

  3. Path integrated optical remote sensing technique to estimate ammonia and methane gas emissions from CAFOs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. EPA recently demonstrated the open-path optical remote sensing technology to identify hot spots and estimate mass flux of fugitive gases from closed landfill. The objective of this research is to validate this technology for estimating ammonia and methane emission from concentrated animal f...

  4. Coherent-state path integrals in the continuum: The SU(2) case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordas, G.; Kalantzis, D.; Karanikas, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    We define the time-continuous spin coherent-state path integral in a way that is free from inconsistencies. The proposed definition is used to reproduce known exact results. Such a formalism opens new possibilities for applying approximations with improved accuracy and can be proven useful in a great variety of problems where spin Hamiltonians are used.

  5. Perturbative Methods in Path Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-Freyd, Theodore Paul

    This dissertation addresses a number of related questions concerning perturbative "path" integrals. Perturbative methods are one of the few successful ways physicists have worked with (or even defined) these infinite-dimensional integrals, and it is important as mathematicians to check that they are correct. Chapter 0 provides a detailed introduction. We take a classical approach to path integrals in Chapter 1. Following standard arguments, we posit a Feynman-diagrammatic description of the asymptotics of the time-evolution operator for the quantum mechanics of a charged particle moving nonrelativistically through a curved manifold under the influence of an external electromagnetic field. We check that our sum of Feynman diagrams has all desired properties: it is coordinate-independent and well-defined without ultraviolet divergences, it satisfies the correct composition law, and it satisfies Schrodinger's equation thought of as a boundary-value problem in PDE. Path integrals in quantum mechanics and elsewhere in quantum field theory are almost always of the shape ∫ f es for some functions f (the "observable") and s (the "action"). In Chapter 2 we step back to analyze integrals of this type more generally. Integration by parts provides algebraic relations between the values of ∫ (-) es for different inputs, which can be packaged into a Batalin--Vilkovisky-type chain complex. Using some simple homological perturbation theory, we study the version of this complex that arises when f and s are taken to be polynomial functions, and power series are banished. We find that in such cases, the entire scheme-theoretic critical locus (complex points included) of s plays an important role, and that one can uniformly (but noncanonically) integrate out in a purely algebraic way the contributions to the integral from all "higher modes," reducing ∫ f es to an integral over the critical locus. This may help explain the presence of analytic continuation in questions like the

  6. Adaptively Ubiquitous Learning in Campus Math Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Shu-Chuan; Kuo, Bor-Chen; Liu, Yu-Lung

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to develop and evaluate the instructional model and learning system which integrate ubiquitous learning, computerized adaptive diagnostic testing system and campus math path learning. The researcher first creates a ubiquitous learning environment which is called "adaptive U-learning math path system". This system…

  7. The path dependence of deformation texture development

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, T.; Kocks, U.F.; Wenk, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated for the case of three different strain paths, all of which end up with the same, elongated specimen shape, that the texture developed during straining is path dependent. This is true both for experiments on aluminum polycrystals and for simulations using the LApp code.

  8. Cooperative organic mine avoidance path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, Christopher B.; Piatko, Christine D.; Peterson, Adam V.; Donnald, Creighton R.; Cohen, David

    2005-06-01

    The JHU/APL Path Planning team has developed path planning techniques to look for paths that balance the utility and risk associated with different routes through a minefield. Extending on previous years' efforts, we investigated real-world Naval mine avoidance requirements and developed a tactical decision aid (TDA) that satisfies those requirements. APL has developed new mine path planning techniques using graph based and genetic algorithms which quickly produce near-minimum risk paths for complicated fitness functions incorporating risk, path length, ship kinematics, and naval doctrine. The TDA user interface, a Java Swing application that obtains data via Corba interfaces to path planning databases, allows the operator to explore a fusion of historic and in situ mine field data, control the path planner, and display the planning results. To provide a context for the minefield data, the user interface also renders data from the Digital Nautical Chart database, a database created by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency containing charts of the world's ports and coastal regions. This TDA has been developed in conjunction with the COMID (Cooperative Organic Mine Defense) system. This paper presents a description of the algorithms, architecture, and application produced.

  9. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VI.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, M.

    1949-06-30

    This paper is a compilation of the essential results of our experimental work in the determination of the path of carbon in photosynthesis. There are discussions of the dark fixation of photosynthesis and methods of separation and identification including paper chromatography and radioautography. The definition of the path of carbon in photosynthesis by the distribution of radioactivity within the compounds is described.

  10. Career Path Guide for Adult Career Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Clydia

    Intended for adults who are considering career choices or changes, this booklet provides opportunities for self-study and reflection in six career paths. The booklet begins with tips for long-term career survival and myths and realities of career planning. After a brief career survey, readers are introduced to six career paths: arts and…

  11. A Random Walk on a Circular Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, W.-K.; Lee, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    This short note introduces an interesting random walk on a circular path with cards of numbers. By using high school probability theory, it is proved that under some assumptions on the number of cards, the probability that a walker will return to a fixed position will tend to one as the length of the circular path tends to infinity.

  12. Precision Cleaning - Path to Premier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackler, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    ITT Space Systems Division s new Precision Cleaning facility provides critical cleaning and packaging of aerospace flight hardware and optical payloads to meet customer performance requirements. The Precision Cleaning Path to Premier Project was a 2007 capital project and is a key element in the approved Premier Resource Management - Integrated Supply Chain Footprint Optimization Project. Formerly precision cleaning was located offsite in a leased building. A new facility equipped with modern precision cleaning equipment including advanced process analytical technology and improved capabilities was designed and built after outsourcing solutions were investigated and found lacking in ability to meet quality specifications and schedule needs. SSD cleans parts that can range in size from a single threaded fastener all the way up to large composite structures. Materials that can be processed include optics, composites, metals and various high performance coatings. We are required to provide verification to our customers that we have met their particulate and molecular cleanliness requirements and we have that analytical capability in this new facility. The new facility footprint is approximately half the size of the former leased operation and provides double the amount of throughput. Process improvements and new cleaning equipment are projected to increase 1st pass yield from 78% to 98% avoiding $300K+/yr in rework costs. Cost avoidance of $350K/yr will result from elimination of rent, IT services, transportation, and decreased utility costs. Savings due to reduced staff expected to net $4-500K/yr.

  13. Decision paths in complex tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    Complex real world action and its prediction and control has escaped analysis by the classical methods of psychological research. The reason is that psychologists have no procedures to parse complex tasks into their constituents. Where such a division can be made, based say on expert judgment, there is no natural scale to measure the positive or negative values of the components. Even if we could assign numbers to task parts, we lack rules i.e., a theory, to combine them into a total task representation. We compare here two plausible theories for the amalgamation of the value of task components. Both of these theories require a numerical representation of motivation, for motivation is the primary variable that guides choice and action in well-learned tasks. We address this problem of motivational quantification and performance prediction by developing psychophysical scales of the desireability or aversiveness of task components based on utility scaling methods (Galanter 1990). We modify methods used originally to scale sensory magnitudes (Stevens and Galanter 1957), and that have been applied recently to the measure of task 'workload' by Gopher and Braune (1984). Our modification uses utility comparison scaling techniques which avoid the unnecessary assumptions made by Gopher and Braune. Formula for the utility of complex tasks based on the theoretical models are used to predict decision and choice of alternate paths to the same goal.

