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Sample records for open surgical wounds

  1. Surgical wound care - open

    MedlinePlus

    Surgical incision care; Open wound care ... your wound again with sutures, you need to care for it at home, since it may take ... Your health care provider will tell you how often to change your dressing . To prepare for the dressing change: Clean your ...

  2. Gauze Packing of Open Surgical Wounds: Empirical or Evidence-Based Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Dinah, F; Adhikari, A

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Most surgical wounds are closed primarily, but some are allowed to heal by secondary intention. This usually involves repeated packing and dressing of the raw wound surfaces. Although the long-term care of such wounds has devolved to the care of nurses in the community or out-patient setting, the initial wound dressing or cavity packing is done by the surgeon in the operating theatre. Many surgeons are unaware of the growth of the discipline of wound care, and still use traditional soaked gauze for dressing and packing open surgical wounds and cavities. RESULTS This review summarises the some of the modern alternatives available and the evidence – or the lack of it – for their use in both the acute and chronic setting. PMID:16460637

  3. Simulation of carbon dioxide insufflation via a diffuser in an open surgical wound model.

    PubMed

    Cater, John E; van der Linden, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Flow within a model surgical opening during insufflation with heated carbon dioxide was studied using computational fluid dynamics. A volume of fluid method was used to simulate the mixture of ambient air and carbon dioxide gas. The negative buoyancy of the carbon dioxide caused it to fill the wound and form a protective layer on the internal surfaces for a range of flow rates, temperatures, and angles of patient inclination. It was observed that the flow remained attached to the surface of the model due to the action of the Coanda effect. A flow rate of 10 L/min was sufficient to maintain a warm carbon dioxide barrier for a moderately sized surgical incision for all likely angles of inclination.

  4. Does human immunodeficiency virus status affect early wound healing in open surgically stabilised tibial fractures?: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Howard, N E; Phaff, M; Aird, J; Wicks, L; Rollinson, P

    2013-12-01

    We compared early post-operative rates of wound infection in HIV-positive and -negative patients presenting with open tibial fractures managed with surgical fixation. The wounds of 84 patients (85 fractures), 28 of whom were HIV positive and 56 were HIV negative, were assessed for signs of infection using the ASEPIS wound score. There were 19 women and 65 men with a mean age of 34.8 years. A total of 57 fractures (17 HIV-positive, 40 HIV-negative) treated with external fixation were also assessed using the Checkett score for pin-site infection. The remaining 28 fractures were treated with internal fixation. No significant difference in early post-operative wound infection between the two groups of patients was found (10.7% (n = 3) vs 19.6% (n = 11); relative risk (RR) 0.55 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17 to 1.8); p = 0.32). There was also no significant difference in pin-site infection rates (17.6% (n = 3) vs 12.5% (n = 5); RR 1.62 (95% CI 0.44 to 6.07); p = 0.47). The study does not support the hypothesis that HIV significantly increases the rate of early wound or pin-site infection in open tibial fractures. We would therefore suggest that a patient's HIV status should not alter the management of open tibial fractures in patients who have a CD4 count > 350 cells/μl.

  5. Surgical wound care -- closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the incision increases or becomes thick, tan, green, or yellow, or smells bad (pus). Also call if your temperature is above 100°F (37.7°C) for more than 4 hours. Alternative Names Surgical incision care; Closed wound care References Leong M, Phillips LG. ...

  6. Wound Edge Protectors in Open Abdominal Surgery to Reduce Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mihaljevic, André L.; Müller, Tara C.; Kehl, Victoria; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Importance Surgical site infections remain one of the most frequent complications following abdominal surgery and cause substantial costs, morbidity and mortality. Objective To assess the effectiveness of wound edge protectors in open abdominal surgery in reducing surgical site infections. Evidence Review A systematic literature search was conducted according to a prespecified review protocol in a variety of data-bases combined with hand-searches for randomized controlled trials on wound edge protectors in patients undergoing laparotomy. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of included trials was conducted. Findings We identified 16 randomized controlled trials including 3695 patients investigating wound edge protectors published between 1972 and 2014. Critical appraisal uncovered a number of methodological flaws, predominantly in the older trials. Wound edge protectors significantly reduced the rate of surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.51–0.83; p = 0.0007; I2 = 52%). The results were robust in a number of sensitivity analyses. A similar effect size was found in the subgroup of patients undergoing colorectal surgery (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.44–0.97; p = 0.04; I2 = 56%). Of the two common types of wound protectors double ring devices were found to exhibit a greater protective effect (risk ratio 0.29; 95%CI, 0.15–0.55) than single-ring devices (risk ratio 0.71; 95%CI, 0.54–0.92), but this might largely be due to the lower quality of available data for double-ring devices. Exploratory subgroup analyses for the degree of contamination showed a larger protective effect in contaminated cases (0.44; 95%CI, 0.28–0.67; p = 0.0002, I2 = 23%) than in clean-contaminated surgeries (0.72, 95%CI, 0.57–0.91; p = 0.005; I2 = 46%) and a strong effect on the reduction of superficial surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.45; 95%CI, 0.24–0.82; p = 0.001; I2 = 72%). Conclusions and Relevance Wound edge protectors significantly reduce the rate of

  7. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... wounds heal, you may have a wound VAC (vacuum-assisted closure) dressing. It increases blood flow in ... helps with healing. This is a negative pressure (vacuum) dressing. There is a vacuum pump, a foam ...

  8. The Role of Topical Antiseptic Agents Within Antimicrobial Stewardship Strategies for Prevention and Treatment of Surgical Site and Chronic Open Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Christopher D.; Leaper, David J.; Assadian, Ojan

    2017-01-01

    Scope and Significance: The topical use of antiseptics for wound care has a role in an antimicrobial stewardship strategy. However, the details of this role need clarification. Further clinical research into the use of topical antiseptics in wound care would lower the risk of furthering antibiotic resistance and contribute to more effective antibiotic use. As part of this research, experimental and surveillance data are needed on the resistance and tolerance patterns associated with topical antiseptic use in wound infections. Objective: The development of antibiotic resistance presents global challenges in terms of patient harm and increased healthcare costs. The treatment of “at risk” and infected wounds contributes to this conundrum. Synergies between antibiotics and antiseptics and their appropriate combined use need exploration. Approach: A review of available evidence on the appropriateness of antiseptics as a fundamental component of antimicrobial stewardship strategies has been undertaken. Innovation: Opening up new ways of thinking and identifying gaps of knowledge will lead to optimizing justification of antimicrobial choices and combinations. This may lead to changes in practice in terms of solutions for the prevention and treatment of wound infection. Conclusion: Antiseptics are an integral part of antimicrobial stewardship strategies for the prevention and treatment of surgical site and chronic open wound infections. PMID:28224049

  9. [Surgical therapy of wounds and scars].

    PubMed

    Koller, J

    2013-08-01

    Surgery can be very useful in all phases of wound healing and in treating scars. It can be employed along with conservative therapy, either simultaneously or in a sequential manner. The spectrum of surgical measures includes debridement with excision of wound edges or necrotic areas, skin transplantation to cover granulating wounds, and simple excision or complex reconstructive approaches to scars. The advantages of surgical treatment are seen in all phases of wound healing and include rapid onset of action, avoidance of secondary infection and improved function. The shortened healing time helps save personal and material costs.

  10. Open-label clinical trial comparing the clinical and economic effectiveness of using a polyurethane film surgical dressing with gauze surgical dressings in the care of post-operative surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Ana Abejón; Casanova, Pabló López; Soriano, José Verdú; Torra I Bou, Joan-Enric

    2015-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common postoperative complication and can cause avoidable morbidity and excessive costs for the health service. Novel dressings, designed specifically for postoperative wounds, can help to reduce the risk of SSI and other complications such as blistering. This study compared the use of a new polyurethane film surgical dressing (Opsite Post-Op Visible, Smith & Nephew, Hull, UK) with gauze and tape in the management of postoperative wounds. The results show that the polyurethane film dressing results in a significant reduction in SSI (1·4% versus 6·6%, P = 0·006) as well as a reduction in other postoperative wound complications (e.g. blistering and erythema). Economic analysis conducted alongside the study suggests that these improved outcomes can be achieved at a lower treatment cost than gauze and tape dressings. The modest incremental cost of the polyurethane film surgical dressing is easily offset by the reduction in the costs related to treating SSI and other wound complications associated with gauze and tape dressings.

  11. Collecting and measuring wound exudate biochemical mediators in surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brendan; Clark, David J; Yeomans, David; Angst, Martin S

    2012-10-20

    We describe a methodology by which we are able to collect and measure biochemical inflammatory and nociceptive mediators at the surgical wound site. Collecting site-specific biochemical markers is important to understand the relationship between levels in serum and surgical wound, determine any associations between mediator release, pain, analgesic use and other outcomes of interest, and evaluate the effect of systemic and peripheral drug administration on surgical wound biochemistry. This methodology has been applied to healthy women undergoing elective cesarean delivery with spinal anesthesia. We have measured wound exudate and serum mediators at the same time intervals as patient's pain scores and analgesics consumption for up to 48 hours post-cesarean delivery. Using this methodology we have been able to detect various biochemical mediators including nerve growth factor (NGF), prostaglandin E2 (PG-E2) substance P, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, TNFα, INFγ, G-CSF, GM-CSF, MCP-1 and MIP-1β. Studies applying this human surgical wound bioassay have found no correlations between wound and serum cytokine concentrations or their time-release profile (J Pain. 2008; 9(7):650-7).(1) We also documented the utility of the technique to identify drug-mediated changes in wound cytokine content.

  12. Collecting And Measuring Wound Exudate Biochemical Mediators In Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Brendan; Clark, David J; Yeomans, David; Angst, Martin S

    2012-01-01

    We describe a methodology by which we are able to collect and measure biochemical inflammatory and nociceptive mediators at the surgical wound site. Collecting site-specific biochemical markers is important to understand the relationship between levels in serum and surgical wound, determine any associations between mediator release, pain, analgesic use and other outcomes of interest, and evaluate the effect of systemic and peripheral drug administration on surgical wound biochemistry. This methodology has been applied to healthy women undergoing elective cesarean delivery with spinal anesthesia. We have measured wound exudate and serum mediators at the same time intervals as patient's pain scores and analgesics consumption for up to 48 hours post-cesarean delivery. Using this methodology we have been able to detect various biochemical mediators including nerve growth factor (NGF), prostaglandin E2 (PG-E2) substance P, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, TNFα, INFγ, G-CSF, GM-CSF, MCP-1 and MIP-1β. Studies applying this human surgical wound bioassay have found no correlations between wound and serum cytokine concentrations or their time-release profile (J Pain. 2008; 9(7):650-7).1 We also documented the utility of the technique to identify drug-mediated changes in wound cytokine content (Anesth Analg 2010; 111:1452-9).2 PMID:23117346

  13. Wound infection after arterial surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    van Himbeeck, F J; van Knippenberg, L A; Niessen, M C; van Griethuysen, A J

    1992-09-01

    During the period October 1983 to March 1987, 603 patients who underwent arterial surgical procedures were studied to determine the incidence and treatment of wound infections. Bypass procedures were performed in 395 patients (65.5%), in which autogenous vein was used for 158 grafts (26%), synthetic Dacron for 216 grafts (36%), and umbilical vein for 21 grafts (3.5%). Thrombo-endarterectomies, embolectomies and patch-grafts were performed in 208 patients (34.5%). An Infection Control Nurse examined and registered the wounds. The definition of wound infection used in our study is equivalent to Szilagyi grade II infection. Vascular surgery is classified as clean surgery, the clean wound infection rate being a useful measurement to evaluate preventative measures and surgical technique. Thirty-one patients (5.1%) developed a wound infection as a postoperative complication. The overall incidence of wound complications including haematoma and seroma following arterial reconstruction was 13%. The site of wound infection was predominantly the groin. The most common pathogen was Staphylococcus aureus which was found in 17 patients (2.8%). All infections resolved without further surgical intervention. The influence of possible aetiological factors is considered and the importance of prophylactic antibiotics and good surgical technique is stressed.

  14. Surgical Management of Chronic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Benjamin R; Ha, Austin Y; Kwan, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we outline the important role the surgeon plays in the management of chronic wounds. Debridement and washout are required for grossly infected wounds and necrotizing soft tissue infections. Cutaneous cancers such as squamous cell carcinomas may contribute to chronic wounds and vice versa; if diagnosed, these should be treated with wide local excision. Arterial, venous, and even lymphatic flows can be restored in select cases to enhance delivery of nutrients and removal of metabolic waste and promote wound healing. In cases where vital structures, such as bones, joints, tendons, and nerves, are exposed, vascularized tissue transfers are often required. These tissue transfers can be local or remote, the latter of which necessitates anastomoses of arteries and veins. Pressure sores are managed by relieving pressure, treating acute trauma or infection, and using rotation fasciocutaneous flaps. Lastly, the surgeon must always consider the possibility of osteomyelitis and retained foreign body as etiology for chronic wounds.

  15. Treatment of surgical wound dehiscence.

    PubMed

    Candido, Luiz Claudio

    2002-06-01

    Surgical exploration of cavities, sinuses, and specific antibiotic therapy are fundamental for the control fo cutaneous infection. Topical treatment will vary based on evaluation of the lesion, experience of the health care team, and the environment.

  16. Prevention of post-operative infections after surgical treatment of bite wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Frank, Matthias; Bender, Claudia; Hinz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the literature about the microbial spectrum, the risk factors of post-operative infections, and the results of surgical interventions, the following recommendation can be made for the management of bite wounds: fresh, open wounds: surgical debridement, if appropriate, then an antiseptic lavage with a fluid consisting of povidone iodine and ethanol (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics, primary wound closure nearly closed fresh wounds (e.g., cat bites): surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics older wounds after ~4 hours: surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress or bandage for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), at the same time intravenous or dose-adapted oral antibiotics (Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid) older wounds after ~24 hours: surgical debridement, then antiseptic lavage (Betaseptic®), in case of clinically apparent infection or inflammation surgical revision with opening of wound and treatment with antibiotics according to resistogram (empirical start with Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid). For each kind of bite wound, the patient’s tetanus immunization status as well as the risk of exposure to rabies have to be assessed. Similarly, the possibility of other infections, such as lues (Syphilis), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HBC), hepatitis D (HDV) and HIV, in the rare case of a human bite wound, has to be taken into account. PMID:20941334

  17. Ultra-delayed lumbar surgical wound hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Kinon, Merritt D.; Nakhla, Jonathan; Brown, Kenroy; Bhashyam, Niketh; Yassari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: There exists an inherent risk of increased venous thromboembolism (VTE) in surgical spine patients, which is independent of their existing risk factors. Prophylaxis and treatment of VTE is an imprecise practice and may have serious complications even well after the initial surgery. Furthermore, there are no clear guidelines on how to manage postoperative spine patients with regards to the timing of anticoagulation. Case Description: Here, we present the case of a middle-aged male, status post L2/3 laminectomy and discectomy who developed bilateral below the knee deep venous thrombosis. He was started on Enoxaparin and transitioned to Warfarin and returned with axial back pain, and was found to have a postoperative hematoma almost 3 weeks later in a delayed fashion. Conclusion: Delayed surgical wound hematoma with neural compression is an important complication to identify and should remain high on the differential diagnosis in patients on warfarin who present with axial spinal pain. PMID:28144491

  18. A Study of Sepsis in Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hnatko, S. I.; Macdonald, G. R.; Rodin, A. E.

    1963-01-01

    Published records of the frequency of wound sepsis are often unreliable sources of information on the general frequency of this complication because of unstandardized methods of reporting and because of the various views of different investigators as to what constitutes sepsis. A method of infection reporting, its study and analysis are outlined. A survey of postoperative infections by this method for the years 1959, 1960 and 1961 revealed infection rates of 2.02%, 1.20% and 1.14%, respectively. For the same period the percentages of wound infections caused by Staph. aureus were 83.06%, 69.8% and 51.8%, respectively. The most prevalent phage types were 55/53/54 and 52/80/81/82, although types 80/81/82 and 80 were also involved. Infections with Gram-negative organisms were encountered more often in 1961 than in 1959. The majority of these were of mixed type, and followed abdominal surgery. There is need for more comprehensive study and analysis of postoperative wound sepsis and its complications. It was apparent from this study that, statistically, a relatively low rate of postoperative infections may mask a high rate following a specific surgical procedure. PMID:13954844

  19. The 'French Fry' VAC technique: hybridisation of traditional open wound NPWT with closed incision NPWT.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Karan; Tadisina, Kashyap K; Singh, Devinder P

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site occurrences (SSO), specifically surgical site infections represent a significant burden in the US health care system. It has been hypothesised that postoperative dressing can help drive down SSO. We describe the successful use of a novel technique combining both closed incision and open negative pressure wound therapy in the management of a high-risk wound associated with lymphoedema of obesity.

  20. Traffic in the operating room: a review of factors influencing air flow and surgical wound contamination.

    PubMed

    Pokrywka, Marian; Byers, Karin

    2013-06-01

    Surgical wound contamination leading to surgical site infection can result from disruption of the intended airflow in the operating room (OR). When personnel enter and exit the OR, or create unnecessary movement and traffic during the procedure, the intended airflow in the vicinity of the open wound becomes disrupted and does not adequately remove airborne contaminants from the sterile field. An increase in the bacterial counts of airborne microorganisms is noted during increased activity levels within the OR. Researchers have studied OR traffic and door openings as a determinant of air contamination. During a surgical procedure the door to the operating room may be open as long as 20 minutes out of each surgical hour during critical procedures involving implants. Interventions into limiting excessive movement and traffic in the OR may lead to reductions in surgical site infections in select populations.

  1. Radio electric tissue optimization in the treatment of surgical wounds

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Alessandro; Fontani, Vania; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Mannu, Piero

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To report preliminary results with the tissue optimization (TO) treatment with a radio electric asymmetric conveyer (REAC) in promoting the repair of surgical wounds. Patients and methods Two subjects, a 54-year-old male with a tear bruise on the upper third of the leg and a 19-year-old female with a stab wound to the hand, were treated with 12 REAC-TO treatment sessions. Results In both patients, the wounds showed shorter healing time compared with the time usually required for similar wounds, and good repair quality. Conclusion REAC device with its specific treatment protocols may be an alternative therapy for wound healing. PMID:21931498

  2. Surgical and traumatic wound infections, cellulitis, and myositis in horses.

    PubMed

    Adam, Emma N; Southwood, Louise L

    2006-08-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) and traumatic wound management remain challenging clinical scenarios. The prevention of SSIs involves meticulous surgical technique and aftercare. Traumatic wounds require thorough evaluation to assess the involvement of synovial structures and radiographs to check for fractures. Chronic wounds can require a biopsy and histologic evaluation to obtain a diagnosis, because many underlying pathologic processes grossly appear similar but different treatment regimens are required. Early recognition and diagnosis of cellulitis and myositis enable the rapid aggressive intervention necessary for a positive outcome. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment increases the complication and mortality rates and makes these conditions difficult to treat successfully.

  3. A Novel Option of Uninterrupted Closure of Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Sulamanidze, Marlen A; Sulamanidze, George M

    2009-01-01

    Background: A cosmetically pleasing postoperative scar is an important aim of all aesthetic surgeries. Use of proper suture materials for delicate and gentle suturing of the operative injury is an important requirement for achieving satisfactory scars. However, closure of the edges of wounds by means of conventional suture materials does not always meet the requirements to achieve this objective. Aim: To simplify and facilitate the process of surgical wound closure, to improve the quality of scar, and to achieve a good cosmetic effect through the introduction of a new type of suture material. Materials and Methods: We have introduced a new surgical suturing material—a nontraumatic, barbed thread connected with the suture needle—APTOS SUTURE (European patent 1075843 as of 1999). Presented herein is a new modification of the technique of uninterrupted subcutaneous and intracutaneous suturing of wound edges, and the details of our experience with this material. Results: Our experience shows that, with use of APTOS, wound closure is carried out easily and quickly. The wound remains stable, the time of healing is shortened, and the process of suture removal is simplified, resulting in an aesthetically pleasing scar. Conclusions: The technique of surgical wound suturing proposed herein is a simple, facilitated, and efficient option of wound-edge closure, which can successfully be used, both in general and in aesthetic surgery for wound closure, such as plasty of scars, face lift, mammoplasty, and abdominal plasty. PMID:20808595

  4. Medicare Payment: Surgical Dressings and Topical Wound Care Products.

    PubMed

    Schaum, Kathleen D

    2014-08-01

    Medicare patients' access to surgical dressings and topical wound care products is greatly influenced by the Medicare payment system that exists in each site of care. Qualified healthcare professionals should consider these payment systems, as well as the medical necessity for surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Scientists and manufacturers should also consider these payment systems, in addition to the Food and Drug Administration requirements for clearance or approval, when they are developing new surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Due to the importance of the Medicare payment systems, this article reviews the Medicare payment systems in acute care hospitals, long-term acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, durable medical equipment suppliers, hospital-based outpatient wound care departments, and qualified healthcare professional offices.

  5. Medicare Payment: Surgical Dressings and Topical Wound Care Products

    PubMed Central

    Schaum, Kathleen D.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare patients' access to surgical dressings and topical wound care products is greatly influenced by the Medicare payment system that exists in each site of care. Qualified healthcare professionals should consider these payment systems, as well as the medical necessity for surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Scientists and manufacturers should also consider these payment systems, in addition to the Food and Drug Administration requirements for clearance or approval, when they are developing new surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Due to the importance of the Medicare payment systems, this article reviews the Medicare payment systems in acute care hospitals, long-term acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, durable medical equipment suppliers, hospital-based outpatient wound care departments, and qualified healthcare professional offices. PMID:25126477

  6. [Limited evidence for negative pressure wound treatment of skin transplants and closed surgical wounds].

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jens Lykke; Matzen, Steen Henrik

    2013-04-15

    The indications for negative pressure wound treatment (NPWT) are increasing, e.g. for fixation of skin transplant and primary closed surgical wounds. The evidence for indications and positive effects are limited. NPWT should exclusively be used for fixation of split thickness skin transplants when immobilisation is otherwise difficult and for primary closed surgical wounds in selected patients at risk. Future high-quality investigations are necessary to pinpoint indications for topical negative pressure therapy, the effect of the different NPWT-modalities, and the overall economy compared to conventional bandages.

  7. Wound wise: wounds in surgical patients who are obese.

    PubMed

    Baugh, Nancy; Zuelzer, Helen; Meador, Jill; Blankenship, Jolie

    2007-06-01

    The number of surgical patients who are obese in the United States is rising, a trend that's likely to continue. Such patients are at higher risk than nonobese patients are for surgical site infections and other complications such as dehiscence, pressure ulcers, deep tissue injury, and rhabdomyolysis. This article details the factors that can contribute to such complications, including a high number of comorbidities, and offers practical suggestions for preventing them. Nurses should understand that special equipment, precautions, and protocols may be needed at every stage of care, and that obese patients aren't anomalies but rather a part of a growing population with particular needs.

  8. Collecting and Measuring Nociceptive and Inflammatory Mediators in Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Brendan; Clark, David J.; Yeomans, David; Angst, Martin S.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the feasibility of collecting and measuring inflammatory and nociceptive biochemical mediators at the surgical site; to evaluate the relationship between wound and serum levels; and to determine any associations between mediator release, pain and analgesic consumption post-cesarean delivery. Twenty healthy women undergoing elective cesarean delivery with spinal anesthesia were enrolled. Wound exudate and serum mediators, pain scores and analgesics consumption were measured at 1, 6, 24, and 48 hours post-cesarean. In wound exudate, 19 out of 20 mediators were reliably detected including IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, TNFα, INFγ, G-CSF, GM-CSF, MCP-1 and MIP-1β, nerve growth factor (NGF), prostaglandin E2 (PG-E2) and substance P. Wound PG-E2 and various cytokines peaked early, whereas NGF showed a more delayed release. There were no correlations between the concentration versus time profile of wound and serum cytokines. This study demonstrates the feasibility of collecting and measuring nociceptive and inflammatory mediators in surgical wounds at specific time points. The lack of significant correlations between wound and serum levels emphasizes the importance of determining site-specific release if localized pathologies are to be studied. PMID:19078937

  9. Evaluating and managing open skin wounds: colonization versus infection.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Annette B

    2002-08-01

    Open skin wounds are colonized with bacteria, and optimal wound care is required to prevent progression to infection. Intact skin normally provides protection from external environmental assaults. Disruption of the skin or tissue creating an open skin wound can result in infection, dehydration, hypothermia, scarring, compromised immunity, and changes in body image. Biofilms and bacterial genomics are areas of intense scientific investigation in the face of the emerging threat of bacterial resistance. Optimal wound care to prevent progression from colonization to infection remains the foundation of good clinical practice. On the basis of wound conditions, cleansing, debridement, measures to increase oxygenation and perfusion, adequate nutrition, and appropriate use of topical agents and antibiotics, when indicated, are the keys to managing open skin wounds. This article provides a targeted review of normal skin flora, wound healing, prevention of skin infection, colonization versus infection, biofilms, genomics and infectious disease, and management of open skin wounds.

  10. The Use of NPWT-i Technology in Complex Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Robert A; Punch, Laurie; Van Epps, Jeffrey; Gordon-Burroughs, Sherilyn; Martinez, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Advanced wound management of complex surgical wounds remains a significant challenge as more patients are being hospitalized with infected wounds. Reducing recurrent infections and promoting granulation tissue formation is essential to overall wound healing. Wounds with acute infection and critical colonization require advanced multimodal approaches including systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and primary wound care. The goal in surgical wound management is to optimize clinical outcomes such as time to wound closure and functional recovery. A review of current literature suggests that negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWT-i) is a viable adjunct therapy in the management of infected wounds especially in patients with medical comorbidities. The aim of this case series is to highlight the ability of NPWT-i as adjunct to prepare the wound bed for closure on infected surgical wounds that would normally require multiple operations to obtain source control. PMID:28083464

  11. The Use of NPWT-i Technology in Complex Surgical Wounds.

    PubMed

    Rupert, Paula; Ochoa, Robert A; Punch, Laurie; Van Epps, Jeffrey; Gordon-Burroughs, Sherilyn; Martinez, Sylvia

    2016-12-08

    Advanced wound management of complex surgical wounds remains a significant challenge as more patients are being hospitalized with infected wounds. Reducing recurrent infections and promoting granulation tissue formation is essential to overall wound healing. Wounds with acute infection and critical colonization require advanced multimodal approaches including systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and primary wound care. The goal in surgical wound management is to optimize clinical outcomes such as time to wound closure and functional recovery. A review of current literature suggests that negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWT-i) is a viable adjunct therapy in the management of infected wounds especially in patients with medical comorbidities. The aim of this case series is to highlight the ability of NPWT-i as adjunct to prepare the wound bed for closure on infected surgical wounds that would normally require multiple operations to obtain source control.

  12. The study of gunshot wounds in surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G K

    1980-06-01

    Both the laboratory and the pathologist are frequently involved in medicolegal cases. A relatively infrequent though important example is the case involving study of gunshot wounds in surgical pathology. Procedures for the proper gross and microscopic examination of gunshot wound specimens have been documented in the literature, and are briefly reviewed. A protocol for documenting the chain of custody for physical evidence recovered in these cases must be strictly observed in each department of surgical pathology. A large hospital's surgical pathology files contained 70 gunshot wound cases for 1969-1978. Review employing Adelson's reference work revealed correct microscopic findings and diagnosis in 90% of specimens, the 11 errors all failures to recognize gunpowder residue in tissues. There were nine specimens of physical evidence. Two errors were made in the gross examination of these specimens, and despite a chain-of-custody protocol pathologists failed to adequately document 44% of them. The surgical pathologist has available ample resources for studying gunshot wound specimens. Using them he can correctly interpret most cases, at the same time fulfilling his medicolegal obligations.

  13. Morphological Peculiarities Of Laser Surgical Wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeliseenko, Vladimir I.

    1988-06-01

    Under the laser continuous irradiation one can observe on tissues and organs a whole complex of dystrophic processes including the coagulation necrosis as well as impairements in hemo- and microcirculation. The peculiarity of the inflammatory reaction in the healing process in laser wounds lies in an absence of demarcation leucocytic infiltration and lack of edema on a border of intact tissues and those with thermal necrosis; the healing process is characterised as well as with early proliferative phase. The main role in the reparative process belongs to cells of mononuclear phagocytic system ( macrophages ), wich make the reparative process like an aseptic productive inflammation.

  14. Surgical tip: Repair of acute Achilles rupture with Krackow suture through a 1.5 cm medial wound.

    PubMed

    Lui, T H

    2010-03-01

    Acute Achilles tendon ruptures is one of the commonest tendon injury of the foot and ankle. The management of this problem is still controversial. Treatment can be classified into non-surgical and surgical types. Surgical management can be subdivided into open repair, percutaneous with or without adjunct of arthroscopy. In compare with non-surgical management, surgical management will decrease the tendon re-rupture rate. However, the possible surgical complications including wound breakdown and sural nerve injury are still quite significant. Percutaneous repair technique has the advantage of less chance of wound breakdown, but the rate of tendon re-rupture is higher than that after open tendon repair, because the repair is usually weaker than that achieved in open repair. Lui have described an endoscopic assisted repair with the Krackow locking suture. However, the technique is complicated and six portal wounds are needed. A simpler way of applying the Krackow suture through the portal wound has been described for reattachment of Achilles tendon insertion after endoscopic calcaneoplasty. We describe a mini-open approach of Achilles tendon repair with the Krackow locking suture. By means of release of the medial edge of the investing fascia, the Achilles tendon can be mobilized easily and the Krackow locking suture can be applied through a 1.5cm medial wound. Hopefully, this can improve the strength of repair and maintaining the advantage of minimally invasive tendon repair.

  15. Improved Surgical Site Infection (SSI) rate through accurately assessed surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    John, Honeymol; Nimeri, Abdelrahman; Ellahham, Samer

    2015-01-01

    Sheikh Khalifa Medical City's (SKMC) Surgery Institute was identified as a high outlier in Surgical Site Infections (SSI) based on the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) - Semi-Annual Report (SAR) in January 2012. The aim of this project was to improve SSI rates through accurate wound classification. We identified SSI rate reduction as a performance improvement and safety priority at SKMC, a tertiary referral center. We used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) best practice guidelines as a guide. ACS NSQIP is a clinical registry that provides risk-adjusted clinical outcome reports every six months. The rates of SSI are reported in an observed/expected ratio. The expected ratio is calculated based on the risk factors of the patients which include wound classification. We established a multidisciplinary SSI taskforce. The members of the SSI taskforce included the ACS NSQIP team members, quality, surgeons, nurses, infection control, IT, pharmacy, microbiology, and it was chaired by a colorectal surgeon. The taskforce focused on five areas: pre-op showering and hair removal, skin antisepsis, prophylactic antibiotics, peri-operative maintenance of glycaemia, and normothermia. We planned audits to evaluate our wound classification and our SSI rates based on the SAR. Our expected SSI rates in general surgery and the whole department were 2.52% and 1.70% respectively, while our observed SSI rates were 4.68% and 3.57% respectively, giving us a high outlier status with an odd's ratio of 1.72 and 2.03. Wound classifications were identified as an area of concern. For example, wound classifications were preoperatively selected based on the default wound classification of the booked procedure in the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) which led to under classifying wounds in many occasions. A total of 998 cases were reviewed, our rate of incorrect wound classification

  16. Improved Surgical Site Infection (SSI) rate through accurately assessed surgical wounds

    PubMed Central

    John, Honeymol; Nimeri, Abdelrahman; ELLAHHAM, SAMER

    2015-01-01

    Sheikh Khalifa Medical City's (SKMC) Surgery Institute was identified as a high outlier in Surgical Site Infections (SSI) based on the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) - Semi-Annual Report (SAR) in January 2012. The aim of this project was to improve SSI rates through accurate wound classification. We identified SSI rate reduction as a performance improvement and safety priority at SKMC, a tertiary referral center. We used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) best practice guidelines as a guide. ACS NSQIP is a clinical registry that provides risk-adjusted clinical outcome reports every six months. The rates of SSI are reported in an observed/expected ratio. The expected ratio is calculated based on the risk factors of the patients which include wound classification. We established a multidisciplinary SSI taskforce. The members of the SSI taskforce included the ACS NSQIP team members, quality, surgeons, nurses, infection control, IT, pharmacy, microbiology, and it was chaired by a colorectal surgeon. The taskforce focused on five areas: pre-op showering and hair removal, skin antisepsis, prophylactic antibiotics, peri-operative maintenance of glycaemia, and normothermia. We planned audits to evaluate our wound classification and our SSI rates based on the SAR. Our expected SSI rates in general surgery and the whole department were 2.52% and 1.70% respectively, while our observed SSI rates were 4.68% and 3.57% respectively, giving us a high outlier status with an odd's ratio of 1.72 and 2.03. Wound classifications were identified as an area of concern. For example, wound classifications were preoperatively selected based on the default wound classification of the booked procedure in the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) which led to under classifying wounds in many occasions. A total of 998 cases were reviewed, our rate of incorrect wound classification

  17. Surgical skill facilitation in videoscopic open surgery.

    PubMed

    Panait, Lucian; Rafiq, Azhar; Mohamed, Ahmed; Doarn, Charles; Merrell, Ronald C

    2003-12-01

    The operating room (OR) was traditionally characterized as a closed environment, in which the view of the operative field was available to the surgeon and assistant only. In laparoscopy, integration of technology into the surgical theatre has transformed surgical procedures into minimally invasive events, with viewing of the surgical field using endoscopic cameras. Similar technical advances to the open surgical environment will allow visualization and coordination of finer surgical maneuvers on standard video monitors. The objective of this study was to develop optimal protocols for performing basic open surgical maneuvers without direct viewing of the operating field, instead watching a monitor that displays the image of the surgical field captured by an endoscopic camera. The AESOP robotic arm and Alpha Virtual Port (Computer Motion, Goleta, California) were used to hold the endoscopic camera in different positions relative to the surgeon and the operative table. The surgeons conducting the study evaluated six such different setups. Based on the average time to complete the task in each of these setups and the ease of adaptation to the new working conditions, we concluded that at least one of these setups could be translated into the OR. The advantages of integrating video image enhancement over classical open surgery (OS) are that the surgical field can be magnified to perform finer maneuvers, and to share views of the surgical field with additional clinicians and trainees.