  14. Gerbertian paths for the Jubilee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2015-04-01

    Gerbert before becoming Pope Sylvester II came several times in Rome, as reported in his Letters and in the biography of Richerus. Eight places in Rome can be connected with Gerbertian memories. 1. The Cathedral of St. John in the Lateran where the gravestone of his tumb is still preserved near the Holy Door; 2. the “Basilica Hierusalem” (Santa Croce) where Gerbert had the stroke on May 3rd 1003 which lead him to death on May 12th; 3. the Aventine hill, with the church of the Knights of Malta in the place where the palace of the Ottonian Emperors was located; 4. the church of St. Bartholomew in the Tiber Island built in 997 under Otto III; 5. the Obelisk of Augustus in Montecitorio to remember the relationship between Gerbert, Astronomy and numbers which led the birth of the legends on Gerbert magician; 6. St. Mary Major end of the procession of August 15, 1000; 7. St. Paul outside the walls with the iconography of the Popes and 8. St. Peter's tumb end of all Romaei pilgrimages. This Gerbertian path in Rome suggests one way to accomplish the pilgrimage suggested by Pope Francis in the Bulla Misericordiae Vultus (14) of indiction of the new Jubilee.

  15. Converging towards the optimal path to extinction

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Ira B.; Forgoston, Eric; Bianco, Simone; Shaw, Leah B.

    2011-01-01

    Extinction appears ubiquitously in many fields, including chemical reactions, population biology, evolution and epidemiology. Even though extinction as a random process is a rare event, its occurrence is observed in large finite populations. Extinction occurs when fluctuations owing to random transitions act as an effective force that drives one or more components or species to vanish. Although there are many random paths to an extinct state, there is an optimal path that maximizes the probability to extinction. In this paper, we show that the optimal path is associated with the dynamical systems idea of having maximum sensitive dependence to initial conditions. Using the equivalence between the sensitive dependence and the path to extinction, we show that the dynamical systems picture of extinction evolves naturally towards the optimal path in several stochastic models of epidemics. PMID:21571943

  16. Operational Shortest-Term PV Solar Forecasting for ramp rate control with an ultracapacitor energy storage system using a Whole Sky Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. A.; Kleissl, J. P.; Torre, W.; Kurtz, B.; Mejia, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    UCSD has partnered with Maxwell Technologies to demonstrate Maxwells' ultracapacitor energy storage system (UESS) using UCSDs' shortest-term advective forecast for PV systems. Specifically, UCSD will be supplying 5-minute forecasts to predict ramp events for the UESS, which will then discharge/charge the system as appropriate for the event. Four different metrics will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the UCSD advective forecast with the UESS: (1) The root mean square error, root mean bias, and root mean absolute error will be calculated for the 5-minute forecast using measured irradiance from the UCSD DEMROES stations and compared to a persistence forecast (2) A "matching" error analysis will be performed to compare the 5-minute forecasted cloud cover of the PV system to the actual cloud cover at the forecasted time (3) The matching error of the advective forecast will be compared to the matching error of a persistence forecast to determine if, operationally, advective or persistence forecast performs best (4) Timing of predicted ramp events using the advective forecast will be compared to actual ramp events experienced by the UESS. The above metrics will also be used to analyze the effectiveness of cross-correlational and optical flow advective schemes in an operational setting. The cross-correlational method analyzes images from two different times to find an average velocity vector for cloud cover. Optical flow uses images from two time steps to find a velocity vector for each pixel of an image, allowing different sections of clouds to move at different speeds and directions. Hence, it is hypothesized the optical flow advective scheme will perform better then the cross-correlation method in operational settings.

  17. The Path of Human Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feibel, C. S.

    2004-12-01

    A complex series of evolutionary steps, contingent upon a dynamic environmental context and a long biological heritage, have led to the ascent of Homo sapiens as a dominant component of the modern biosphere. In a field where missing links still abound and new discoveries regularly overturn theoretical paradigms, our understanding of the path of human evolution has made tremendous advances in recent years. Two major trends characterize the development of the hominin clade subsequent to its origins with the advent of upright bipedalism in the Late Miocene of Africa. One is a diversification into two prominent morphological branches, each with a series of 'twigs' representing evolutionary experimentation at the species or subspecies level. The second important trend, which in its earliest manifestations cannot clearly be ascribed to one or the other branch, is the behavioral complexity of an increasing reliance on technology to expand upon limited inherent morphological specializations and to buffer the organism from its environment. This technological dependence is directly associated with the expansion of hominin range outside Africa by the genus Homo, and is accelerated in the sole extant form Homo sapiens through the last 100 Ka. There are interesting correlates between the evolutionary and behavioral patterns seen in the hominin clade and environmental dynamics of the Neogene. In particular, the tempo of morphological and behavioral innovation may be tracking major events in Neogene climatic development as well as reflecting intervals of variability or stability. Major improvements in analytical techniques, coupled with important new collections and a growing body of contextual data are now making possible the integration of global, regional and local environmental archives with an improved biological understanding of the hominin clade to address questions of coincidence and causality.

  18. Evolution paths for advanced automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healey, Kathleen J.

    1990-01-01

    As Space Station Freedom (SSF) evolves, increased automation and autonomy will be required to meet Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) objectives. As a precursor to the use of advanced automation within the SSFP, especially if it is to be used on SSF (e.g., to automate the operation of the flight systems), the underlying technologies will need to be elevated to a high level of readiness to ensure safe and effective operations. Ground facilities supporting the development of these flight systems -- from research and development laboratories through formal hardware and software development environments -- will be responsible for achieving these levels of technology readiness. These facilities will need to evolve support the general evolution of the SSFP. This evolution will include support for increasing the use of advanced automation. The SSF Advanced Development Program has funded a study to define evolution paths for advanced automaton within the SSFP's ground-based facilities which will enable, promote, and accelerate the appropriate use of advanced automation on-board SSF. The current capability of the test beds and facilities, such as the Software Support Environment, with regard to advanced automation, has been assessed and their desired evolutionary capabilities have been defined. Plans and guidelines for achieving this necessary capability have been constructed. The approach taken has combined indepth interviews of test beds personnel at all SSF Work Package centers with awareness of relevant state-of-the-art technology and technology insertion methodologies. Key recommendations from the study include advocating a NASA-wide task force for advanced automation, and the creation of software prototype transition environments to facilitate the incorporation of advanced automation in the SSFP.

  19. Robot path planning using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, Timothy F.; Baffes, Paul T.; Wang, Liu

    1988-01-01

    Robot path planning can refer either to a mobile vehicle such as a Mars Rover, or to an end effector on an arm moving through a cluttered workspace. In both instances there may exist many solutions, some of which are better than others, either in terms of distance traversed, energy expended, or joint angle or reach capabilities. A path planning program has been developed based upon a genetic algorithm. This program assumes global knowledge of the terrain or workspace, and provides a family of good paths between the initial and final points. Initially, a set of valid random paths are constructed. Successive generations of valid paths are obtained using one of several possible reproduction strategies similar to those found in biological communities. A fitness function is defined to describe the goodness of the path, in this case including length, slope, and obstacle avoidance considerations. It was found that with some reproduction strategies, the average value of the fitness function improved for successive generations, and that by saving the best paths of each generation, one could quite rapidly obtain a collection of good candidate solutions.

  20. Functional equivalence and spatial path memory.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Don R; Gunzelmann, Glenn M

    2011-11-01

    Loomis, Klatzky, Avraamides, Lippa and Golledge ( 2007 ) suggest that, when it comes to spatial information, verbal description and perceptual experience are nearly functionally equivalent with respect to the cognitive representations they produce. We tested this idea for the case of spatial memory for complex paths. Paths consisted entirely of unit-length segments followed by 90-degree turns, thus assuring that a path could be described with equal precision using either an egocentric verbal description or a virtual self-motion experience. The verbal description was analogous to driving directions (e.g., turn left and go one block, then turn right, etc.) except in three dimensions (allowing rotation followed by up or down movement). Virtual self-motion was depicted as first-person travel through a 3D grid of featureless corridors. Comparison of these two conditions produced a result that may be surprising to some, but nevertheless appears to support the notion of functional equivalence: Virtual self-motion does not produce better path memory than verbal description, when care is taken to present equally precise path information. This result holds for even very complex paths and despite evidence from proximity-based interference that the memory representation of the path is spatial.

  1. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  2. Automated flight path planning for virtual endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Paik, D S; Beaulieu, C F; Jeffrey, R B; Rubin, G D; Napel, S

    1998-05-01

    In this paper, a novel technique for rapid and automatic computation of flight paths for guiding virtual endoscopic exploration of three-dimensional medical images is described. While manually planning flight paths is a tedious and time consuming task, our algorithm is automated and fast. Our method for positioning the virtual camera is based on the medial axis transform but is much more computationally efficient. By iteratively correcting a path toward the medial axis, the necessity of evaluating simple point criteria during morphological thinning is eliminated. The virtual camera is also oriented in a stable viewing direction, avoiding sudden twists and turns. We tested our algorithm on volumetric data sets of eight colons, one aorta and one bronchial tree. The algorithm computed the flight paths in several minutes per volume on an inexpensive workstation with minimal computation time added for multiple paths through branching structures (10%-13% per extra path). The results of our algorithm are smooth, centralized paths that aid in the task of navigation in virtual endoscopic exploration of three-dimensional medical images. PMID:9608471

  3. The Path Tells a Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nack, Frank

    Stories have been shared in every culture because they are a powerful means to entertain, educate, and preserve traditions or instill values. In the history of storytelling technological evolution has changed the tools available to storytellers, from primarily oral representations that have been enriched with gestures and expressions to the sophisticated forms we enjoy today, such as film or complex layered hypermedia environments. Despite these developments the traditional linear presentation of a story is still the most dominant. Yet, the first decade of the twenty-first century established a technology that finally, after many attempts, can challenge the dogma of passive linearity. It is mobile technology that makes people aware that a digital environment opens opportunities to everybody to freely socialize through and with stories relevant for the current spatial, temporal, and social context.

  4. The terminal area automated path generation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsin, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The automated terminal area path generation problem in the advanced Air Traffic Control System (ATC), has been studied. Definitions, input, output and the interrelationships with other ATC functions have been discussed. Alternatives in modeling the problem have been identified. Problem formulations and solution techniques are presented. In particular, the solution of a minimum effort path stretching problem (path generation on a given schedule) has been carried out using the Newton-Raphson trajectory optimization method. Discussions are presented on the effect of different delivery time, aircraft entry position, initial guess on the boundary conditions, etc. Recommendations are made on real-world implementations.

  5. Extending the application of critical path methods.

    PubMed

    Coffey, R J; Othman, J E; Walters, J I

    1995-01-01

    Most health care organizations are using critical pathways in an attempt to reduce the variation in patient care, improve quality, enhance communication, and reduce costs. Virtually all of the critical path efforts to date have developed tables of treatments, medications, and so forth by day and have displayed them in a format known as a Gantt chart. This article presents a methodology for identifying the true "time-limiting" critical path, describes three additional methods for presenting the information--the network, precedent, and resource formats--and shows how these can significantly enhance current critical path efforts.

  6. Steering Chiral Swimmers along Noisy Helical Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-08-01

    Chemotaxis along helical paths towards a target releasing a chemoattractant is found in sperm cells and many microorganisms. We discuss the stochastic differential geometry of the noisy helical swimming path of a chiral swimmer. A chiral swimmer equipped with a simple feedback system can navigate in a concentration gradient of chemoattractant. We derive an effective equation for the alignment of helical paths with a concentration gradient which is related to the alignment of a dipole in an external field and discuss the chemotaxis index.

  7. Demonstration of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Steering Using Single-Photon Path Entanglement and Displacement-Based Detection.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, T; Monteiro, F; Martin, A; Brask, J B; Vértesi, T; Korzh, B; Caloz, M; Bussières, F; Verma, V B; Lita, A E; Mirin, R P; Nam, S W; Marsilli, F; Shaw, M D; Gisin, N; Brunner, N; Zbinden, H; Thew, R T

    2016-08-12

    We demonstrate the violation of an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering inequality developed for single-photon path entanglement with displacement-based detection. We use a high-rate source of heralded single-photon path-entangled states, combined with high-efficiency superconducting-based detectors, in a scheme that is free of any postselection and thus immune to the detection loophole. This result conclusively demonstrates single-photon entanglement in a one-sided device-independent scenario, and opens the way towards implementations of device-independent quantum technologies within the paradigm of path entanglement.

  8. Demonstration of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Steering Using Single-Photon Path Entanglement and Displacement-Based Detection.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, T; Monteiro, F; Martin, A; Brask, J B; Vértesi, T; Korzh, B; Caloz, M; Bussières, F; Verma, V B; Lita, A E; Mirin, R P; Nam, S W; Marsilli, F; Shaw, M D; Gisin, N; Brunner, N; Zbinden, H; Thew, R T

    2016-08-12

    We demonstrate the violation of an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering inequality developed for single-photon path entanglement with displacement-based detection. We use a high-rate source of heralded single-photon path-entangled states, combined with high-efficiency superconducting-based detectors, in a scheme that is free of any postselection and thus immune to the detection loophole. This result conclusively demonstrates single-photon entanglement in a one-sided device-independent scenario, and opens the way towards implementations of device-independent quantum technologies within the paradigm of path entanglement. PMID:27563941

  9. Demonstration of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Steering Using Single-Photon Path Entanglement and Displacement-Based Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, T.; Monteiro, F.; Martin, A.; Brask, J. B.; Vértesi, T.; Korzh, B.; Caloz, M.; Bussières, F.; Verma, V. B.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.; Marsilli, F.; Shaw, M. D.; Gisin, N.; Brunner, N.; Zbinden, H.; Thew, R. T.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the violation of an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering inequality developed for single-photon path entanglement with displacement-based detection. We use a high-rate source of heralded single-photon path-entangled states, combined with high-efficiency superconducting-based detectors, in a scheme that is free of any postselection and thus immune to the detection loophole. This result conclusively demonstrates single-photon entanglement in a one-sided device-independent scenario, and opens the way towards implementations of device-independent quantum technologies within the paradigm of path entanglement.

  10. Path discrepancies between great circle and rhumb line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Rajan

    1987-01-01

    A simulation of a mathematical model to compute path discrepancies between great circle and rhumb line flight paths is presented. The model illustrates that the path errors depend on the latitude, the bearing, and the trip length of the flight.