  18. Intravenous Adenosine for Surgical Management of Penetrating Heart Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kokotsakis, John; Hountis, Panagiotis; Antonopoulos, Nikolaos; Skouteli, Elian; Athanasiou, Thanos; Lioulias, Achilleas

    2007-01-01

    Accurate suturing of penetrating cardiac injuries is difficult. Heart motion, ongoing blood loss, arrhythmias due to heart manipulation, and the near-death condition of the patient can all affect the outcome. Rapid intravenous injection of adenosine induces temporary asystole that enables placement of sutures in a motionless surgical field. Use of this technique improves surgical conditions, and it is faster than other methods. Herein, we describe our experience with the use of intravenous adenosine to successfully treat 3 patients who had penetrating heart wounds. PMID:17420798

  19. Silver Dressings Augment the Ability of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy to Reduce Bacteria in a Contaminated Open Fracture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Silver Dressings Augment the Ability of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy to Reduce Bacteria in a Contaminated Open Fracture Model...contaminated by S. aureus. Key Words: Contamination, Infection, Open fracture , Negative pressure, Silver dressing. (J Trauma. 2011;71: S147–S150...is commonly used in the treatment of large wounds and acute open fractures , and has even been applied to surgical incisions in an effort to minimize

  20. INFLUENCE OF SURGICAL TECHNIQUE IN THE PERITONEAL CARCINOMATOSIS SURGICAL WOUND IMPLANT: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    ROSA, Roberto Maranhão; CAIADO, Rafael Coelho; REIS, Paulo Roberto de Melo; LACERDA, Elisângela de Paula Silveira; SUGITA, Denis Masashi; MRUÉ, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of malignancies increased alarmingly. Surgery constitutes one of the most efficient therapeutic modalities for the treatment of solid tumors. The neoplastic implant in surgical wound is a complication whose percentage of occurrence reported in the literature is variable, but sets with high morbidity and therapeutic difficulties. Protecting the wound is one of the recommended principles of oncologic surgery. Aim To evaluate the influence of wound protection in the development of tumor implantation. Methods Sarcoma 180 tumor cells were used, with intraperitoneal inoculation in Swiss mice. After the establishment of neoplastic ascites, animals were randomized into two groups of 10, each group consisting of five males and five females. In both groups, laparotomy and manipulation of intra-abdominal organs was performed. In a group laparotomy was performed using the protection of the abdominal wound and the other group without it. On the 9th postoperative day macroscopic evaluation of the operative scar was performed, which was later removed for microscopic evaluation. Results There was microscopic infiltration of tumor cells in the wound of all animals. However, the group that held the protection, infiltration was less intense when compared to the group without it. The infiltration was also more severe in females than in males of the same group. Conclusion Tumor infiltration into the wound was more intense in the group in which the protection of the surgical site was not performed, and in females when compared to males of the same group. PMID:25861061

  1. Surgical wound infections. A 5-year prospective study of 20,193 wounds at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, M; O'Connor, M; Schwartz, M L

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a 5-year prospective study of postoperative wound sepsis utilizing a careful program of wound surveillance. Surgical wounds following 20,193 operations on all surgical services were surveyed by a trained nurse epidemiologist. Daily examination of wounds, culture of all suspicious wounds, and 30-day outpatient clinic follow-up were performed. Results were disseminated at monthly intervals to all involved surgeons and operating room personnel. Prospective and ongoing analysis of results facilitated identification and rectification of specific problem areas. Wound infection rates demonstrated a steady decline over the course of the study, overall rates dropping from 4.2% to 1.9% (p less than 0.05). This reduction in incidence of postoperative wound sepsis of 55% is estimated to have saved 2740 inhospital days and nearly $750,000. PMID:6703787

  2. Open core control software for surgical robots

    PubMed Central

    Kozuka, Hiroaki; Kim, Hyung Wook; Takesue, Naoyuki; Vladimirov, B.; Sakaguchi, Masamichi; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Chinzei, Kiyoyuki; Fujimoto, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Object In these days, patients and doctors in operation room are surrounded by many medical devices as resulting from recent advancement of medical technology. However, these cutting-edge medical devices are working independently and not collaborating with each other, even though the collaborations between these devices such as navigation systems and medical imaging devices are becoming very important for accomplishing complex surgical tasks (such as a tumor removal procedure while checking the tumor location in neurosurgery). On the other hand, several surgical robots have been commercialized, and are becoming common. However, these surgical robots are not open for collaborations with external medical devices in these days. A cutting-edge “intelligent surgical robot” will be possible in collaborating with surgical robots, various kinds of sensors, navigation system and so on. On the other hand, most of the academic software developments for surgical robots are “home-made” in their research institutions and not open to the public. Therefore, open source control software for surgical robots can be beneficial in this field. From these perspectives, we developed Open Core Control software for surgical robots to overcome these challenges. Materials and methods In general, control softwares have hardware dependencies based on actuators, sensors and various kinds of internal devices. Therefore, these control softwares cannot be used on different types of robots without modifications. However, the structure of the Open Core Control software can be reused for various types of robots by abstracting hardware dependent parts. In addition, network connectivity is crucial for collaboration between advanced medical devices. The OpenIGTLink is adopted in Interface class which plays a role to communicate with external medical devices. At the same time, it is essential to maintain the stable operation within the asynchronous data transactions through network. In the Open

  3. Negative pressure wound therapy combined with skin grafting improves surgical wound healing in the perianal area

    PubMed Central

    Jia-zi, Shi; Xiao, Zhai; Jun-hui, Li; Chun-yu, Xue; Hong-da, Bi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Management of large tissue defects resulting from local wide resection of perianal is a clinical challenge for surgeons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) following skin grafting on perianal surgical wound healing. Included in this study were 12 patients with perianal tumors who received skin grafting after perianal tumor resection between December 2012 and December 2014. A self-designed negative pressure drainage device was then applied to maintain a standard negative pressure at −150 mm Hg and removed on day 8 postoperation. The outcome was recorded immediately after NPWT and at 6-month follow-up. All skin grafts survived without infection, hematoma, and necrosis in all 12 patients. No tumor recurrence was detected during 6-month follow-up. Natural folds were observed around the anus. All patients showed normal bowel movements. NPWT following skin grafting was effective for perianal surgical wound healing and infection prevention, thus benefiting anatomical and functional recovery of the anus. PMID:27583890

  4. Syneture stainless STEEL suture. A collective review of its performance in surgical wound closure.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Drake, David B; Rodeheaver, George T; Winters, Kathryne L; Greene, Jill A; Gubler, K Dean; Long, William B; Britt, L D; Winters, Samuel P; Scott, Christine C; Lin, Kant Y

    2006-01-01

    Syneture (division of U.S. Surgical, division of Tyco Healthcare, Norwalk, Connecticut, USA) STEEL sutures are monofilament stainless steel sutures composed of 316L stainless steel conforming to ASTM Standard F138 grade 2 (" Stainless steel bar and wire for surgical implant"). STEEL sutures meet all requirements established by the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) for nonabsorbable surgical sutures. Steel sutures are for use in abdominal wound closure, intestinal anastomosis, hernia repair, sternal closure, and skin closure. They are attached to the following types of surgical needles: Roto-Grip Needles and SCC Needle. The sutures and needles are packaged in a Mylar/Tyvek outer envelope. The purposes of this clinical review are two fold. First, we will report the performance of the Syneture STEEL suture product in the largest studies of suture performance ever reported in the literature. In addition, we will provide comprehensive information from the surgical literature that highlights the unique benefits of stainless steel sutures for the following wound closure techniques: sternal fixation, abdominal wound repair, inguinal hernia repair, and skin wound closure. Consorta Inc. (Rolling Meadows, Illinois), a leading healthcare resource management group purchasing organization, and Syneture, jointly with a clinician task force, designed a reproducible surgical evaluation program for needles and sutures in a large cooperative of healthcare systems. Because of the subjective nature of the more commonly used suture selection techniques, a nonexperimental observational study approach was designed to replace perception of performance characteristics with actual clinical experience. In a report involving 19 Consorta shareholder hospitals, they discussed the preliminary part (Phase I) of a large nonexperimental observational study of the clinical performance of surgical needles and sutures. Performance characteristics of the sutures and needles produced by Syneture that were

  5. Wound healing following surgical and regenerative periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Susin, Cristiano; Fiorini, Tiago; Lee, Jaebum; De Stefano, Jamie A; Dickinson, Douglas P; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2015-06-01

    Clinical studies have evaluated the effect of conventional periodontal surgical therapy. In general, although some clinical gain in tissue support may be attained, these therapies do not support regeneration of the periodontal attachment. Even though the biological possibility of periodontal regeneration has been demonstrated, the clinical application of this intrinsic potential appears difficult to harness; thus also conceptually most intriguing candidate protocols face clinical challenges. In this review, we explore the bioclinical principles, condiciones sine quibus non, that unleash the innate potential of the periodontium to achieve clinically meaningful periodontal regeneration (i.e. space-provision, wound stability and conditions for primary intention healing). Moreover, limiting factors and detrimental practices that may compromise clinical and biological outcomes are reviewed, as is tissue management in clinical settings.

  6. Successful treatment of complex traumatic and surgical wounds with a foetal bovine dermal matrix.

    PubMed

    Hayn, Ernesto

    2014-12-01

    A foetal bovine dermal repair scaffold (PriMatrix, TEI Biosciences) was used to treat complex surgical or traumatic wounds where the clinical need was to avoid skin flaps and to build new tissue in the wound that could be reepithelialised from the wound margins or closed with a subsequent application of a split-thickness skin graft (STSG). Forty-three consecutive cases were reviewed having an average size of 79·3 cm(2) , 50% of which had exposed tendon and/or bone. In a subset of wounds (44·7%), the implantation of the foetal dermal collagen scaffold was also augmented with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Complete wound healing was documented in over 80% of the wounds treated, whether the wound was treated with the foetal bovine dermal scaffold alone (95·2%) or when supplemented with NPWT (82·4%). The scaffold successfully incorporated into wounds with exposed tendon and/or bone to build vascularised, dermal-like tissue. The new tissue in the wound supported STSGs however, in the majority of the cases (88·3%); wound closure was achieved through reepithelialisation of the incorporated dermal scaffold by endogenous wound keratinocytes. The foetal bovine dermal repair scaffold was found to offer an effective alternative treatment strategy for definitive closure of challenging traumatic or surgical wounds on patients who were not suitable candidates for tissue flaps.

  7. Distant Healing Of Surgical Wounds: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Schlitz, Marilyn; Hopf, Harriet W.; Eskenazi, Loren; Vieten, Cassandra; Radin, Dean

    2012-01-01

    Distant healing intention (DHI) is one of the most common complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) healing modalities, but clinical trials to date have provided ambivalent support for its efficacy. One possible reason is that DHI effects may involve variables that are sensitive to unknown, uncontrolled, or uncontrollable factors. To examine two of those potential variables – expectation and belief – the effects of DHI were explored on objective and psychosocial measures associated with surgical wounds in 72 women undergoing plastic surgery. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: blinded and receiving DHI (DH), blinded and not receiving DHI (Control), and knowing that they were receiving DHI (Expectancy). Outcome measures included collagen deposition in a surrogate wound and several self-report measures. DHI was provided by experienced distant healers. No differences in the main measures were observed across the three groups. Participants’ prior belief in the efficacy of DHI was negatively correlated with the status of their mental health at the end of the study (p = 0.04, two-tailed), and healers’ perceptions of the quality of their subjective “contact” with the participants were negatively correlated both with change in mood (p = 0.001) and with collagen deposition (p = 0.04). A post-hoc analysis found that among participants assigned to receive DHI under blinded conditions, those undergoing reconstructive surgery after breast cancer treatment reported significantly better change in mood than those who were undergoing purely elective cosmetic surgery (p = 0.004). If future DHI experiments confirm the post-hoc observations, then some of the ambiguity observed in earlier DHI studies may be attributable to interactions among participants’ and healers’ beliefs, their expectations, and their motivations. PMID:22742672

  8. [Treatment of surgical wound dehiscence by topical negative pressure therapy: Clinical case].

    PubMed

    Fresno-García, Carmen; Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Fernández-Carro, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Topical negative pressure therapy is an alternative treatment for complex wounds that consists of the direct application of sub-atmospheric pressure, obtaining a number of effects that are beneficial for tissues, promoting the healing of both acute and chronic wounds and complementing surgical procedures. We report the case of a 75 year old man diagnosed with surgical wound dehiscence after a femorotibial bypass graft, who was hospitalized again with the aim to perform the implantation of a topical negative pressure therapy in the infected wound. We designed a care plan for this patient following the steps of the scientific method and basing ourselves on the NANDA, NIC, and NOC taxonomies.

  9. [Surgical strategy for combined gun-shot wounds of extremities with injuries of main arteries].

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, I M; Zavrazhnov, A A; Kornilov, E A; Margarian, S A

    2006-01-01

    An investigation of materials of treatment of 130 wounded with combined wounds (CW) of extremity blood vessels during war in Afghanistan and in counter-terrorist operations in the Northern Caucasus has shown that the specific feature of surgical treatment of wounds of the extremity arteries associated with severe wounds of other localizations consists in limited possibilities to save the extremities. The scale MESS of a severity of extremity wounds was improved. It allowed a reliable prognosis for wounded with gunshot injuries of the arteries concerning necessary amputation (97%) or a possibility to save the extremity (100%). A strategy of surgical treatment of CW of the extremity arteries is proposed on the basis of an estimation of the general severity of the trauma, the V.A. Kornilov classification of the severity of acute ischemia and a FS-MESS scale of extremity injuries.

  10. Nonlinear finite element simulations of injuries with free boundaries: application to surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Valero, C; Javierre, E; García-Aznar, J M; Gómez-Benito, M J

    2014-06-01

    Wound healing is a process driven by biochemical and mechanical variables in which a new tissue is synthesised to recover original tissue functionality. Wound morphology plays a crucial role in this process, as the skin behaviour is not uniform along different directions. In this work, we simulate the contraction of surgical wounds, which can be characterised as elongated and deep wounds. Because of the regularity of this morphology, we approximate the evolution of the wound through its cross section, adopting a plane strain hypothesis. This simplification reduces the complexity of the computational problem; while allows for a thorough analysis of the role of wound depth in the healing process, an aspect of medical and computational relevance that has not yet been addressed. To reproduce wound contraction, we consider the role of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor. The contraction phenomenon is driven by cell-generated forces. We postulate that these forces are adjusted to the mechanical environment of the tissue where cells are embedded through a mechanosensing and mechanotransduction mechanism. To solve the nonlinear problem, we use the finite element method (FEM) and an updated Lagrangian approach to represent the change in the geometry. To elucidate the role of wound depth and width on the contraction pattern and evolution of the involved species, we analyse different wound geometries with the same wound area. We find that deeper wounds contract less and reach a maximum contraction rate earlier than superficial wounds.

  11. Non-linear finite element simulations of injuries with free boundaries: application to surgical wounds

    PubMed Central

    Valero, C.; Javierre, E.; García-Aznar, J. M.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Wound healing is a process driven by biochemical and mechanical variables in which new tissue is synthesised to recover original tissue functionality. Wound morphology plays a crucial role in this process, as the skin behaviour is not uniform along different directions. In this work we simulate the contraction of surgical wounds, which can be characterised as elongated and deep wounds. Due to the regularity of this morphology, we approximate the evolution of the wound through its cross-section, adopting a plane strain hypothesis. This simplification reduces the complexity of the computational problem while maintaining allows for a thorough analysis of the role of wound depth in the healing process, an aspect of medical and computational relevance that has not yet been addressed. To reproduce wound contraction we consider the role of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor. The contraction phenomenon is driven by cell-generated forces. We postulate that these forces are adjusted to the mechanical environment of the tissue where cells are embedded through a mechanosensing and mechanotransduction mechanism. To solve the non-linear problem we use the Finite Element Method and an updated Lagrangian approach to represent the change in the geometry. To elucidate the role of wound depth and width on the contraction pattern and evolution of the involved species, we analyse different wound geometries with the same wound area. We find that deeper wounds contract less and reach a maximum contraction rate earlier than superficial wounds. PMID:24443355

  12. Surgical management of civilian gunshot wounds to the head.

    PubMed

    Bizhan, Aarabi; Mossop, Corey; Aarabi, Judith Ann

    2015-01-01

    Each year close to 20000 Americans are involved in gunshot wounds to the head (GSWH). Over 90% of the victims of GSWH eventually fail to survive and only a meager 5% of the patients have a chance to continue with a useful life. One of the fundamental jobs of providers is to realize who the best candidate for the best possible management is. Recent evidence indicates that a good Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score at the time of admission puts such patients at high priority for management. Lack of abnormal pupillary response to light, trajectory of slug away for central gray, and visibility of basal cisterns upgrade the need for utmost care for such a victim. Surgical management is careful attention to involvement of air sinuses and repair of base dura. Patients with diffuse injury should have intraventricular intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and if needed a timely decompressive craniectomy. Since close to 2% of patients with penetrating brain injury may harbor a vascular injury, subjects with injuries close to the Sylvian fissure and those with the fragment crossing two dural compartments should have computed tomography angiography and if needed digital subtraction angiography to rule out traumatic intracranial aneurysms. In case of a positive study, these patients should have endovascular management of their vascular injuries in order to prevent catastrophic intracerebral hematomas and permanent deficit. Although supported by class III data, subjects of GSWH need to be on broad spectrum antibiotics for a period of 3-5 days. If cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas are observed at any time during the patient's hospital course, they should be taken very seriously and appropriate management is needed to prevent deep intracranial infections.

  13. [Surgical hygroscopic bandages for amputations, secreting wounds and diabetes foot].

    PubMed

    Topolav, J; Kirov, G; Markov, G; Girov, K; Nedkov, P; Georgieva, A

    2010-01-01

    The authors adopt in clinical practice using of sterile hygroscopic wound dressings 'pampers type'. They use these dressings in 113 patients. The appropriate patients are these with limbs amputations, diabetic foot, suppurative and plenty secreting deep wounds, atonite and decubital wounds. The dressings are sterilised using paraformaldehyde sterilization which do not injure the synthetic materials. The hygroscopic dressings are non- allergic and are well tolerated by the patients. Using these dressings facilitate the medical team work and help to reduce the contamination of the hospital linen and the patients coverlet. They help for accelerating the wound healing process. They are also economic effective by reducing the amount of used dressing material.

  14. Negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam in children: an overview.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Dhruti; Amling, June; Brandoli, Cinzia; Tosi, Laura L

    2008-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a comprehensive review of the literature on the use of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by V.A.C.(R) Therapy (KCI, San Antonio, TX) in pediatric patients. A review of the literature revealed 20 articles that discussed the use of NPWT/ROCF in exclusively pediatric patients. Nine articles were retrospective reviews, and 11 were case studies. This review discusses the insights from these articles. This review discusses the versatility of NPWT/ROCF for use with pediatric patients with infected wounds; full-thickness burns; open fractures; large soft tissue wounds; surgical wounds of the chest, abdomen, and spine; pilonidal disease; and pressure ulcers. NPWT/ROCF has been used in children as young as a few weeks of age, and in children with comorbidities such as congenital heart disease, immunosuppression, and spina bifida. Wound healing in children can be delayed by impaired perfusion, infection, edema, and poor nutrition. Clinical considerations for using NPWT/ROCF in children can include differences in healing due to higher granulation rates requiring more frequent dressing changes, poor nutritional status, small size, and low weight. With pediatric patients, there is no consensus on foam (white or black) selection, optimum amount of negative pressure, frequency of NPWT/ROCF dressing changes, and interposing contact layer selection. Randomized prospective studies are needed to make recommendations for safe and efficacious clinical practice. Research regarding the effects of dressing types, adjunctive treatment, and wound healing in neonates and children is needed.

  15. [Problems of organization of surgical care to the wounded in a modern armed conflict: surgical care to the walking wounded in armed conflicts (Report 2)].

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, I M; Kotenko, P K; Severin, V V

    2013-01-01

    There are two triage groups of the walking wounded in a medical company of a brigade/special-purpose medical team: those returning to fighting role and those who have to be evacuated to level 3 echelon of care. The main purposes of surgical care of the walking wounded in the 3rd echelon of care are the following: diagnosis of injury pattern ruling out severe damages and separation of the independent category of the walking wounded. There is medical evacuation of the walking wounded from the 3rd echelon to the 4th echelon deployed in a combat zone. The walking wounded who needs less than 30 days of staying in hospital are evacuated to the garrison military hospitals and medical treatment facilities subordinated to a district military hospital. The wounded with the prolonged period of hospitalization (more than 30 days) are evacuated toward the district military hospital. Treatment of the walking wounded should be accomplished in the military district where the armed conflict goes on.

  16. Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type A on a Rat Surgical Wound Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Joo; Jeong, Jae-Hwi; Wang, Soo-Geun; Lee, Jin-Choon; Kim, Hwal-Woong

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The tension on a wound is one of the important factors that determine the degree of fibrosis and scar formation. We hypothesized that local botulinum toxin type A (Botox) induced paralysis of the musculature subjacent to a surgical wound with a skin defect would minimize the repetitive tensile forces on the surgical wound's edges, and this will result in a decreased fibroplastic response and fibrosis of the wound. Methods This is a prospective randomized experimental study. Two distinct surgical wounds were made to the dorsum of 15 adult rats, respectively. One of the 2 wounds was injected with Botox, and the other wound was used as a control, and this was done for all the rats' wounds. We evaluated the wound size, the degree of fibrosis and inflammation, the blood vessel proliferation, the thickness of the wound and the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the wounds. Results There were significant differences of wound size at the 3rd and 4th week between the Botox and control groups (P<0.05). The Botox group showed less infiltration of inflammatory cells than the control group at the 2nd week (P<0.05). The Botox group showed a smaller number of fibroblasts and less fibrosis than the control group at the 4th week (P<0.05). The Botox group showed much strong collagen density than the control group at the 8th week (P<0.05). For the immunohistochemical staining, there was a lower transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression in the Botox group than that of the control group at the 4th week (P<0.05). Conclusion The wounds of the Botox-treated group showed a larger wound size, less infiltration of inflammatory cells and less fibrosis, a much greater amount of collagen and a lower expression of TGF-β1 than did the control group. Botox might be used to decrease the fibrosis of a surgical wound without damaging the epithelial growth in situations for which decreased fibrosis is necessary, such as for treating laryngeal, tracheal and nasal

  17. Peripheral surgical wounding may induce cognitive impairment through interlukin-6-dependent mechanisms in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanlin; Xu, Zhipeng; Huang, Lining; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with morbidity, mortality and increased cost of medical care. However, the neuropathogenesis and targeted interventions of POCD remain largely to be determined. We have found that the peripheral surgical wounding induces an age-dependent Aβ accumulation, neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pro-inflammatory cytokine interlukin-6 (IL-6) has been reported to be associated with cognitive impairment in rodents and humans. However, the role of IL-6 in the neuropathogenesis of POCD is unknown. We therefore employed pharmacological (IL-6 antibody) and genetic (knockout of IL-6) approach to investigate whether IL-6 contributed to the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in aged mice. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia (peripheral surgical wounding) was established in 18-month-old wild-type and IL-6 knockout mice (n = 6 to 10 in each group). Brain level of IL-6 and cognitive function in the mice were determined by western blot, ELISA at the end of procedure, and Fear Conditioning System at 7 days after the procedure. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the level of IL-6 in the hippocampus of aged wild-type, but not IL-6 knockout mice. IL-6 antibody ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in the aged wild-type mice. Finally, the peripheral surgical wounding did not induce cognitive impairment in the aged IL-6 knockout mice. These data suggested that IL-6 would be a required pro-inflammatory cytokine for the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment. Given this, further studies are warranted to investigate the role of IL-6 in the neuropathogenesis and targeted interventions of POCD. PMID:28217289

  18. Negative pressure wound therapy aids recovery following surgical debridement due to severe bacterial cellulitis with abdominal abscess post-cesarean

    PubMed Central

    Young, Christopher N.J.; Ng, Ka Ying Bonnie; Webb, Vanessa; Vidow, Sarah; Parasuraman, Rajeswari; Umranikar, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    healed with no additional scarring beyond the boundaries of the original Cesarean incision. The patient was pleased with treatment outcomes, reporting no lasting pain or discomfort from the scar. Conclusions: This report represents the first documented use of NPWT to aid healing of an actively infected, open wound following extensive surgical debridement 10 days post-Cesarean section, confirming both the efficacy and tolerability of NPWT for the treatment of severe bacterial cellulitis in obstetric debridement. PMID:27977577

  19. VAC therapy to promote wound healing after surgical revascularisation for critical lower limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Pipitò, Narayana; Spinelli, Francesco; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; de Franciscis, Stefano; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new emerging non-invasive system in wound care, which speeds up wound healing by causing vacuum, improving tissue perfusion and suctioning the exudates, and facilitating the removal of bacteria from the wound. The application of sub-atmospheric pressure on the lesions seems to alter the cytoskeleton of the cells on the wound bed, triggering a cascade of intracellular signals that increase the rate of cell division and subsequent formation of granulation tissue. The aim of this study is to analyse the results of VAC therapy used as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of foot wounds in patients affected by critical limb ischaemia (CLI) (Rutherford 6 class) after distal surgical revascularisation, to promote and accelerate the healing of ulcers. Twenty-nine patients (20 males, 9 females; mean age 68·4) affected by CLI of Rutherford 6 class, after surgical revascularisation of the lower limb, underwent VAC therapy in order to speed up wound healing. Complete wound healing was achieved in 19 patients (65·51%), in an average period of 45·4 ± 25·6 days. VAC therapy is a valid aid, after surgical revascularisation, to achieve rapid healing of foot lesions in patients with CLI.

  20. Evaluation of Risk Factors of Surgical Wound Dehiscence in Adults After Laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Aksamija, Goran; Mulabdic, Adi; Rasic, Ismar; Aksamija, Lejla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The percentage of patients with difficult and prolonged healing of the wound is still high, while the immediate complications such as wound dehiscence occurs in up to 3 % of all treated patients in abdominal surgery. The aim of study was to analyze the risk factors and comorbidities in the group patients undergoing laparotomy and associated with early postoperative wound dehiscence. Methods: The retrospective study included all patients treated surgically at Clinic of General and Abdominal surgery, Clinical Center of the University of Sarajevo in the period from January 1, 2013 until January 1, 2016, with clinically verified surgical wound dehiscence. Results: The results showed statistically proportion of male patients (70%) compared to female (30%). The largest number of respondents were in age group 71-80. Surgical wound infection was evident in 61% of patients, malignant staining in 52%, hypoproteinemia was found in 50% of patients, anemia in 43%, peritonitis in 36% and diabetes in 14% of respondents. Of the total respondents with surgical wound dehiscence, 30 (68%) had comorbidities present. By analyzing the prevalence of comorbidity and risk factors recorded in relation to comorbidity, it was noted that hypertension is most often associated with hypoproteinemia (X2=4.399; p=0.036), wound infection (X2=4.112; p=0.043) and malignant diseases (X2=4.016; p=0.045). The frequency of the anemia, peritonitis and diabetes in the sample was not different in relation to the comorbidity conditions (p >0.05). Conclusions: The risk factors occurrence of surgical wound dehiscence in our study were identified as hypoproteinemia, malignant disease, anemia and peritonitis. The highest incidence of dehiscence was in patients operated on in medical emergencies, and in patients with malignant disease. PMID:27994299

  1. Effect of Topical Application of Different Substances on Fibroplasia in Cutaneous Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Andreza Miranda; Oliveira, Dhelfeson Willya Douglas; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Lima, Nádia Lages; de Miranda, João Luiz; Verli, Flaviana Dornela

    2012-01-01

    Background. Fibroblasts on the edges of a surgical wound are induced to synthesize collagen during the healing process which is known as fibroplasia. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the application of different substances on fibroplasia of cutaneous surgical wounds on rats. Materials and Methods. 48 Wistar rats were divided into three groups. A surgical wound 1 cm in diameter and 1  mm in depth was created on the dorsum of each animal. The surgical wounds were submitted to the topical application of an alcoholic extract of 30% propolis, 70% alcohol, or 0.001% dexamethasone in a cream base every 12 hours. The animals were sacrificed three, seven, 14, and 28 days postoperatively. The specimens were histologically processed and stained with Masson's trichrome. The assessment of fibroplasia was performed using a scoring system: (1) 5 to 25% collagen deposition; (2) 26 to 50% collagen deposition; (3) 51 to 75% collagen deposition; (4) more than 75% collagen deposition. Results. There were statistically significant differences in collagen deposition between the substances at all postoperative evaluation times. Conclusion. Propolis and alcohol promoted greater collagen deposition in surgical wounds than dexamethasone. PMID:22536526

  2. Surgical modalities in gunshot wounds of the face.

    PubMed

    Firat, Cemal; Geyik, Yilmaz

    2013-07-01

    Maxillofacial traumas caused by gunshot wounds may cause quite varied defects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reconstruction methods in 12 patients with gunshot wound-related mandibular and maxillofacial bony and soft tissue defects. Twelve patients who were operated on for maxillofacial gunshot wounds at our clinic between 2002 and 2012 were included in the study. Seven patients were wounded in a suicide attempt, and 5 were wounded as a result of an accident or in assaults. Two patients underwent reconstruction using free fibula osteocutaneous flap, 4 patients received the free radial forearm osteocutaneous flap, 2 patients received costal bone graft, and 3 patients received iliac bone grafts. Satisfactory functional and aesthetic outcomes were achieved in cases where staged secondary reconstruction, balloon treatment, and consecutive fat and steroid injections into the depressed scar areas were applied. In conclusion, the basic goal in maxillofacial reconstruction is the functional and aesthetic reconstruction of the contours. Because it is not easy to get perfect results with only 1 clinical approach or 1 method, the proper timing and reconstruction method should be selected.

  3. [Surgical wound infection in patients undergoing extra-anatomical arterial surgery. A retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Monreal, M; Callejas, J M; Lisbona, C; Martorell, A; Lerma, R; Boabaid, R; Mejía, S

    1993-01-01

    We present a retrospective review of a series of patients from our Service submitted to surgical extra-anatomical grafts. Correlation between diverse variants and ulterior obliteration by thrombosis or infection of the surgical wounds is analyzed. The series included 133 patients surgically treated between 1986 and 1991. The studied variants were: sex, age, type of graft, the material used, length and type of anesthesia, presentation of hypotension during the surgical intervention, diabetes, platelet recount. Fourteen patients (11%) presented early graft obliteration and 15 (11%) presented an infection of their surgical wound. Only the platelet variant showed statistical differences in patients presenting infection. A high recount of platelets could be a factor risk of infection.

  4. Patient Risk Factors for Mechanical Wound Complications and Postoperative Infections after Elective Open Intestinal Resection

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei Chao; Turner, Akiva; Imon, Michael; Dyda, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies focused on the construction of preoperative patient surgical risk profile using only patients’ personal, social history, and comorbidity profiles. Objective To identify risk factors for mechanical wound complications and postoperative infections in patients’ preoperative profiles. Design Quantitative retrospective cohort study using 2009–2011 Health Care Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) databases. Patients 56,853 patients who underwent elective open intestinal resection. Measurements Predictors of mechanical wound complications and postoperative infections in patients’ personal, social history, and comorbidity profiles. Results Patients age 18–39 were more likely to suffer mechanical wound complications compared to patients age 65–79 (OR = 1.9, 95% CI [1.5, 2.4], p < .01) and to patients age 80 and over (OR = 2.9, 95% CI [2.2, 3.8], p < .01). Patients age 18–39 were also more likely to suffer postoperative infections compared to patients age 65–79 (OR = 1.4, 95% CI [1.1, 1.6], p < .01) and to patients age 80 and over (OR = 2.0, 95% CI [1.6, 2.6], p < .01). Other most significant predictors included male gender, fluid and electrolyte disorders, pulmonary circulation disorders, and weight loss, as well as patients with comorbidities. All statistically significant predictors with positive estimates for postoperative infections were also statistically significant predictors of mechanical wound complications. Conclusions Individual patient risk profile can be constructed using preoperative patient profiles for improving perioperative care coordination and patient care quality. Postoperative infections were associated with mechanical wound complications in patients undergoing elective open intestinal resection. PMID:27833511

  5. Evaluation of topical formulations of aqueous extract of Centella asiatica on open wounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Sunilkumar; Parameshwaraiah, S; Shivakumar, H G

    1998-06-01

    Formulations (ointment, cream and gel) of aqueous extract of C. asiatica, when applied topically, thrice daily for 24 days on the open wounds in rats increased cellular proliferation and collagen synthesis at the wound site, as evidenced by increase in collagen content and tensile strength. The treated wounds epithelialised faster and the rate of wound contraction was higher as compared to control wounds. The process of healing was better with gel formulation when compared to other two formulations.

  6. VAC therapy for wound management in patients with contraindications to surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Negosanti, Luca; Sgarzani, Rossella; Nejad, Parissa; Pinto, Valentina; Tavaniello, Beatrice; Palo, Stefano; Oranges, Carlo Maria; Fabbri, Erich; Michelina, Veronica Vietti; Zannetti, Guido; Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Cipriani, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of complex wounds often requires multiple surgical debridement and eventually reconstruction with skin grafts or flaps, under local or general anesthesia. When the patient's general conditions contraindicate surgical procedures, topical negative pressure with vacuum assisted closure (VAC)) device can achieve wound healing with reduction of healing time and simpler management. We treated with VAC device four patients with complex wounds and important contraindications to surgery. In all the patients, we used VAC device with common protocol of topical negative pressure. The healing was obtained in a period variable between 18 and 40 days; the results were satisfactory in three cases, one patient developed an aesthetically unpleasant scar. We present our experience to propose VAC when surgical procedures are contraindicated.

  7. Quality of measurements of acute surgical and traumatic wounds using a digital wound-analysing tool.

    PubMed

    Landa, Dymmie Lc; van Dishoeck, Anne-Margreet; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Hovius, Steven Er

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of measurements using a wound-analysing tool and their interpretability. Wound surface areas and tissue types, such as granulation, slough and necrosis, in twenty digital photographs were measured using a specific software program. The ratio of these tissue types in a wound was calculated using a wound profile. We calculated the intraclass coefficient or κ for reliability, standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest detectable change (SDC). The inter-rater reliability intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0·99 for surface area, 0·76 for granulation, 0·67 for slough and 0·22 for necrosis. The profiles gave an overall κ of 0·16. For test-retest reliability, the ICC was 0·99 for surface area, 0·81 for granulation, 0·80 for slough and 0·97 for necrosis. The agreement of the applied profiles in the test-retest was 66% (40-100). SEM and SDC for surface area were 0·10/0·27; for granulation, 6·88/19·08; for slough, 7·17/19·87; and for necrosis, 0·35/0·98, respectively. Measuring wound surface area and tissue types by means of digital photo analysis is a reliable and applicable method for monitoring wound healing in acute wounds in daily practice as well as in research.

  8. Effect of green tea (Camellia sinensis) extract on healing process of surgical wounds in rat.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Sayyed Yazdan; Parsaei, Pouya; Karimi, Mehrdad; Ezzati, Sareh; Zamiri, Alaleh; Mohammadizadeh, Fereshteh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis) has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and may enhance wound healing process. The present study, therefore, was aimed to examine the effect of green tea ethanolic extract on wound healing process. For this experimental study, 36 healthy male Wistar rats were randomly designated to three groups of A, B, and C which, respectively treated with, Vaseline + 0.6% green tea extract, Vaseline and normal saline for 21 days. Wounds' length and area were measured by caliper every other day and specimens were taken at 3rd, 12th, and 21st day for microscopical examinations. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using survival analysis (Breslow test), repeated measured ANOVA, one-way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The mean healing duration of surgical wounds in groups A and B was 14.66 and 20.66 (P = 0.018), respectively. Decrease in healing duration in the group A was significantly higher within the first two weeks compared with control groups (P = 0.05). Microscopic examinations also indicated a significant difference in wound healing process between groups A and C throughout the whole study duration as well as groups A and B during the 3rd week of the study (P < 0.05). Green tea extract could help wound healing process, probably effective on surgical wounds healing.

  9. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Closed Surgical Wounds With Dead Space

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Hyunsuk; Lee, A-Young; Park, Eun Jung; Hong, Joon Pio

    2016-01-01

    Background Closed incisional wound surgery frequently leaves dead space under the repaired skin, which results in delayed healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on incisional wounds with dead space after primary closure by evaluating the fluid volume through the suction drain, blood flow of the skin, tensile strength, and histology of the wounds. Methods Bilateral 25-cm-long incisional wounds with dead space were created on the back of 6 pigs by partially removing the back muscle and then suturing the skin with nylon sutures. NPWT (experimental group) or gauze dressing (control group) was applied over the closed incision for 7 days. Analysis of the wound included monitoring the amount of closed suction drain, blood perfusion unit, tensile strength of the repaired skin, and histology of the incision site. Results The drainage amount was significantly reduced in the experimental group (49.8 mL) compared to the control group (86.2 mL) (P = 0.046). Skin perfusion was increased in the experimental group with statistical significance compared to the control group (P = 0.0175). Collagen staining was increased in the experimental group. The tensile strength of the incision site was significantly higher in the experimental group (24.6 N at 7 days, 61.67 N at 21 days) compared to the control group (18.26 N at 7 days, 50.05 N at 21 days) (P = 0.02). Conclusion This study explains some of the mechanism for using NPWT in closed incision wounds with dead space. It demonstrates that NPWT significantly reduces drainage amount, increases skin perfusion, increases tensile strength, and has the tendency to promote collagen synthesis for closed wound with dead space indicating enhanced healing. PMID:25003432

  10. Increased mid-abdominal circumference is a predictor for surgical wound complications in kidney transplant recipients: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mohamed; Davis, Niall F; Power, Richard; Mohan, Ponusamy; Forde, James; Smyth, Gordon; Little, Dilly M

    2017-03-15

    Kidney transplant recipients are at an increased risk of developing surgical site wound complications due to their immunosuppressed status. We aimed to determine whether increased mid-abdominal circumference (MAC) is predictive for wound complications in transplant recipients. A prospective study was performed on all kidney transplant recipients from October 2014 to October 2015. "Controls" consisted of kidney transplant recipients without a surgical site wound complication and "cases" consisted of recipients that developed a wound complication. In total, 144 patients underwent kidney transplantation and 107 patients met inclusion criteria. Postoperative wound complications were documented in 28 (26%) patients. Patients that developed a wound complication had a significantly greater MAC, body mass index (BMI), and body weight upon renal transplantation (P<.001, P=.011, and P=.011, respectively). On single and multiple logistic regression analyses, MAC was a significant predictor for developing a surgical wound complication (P=.02). Delayed graft function and a history of preformed anti-HLA antibodies were also predictive for surgical wound complications (P=.003 and P=.014, respectively). Increased MAC is a significant predictor for surgical wound complications in kidney transplant recipients. Integrating clinical methods for measuring visceral adiposity may be useful for stratifying kidney transplant recipients with an increased risk of a surgical wound complication.

  11. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Frank, Rachel M.; Pulido, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain, and when indicated, can be successfully managed through open surgery or hip arthroscopy. The goal of this review is to describe the different approaches to the surgical treatment of FAI. We present the indications, surgical technique, rehabilitation, and complications associated with (1) open hip dislocation, (2) reverse periacetabular osteotomy, (3) the direct anterior “mini-open” approach, and (4) arthroscopic surgery for FAI. PMID:26697431

  12. [Early specialized surgical care for gunshot wounds of major vessels in Donbas].

    PubMed

    Rozin, Yu A; Ivanenko, A A

    2016-01-01

    The authors share their experience gained in rendering early specialized surgical care during combat operations in Donbas, having operated on a total of 139 wounded with lesions of large vessels, of these, 21 (15.1%) presenting with concomitant lesions of vessels. Reconstructive operations were carried out in 122 (87.8%) wounded, ligating operations - in 12 (8.6%), and primary amputations - in 5 (3.6%). Two (1.4%) patients died. Blood flow was restored in 117 (84.2%) patients, with six amputations performed after primary operations. The limb was saved in 116 (83.4%) wounded. Peculiarities of a vascular injury in Donbas comprise a large proportion of severe concomitant vascular wounds and lack of intermediate stages of evacuation. The prognosis of life and limb salvage largely depends on correctly chosen method of temporary arrest of bleeding at first stages of medical evacuation and shortening the terms of rendering first specialized surgical care. The variant of operation (reconstruction, ligation or primary amputation) in severe concomitant vascular wounds should be determined proceeding from the degree of ischaemia and severity of the condition of the wounded person, assessed by means of the Military Surgery - Mangled Extremity Severity Score.