  11. Local-time representation of path integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x -dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x (t ) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x . Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed.

  12. Riemann Curvature Tensor and Closed Geodesic Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morganstern, Ralph E.

    1977-01-01

    Demonstrates erroneous results obtained if change in a vector under parallel transport about a closed path in Riemannian spacetime is made in a complete circuit rather than just half a circuit. (Author/SL)

  13. Critical paths: maximizing patient care coordination.

    PubMed

    Spath, P L

    1995-01-01

    1. With today's emphasis on horizontal and vertical integration of patient care services and the new initiatives prompted by these challenges, OR nurses are considering new methods for managing the perioperative period. One such method is the critical path. 2. A critical path defines an optimal sequencing and timing of interventions by physicians, nurses, and other staff members for a particular diagnosis or procedure, designed to better use resources, maximize quality of care, and minimize delays. 3. Hospitals implementing path-based patient care have reported cost reductions and improved team-work. Critical paths have been shown to reduce patient care costs by improving hospital efficiency, not merely by reducing physician practice variations.

  14. A chemist building paths to cell biology.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-11-01

    Galileo is reported to have stated, "Measure what is measurable and make measurable what is not so." My group's trajectory in cell biology has closely followed this philosophy, although it took some searching to find this path.

  15. Building a path in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Voeltz, Gia; Cheeseman, Iain

    2012-11-01

    Setting up a new lab is an exciting but challenging prospect. We discuss our experiences in finding a path to tackle some of the key current questions in cell biology and the hurdles that we have encountered along the way.

  16. Animation: Path of 2010 Solar Eclipse

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Sunday, 2010 July 11, a total eclipse of the Sun is visible from within a narrow corridor that traverses Earth's southern hemisphere. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow crosses the South Pacif...

  17. IRIS Optical Instrument and Light Paths

    NASA Video Gallery

    The optical portion of the instrument and the light paths from the primary and secondary mirror of the telescope assembly into the spectrograph. The spectrograph then breaks the light into 2 Near U...

  18. Local-time representation of path integrals.

    PubMed

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x-dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x(t) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x. Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed.

  19. Identifying decohering paths in closed quantum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    A specific proposal is discussed for how to identify decohering paths in a wavefunction of the universe. The emphasis is on determining the correlations among subsystems and then considering how these correlations evolve. The proposal is similar to earlier ideas of Schroedinger and of Zeh, but in other ways it is closer to the decoherence functional of Griffiths, Omnes, and Gell-Mann and Hartle. There are interesting differences with each of these which are discussed. Once a given coarse-graining is chosen, the candidate paths are fixed in this scheme, and a single well defined number measures the degree of decoherence for each path. The normal probability sum rules are exactly obeyed (instantaneously) by these paths regardless of the level of decoherence. Also briefly discussed is how one might quantify some other aspects of classicality. The important role that concrete calculations play in testing this and other proposals is stressed.

  20. An Alternate Path To Stoichiometric Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    1997-01-01

    Discusses an alternate path to teaching introductory stoichiometry based on research findings. The recommendation is to use problems that can be solved easily by rapid mental calculation as well as by pure logic. (AIM)

  1. Orbital Path of the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts Don Pettit, Andre Kuipers and Dan Burbank explain the orbital path of the International Space Station. Earth video credit: Image Science and Analysis Laboratory, NASA's Johnson Space Cen...

  2. A Path Algorithm for Constrained Estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Many least-square problems involve affine equality and inequality constraints. Although there are a variety of methods for solving such problems, most statisticians find constrained estimation challenging. The current article proposes a new path-following algorithm for quadratic programming that replaces hard constraints by what are called exact penalties. Similar penalties arise in l1 regularization in model selection. In the regularization setting, penalties encapsulate prior knowledge, and penalized parameter estimates represent a trade-off between the observed data and the prior knowledge. Classical penalty methods of optimization, such as the quadratic penalty method, solve a sequence of unconstrained problems that put greater and greater stress on meeting the constraints. In the limit as the penalty constant tends to ∞, one recovers the constrained solution. In the exact penalty method, squared penalties!are replaced by absolute value penalties, and the solution is recovered for a finite value of the penalty constant. The exact path-following method starts at the unconstrained solution and follows the solution path as the penalty constant increases. In the process, the solution path hits, slides along, and exits from the various constraints. Path following in Lasso penalized regression, in contrast, starts with a large value of the penalty constant and works its way downward. In both settings, inspection of the entire solution path is revealing. Just as with the Lasso and generalized Lasso, it is possible to plot the effective degrees of freedom along the solution path. For a strictly convex quadratic program, the exact penalty algorithm can be framed entirely in terms of the sweep operator of regression analysis. A few well-chosen examples illustrate the mechanics and potential of path following. This article has supplementary materials available online.

  3. The prediction of radio-path characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitina, G. M.; Kalinin, Iu. K.

    The paper examines algorithms for the long-term prediction of radio-path characteristics in the ionosphere, the main characteristic being the MUF at a given distance. The proposed approach is based on long-term memories called DATA BANKS. Attention is given to the characteritics of the various banks, including the BANK OF CITIES, the BANK OF RADIO PATHS, the REFERENCE DATA BANK, and the OUTPUT DATA BANK.

  4. Equivalence of trans paths in ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Juan; Hajek, Bruce

    2006-04-01

    We explore stochastic models for the study of ion transport in biological cells. Analysis of these models explains and explores an interesting feature of ion transport observed by biophysicists. Namely, the average time it takes ions to cross certain ion channels is the same in either direction, even if there is an electric potential difference across the channels. It is shown for simple single ion models that the distribution of a path (i.e., the history of location versus time) of an ion crossing the channel in one direction has the same distribution as the time-reversed path of an ion crossing the channel in the reverse direction. Therefore, not only is the mean duration of these paths equal, but other measures, such as the variance of passage time or the mean time a path spends within a specified section of the channel, are also the same for both directions of traversal. The feature is also explored for channels with interacting ions. If a system of interacting ions is in reversible equilibrium (net flux is zero), then the equivalence of the left-to-right trans paths with the time-reversed right-to-left trans paths still holds. However, if the system is in equilibrium, but not reversible equilibrium, then such equivalence need not hold.

  5. Quantum cosmology based on discrete Feynman paths

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, Geoffrey F.

    2002-10-10

    Although the rules for interpreting local quantum theory imply discretization of process, Lorentz covariance is usually regarded as precluding time quantization. Nevertheless a time-discretized quantum representation of redshifting spatially-homogeneous universe may be based on discrete-step Feynman paths carrying causal Lorentz-invariant action--paths that not only propagate the wave function but provide a phenomenologically-promising elementary-particle Hilbert-space basis. In a model under development, local path steps are at Planck scale while, at a much larger ''wave-function scale'', global steps separate successive wave-functions. Wave-function spacetime is but a tiny fraction of path spacetime. Electromagnetic and gravitational actions are ''at a distance'' in Wheeler-Feynman sense while strong (color) and weak (isospin) actions, as well as action of particle motion, are ''local'' in a sense paralleling the action of local field theory. ''Nonmaterial'' path segments and ''trivial events'' collaborate to define energy and gravity. Photons coupled to conserved electric charge enjoy privileged model status among elementary fermions and vector bosons. Although real path parameters provide no immediate meaning for ''measurement'', the phase of the complex wave function allows significance for ''information'' accumulated through ''gentle'' electromagnetic events involving charged matter and ''soft'' photons. Through its soft-photon content the wave function is an ''information reservoir''.

  6. Ant navigation: resetting the path integrator.

    PubMed

    Knaden, Markus; Wehner, Rüdiger

    2006-01-01

    Desert ants use path integration as their predominant system of long-distance navigation, but they also make use of route-defining and nest-defining visual landmarks. Such landmark-gained information might override the information provided by the path integrator, but nevertheless the path integrator keeps running. Here we show that only cues that are associated with the ant being inside the nest are able to reset the path integrator to zero state. Ants were captured at a feeder, i.e. without having run off their home vector, and were forced to enter the nest. On their next outbound run their walking direction differed by 180 degrees from that of ants that had also been captured at the feeder but instead of having been forced to enter the interior of the nest were released at its entrance. Whereas these latter ants still ran off their home vector pointing in the feeder-nest direction (and by this departed from the nest in a direction opposite to the feeder direction) the former ants had reset their home vector to zero state, and had therefore been able to reload their learned feeder vector, and consequently departed from the nest in the feeder direction. Owing to its egocentric nature the path-integrator is error prone. Hence, it is a suitable strategy to reset the path integrator if the ant has appeared at its final goal, the nest. Otherwise during consecutive foraging runs navigational errors would steadily increase.

  7. Path detection and the uncertainty principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Pippa; Tan, Sze; Collett, Matthew; Walls, Daniel

    1994-02-01

    QUANTUM mechanics predicts that any detector capable of determining the path taken by a particle through a double slit will destroy the interference. This follows from the principle of complementarity formulated by Niels Bohr: simultaneous observation of wave and particle behaviour is prohibited. But such a description makes no reference to the physical mechanism by which the interference is lost. In the best studied welcher Weg (`which path') detection schemes1,2, interference is lost by the transfer of momentum to the particle whose path is being determined, the extent of momentum transfer satisfying the position-momentum uncertainty relation. This has prompted the question as to whether complementarity is always enforced in welcher Weg schemes by momentum transfer. Scully et al 3. have recently responded in the negative, suggesting that complementarity must be accepted as an independent component of quantum mechanics, rather than as simply a consequence of the uncertainty principle. But we show here that, in any path detection scheme involving a fixed double slit, the amount of momentum transferred to the particle by a perfectly efficient detector (one capable of resolving the path unambiguously) is related to the slit separation in accordance with the uncertainty principle. If less momentum than this is transferred, interference is not completely destroyed and the path detector cannot be perfectly efficient.

  8. Semiclassical wave functions for open quantum billiards.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Fabian; Březinová, Iva; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Libisch, Florian

    2013-08-01

    We present a semiclassical approximation to the scattering wave function Ψ(r,k) for an open quantum billiard, which is based on the reconstruction of the Feynman path integral. We demonstrate its remarkable numerical accuracy for the open rectangular billiard and show that the convergence of the semiclassical wave function to the full quantum state is controlled by the mean path length or equivalently the dwell time for a given scattering state. In the numerical implementation a cutoff length in the maximum path length or, equivalently, a maximum dwell time τ(max) included implies a finite energy resolution ΔE~τ(max)(-1). Possible applications include leaky billiards and systems with decoherence present. PMID:24032910

  9. Open Content in Open Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansa, Sarah Whitcher; Kansa, Eric C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the challenges and rewards of sharing research content through a discussion of Open Context, a new open access data publication system for field sciences and museum collections. Open Context is the first data repository of its kind, allowing self-publication of research data, community commentary through tagging, and clear…

  10. Infiltration Flow Path Distributions in Unsaturated Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, T. K.; Olson, K. R.; Wan, J.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial distributions of infiltration flow paths through rock formations are complex networks that determine flow velocities, control rates of natural geochemical reactions in the subsurface, as well as rates of contaminant transport to underlying groundwater. Despite these important consequences, distributions of infiltration paths and locally fast seepage rates through rocks are not well understood. Laboratory-based studies on fractured rocks cannot easily be conducted on systems large enough to include sufficient fracture network complexity, so that inferences of field-scale flux distributions cannot be reliably made. Field-based studies to date have permitted quantification of only a small fraction of the flow distribution, typically while imposing extremely high fluxes, and therefore have not allowed comprehensive delineation of flow distributions expected under natural recharge. Based on hydraulic scaling considerations, we hypothesize that unsaturated flow path distributions in rock deposits will be similar to those occurring in fractured rock formations under low overall infiltration rates. Talus rock deposits and mine waste rock piles control flow and transport into their respective underlying groundwaters. All of these reasons motivated infiltration experiments in rock packs. Experiments have been conducted on 4 different rock types and system scales ranging from 1 to 46 rock layers. Our experiments showed that infiltration through rocks conforms to no previously reported behavior in soils, and that flow paths do not progressively converge into fewer and fewer flow paths. Instead, a fundamentally different hydraulic structure develops, having an exponential (geometric) flux distribution, with the characteristic scale determined by the characteristic rock size. Although the phenomena are very different, the evolution of flow path distributions and local seepage rate distributions is predictable based on a statistical mechanical model for energy

  11. Path-memory induced quantization of classical orbits

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Emmanuel; Eddi, Antonin; Boudaoud, Arezki; Moukhtar, Julien; Couder, Yves

    2010-01-01

    A droplet bouncing on a liquid bath can self-propel due to its interaction with the waves it generates. The resulting “walker” is a dynamical association where, at a macroscopic scale, a particle (the droplet) is driven by a pilot-wave field. A specificity of this system is that the wave field itself results from the superposition of the waves generated at the points of space recently visited by the particle. It thus contains a memory of the past trajectory of the particle. Here, we investigate the response of this object to forces orthogonal to its motion. We find that the resulting closed orbits present a spontaneous quantization. This is observed only when the memory of the system is long enough for the particle to interact with the wave sources distributed along the whole orbit. An additional force then limits the possible orbits to a discrete set. The wave-sustained path memory is thus demonstrated to generate a quantization of angular momentum. Because a quantum-like uncertainty was also observed recently in these systems, the nonlocality generated by path memory opens new perspectives.

  12. An Alternative Path for the Evolution of Biological Nitrogen Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Peters, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogenase catalyzed nitrogen fixation is the process by which life converts dinitrogen gas into fixed nitrogen in the form of bioavailable ammonia. The most common form of nitrogenase today requires a complex metal cluster containing molybdenum (Mo), although alternative forms exist which contain vanadium (V) or only iron (Fe). It has been suggested that Mo-independent forms of nitrogenase (V and Fe) were responsible for N2 fixation on early Earth because oceans were Mo-depleted and Fe-rich. Phylogenetic- and structure-based examinations of multiple nitrogenase proteins suggest that such an evolutionary path is unlikely. Rather, our results indicate an evolutionary path whereby Mo-dependent nitrogenase emerged within the methanogenic archaea and then gave rise to the alternative forms suggesting that they arose later, perhaps in response to local Mo limitation. Structural inferences of nitrogenase proteins and related paralogs suggest that the ancestor of all nitrogenases had an open cavity capable of binding metal clusters which conferred reactivity. The evolution of the nitrogenase ancestor and its associated bound metal cluster was controlled by the availability of fixed nitrogen in combination with local environmental factors that influenced metal availability until a point in Earth’s geologic history where the most desirable metal, Mo, became sufficiently bioavailable to bring about and refine the solution (Mo-nitrogenase) we see perpetuated in extant biology. PMID:22065963

  13. Long-length contaminated equipment disposal process path document

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-30

    The first objective of the LLCE Process Path Document is to guide future users of this system on how to accomplish the cradle-to-grave process for the disposal of long-length equipment. Information will be provided describing the function and approach to each step in the process. Pertinent documentation, prerequisites, drawings, procedures, hardware, software, and key interfacing organizations will be identified. The second objective is related to the decision to lay up the program until funding is made available to complete it or until a need arises due to failure of an important component in a waste tank. To this end, the document will identify work remaining to be completed for each step of the process and open items or issues that remain to be resolved.