  13. A comparison of obsidian and surgical steel scalpel wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Disa, J J; Vossoughi, J; Goldberg, N H

    1993-10-01

    There are several anecdotal clinical articles claiming wound healing and scar superiority using obsidian (volcanic glass) scalpels. In order to determine if skin incisions made with obsidian were superior to those made with standard surgical steel, wound tensile strength, scar width, and histology were assessed in 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Each rat received two parallel 8-cm dorsal skin incisions, one with an obsidian scalpel and the other with a surgical steel scalpel (no. 15 blade). Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Tensile strength of the two wound types was not different at 7, 14, 21, and 42 days. Scar width, however, was significantly less in the obsidian wounds at 7, 10, and 14 days (p < 0.005). At 21 days, scar width was not different in the two groups. At 42 days, all wounds were barely detectable, thus precluding scar width analysis. A blinded histologic review suggested that obsidian wounds contained fewer inflammatory cells and less granulation tissue at 7 days.

  14. Computer-assisted surgical techniques evaluated with wound-healing-impaired animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Lou; West, Courtney; Rivas, Mike; Patil, Yash; Ossoff, Robert H.

    1996-04-01

    As part of our computer assisted surgical techniques (CAST) program, we use computers to assist in the guidance of surgical lasers. The computer helps to create laser incisions with minimal widths, a reduction of collateral thermal damage, and regulates the rate of tissue ablation. Previous studies have compared laser incisions under manual control to incisions made with the CAST system. These studies were carried out with healthy animals. In this study, we compare the manual and CAST laser incisions on rats with induced diabetes. The diabetic rats have impaired wound healing and make a better model for our wound healing studies. Cutaneous incisions were made on the dorsal pelt using a carbon dioxide laser. The incisions were sutured and allowed to heal for 3, 7, 14, and 21 days. Wounds were analyzed histologically and with tensiometry. We have found definite advantages to the CAST program.

  15. [The operative videothoracosopy in rendering emergency surgical care in penetrating gunshot chest wounds].

    PubMed

    Briusov, P G; Kuritsyn, A N; Urazovskiĭ, N Iu

    1998-02-01

    The modern doctrine of military surgery is based on the concept of maximal and, if possible, simultaneous surgical aid to the wounded in the shortest period of time after the injury. It could be achieved by approximation of specialized surgical section to the zone of fighting and improvement of medical evaluation. These are conditions for applicability of modern methods of treatment and for perfecting of surgical strategies to the wounded, such as videothoracoscopy. To report the experience of the usage of videothoracoscopy in the treatment of the wounded with penetrating gunshot wounds of chest (PFAWT) in military hospital. 23 patients with PFWAT was administer surgical therapy: 19 patients had pleural draining at previous stages of medical evacuation, 4 patients were delivered directly from the battle Geld 1.5 hours after the injury. 11 patients with pleural drains and 4 patients, delivered from battle Geld, had indications for videothoracoscopy. These indications included ongoing intrapleural bleeding, clotted hemothorax and prolonged leakage of the air through the drain. Suturing of the lung wounds was performed by Endo-GIA-30 stapler. If it was impossible, manual suture EndoStitch USSC was used. In 2 cases was performed wedge-like resection by EndoGIA-30. The bleeding from the thoracic wall wounds was controlled by electrocautery. The clotted hemothorax was removed by fragmentation with EndoBabcock, washing out and aspiration through large diameter tubes. The duration of the procedure ranged from 40 to 90 minutes. None had suppurative complications. All patients was survived. The mean duration of inpatient period was 20 days, rehabilitation period-14 days.

  16. Clinical evaluation of coverage of open wounds: Polyglycolic acid sheet with fibrin glue spray vs split thickness skin

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Yumi; Tomioka, Hirofumi; Tushima, Fumihiko; Shimamoto, Hiroaki; Hirai, Hideaki; Oikawa, Yuu; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the coverage of oral wounds using either a polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheet or split-thickness skin grafting (STSG). Materials and Methods: A total of 119 cases of wound coverage using a PGA sheet and fibrin glue spray as well as 132 cases of wound coverage cases using STSG were reviewed retrospectively. The site of the excision area, perioperative conditions, and postoperative functional problems were evaluated. Results: The PGA group had significantly shorter operation time, earlier start of oral intake, and shorter hospitalization than the STSG group. If the PGA sheet over the wound with exposed bone could be protected by a surgical sprint, oral food intake could be started on the day after surgery at the earliest. When the size of the wound in the buccal excisional area was classified into two groups (<6 or ≥6 cm2), mouth opening in the STSG group was significantly larger at 3 months postoperatively. When the size of the wound in the tongue and floor of mouth was classified into two groups (<12 or ≥12 cm2), the STSG group had a significantly higher score in postoperative speech intelligibility. Conclusion: Selection of a PGA sheet or STSG based on the consideration of defect size, tumor location, patients’ local and general condition and tolerance for surgery could reduce the patients’ postsurgical dysfunctional problems. PMID:28299263

  17. Molecular Markers in Patients with Chronic Wounds to Guide Surgical Debridement

    PubMed Central

    Brem, Harold; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Diegelmann, Robert F; Entero, Hyacinth; Lee, Brian; Pastar, Irena; Golinko, Michael; Rosenberg, Harvey; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wounds, such as venous ulcers, are characterized by physiological impairments manifested by delays in healing, resulting in severe morbidity. Surgical debridement is routinely performed on chronic wounds because it stimulates healing. However, procedures are repeated many times on the same patient because, in contrast to tumor excision, there are no objective biological/molecular markers to guide the extent of debridement. To develop bioassays that can potentially guide surgical debridement, we assessed the pathogenesis of the patients’ wound tissue before and after wound debridement. We obtained biopsies from three patients at two locations, the nonhealing edge (prior to debridement) and the adjacent, nonulcerated skin of the venous ulcers (post debridement), and evaluated their histology, biological response to wounding (migration) and gene expression profile. We found that biopsies from the nonhealing edges exhibit distinct pathogenic morphology (hyperproliferative/hyperkeratotic epidermis; dermal fibrosis; increased procollagen synthesis). Fibroblasts deriving from this location exhibit impaired migration in comparison to the cells from adjacent nonulcerated biopsies, which exhibit normalization of morphology and normal migration capacity. The nonhealing edges have a specific, identifiable, and reproducible gene expression profile. The adjacent nonulcerated biopsies have their own distinctive reproducible gene expression profile, signifying that particular wound areas can be identified by gene expression profiling. We conclude that chronic ulcers contain distinct subpopulations of cells with different capacity to heal and that gene expression profiling can be utilized to identify them. In the future, molecular markers will be developed to identify the nonimpaired tissue, thereby making surgical debridement more accurate and more efficacious. PMID:17515955

  18. Surgical outcomes of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot wounds in adults

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The management of brachial plexus injuries due to gunshot wounds is a surgical challenge. Better surgical strategies based on clinical and electrophysiological patterns are needed. The aim of this study is to clarify the factors which may influence the surgical technique and outcome of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries. Methods Two hundred and sixty five patients who had brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries were included in this study. All of them were male with a mean age of 22 years. Twenty-three patients were improved with conservative treatment while the others underwent surgical treatment. The patients were classified and managed according to the locations, clinical and electrophysiological findings, and coexisting lesions. Results The wounding agent was shrapnel in 106 patients and bullet in 159 patients. Surgical procedures were performed from 6 weeks to 10 months after the injury. The majority of the lesions were repaired within 4 months were improved successfully. Good results were obtained in upper trunk and lateral cord lesions. The outcome was satisfactory if the nerve was intact and only compressed by fibrosis or the nerve was in-contunuity with neuroma or fibrosis. Conclusion Appropriate surgical techniques help the recovery from the lesions, especially in patients with complete functional loss. Intraoperative nerve status and the type of surgery significantly affect the final clinical outcome of the patients. PMID:19627573

  19. Reversible cortical blindness following successful surgical repair of two stab wounds in the heart.

    PubMed

    El Gatit, A; Abdul Razeq, M; El Snaini, F; Saad, K; Zaiton, A

    2008-03-01

    This report describes a case of cortical blindness that followed successful surgical repair of two stab wounds in the heart in a 29-year old Libyan man. The patient presented in a state of pre cardiac arrest (shock and low cardiac output status), following multiple chest stab wounds. Chest tube was immediately inserted. Surgery was urgently performed suturing the two wounds; in the root of the aorta and in the left ventricle, and haemostasis was secured. Cardiac arrest was successfully prevented. The patient recovered smoothly, but 24 hours later he declared total blindness. Ophtalmic and neurological examinations and investigations that included fundoscopy, Electroencephalograms (EEGs) and Computed Tomography Scans revealed no abnormalities, apart from absence of alpha waves in the EEGs. We diagnosed the case as cortical blindness and continued caring for the patient conservatively. Three days later, the patient regained his vision gradually and was discharged on the 7(th) postoperative day without any remarks.

  20. Reversible Cortical Blindness Following Successful Surgical Repair Of Two Stab Wounds In The Heart

    PubMed Central

    El Gatit, A; Abdul Razeq, M; El Snaini, F; Saad, K; Zaiton, A

    2008-01-01

    This report describes a case of cortical blindness that followed successful surgical repair of two stab wounds in the heart in a 29-year old Libyan man. The patient presented in a state of pre cardiac arrest (shock and low cardiac output status), following multiple chest stab wounds. Chest tube was immediately inserted. Surgery was urgently performed suturing the two wounds; in the root of the aorta and in the left ventricle, and haemostasis was secured. Cardiac arrest was successfully prevented. The patient recovered smoothly, but 24 hours later he declared total blindness. Ophtalmic and neurological examinations and investigations that included fundoscopy, Electroencephalograms (EEGs) and Computed Tomography Scans revealed no abnormalities, apart from absence of alpha waves in the EEGs. We diagnosed the case as cortical blindness and continued caring for the patient conservatively. Three days later, the patient regained his vision gradually and was discharged on the 7th postoperative day without any remarks. PMID:21516165

  1. Preoperative hair removal with clippers does not increase infection rate in clean surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Olson, M M; MacCallum, J; McQuarrie, D G

    1986-02-01

    For a one year period, hair was removed from the operative site with clippers rather than by shaving with a razor or by application of depilatories. The study involved comparison of clean (Class I) wound infection rates in 2,580 patients after clipping was instituted compared with 17,424 patients studied in seven preceding years. There was no significant change in the wound infection rate (1 per cent) when compared with the three years immediately preceding. There was no change in the identified distribution of the infecting organism. Failure to show a clear reduction in wound infection rate was probably related to the low historic base line rate. There were definite benefits achieved by avoiding cancellation of elective operations, by using operating room personnel more efficiently and by expediating the surgical schedule.

  2. Perioperative hypothermia and incidence of surgical wound infection: a bibliographic study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Aline Batista; Peniche, Aparecida de Cassia Giani

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review article was to understand and analyze the scientific production related to the occurrence of perioperative hypothermia and the incidence of infection on the surgical site. For this purpose, a search was conducted in the databases LILACS, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL and Cochrane, using the health science descriptors DECS, from 2004 to 2009. A total of 91 articles were found. After eliminating duplicate items and using selection criteria for inclusion, six manuscripts remained for analysis. The studies were classified as retrospective, prospective, case studies, and clinical trials. After analysis, the majority of studies showed that hypothermia must be prevented during the perioperative period to reduce complications in the healing process of the surgical incision. Therefore, unadverted hypothermia directly influences in surgical site healing, increasing the incidence of infection in the surgical wound. PMID:25628208

  3. Perioperative hypothermia and incidence of surgical wound infection: a bibliographic study.

    PubMed

    Silva, Aline Batista da; Peniche, Aparecida de Cassia Giani

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review article was to understand and analyze the scientific production related to the occurrence of perioperative hypothermia and the incidence of infection on the surgical site. For this purpose, a search was conducted in the databases LILACS, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL and Cochrane, using the health science descriptors DECS, from 2004 to 2009. A total of 91 articles were found. After eliminating duplicate items and using selection criteria for inclusion, six manuscripts remained for analysis. The studies were classified as retrospective, prospective, case studies, and clinical trials. After analysis, the majority of studies showed that hypothermia must be prevented during the perioperative period to reduce complications in the healing process of the surgical incision. Therefore, unadverted hypothermia directly influences in surgical site healing, increasing the incidence of infection in the surgical wound.

  4. Origin of Propionibacterium in Surgical Wounds and Evidence-Based Approach for Culturing Propionibacterium from Surgical Sites

    PubMed Central

    Matsen, Frederick A.; Butler-Wu, Susan; Carofino, Bradley C.; Jette, Jocelyn L.; Bertelsen, Alexander; Bumgarner, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Background: To explore the origin of Propionibacterium in surgical wounds and to suggest an optimized strategy for culturing this organism at the time of revision surgery, we studied the presence of this organism on the skin and in the surgical wounds of patients who underwent revision arthroplasty for reasons other than apparent infection. Methods: Specimens were cultured in broth and on aerobic and anaerobic media. The presence and degree of positivity of Propionibacterium cultures were correlated with sex. The results of dermal and deep cultures were correlated. Times to positivity and the yields of each media type and specimen source were investigated. Results: Propionibacterium grew in twenty-three of thirty cultures of specimens obtained preoperatively from the unprepared epidermis over the area where a skin incision was going to be made for a shoulder arthroplasty; males had a greater average degree of positivity than females (p < 0.002). Twelve of twenty-one male subjects and zero of twenty female subjects who had cultures of dermal specimens obtained during revision shoulder arthroplasty had positive findings for Propionibacterium (p = 0.0001). Twelve of twenty male subjects and only one of twenty female subjects had positive deep cultures (p = 0.0004). The positivity of dermal cultures for Propionibacterium was significantly associated with the positivity of deep cultures for this organism (p = 0.0001). If Propionibacterium was present in deep tissues, it was likely that it would be recovered by culture if four different specimens were obtained and cultured for a minimum of seventeen days on three different media: aerobic, anaerobic, and broth. Conclusions: Because the surgical incision of dermal sebaceous glands may be a source of Propionibacterium in deep wounds, strategies for minimizing the risk of Propionibacterium infections may need to be directed at minimizing the contamination of surgical wounds from these bacteria residing in rather than on the

  5. An innovative method to evaluate the suture compliance in sealing the surgical wound lips

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Farid; Palmieri, Beniamino; Lodi, Danielle; Al-Sebeih, Khalid

    2008-01-01

    Background and aim: The increasing number of surgical procedures performed with local anesthesia, followed by immediate patient discharge from the hospital, emphasizes the need for a tight waterproof suture that is capable of maintaining its tensile strength in the postoperative phase when the wound tumescence, edema due to the anesthetic drug, and surgical trauma disappear. Moreover, the issue of having an accurate surgical wound closure is very relevant in vivo in order to prevent hemorrhage and exogenous microbial infections. This study aimed at designing a new a lab technique that could be used for evaluating the best surgical material. Using such a technique, we compared the wound-lip-sealing properties of three commonly-used suture threads, namely polyurethane, polypropylene, and polyamide. Materials and methods: The mechanical properties of same-size suture threads made from polyurethane, polypropylene, and polyamide, were compared in order to define the one that possess the best elastic properties by being able to counteract the tension-relaxation process in the first 12 hours following surgery. The tension holding capacity of the suture materials was measured in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. The surface area of the scar associated with the three different suture threads was measured and compared, and the permeability of the three different suture threads was assessed at 0 minute, 2 minute, 4 minute, 6 minute, and 8 minute- interval. Results: Results showed that polyurethane suture threads had significantly (P < 0.05) better tensile strength, elongation endurance before breakage, and better elasticity coefficient as compared to polypropylene and polyamide suture threads. Moreover, polyurethane suture threads were significantly (P < 0.05) more impermeable as compared to the other two suture thread types (polypropylene and polyamide). This impermeability was also associated with a tighter wound-lip-sealing ability, and with significantly (P < 0

  6. Prevalence of biofilms on surgical suture segments in wounds of dogs, cats, and horses.

    PubMed

    König, L; Klopfleisch, R; Kershaw, O; Gruber, A D

    2015-03-01

    The formation of biofilms on surgical implants is thought to play a major role in chronic infection and wound-healing disorders and has been rarely described in veterinary medicine. Due to poor and unreliable results from bacterial culturing, histology may be an economic tool for the detection of biofilms. In this study, the prevalence of biofilms on surgical suture materials and swabs with chronic wound-healing complications in dogs, cats, and horses was assessed by histologic examination using hematoxylin and eosin, Gram, and Giemsa stains, as well as periodic acid-Schiff reaction. Of the 91 tissue samples with intralesional suture material or swab residues associated with inflammation, only 2 contained bacterial colonies arranged in an extracellular polymeric matrix consistent with a biofilm. The results of this study suggest that biofilms on suture material may occur in veterinary medicine.

  7. Fabrication and feasibility study of an absorbable diacetyl chitin surgical suture for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shao, Kai; Han, Baoqin; Gao, Jinning; Jiang, Zhiwen; Liu, Weizhi; Liu, Wanshun; Liang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Diacetyl chitin (DAC) is an acidylated chitin obtained using acetic anhydride mixed perchloric acid system. By wet spinning and weaving technique, DAC has been successfully developed into a novel absorbable surgical suture. Thanks to the unique properties of chitins, the potential application of this novel monocomponent multifilament DAC suture may break the monopoly of synthetic polymer sutures in wound closure area. In this study, DAC was synthesized and characterized by multiple approaches including elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, we performed the feasibility assessment of DAC suture (USP 2-0) as absorbable suture for wound healing. Several lines of evidences suggested that DAC suture had comparable mechanical properties as synthetic polymer sutures. Moreover, DAC suture retained approximately 63% of the original strength at 14 days and completely absorbed in 42 days with no remarkable tissue reaction in vivo. Most important of all, DAC suture significantly promoted skin regeneration with faster tissue reconstruction and higher wound breaking strength on a linear incisional wound model. All these results demonstrated the potential use of DAC suture in short- or middle-term wound healing, such as epithelial and connective tissue.

  8. Factors associated with the healing of complex surgical wounds in the breast and abdomen: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Eline Lima; Pires, José Ferreira; Abreu, Mery Natali Silva; Lima, Vera Lúcia de Araújo; Silva, Patrícia Aparecida Barbosa; Soares, Sônia Maria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to estimate the healing rate of complex surgical wounds and its associated factors. Method: retrospective cohort study from 2003 to 2014 with 160 outpatients of a Brazilian university hospital. Data were obtained through consultation of the medical records. Survival function was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression model to estimate the likelihood of the occurrence of healing. Results: the complex surgical wound healing rate was 67.8% (95% CI: 60.8-74.9). Factors associated with a higher likelihood of wound healing were segmentectomy/quadrantectomy surgery, consumption of more than 20 grams/day of alcohol, wound extent of less that 17.3 cm2 and the length of existence of the wound prior to outpatient treatment of less than 15 days, while the use of hydrocolloid covering and Marlex mesh were associated with a lower likelihood of healing. Conclusion: the wound healing rate was considered high and was associated with the type of surgical intervention, alcohol consumption, type of covering, extent and length of wound existence. Preventive measures can be implemented during the monitoring of the evolution of the complex surgical wound closure, with possibilities of intervention in the modifiable risk factors. PMID:27737379

  9. Expanding the use of simulation in open vascular surgical training.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vikas A; Wolfe, John H N

    2012-09-01

    Simulation technology has a well-defined role in nonmedical professions such as aviation and over the last two decades has permeated medical training. The most successful surgical simulation is in the fields of laparoscopic and endovascular surgery. These two-dimensional scenarios, as in the aviation industry, lend themselves to simulation. Open simulators have been met with more resistance than their laparoscopic counterparts because of the difficulties in simulating the three-dimensional field. Engaging in persistent practice is what makes the expert and all trainees should aspire to this. Without knowing, all surgical trainees have engaged in deliberate practice when first learning to tie surgical knots. This deliberate practice should be used in all aspects of vascular surgical practice, and it is no longer acceptable to perform procedures such as arterial anastomoses for the first time on patients. Simulators exist for all aspects of vascular surgical training and vary in complexity and price. Some of these simulators are suitable for use at home or in a skills laboratory whereas others are more suitable for use in a specialized skills center. Training on these simulators can be offered at a local level or at a regional level in the skills center. Where surgical procedures are not commonly performed or expertise is required for a new innovation, it is more appropriate to have national or internationally based workshops under the auspices of surgical boards or societies. Simulation of crisis management, well known in aviation, has also been applied to vascular surgical practice and can offer benefit to senior trainees even when their performance on a noncrisis simulator has reached a plateau. This article identifies the areas where simulation in open vascular surgery can benefit the trainee.

  10. Negative pressure wound therapy for management of the surgical incision in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karlakki, S.; Brem, M.; Giannini, S.; Khanduja, V.; Stannard, J.; Martin, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The period of post-operative treatment before surgical wounds are completely closed remains a key window, during which one can apply new technologies that can minimise complications. One such technology is the use of negative pressure wound therapy to manage and accelerate healing of the closed incisional wound (incisional NPWT). Methods We undertook a literature review of this emerging indication to identify evidence within orthopaedic surgery and other surgical disciplines. Literature that supports our current understanding of the mechanisms of action was also reviewed in detail. Results A total of 33 publications were identified, including nine clinical study reports from orthopaedic surgery; four from cardiothoracic surgery and 12 from studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular disciplines. Most papers (26 of 33) had been published within the past three years. Thus far two randomised controlled trials – one in orthopaedic and one in cardiothoracic surgery – show evidence of reduced incidence of wound healing complications after between three and five days of post-operative NPWT of two- and four-fold, respectively. Investigations show that reduction in haematoma and seroma, accelerated wound healing and increased clearance of oedema are significant mechanisms of action. Conclusions There is a rapidly emerging literature on the effect of NPWT on the closed incision. Initiated and confirmed first with a randomised controlled trial in orthopaedic trauma surgery, studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular surgery with high rates of complications have been reported recently. The evidence from single-use NPWT devices is accumulating. There are no large randomised studies yet in reconstructive joint replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:276–84. PMID:24352756

  11. GiPSiNet: an open source/open architecture network middleware for surgical simulations.

    PubMed

    Liberatore, Vincenzo; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk; Cai, Qingbo

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and techniques of GiPSiNet, an open source/open architecture network middleware being developed for surgical simulations. GiPSiNet extends GiPSi (General Interactive Physical Simulation Interface), our framework for developing organ level surgical simulations, to network environments. This network extension is non-trivial, since the network settings pose several serious problems for distributed surgical virtual environments such as band-width limit, delays, and packet losses. Our goal is to enhance the quality (fidelity and realism) of networked simulations in the absence of network QoS (Quality of Service) through the GiPSiNet middleware.

  12. Safety and utility of a PMMA-based tissue adhesive for closure of surgical incision wounds.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryusuke; Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the safety and utility of the polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based tissue adhesive (PMMA-ta) for wound closure. This product is composed of 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride and methylmethacrylate as monomers, tri-n-butylborane as initiator, and PMMA powder as filler. These components are mixed at the time of use. This resulting paste hardens within several minutes. The safety of PMMA-ta was evaluated in an internal wound model using a cultured dermal substitute (CDS), i.e. a fibroblast-embedded collagen gel sheet. PMMA-ta was applied to one CDS, covered with a second CDS, and then cultured for 1 week (group II). A commercially available 2-octyl cyanoacrylate-based tissue adhesive (OCA) was used for comparative purposes (group I). No tissue adhesive was applied to the CDSs in the control group. Fibroblast viability was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell viability in the group I was 36%, and cell viability in the group II was 84%, of that in the control group. These results indicate that PMMA-ta has lower cytotoxicity than OCA. Next, the usefulness of PMMA-ta as a tissue adhesive was evaluated in three different wound models using Sprague-Dawley rats: (1) a thin skin incision wound, (2) a thick skin incision wound, and (3) a full-thickness incision wound through the abdominal wall. The third experiment is the surgical incision model with the most severe condition. The comparative study using OCA was conducted only in the third experiment. Each wound healing process was evaluated macroscopically and histologically after 1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 months. An excellent macroscopic wound appearance was observed with both PMMA-ta and OCA, with only a slightly visible fine-line scar. Histologically, a typical primary healing was observed for both adhesives. Considering its safety and utility, PMMA-ta is therefore promising for use as a tissue adhesive in wound closure.

  13. Healing of surgical castration wounds: a description and an evaluation of flunixin.

    PubMed

    Mintline, E M; Varga, A; Banuelos, J; Walker, K A; Hoar, B; Drake, Daniel; Weary, D M; Coetzee, J F; Stock, M L; Tucker, C B

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that surgical castration wounds take between 10 and 61 d to heal. The objectives of this work were to describe healing, inflammation, lying behavior, and serum concentration of substance P after surgical castration in beef calves and to evaluate the effect of a possible intervention, a single injection of flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg IV, a NSAID), on the healing process. Calves (mean±SE: 25±2.0 d of age; 54±1.4 kg BW) were surgically castrated with or without an injection of flunixin immediately before the procedure (n=24/treatment). Healing was measured with a 5-point scale (1=fresh wound, 5=no visible incision or inflammation) as well as weight gain, scrotal size, and scrotal surface temperature, on d 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 49, and 63 after castration. Serum concentration of substance P was recorded on all d, including d 0, but not d 63. Lying behavior was recorded with loggers from 2 d before to 29 d after castration. Inflammation, as measured by scrotal size, peaked on d 2 and 3 after the procedure (e.g., 51±1.0 mm on d 2 versus 28±1.3 mm before castration) and then declined with time (P<0.001). The first wound to score as fully healed (i.e., 5/5) was seen on d 28; by d 63, 98% of wounds were fully healed. The greatest changes in healing score occurred between d 21 and 35; this was also the peak of wound surface temperature and may correspond with revascularization. Serum concentration of substance P was highest before castration (41±1.2 pg/mL), possibly because the sample was collected after the lidocaine ring block was administered, which was likely painful, and because of separation from the dam and restraint. Values began to drop by d 3 (34±1.2 pg/mL) and leveled out by d 21 (30±1.2 pg/mL; P<0.001). Calves given flunixin had more lying bouts than those that received saline (flunixin by time interaction; P=0.052), but this pattern emerged on and after d 8, well after the 3 to 8 h half-life of this NSAID. In

  14. [Peculiarities of surgical care in case of open injuries of limbs in emergency situations in peacetime].

    PubMed

    Dubrov, V É; Mitish, V A; Kobritsov, G P; Shabanov, V É; Baĭramov, Sh A; Khanin, M Iu

    2014-01-01

    It was done the comparative analysis of treatment results of casualties with open injuries of limbs in emergency situations in peacetime. It was determined that traditional approach of field surgery is unacceptable for this group of casualties. It is connected with limitations of evacuation and high frequency of complications. The developed modified surgical protocol permits not only to provide specialized care to casualties with soft tissue trauma and open fracture of limbs but also to reduce frequency of deep suppuration in 1.9 times. Also it allows to decrease number of dressings for one patient and period of the wound defect preparation to reconstructive plastic surgeries in 2.6 and 1.5 times respectively.

  15. Intraoperative Near-Infrared Imaging of Surgical Wounds after Tumor Resections Can Detect Residual Disease

    PubMed Central

    Madajewski, Brian; Judy, Brendan F.; Mouchli, Anas; Kapoor, Veena; Holt, David; Wang, May D.; Nie, Shuming; Singhal, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    Background Surgical resection remains the most effective therapy for solid tumors worldwide. The most important prognostic indicator for cure following cancer surgery is a complete resection with no residual disease. However, intraoperative detection of retained cancer cells after surgery is challenging, and residual disease continues to be the most common cause of local failure. We hypothesized visual enhancement of tumors using near-infrared imaging could potentially identify tumor deposits in the wound after resection. Methods A small animal model of surgery and retained disease was developed. Residual tumor deposits in the wound were targeted using an FDA approved imaging agent, indocyanine green, by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. A novel hand-held spectrometer was used to optically visualize retained disease after surgery. Results We found residual disease using near-infrared imaging during surgery that was not visible to the naked eye or microCT. Furthermore, examination of tumor nodules was remarkably precise in delineating margins from normal surrounding tissues. This approach was most successful for tumors with increased neovasculature. Conclusions The results suggest that near-infrared examination of the surgical wound after curative resection can potentially enable the surgeon to locate residual disease. The data in this study is the basis of an ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial in patients who undergo resection for lung and breast cancer. PMID:22932668

  16. Epidermal differentiation and dermal changes in healing following treatment of surgical wounds with sheets of cultured allogeneic keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, S R; Navsaria, H A; Brain, A N; Purkis, P E; Leigh, I M

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To establish the structural changes that occur in deep surgical wounds engrafted with allogeneic sheets, their time course and inter-relation. METHODS--Deep surgical wounds following shave excision of tattoos (down to deep dermis/subcutaneous fat) were treated with sheets of sex mismatched allogeneic keratinocytes in 19 patients and then biopsied weekly until wound healing was complete. More superficial surgical wounds--that is, 20 standard skin graft donor sites, were biopsied at seven to 10 days (all healed) following application of keratinocyte allografts. All biopsy specimens were examined with a large panel of monoclonal antibodies to keratins, envelope proteins, basement membrane components, and to extracellular matrix components. RESULTS--The hyperproliferative keratin pair K6/16 was expressed in all wounds, for up to six weeks in keratinocyte grafted deep wounds, and up to six months in split thickness skin grafted wounds. CONCLUSIONS--Keratins 6 and 16 have not been detected in normal skin, although the relevant mRNA has. This raises the possibility of regulation at a post-transcriptional level allowing a rapid response to injury with cytoskeletal changes that may aid cell migration. This keratin pair offers the most sensitive marker for altered epidermis following wounding. Images PMID:8567992

  17. [The effect of chondroitin sulfate preparations on wound healing and the strength of the surgical scar].

    PubMed

    Fialkova, M A; Smirnova, T Iu; Ivanova, G I; Aboiants, R K; Golubeva, V F

    1989-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the ability of the chondroitinsulphate preparation produced from cattle tracheas, of rumalon and chonsuride to stimulate the regeneration of cutaneous coverings in case of their injury was carried out. A strength of the surgical cicatrix and its elongation at rupture in two weeks' injections of chondroitinsulphate increased in comparison with control. A stimulating effect of chondroitinsulphate to regeneration of flesh wound in case of local single action didn't differ essentially from the effect of chonsuride. In case of application of the preparations, an area of wound for the rats received chondroitinsulphate was already on the eighth day twice as less in comparison with the animals treated with chonsuride. Thus, a stimulating effect of chondroitinsulphate preparation to the regeneration of damaged cutaneous coverings by both parenteral and local administration was shown.

  18. Spleen removal - open - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneeze to ease discomfort and protect your incision. Wound Care Care for your incision as instructed . If ... Instructions Getting out of bed after surgery Surgical wound care - open Wet to dry dressing changes Review ...

  19. [Surgical treatment of wounds of the neck in practice of the emergency hospital during peacetime].

    PubMed

    Mosiagin, V B; Ryl'kov, V F; Moiseev, A A

    2013-01-01

    The data of the follow-up study of 60 patients with wounds of the neck are presented in this article. The authors describe the volume and severity of injuries of the neck and at the same time examine the difficulties of diagnostics and treatment. The scope of investigations, the necessity of consultation of "narrow" specialist, the volume of surgical handbook and the conservative therapy are determined. The significance of the up-to-date methods of instrumental researches, such as computed tomography, Doppler tomography, are emphasized particularly for evaluation of the injury volume.

  20. Use of cyanoacrylate in the coaptation of edges of surgical wounds*

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Ruthinéia Diógenes Alves Uchôa; Gomes, Raquel Christina Barboza; dos Santos, Kátia Simone Alves; da Silva, Paula Vanessa; da Silva, Renata Torres Moreira; Ramos, Ianny Alves

    2012-01-01

    Cyanoacrylate has been used in several fields of different surgical specialties as an adhesive for closure of gingival flaps and in mucous and cutaneous lacerations. One of its advantages is that it has an excellent immunological response. In view of aesthetic needs, cyanoacrylate has been applied with satisfactory results, when compared with sutures. It presents better coaptation of edges of cutaneous and mucosal lesions, smaller residual scars, and biocompatibility. However, it is limited to areas of little tissue tension. This work attempts to provide a literature review with the aim of revealing the advantages of using tissue adhesives, especially cyanoacrylates, in wound coaptation in comparison with conventional methods. PMID:23197206

  1. An Inexpensive Modified Primary Closure Technique for Class IV (Dirty) Wounds Significantly Decreases Superficial and Deep Surgical Site Infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bradford J; Aloia, Thomas A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the creation of several programs to decrease the incidence of surgical site infection, it remains a common complication that has a significant impact on patient recovery and medical costs. The following is a description and brief outcome report of a modified primary closure technique used for dirty (Class IV) wounds. There were 14 consecutive patients who had a laparotomy with Class IV wounds treated by a single surgeon (TAA) from 2011 to 2015. All patients had a history of cancer and either showed signs suggestive for an acute abdomen and required an emergent exploratory laparotomy or were found to have purulent intraabdominal infection at the time of elective surgery. The operation and "modified primary closure" technique (subcutaneous wound wicks with stapled skin closure) were performed in every case. The modified primary closure technique was utilized in 14 patients with a Class IV wound. There were no 30-day mortalities or readmissions. Wound wicks were slowly advanced out over a 7-day period, and only one patient required subsequent wound packing of a single-wicked area. There were no superficial or deep surgical site infections, or wound dehiscence during the hospital course, or 30-day postoperative period. The modified primary closure technique is efficient and inexpensive and was effective in a series of 14 patients with wounds classified as dirty.

  2. Combination of negative pressure wound therapy with open bone grafting for bone and soft tissue defects.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Yu, Ai-Xi; Xia, Cheng-Yan; Li, Zong-Huan; Wang, Wei-Yang

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) combined with open bone graft (OBG; NPWT-OBG) for the treatment of bone and soft tissue defects with polluted wounds in an animal model. All rabbits with bone and soft tissue defects and polluted wounds were randomly divided into two groups, the experimental group (NPWT with bone graft) and the control group (OBG). The efficacy of the treatment was assessed by the wound conditions and healing time. Bacterial bioburdens and bony calluses were evaluated by bacteria counting and X-rays, respectively. Furthermore, granulation tissue samples from the wounds on days 0, 3, 7 and 14 of healing were evaluated for blood vessels and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Wounds in the experimental group tended to have a shorter healing time, healthier wound conditions, lower bacterial bioburden, improvement of the bony calluses and an increased blood supply compared with those in the control group. With NPWT, wound infection was effectively controlled. For wounds with osseous and soft tissue defects, NPWT combined with bone grafting was demonstrated to be more effective than an OBG.

  3. HOSPITALIZATION TIME AFTER OPEN APPENDECTOMY BY THREE DIFFERENT SURGICAL TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    XIMENES, Agláia Moreira Garcia; MELLO, Fernando Salvo Torres; de LIMA-JÚNIOR, Zailton Bezerra; FERREIRA, Cícero Faustino; CAVALCANTI, Amanda Dantas Ferreira; DIAS-FILHO, Adalberto Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Background The choice of surgical technique to approach the appendicular stump depends mostly on skill and personal preference of the surgeon or on the protocol used in the service, and the influence of this choice in hospitalization time is not evaluated. Aim To evaluate the relation between surgical technique and postoperative hospitalization time in patients presenting with acute appendicitis. Methods Retrospective analysis of 180 patients who underwent open appendectomy. These where divided into three groups according to surgical technique: conventional appendectomy (simple ligation of the stump), tobacco pouch suture and Parker-Kerr suture. Data where crossed with hospitalization time (until three days, from four to six days and over seven days). Results A hundred and eighty patients with age from 15 to 85 years where included. From these, 95 underwent conventional technique, had an average hospitalization time of 3,9 days and seven had complications (surgical site infection, seroma, suture dehiscence and evisceration). In 67 patients, tobacco pouch suture was chosen and had average hospitalization time of 3,7 days and two complications (infection and seroma). In 18 Parker-Kerr suture was made, with average hospitalization time of 2,6 days, with no complication. Contingency coefficient between the variables hospitalization time and technique was 0,255 and Cramér's V was 0,186. Conclusion There was tendency to larger hospitalization time and larger number of complications in conventional appendectomy, whereas in patients where Parker-Kerr suture was performed, hospitalization time was significantly smaller. PMID:25184769

  4. Effects of Surgical Wound Infiltration with Bupivacaine on Postoperative Analgesia in Cats Undergoing Bilateral Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    YILMAZ, Özge Turna; TOYDEMIR, T. Seval Fatma; KIRŞAN, İsmail; DOKUZEYLUL, Banu; GUNAY, Zeynep; KARACAM, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine was evaluated in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy. Twenty-one female cats with mammary gland tumors were anesthetized with propofol and oxygen-isoflurane anesthesia following premedication with atropine. In the trial group (Group I; n=11), 30 ml of saline containing 2 mg/kg of bupivacaine was infiltrated topically into the surgical wound right after removal of the mammary glands, whereas only saline solution was infiltrated in the control group (Group II; n=10). At the same time, carprofen (4 mg/kg) was also administered subcutaneously in both groups. Behavioral signs of pain were monitored during the recovery period after general anesthesia. In order to examine the behavioral changes associated with acute pain, a questionnaire was prepared and given to the owners to be completed 4 hr and then 10 hr after the operation. According to the owners’ anwers to the questionnaire, a pain score was specified using a “numerical rating scale” for each cat. Although some cats showed mild to moderate pain, the pain score recorded at 4 hr after the operation was significantly lower in Group I (P<0.001). No significant difference was found at 10 hr after the operation between the groups. The incidence of vocalization, aggression and convulsion within 2 hr after the operation was also lower in Group I. In conclusion, wound infiltration with bupivacaine before incisional closure provided reliable analgesia at least 4 hr after bilateral radical mastectomy in cats. PMID:25649941

  5. Transdermal treatment of the surgical and burned wound skin via phytochemical-capped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewook; Kim, JiEun; Go, Jun; Lee, Jong Ho; Han, Dong-Wook; Hwang, DaeYoun; Lee, Jaebeom

    2015-11-01

    The biological activities and therapeutic potential of phytochemical-decorated Au nanoparticles (Phyto-AuNPs) were investigated through the treatment of Phyto-AuNPs on the dorsal skin of rats via transdermal drug delivery process in order to regenerate surgical wounded and burned skin. Two different Phyto-AuNPs were applied to the dorsal skin: gallic acid-isoflavone--covered AuNPs (GI-AuNPs) and protocatechuic acid-isoflavone--covered AuNPs (PI-AuNPs). From the biological activity monitoring, it has been resulted that 5-fold thicker epidermis (ER), 50% reduction of metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) level, 3-fold higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were obtained in the Phyto-AuNP-treated group, compared with a vehicle group (deionized water (DI-water) treatment). Moreover, the Phyto-AuNPs treatment on the surgical and burn damaged Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats induced higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2). It would be plausible that antioxidant property of Phyto-AuNPs assist the acceleration and activation of biomolecules in the healing mechanism, where Phyto-AuNPs can be potential candidates for skin regeneration and wound healing.