  14. Accurate free energy calculation along optimized paths.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changjun; Xiao, Yi

    2010-05-01

    The path-based methods of free energy calculation, such as thermodynamic integration and free energy perturbation, are simple in theory, but difficult in practice because in most cases smooth paths do not exist, especially for large molecules. In this article, we present a novel method to build the transition path of a peptide. We use harmonic potentials to restrain its nonhydrogen atom dihedrals in the initial state and set the equilibrium angles of the potentials as those in the final state. Through a series of steps of geometrical optimization, we can construct a smooth and short path from the initial state to the final state. This path can be used to calculate free energy difference. To validate this method, we apply it to a small 10-ALA peptide and find that the calculated free energy changes in helix-helix and helix-hairpin transitions are both self-convergent and cross-convergent. We also calculate the free energy differences between different stable states of beta-hairpin trpzip2, and the results show that this method is more efficient than the conventional molecular dynamics method in accurate free energy calculation.

  15. 14 CFR 23.61 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 23.61 Section 23.61... flight path. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff flight path must be determined as follows: (a) The takeoff flight path begins 35 feet above the takeoff surface at the end of the...

  16. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Glide path automatic monitor system. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.267 Glide path automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS glide path equipment... control points when any of the following occurs: (1) A shift of the mean ISMLS glide path angle...

  17. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Glide path automatic monitor system. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.267 Glide path automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS glide path equipment... control points when any of the following occurs: (1) A shift of the mean ISMLS glide path angle...

  18. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Glide path automatic monitor system. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.267 Glide path automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS glide path equipment... control points when any of the following occurs: (1) A shift of the mean ISMLS glide path angle...

  19. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Glide path automatic monitor system. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.267 Glide path automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS glide path equipment... control points when any of the following occurs: (1) A shift of the mean ISMLS glide path angle...

  20. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Glide path automatic monitor system. 171... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.267 Glide path automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS glide path equipment... control points when any of the following occurs: (1) A shift of the mean ISMLS glide path angle...

  1. 14 CFR 23.61 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 23.61 Section 23.61... flight path. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 75753, December 2, 2011. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff flight path must be determined as follows: (a) The takeoff flight path begins 35...

  2. 14 CFR 23.61 - Takeoff flight path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff flight path. 23.61 Section 23.61... flight path. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff flight path must be determined as follows: (a) The takeoff flight path begins 35 feet above the takeoff surface at the end of the...

  3. An Adaptive Path Planning Algorithm for Cooperating Unmanned Air Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, C.T.; Roberts, R.S.

    2000-09-12

    An adaptive path planning algorithm is presented for cooperating Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) that are used to deploy and operate land-based sensor networks. The algorithm employs a global cost function to generate paths for the UAVs, and adapts the paths to exceptions that might occur. Examples are provided of the paths and adaptation.

  4. Adaptive path planning algorithm for cooperating unmanned air vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, C T; Roberts, R S

    2001-02-08

    An adaptive path planning algorithm is presented for cooperating Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) that are used to deploy and operate land-based sensor networks. The algorithm employs a global cost function to generate paths for the UAVs, and adapts the paths to exceptions that might occur. Examples are provided of the paths and adaptation.

  5. Radial polar histogram: obstacle avoidance and path planning for robotic cognition and motion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Jen; Keyawa, Nicholas R.; Euler, Craig

    2012-01-01

    In order to achieve highly accurate motion control and path planning for a mobile robot, an obstacle avoidance algorithm that provided a desired instantaneous turning radius and velocity was generated. This type of obstacle avoidance algorithm, which has been implemented in California State University Northridge's Intelligent Ground Vehicle (IGV), is known as Radial Polar Histogram (RPH). The RPH algorithm utilizes raw data in the form of a polar histogram that is read from a Laser Range Finder (LRF) and a camera. A desired open block is determined from the raw data utilizing a navigational heading and an elliptical approximation. The left and right most radii are determined from the calculated edges of the open block and provide the range of possible radial paths the IGV can travel through. In addition, the calculated obstacle edge positions allow the IGV to recognize complex obstacle arrangements and to slow down accordingly. A radial path optimization function calculates the best radial path between the left and right most radii and is sent to motion control for speed determination. Overall, the RPH algorithm allows the IGV to autonomously travel at average speeds of 3mph while avoiding all obstacles, with a processing time of approximately 10ms.

  6. A taxonomy of integral reaction path analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.

    2004-12-23

    W. C. Gardiner observed that achieving understanding through combustion modeling is limited by the ability to recognize the implications of what has been computed and to draw conclusions about the elementary steps underlying the reaction mechanism. This difficulty can be overcome in part by making better use of reaction path analysis in the context of multidimensional flame simulations. Following a survey of current practice, an integral reaction flux is formulated in terms of conserved scalars that can be calculated in a fully automated way. Conditional analyses are then introduced, and a taxonomy for bidirectional path analysis is explored. Many examples illustrate the resulting path analysis and uncover some new results about nonpremixed methane-air laminar jets.

  7. Quantum state of wormholes and path integral

    SciTech Connect

    Garay, L.J. )

    1991-08-15

    The quantum state of a wormhole can be represented by a path integral over all asymptotically Euclidean four-geometries and all matter fields which have prescribed values, the arguments of the wave function, on a three-surface {ital S} which divides the spacetime manifold into two disconnected parts. The ground-state wave function is picked out by requiring that there be no matter excitations in the asymptotic region. Once the path integrals over the lapse and shift functions are evaluated, the requirement that the spacetime be asymptotically Euclidean can be accomplished by fixing the asymptotic gravitational momentum in the remaining path integral. It is claimed that no wave function exists which corresponds to asymptotic field configurations such that the effective gravitational constant is negative in the asymptotic region. The wormhole wave functions are worked out in minisuperspace models with massless minimal and conformal scalar fields.

  8. Circular common-path point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongzhao; Feng, Guoying; Li, Hongru; Vargas, J; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2012-10-01

    A simple and compact point-diffraction interferometer with circular common-path geometry configuration is developed. The interferometer is constructed by a beam-splitter, two reflection mirrors, and a telescope system composed by two lenses. The signal and reference waves travel along the same path. Furthermore, an opaque mask containing a reference pinhole and a test object holder or test window is positioned in the common focal plane of the telescope system. The object wave is divided into two beams that take opposite paths along the interferometer. The reference wave is filtered by the reference pinhole, while the signal wave is transmitted through the object holder. The reference and signal waves are combined again in the beam-splitter and their interference is imaged in the CCD. The new design is compact, vibration insensitive, and suitable for the measurement of moving objects or dynamic processes.