  6. [Timing of dressing removal in the healing of surgical wounds by primary intention: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Doris; Berg, Almuth; Fleischer, Steffen; Langer, Gero

    2013-08-01

    An appropriate postoperative wound management helps to prevent surgical site infections. However, ideal timing of dressing removal is an unresolved issue in current practice. The objective of this systematic review therefore was to provide a comprehensive synthesis of existing evidence concerning the efficacy of different periods of postoperative dressing removal in surgical wounds which are healing by primary intention. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library (all in August 2011), and hand-searched additional sources. All randomised controlled trials that were comparing different periods of leaving dressings in place, including not dressing the surgical site at all, and covering wounds until suture removal were included. We conducted our systematic review and meta-analysis in accordance with the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. Eight trials with a total of 2097 participants were included in our meta-analysis. All studies were at high or unclear risk of bias. This meta-analysis did not show a higher rate of wound infections or other wound complications associated with an early dressing removal in wounds that are healing by primary intention: risk difference (RD) -0.01; 95%-confidence interval (CI) -0.03, 0.01. However, conclusions are limited due to bad study quality of included studies. Finally more sound research is needed.

  7. Application of hyaluronic acid in the healing of non-experimental open wounds: A pilot study on 12 wounds in 10 client-owned dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Roberta; Boracchi, Patrizia; Romussi, Stefano; Ravasio, Giuliano; Stefanello, Damiano

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Veterinarians have frequently to deal with wounds to the skin, subcutis, and underlying muscle. The aim was to explore the application of hyaluronic acid (HA)-containing dressing on open skin wounds in dogs. The progress of healing was assessed by wound area reduction and two scoring scales applied in human medicine. Materials and Methods: Ten client-owned dogs with 12 cutaneous open wounds healed by the second intention were included. All wounds were treated using available in commerce HA-containing wound dressing from admission to complete re-epithelialization. At every clinical examination, wound area and scale scoring assessments were performed. Results: After debridement, an increased wound size was obtained while an improvement was determined by both grading systems. The median numbers of return to the clinic for bandage change were 5 times. The median time to complete wound healing was 34.5 days. The mean wound area at day 7, 14, 21, and 28 were, respectively, 90.4%, 47.7%, 22.4%, and 14.8% of the original size (for linear measurement) and 95.5%, 54.4%, 23.10%, and 14.8% of the original size (for software measurement). Regarding wound healing assessment tools, the agreement between two operators was considered high for both scales. Conclusions: HA-containing dressing may be a possible wound treatment for cutaneous open wounds in dogs. The assessment of wound quality using scale scoring system could be useful especially in the 1st week and to direct clinical decision-making process. PMID:27047026

  8. Alterations in respiratory mechanics after laparoscopic and open surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Kimberley, Nicholas A.; Kirkpatrick, Susan M.; Watters, James M.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of laparoscopic and open surgical procedures on postoperative strength and respiratory mechanics. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Adult university hospital. Participants Fifty-one women aged 21 to 62 years scheduled to undergo elective cholecystectomy or hysterectomy (or related procedures), otherwise in good health. Intervention Open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy or hysterectomy (or related procedures). Main Outcome Measures Maximum voluntary handgrip strength (HGS), forced vital capacity (VC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) were each measured preoperatively and on the first postoperative morning. A visual analogue pain scale score was evaluated in relation to performance of the postoperative strength and respiratory measurements. Results VC, FEV1 and MIP, but not HGS, were decreased after surgery. Postoperative VC, FEV1 and MIP were lower after open procedures than after laparoscopic procedures and after cholecystectomy than after hysterectomy (all p < 0.001). Pain scores were lower after laparoscopic than after open procedures (p < 0.005) and could account in part for differences in postoperative respiratory mechanics. Conclusions Cholecystectomy and hysterectomy do not result in generalized muscle weakness, unlike more major abdominal procedures. Postoperative alterations in respiratory mechanics are related to the site of the surgery, the use of an open versus a laparoscopic approach and postoperative pain. PMID:8697322

  9. Colchicine inhibits pressure-induced tumor cell implantation within surgical wounds and enhances tumor-free survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Craig, David H.; Owen, Cheri R.; Conway, William C.; Walsh, Mary F.; Downey, Christina; Basson, Marc D.

    2008-01-01

    Iatrogenic tumor cell implantation within surgical wounds can compromise curative cancer surgery. Adhesion of cancer cells, in particular colon cancer cells, is stimulated by exposure to increased extracellular pressure through a cytoskeleton-dependent signaling mechanism requiring FAK, Src, Akt, and paxillin. Mechanical stimuli during tumor resection may therefore negatively impact patient outcome. We hypothesized that perioperative administration of colchicine, which prevents microtubule polymerization, could disrupt pressure-stimulated tumor cell adhesion to surgical wounds and enhance tumor-free survival. Ex vivo treatment of Co26 and Co51 colon cancer cells with colchicine inhibited pressure-stimulated cell adhesion to murine surgical wounds and blocked pressure-induced FAK and Akt phosphorylation. Surgical wound contamination with pressure-activated Co26 and Co51 cells significantly reduced tumor-free survival compared with contamination with tumor cells under ambient pressure. Mice treated with pressure-activated Co26 and Co51 cells from tumors preoperatively treated with colchicine in vivo displayed reduced surgical site implantation and significantly increased tumor-free survival compared with mice exposed to pressure-activated cells from tumors not pretreated with colchicine. Our data suggest that pressure activation of malignant cells promotes tumor development and impairs tumor-free survival and that perioperative colchicine administration or similar interventions may inhibit this effect. PMID:18704196

  10. ‘This wound has spoilt everything’: emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to ‘germs’ or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. PMID:25470322

  11. 'This wound has spoilt everything': emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections.

    PubMed

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to 'germs' or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system.

  12. Intraoperative antibiotic wound lavage: an attempt to eliminate postoperative infection in arterial and clean general surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Lord, J W; Rossi, G; Daliana, M

    1977-06-01

    Intraoperative antibiotic wound lavage has been used in all arterial reconstructive procedures for the past 7 years and reduced the incidence of early and late postoperative infections from 1.5% in 400 operations prior to 1969 to 0.23% (one post-hospital) in 434 patients operated since that date. In 226 consecutive clean major general surgical procedures since June 1971 there has been no early or late wound infections following intraoperative antibiotic wound lavage in contrast to an infection rate of 1.5% in 185 operations prior to that date. A double blind study of 200 patients undergoing operations for varicose veins was carried out as follows: The wounds of alternate patients were irrigated either with normal saline or with antibiotic solution. There were no gross (grade II) postoperative wound infections. Minor skin changes were noted in 93 of 632 incisions in the saline group and only 49 of 608 incisions irrigated with antibiotic solution (P less than 0.001). In clean operations without antibiotic wound lavage there was a 0.73% rate of in-hospital wound infections in 685 patients in contrast to a zero rate in 760 patients wherein intraoperative wound lavage was carried out throughout the operative procedure.

  13. Effect of low-power luminescent irradiation on surgical and burn wounds of soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monich, Victor A.; Malinovskaya, Svetlana L.; Lokhmachova, Elvira; Vorobjev, Andrei

    1996-11-01

    It is shown, that direct, of low-intensity luminescent incoherent radiation (LUMIR) exposure on the surgery skin wound, causes the acceleration of wound healing in rats. The influence of LUMIR spectrum at the wound healing processes was found.

  14. Microcirculation in the healing of surgical wounds in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Scardina, G A; Carini, F; Noto, F; Messina, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate in vivo the characteristics of microcirculation after taking a biopsy sample from the oral mucosa. 20 patients were recruited to the study and all underwent an oral mucosa biopsy for the excision of benign neoformations. The modifications in the oral microcirculation were evaluated in vivo in correspondence to the surgical site through videocapillaroscopy at three different times: 30 min before the biopsy; 48 h after the biopsy; and 7 days after the biopsy. The statistical significance was checked with the Mann-Whitney U-test (P<0.05). The analysis of videocapillaroscopic patterns showed statistically significant variations relative to the capillary loop density; the diameter of the outgoing loop; and the length of the capillary loop. In conclusion, the study describes a simple and reproducible model for the study of wound healing from a microcirculatory point of view.

  15. Application of the Single Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device (PICO) on a Heterogeneous Group of Surgical and Traumatic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Caroline; Edwards, Daren

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic wounds and surgery inherently have their complications. Localized infections, wound dehiscence, and excessive wound leakage can be devastating to the patient with a prolonged recovery, but it is also costly to the hospital with an increased length of stay, extra workload, and dressing changes. The single use PICO (Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, United Kingdom) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing has revolutionized our management of various acute, chronic, and high output wounds. It requires fewer dressing changes than conventional practice, is used in the outpatient setting, and is a necessary adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To observe the efficacy of the PICO vacuum-assisted healing within a cost improvement programme. Settings: Plastic surgery department, Royal London Hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with a diversity of postoperative or posttraumatic wounds were considered suitable for PICO application and treated totally on an outpatient basis once the PICO dressing was applied. All wounds were then subjected to continued PICO dressings until healed. Results: All patients tolerated the PICO well with no dressing failure or failure to comply. The number of dressings per patient ranged from 1 to 7. The cost per patient of treatment ranged from £120 to £1578. Estimated cost of all PICO dressing for 21 patients including plastic surgery dressing clinic appointments = £13,345. Median length of treatment to healing (days) = 16; standard deviation = 9.5. Eight patients would have had an inpatient bed stay with conventional therapy, total 24 bed days saved at Bartshealth @£325 per day. Conclusions: The outpatient application of a disposable NPWT can benefit a wide range of clinical wounds that optimizes patient care, promotes rapid wound healing, and importantly helps manage costs. PMID:24917894

  16. LiquiBand® Surgical S topical adhesive versus sutures for the closure of laparoscopic wounds. A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jan, Haider; Waters, Natasha; Haines, Pat; Kent, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Cyanoacrylate adhesives offer the surgeon and patient an alternative to subcuticular suturing. LiquiBand® Surgical S (LBSS) is a new formulation with a blend of monomeric n-butyl and 2-octyl cyanoacrylates. In this study, the effectiveness, safety, and clinical utility of LBSS was compared to Vicryl(™) sutures for the closure of laparoscopic incisions. This was a prospective randomized study of LBSS skin adhesive versus Vicryl(™) sutures for the topical closure of laparoscopic surgical incisions. Subjects were asked to return at 2 weeks postsurgery to report complications and adverse events. Wounds were evaluated for apposition and cosmesis using a modified Hollander Wound Evaluation Scale (HWES). The Shapiro-Wilk test of normality was done. Independent-samples T test, Mann Whitney U test, and chi-square test were used to compare variables between the two wound closure methods. A total of 114 subjects participated in this trial completing all aspects of the study. Fifty-five subjects received sutures for topical wound closure, with 59 subjects receiving LBSS. Surgeons were found to be satisfied with 100 % of all applications using the LBSS device. One hundred percent of wounds closed with sutures and 98.9 % wounds closed with LBSS achieving an optimal HWES of 0. There was no statistical difference in cosmesis or complications for either method. Closure with LBSS was significantly faster by a mean of 2 min. LiquiBand® Surgical S is as good as sutures for the closure of laparoscopic wounds in terms of cosmesis and complications with the added benefit of being significantly faster.

  17. Biobased silver nanocolloid coating on silk fibers for prevention of post-surgical wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dhas, Sindhu Priya; Anbarasan, Suruthi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibers are an important biomaterial and are used in surgical sutures due to their remarkable biocompatibility. The major drawback to the application of biomaterials is the risk of bacterial invasion, leading to clinical complications. We have developed an easy and cost-effective method for fabrication of antibacterial silk fibers loaded with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by an in situ and ex situ process using an aqueous extract of Rhizophora apiculata leaf. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that well dispersed nanoparticles impregnated the silk fibers both in situ and ex situ. The crystalline nature of the AgNPs in the silk fibers was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. The thermal and mechanical properties of the silk fibers were enhanced after they were impregnated with AgNPs. The silver-coated silk fibers fabricated by the in situ and ex situ method exhibited more than 90% inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Silk fibers doped with AgNPs were found to be biocompatible with 3T3 fibroblasts. The results obtained represent an important advance towards the clinical application of biocompatible AgNP-loaded silk fibers for prevention of surgical wound infections. PMID:26491317

  18. p70S6 kinase mediates breast cancer cell survival in response to surgical wound fluid stimulation.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Ilenia; Berton, Stefania; Sonego, Maura; Massarut, Samuele; Fabris, Linda; Armenia, Joshua; Mileto, Mario; Colombatti, Alfonso; Vecchione, Andrea; Baldassarre, Gustavo; Belletti, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    In early breast cancer, local relapses represent a determinant and not simply an indicator of risk for distant relapse and death. Notably, 90% of local recurrences occur at or close to the same quadrant of the primary cancer. Relevance of PI3K/mTOR/p70S6K signaling in breast tumorigenesis is very well documented. However, the pathway/s involved in the process of breast cancer local relapse are not well understood. The ribosomal protein p70S6K has been implicated in breast cancer cell response to post-surgical inflammation, supporting the hypothesis that it may be crucial also for breast cancer recurrence. Here, we show that p70S6K activity is required for the survival of breast cancer cells challenged in "hostile" microenvironments. We found that impairment of p70S6K activity in breast cancer cells strongly decreased their tumor take rate in nude mice. In line with this observation, if cells were challenged to grow in anchorage independence or in clonogenic assay, growth of colonies was strongly dependent on an intact p70S6K signaling. This in vitro finding was particularly evident when breast cancer cells were grown in the presence of wound fluids harvested following surgery from breast cancer patients, suggesting that the stimuli present in the post-surgical setting at least partially relied on activity of p70S6K to stimulate breast cancer relapse. From a mechanistic point of view, our results indicated that p70S6K signaling was able to activate Gli1 and up-regulate the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2, thereby activating a survival response in breast cancer cells challenged in hostile settings. Our work highlights a previously poorly recognized function of p70S6K in preserving breast cancer cell survival, which could eventually be responsible for local relapse and opens the way to the design of new and more specific therapies aiming to restrain the deleterious effects of wound response.

  19. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial of standard wound management versus negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of adult patients with an open fracture of the lower limb: UK Wound management of Open Lower Limb Fractures (UK WOLFF)

    PubMed Central

    Achten, Juul; Parsons, Nick R; Bruce, Julie; Petrou, Stavros; Tutton, Elizabeth; Willett, Keith; Lamb, Sarah E; Costa, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients who sustain open lower limb fractures have reported infection risks as high as 27%. The type of dressing applied after initial debridement could potentially affect this risk. In this trial, standard dressings will be compared with a new emerging treatment, negative pressure wound therapy, for patients with open lower limb fractures. Methods and analysis All adult patients presenting with an open lower limb fracture, with a Gustilo and Anderson (G&A) grade 2/3, will be considered for inclusion. 460 consented patients will provide 90% power to detect a difference of eight points in the Disability Rating Index (DRI) score at 12 months, at the 5% level. A randomisation sequence, stratified by trial centre and G&A grade, will be produced and administered by a secure web-based service. A qualitative substudy will assess patients’ experience of giving consent for the trial, and acceptability of trial procedures to patients and staff. Patients will have clinical follow-up in a fracture clinic up to a minimum of 12 months as per standard National Health Service (NHS) practice. Functional and quality of life outcome data will be collected using the DRI, SF12 and EQ-5D questionnaires at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months postoperatively. In addition, information will be requested with regards to resource use and any late complications or surgical interventions related to their injury. The main analysis will investigate differences in the DRI score at 1 year after injury, between the two treatment groups on an intention-to-treat basis. Tests will be two sided and considered to provide evidence for a significant difference if p values are less than 0.05. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was given by NRES Committee West Midlands—Coventry & Warwickshire on 6/2/2012 (ref: 12/WM/0001). The results of the trial will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and presentations at relevant conferences. Trial registration number ISRCTN33756652. PMID

  20. Effect of semiquantitative culture results from complex host surgical wounds on dehiscence rates.

    PubMed

    Elmarsafi, Tammer; Garwood, Caitlin S; Steinberg, John S; Evans, Karen K; Attinger, Christopher E; Kim, Paul J

    2017-01-16

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of positive bacterial cultures at the time of closure on dehiscence rates. Pre- and post-débridement wound cultures from patients undergoing serial surgical débridement of infected wounds were compared with outcomes 30 days postoperatively. One-hundred patients were enrolled; 35 were excluded for incomplete culture data. Sixty-five patients were evaluated for species counts, including Coagulase negative Staphylococcus (CoNS), and semiquantitative culture data for each débridement. The post-débridement cultures on the date of closure had no growth in 42 patients (64.6%) of which 6 dehisced (14.3%), and 36 remained closed; with no statistically significant difference in dehiscence rates (p = 0.0664). Pre-débridement cultures from the 1st débridement of the 65 patients showed 8 patients had no growth, 29 grew 1 species, 19 grew 2 species, and 9 had 3-5 species. There was a reduction in the number of species and improvement of semiquantitative cultures with each subsequent débridement. The dehiscence rate for those who had 2 débridements (n = 42) was 21.4% at 30 day follow-up and 21.7% in those who had 3 débridements (n = 23). The number of débridements had no statistical significance on dehiscence rates. The presence of CoNS on the day of closure was a statistically significant risk for dehiscence within 30 days (p = 0.0091) postoperatively. This data demonstrates: (1) positive post-débridement cultures (scant/rare, growth in enrichment broth) at the time of closure did not affect overall dehiscence rates (p = 0.0664), (2) the number of species and semiquantitative culture results both improved with each subsequent débridement, (3) the number of surgical débridement did not influence postclosure dehiscence rates. (4) Positive cultures containing CoNS at the time of closure is a risk factor for dehiscence (p = 0.0091).

  1. Human Skin Allograft for Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcers, Venous Leg Ulcers, or Surgical/Traumatic Wounds Retrospective, Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Desman, Eric; Bartow, William; Anderson, Louise H

    2015-07-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) and venous leg ulcers (VLU) may take a long time to heal and increase the risk of complications. Previous studies have suggested human skin allograft may facilitate healing of these chronic wounds. A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted among outpatients with nonhealing DFU, VLU, surgical, or traumatic wounds managed with a meshed, partial-thickness, cryopreserved human skin allograft. Charts of all patients who received an allograft from 2011 to 2013 were abstracted if the wound was >1 cm2, had a duration>30 days, was adequately debrided, and was free of infection before the first allograft application. Primary outcome was percentage of wounds healed (ie, 100% epithelialized) at 12 and 20 weeks. Secondary outcome was the number of recorded adverse events. Wound measurements (area--calculated as width x length in cm2), wound type and duration, number of allograft applications, number of adverse events, and race, smoking status, and body mass index were abstracted. Of the 49 patients (average age 64.3 [SD 15.0]; 64% male) who met the inclusion criteria, 13 did not have medical follow-up through the primary outcomes at 12 and 20 weeks, leaving 36 patients (average age 65.1 [SD 15.4]; 67% male) available for analysis. The most common diagnoses were VLU (18 patients, 50%) and traumatic wounds (9 patients, 25%). Average wound size was 19.4 cm2 (SD 29.3, range 1.2-156, median 9.5), and average wound duration at initial treatment was 17.2 (SD 17.0, range 4-72, excluding outlier) weeks. Seventeen (17) wounds (47%) healed by 12 weeks, and 21 (58%) were healed by week 20 with an average of 3.3 (SD 2.0) allograft applications. No serious adverse events occurred. The results of this study are encouraging and add to the currently available literature on the use of allograft skin for chronic wounds, but the study design and sample size limit the ability to interpret the observations. Prospective, controlled clinical

  2. Negative pressure wound therapy for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul Hyun; Shon, Oog Jin; Kim, Gi Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures have been treated by initial wide wound debridement, stabilization of fracture with external fixation, and delayed wound closure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of staged treatment using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Materials and Methods: 15 patients with Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures, treated using staged protocol by a single surgeon between January 2007 and December 2011 were reviewed in this retrospective study. The clinical results were assessed using a Puno scoring system for severe open fractures of the tibia at the last followup. The range of motion (ROM) of the knee and ankle joints and postoperative complication were evaluated at the last followup. The radiographic results were assessed using time to bone union, coronal and sagittal angulations and a shortening at the last followup. Results: The mean score of Puno scoring system was 87.4 (range 67–94). The mean ROM of the knee and ankle joints was 121.3° (range 90°–130°) and 37.7° (range 15°–50°), respectively. Bone union developed in all patients and the mean time to union was 25.3 weeks (range 16–42 weeks). The mean coronal angulation was 2.1° (range 0–4°) and sagittal was 2.7° (range 1–4°). The mean shortening was 4.1 mm (range 0–8 mm). Three patients had partial flap necrosis and 1 patient had total flap necrosis. There was no superficial and deep wound infection. Conclusion: Staged treatment using NPWT decreased the risks of infection and requirement of flap surgeries in Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Therefore, staged treatment using NPWT could be a useful treatment option for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. PMID:27746498

  3. Treatment of Burn and Surgical Wounds With Recombinant Human Tropoelastin Produces New Elastin Fibers in Scars.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hua; Lucchesi, Lisa; Zheng, Bo; Ladich, Elena; Pineda, Teresa; Merten, Rose; Gregory, Cynthia; Rutten, Michael; Gregory, Kenton

    2017-02-15

    Tropoelastin (TE), the soluble precursor of insoluble elastin fibers, is produced in minimal amounts in adults. Burn injuries result in inflexible collagen-rich scars because of lack of elastin fiber formation. We studied the feasibility of using recombinant human tropoelastin to enable elastin fiber production in burn and surgical scars to improve skin flexibility. In a swine hypertrophic burn scar model, normal skin and 3 × 3-cm partial thickness thermal burns underwent dermatome resection at 1 week post burn and randomized to four subcutaneous injections of saline or TE (either 0.5, 5, or 10 mg/ml) spaced 3 days apart. Two burn sites received TE injections after wound closure (0.5 or 10 mg/ml). At 90 days, skin hardness, flexibility, and histology were evaluated. All injury sites developed hypertrophic scars. New elastin fibers were found in burn scars in all injuries injected after skin closure with low (5/5) and high (6/6) TE doses (P < .05). No elastin fibers were observed without TE treatment. No significant differences in skin hardness, flexibility, or inflammation were observed. This is the first report demonstrating that subcutaneous injections of TE into surgical and burn injuries can safely produce new elastin fibers in scars. Despite the development of new elastin fibers, skin flexibility was not improved, possibly because of insufficient elastin fiber maturation or the hypertrophic model used. The ability to restore elastin fiber formation in adult skin after burns, trauma, and surgery may improve skin regeneration and reduce disabling complications of scar formation.

  4. Molecular Wiring in Smart Dressings: Opening a New Route to Monitoring Wound pH

    PubMed Central

    McLister, Anna; Davis, James

    2015-01-01

    It has been proposed that fluctuations in wound pH can give valuable insights into the healing processes in chronic wounds, but acquiring such data can be a technological challenge especially where there is little sample available. Developments in voltammetric pH sensing have opened up new avenues for the design of probes that can function in ultra-small volumes and can be inherently disposable but, as yet few can meet the demands of wound monitoring. A preliminary investigation of the pH response of a new redox wire prepared from a peptide homopolymer of tryptophan is presented and its potential applicability as a sensing material for use in smart dressings is critically discussed. PMID:27417774

  5. Effects of Covering Surgical Wounds with Polyglycolic Acid Sheets for Posttonsillectomy Pain.

    PubMed

    Miyaguchi, Shin-Ichi; Horii, Arata; Kambara, Rumi; Takemoto, Norihiko; Akazawa, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Nao; Baba, Hironori; Inohara, Hidenori

    2016-11-01

    Postoperative pain is a remaining issue in tonsillectomy. Polyglycolic acid (PGA) is a biocompatible material used for absorbent suture reinforcement, and its sheet has been applied for covering defects after resection of oral carcinoma. The aim of this study is to examine whether the attachment of a PGA sheet to surgical wounds would reduce posttonsillectomy pain. In this prospective single-blind study, 17 consecutive adult patients were recruited who needed to undergo tonsillectomy, mainly due to habitual tonsillitis. Following bilateral tonsillectomies, a PGA sheet was attached with fibrin glue to only 1 side, without notification to patients of which side. Postoperative pain of each side was separately evaluated with a visual analog scale at 4 time points: before each meal and before sleep. Postoperative pain of both the PGA sheet-attached and nonattached sides was most severe before breakfast among 4 time points. Postoperative pain measured before breakfast was significantly more severe in the PGA sheet-attached side than the nonattached side. As such, this study provided solid data on the negative effects of PGA sheeting on posttonsillectomy pain.

  6. Impact of wound edge protection devices on surgical site infection after laparotomy: multicentre randomised controlled trial (ROSSINI Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, Melanie; Bartlett, David C; Gheorghe, Adrian; Redman, Val; Dowswell, George; Hawkins, William; Mak, Tony; Youssef, Haney; Richardson, Caroline; Hornby, Steven; Magill, Laura; Haslop, Richard; Wilson, Sue; Morton, Dion

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical effectiveness of wound edge protection devices in reducing surgical site infection after abdominal surgery. Design Multicentre observer blinded randomised controlled trial. Participants Patients undergoing laparotomy at 21 UK hospitals. Interventions Standard care or the use of a wound edge protection device during surgery. Main outcome measures Surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery, assessed by blinded clinicians at seven and 30 days and by patient’s self report for the intervening period. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, duration of stay in hospital, and the effect of characteristics of the patient and operation on the efficacy of the device. Results 760 patients were enrolled with 382 patients assigned to the device group and 378 to the control group. Six patients in the device group and five in the control group did not undergo laparotomy. Fourteen patients, seven in each group, were lost to follow-up. A total of 184 patients experienced surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery, 91/369 (24.7%) in the device group and 93/366 (25.4%) in the control group (odds ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.69 to 1.36; P=0.85). This lack of benefit was consistent across wound assessments performed by clinicians and those reported by patients and across all secondary outcomes. In the secondary analyses no subgroup could be identified in which there was evidence of clinical benefit associated with use of the device. Conclusions Wound edge protection devices do not reduce the rate of surgical site infection in patients undergoing laparotomy, and therefore their routine use for this role cannot be recommended. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 40402832 PMID:23903454

  7. Prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy in colorectal surgery. Effects on surgical site events: current status and call to action.

    PubMed

    Pellino, Gianluca; Sciaudone, Guido; Selvaggi, Francesco; Canonico, Silvestro

    2015-09-01

    Surgical site events, including surgical site infections (SSI), represent a major problem in general surgery. SSI are responsible of nuisance for patients, and can lead to important complications and disability, often needing prolonged postoperative stay with specific treatment and recovery in Intensive Care Units. These justify the higher costs due to SSI. Despite the growing body of evidence concerning SSI in general surgery, literature dealing with SSI after colorectal surgery is scarce, reflecting in suboptimal perception of such a relevant issue by colorectal surgeons and health authorities in Italy, though colorectal surgery is associated with higher rates of SSI. The best strategy for reducing the impact of SSI on costs of care and patients quality of life would be the development of a preventive bundle, similar to that adopted in the US through the colorectal section of the National Surgery Quality Improvement Project of the American College of Surgeons (ACS-NSQIP). This policy has been showed to significantly reduce the rates of SSI. In this scenario, incisional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is likely to play a pivotal role. We herein reviewed the literature to report on the current status of preventive NPWT on surgical wounds of patients undergoing colorectal procedures with primary wound closure, suggesting evidence-based measures to reduce the impact of SSI, and to contain the costs associated with conventional NPWT devices by means of newer available technologies. Some explicative real life cases are presented.

  8. Correlation of the Vocal Fold Vibratory Pattern to the Post-Operative Surgical Wound in the Porcine Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-15

    functional layers within the vocal folds. To do this, videostroboscopy (VS) and electroglottography ( EGG ) were used to record glottal function during...of air is formed as the lower margin opens first , followed by opening of the upper margin and release of the puff. This fluid-like movement is defined...normal laryngeal anatomy. The first surgical procedure on the right true vocal fold utilized microsurgical instruments. The surgical incision and/or

  9. Evolution from open surgical to endovascular treatment of ureteral-iliac artery fistula

    PubMed Central

    Malgor, Rafael D.; Oderich, Gustavo S.; Andrews, James C.; McKusick, Michael; Kalra, Manju; Misra, Sanjay; Gloviczki, Peter; Bower, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the indications and results of open surgical and endovascular treatment for ureteral-iliac artery fistula (UIAF). Methods We reviewed the clinical data of 20 consecutive patients treated for 21 UIAFs between 1996 and 2010. Since 2004, iliac artery stent grafts were the primary treatment except for complex fistulas with enteric contamination or abscess. Endpoints were early morbidity and mortality, patient survival, vessel or graft patency, freedom from vascular or stent graft/graft infection, and freedom from recurrent bleeding. Results There were 20 patients, 15 females, and five males, with mean age of 63 ± 13 years. Predisposing factors for UIAF were prior tumor resection in 18 patients, radiation in 15, ureteral stents in 15, ileal conduits in four, and ileofemoral grafts in three. All patients presented with hematuria, which was massive in 10. Treatment included iliac stent grafts in 11 patients/12 fistulas (55%), with internal iliac artery (IAA) exclusion in nine, femoral crossover graft with IAA exclusion in five, direct arterial repair in three, and ureteral exclusion with percutaneous nephrostomy and no arterial repair in one. There were no early deaths. Five of eight patients treated by open surgical repair developed complications, which included enterocutaneous fistula in three and superficial wound infection in two. Four patients (36%) treated by iliac stent grafts had complications, including pneumonia, non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, buttock claudication, and early stent occlusion in one each. After a median follow-up of 26 months, no one had recurrent massive hematuria, but minor bleeding was reported in three. Patient survival at 5 years was 42% compared with 93% for the general population (P < .001). Freedom from any recurrent bleeding at 3 years was 76%. In the stent graft group, primary and secondary patency rates and freedom from stent graft infection at 3 years were 81%, 92%, and 100%. Conclusions UIAF is a

  10. The versatility of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam for soft tissue management after severe musculoskeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Tarkin, Ivan S

    2008-01-01

    This review serves to outline the current and evolving usages of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by V.A.C.(R) Therapy (KCI, San Antonio, TX) as an adjunctive treatment modality for optimal management of wounds associated with high energy musculoskeletal trauma.

  11. Surgical wound segmentation based on adaptive threshold edge detection and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsueh-Fu; Ho, Te-Wei; Hsu, Jui-Tse; Chang, Chun-Che; Lai, Feipei; Wu, Jin-Ming

    2017-02-01

    Postsurgical wound care has a great impact on patients' prognosis. It often takes few days, even few weeks, for the wound to stabilize, which incurs a great cost of health care and nursing resources. To assess the wound condition and diagnosis, it is important to segment out the wound region for further analysis. However, the scenario of this strategy often consists of complicated background and noise. In this study, we propose a wound segmentation algorithm based on Canny edge detector and genetic algorithm with an unsupervised evaluation function. The results were evaluated by the 112 clinical images, and 94.3% of images were correctly segmented. The judgment was based on the evaluation of experimented medical doctors. This capability to extract complete wound regions, makes it possible to conduct further image analysis such as intelligent recovery evaluation and automatic infection requirements.

  12. The direct perfusion of surgical wounds with local anaesthetic solution: an approach to postoperative pain?

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D. F.; Lambert, W. G.; Williams, K. L.

    1983-01-01

    A simple technique of wound perfusion with bupivacaine (Marcain) which provides sustained postoperative analgesia is described. No complications nor side effects related to toxicity, hypersensitivity, infection, or impaired wound healing were encountered. Postoperative pain was reduced and analgesic requirements were significantly lower in patients undergoing both intermittent (P less than 0.01) and continuous (P = 0.1) wound perfusion (Student t test). Perfusion with isotonic saline was also found to be effective. This may represent a true therapeutic effect attributable to the removal or dilution of pain mediating substances in the wound. PMID:6347012

  13. Stab wound to the intramedullary spinal cord: Presurgical and surgical management options for a retained blade to optimize neurological preservation

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Prateek; Burke, John F.; Abdullah, Kalil G.; Piazza, Matthew; Smith, Brian P.; Thawani, Jayesh P.; Malhotra, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We present a rare case of an intraparenchymal nonmissile penetrating spinal injury (NMPSI) occurring at the T11 level in a patient presenting without neurological deficit. Case Description: The patient sustained a knife wound that penetrated the lamina without incurring bony injury and entered the spinal cord at the T11 level. During surgery, the intramedullary penetration of the cord was confirmed, and following surgical removal of the knife, the patient fully recovered without losing any neurological function. Conclusions: The surgical management of NMPSI in patients who are neurologically intact is controversial. Here, we report surgical excision of a knife that penetrated the spinal cord at the T11 level, without the patient incurring further neurological deterioration. PMID:28144493

  14. Surgical amputation of a digit and vacuum-assisted-closure (V.A.C.) management in a case of osteomyelitis and wound care in an eastern black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis michaeli).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Stanley, Bryden J; Sikarskie, James G; Bohart, George; Ames, N Kent; Tomlian, Janice; Marquardt, Mark; Marcum, Annabel; Kiupel, Matti; Sledge, Dodd; Agnew, Dalen

    2011-06-01

    A 14-yr-old female eastern black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis michaeli) presented with progressive suppurative osteomyelitis in her left hind lateral toe. beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus sp. was isolated. The animal was treated with multiple systemic antibiotics, and topical wound cleansing. Repeated debridements and nail trimmings were performed for 5 mo prior to electing amputation. The toe was surgically amputated under general anesthesia between the first and second phalanges. Analgesia was diffused into the wound topically via a catheter and elastomeric pump. The open amputation site was covered with adherent drapes and a negative-pressure wound therapy device provided vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.) for 72 hr. Three months later this animal developed a deep dermal ulcer on the lateral aspect of the right hind limb, at the level of the stifle. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. The wound was managed by initial daily lavage, followed by 1 mo of V.A.C. therapy, with 72 hr between dressing changes. Clinically, this therapy expedited the formation of healthy granulation tissue and overall healing was accelerated. The animal tolerated the machine and bandage changes well via operant conditioning. The use of negative-pressure wound therapy appeared to shorten time to resolution of slow-healing wounds in black rhinoceros.

  15. Surgical Skills Beyond Scientific Management

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    During the Great War, the French surgeon Alexis Carrel, in collaboration with the English chemist Henry Dakin, devised an antiseptic treatment for infected wounds. This paper focuses on Carrel’s attempt to standardise knowledge of infected wounds and their treatment, and looks closely at the vision of surgical skill he espoused and its difference from those associated with the doctrines of scientific management. Examining contemporary claims that the Carrel–Dakin method increased rather than diminished demands on surgical work, this paper further shows how debates about antiseptic wound treatment opened up a critical space for considering the nature of skill as a vital dynamic in surgical innovation and practice. PMID:26090737

  16. Effect of the lectin of Bauhinia variegata and its recombinant isoform on surgically induced skin wounds in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Neto, Luiz Gonzaga do Nascimento; Pinto, Luciano da Silva; Bastos, Rafaela Mesquita; Evaristo, Francisco Flávio Vasconcelos; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves de; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Júnior, Valdemiro Amaro da Silva; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Teixeira, Edson Holanda

    2011-11-07

    Lectins are a structurally heterogeneous group of highly specific carbohydrate-binding proteins. Due to their great biotechnological potential, lectins are widely used in biomedical research. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the healing potential of the lectin of Bauhinia variegata (nBVL) and its recombinant isoform (rBVL-1). Following surgical creation of dorsal skin wounds, seven groups of mice were submitted to topical treatment for 12 days with lectin, D-galactose, BSA and saline. The animals were anesthetized and euthanized on POD 2, 7 and 12 in order to evaluate the healing potential of each treatment. The parameters considered included wound size, contraction rate, epithelialization rate and histopathological findings. Wound closure was fastest in animals treated with rBVL-1 (POD 7). nBVL was more effective than the controls. All skin layers were reconstructed and keratin deposition increased. Our findings indicate that the lectin of Bauhinia variegata possesses pro-healing properties and may be employed in the treatment of acute skin wounds.

  17. New advances in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for surgical wounds of patients affected with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, Francesco; Pellino, Gianluca; Sciaudone, Guido; Corte, Angela Della; Candilio, Giuseppe; Campitiello, Ferdinando; Canonico, Silvestro

    2014-03-01

    Surgical site complications (SSC) negatively affect costs of care and prolong length of stay. Crohn's disease (CD) is a risk factor for SSC. CD patients often need surgery, sometimes requiring stoma. Our primary aim was to compare the effects on SSC of a portable device for NPWT (PICO, Smith & Nephew, London, UK) with gauze dressings after elective surgery for CD. Secondary aims were manageability and safety of PICO and its feasibility as home therapy. Between 2010 and 2012, 50 patients were assigned to treatment with either PICO (n = 25) or conventional dressings (n = 25). Each patient completed 12-month follow-up. Parameters of interests for primary aim were SSC, surgical complications, and readmission rates. Data on difficulties in managing PICO and device-related complications were also collected. Patients receiving PICO had less SSC, resulting in shorter hospital stay. At last follow-up, readmission rates were lower with PICO. No differences were observed in surgical complications between groups. No patients reported difficulties in managing the device. Among patients discharged with PICO, none needed to come back to the hospital for device malfunctioning or inability to manage it. PICO reduces SSC and length of stay in selected CD patients compared with conventional dressings. The device is safe and user friendly.

  18. Growth factor-enriched autologous plasma improves wound healing after surgical debridement in odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is a fulminant infection of odontogenic origin that quickly spreads along the fascial planes and results in necrosis of the affected tissues. It is usually polymicrobial, occurs frequently in immunocompromised patients, and has a high mortality rate. Case presentation A 69-year old Mexican male had a pain in the maxillar right-canine region and a swelling of the submental and submandibular regions. Our examination revealed local pain, tachycardia, hyperthermia (39°C), and the swelling of bilateral submental and submandibular regions, which also were erythematous, hyperthermic, crepitant, and with a positive Godet sign. Mobility and third-degree caries were seen in the right mandibular canine. Bacteriological cultures isolated streptococcus pyogenes and staphylococcus aureus. The histopathological diagnosis was odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the submental and submandibular regions. The initial treatment was surgical debridement and the administration of antibiotics. After cultures were negative, the surgical wound was treated with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma eight times every third day until complete healing occurred. Conclusions The treatment with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma caused a rapid healing of an extensive surgical wound in a patient with odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis. The benefits were rapid tissue regeneration, an aesthetic and a functional scar, and the avoidance of further surgery and possible complications. PMID:21396085

  19. Single-use NPWT for the treatment of complex orthopaedic surgical and trauma wounds.

    PubMed

    Sharp, E

    2013-10-01

    Orthopaedic limb reconstruction patients often have wounds that are difficult to heal either due to the underlying problems, their surgery, underlying comorbidities or a combination of these factors. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a useful tool with which to manage these wounds; however, many systems are not ideal for use in the patient's home, due in part to size and complexity. There are also staff training issues if transferring patients to an area which does not routinely use negative pressure systems. This paper reports the outcomes for some of the patients who were treated with a novel, single-use NPWT device in a orthopaedic trauma/limb reconstruction unit.

  20. Extremity gunshot wound and gunshot fracture in civilian practice.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, M J; Banks, H H; Leach, R B; Quigley, T B

    1976-01-01

    The civilian gunshot wound is a low velocity injury. Temporary cavitation does not occur in the low velocity wound and damage is confined to the projectile pathway. Extensive debridement is not indicated for this injury. Surgical cleansing is used to convert the open, contaminated wound to a clean, closed wound. Reparative and definitive reconstruction then follow to restore form and function with minimized patient hazard.

  1. The pros and cons of endovascular and open surgical treatments for patients with acute limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Branco, B C; Montero-Baker, M F; Mills, J L

    2015-06-01

    The present review addresses the pros and cons of the current, wide variety of therapeutic options available for the treatment of acute limb ischemia (ALI). Despite five prospective randomized controlled trials comparing catheter directed thrombolysis and open surgical revascularization, no single treatment strategy can yet be considered optimal for patients with ALI. This report includes 20 years of published data to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of thrombolytic agents and adjunctive endovascular techniques when compared to open surgical revascularization.

  2. Clinical evaluations of autologous fibrin glue and polyglycolic acid sheets as oral surgical wound coverings after partial glossectomy.

    PubMed

    Kouketsu, Atsumu; Nogami, Shinnosuke; Fujiwara, Minami; Mori, Shiro; Yamauchi, Kensuke; Hashimoto, Wataru; Miyashita, Hitoshi; Kurihara, Jun; Kawai, Tadashi; Higuchi, Keisuke; Takahashi, Tetsu

    2016-08-01

    Polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheets and commercial fibrin glue are commonly used to cover open wound surfaces in oral surgery. Compared to commercial fibrin glue composed of pooled allogeneic blood, autologous fibrin glue is less expensive and poses lower risks of viral infection and allergic reaction. Here, we evaluated postoperative pain, scar contracture, ingestion, tongue dyskinesia, and postoperative bleeding in 24 patients who underwent partial glossectomy plus the application of a PGA sheet and an autologous fibrin glue covering (autologous group) versus 11 patients in whom a PGA sheet and commercial fibrin glue were used (allogeneic group). The evaluated clinical measures were nearly identical in both groups. Remarkable wound surface granulation was recognized in two cases in the autologous group. No complications were observed in either group, including viral infection or allergic reaction. Abnormal postoperative bleeding in the wound region was observed in one case in the allogeneic group. Coagulation and adhesion of the autologous fibrin glue were equivalent to those of conventional therapy with a PGA sheet and commercial fibrin glue. Thus, our results show that covering wounds with autologous fibrin glue and PGA sheets may help avoid the risks of viral infection and allergic reaction in partial glossectomy cases.

  3. Animal models of external traumatic wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Huang, Ying-Ying; Bil de Arce, Vida J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in traumatic wound care and management, infections remain a leading cause of mortality, morbidity and economic disruption in millions of wound patients around the world. Animal models have become standard tools for studying a wide array of external traumatic wound infections and testing new antimicrobial strategies. Results: Animal models of external traumatic wound infections reported by different investigators vary in animal species used, microorganism strains, the number of microorganisms applied, the size of the wounds and for burn infections, the length of time the heated object or liquid is in contact with the skin. Methods: This review covers experimental infections in animal models of surgical wounds, skin abrasions, burns, lacerations, excisional wounds and open fractures. Conclusions: As antibiotic resistance continues to increase, more new antimicrobial approaches are urgently needed. These should be tested using standard protocols for infections in external traumatic wounds in animal models. PMID:21701256

  4. Bluebelle study (phase A): a mixed-methods feasibility study to inform an RCT of surgical wound dressing strategies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Dressing primary surgical wounds is common, but the implications for surgical site infection (SSI) remain unknown. The Bluebelle study aimed to determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing ‘simple’, ‘complex’ or ‘no’ dressings on abdominal wounds, as prespecified in a funder's research brief. Bluebelle includes exploratory work (phase A) to inform a pilot version of the proposed RCT (phase B). Phase A aimed to investigate current dressing practices and perspectives on the proposed RCT, with a view to refining the forthcoming pilot. Design Mixed methods, including semi-structured interviews and document analysis. Setting 6 UK hospitals. Participants 51 patients and 92 clinical professionals from abdominal surgical specialities. Results Professionals had variable interpretations of what constitutes a ‘dressing’, particularly with respect to ‘glue’—a product listed under ‘wound-closure products’ in the British National Formulary, which some surgeons reportedly applied as a ‘wound covering’. Areas of ambiguity arising from interviews informed development of pragmatic definitions, including specification of conditions under which glue constituted a ‘dressing’. Professionals reported that ‘simple’ dressings were routinely used in practice, whereas ‘complex’ dressings were not. This raised questions about the relevance of comparison groups, prompting the design of a survey to determine the types/frequency of dressing use in abdominal surgery (reported elsewhere). This confirmed that complex dressings were rarely used, while ‘glue as a dressing’ was used relatively frequently. ‘Complex dressings’ were therefore substituted for ‘glue as a dressing’ (following an updated Cochrane review, which found insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of ‘glue as a dressing’). Patients and professionals acknowledged uncertainty around dressing use and SSI prevention, but felt

  5. Magnetoledtherapy in the treatment of wounds after surgical procedures of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Jarosław; Pasek, Tomasz; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The intense development of methods of physical medicine has been noted recently. The new methods are treatment methods, which in many cases allow a reduction of treatment time and positively influence the quality of life of patients undergoing treatment. This applies to illnesses and injuries of the locomotor system and diseases affecting soft tissues, as well as chronic wounds. This article discusses the positive results of the treatment of a 63-year-old woman with a persisting chronic wound of her right lower extremity after knee joint endoprosthesis surgery. The physical medicine method applied, in the form of magnetoledtherapy, contributed to complete wound healing and alleviation of pain suffered, as well as improvement of the quality of life of the treated patient.

  6. Magnetoledtherapy in the treatment of wounds after surgical procedures of the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Pasek, Jarosław; Pasek, Tomasz; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The intense development of methods of physical medicine has been noted recently. The new methods are treatment methods, which in many cases allow a reduction of treatment time and positively influence the quality of life of patients undergoing treatment. This applies to illnesses and injuries of the locomotor system and diseases affecting soft tissues, as well as chronic wounds. This article discusses the positive results of the treatment of a 63-year-old woman with a persisting chronic wound of her right lower extremity after knee joint endoprosthesis surgery. The physical medicine method applied, in the form of magnetoledtherapy, contributed to complete wound healing and alleviation of pain suffered, as well as improvement of the quality of life of the treated patient. PMID:25214792

  7. Effects of perioperative antiinflammatory and immunomodulating therapy on surgical wound healing.

    PubMed

    Busti, Anthony J; Hooper, Justin S; Amaya, Christopher J; Kazi, Salahuddin

    2005-11-01

    Patients with various rheumatologic and inflammatory disease states commonly require drugs known to decrease the inflammatory or autoimmune response for adequate control of their condition. Such drugs include nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, corticosteroids, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and biologic response modifiers. These drugs affect inflammation and local immune responses, which are necessary for proper wound healing in the perioperative setting, thereby potentially resulting in undesirable postoperative complications. Such complications include wound dehiscence, infection, and impaired collagen synthesis. The end result is delayed healing of soft tissue and bone wounds. The current literature provides insight into the effect of some of these drugs on wound healing. For certain drugs, such as methotrexate, trials have been conducted in humans and direct us on what to do during the perioperative period. Whereas with other drugs, we must rely on either small-animal studies or extrapolation of data from human studies that did not specifically look at wound healing. Unfortunately, no clear consensus exists on the need and optimum time for withholding therapy before surgery. Likewise, clinicians are often uncertain of the appropriate time to resume therapy after the procedure. For those drugs with limited or no data in this setting, the use of pharmacokinetic properties and biologic effects of each drug should be considered individually. In some cases, discontinuation of therapy may be required up to 4 weeks before surgery because of the long half-lives of the drugs. In doing so, patients may experience an exacerbation or worsening of disease. Clinicians must carefully evaluate individual patient risk factors, disease severity, and the pharmacokinetics of available therapies when weighing the risks and benefits of discontinuing therapy in the perioperative setting.

  8. Requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute burn and chronic surgical wound infection.

    PubMed

    Turner, Keith H; Everett, Jake; Trivedi, Urvish; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-07-01

    Opportunistic infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be acute or chronic. While acute infections often spread rapidly and can cause tissue damage and sepsis with high mortality rates, chronic infections can persist for weeks, months, or years in the face of intensive clinical intervention. Remarkably, this diverse infectious capability is not accompanied by extensive variation in genomic content, suggesting that the genetic capacity to be an acute or a chronic pathogen is present in most P. aeruginosa strains. To investigate the genetic requirements for acute and chronic pathogenesis in P. aeruginosa infections, we combined high-throughput sequencing-mediated transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) and genome-wide insertion mutant fitness profiling (Tn-seq) to characterize gene expression and fitness determinants in murine models of burn and non-diabetic chronic wound infection. Generally we discovered that expression of a gene in vivo is not correlated with its importance for fitness, with the exception of metabolic genes. By combining metabolic models generated from in vivo gene expression data with mutant fitness profiles, we determined the nutritional requirements for colonization and persistence in these infections. Specifically, we found that long-chain fatty acids represent a major carbon source in both chronic and acute wounds, and P. aeruginosa must biosynthesize purines, several amino acids, and most cofactors during infection. In addition, we determined that P. aeruginosa requires chemotactic flagellar motility for fitness and virulence in acute burn wound infections, but not in non-diabetic chronic wound infections. Our results provide novel insight into the genetic requirements for acute and chronic P. aeruginosa wound infections and demonstrate the power of using both gene expression and fitness profiling for probing bacterial virulence.

  9. The enhanced healing of a high-risk, clean, sutured surgical incision by prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy as delivered by Prevena™ Customizable™: cosmetic and therapeutic results.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Calamita, Roberto; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Pierangeli, Marina; Grassetti, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    According to the literature, incisional closure complications may range from postoperative surgical site infections, representing 17-22% of health care-associated infections, surgical wound dehiscence and formation of haematomas or seromas, and can lead to delayed or impaired incision healing. These kinds of situations are more common when wounds are closed under tension or in specific patient morbidities. Obesity, in particular, is associated with an impaired blood flow to tissues, predisposing the patient to increased risk of wound complications by various mechanisms. Incisional complications can become relevant economic burdens for health care systems because of an increase in the average length of hospital stay and readmissions, and additional medical and surgical procedures. Thus, a preventive therapy may have a critical role in the management of healing. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) technology as delivered by Prevena™ Customizable™ (Kinetic Concepts Inc., San Antonio, TX) has recently been the focus of a new investigation, as a prophylactic measure to prevent complications via immediate postoperative application in high-risk, clean, closed surgical incisions. The authors present a 62-year-old class II obese female, who underwent bilateral inguinal dermolipectomy. Prophylactic NPWT as delivered by Prevena™ was performed successfully over surgical incisions. Cosmetic and therapeutic results are shown.

  10. Evaluation of surgical treatment of Dupuytren's disease by modified open palm technique☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Guilhen, Thiago Almeida; Vieira, Ana Beatriz Macedo; de Castro, Marcelo Claudiano; Hirata, Helton Hiroshi; Machado, Itibagi Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Objective to assess the surgical technique using the modified palm open technique for the treatment of severe contractions of Dupuytren's disease. Methods over a period of four years, 16 patients underwent surgical treatment, and in its entirety belonged to stages III and IV of the classification proposed by Tubiana et al. We performed measurements of the extension deficit of the metacarpophalangeal joints, proximal and distal interphalangeal in preoperative, postoperative (3 months) and late postoperative period (5–8 years). Angles greater than 30° metacarpophalangeal joints and 15° proximal interphalangeal the results were considered surgical recurrence. Results there was obtained an average of 6.3° at the metacarpophalangeal joint, 13.8° in the proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal at 1.9°. Conclusion the modified open palm technique is an effective method in the surgical treatment of severe contractures in Dupuytren's disease. PMID:26229769

  11. Post-surgical unilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation treated by open reduction followed by orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Satake, H; Yamada, T; Kitamura, N; Yoshimura, T; Sasabe, E; Yamamoto, T

    2011-03-01

    A case of prolonged unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation, which was treated by open surgical reduction and post-surgical orthodontic therapy, is presented. A 58-year-old woman presented complaining of facial asymmetry and malocclusion. She had received surgery for a malignant tumour in the right retromolar region 7 years previously. It was considered that contraction of the pterygoid muscle by surgical injury caused anterior meniscal displacement and TMJ dislocation. Since manual manipulation failed, direct open reduction was performed after separation of the lateral pterygoid muscle from the condylar head and removal of the intra-articular scar tissues. Although the condylar head was returned to the glenoid fossa, optimal occlusion was not obtained because of compensatory tooth movement and inclination. Satisfactory occlusion and symmetric facial appearance were brought about by post-surgical orthodontic therapy.

  12. Fluid Lavage of Open Wounds (FLOW): design and rationale for a large, multicenter collaborative 2 × 3 factorial trial of irrigating pressures and solutions in patients with open fractures

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Open fractures frequently result in serious complications for patients, including infections, wound healing problems, and failure of fracture healing, many of which necessitate subsequent operations. One of the most important steps in the initial management of open fractures is a thorough wound irrigation and debridement to remove any contaminants. There is, however, currently no consensus regarding the optimal approach to irrigating open fracture wounds during the initial operative procedure. The selection of both the type of irrigating fluid and the pressure of fluid delivery remain controversial. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effects of irrigation solutions (soap vs. normal saline) and pressure (low vs. high; gravity flow vs. high; low vs. gravity flow) on re-operation within one year among patients with open fractures. Methods/Design The FLOW study is a multi-center, randomized controlled trial using a 2 × 3 factorial design. Surgeons at clinical sites in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia will recruit 2 280 patients who will be centrally randomized into one of the 6 treatment arms (soap + low pressure; soap + gravity flow pressure; soap + high pressure; saline + low pressure; saline + gravity flow pressure; saline + high pressure). The primary outcome of the study is re-operation to promote wound or bone healing, or to treat an infection. This composite endpoint of re-operation includes a narrow spectrum of patient-important procedures: irrigation and debridement for infected wound, revision and closure for wound dehiscence, wound coverage procedures for infected or necrotic wound, bone grafts or implant exchange procedures for established nonunion in patients with postoperative fracture gaps less than 1 cm, intramedullary nail dynamizations in the operating room, and fasciotomies for compartment syndrome. Patients, outcome adjudicators, and data analysts will be blinded. We will compare rates of re-operation at

  13. Animal-inflicted open wounds in rural Turkey: lessons learned and a proposed treatment algorithm for uncertain scenarios.

    PubMed

    Sezgin, Billur; Ljohiy, Mbaraka; Akgol Gur, Sultan Tuna

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainty in the management of animal-inflicted injuries, especially in rural settings, usually results in a general approach to leave all wounds to heal with secondary intention, which can lead to unsightly scarring and functional loss. This study focusus on different circumstances dealt with by plastic surgeons in a rural setting in Turkey and aims to configure what the general approach should be through an analysis of a wide spectrum of patients. Between June 2013 and December 2014, 205 patients who presented to the emergency department for animal-inflicted injuries were retrospectively analysed. Patients who consulted for plastic surgery were included in the analysis to determine which wounds require further attention. Patients with past animal-inflicted injuries who presented to the outpatient plastic surgery clinic with concerns such as non-healing open wounds or cosmetic or functional impairment were also evaluated. Statistical analysis demostrated a significantly lower rate of infection encountered in animal-inflicted open wounds (AIOWs) of patients who consulted for plastic surgery from the emergency department than those who presented to the outpatient clinic (P < 0·05). The main concern in the management of animal-inflicted wounds is their potential for infection, but this does not mean that every wound will be infected. The most important factor is being able to distinguish wounds that have a higher potential for infection and to select the type of wound management accordingly. An algorithm has been proposed as a guidance for the management of AIOWs, which covers the approach towards both domestic and stray animal-inflicted injuries.

  14. Open and Arthroscopic with Mini-Open Surgical Hip Approaches for Treatment of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis and Concomitant Hip Pathology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background. Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare benign tumor affecting large joints and prompts excision to prevent local destruction of the joint. The purpose of this case report is to describe two differing surgical approaches for management of PVNS of the hip in patients requiring concomitant treatment for additional hip pathology. Methods. This report discusses the presentation, clinical and radiographic findings, and operative management of two contrasting cases of PVNS of the hip. Case 1 describes a 31-year-old female with localized PVNS in addition to a labral tear treated with arthroscopic labral repair followed by tumor excision via a mini-open incision. Case 2 describes a 29-year-old male with more diffuse PVNS in addition to a cam deformity managed with open surgical dislocation of the hip, tumor excision, and restoration of the femoral head/neck junction. Results. This report demonstrates two cases of successful excision of PVNS of the hip in addition to addressing concomitant hip pathology in both cases. Conclusions. Open surgical dislocation of the hip or arthroscopic surgery with a mini-open incision may be used in appropriately selected patients to successfully excise PVNS lesions in addition to addressing concomitant hip pathology. PMID:28326214

  15. Anatomic and histological study of the rabbit mandible as an experimental model for wound healing and surgical therapies.

    PubMed

    Campillo, V-E; Langonnet, S; Pierrefeu, A; Chaux-Bodard, A-G

    2014-10-01

    The rabbit is one of the most widely used models for studying bone remodeling or dental implant osseointegration but very few data are available about the rabbit's mandible. The aim of this work was to describe the anatomy of the rabbit mandible and to estimate the available bone volume for experimental studies. First, with a dissection, the morphology of the mandible was described and the mental foramen, the position of the main salivary glands and muscular insertions were located. Then, by X-ray imaging, the position of the inferior alveolar canal, the dental root courses and volume and bone density were described. Finally, with frontal sections of the mandible body, the rabbit's dental and alveolar bone histological structure were assessed. Thus, the relevance of the rabbit mandible as an experimental model for wound healing or surgical therapies was discussed.

  16. A review of current strategies to reduce intraoperative bacterial contamination of surgical wounds

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infections are a mean topic in cardiac surgery, leading to a prolonged hospitalization, and substantially increased morbidity and mortality. One source of pathogens is the endogenous flora of the patient’s skin, which can contaminate the surgical site. A number of preoperative skin care strategies are performed to reduce bacterial contamination like preoperative antiseptic showering, hair removal, antisepsis of the skin, adhesive barrier drapes, and antimicrobial prophylaxis. Furthermore we can also support the natural host defense by optimal intra-operative management of oxygen supply, normoglycemia, and temperature. Nevertheless we still have a number of patients, who develop a surgical site infection. Therefore new skin care strategies are introduced to reduce the contamination by the endogenous skin flora. We present the use of a new microbial sealant, InteguSeal®, which was evaluated in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The preliminary results of this investigation showed a trend in surgical site infection reduction by the use of this new microbial sealant. PMID:20204082

  17. Improved Survival with Aggressive Surgical Management of Noncandidal Fungal Infections of the Burn Wound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    from this study that if the fungal infec- 5. Spebar. M. J.. Pruitt. B. A.: Candidiasis in the hurned patient. J. tion can be recognized and surgically excised, the mor- Trauma. 21: 237-239, 1981. .• I’i I/ A,/* Di:; t iA . _

  18. Hemostasis and Post-operative Care of Oral Surgical Wounds by Hemcon Dental Dressing in Patients on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Split Mouth Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K.R. Ashok; Sarvagna, Jagadesh; Gadde, Praveen; Chikkaboriah, Shwetha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemostasis is a fundamental management issue post-operatively in minor oral surgical procedures. To ensure safety and therapeutic efficacy in patients, under oral anti coagulant therapy, is complicated by necessity for frequent determination of prothrombin time or international normalised ratio. Aim The aim of the study was to determine whether early hemostasis achieved by using Hemcon Dental Dressing (HDD) will affect post-operative care and surgical healing outcome in minor oral surgical procedures. Materials and Methods A total of 30 patients, aged 18 years to 90 years, except those allergic to seafood, who consented to participate, were enrolled into this study. Patients were required to have two or more surgical sites so that they would have both surgical and control sites. All patients taking Oral Anticoagulation Therapy (OAT) were included for treatment in the study without altering the anticoagulant regimens. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for the same. The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t-test. Results All HDD surgically treated sites achieved hemostasis in 1.49 minutes and control wounds in 4.06 minutes (p < 0.001). Post-operative pain at HDD treated sites (1.87,1.27 on 1st and 3rd day respectively) was significantly lower than the control sites (4.0,1.87 on 1st and 3rd day respectively) p-value (0.001, 0.001 respectively). HDD treated oral surgery wounds achieved statistically significant improved healing both at 1st and 3rd post-operative days (p <0.0001). Conclusion The HDD has been proven to be a clinically effective hemostatic dressing material that significantly shortens bleeding time following minor oral surgical procedures under local anaesthesia, including those patients taking OAT. Patients receiving the HDD had improved surgical wound healing as compared to controls. PMID:27790577

  19. Clippers or the knife? The reform of surgical practice and the difficulty of early wound closure.

    PubMed

    Stephens-Borg, Keith

    2009-09-01

    Salt, vinegar and wine sounds more like a recipe from the Saturday kitchen, but in 1667 it was all a surgeon could use to close wounds, along with silk and linen strips. In providing this service, barbers and surgeons found themselves confused and intertwined, struggling for professional recognition that was about to experience reform. Allegations of neglect in the aftermath of a major seafaring battle on the very shores of our capital city required the court of King Charles II to search for a solution of supreme magnitude to accommodate the hundreds of maimed sailors who were littering the streets of London. A campaign to conceal the horrors of warfare began which lead to the implementation of the Greenwich charter and the construction of a hospital which the architect Christopher Wren helped to design.

  20. Clinical Effectiveness of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Following Surgical Resection of Sternoclavicular Joint Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D; Merritt, Robert E; D'Souza, Desmond M

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) is a rare condition accounting for 0.5% of bone and joint infections. The majority of cases require joint resection and advancement flaps to provide coverage to the resulting wound defect. However, in the setting of an infected wound space, surgeons are often inclined to allow wound healing by secondary intention. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) can be an important adjunct to promote and shorten wound healing time following SCJ resection. PMID:27843733

  1. Non-surgical treatment of deep wounds triggered by harmful physical and chemical agents: a successful combined use of collagenase and hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Onesti, Maria G; Fino, Pasquale; Ponzo, Ida; Ruggieri, Martina; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-02-01

    Some chronic ulcers often occur with slough, not progressing through the normal stages of wound healing. Treatment is long and other therapies need to be performed in addition to surgery. Patients not eligible for surgery because of ASA class (American Society of Anesthesiologists class) appear to benefit from chemical therapy with collagenase or hydrocolloids in order to prepare the wound bed, promoting the healing process. We describe four cases of traumatic, upper limb deep wounds caused by different physical and chemical agents, emphasising the effectiveness of treatment based on topical application of collagenase and hyaluronic acid (HA) before standardised surgical procedures. We performed careful disinfection of lesions combined with application of topical cream containing hyaluronic acid, bacterial fermented sodium hyaluronate (0·2%w/w) salt, and bacterial collagenase obtained from non-pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus (>2·0 nkat1/g). In one patient a dermo-epidermal graft was used to cover the wide loss of substance. In two patients application of a HA-based dermal substitute was done. We obtained successful results in terms of wound healing, with satisfactory aesthetic result and optimal recovery of the affected limb functionality. Topical application of collagenase and HA, alone or before standardised surgical procedures allows faster wound healing.

  2. Laparoscopic telescope with alpha port and aesop to view open surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Russell, K M; Broderick, T J; Demaria, E J; Kothari, S N; Merrell, R C

    2001-08-01

    Laparoscopy has advanced surgery by allowing the surgeon to operate within a patient's abdominal and pelvic cavity with minimal trauma and scarring. The coupling of a video camera to the laparoscopic telescope has had the secondary effect of allowing others to view the surgical field either on color video monitors or by watching the video feed over the Internet at a remote location. These advancements have allowed better teaching and mentoring of operations. Open procedures can benefit from this technology as well but have suffered in the past from inadequate methods to depict the open surgical field. We used the Alpha Port and Aesop robot to position a sterile laparoscopic telescope near the surgical field to view open cholecystectomies performed on five pigs and to send the video feed over the Internet to remote physicians. Viewing the video on the monitor, the surgeons performed the operation in a comfortable ergonomic upright position. Both the surgeons and the remote physicians found the quality of the video to be excellent, and the remote physicians felt comfortable learning and mentoring surgical procedures using this technique.

  3. Open surgical revision provides a more durable repair than endovascular treatment for unfavorable vein graft lesions

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, John C.; Bensley, Rodney P.; Darling, Jeremy D.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Hile, Chantel; Guzman, Raul J.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lower extremity bypass grafts that develop stenoses are commonly treated with either open surgical or endovascular revision. Vein graft stenoses with unfavorable lesions (multiple lesions, lesions greater than 2cm in length, lesions in grafts less than 3 months old, lesions in grafts less than 3mm in diameter) fare worse than those with favorable lesions when treated with endovascular therapy. However, it is not known if unfavorable lesions fare better with surgical revision than with endovascular treatment or than favorable lesions treated with surgery. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 175 vein graft revisions performed at a single institution from 2000 to 2010. Characteristics of lesions treated with surgical and endovascular revision were identified. Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify predictors of revision failure (restenosis >75%, revision, or amputation). Results 91 (52%) failing vein grafts were treated with surgical revision and 84 (48%) with endovascular treatment, with a median follow up of 30 months. Favorable lesions fared better than unfavorable lesions after endovascular treatment, with 12-month freedom from failure of 59% vs 34% (P <.01), but not after surgical revision (66% vs 62%, P =.90). Unfavorable lesions had better freedom from failure after surgery than endovascular treatment (62%vs 34%, P <.01), while results in favorable lesions were similar (66% versus 59%, P =.57). Conclusion For the treatment of failing vein grafts, endovascular therapy appears adequate for favorable lesions while surgical revision is more durable for unfavorable lesions. PMID:26483000

  4. Source and route of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis transmitted to the surgical wound during cardio-thoracic surgery. Possibility of preventing wound contamination by use of special scrub suits.

    PubMed

    Tammelin, A; Hambraeus, A; Ståhle, E

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this study was to trace the source and route of transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) in the surgical wound during cardio-thoracic surgery, and to investigate the possibility of reducing wound contamination by wearing special scrub suits. In total 65 elective operations for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with or without concomitant valve replacement were investigated. All staff present in the operating room wore conventional scrub suits during 33 operations and special scrub suits during 32 operations. Samples were taken from the hands of the scrubbed team after surgical scrub but before putting on sterile gowns and gloves, and from patients' skin (incisional area of sternum and vein harvesting area of legs) after preoperative skin preparation with chlorhexidine gluconate. Air samples were taken during operations. Samples were also taken from the wound just before closure. Total counts of bacteria on sternal skin and from the wound (cfu/cm2) were calculated as well as total counts of bacteria in the air (cfu/m3). Strains of MRSE recovered from the different sampling sites were compared by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). It was found that wearing special scrub suits did not reduce the number of air-samples where MRSE was found compared with conventional scrub suits. The risk factor most strongly associated with MRSE in the wound at the end of the operation was preoperative carriage of MRSE on sternal skin; RR 2.42 [95% CI 1.43-4.10], P= 0.021. By use of PFGE, it was possible to identify the probable source for four MRSE isolates recovered from the wound. In three cases the source was the patients own skin. Finding MRSE in air-samples, or on the hands of the scrubbed team, were not risk factors for the recovery of MRSE in the wound at the end of operation. In conclusion, with a total bacterial air count around 20 cfu/m3 and a low proportion of MRSE, the reduction of total air counts by use of tightly

  5. Effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical stabilisation for the management of traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Ng, Choong; Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Hinman, Rana

    2007-06-01

    Background  Anterior instability is a frequent complication following a traumatic glenohumeral dislocation. Frequently the underlying pathology associated with recurrent instability is a Bankart lesion. Surgical correction of Bankart lesions and other associated pathology is the key to successful treatment. Open surgical glenohumeral stabilisation has been advocated as the gold standard because of consistently low postoperative recurrent instability rates. However, arthroscopic glenohumeral stabilisation could challenge open surgical repair as the gold standard treatment for traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability. Objectives  Primary evidence that compared the effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical glenohumeral stabilisation was systematically collated regarding best-practice management for adults with traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability. Search strategy  A systematic search was performed using 14 databases: MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), ISI Web of Science, Expanded Academic ASAP, Proquest Medical Library, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, TRIP Database, PubMed, ISI Current Contents Connect, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, Australian Digital Thesis Program. Studies published between January 1984 and December 2004 were included in this review. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria  Eligible studies were those that compared the effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical stabilisation for the management of traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability, which had more than 2 years of follow up and used recurrent instability and a functional shoulder questionnaire as primary outcomes. Studies that used non-anatomical open repair techniques, patient groups that were specifically 40 years or older, or had multidirectional instability or other concomitant

  6. Does the Application of Incisional Negative Pressure Therapy to High-Risk Wounds Prevent Surgical Site Complications? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ingargiola, Michael J.; Daniali, Lily N.; Lee, Edward S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The application of incisional negative pressure wound therapy (INPWT) to clean, closed surgical incisions is a growing clinical practice. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effect of INPWT on surgical sites healing by primary intention. The primary outcomes of interest are incidence of complications (infection, dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, skin necrosis, or blistering). Methods: Two independent reviewers performed a search of the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 2006 to 2012 for published articles. Supplemental searches were performed using reference lists and conference proceedings. Studies were selected for inclusion based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extraction regarding study quality, demographic and clinical characteristics, and outcomes was performed independently, and data on the incidence of infection was combined using a fixed-effects meta-analysis model. Results: Ten (5 randomized controlled trials and 5 observational) studies were included, which investigated the outcomes of 626 incisions on 610 patients. Six studies compared INPWT with sterile dry dressings (SDDs). The literature shows a significant decrease in rates of infection when using INPWT. Results on dehiscence do show a decrease in some studies, but results are inconsistent to make a conclusion. Because of limited studies, it is difficult to make any assertions on seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis. Conclusions: This systematic review shows possible evidence of a decrease in the incidence of infection with application of INPWT. Looking at other variables such as dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis show no consistent data and suggest further studies in order for proper recommendations for INPWT. PMID:24106562

  7. Open fractures and the incidence of infection in the surgical debridement 6 hours after trauma

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Miguel de Castro; Peres, Luciano Rodrigo; de Queiroz, Aristóteles Correia; Lima, José Queiroz; Turíbio, Flávio Moral; Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether a time delay greater than 6h from injury to surgical debridement influences the infection rate in open fractures. Methods: During a period of 18 months, from October 2010 to March 2012, 151 open fractures were available for study in 142 patients in our hospital. The data were collected prospectively and the patients were followed up for 6 weeks. The patients were divided into two groups regarding the time delay from injury to surgical debridement (more or less than 6 hours). Results: Surgical debridement was carried out in less than 6h from injury in 90 (59.6%) fractures and after 6 hours from injury in 61 (40.4%) fractures. Infection rates were 12.22% and 13.24%, respectively. The global infection rate was 13.24%. Conclusion: A significantly increased infection rate was not observed in patients whose surgical debridement occurred more than 6h after injury. However, in the fractures of high-energy trauma, a statistically significant increase of the rate of infection was observed in those operated 6 hours after trauma. Level of Evidence II, Study Type Comparative and Prospective. PMID:26327794

  8. Fluid Lavage of Open Wounds (FLOW): A Multicenter, Blinded, Factorial Trial Comparing Alternative Irrigating Solutions and Pressures in Patients with Open Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    serious adverse event SF-12: Short Form-12 questionnaire SPRINT: Study to Prospectively evaluate Reamed Intramedually Nails in Patients with Tibial ...models of a contaminated tibial shaft fracture, rat models of fracture healing, and cell culture models of bone nodule formation. Our experimental...Bhandari et al, 2002; Petrisor et al, 2008) to explore surgeons’ views regarding wound irrigation. Of 577 orthopaedic surgeons managing open tibial

  9. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Many wounds are difficult to heal, despite medical and nursing care. They may result from complications of an underlying disease, like diabetes; or from surgery, constant pressure, trauma, or burns. Chronic wounds are more often found in elderly people and in those with immunologic or chronic diseases. Chronic wounds may lead to impaired quality of life and functioning, to amputation, or even to death. The prevalence of chronic ulcers is difficult to ascertain. It varies by condition and complications due to the condition that caused the ulcer. There are, however, some data on condition-specific prevalence rates; for example, of patients with diabetes, 15% are thought to have foot ulcers at some time during their lives. The approximate community care cost of treating leg ulcers in Canada, without reference to cause, has been estimated at upward of $100 million per year. Surgically created wounds can also become chronic, especially if they become infected. For example, the reported incidence of sternal wound infections after median sternotomy is 1% to 5%. Abdominal surgery also creates large open wounds. Because it is sometimes necessary to leave these wounds open and allow them to heal on their own (secondary intention), some may become infected and be difficult to heal. Yet, little is known about the wound healing process, and this makes treating wounds challenging. Many types of interventions are used to treat wounds. Current best practice for the treatment of ulcers and other chronic wounds includes debridement (the removal of dead or contaminated tissue), which can be surgical, mechanical, or chemical; bacterial balance; and moisture balance. Treating the cause, ensuring good nutrition, and preventing primary infection also help wounds to heal. Saline or wet-to-moist dressings are reported as

  10. Infrainguinal endovascular procedures should be reserved for patients who do not have good open surgical options.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Brian; Reddy, Daniel J; Kalman, Peter G

    2005-09-01

    This article is the result of a debate. The motion proposed was "Infrainguinal endovascular procedures should be reserved for patients who do not have good open surgical options.'' Arguments in favor of the motion were offered by Daniel J. Reddy of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, MI, and arguments against the motion were offered by Peter Kalman of Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, IL.