  9. Paths to Licensure: Things Physicists Should Know

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Gay; Stewart, John

    2016-03-01

    The path to licensure can be quite complicated, and can thwart a physics department's efforts to produce more and better prepared high school physics teachers. Each state has different pathways to licensure. Acronyms like CAEP and SPA are not within the normal physicist's vocabulary. Some understanding of this topic can allow physics faculty advisers to help our students so that fewer are derailed on their path to the classroom, or take a path that will leave them less well prepared if they do find themselves there. Examples of different approaches that work within state licensure systems from two different states will be presented. Physics teacher preparation efforts in both Arkansas and West Virginia have been supported in part by the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC).

  10. Fermionic path integrals and local anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roepstorff, G.

    2003-05-01

    No doubt, the subject of path integrals proved to be an immensely fruitful human, i.e. Feynman's idea. No wonder it is more timely than ever. Some even claim that it is the most daring, innovative and revolutionary idea since the days of Heisenberg and Bohr. It is thus likely to generate enthusiasm, if not addiction among physicists who seek simplicity together with perfection. Professor Devreese's long-lasting interest in, if not passion on the subject stems from his firm conviction that, beyond being the tool of choice, path integration provides the key to all quantum phenomena, be it in solid state, atomic, molecular or particle physics as evidenced by the impressive list of publications at the address http://lib.ua.ac.be/AB/a867.html. In this note, I review a pitfall of fermionic path integrals and a way to get around it in situations relevant to the Standard Model of particle physics.

  11. A Comparison of Two Path Planners for Planetary Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarokh, M.; Shiller, Z.; Hayati, S.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents two path planners suitable for planetary rovers. The first is based on fuzzy description of the terrain, and genetic algorithm to find a traversable path in a rugged terrain. The second planner uses a global optimization method with a cost function that is the path distance divided by the velocity limit obtained from the consideration of the rover static and dynamic stability. A description of both methods is provided, and the results of paths produced are given which show the effectiveness of the path planners in finding near optimal paths. The features of the methods and their suitability and application for rover path planning are compared

  12. Tornado intensity estimated from damage path dimensions.

    PubMed

    Elsner, James B; Jagger, Thomas H; Elsner, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s(-1) for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width. PMID:25229242

  13. Tornado intensity estimated from damage path dimensions.

    PubMed

    Elsner, James B; Jagger, Thomas H; Elsner, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s(-1) for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width.

  14. Tornado Intensity Estimated from Damage Path Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, James B.; Jagger, Thomas H.; Elsner, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s−1 for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width. PMID:25229242

  15. Gas Path Sealing in Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of gas path seals is presented with particular attention given to sealing clearance effects on engine component efficiency. The effects on compressor pressure ratio and stall margin are pointed out. Various case-rotor relative displacements, which affect gas path seal clearances, are identified. Forces produced by nonuniform sealing clearances and their effect on rotor stability are discussed qualitatively, and recent work on turbine-blade-tip sealing for high temperature is described. The need for active clearance control and for engine structural analysis is discussed. The functions of the internal-flow system and its seals are reviewed.

  16. Practical path planning among movable obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang C.; Hwang, Yong K.

    1990-09-05

    Path planning among movable obstacles is a practical problem that is in need of a solution. In this paper an efficient heuristic algorithm that uses a generate-and-test paradigm: a good'' candidate path is hypothesized by a global planner and subsequently verified by a local planner. In the process of formalizing the problem, we also present a technique for modeling object interactions through contact. Our algorithm has been tested on a variety of examples, and was able to generate solutions within 10 seconds. 5 figs., 27 refs.

  17. Gas path sealing in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Survey of gas path seals is presented with particular attention given to sealing clearance effects on engine component efficiency. The effects on compressor pressure ratio and stall margin are pointed out. Various case-rotor relative displacements, which affect gas path seal clearances, are identified. Forces produced by nonuniform sealing clearances and their effect on rotor stability are discussed qualitatively, and recent work on turbine-blade-tip sealing for high temperatures is described. The need for active clearance control and for engine structural analysis is discussed. The functions of the internal-flow system and its seals are reviewed.

  18. Gas path sealing in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Gas path seals are discussed with emphasis on sealing clearance effects on engine component efficiency, compressor pressure ratio, and stall margin. Various case-rotor relative displacements, which affect gas path seal clearances, are identified. Forces produced by nonuniform sealing clearances and their effect on rotor stability are examined qualitatively, and recent work on turbine-blade-tip sealing for high temperatures is described. The need for active clearance control and for engine structural analysis is discussed. The functions of the internal-flow system and its seals are reviewed.

  19. Optical tomography with discretized path integral

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bingzhi; Tamaki, Toru; Kushida, Takahiro; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present a framework for optical tomography based on a path integral. Instead of directly solving the radiative transport equations, which have been widely used in optical tomography, we use a path integral that has been developed for rendering participating media based on the volume rendering equation in computer graphics. For a discretized two-dimensional layered grid, we develop an algorithm to estimate the extinction coefficients of each voxel with an interior point method. Numerical simulation results are shown to demonstrate that the proposed method works well. PMID:26839903

  20. Path planning for everday robotics with SANDROS

    SciTech Connect

    Watterberg, P.; Xavier, P.; Hwang, Y.

    1997-02-01

    We discuss the integration of the SANDROS path planner into a general robot simulation and control package with the inclusion of a fast geometry engine for distance calculations. This creates a single system that allows the path to be computed, simulated, and then executed on the physical robot. The architecture and usage procedures are presented. Also, we present examples of its usage in typical environments found in our organization. The resulting system is as easy to use as the general simulation system (which is in common use here) and is fast enough (example problems are solved in seconds) to be used interactively on an everyday basis.

  1. A path-integral Langevin equation treatment of low-temperature doped helium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ing, Christopher; Hinsen, Konrad; Yang, Jing; Zeng, Toby; Li, Hui; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    We present an implementation of path integral molecular dynamics for sampling low temperature properties of doped helium clusters using Langevin dynamics. The robustness of the path integral Langevin equation and white-noise Langevin equation [M. Ceriotti, M. Parrinello, T. E. Markland, and D. E. Manolopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 124104 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3489925 sampling methods are considered for those weakly bound systems with comparison to path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) in terms of efficiency and accuracy. Using these techniques, convergence studies are performed to confirm the systematic error reduction introduced by increasing the number of discretization steps of the path integral. We comment on the structural and energetic evolution of HeN-CO2 clusters from N = 1 to 20. To quantify the importance of both rotations and exchange in our simulations, we present a chemical potential and calculated band origin shifts as a function of cluster size utilizing PIMC sampling that includes these effects. This work also serves to showcase the implementation of path integral simulation techniques within the molecular modelling toolkit [K. Hinsen, J. Comp. Chem. 21, 79 (2000)], 10.1002/(SICI)1096-987X(20000130)21:2<79::AID-JCC1>3.0.CO;2-B, an open-source molecular simulation package.

  2. PathGrid: The Transfer of Astronomical Image Algorithms to the Analysis of Medical Microscopy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, N. A.; Brenton, J. D.; Caldas, C.; Irwin, M. J.; Akram, A.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Lewis, J. R.; MacCullum, P.; Morris, L. J.; Rixon, G. T.

    2009-09-01

    We describe our pilot `PathGrid' study which applies astronomical image processing and data handling techniques to the challenges involved in analysing Tissue Micro Array (TMA) image data. Image analysis has been applied to the input TMA data using open source solutions developed for an astronomical context. The resulting data products are in turn interfaced to the clinical trials systems in use at the Cambridge Research Institute (Cancer Research-UK).

  3. A comparison of NH{sub 3} point monitoring and diode laser based path integrated measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.; Richtsmeier, S.C.; Lee, J.; Bien, F.; Fetzer, G.J.; Groff, K.W.

    1994-12-31

    Measurements made using two different types of ammonia monitors during a two-month field study in the summer of 1994 are discussed. The first was a diode-laser based open path monitor designed for automated operation in an industrial environment. The second is a monitoring analyzer based on thermal decomposition of ammonia to NO and subsequent analysis by O{sub 3}-NO chemiluminescence. The two monitors provided consistent measurements of ammonia concentration during weeks of continuous unattended operation.

  4. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  5. Homing by path integration when a locomotion trajectory crosses itself.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Meléndez, Jayleen A; Menzies, Derek T

    2014-01-01

    Path integration is a process with which navigators derive their current position and orientation by integrating self-motion signals along a locomotion trajectory. It has been suggested that path integration becomes disproportionately erroneous when the trajectory crosses itself. However, there is a possibility that this previous finding was confounded by effects of the length of a traveled path and the amount of turns experienced along the path, two factors that are known to affect path integration performance. The present study was designed to investigate whether the crossover of a locomotion trajectory truly increases errors of path integration. In an experiment, blindfolded human navigators were guided along four paths that varied in their lengths and turns, and attempted to walk directly back to the beginning of the paths. Only one of the four paths contained a crossover. Results showed that errors yielded from the path containing the crossover were not always larger than those observed in other paths, and the errors were attributed solely to the effects of longer path lengths or greater degrees of turns. These results demonstrated that path crossover does not always cause significant disruption in path integration processes. Implications of the present findings for models of path integration are discussed.

  6. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  7. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  8. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  9. Dynamical characterization of inactivation path in voltage-gated Na(+) ion channel by non-equilibrium response spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pal, Krishnendu; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2016-11-01

    Inactivation path of voltage gated sodium channel has been studied here under various voltage protocols as it is the main governing factor for the periodic occurrence and shape of the action potential. These voltage protocols actually serve as non-equilibrium response spectroscopic tools to study the ion channel in non-equilibrium environment. In contrast to a lot of effort in finding the crystal structure based molecular mechanism of closed-state(CSI) and open-state inactivation(OSI); here our approach is to understand the dynamical characterization of inactivation. The kinetic flux as well as energetic contribution of the closed and open- state inactivation path is compared here for voltage protocols, namely constant, pulsed and oscillating. The non-equilibrium thermodynamic quantities used in response to these voltage protocols serve as improved characterization tools for theoretical understanding which not only agrees with the previously known kinetic measurements but also predict the energetically optimum processes to sustain the auto-regulatory mechanism of action potential and the consequent inactivation steps needed. The time dependent voltage pattern governs the population of the conformational states which when couple with characteristic rate parameters, the CSI and OSI selectivity arise dynamically to control the inactivation path. Using constant, pulsed and continuous oscillating voltage protocols we have shown that during depolarization the OSI path is more favored path of inactivation however, in the hyper-polarized situation the CSI is favored. It is also shown that the re-factorisation of inactivated sodium channel to resting state occurs via CSI path. Here we have shown how the subtle energetic and entropic cost due to the change in the depolarization magnitude determines the optimum path of inactivation. It is shown that an efficient CSI and OSI dynamical profile in principle can characterize the open-state drug blocking phenomena.

  10. Creativity, Spirituality, and Transcendence: Paths to Integrity and Wisdom in the Mature Self. Publications in Creativity Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melvin E., Ed.; Cook-Greuter, Susanne R., Ed.

    This book contains 11 papers on creativity, spirituality, and transcendence as paths to integrity and wisdom in the mature self. The book begins with the paper "Introduction--Creativity in Adulthood: Personal Maturity and Openness to Extraordinary Sources of Inspiration" (Susanne R. Cook-Greuter, Melvin E. Miller). The next four papers, which…

  11. Behavioral Path Analysis and Environmental Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, James A.; Kahle, Ellen

    Behavioral Path Analysis is both a theory and a methodology for studying person-environment interactions. It is designed to be applicable to the evaluation of both environments in use and proposed designed environments. This paper presents the basics of the theory, and some examples of recent applications that have guided its development. The…

  12. Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban

    2012-08-14

    Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

  13. Visualizing Transmedia Networks: Links, Paths and Peripheries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppel, Marc Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    'Visualizing Transmedia Networks: Links, Paths and Peripheries' examines the increasingly complex rhetorical intersections between narrative and media ("old" and "new") in the creation of transmedia fictions, loosely defined as multisensory and multimodal stories told extensively across a diverse media set. In order…

  14. Explore the Many Paths to Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    The road to leadership is not necessarily one that educators plan carefully with a series of logical steps. Certainly some educators start as teachers and then systematically work through a traditional hierarchy on their way to the superintendency. No matter their role or their path, education leaders demand more from themselves and others and…

  15. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, Robert M.; Wright, David D.

    1995-01-01

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

  16. Conflicting Paths: Growing Up in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Harvey J.

    This history of growing up is based on more than 500 first-person accounts relating to growing up from the middle of the 18th through the early 20th centuries. Major focus is on the formation, experience, and transformation of the principal paths of growing up. It considers transitions or turning points, particularly as they surround entries and…

  17. Path to Scholarships: "Making Dreams Come True."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, June

    This easy-to-read book with worksheets and instructional guides details a simple organizational portfolio method that has been used for over 6 years to obtain over one-half million dollars in scholarships for migrant students. Following an introduction, chapter 2, "Path of Hard Work," discusses scholarship qualifications such as a 3.0 grade point…

  18. Quad-rotor flight path energy optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Edward

    Quad-Rotor unmanned areal vehicles (UAVs) have been a popular area of research and development in the last decade, especially with the advent of affordable microcontrollers like the MSP 430 and the Raspberry Pi. Path-Energy Optimization is an area that is well developed for linear systems. In this thesis, this idea of path-energy optimization is extended to the nonlinear model of the Quad-rotor UAV. The classical optimization technique is adapted to the nonlinear model that is derived for the problem at hand, coming up with a set of partial differential equations and boundary value conditions to solve these equations. Then, different techniques to implement energy optimization algorithms are tested using simulations in Python. First, a purely nonlinear approach is used. This method is shown to be computationally intensive, with no practical solution available in a reasonable amount of time. Second, heuristic techniques to minimize the energy of the flight path are tested, using Ziegler-Nichols' proportional integral derivative (PID) controller tuning technique. Finally, a brute force look-up table based PID controller is used. Simulation results of the heuristic method show that both reliable control of the system and path-energy optimization are achieved in a reasonable amount of time.

  19. Gender Differences in Career Paths in Banking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Sandra; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed career paths of middle managers in bank. Study of matched pairs found that men (n=25) advanced faster and reached middle management through fewer promotions and positions than did women (n=25). Men had significantly more work experience outside of banking. In banking careers, men held more jobs in lending, whereas women occupied more…

  20. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

    1995-08-08

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.