  11. The effect of HIV on early wound healing in open fractures treated with internal and external fixation.

    PubMed

    Aird, J; Noor, S; Lavy, C; Rollinson, P

    2011-05-01

    There are 33 million people worldwide currently infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This complex disease affects many of the processes involved in wound and fracture healing, and there is little evidence available to guide the management of open fractures in these patients. Fears of acute and delayed infection often inhibit the use of fixation, which may be the most effective way of achieving union. This study compared fixation of open fractures in HIV-positive and -negative patients in South Africa, a country with very high rates of both HIV and high-energy trauma. A total of 133 patients (33 HIV-positive) with 135 open fractures fulfilled the inclusion criteria. This cohort is three times larger than in any similar previously published study. The results suggest that HIV is not a contraindication to internal or external fixation of open fractures in this population, as HIV is not a significant risk factor for acute wound/implant infection. However, subgroup analysis of grade I open fractures in patients with advanced HIV and a low CD4 count (< 350) showed an increased risk of infection; we suggest that grade I open fractures in patients with advanced HIV should be treated by early debridement followed by fixation at an appropriate time.

  12. 3D Surgical Printing Cutting Guides for Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: Do It Yourself.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mañanes, Rubén; Burró, Juan Arnal; Manaute, Jose Rojo; Rodriguez, Francisco Chana; Martín, Javier Vaquero

    2016-11-01

    Opening wedge osteotomy has recently gained popularity, thanks to the recent implementation of locking plates, which have shown equivalent stability with greater reproducibility, accuracy, and longevity than the closing wedge techniques and a lower prosthetic conversion rate. We present a new "do-it-yourself" cutting guides system for tibial opening osteotomy. Using a conventional computed tomography digital image, a positioning guide and wedge spacers were printed in three dimensions (3D) for implementing the osteotomy and obtaining the planned correction. The surgeon makes the whole process in a do-it-yourself style. This new technique was used in eight cases. Previous opening osteotomies with the standard technique were used as control (20 cases). Surgical time, fluoroscopic time, and accuracy of the axial correction were measured. The use of a custom positioning guide reduced the surgical (31 minutes less) and fluoroscopic times (6.9 times less) while achieving a high-axis correction accuracy compared with the standard technique. Digitally planned and executed osteotomies under 3D printed osteotomy positioning guides help the surgeon to minimize human error while reducing surgical time. The reproducibility of this technique is very robust, allowing a transfer of the steps planned in a virtual environment to the operating table.

  13. Lesson learned from early and long-term results of 327 cases of coexisting surgical abdominal diseases and aortic aneurysms treated in open and endovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Bonardelli, Stefano; Cervi, Edoardo; Nodari, Franco; Guadrini, Cristina; Zanotti, Camilla; Giulini, Stefano Maria

    2012-06-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) frequently have other abdominal pathologies of surgical interest (other diseases, OD). Out of 1,375 elective open aortic replacements for AAA, 315 cases with OD were subdivided in Group 1 (82 patients with "clean wound" OD) and Group 2 (233 patients with "clean-contaminated wound" OD). The results of the sub-groups in which OD was treated at the same time as AAA were analysed (1a, 66 cases and 2a, 86 cases) and compared with OD not treated at the same time as AAA (1b, 16 cases and 2b, 147 cases). EVAR was done in 12 patients with a infrarenal AAA and concomitant abdominal disease. In this group post-operative complications occurred in two patients (endoleaks) and no sign of endograft infection was developed. Mean follow-up was 36 months. Mortality was 0% in Group 1a, 1b, 2b and 5.8% in Group 2a. In Group 1a there were one haemoperitoneum, one ischaemic colitis and one graft infection. In Group 1b there were 4 nefrectomies for renal carcinoma and three emergency hernia repairs within 18 months from AAA operation. In Group 2a the follow-up was uneventful. In Group 2b there was no acute complication of OD and 57.2% of patients were subsequently operated for OD. In the EVAR group the 30-day and late mortality rates were 0 and 25%, respectively and all deaths were cancer-related. Contemporary correction of OD in open surgery for AAA should be performed in clean wound cases, while clean-contaminated operations can be done only in selected cases. EVAR is a valid alternative technique to open vascular surgery for the concomitant treatment of aortic aneurysms and abdominal pathologies.

  14. Abortion - surgical

    MedlinePlus

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  15. A Case of Continuous Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Infected Lymphocele after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Soldini, Gabriele; Piffaretti, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocele is a common complication after kidney transplantation. Although superinfection is a rare event, it generates a difficult management problem; generally, open surgical drainage is the preferred method of treatment but it may lead to complicated postoperative course and prolonged healing time. Negative pressure wound therapy showed promising outcomes in various surgical disciplines and settings. We present a case of an abdominal infected lymphocele after kidney transplantation managed with open surgery and negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:25374744

  16. The Impact of Body Mass Index on Perioperative Outcomes of Open and Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program 2005–2007

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Kristina A; Wyers, Mark C; Pomposelli, Frank B; Hamdan, Allen D; Ching, Y Avery; Schermerhorn, Marc L

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Obesity and morbid obesity have been shown to increase wound infections and occasionally mortality after many surgical procedures. Little is known about the relative impact of body mass index on these outcomes after open (OAR) and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). METHODS The 2005–2007 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), a multi-institutional risk-adjusted database, was retrospectively queried to compare perioperative mortality (in-hospital or 30-day) and postoperative wound infections after OAR and EVAR. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative details were analyzed. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from height and weight variables and definitions of obesity and morbid obesity were defined as BMI > 30kg/m2 and BMI > 40kg/m2 respectively. Student's T-test, Wilcoxon Rank Sum, Chi-square, and multivariate logistic regression were used to compare outcomes. RESULTS There were 2,097 OAR and 3,358 EVAR. Compared to EVAR, OAR patients were younger, more likely to be female (26% vs. 17%, P < .001), and less obese (27% vs. 32%, P < .001). Mortality was 3.7% vs. 1.2% after OAR vs. EVAR respectively (RR 3.1, P < .001) and overall morbidity was 28% vs. 12% (RR 2.3, P < .001). Morbidly obese patients had a higher mortality for both OAR (7.3%) and EVAR (2.4%) than obese patients (3.9% OAR; 1.5% EVAR) or non-obese patients (3.7% OAR; 1.1% EVAR). Obese patients had a higher rate of wound infection vs. non-obese after open repair (6.3% vs. 2.4%, P < .001) and EVAR (3.3% vs. 1.5%, P < .001). Morbid obesity predicted mortality after OAR but not EVAR and obesity was an independent predictor of wound infection after OAR and EVAR. CONCLUSIONS Morbid obesity confers a worse outcome for mortality after AAA repair. Obesity is also a risk factor for infectious complications after OAR and EVAR. Obese patients and particularly morbidly obese patients should be treated with EVAR when anatomically feasible. PMID:20843627

  17. Surgical approach to right colon cancer: From open technique to robot. State of art.

    PubMed

    Fabozzi, Massimiliano; Cirillo, Pia; Corcione, Francesco

    2016-08-27

    This work is a topic highlight on the surgical treatment of the right colon pathologies, focusing on the literature state of art and comparing the open surgery to the different laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Different laparoscopic procedures have been described for the treatment of right colon tumors: Totally laparoscopic right colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, robotic right colectomy. Two main characteristics of these techniques are the different type of anastomosis: Intracorporeal (for totally laparoscopic right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy and robotic technique) or extracorporeal (for laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy and open right colectomy) and the different incision (suprapubic, median or transverse on the right side of abdomen). The different laparoscopic techniques meet the same oncological criteria of radicalism as the open surgery for the right colon. The totally laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis and even more the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, remain a technical challenge due to the complexity of procedures (especially for the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy) and the particular right colon vascular anatomy but they seem to have some theoretical advantages compared to the other laparoscopic and open procedures. Data reported in literature while confirming the advantages of laparoscopic approach, do not allow to solve controversies about which is the best laparoscopic technique (Intracorporeal vs Extracorporeal Anastomosis) to treat the right colon cancer. However, the laparoscopic techniques with intracorporeal anastomosis for the right colon seem to show some theoretical advantages (functional, technical

  18. Treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds using human fibroblast-derived dermis: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Russell M; Smith, Nicholas C; Dux, Katherine; Stuck, Rodney M

    2014-04-01

    Human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute is a well-studied treatment for diabetic foot ulcers; however, no case series currently exist for its use in healing postoperative wounds of the lower extremity. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 32 lower extremity postoperative wounds treated weekly with human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute. Postoperative wounds were defined as a wound resulting from an open partial foot amputation, surgical wound dehiscence, or nonhealing surgical wound of the lower extremity. Wound surface area was calculated at 4 and 12 weeks or until wound closure if prior to 12 weeks. Postoperative wounds treated with weekly applications showed mean improvement in surface area reduction of 63.6% at 4 weeks and 96.1% at 12 weeks. More than 56% of all wounds healed prior to the 12-week endpoint. Additionally, only one adverse event was noted in this group. This retrospective review supports the use of human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute in the treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds. This advanced wound care therapy aids in decreased total healing time and increased rate of healing for not only diabetic foot wounds but also postoperative wounds of the lower extremity, as demonstrated by this retrospective review.

  19. Causes of late mortality after endovascular and open surgical repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Goodney, Philip P.; Tavris, Dale; Lucas, F. Lee; Gross, Thomas; Fisher, Elliott S.; Finlayson, Samuel R. G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Several reports suggest unexpectedly high rates of late abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture occur after endovascular AAA repair (EVAR). However, a population-based study examining causes of late death after EVAR vs open surgical repair has not been performed. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing infrarenal AAA repair using information from the Medicare inpatient hospital discharge records (MedPAR files), physician claim files (Part B files, 20% sample), and Medicare Denominator Files for the years 2001 to 2004. Using the Social Security Death Index, we identified all “late” deaths, defined as deaths occurring >30 days and after hospital discharge. We used the National Death Index to identify cause of death information; in particular, those deaths that were likely caused by late rupture. We compared causes of late death and survival between EVAR and open repair using Wilcoxon log-rank and rank-sum tests. Results Between 2001 and 2004, 13,971 patients underwent AAA repair (6119 EVAR, 7852 open repair). After a mean follow-up of 1.6 years in the EVAR cohort and 1.9 years in the open cohort, mortality rates were similar across repair type (15.4% EVAR, 15.9% open repair), with an adjusted odds ratio for death after open repair of 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.90–1.07). Of the 2194 documented deaths, 523 occurred before discharge or ≤30 days, and 1671 occurred >30 days and after hospital discharge. Cause of death information for the 1671 late deaths was available from the National Death Index for 1515 (91%). The 15 most common codes for causes of late death were dominated by cardiac disease (atherosclerotic heart disease, acute myocardial infarction) and pulmonary disease (lung cancer, respiratory failure). Causes of late death with specific mention of aneurysm were identified in 37 patients (2.4% of all deaths), but this event was not more common in EVAR or open repair (15 [0.3%] in the EVAR group, 22 [0

  20. Effect of surgical wound fluids after intraoperative electron radiotherapy on the cancer stem cell phenotype in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska, Karolina; Suchorska, Wiktoria Maria; Przybyła, Anna; Murawa, Dawid

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process after surgery alters the area surrounding the original tumor and around the scar, and the modified microenvironment is more favorable for tumor recurrence. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is one of the more novel strategies in breast cancer (BC) treatment. Irradiation during surgery has effects on the tumor microenvironment, abrogating the proliferative cascade induced by surgical wound healing. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of surgical wound fluids from IOERT treatment (RT-WF) compared with wound fluids from conservative-breast surgery only (WF) on the cancer stem cell phenotype in a panel of BC cell lines. Post-operative wound fluids were derived from patients with BC who underwent a tumor resection (quadrantectomy) plus intraoperative electron radiotherapy using a single dose of ≤10 Gy on the tumor bed and surrounding tissues, or from those who underwent a tumor resection without IOERT. Cell lines were incubated with 10% wound fluids, and after 4 days, the cluster of differentiation (CD)44+/CD24−/low phenotype and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity were determined by flow cytometry. The two types of fluid each affected the CD44+/CD24−/low phenotype. The results varied markedly between each cell line, even for the same histological subtypes. RT-WF decreased the CD44+/CD24−/low populations in the basal-like BT-549 and MDA-MB-468 cell lines, whereas in the luminal type MCF7 cell line, the two fluids inhibited these populations. The HER-OE subtypes harbored a minimal CD44+/CD24−/low population, but the growth of SK-BR-3 was stimulated by the two post-operative fluids. WF exhibited a stronger effect on ALDH1 activity compared with RT-WF. The stimulatory effect was dependent on the histological subtype of the cell line and the strongest dependence was observed in luminal subtypes characterized by low dehydrogenase activity in the control group. The present results enable a better understanding of

  1. [Experimental studies of wound healing in the paranasal sinuses. III. Endoscopy and histology of the surgical area after endonasal ethmoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Hosemann, W; Dunker, I; Göde, U; Wigand, M E

    1991-03-01

    Twenty two patients underwent standardized endoscopic follow-up for a period 3 months after a partial or complete intranasal ethmoidectomy. 370 endoscopic photographs were taken from the healing ethmoidal wound. After precise documentation of the site of removal, 157 biopsies of the regenerating mucosa were made. The endoscopic appearance of the wound was compared with the histological structure. Endoscopy showed that the process of wound healing of the respiratory mucosa could be subdivided into 4 phases: 1. Hemorrhagic crusting lasting up to 10 days 2. Obstructive lymphatic edema lasting up to 30 days 3. Mesenchymal tissue reaction lasting up to 3 months 4. Scar formation beginning after 3 months. The subdivision of wound healing phases enables the endoscopist to recognize retardation of healing and may lead to a staging of the postoperative therapeutic regime.

  2. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity and the healing action of the ethanol extract of Calotropis procera bark against surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Tsala, David Emery; Nga, Nnanga; Thiery, Bella Ndzana Martin; Bienvenue, Mballa Therese; Theophile, Dimo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant potential and the wound healing effect of the ethanolic extract of the bark of Calotropis procera. The antioxidant study was evaluated in vitro, using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and deoxyribose degradation assays. Wound healing was studied using excision and incision wound on normal and dexamethasone-suppressed wound healing rodent models. Alkaloids, flavonoids, proteins and phenols were screened in the extract used whereas saponins and true tannins were absent. The extract contains only 12.5 gallic acid equivalent and 399.54 rutin equivalent. It was found to inhibit DPPH and deoxyribose oxidation (IC50 = 24.24 and 5.40 respectively). In vivo study demonstrated a significant reduction in the epithelialization time (P < 0.001) to 17-18 days in normal and dexamethasone treated rats following the ethanolic extract of the bark of C. procera application. The same extract also significantly increased the breaking strength in dexamethasone treated rats. Histological examination of incision wounds of treated group showed matured extracellular matrix, numerous fibroblasts. This study illustrated an excellent potential of the bark of C. procera therapy on dermal wound healing, with a tentative mechanism of action related to improved collagen deposition and reduced inflammatory reaction.

  3. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity and the healing action of the ethanol extract of Calotropis procera bark against surgical wounds

    PubMed Central

    Tsala, David Emery; Nga, Nnanga; Thiery, Bella Ndzana Martin; Bienvenue, Mballa Therese; Theophile, Dimo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant potential and the wound healing effect of the ethanolic extract of the bark of Calotropis procera. The antioxidant study was evaluated in vitro, using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and deoxyribose degradation assays. Wound healing was studied using excision and incision wound on normal and dexamethasone-suppressed wound healing rodent models. Alkaloids, flavonoids, proteins and phenols were screened in the extract used whereas saponins and true tannins were absent. The extract contains only 12.5 gallic acid equivalent and 399.54 rutin equivalent. It was found to inhibit DPPH and deoxyribose oxidation (IC50 = 24.24 and 5.40 respectively). In vivo study demonstrated a significant reduction in the epithelialization time (P < 0.001) to 17-18 days in normal and dexamethasone treated rats following the ethanolic extract of the bark of C. procera application. The same extract also significantly increased the breaking strength in dexamethasone treated rats. Histological examination of incision wounds of treated group showed matured extracellular matrix, numerous fibroblasts. This study illustrated an excellent potential of the bark of C. procera therapy on dermal wound healing, with a tentative mechanism of action related to improved collagen deposition and reduced inflammatory reaction. PMID:26401387

  4. [Wound dressings].

    PubMed

    Breuninger, H

    1988-01-01

    The wide variety of dermatologic surgical procedures has resulted in a corresponding choice of wound dressings. Considering the chemical and physical properties as well as the function of the dressings, standardized dressing techniques can be performed with relatively few materials. This saves both time and money.

  5. Surgical outcomes of laparoscopic versus open liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma for various resection extent

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhua; Li, Hongyu; Liu, Fei; Li, Bo; Wei, Yonggang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although the number of laparoscopic liver resections (LRRs) has increased, studies of surgical outcomes in comparison with the conventional open approach are limited. The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical outcomes (safety and efficacy) of LLR versus open liver resection (OLR) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We collected data on all patients who received liver resection for HCC between April 2015 and September 2016 in our institution, and retrospectively investigated the demographic and perioperative data, and also surgical outcomes. Laparoscopic liver resection was performed in 225 patients and OLR in 291. In patients who underwent minor hepatectomy, LLR associated with a shorter duration of operation time (200 vs 220 minutes; P < 0.001), less blood loss (100 vs 225 mL; P < 0.001), lower transfusion rate (3.0% vs 12.0%; P = 0.012), and shorter postoperative hospital stay (6 vs 7 days; P < 0.001) compared with OLR. Dietary recovery was relatively fast in the group of LLR, but there were no significant differences in hepatic inflow occlusion rate, complication rate, and transfusion volume. Patients who received major hepatectomy had a longer duration of operation (240 vs 230 minutes; P < 0.001), less blood loss (200 vs 400 mL; P < 0.001), lower transfusion rate (4.8% vs 16.5%; P = 0.002), lower hepatic inflow occlusion rate (68.3% vs 91.7%; P < 0.001), and shorter postoperative hospital stay (6 vs 8 days; P < 0.001). Complication rate (P = 0.366) and transfusion volume (P = 0.308) did not differ between groups. Laparoscopic liver resection is a feasible and safe alternative to OLR for HCC when performed by a surgeon experienced with the relevant surgical techniques, associated with less blood loss, lower transfusion rate, a rapid return to a normal diet, and shorter postoperative hospital stay with no compromise in complications. Further, long-term follow-up should be acquired for

  6. [Histoacryl vs Dermabond cyanoacrylate glue for closing small operative wounds].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Z; Mogilner, J

    2000-12-01

    Acrylate glues used in a childrens' day care unit to close small surgical wounds were compared. In 157 children, aged 12 weeks to 3.7 years, either Histoacryl or Dermabond was used (respectively, H: Ethicon Inc., Johnson & Johnson, NJ or D: Dermabond, Braun Surgical Gmbh, Melsungen, Germany). Operations were for inguinal hernia (110 cases), hydrocele (25), undescended testis (16), umbilical hernia (13) and funiculocele (3). 1 week after surgery the wounds were evaluated in terms of integrity of closure, redness or infection, need for antibiotics, wound granuloma, and parental satisfaction with instructions and actual method of wound caring. 3 months after surgery the wound/scar was reexamined. The margins of the wounds were separated partially or completely in 8 of 85 in group H (9.4%) while in the D group, 2 wounds (2.4%) had partially opened (p < 0.05). There were no differences between the glues with regard to wound infection or cosmetic results. Parental satisfaction was higher with D (96%) than H (82%) but the difference was not statistically significant. It is convenient to use glue to close operative wounds in children after ambulatory surgery. The use of D significantly reduced wound ruptures compared to H. Long-term cosmetic results were similar.

  7. Rapidly stopping hemorrhage by enhancing blood clotting at an opened wound using chitosan/polylactic acid/polycaprolactone wound dressing device.

    PubMed

    Boonkong, Wasinee; Petsom, Amorn; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2013-06-01

    Doxycycline and monosodium glutamate (MSG) loaded chitosan (CHI)/polylactic acid (PLA)/polycaprolactone (PCL) blend film was studied as a model device to deliver drug to targeted human organ which in this case was the skin with opened wound. The CHI/PLA/PCL blend film containing 60 % CHI, 28 % PLA, and 12 % PCL exhibited the good properties for making the dressing device. It was observed that doxycycline/MSG loaded CHI/PLA/PCL blend film could rapidly deliver both doxycycline and MSG at the high release percentage approaching 100 % loaded. MSG accelerated blood clotting and fibrin formation; thus, it exhibited the good hemostatic activity. The antibacterial activity of doxycycline loaded CHI/PLA/PCL blend film against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as model bacteria was investigated. Doxycycline release played the crucial role in bacterial inhibition as observed from the lowest bacterial cell dry weight observed when compared with the control bacterial culture or the bacterial cultures with the presence of other films studied.

  8. The Midterm Surgical Outcome of Modified Expansive Open-Door Laminoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Kuang-Ting; Lee, Ru-Ping; Chen, Ing-Ho; Yu, Tzai-Chiu; Peng, Cheng-Huan; Liu, Kuan-Lin; Wang, Jen-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Laminoplasty is a standard technique for treating patients with multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Modified expansive open-door laminoplasty (MEOLP) preserves the unilateral paraspinal musculature and nuchal ligament and prevents facet joint violation. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the midterm surgical outcomes of this less invasive technique. We retrospectively recruited 65 consecutive patients who underwent MEOLP at our institution in 2011 with at least 4 years of follow-up. Clinical conditions were evaluated by examining neck disability index, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA), Nurick scale, and axial neck pain visual analog scale scores. Sagittal alignment of the cervical spine was assessed using serial lateral static and dynamic radiographs. Clinical and radiographic outcomes revealed significant recovery at the first postoperative year and still exhibited gradual improvement 1–4 years after surgery. The mean JOA recovery rate was 82.3% and 85% range of motion was observed at the final follow-up. None of the patients experienced aggravated or severe neck pain 1 year after surgery or showed complications of temporary C5 nerve palsy and lamina reclosure by the final follow-up. As a less invasive method for reducing surgical dissection by using various modifications, MEOLP yielded satisfactory midterm outcomes. PMID:27563676

  9. Wound Volume Measurement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    III and IV decubitus ulcers ). Wounds can also be classified by etiology as (a) surgical, (b) traumatic (such as mechanical or thermal injuries), and...had either decubitus ulcers or venous stasis ulcers . Each patient’s wound was measured with each of the three methods. First, the wound was...standardized and clinically available method to estimate wound volume is needed to determine rate of pressure ulcer healing. This quasi-experimental

  10. Vascular Complications and Bleeding After Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Performed Through Open Surgical Access.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence; Akodad, Mariama; Macia, Jean-Christophe; Gandet, Thomas; Lattuca, Benoit; Schmutz, Laurent; Gervasoni, Richard; Nogue, Erika; Nagot, Nicolas; Levy, Gilles; Maupas, Eric; Robert, Gabriel; Targosz, Frederic; Vernhet, Hélène; Cayla, Guillaume; Albat, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Major vascular complications (VC) remain frequent after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and may be associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of VC after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive open surgical access strategy. From 2010 to 2014, we included in a monocentric registry all consecutive patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI. The procedures were performed with 16Fr to 20Fr sheath systems. VC were evaluated within 30 days and classified as major or minor according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition. The study included 396 patients, 218 were women (55%), median age was 85 years (81 to 88), and the median logistic Euroscore was 15.2% (11 to 23). The balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT and the self-expandable Medtronic Core Valve prosthesis were used in 288 (72.7%) and 108 patients (27.3%), respectively. The total length of the procedure was 68 ± 15 minutes including 13 ± 5 minutes for the open surgical access. Major and minor VC were observed in 9 (2.3%) and 16 patients (4%), respectively, whereas life-threatening and major bleeding concerned 18 patients (4.6%). The median duration of hospitalization was 5 days (interquartile range 2 to 7), significantly higher in patients with VC (7 days [5 to 15], p <0.001). Mortality at 1-month and 1-year follow-up (n = 26, 6.6%; and n = 67, 17.2%, respectively) was not related to major or minor VC (p = 0.6). In multivariable analysis, only diabetes (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 6.1, p = 0.034) and chronic kidney failure (odds ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 9.0, p = 0.046) were predictive of VC, whereas body mass index, gender, Euroscore, and lower limb arteriopathy were not. In conclusion, minimal rate of VC and bleeding can be obtained after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive surgical strategy, with a particular advantage observed in high-risk bleeding patients.

  11. Development and characterization of cefazolin loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles composite gelatin nanofiber mats for postoperative surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Rath, Goutam; Hussain, Taqadus; Chauhan, Gaurav; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Systemic antibiotic therapy in post-operative wound care remain controversial leading to escalation in levels of multi-resistant bacteria with unwanted morbidity and mortality. Recently zinc (Zn) because of multiple biophysiological functions, gain considerable interest for wound care. Based on our current understanding, the present study was designed with an intent to produce improve therapeutic approaches for post-operative wound management using composite multi-functional antibiotic carrier. The study involved the fabrication, characterization and pre-clinical evaluation of cefazolin nanofiber mats loaded with zinc oxide (ZnO) and comparing co-formulated mats with individual component, enable a side by side comparison of the benefits of our intervention. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug, ZnO nanoparticles (ZnONPs) and drug-ZnONP mixture against Staphylococcus aureus was determined using micro dilution assay. The fabricated nanofibers were then evaluated for in-vitro antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of inhibition was predicted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further these nanofiber mats were evaluated in-vivo for wound healing efficacy in Wistar rats. Study revealed that the average diameter of the nanofibers is around 200-900 nm with high entrapment efficiency and display sustained drug release behavior. The combination of ZnO and cefazolin in 1:1 weight ratio showed higher anti-bacterial activity of 1.9 ± 0.2 μg/ml. Transmission electron microscopy of bacterial cells taken from the zone of inhibition revealed the phenomenon of cell lysis in tested combination related to cell wall disruption. Further composite medicated nanofiber mats showed an accelerated wound healing as compared to plain cefazolin and ZnONP loaded mats. Macroscopical and histological evaluations demonstrated that ZnONP hybrid cefazolin nanofiber showed enhanced cell adhesion, epithelial migration, leading to faster and more efficient collagen synthesis

  12. Diabetic Wound Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Information Diabetic Wound Care What is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer? A diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound that ... key factors in the appropriate treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer: Prevention of infection Taking the pressure off ...

  13. Efficacy of a dual-ring wound protector for prevention of incisional surgical site infection after Whipple's procedure (pancreaticoduodenectomy) with preoperatively-placed intrabiliary stents: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Alexsander K; Roberts, Derek J; Edwards, Janet P; Bhatti, Sana U; Dixon, Elijah; Sutherland, Francis R; Bathe, Oliver; Ball, Chad G

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Among surgical oncology patients, incisional surgical site infection is associated with substantially increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Moreover, while adults undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy with preoperative placement of an intrabiliary stent have a high risk of this type of infection, and wound protectors may significantly reduce its risk, no relevant studies of wound protectors yet exist involving this patient population. This study will evaluate the efficacy of a dual-ring wound protector for prevention of incisional surgical site infection among adults undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy with preoperatively-placed intrabiliary stents. Methods and analysis This study will be a parallel, dual-arm, randomised controlled trial that will utilise a more explanatory than pragmatic attitude. All adults (≥18 years) undergoing a pancreaticoduodenectomy at the Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with preoperative placement of an intrabiliary stent will be considered eligible. Exclusion criteria will include patient age <18 years and those receiving long-term glucocorticoids. The trial will employ block randomisation to allocate patients to a commercial dual-ring wound protector (the Alexis Wound Protector) or no wound protector and the current standard of care. The main outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infection as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria within 30 days of the index operation date as determined by a research assistant blinded to treatment allocation. Outcomes will be analysed by a statistician blinded to allocation status by calculating risk ratios and 95% CIs and compared using Fisher's exact test. Ethics and dissemination This will be the first randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of a dual-ring wound protector for prevention of incisional surgical site infection among patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy. Results of this study are expected

  14. A profile of drug resistance genes and integrons in E. coli causing surgical wound infections in the Faisalabad region of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Muhammad Azeem; Haque, Abdul; Ali, Aamir; Mohsin, Mashkoor; Bashir, Saira; Tariq, Ayesha; Afzal, Amna; Iftikhar, Tayyaba; Sarwar, Yasra

    2009-06-01

    Escherichia coli are one of the leading causes of infection in wounds. Emerging multiple drug resistance among E. coli poses a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapy for wounds. This study was conducted to ascertain a baseline profile of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolates infecting surgical wounds. A total of 64 pus samples from hospitalized patients were screened and 29 (45.3%) were found to have E. coli, which were identified biochemically and confirmed by molecular methods. Using the disc diffusion method, antimicrobial resistance was observed toward tetracycline (100%), cefradine (100%), nalidixic acid (93.1%), ampicillin (86.2%), gentamicin (86.2%), cefixime (82.8%), ceftriaxone (82.8%), aztreonam (82.8%), ciprofloxacin (75.9%), streptomycin (72.4%), cefoperazone (65.5%), chloramphenicol (58.6%) and amikacin (58.6%). In an effort to find relevant genes, 11 different genes were targeted by PCR. Among these, the mutated gyrA gene was found to be the most prevalent (82.8%), followed by the TEM (72.4%), catP (68.9%), catA1 (68.9%), tetB (62.1%), blt (58.6%), bla(CTX-M-15) (27.6%), bla(TEM) (20.7%), bla(OXA) (17.2%), tetA (17.2%) and aadA1 (13.8%) genes. The presence of integrons was also studied among these isolates. The prevalence of class 1 integrons was the highest (44.8%), followed by class 2 (27.6%). Three (10.3%) isolates carried both class 1 and class 2 integrons (first report from E. coli infecting wounds). The high incidence of integrons points toward their facilitation for carriage of antimicrobial resistance genes; however, in nearly 37% isolates, no integrons were detected, indicating the significance of alternative mechanisms of gene transfer. Another salient finding was that all isolates were multidrug-resistant E. coli.

  15. Strategies to Address Infection Prevention and Treatment in the Reduced Inflammatory Milieu of Irrigated Open Wound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    debridement, however, removes the body’s first healing response, such as fracture hematoma . We implemented an irrigated radius defect model intended...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Open fractures require irrigation and debridement to prevent potential infection. Irrigation and...to represent the open fracture setting with bone loss. We evaluated feasibility to investigate the role of platelet rich plasma (PRP) to restore

  16. Total Posterior Leg Open Wound Management With Free Anterolateral Thigh Flap: Case and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Soleiman; Chou, Stephanie; Rosing, James; Sahar, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Soft tissue coverage of the exposed Achilles tendon is a unique reconstructive challenge. In this report, we describe the management of a large posterior leg wound with exposed Achilles tendon using a free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap. A careful review of alternative reconstructive options is included, along with their respective advantages and disadvantages. A 32-year-old white man suffered a fulminant right lower extremity soft tissue infection requiring extensive debridement of the entire posterior surface of the right leg. The resulting large soft tissue defect included exposure of the Achilles tendon. Reconstruction of the defect was achieved with an ALT flap and split-thickness skin graft for coverage of the Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius muscle, respectively. The patient was able to ambulate independently within 2 months of the procedure. PMID:24106563

  17. [Wound healing and wound dressing].

    PubMed

    Eitel, F; Sklarek, J

    1988-01-01

    This review article intends to discuss the clinical management of wounds in respect to a pathophysiological background. Recent results of research in the field of wound healing are demonstrated. Wound healing can be seen as aseptic inflammatory response to a traumatic stimulus. The activation of the clotting cascade by the trauma induces a sequence of humoral and cellular reactions. Platelets, granulocytes and macrophages are activated stepwisely. In the first phase of wound healing the wounded tissue area will be prepared for phagocytosis by enzymatic degradation of ground substance and depolymerisation of protein macromolecules (wound edema). Following the phagocytic microdebridement mesenchymal cells proliferate and produce matrix substance. Microcirculation within the traumatized area will be restored by angiogenesis, macroscopically observed as new formed granulation tissue. This leads to the wound healing phase of scar tissue formation. In this complexity of reactions naturally many possibilities of impairment are given. The most common complication during wound healing is the infection. It can be seen as self reinforcing process. The therapy of the impairment of wound healing consists in the disruption of the specific vicious circle, in the case of an osseus infection that would be a macrodebridement (that is necrectomy) and biomechanical stabilization. The surgical management of wounds principally consists in ensuring an undisturbed sequence of the healing process. This can be done by the wound excision that supports the phagocytic microdebridement. A further possibility is to avoid overwhelming formation of edema by eliminating the traumatic stimulus, by immobilization of the injured region and by ensuring a physiological microenvironment with a primary suture if possible. There are up to the present no drugs available to enhance cell proliferation and to regulate wound healing but it seems that experimental research is successful in characterizing

  18. Impact of an absorbent silver-eluting dressing system on lower extremity revascularization wound complications.

    PubMed

    Childress, Beverly B; Berceli, Scott A; Nelson, Peter R; Lee, W Anthony; Ozaki, C Keith

    2007-09-01

    Surgical wounds for lower extremity revascularization are prone to infection and dehiscence. Acticoat Absorbent, an antimicrobial dressing, offers sustained release of ionic silver. We hypothesized that immediate application of Acticoat as a postoperative dressing would reduce wound complications in patients undergoing leg revascularization. All infrainguinal revascularization cases involving leg incisions at a single Veterans Administration Medical Center were identified from July 1, 2002, to September 30, 2005. The control group received conventional dressings, while the treatment group received an Acticoat dressing. Wound complication rates were captured via National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data. Patient characteristics and procedure distributions were similar between groups. The wound complication rate fell 64% with utilization of the Acticoat-based dressing (control 14% [17/118], treatment 5% [7/130]; P = 0.016). An Acticoat-based dressing system offers a potentially useful, cost-effective adjunct to reduce open surgical leg revascularization wound complications.

  19. Surgical judgment in the management of abdominal stab wounds. Utilizing clinical criteria from a 10-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W C; Uddo, J F; Nance, F C

    1984-01-01

    A 10-year retrospective study of patients with stab wounds to the abdomen managed under a protocol of selective management has been performed. Patients were assessed on the basis of clinical presentation and physical examination, with minimal diagnostic studies. Peritoneal lavage was not utilized in the evaluation of the patients. Two hundred and nineteen such patients were identified. One hundred and eleven of these patients were treated nonoperatively. Ninety patients were treated by immediate laparotomy. Eighteen patients, initially observed, underwent delayed laparotomy. One patient, not explored despite clear-cut indications for laparotomy, died of sepsis, emphasizing the need for strict adherence to the stated protocol. The negative or unnecessary laparotomy rate was 7.8%. The false-negative examination rate was 5.5%. Overall mortality rate was 2.3%. The accuracy of careful clinical evaluation and observation is comparable to, or better than, any other method currently available to identify intra-abdominal injuries in patients with abdominal stab wounds. The study suggests that selective management of stab wounds of the abdomen may be safely practiced in a smaller community hospital. PMID:6721604

  20. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  1. Patients' perceptions of recovery after surgical exposure of impacted maxillary teeth treated with an open-eruption surgical-orthodontic technique.

    PubMed

    Chaushu, S; Becker, A; Zeltser, R; Vasker, N; Chaushu, G

    2004-12-01

    This study assessed patient perceptions of immediate post-operative recovery after the surgical exposure of impacted maxillary teeth with an open-eruption technique. Thirty patients (24 females and six males) underwent surgical exposure of 39 impacted maxillary teeth using this technique. After surgery the patients were contacted by telephone daily for 7 days, to complete a health-related quality of life (HRQOL) questionnaire, which assessed their perception of recovery in four main areas: pain, oral function, general activity, and other symptoms. Severe pain was reported by 30 per cent of the patients in the first post-operative day (POD 1), which declined to 6.7 per cent by POD 6. Consumption of analgesics declined gradually over the post-operative days (POD 1: 80 per cent, POD 7: 20 per cent). Difficulty in eating required 5 days to reach minimal levels; enjoying everyday food, 2.5 days; school attendance, limitations in daily routine, swallowing, and speech, 2 days each; swelling, bad taste/smell, 1.5 days each; within 1 day all other measures attained minimal levels. The need for bone removal during the exposure resulted in delayed recovery with regard to the ability to eat. In general, females reported delayed recovery for pain. The present data may serve as basic guidelines against which future studies which assess post-operative management of patients after surgical exposure of impacted teeth by an open-eruption technique may be compared.

  2. Delayed wound healing and postoperative surgical site infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Tada, Masahiro; Inui, Kentaro; Sugioka, Yuko; Mamoto, Kenji; Okano, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Hidaka, Noriaki; Koike, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have become more popular for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether or not bDMARDs increase the postoperative risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has remained controversial. We aimed to clarify the effects of bDMARDs on the outcomes of elective orthopedic surgery. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to analyze risk factors for SSI and delayed wound healing among 227 patients with RA (mean age, 65.0 years; disease duration, 16.9 years) after 332 elective orthopedic surgeries. We also attempted to evaluate the effects of individual medications on infection. Rates of bDMARD and conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) administration were 30.4 and 91.0 %, respectively. Risk factors for SSI were advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; P = 0.045), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.03), and preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 3.66; P = 0.003). Those for delayed wound healing were advanced age (OR, 1.16; P = 0.001), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.007), preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 4.56; P = 0.02), and foot surgery (OR, 6.60; P = 0.001). Risk factors for SSI and medications did not significantly differ. No DMARDs were risk factors for any outcome examined. Biological DMARDs were not risk factors for postoperative SSI. Foot surgery was a risk factor for delayed wound healing.

  3. Cyanoacrylate Adhesives in Eye Wounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EYE, *WOUNDS AND INJURIES), (*ADHESIVES, EYE), (*ACRYLIC RESINS, ADHESIVES), CORNEA , HEALING, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), NECROSIS, SURGICAL SUPPLIES, STRENGTH(PHYSIOLOGY), SURGERY, THERAPY

  4. Laser Hemorrhoidoplasty Procedure vs Open Surgical Hemorrhoidectomy: a Trial Comparing 2 Treatments for Hemorrhoids of Third and Fourth Degree

    PubMed Central

    Maloku, Halit; Gashi, Zaim; Lazovic, Ranko; Islami, Hilmi; Juniku-Shkololli, Argjira

    2014-01-01

    Objective: According to the ‘‘vascular’’ theory, arterial overflow in the superior hemorrhoidal arteries would lead to dilatation of the hemorrhoidal venous plexus. Hemorrhoid laser procedure (LHP) is a new laser procedure for outpatient treatment of hemorrhoids in which hemorrhoidal arterial flow feeding the hemorrhoidal plexus is stopped by laser coagulation. Aim: Our aim was to compare the hemorrhoid laser procedure with open surgical procedure for outpatient treatment of symptomatic hemorrhoids. Material and method: A comparison trial between hemorrhoid laser procedure or open surgical hemorrhoidectomy was made. This study was conducted at Aloka hospital in Kosovo. Patients with symptomatic grade III or grade IV hemorrhoids with minimal or complete mucosal prolapse were eligible for the study: 20 patients treated with the laser hemorrhoidoplasty, and 20 patients–with open surgery hemorrhoidectomy. Operative time and postoperative pain with visual analog scale, were evaluated. Results: A total number of 40 patients (23 men and 17 women, mean age, 46 years) entered the trial. Significant differences between laser hemorrhoidoplasty and open surgical procedure were observed in operative time and early postoperative pain. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding the early postoperative period: 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks and 1 month after respective procedure (p<0.01). The procedure time for LHP was 15.94 min vs. 26.76 min for open surgery (p<0.01). Conclusion: The laser hemorrhoidoplasty procedure was more effective than open surgical hemorrhoidectomy. Postoperative pain and duration time are only two indicators for this difference between there procedures. PMID:25684841

  5. Role of Recipient-site Preparation Techniques and Post-operative Wound Dressing in the Surgical Management of Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadidi, Nour; Griffith, James L; Al-Jamal, Mohammed S; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired skin disorder characterized by the destruction of melanocytes resulting in achromic macules and patches involving the affected skin. Multiple methods of treatments have emerged to manage vitiligo, including medical and surgical techniques. Among the surgical techniques described in the management of vitiligo are minipunch grafting, split-thickness skin grafting, hair follicle transplantation, suction blister grafting, and cultured and non-cultured autologous melanocyte transplantation. However, prior to grafting optimal recipient-site preparation is needed for graft survival and successful repigmentation outcomes. Similarly, post-operative care of the recipient site is vital to yielding a viable graft irrespective of the transplantation technique employed. This article reviews the multiple methods employed to prepare the recipient site in vitiligo surgeries and the post-surgical conditions which optimize graft viability. A pubmed search was conducted utilizing the key words listed below. PMID:26157306

  6. Open tibial fractures grade IIIC treated successfully with external fixation, negative-pressure wound therapy and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7.

    PubMed

    Babiak, Ireneusz

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the therapy in open tibial fractures grade III was to cover the bone with soft tissue and achieve healed fracture without persistent infection. Open tibial fractures grade IIIC with massive soft tissue damage require combined orthopaedic, vascular and plastic-reconstructive procedures. Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT), used in two consecutive cases with open fracture grade IIIC of the tibia diaphysis, healed extensive soft tissue defect with exposure of the bone. NPWT eventually allowed for wound closure by split skin graft within 21-25 days. Ilizarov external fixator combined with application of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7 at the site of delayed union enhanced definitive bone healing within 16-18 months.

  7. Assessment of Severe Extremity Wound Bioburden at the Time of Definitive Wound Closure or Coverage: Correlation With Subsequent Postclosure Deep Wound Infection (Bioburden Study).

    PubMed

    Bosse, Michael J; Murray, Clinton K; Carlini, Anthony R; Firoozabadi, Reza; Manson, Theodore; Scharfstein, Daniel O; Wenke, Joseph C; Zadnik, Mary; Castillo, Renan C

    2017-04-01

    Infection remains the most common and significant complication after high-energy fractures. The Bioburden Study is a multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study of wound bacterial bioburden and antibiotic care in severe open lower extremity fractures. The aims of this study are to (1) characterize the contemporary extremity wound "bioburden" at the time of definitive wound closure; (2) determine the concordance between polymerase chain reaction results and hospital microbiology; (3) determine, among those who develop deep infections, the concordance between the pathogens at wound closure and at deep infection; and (4) compare the probability of deep infection between those who did and did not receive an appropriate course of antibiotics based on bioburden at the time of wound closure. To address these aims, sites collected tissue samples from severe lower extremity injuries at the time of wound closure and at first surgery for treatment of a deep infection, nonunion, flap failure, amputation, or other complications (because these surgeries may be due to undetected infection). Otherwise, if no further surgical treatment occurred, participants were followed for 12 months. The study was conducted at 38 US trauma centers and has enrolled 655 participants aged 18-64 years. This is the first large multi-institutional study evaluating the wound bioburden of severe open tibia fractures and correlating this bioburden with the risk of wound complications after definitive soft tissue closure.

  8. Early results from an angiosome-directed open surgical technique for venous arterialization in patients with critical lower limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Houlind, Kim; Christensen, Johnny; Hallenberg, Christian; Jepsen, Jørn M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with critical lower limb ischemia without patent pedal arteries cannot be treated by the conventional arterial reconstruction. Venous arterialization has been suggested to improve limb salvage in this subgroup of patients but has not gained wide acceptance. We report our early experience after implementing deep and superficial venous arterialization of the lower limb. Materials and methods Ten patients with critical ischemia and without crural or pedal arteries available for conventional bypass surgery or angioplasty were treated with distal venous arterialization. Inflow was from the most distal unobstructed segment. Run-off was the dorsal pedal venous arch (n=5), the dorsal pedal venous arch and a concomitant vein of the posterior tibial artery (n=3), or the dorsal pedal venous arch and a concomitant vein of the common plantar artery (n=2) depending on the location of the ischemic lesion. Venous valves were destroyed using antegrade valvulotomes, guide wires, knob needles, or retrograde valvulotomes via an extra incision. Results Seven of the operated limbs were amputated after 23 (1–256) days (median [range]). The main reasons for amputation were lack of healing of either the original wound, of incisional wounds on the foot, or persisting pain at rest. In three cases, the bypass was open at the time of amputation. Two patients experienced complete wound healing after 231 and 342 days, respectively. By the end of follow-up, the last patient was ambulating with slow wound healing but without pain 309 days after surgery. Conclusion Venous arterialization may be used as a treatment of otherwise unsalveable limbs. The success rate is, however, limited. Technical optimization of the technique is warranted. PMID:24358432

  9. Closure of an Open Wound Associated with Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw in a Breast Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    Soolari, Nafiseh; Soolari, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective: Many clinicians will not treat patients presenting with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw following long-term use of bisphosphonates because of the lack of predictable outcomes. Materical and Methods: The patient presented with pain from a nonhealing lesion in the posterior maxilla following extraction of the maxillary right third molar. The lesion had not responded to any conventional dental treatment. The patient had suffered from breast cancer, and her treatment included several years of therapy with Zometa (zoledronic acid), a bisphosphonate. Results: The patient stopped taking Zometa and commenced rinsing with phosphate buffer–stabilized 0.1% chlorine dioxide–containing mouthwash. After 5 months, changes in the morphology of the lesion were noted and the soft tissue had closed over the open wound. Conclusion: Cessation of bisphosphonate therapy and usage of a phosphate buffer–stabilized 0.1% chlorine dioxide–containing mouthwash lessened the patient’s pain and resulted in closure of the soft tissue lesion. PMID:22135700

  10. Skeletal and dento-alveolar stability after surgical-orthodontic treatment of anterior open bite: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, K; Politis, C; Willems, G; De Bruyne, I; Fieuws, S; Heidbuchel, K; van Erum, R; Verdonck, A; Carels, C

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess skeletal and dento-alveolar stability after surgical-orthodontic correction of skeletal anterior open bite treated by maxillary intrusion (group A) versus extrusion (group B). The cephalometric records of 49 adult anterior open bite patients (group A: n = 38, group B: n = 11), treated by the same maxillofacial surgeon, were examined at different timepoints, i.e. at the start of the orthodontic treatment (T1), before surgery (T2), immediately after surgery (T3), early post-operatively (+/- 20 weeks, T4) and one year post-operatively (T5). A bimaxillary operation was performed in 31 of the patients in group A and in six in group B. Rigid internal fixation was standard. If maxillary expansion was necessary, surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion (SRPE) was performed at least 9 months before the Le Fort I osteotomy. Forty-five patients received combined surgical and orthodontic treatment. The surgical open bite reduction (A, mean 3.9 mm; B, mean 7.7 mm) and the increase of overbite (A, mean 2.4 mm; B, mean 2.7 mm), remained stable one year post-operatively. SNA (T2-T3), showed a high tendency for relapse. The clockwise rotation of the palatal plane (1.7 degrees; T2-T3), relapsed completely within the first post-operative year. Anterior facial height reduction (A, mean -5.5 mm; B, mean -0.8 mm) occurred at the time of surgery. It can be concluded that open bite patients, treated by posterior Le Fort I impaction as well as with anterior extrusion, with or without an additional bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO), one year post-surgery, exhibit relatively good clinical dental and skeletal stability.

  11. Blood flow response in small intestinal loops at different depths during negative pressure wound therapy of the open abdomen.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2013-08-01

    High closure rates of the open abdomen have been reported following negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, the method has occasionally been associated with increased development of intestinal fistulae. We have previously shown that the application of NPWT to the open abdomen causes a decrease in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal loop and the omentum adjacent to the visceral protective layer of the dressing. In this study we investigate whether the negative pressure affects only small intestinal loops lying directly below the dressing or if it also affects small intestinal loops that are not in direct contact with the dressing. Six pigs underwent midline incision and application of NPWT to the open abdomen. The microvascular blood flow was measured in four intestinal loops at different depths from the visceral protective layer, at two different locations: beneath the dressing and at the anterior abdominal wall, before and after the application of NPWT of -50, -70, -100, -120, -150 and -170 mmHg, using laser Doppler velocimetry. Negative pressures between -50 and -170 mmHg caused a significant decrease in the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal loops in direct contact with the visceral protective layer. A slight, but significant, decrease in blood flow was also seen in the intestinal loops lying beneath these loops. The decrease in microvascular blood flow increased with the amount of negative pressure applied. No difference in blood flow was seen in the intestinal loops lying deeper in the abdominal cavity. A decrease in blood flow was seen in the upper two intestinal loops located apically and anteriorly, but not in the lower two, indicating that this is a local effect and that pressure decreases with distance from the source. A long-term decrease in blood flow in the intestinal wall may induce ischaemia and secondary necrosis in the intestinal wall, which could promote the development of intestinal fistulae. We believe that NPWT of

  12. Comparative study of the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation during negative pressure wound therapy in laparostomy using the V.A.C. abdominal dressing and the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin; Hlebowicz, Joanna; Ingemansson, Richard

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to compare the changes in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation, using the established V.A.C. abdominal dressing (VAC dressing) and a new abdominal dressing, the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system (ABThera dressing), in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Midline incisions were made in 12 pigs that were subjected to treatment with NPWT using the VAC or ABThera dressing. The microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall was measured before and after the application of topical negative pressures of −50, −75 and −125mmHg using laser Doppler velocimetry. Wound contraction and fluid evacuation were also measured. Baseline blood flow was defined as 100% in all settings. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 64·6±6·7% (P <0·05) after the application of −50mmHg using the VAC dressing, and to 65·3±9·6% (P <0·05) after the application of −50mmHg using the ABThera dressing. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 39·6±6·7% (P <0·05) after the application of −125mmHg using VAC and to 40·5±6·2% (P <0·05) after the application of −125mmHg using ABThera. No significant difference in reduction in blood flow could be observed between the two groups. The ABThera system afforded significantly better fluid evacuation from the wound, better drainage of the abdomen and better wound contraction than the VAC dressing.

  13. Simple and effective approach for the treatment of traumatic wounds in non-diabetic patients: a prospective open study.

    PubMed

    Nagoba, Basavraj; Gandhi, Rajan; Wadher, Bharat; Rao, Arunkumar; Selkar, Sohan

    2013-10-01

    Infection is one of the most important obstacles in the wound-healing process. Conventional methods used for the treatment of wound infections have their own limitations and hence, are difficult to control. If infection is not addressed well in time, it will further increase morbidity and cost of treatment. An attempt was made to develop a simple and effective treatment modality by using citric acid as the sole antimicrobial agent to control bacterial infections of traumatic wounds. A total of 259 cases of traumatic wounds infected with a variety of bacteria were investigated for culture and susceptibility, and susceptibility to citric acid. Citric acid ointment (3%) was applied to traumatic wounds to determine its efficacy in their treatment of traumatic wounds. In a culture and susceptibility study, a total of 369 aerobic bacteria and 7 fungi were isolated, with Staphylococcus aureus (30.31%) being the most common isolate and ciprofloxacin (61.43%) being the most effective agent. All the isolates were found to be inhibited by citric acid in in vitro studies (minimum inhibitory concentration--500-2500 µg/ml). Citric acid ointment was found effective in controlling infections. Out of 259 cases, 244 (around 95%) were healed completely in 5-25 applications of 3% citric acid. As citric acid has antibacterial activity and wound-healing property; hence it is the best alternative for the treatment of traumatic wounds. Besides these properties, citric acid has no adverse effects and it is a good dressing agent.

  14. Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy: A Hemostatic Adjunct for Control of Coagulopathic Hemorrhage in Large Soft Tissue Wounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    such as large soft tissue injuries, high-energy pene- trating trauma and open fractures have also been reported.6Y10 NPWT has been used for evacuating...injuries associated with high-energy open tibial shaft fractures . J Orthop Trauma. 2007;21:11 17. 10. Stannard JP, Robinson JT, Anderson ER, et al...Negative pressure wound therapy to treat hematomas and surgical incisions following high-energy trauma. J Trauma. 2006;60;1301 1306. 11. Kakagia D

  15. [Stab wounds in emergency department].

    PubMed

    Bège, T; Berdah, S V; Brunet, C

    2013-12-01

    Stab wounds represent the most common cause of penetrating wounds, occurring mainly in case of aggression or suicide attempt. Clinical severity depends on the superficial or penetrating aspect of the wound, its location and damaged organs. Medical management must be known because the vital risk is involved in penetrating wounds. Hemodynamically unstable patients should be operated without delay after performing a chest X-ray and ultrasound Focus assisted sonography for trauma (FAST) to guide the surgery. In the stable patients, the general clinical examination, exploration of the wound and medical imaging detect injuries requiring surgical management. Stab penetrating wounds require close and rapid collaboration between medical teams, tailored to the institution's resources.

  16. The Cost-Effectiveness of Wound-Edge Protection Devices Compared to Standard Care in Reducing Surgical Site Infection after Laparotomy: An Economic Evaluation alongside the ROSSINI Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, Adrian; Roberts, Tracy E.; Pinkney, Thomas D.; Bartlett, David C.; Morton, Dion; Calvert, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Background Wound-edge protection devices (WEPDs) have been used in surgery for more than 40 years to reduce surgical site infection (SSI). No economic evaluation of WEPDs against any comparator has ever been conducted. The aim of the paper was to assess whether WEPDs are cost-effective in reducing SSI compared to standard care alone in the United Kingdom. Methods and Findings An economic evaluation was conducted alongside the ROSSINI trial. The study perspective was that of the UK National Health Service and the time horizon was 30 days post-operatively. The study was conducted in 21 UK hospitals. 760 patients undergoing laparotomy were randomised to either WEPD or standard care and 735 were included in the primary analysis. The main economic outcome was cost-effectiveness based on incremental cost (£) per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Patients in the WEPD arm accessed health care worth £5,420 on average and gained 0.02131 QALYs, compared to £5,130 and 0.02133 QALYs gained in the standard care arm. The WEPD strategy was more costly and equally effective compared to standard care, but there was significant uncertainty around incremental costs and QALYs. The findings were robust to a range of sensitivity analyses. Conclusions There is no evidence to suggest that WEPDs can be considered a cost effective device to reduce SSI. Their continued use is a waste of limited health care resources. PMID:24748154

  17. Surgical stabilization for open tibial fractures in children: External fixation or elastic stable intramedullary nail - which method is optimal?

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubbu, Rohan A; Ramasubbu, Benjamin M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of open tibial fractures is well documented in adults, with existing protocols outlining detailed treatment strategies. No clear guidelines exist for children. Surgical stabilization of tibial fractures in the pediatric population requires implants that do not disrupt the open epiphyses (growth plate). Both elastic stable intramedullary nails and external fixation can be used. The objective of this study was to identify the optimal method of surgical stabilization in the treatment of open tibial fractures in children. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE and Embase were searched from their inception to March 2014 using the following advanced search terms (Key words): “open tibia fracture,” “fracture fixation,” “external fixation,” “intramedullary,” and “bone nail.” Only studies in English and pertaining to children with open fractures treated with elastic stable intramedullary nails or external fixation between 1994 and 2014 were included. Twelve clinical studies were critically appraised. Results: Due to a paucity in the literature coupled with a nonsystematic presentation of results, it proved to be very difficult in extracting relevant results from the studies. This was further added by a variation in outcome measures. Consequently, the results we obtained were difficult to draw conclusions from. Conclusion: There is no conclusive evidence or best practice guidelines for their management. Thus, as is highlighted in this study, more research is needed to determine the optimum treatment strategy for this common pediatric injury. The existing literature is of poor quality; consisting mainly of retrospective reviews of patients’ medical records, charts, and radiographs. Carefully designed, high-quality prospective cohort studies utilizing a nationalized multi-hospital approach are needed to improve understanding before protocols and guidelines can be developed and implemented. PMID:27746486

  18. Open Surgical Treatment for Femoroacetabular Impingement in Patients over Thirty Years: Two Years Follow-up Results

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We report short term results of open surgical treatment for symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in patients over the age of 30 years. Materials and Methods Between May 2011 and June 2012, thirteen FAI hips (11 patients) with hip pain persisting longer than 6 months were treated by either surgical hip dislocation (SHD) or anterior mini-open. They were followed up for longer than 2 years. The 11 patients included 7 females and 4 males with a mean age of 45 (range, 33-60) years. They were clinically evaluated for modified Harris hip score (MHHS) and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) activity level. Their lateral center-edge angle, acetabular index, and alpha angle were measured and compared. Results Acetabuloplasties were performed for seven cases. Femoral osteochondroplasty was performed for all thirteen cases. At minimum follow-up of two year (range, 24-29 months), all patients had substantial relief in preoperative pain with improvement in range of motion. The median MHHS was significantly (P<0.05) improved from 61 points preoperatively to 87 points at the last follow-up. The median UCLA activity level was 7 (range, 5-8) at last follow-up. Radiological indices improved. Two cases showed mild residual pain attributable to adhesion between capsule and reshaped femoral head-neck area. Conclusion Open surgical treatment of FAI was a reliable and effective treatment method in symptomatic FAIs for patients over the age of 30 years without advanced arthritic change of hip joint at short term follow-up. PMID:27536632

  19. Platelet-rich plasma versus open surgical release in chronic tennis elbow: A retrospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Karaduman, Mert; Okkaoglu, Mustafa Caner; Sesen, Hakan; Taskesen, Anil; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Altay, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare short and mid-term results in the treatment of chronic elbow tendinosis with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or Nirschl surgical technique. Method A retrospective study was conducted on patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, treated by Nirschl surgical technique (50 elbows) or PRP (60 elbows). Outcome was evaluated with Visual Analog Score (VAS), Mayo Elbow Scores and grip strength measurements. Results VAS and Mayo Elbow Scores of the PRP group had improved as a mean of 83% (p = 0.0001), 74% (p = 0.0001) over baseline and 34.2 pounds gain of grip strength. Conclusion The PRP seems to be better for pain relief and functionality in the short and mid-term periods. PMID:26955228

  20. Effect of Gabapentin on Morphine Consumption and Pain after Surgical Debridement of Burn Wounds: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Rimaz, Siamak; Alavi, Cyrus Emir; Sedighinejad, Abbas; Tolouie, Mohammad; Kavoosi, Sharareh; Koochakinejad, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Background: Burn pain is recognized as being maximal during therapeutic procedures, and wound debridement can be more painful than the burn injury itself. Uncontrolled acute burn pain increases the stress response and the incidence of chronic pain and associated depression. Although opiates are excellent analgesics, they do not effectively prevent central sensitization to pain. The anticonvulsant gabapentin has been proven effective for treating neuropathic pain in large placebo-controlled clinical trials. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated antihyperalgesic effects in models with central neuronal sensitization. It has been suggested that central neuronal sensitization may play an important role in postoperative pain. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gabapentin on morphine consumption and postoperative pain in burn patients undergoing resection of burn wounds. Patients and Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 50 burn patients received a single oral dose of gabapentin (1200mg) or placebo 2h before surgery. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and fentanyl and maintained by infusingpropofol, remifentanil, and 50% N2O in O2. All patients received patient-controlled analgesia with morphine at doses of 2.5 mg bolus and a lock-out time of 10 min for 24h before the operation. Pain was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) at rest and during movement at 1,4,8,12,16,20, and 24 h before the operation. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, mean arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate, sedation score, and morphine consumption were studied. Results: All the enrolled patients were able to complete the study; therefore, data from 50 patients wereanalyzed. The VAS scores at rest andduring movement at 1,4,8,12,16,20, and 24 h after the operation were significantly lower in the gabapentin group than in the placebo group (P < 0.05). Morphine consumption was significantly lessr in the gabapentin group than in

  1. Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve.

  2. Nutritional support for wound healing.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Douglas; Miller, Alan L

    2003-11-01

    Healing of wounds, whether from accidental injury or surgical intervention, involves the activity of an intricate network of blood cells, tissue types, cytokines, and growth factors. This results in increased cellular activity, which causes an intensified metabolic demand for nutrients. Nutritional deficiencies can impede wound healing, and several nutritional factors required for wound repair may improve healing time and wound outcome. Vitamin A is required for epithelial and bone formation, cellular differentiation, and immune function. Vitamin C is necessary for collagen formation, proper immune function, and as a tissue antioxidant. Vitamin E is the major lipid-soluble antioxidant in the skin; however, the effect of vitamin E on surgical wounds is inconclusive. Bromelain reduces edema, bruising, pain, and healing time following trauma and surgical procedures. Glucosamine appears to be the rate-limiting substrate for hyaluronic acid production in the wound. Adequate dietary protein is absolutely essential for proper wound healing, and tissue levels of the amino acids arginine and glutamine may influence wound repair and immune function. The botanical medicines Centella asiatica and Aloe vera have been used for decades, both topically and internally, to enhance wound repair, and scientific studies are now beginning to validate efficacy and explore mechanisms of action for these botanicals. To promote wound healing in the shortest time possible, with minimal pain, discomfort, and scarring to the patient, it is important to explore nutritional and botanical influences on wound outcome.

  3. [THE PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIZATION AND TREATMENT FOR SORTING OF WOUNDED PERSONS WITH A COMBAT SURGICAL TRAUMA OF EXTREMITIES ON THE IV LEVEL OF THE MEDICAL CARE PROVISION].

    PubMed

    Korohl, S O; Zherdev, I I; Domanskiy, A M

    2015-12-01

    Experience of medical sorting of 434 injured persons with a gun-shot woundings of extremities in 2014-2015 yrs is adduced. The principles of organization and treatment for medical sorting of wounded persons were elaborated. Prognostic intrahospital, diagnostic and evacuation--transport sorting was introduced in wounded persons in the IV level hospital, concerning severity of traumatic shock and prognosis of their survival.

  4. A prospective two-armed trial assessing the efficacy and performance of a silver dressing used postoperatively on high-risk, clean surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jamie; Goss, Selena; Facchin, Federico; Manizate, Fotini; Gendics, Cynthia; Braitman, Elissa; Lantis, John

    2014-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are a known complication of surgery. Silver-containing wound treatments are popular, despite the lack of evidence of SSI reduction. A two-armed study was conducted between July 2007 and November 2008 to evaluate the efficacy and ease of use of a postoperative silver dressing. In the first arm of the study, patients undergoing clean general, vascular, orthopedic, and neurosurgical procedures were allocated to receive a postoperative silver dressing (POSD) or a standard dressing of nonstick gauze under a fluid occlusive dressing. Outcome variables included the incidence of antibiotic initiation for SSI, clinical signs of infection, and leukocyte counts. The second arm of the study was a prospective case series designed to evaluate the performance and handling characteristics of the POSD. Onehundred- ninety-nine (199) patients (mean age 59.2 [range 21-94] years) were enrolled in the first arm of the study. Three out of 99 (3%) patients in the POSD and six out of 100 (6%) control group patients received antibiotic therapy for SSI (P = 0.498). Differences in the percentage of patients with clinical signs of infection following surgery also were not statistically significant (POSD: n = 24, 24.2%; control: n = 30, 30%; P = 0.426). In the second arm, 34 out of 36 patients rated the study dressing easy to apply in (94%), and no pain on removal was noted in 38 out of 57 (66.7%) assessments. No patients in the dressing performance cohort developed an SSI. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies with large sample sizes are warranted to evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the POSD.

  5. Gallbladder removal - open - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... your home is safe as you are recovering. Wound Care Change the dressing over your surgical wound once a day, or sooner if it becomes ... when you no longer need to keep your wound covered. Keep the wound area clean by washing ...

  6. [Comparative description and retrospective analisis of modern methods of surgical wounds closure for intraoperative prophylaxis of development of pathologic cutaneous cicatrices].

    PubMed

    Stavyts'kyĭ, S O; Avetikov, D S; Lokes, K P; Rozkolupa, O O; Boĭko, I V

    2014-05-01

    The experience of application of various methods of closure was presented for the head and neck cutaneous wound surfaces after elective operative interventions. The variant of the postoperative results estimation and optimization of the wounds healing by primary closure was proposed.

  7. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

  8. Comparing primary and secondary wound healing discomfort after mandibular third molar surgery: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Refo'a, Youshiaho; Ouatik, Nabil; Golchin, Foroogh; Mahboobi, Nima

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of impacted mandibular third molars is one of the most common procedures in the oral cavity and often is followed by pain, swelling, and postextraction alveolitis and trismus. It has been suggested that postoperative discomfort is in relation to the type of surgical wound healing. The aim of this study was to compare pain, swelling, and maximum mouth opening in two groups of patients with primary and secondary wound healing after impacted mandibular third molar surgery. Thirty-two patients were enrolled in this study and randomly divided into two equal groups, quantitatively and by gender. After the surgical procedures, 16 patients received primary wound closure, while the other 16 participants received secondary wound closure. A visual analog scale was used to collect pain data three days after the surgeries. A checklist was used to record data regarding swelling size and maximum mouth opening before, immediately following, three days after, and one week after surgery. Frequency tests and a t-test were used for statistical analysis and a P value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Patients in the secondary wound healing group showed statistically significant lower discomfort regarding pain, swelling size, and maximal mouth opening compared to the primary wound healing group. The authors suggest the use of secondary wound healing closure to reduce postoperative complications such as pain, maximal mouth opening, and swelling size after impacted mandibular third molar extractions.

  9. Long-term stability of anterior open bite closure corrected by surgical-orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Teittinen, Marjut; Tuovinen, Veikko; Tammela, Leena; Schätzle, Marc; Peltomäki, Timo

    2012-04-01

    In adults, superior repositioning of posterior maxilla with or without mandibular surgery has become the treatment method of choice to close anterior open bite. Study aim was to examine the long-term stability of anterior open bite closure by superior repositioning of maxilla or by combining maxillary impaction with mandibular surgery. The sample comprised 24 patients who underwent anterior open bite closure by superior repositioning of maxilla (maxillary group, n = 12, mean age 29.3 years) or by maxillary impaction and mandibular osteotomy (bimaxillary group, n = 12, mean age 30.8 years). Lateral cephalograms were studied prior to surgery (T1), the first post-operative day (T2) and in the long term (T3, maxillary group mean 3.5 years; bimaxillary group mean 2.0 years). Paired and two-sample t-tests were used to assess differences within and between the groups. The vertical incisal bite relations were -2.6 and -2.2 mm at T1; 1.23 and 0.98 mm at T2; and 1.85 and 0.73 mm at T3 in the maxillary and bimaxillary groups. At T3, all subjects had positive overbite in the maxillary group, but open bite recurred in three subjects with bimaxillary surgery. For both groups, the maxilla relapsed vertically. Significant changes in sagittal and vertical positions of the mandible occurred in both groups. In the bimaxillary group, the changes were larger and statistically significant. In general, the maxilla seems to relapse moderately vertically and the mandible both vertically and sagittally, particularly when both jaws were operated on. Overbite seems to be more stable when only the maxilla has been operated on.

  10. Clinical Usage and Economic Effectiveness of a Recently Developed Epidermal Autograft Harvesting System in 13 Chronic Wound Patients in a University-Based Wound Center

    PubMed Central

    Hulsey, Angela; Linneman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic wounds are a significant healthcare problem in the United States. Their costs approach 25 billion dollars in the United States. Current wound-care treatments of local wound care, moist dressings, and source control, while necessary for wound healing, are frequently not enough to ensure complete wound closure. The current surgical technique of split-thickness skin grafting is an operative procedure, painful, time-consuming, and leaves significant donor site wounds. A recently developed and marketed epidermal autograft harvester was tested at our university hospital wound center on 13 patients with wounds of various etiologies. Their clinical outcomes were evaluated, as were the costs associated with its usage compared with the potential costs of continued wound care without autograft placement. Methods: Thirteen patients whose wounds appeared to have "stalled" or reached a plateau in healing by measurement data and visual evidence were chosen to receive an epidermal autograft to accelerate wound closure. Wound-types included diabetic ulcers, venous or lymphedema-related ulcers, surgical site wounds, and traumatic wounds. Time-to-healing in days, when applicable, was captured. Wound center billing and charges were available and evaluated for nine of the 13 patients. Costs of standard care continuation compared with the cost of epidermal autograft technology usage were compared. Results: Healing rates were 62%; eight of the 13 patients had healed within four months, two were lost to follow-up, and three have wounds that remain open. Four of the patients healed in less than one month. The comparatively rapid closure of the open wound(s) post-epidermal autograft placement potentially reduced healthcare costs based on charges at an average of $1,153 per patient and yielded an average of $650 to the wound center, not applying the routine costs of dressings applied in the center.  Conclusion: The epidermal autograft harvester

  11. Surgical Tips in Frozen Abdomen Management: Application of Coliseum Technique.

    PubMed

    Kyriazanos, Ioannis D; Manatakis, Dimitrios K; Stamos, Nikolaos; Stoidis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Wound dehiscence is a serious postoperative complication, with an incidence of 0.5-3% after primary closure of a laparotomy incision, and represents an acute mechanical failure of wound healing. Relatively recently the concept of "intentional open abdomen" was described and both clinical entities share common pathophysiological and clinical pathways ("postoperative open abdominal wall"). Although early reconstruction is the target, a significant proportion of patients will develop adhesions between abdominal viscera and the anterolateral abdominal wall, a condition widely recognized as "frozen abdomen," where delayed wound closure appears as the only realistic alternative. We report our experience with a patient who presented with frozen abdomen after wound dehiscence due to surgical site infection and application of the "Coliseum technique" for its definitive surgical management. This novel technique represents an innovative alternative to abdominal exploration, for cases of "malignant" frozen abdomen due to peritoneal carcinomatosis. Lifting the edges of the surgical wound upwards and suspending them under traction by threads from a retractor positioned above the abdomen facilitates approach to the peritoneal cavity, optimizes exposure of intra-abdominal organs, and prevents operative injury to the innervation and blood supply of abdominal wall musculature, a crucial step for subsequent hernia repair.

  12. Comparative analysis of outcome between laparoscopic versus open surgical repair for vesico-vaginal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Bastab; Wats, Varun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) causes detrimental psychosomatic effects on a woman. It is repaired using open abdominal as well as laparoscopic approach. Here we compare a series of open versus laparoscopic VVF repairs done at a single centre. Methods Retrospectively data of patients undergoing VVF repair in our department between January 2011 to December 2014 was analyzed. Patients who had a single, primary, simple VVF following a gynaecological surgery were included in the study. 26 patients met all the criteria. Out of these, thirteen patients had undergone a laparoscopic VVF repair (group 1) while thirteen had undergone an open transabdominal VVF repair (group 2). Results Mean fistula size was 2.14±0.23 cm in group 1 and 2.18±0.30 cm in group 2, which was comparable. Mean blood loss was 58.69±6.48 mL in group 1 and 147.30±19.24 mL in group 2, which is statistically significant (P<0.0001). Mean hospital stay was 4 days in group 1 and 13 days in group 2 which is statistically significant (P<0.0001). The analgesic requirement (diclofenac) was 261.53±29.95 mg in group 1 and 617.30±34.43 mg in group 2, which is statistically significant (P<0.0001). Fistula repair was successful in all the patients in both the groups. Conclusion The present study shows that laparoscopic VVF repair results in reduced patient morbidity and shorter hospital stay without compromising the results. So laparoscopic repair may be a more attractive treatment option for patients with post gynecology surgery VVF. PMID:27896256

  13. A Staged Surgical Treatment Outcome of Type 3 Open Tibial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Emin; Özmeriç, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Aim. In these case series which are about type 3 open tibial fractures formed with three different high energy trauma etiologies in different parts of tibia. We aimed to assess our three-stage treatment approach and discuss final results of our elective surgery management with three different fixation methods. Patients and Methods. We assessed 19 patients with type 3 open tibial fractures between 2009 and 2012. Our treatment protocol consisted of three stages. Early intervention in operating room, which including vascular repairs or soft tissue closure, was done if necessary. Definitive surgery was performed using internal or external fixation in the first 15 days. Patients were followed up for at least one year. Last conditions of all our cases were evaluated according to modified Johner and Wruhs criteria. Results. Nine cases were type 3A, seven cases were type 3B, and three cases were type 3C in terms of fracture typing. All patients were followed up for at least one year and mean follow up time was 15 months. In terms of functional and clinical outcome, six cases were evaluated as excellent, eight cases as good, two cases as fair, and three cases as poor. Discussion. Staged treatment option in type 3 open tibial fractures seems to be a good method in reducing complication and achieving the best result. We think that definitive staged treatment protocol including internal fixation with plating or intramedullary nailing (IMN) of the fractures is a reliable method, especially to avoid complications as a result of external fixator and to provide patient rapport. PMID:24967129

  14. Comparing open and minimally invasive surgical procedures for oesophagectomy in the treatment of cancer: the ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) feasibility study and pilot trial.

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Chris; Avery, Kerry; Berrisford, Richard; Barham, Paul; Noble, Sian M; Fernandez, Aida Moure; Hanna, George; Goldin, Robert; Elliott, Jackie; Wheatley, Timothy; Sanders, Grant; Hollowood, Andrew; Falk, Stephen; Titcomb, Dan; Streets, Christopher; Donovan, Jenny L; Blazeby, Jane M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Localised oesophageal cancer can be curatively treated with surgery (oesophagectomy) but the procedure is complex with a risk of complications, negative effects on quality of life and a recovery period of 6-9 months. Minimal-access surgery may accelerate recovery. OBJECTIVES The ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) study aimed to establish the feasibility of, and methodology for, a definitive trial comparing minimally invasive and open surgery for oesophagectomy. Objectives were to quantify the number of eligible patients in a pilot trial; develop surgical manuals as the basis for quality assurance; standardise pathological processing; establish a method to blind patients to their allocation in the first week post surgery; identify measures of postsurgical outcome of importance to patients and clinicians; and establish the main cost differences between the surgical approaches. DESIGN Pilot parallel three-arm randomised controlled trial nested within feasibility work. SETTING Two UK NHS departments of upper gastrointestinal surgery. PARTICIPANTS Patients aged ≥ 18 years with histopathological evidence of oesophageal or oesophagogastric junctional adenocarcinoma, squamous cell cancer or high-grade dysplasia, referred for oesophagectomy or oesophagectomy following neoadjuvant chemo(radio)therapy. INTERVENTIONS Oesophagectomy, with patients randomised to open surgery, a hybrid open chest and minimally invasive abdomen or totally minimally invasive access. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE The primary outcome measure for the pilot trial was the number of patients recruited per month, with the main trial considered feasible if at least 2.5 patients per month were recruited. RESULTS During 21 months of recruitment, 263 patients were assessed for eligibility; of these, 135 (51%) were found to be eligible and 104 (77%) agreed to participate, an average of five patients per month. In total, 41 patients were allocated to open surgery, 43 to the

  15. A Possible Regression Equation for Predicting Visual Outcomes after Surgical Repair of Open Globe Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bilgec, Mustafa Deger; Sahin, Afsun; Colak, Ertugrul

    2017-01-01

    Background. To analyze the effects of factors other than the ocular trauma score parameters on visual outcomes in open globe injuries. Methods. Open globe injuries primarily repaired in our hospital were reviewed. The number of surgeries, performance of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV), lens status, affected tissues (corneal, scleral, or corneoscleral), intravitreal hemorrhage, intraocular foreign body, glaucoma, anterior segment inflammation, loss of iris tissue, cutting of any prolapsed vitreous in the primary surgery, penetrating injury, and the time interval between the trauma and repair were the thirteen variables evaluated using linear regression analysis. Results. In total, 131 eyes with a mean follow-up of 16.1 ± 4.7 (12–36) months and a mean age of 33.8 ± 22.2 (4–88) years were included. The regression coefficients were 0.502, 0.960, 0.831, −0.385, and −0.506 for the performance of PPV, aphakia after the initial trauma, loss of iris tissue, penetrating injury, and cutting of any prolapsed vitreous in the primary surgery, respectively (P < 0.05 for these variables). Conclusions. The performance of PPV, aphakia after the initial trauma, and loss of iris tissue were associated with poor visual outcomes, whereas cutting any prolapsed vitreous in the primary repair and penetrating-type injury were associated with better visual outcomes. PMID:28168043

  16. Orthodontic and surgical perspectives in management of a severe skeletal open bite

    PubMed Central

    Vadgaonkar, Vaishali; Gangurde, Parag; Deshmukh, Vijay; Shah, Alok

    2014-01-01

    In orthognathic correction of skeletal discrepancy, different treatment options should be considered to give optimum results to the patient with minimal postoperative problems caused by extensive bi-jaw surgery. In a case of severe vertical dysplasia with a large open bite, the orthodontist with the help of advanced diagnostic tools such as imaging software had planned bi-jaw surgery. However, there was a difference in opinion with the oral surgeon who considered only single jaw surgery to get adequate results. The possibility of only maxillary Le Fort I surgery creating autorotation of the mandible was considered, as 0.5° of autorotation results with 1° of maxillary posterior segment clockwise rotation thus avoiding bi-jaw surgery. After performing the Le Fort I superior repositioning of maxilla, the mandibular autorotation was not adequate, so a mandibular bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) for mandibular advancement had to be performed to achieve favourable results. PMID:24835800

  17. Puncture wounds of the foot.

    PubMed

    Racz, Roger S; Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Puncture wounds are common injuries of the foot. Although most puncture wounds are benign, devastating complications are possible without adequate treatment. These injuries can occur in all age groups and in various circumstances. Early diagnosis and appropriate medical and surgical management is paramount in achieving successful outcomes.

  18. Characteristics of positive surgical margins in robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy, open retropubic radical prostatectomy, and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a comparative histopathologic study from a single academic center.

    PubMed

    Albadine, Roula; Hyndman, Matthew E; Chaux, Alcides; Jeong, J Y; Saab, Shahrazad; Tavora, Fabio; Epstein, Jonathan I; Gonzalgo, Mark L; Pavlovich, Christian P; Netto, George J

    2012-02-01

    Studies detailing differences in positive surgical margin among open retropubic radical prostatectomy, laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, and robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy are lacking. A retrospective review of all prostatectomies with positive surgical margin performed at our center in 2007 disclosed 99 cases, 6 (5%) of which were reinterpreted cases as having negative margins. Ninety-three cases were, therefore, included, corresponding to 37 retropubic radical prostatectomies, 19 laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, and 37 robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomies. The relationship of positive surgical margin characteristics to clinicopathologic parameters and biochemical recurrence was assessed. The most commonly found positive surgical margin site was the apex/distal third in all groups (62% retropubic prostatectomies, 79% laparoscopic prostatectomies, 60% robotic-assisted prostatectomies). Total linear length of positive surgical margin sites was significantly correlated with preoperative prostate-specific antigen, preoperative prostate-specific antigen density, pT stage, and tumor volume (P ≤ .001). We found no significant differences among the 3 groups with respect to total linear length, number of foci, laterality, or location of positive surgical margin. The rate of biochemical recurrence was also comparable in the 3 groups. On univariate analyses, biochemical recurrence was significantly associated with preoperative prostate-specific antigen values, preoperative prostate-specific antigen density, Gleason score, number of positive surgical margins, and total linear length of positive surgical margin (P ≤ .02). Only preoperative prostate-specific antigen density and number of positive surgical margin foci were statistically significant (P ≤ .03) independent predictors of biochemical recurrence. We found no significant difference in positive surgical margin characteristics or biochemical recurrence among the 3

  19. Cell therapy for wound healing.

    PubMed

    You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-03-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include utilization of the safest and least invasive methods with goals of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced wound healing technology has triggered the use of cells to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide information on clinically available cell-based treatment options for healing of acute and chronic wounds. Compared with a variety of conventional methods, such as skin grafts and local flaps, the cell therapy technique is simple, less time-consuming, and reduces the surgical burden for patients in the repair of acute wounds. Cell therapy has also been developed for chronic wound healing. By transplanting cells with an excellent wound healing capacity profile to chronic wounds, in which wound healing cannot be achieved successfully, attempts are made to convert the wound bed into the environment where maximum wound healing can be achieved. Fibroblasts, keratinocytes, adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells, bone marrow stem cells, and platelets have been used for wound healing in clinical practice. Some formulations are commercially available. To establish the cell therapy as a standard treatment, however, further research is needed.

  20. Minimally invasive surgical technique for tethered surgical drains

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Shane R; Satpathy, Jibanananda; Waligora, Andrew C; Ugwu-Oju, Obinna

    2017-01-01

    A feared complication of temporary surgical drain placement is from the technical error of accidentally suturing the surgical drain into the wound. Postoperative discovery of a tethered drain can frequently necessitate return to the operating room if it cannot be successfully removed with nonoperative techniques. Formal wound exploration increases anesthesia and infection risk as well as cost and is best avoided if possible. We present a minimally invasive surgical technique that can avoid the morbidity associated with a full surgical wound exploration to remove a tethered drain when other nonoperative techniques fail.

  1. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  2. Expansive open-door laminoplasty secured with titanium miniplates is a good surgical method for multiple-level cervical stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laminoplasty is an effective procedure for treating cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Little information is available regarding the surgical outcomes of expansive open-door laminoplasty (EOLP) when securing with titanium miniplates without bone grafting. This study is aimed to elucidate the efficacy of and problems associated with EOLP secured with titanium miniplates without bone grafting, thereby enhancing future surgical outcomes. Methods This is a retrospective study. The study participants comprised 104 patients who underwent cervical EOLP secured with titanium miniplates without bone graft for CSM treatment between August 2005 and March 2011. The clinical results were evaluated based on the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) and Nurick scores. The radiographic outcomes were determined based on plain film and magnetic resonance imaging findings, which were assessed and compared. Results Lateral cervical spine X-rays exhibited improvement in the Pavlov ratio of the spinal canal at 1 day postoperation, and this ratio did not change at 1 year postoperation. The mean cervical curvature from C2 to C7 decreased 0.21° ± 10.09° and the mean cervical range of motion was deteriorated by 35% at 12 months (P < 0.05). The Nurick score improved from 3.19 ± 1.06 to 0.92 ± 1.32 (P < 0.05). The mean JOA recovery rate was 75% ± 21.1% at 1 year. The mean level of postoperative neck pain at 3 months was 3.09 ± 2.31, as determined using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Increased age, concomitant thoracolumbar stenosis, depression disorder, and preexisting myelomalacia negatively affected the JOA recovery rate (P < 0.05). A decreased preoperative Nurick score and superior sensory function in the upper extremities were powerful predictors of an enhanced JOA recovery rate. The postoperative complications involved hematoma formation 0.9%, reversible C5 nerve palsy 2.8%, and moderate to severe neck pain (VAS ≥ 4) 42%. No

  3. PRE-OPERATIVE PLANNING AND SURGICAL TECHNIQUE OF THE OPEN WEDGE SUPRACONDYLAR OSTEOTOMY FOR CORRECTION OF VALGUS KNEE AND FIXATION WITH A FIXED-ANGLE IMPLANT

    PubMed Central

    Paccola, Cleber Antonio Jansen

    2015-01-01

    The step-by-step preoperative planning for supracondylar opening wedge osteotomy of the femur for precise correction of the load axis of the lower limb using a fixed-angle implant (95° AO blade plate) is presented. The surgical technique and the use of a bone graft from the same site for filling in the defect are also presented. PMID:27026976

  4. Transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy vestibular approach (TOETVA) for Graves’ disease: a comparison of surgical results with open thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jitpratoom, Pornpeera; Ketwong, Khwannara; Sasanakietkul, Thanyawat

    2016-01-01

    Background Transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy vestibular approach (TOETVA) provides excellent cosmetic results from its potential for scar-free operation. The procedure has been applied successfully for Graves’ disease by the authors of this work and compared with the standard open cervical approach to evaluate its safety and outcomes. Methods From January 2014 to November 2016, a total of 97 patients with Graves’ disease were reviewed retrospectively. Open thyroidectomy (OT) and TOETVA were performed in 49 patients and 46 patients, respectively. For TOETVA, a three-port technique through the oral vestibule was utilized. The thyroidectomy was done endoscopically using conventional laparoscopic instruments and an ultrasonic device. Patient demographics and surgical variables, including operative time, blood loss, and complications, were investigated and compared. Results TOETVA was performed successfully in all 45 patients, although conversion to open surgery was deemed necessary in one patient. All patient characteristics for both groups were similar. Operative time was shorter for the OT group compared to the TOETVA group, which totaled 101.97±24.618 and 134.11±31.48 minutes, respectively (P<<0.5). Blood loss was comparable for both groups. The visual analog scale (VAS) pain score for the TOETVA group was significantly lower than for the OT group on day 1 (2.08±1.53 vs. 4.57±1.35), day 2 (0.84±1.12 vs. 2.57±1.08) and day 3 (0.33±0.71 vs. 1.08±1.01) (P<<0.05). Transient recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy was found in four and two cases of TOETVA and OT group, respectively. Transient hypocalcemia was found in ten and seven cases of TOETVA and OT group, respectively. No other complications were observed. Conclusions TOETVA is a feasible and safe treatment for Graves’ disease in comparison to the standard open cervical approach. It is considered a viable alternative for patients who have been indicated for surgery with excellent cosmetic results. PMID

  5. The natural history of pedal puncture wounds in diabetics: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Surgeons usually witness only the limb-threatening stages of infected, closed pedal puncture wounds in diabetics. Given that this catastrophic outcome often represents failure of conservative management of pre-infected wounds, some suggest consideration of invasive intervention (coring or laying-open) for pre-infected wounds in hope of preventing contamination from evolving into infection, there being no evidence based guidelines. However, an invasive pre-emptive approach is only justifiable if the probability of progression to catastrophic infection is very high. Literature search revealed no prior studies on the natural history of closed pedal puncture wounds in diabetics. Methods A survey was conducted via an interviewer-administered questionnaire on 198 adult diabetics resident in the parish of St. James, Jamaica. The sample was selected using a purposive technique designed to mirror the social gradient and residential distribution of the target population and is twice the number needed to detect a prevalence of puncture wounds of 14% with a range of 7-21% in a random sample of the estimated adult diabetic population. Results The prevalence of a history of at least one closed pedal puncture wound since diagnosis of diabetes was 25.8% (CI; 19.6-31.9%). The only modifiable variable associated at the 5% level of significance with risk of pedal puncture wound, after adjustment by multivariable logistic regression, was site of interview/paying status, a variable substantially reflective of income more so than quality-of-care. Of 77 reported episodes of closed pedal puncture wound among 51 participants, 45.4% healed without medical intervention, 27.3% healed after non-surgical treatment by a doctor and 27.3% required surgical intervention ranging from debridement to below-knee amputation. Anesthetic foot (failure to feel the puncture) and sole of the forefoot as site of puncture were the variables significantly associated with risk of requiring surgical

  6. Open Surgical versus Minimal Invasive Necrosectomy of the Pancreas—A Retrospective Multicenter Analysis of the German Pancreatitis Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Sebastian; Phillip, Veit; Reichel, Stephanie; Rau, Bettina; Zapf, Christian; Rosendahl, Jonas; Halm, Ulrich; Zachäus, Markus; Müller, Martin; Kleger, Alexander; Neesse, Albrecht; Hampe, Jochen; Ellrichmann, Mark; Rückert, Felix; Strauß, Peter; Algül, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Background Necrotising pancreatitis, and particularly infected necrosis, are still associated with high morbidity and mortality. Since 2011, a step-up approach with lower morbidity rates compared to initial open necrosectomy has been established. However, mortality and complication rates of this complex treatment are hardly studied thereafter. Methods The German Pancreatitis Study Group performed a multicenter, retrospective study including 220 patients with necrotising pancreatitis requiring intervention, treated at 10 hospitals in Germany between January 2008 and June 2014. Data were analysed for the primary endpoints "severe complications" and "mortality" as well as secondary endpoints including "length of hospital stay", "follow up", and predisposing or prognostic factors. Results Of all patients 13.6% were treated primarily with surgery and 86.4% underwent a step-up approach. More men (71.8%) required intervention for necrotising pancreatitis. The most frequent etiology was biliary (41.4%) followed by alcohol (29.1%). Compared to open necrosectomy, the step-up approach was associated with a lower number of severe complications (primary composite endpoint including sepsis, persistent multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and erosion bleeding: 44.7% vs. 73.3%), lower mortality (10.5% vs. 33.3%) and lower rates of diabetes mellitus type 3c (4.7% vs. 33.3%). Low hematocrit and low blood urea nitrogen at admission as well as a history of acute pancreatitis were prognostic for less complications in necrotising pancreatitis. A combination of drainage with endoscopic necrosectomy resulted in the lowest rate of severe complications. Conclusion A step-up approach starting with minimal invasive drainage techniques and endoscopic necrosectomy results in a significant reduction of morbidity and mortality in necrotising pancreatitis compared to a primarily surgical intervention. PMID:27668746

  7. Evaluation of opening pattern and bone neoformation at median palatal suture area in patients submitted to surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) through cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SALGUEIRO, Daniel Gomes; RODRIGUES, Vitor Hugo Leite de Oliveira; TIEGHI, Victor; de MENEZES, Carolina Carmo; GONÇALES, Eduardo Sanches; FERREIRA, Osny

    2015-01-01

    Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) is the treatment of choice to adult patients even with severe transversal maxillary discrepancies. However, the adequate retention period to achieve the bone remodeling, thus assuring treatment stability, is controversial. Objective To evaluate the opening pattern and bone neoformation process at the midpalatal suture in patients submitted to surgically assisted (SARME) through cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods Fourteen patients were submitted to SARME through subtotal Le Fort I osteotomy. Both the opening pattern and the mean bone density at midpalatal suture area to evaluate bone formation were assessed pre- and post-operatively (15, 60 and 180 days) through CBCT. Results Type I opening pattern (from anterior to posterior nasal spine) occurred in 12 subjects while type II opening pattern (from anterior nasal spine to transverse palatine suture) occurred in 2 individuals. The 180-day postoperative mean (PO 180) of bone density value was 49.9% of the preoperative mean (Pre) value. Conclusions The opening pattern of midpalatal suture is more related to patients’ age (23.9 years in type I and 33.5 years in type II) and surgical technique. It was not possible to observe complete bone formation at midpalatal suture area at the ending of the retention period studied (180 days). PMID:26398512

  8. Minimally Invasive Surgical Approach to Distal Fibula Fractures: A Technique Tip

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tyler; Chien, Bonnie; Ghorbanhoseini, Mohammad; Kwon, John Y.

    2017-01-01

    Wound complications following ankle fracture surgery are a major concern. Through the use of minimally invasive surgical techniques some of these complications can be mitigated. Recent investigations have reported on percutaneous fixation of distal fibula fractures demonstrating similar radiographic and functional outcomes to traditional open approaches. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe in detail the minimally invasive surgical approach for distal fibula fractures. PMID:28271086

  9. Wound Healing and the Dressing*

    PubMed Central

    Scales, John T.

    1963-01-01

    The evolution of surgical dressings is traced from 1600 b.c. to a.d. 1944. The availability of an increasing variety of man-made fibres and films from 1944 onwards has stimulated work on wound dressings, and some of the more important contributions, both clinical and experimental, are discussed. The functions of a wound dressing and the properties which the ideal wound dressing should possess are given. The necessity for both histological and clinical evaluation of wound dressings in animals and in man is stressed. Wound dressings are the most commonly used therapeutic agents, but there is no means whereby their performance can be assessed. An attempt should be made either nationally or internationally to establish a standard method of assessing the performance of wound dressings. For this it is necessary to have an internationally agreed standard dressing which could be used as a reference or control dressing in all animal and human work. The only animal with skin morphologically similar to that of man is the domestic pig. Three types of wounds could be used: (1) partial-thickness wounds; (2) full-thickness excisions; and (3) third-degree burns. The development of standard techniques for the assessment of the efficiency of wound dressings would be of considerable benefit to the research worker, the medical profession, the patient, and the surgical dressings industry. PMID:13976490

  10. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ziheng; Xu, Liang; Qu, Lefeng; Raithel, Dieter

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC.

  11. Comparison of Surgical Outcomes Between Short-Segment Open and Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques for Thoracolumbar Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xi; Shi, Yaohua; Dong, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare the surgical outcomes between open pedicle screw fixation (OPSF) and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PPSF) for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures, which has received scant research attention to date. Material/Methods Eight-four patients with acute and subacute thoracolumbar fractures who were treated with SSPSF from January 2013 to June 2014 at the Changzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Changzhou, China) were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 4 groups: the OPSF with 4 basic screws (OPSF-4) group, the OPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (OPSF-6) group, the PPSF with 4 basic screws (PPSF-4) group, and the PPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (PPSF-6) group. The intraoperative, immediate postoperative, and over 1-year follow-up outcomes were evaluated and compared among these groups. Results Blood loss in the PPSF-4 group and the PPSF-6 group was significantly less than in the OPSF-4 group and the OPSF-6 group (P<0.05). The OPSF-6 group exhibited significantly higher immediate postoperative correction percentage of anterior column height of fractured vertebra than the other 3 groups (P<0.05), and higher correction of sagittal regional Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of injured vertebra than in the PPSF-4 and -6 groups (P<0.05). In addition, there was no significant difference in the correction loss of percentage of anterior column height, and loss of sagittal Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of fractured vertebrae at final follow-up among the 4 groups (P>0.05). Conclusions OPSF with 6 screws had an advantage in the correction of injured vertebral height and kyphosis, and PPSF reduced the intraoperative blood loss of patients. PMID:27602557

  12. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  13. Uncontrolled, open-label, pilot study of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil solution in the decolonisation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus positive wounds and its influence on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Margaret; Newall, Nelly; Carville, Keryln; Smith, Joanna; Riley, Thomas V; Carson, Christine F

    2011-08-01

    Many complementary and alternative products are used to treat wounds. The essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia, tea tree oil, has proven antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties, may be useful in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) decolonisation regimens and is reputed to have 'wound-healing' properties, but more data are required to support these indications. The primary aim of this uncontrolled case series was to assess whether a tea tree oil solution used in a wound cleansing procedure could decolonise MRSA from acute and chronic wounds of mixed aetiology. The secondary aim was to determine if the tea tree oil solution influenced wound healing outcomes. Nineteen participants with wounds suspected of being colonised with MRSA were enrolled in a pilot study. Seven were subsequently shown not to have MRSA and were withdrawn from the study. As many as 11 of the remaining 12 participants were treated with a water-miscible tea tree oil (3·3%) solution applied as part of the wound cleansing regimen at each dressing change. Dressing changes were three times per week or daily as deemed necessary by the study nurse following assessment. One participant withdrew from the study before treatment. No participants were MRSA negative after treatment. After treatment had been implemented, 8 of the 11 treated wounds had begun to heal and reduced in size as measured by computer planimetry. Although this formulation and mode of delivery did not achieve the primary aim of the study, tea tree oil did not appear to inhibit healing and the majority of wounds reduced in size after treatment.

  14. Wound healing and all-cause mortality in 958 wound patients treated in home care.

    PubMed

    Zarchi, Kian; Martinussen, Torben; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2015-09-01

    Skin wounds are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Data are, however, not readily available for benchmarking, to allow prognostic evaluation, and to suggest when involvement of wound-healing experts is indicated. We, therefore, conducted an observational cohort study to investigate wound healing and all-cause mortality associated with different types of skin wounds. Consecutive skin wound patients who received wound care by home-care nurses from January 2010 to December 2011 in a district in Eastern Denmark were included in this study. Patients were followed until wound healing, death, or the end of follow-up on December 2012. In total, 958 consecutive patients received wound care by home-care nurses, corresponding to a 1-year prevalence of 1.2% of the total population in the district. During the study, wound healing was achieved in 511 (53.3%), whereas 90 (9.4%) died. During the first 3 weeks of therapy, healing was most likely to occur in surgical wounds (surgical vs. other wounds: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 2.21, 95% confidence interval 1.50-3.23), while from 3 weeks to 3 months of therapy, cancer wounds, and pressure ulcers were least likely to heal (cancer vs. other wounds: AHR 0.12, 0.03-0.50; pressure vs. other wounds: AHR 0.44, 0.27-0.74). Cancer wounds and pressure ulcers were further associated with a three times increased probability of mortality compared with other wounds (cancer vs. other wounds: AHR 3.19, 1.35-7.50; pressure vs. other wounds: AHR 2.91, 1.56-5.42). In summary, the wound type was found to be a significant predictor of healing and mortality with cancer wounds and pressure ulcers being associated with poor prognosis.

  15. Gunshot wounds: epidemiology, wound ballistics, and soft-tissue treatment.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Paul J; Najibi, Soheil; Silverton, Craig; Vaidya, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    The extremities are the most common anatomic location for gunshot wounds. Because of the prevalence of gunshot injuries, it is important that orthopaedic surgeons are knowledgeable about caring for them. The most common injuries seen with gunshot wounds are those of the soft tissues. Nonsurgical management of patients who have gunshot wounds with minimal soft-tissue disruption has been successfully accomplished in emergency departments for several years; this includes extremity wounds without nerve, intra-articular, or vascular injury. Stable, nonarticular fractures of an extremity have also been successfully treated with either minimal surgical or nonsurgical methods in the emergency department. Indications for surgical treatment include unstable fractures, intra-articular injuries, a significant soft-tissue injury (especially with skin loss), vascular injury, and/or a large or expanding hematoma.

  16. Use of a portable, single-use negative pressure wound therapy device in home care patients with low to moderately exuding wounds: a case series.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Theresa; Trueman, Paul; Rossington, Alan

    2014-03-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely used in the management of acute and chronic wounds. The purpose of this 8-week study was to evaluate outcomes of using a new canisterless, portable, single-use NPWT system in patients with wounds treated in a Canadian community healthcare setting. The device is designed to provide negative pressure at 80±20 mm Hg, 24 hours a day of continuous usage, for a maximum wear time of 7 days. Data on wound outcomes, including exudate levels, wound appearance, and wound area, were collected weekly by a Registered Nurse as part of routine practice. When treatment was discontinued, patients and nurses were asked to rate their satisfaction with the device. Data from patients who had used a conventional NPWT device to manage their wounds were retrospectively abstracted from their medical records. In the prospective study, conducted between October 2011 and July 2012, 326 patients (median age=61 years; range 17-91 years) with wounds of mixed etiology (53 pressure ulcers, 21 venous leg ulcers, 16 diabetic foot ulcers, and 15 traumatic and 221 surgical wounds) were treated for a maximum of 8 weeks with the portable NPWT device. The majority of patients (228 out of 326; 68%) achieved complete wound closure within 8 weeks of treatment. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of median time to healing of all wounds was 9 weeks. The majority of patients (318 patients, 97%) reported they were pleased or satisfied with the dressing performance. Nurses indicated satisfaction with the dressing performance for all but two patients (99%). The majority (89%) of patients managed with conventional NPWT (n=539) had an open surgical wound with moderate or high levels of exudate. Healing rates in the portable and conventional NPWT group were similar (10% to 11% per week). Portable, single-use NPWT has the potential to deliver good wound outcomes in community care settings and simplify the use of negative pressure for nurses and patients. Additional research is

  17. Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in

  18. Effects of the Topical Application of Hydroalcoholic Leaf Extract of Oncidium flexuosum Sims. (Orchidaceae) and Microcurrent on the Healing of Wounds Surgically Induced in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    de G de Gaspi, Fernanda Oliveira; Foglio, Mary Ann; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Santos, Gláucia Maria T; Testa, Milene; Passarini, José Roberto; de Moraes, Cristiano Pedroso; Esquisatto, Marcelo A Marreto; Mendonça, Josué S; Mendonça, Fernanda A Sampaio

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the wound healing activity of hydroalcoholic leaf extract of Oncidium flexuosum Sims. (Orchidaceae), an important native plant of Brazil, combined or not with microcurrent stimulation. Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups of nine animals: control (C), topical application of the extract (OF), treated with a microcurrent (10 μA/2 min) (MC), and topical application of the extract plus microcurrent (OF + MC). Tissue samples were obtained 2, 6, and 10 days after injury and submitted to structural and morphometric analysis. The simultaneous application of OF + MC was found to be highly effective in terms of the parameters analyzed (P < .05), with positive effects on the area of newly formed tissue, number of fibroblasts, number of newly formed blood vessels, and epithelial thickness. Morphometric data confirmed the structural findings. The O. flexuosum leaf extract contains active compounds that speed the healing process, especially when applied simultaneously with microcurrent stimulation.

  19. Effects of the Topical Application of Hydroalcoholic Leaf Extract of Oncidium flexuosum Sims. (Orchidaceae) and Microcurrent on the Healing of Wounds Surgically Induced in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    de G. de Gaspi, Fernanda Oliveira; Foglio, Mary Ann; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Santos, Gláucia Maria T.; Testa, Milene; Passarini, José Roberto; de Moraes, Cristiano Pedroso; Esquisatto, Marcelo A. Marreto; Mendonça, Josué S.; Mendonça, Fernanda A. Sampaio

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the wound healing activity of hydroalcoholic leaf extract of Oncidium flexuosum Sims. (Orchidaceae), an important native plant of Brazil, combined or not with microcurrent stimulation. Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups of nine animals: control (C), topical application of the extract (OF), treated with a microcurrent (10 μA/2 min) (MC), and topical application of the extract plus microcurrent (OF + MC). Tissue samples were obtained 2, 6, and 10 days after injury and submitted to structural and morphometric analysis. The simultaneous application of OF + MC was found to be highly effective in terms of the parameters analyzed (P < .05), with positive effects on the area of newly formed tissue, number of fibroblasts, number of newly formed blood vessels, and epithelial thickness. Morphometric data confirmed the structural findings. The O. flexuosum leaf extract contains active compounds that speed the healing process, especially when applied simultaneously with microcurrent stimulation. PMID:21716707

  20. Field hospital treatment of blast wounds of the musculoskeletal system during the Yugoslav civil war.

    PubMed

    Covey, D C; Lurate, R B; Hatton, C T

    2000-05-01

    The spectrum of wounding and treatment of forty-one patients with musculoskeletal blast injuries at a U.S. military field hospital in the former Yugoslavia was reviewed. Patients underwent wound exploration, irrigation, debridement, broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, early fracture stabilization, and appropriate reconstructive surgery. Four patients developed wound infections. Two patients died as a result of their injuries (overall mortality 5 percent). There were three below-knee amputations and five other amputations (above-knee, ankle, midtarsal, partial forefoot, and finger). Three patients sustained lumbar burst fractures from mines that exploded under their vehicles, resulting in paraplegia in one case. Our patients underwent 112 surgical procedures, an average of 2.1 per patient. Twenty-two patients (54 percent) had other injuries or conditions in addition to their orthopaedic wounds. There were wide variations in the bone and soft tissue injuries caused by detonating ordnance, and the tissue damage was qualitatively different from that caused by gunshot wounds. Early debridement, leaving wounds open, and treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics were important factors in wound healing to allow subsequent successful reconstructive surgery in an austere field setting.

  1. The effect of combined photobiomodulation and metformin on open skin wound healing in a non-genetic model of type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Mohammadali; Kanonisabet, Ali; Safakhah, Mandanad; Azimzadeh, Zahra; Mostafavinia, Ataroalsadat; Amini, Abdollah; Ghorishi, Seyed Kamran; JalaliFiroozkohi, Reza; Bayat, Sahar; Bayat, Mohammad

    2017-03-06

    This study intended to examine the combined influences of photobiomodulation (PBM) and metformin on the microbial flora and biomechanical parameters of wounds in a non-genetic model of type II diabetes mellitus (TII DM). We induced a non-genetic model of TII DM in 20 rats by feeding them a 10% fructose solution for 2weeks followed by an injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 40mg/kg). After 21days from the injection of STZ, we induced one full-thickness skin wound in each of the diabetic rats. We randomly divided the rats into four groups: i) placebo; ii) pulsed wave laser (890nm, 80Hz, 0.324J/cm(2)); iii) metformin; and iv) laser+metformin. Rats received daily intraperitoneal injections of metformin (50mg/kg). On days 7and 15 we inspected the microbial flora of each wound. On day 15 we obtained a standard sample from each healing wound for biomechanical analyses. PBM significantly decreased colony-forming units (CFUs) 7days after wound infliction compared to the placebo group (LSD test, p=0.012). Metformin significantly enhanced the biomechanical property (stress high load) of the wounds compared to the placebo group (LSD test, p=0.028). We observed the same significant result for PBM compared to the placebo group (LSD test, p=0.047). PBM significantly accelerated the wound healing process and significantly reduced CFUs of bacteria in a non-genetic rat model of TII DM.

  2. Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

    1983-10-01

    The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

  3. Caustic burn caused by intradermal self administration of muriatic acid for suicidal attempt: optimal wound healing and functional recovery with a non surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    FINO, P.; SPAGNOLI, A.M.; RUGGIERI, M.; ONESTI, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Caustic burns are burns of third and fourth degree caused by strong acids or strong bases. Muriatic acid is often used for suicidal attempt by ingestion. We describe a case of a caustic skin lesion caused by intravenous failed attempt of suicide by injection of Muriatic acid in a woman affected with bipolar-syndrome. Generally, caustic burns are treated by cleansing, escarectomy and coverage with skin grafts. Case report We treated the patient with a non invasive technique with collagenase and hyaluronic acid sodium salt cream (Bionect start®), hyaluronic acid-based matrix (Hyalomatrix®) and Vacuum-Assisted Closure (VAC) Therapy®. Results We obtained complete healing in 6 weeks. Conclusions Combined use of non invasive techniques seems to ensure only advantages for both the patients and the Health System. It reduces health care costs and risks for the patients such as nosocomial infections. Patient’s compliance is high, as its quality of life. Complete healing of the wound is fast and recovery of function is full. PMID:26712258

  4. Open Wound Healing In Vivo: Monitoring Binding and Presence of Adhesion/Growth-Regulatory Galectins in Rat Skin during the Course of Complete Re-Epithelialization.

    PubMed

    Gál, Peter; Vasilenko, Tomáš; Kostelníková, Martina; Jakubco, Ján; Kovác, Ivan; Sabol, František; André, Sabine; Kaltner, Herbert; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Smetana, Karel

    2011-10-26

    Galectins are a family of carbohydrate-binding proteins that modulate inflammation and immunity. This functional versatility prompted us to perform a histochemical study of their occurrence during wound healing using rat skin as an in vivo model. Wound healing is a dynamic process that exhibits three basic phases: inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. In this study antibodies against keratins-10 and -14, wide-spectrum cytokeratin, vimentin, and fibronectin, and non-cross-reactive antibodies to galectins-1, -2, and -3 were applied to frozen sections of skin specimens two days (inflammatory phase), seven days (proliferation phase), and twenty-one days (maturation phase) after wounding. The presence of binding sites for galectins-1, -2, -3, and -7 as a measure for assessing changes in reactivity was determined using labeled proteins as probes. Our study detected a series of alterations in galectin parameters during the different phases of wound healing. Presence of galectin-1, for example, increased during the early phase of healing, whereas galectin-3 rapidly decreased in newly formed granulation tissue. In addition, nuclear reactivity of epidermal cells for galectin-2 occurred seven days post-trauma. The dynamic regulation of galectins during re-epithelialization intimates a role of these proteins in skin wound healing, most notably for galectin-1 increasing during the early phases and galectin-3 then slightly increasing during later phases of healing. Such changes may identify a potential target for the development of novel drugs to aid in wound repair and patients' care.

  5. Risk Factors for Survival following Open Surgical Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A 13-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ozen, Anil; Hanedan, Muhammet Onur; Songur, Çetin Murat; Boysan, Emre; Unal, Ertekin Utku; Mola, Serkan; Erkengel, Halil Ibrahim; Kubat, Emre; Iscan, Zafer; Tutun, Ufuk; Sarıtas, Ahmet; Birincioglu, Cemal Levent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of a ruptured abdominal aorta aneurysm (RAAA) continues to present a significant challenge to surgeons. There are some patient factors such as age and gender that cannot be changed, and comorbid conditions can be optimized but not eliminated. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors affecting high mortality after the surgical repair of an RAAA. Methods: Data on 121 patients who underwent surgical repair for RAAAs between January 1997 and June 2011 in our institution were collected retrospectively. All the patients had been diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) scans, and intraoperative extra-luminal blood was visualized intraoperatively. Variables studied comprised demographic data; preoperative, operative, and postoperative data; and the causes of mortality. Multivariate regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of mortality. Results: One hundred eight (89.2%) patients were male and 13 (10.7%) were female at an average age of 68.9 ± 10.5 years. Totally, 121 patients underwent surgery for RAAAs. Fifty-four patients had aortic tube grafts, 32 aortobiiliac grafts, 20 aortobifemoral grafts, 1 aortoiliac graft, and 1 aortofemoral graft for the replacement of the RAAAs. Seven patients had only surgical exploration. Operative mortality was 41.3% (50 patients). The factors associated with mortality were preoperative shock, free blood, positive inotropic agent, hematocrit value, and need for blood and plasma. In the multivariate analysis, preoperative shock and positive inotropic agents were found to be significant as the predictors of death (OR: 19.8, 95%CI: 3.2-122.8 and OR: 8.6, 95% CI: 2.9-26.3, respectively). Conclusion: This study revealed that the preoperative clinical findings affected the mortality associated with RAAAs. PMID:26697083

  6. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  9. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  10. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  11. Behind the Curtain: Keeping Surgical Patients Warmer Fights Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... found that just a few degrees of body cooling tripled the risk of surgical wound infection. His ... of wound infections. Sessler has found simple, risk-free and inexpensive interventions that improve patient health after ...

  12. Automatic wound infection interpretation for postoperative wound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jui-Tse; Ho, Te-Wei; Shih, Hsueh-Fu; Chang, Chun-Che; Lai, Feipei; Wu, Jin-Ming

    2017-02-01

    With the growing demand for more efficient wound care after surgery, there is a necessity to develop a machine learning based image analysis approach to reduce the burden for health care professionals. The aim of this study was to propose a novel approach to recognize wound infection on the postsurgical site. Firstly, we proposed an optimal clustering method based on unimodal-rosin threshold algorithm to extract the feature points from a potential wound area into clusters for regions of interest (ROI). Each ROI was regarded as a suture site of the wound area. The automatic infection interpretation based on the support vector machine is available to assist physicians doing decision-making in clinical practice. According to clinical physicians' judgment criteria and the international guidelines for wound infection interpretation, we defined infection detector modules as the following: (1) Swelling Detector, (2) Blood Region Detector, (3) Infected Detector, and (4) Tissue Necrosis Detector. To validate the capability of the proposed system, a retrospective study using the confirmation wound pictures that were used for diagnosis by surgical physicians as the gold standard was conducted to verify the classification models. Currently, through cross validation of 42 wound images, our classifiers achieved 95.23% accuracy, 93.33% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 100% positive predictive value. We believe this ability could help medical practitioners in decision making in clinical practice.

  13. Surgical Treatment of Perianal Fistulizing Crohn's Disease: From Lay-Open to Cell-Based Therapy—An Overview

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. Perianal Crohn's disease (CD) can be challenging. Despite the high incidence of fistulizing CD, literature lacks clear guidelines. Several medical, surgical, and combined treatment modalities have been proposed, but evidences are scarce. Methods. We searched the literature to assess the facets of perianal CD, with particular focus on complex fistulae. Disease epidemiology, classification, diagnosis, activity scoring systems, and medical-surgical treatments were assessed. Results. Perianal fistulizing CD is common, frequently associated with upper gastrointestinal and colorectal CD. Complex fistulas often require repeated treatments. Continence is a major concern when dealing with repeated procedures. A prudent pathway is to resolve active sepsis and to limit damages, delaying a definitive treatment to the time when acute phase has been controlled. The improved diagnostic techniques allow better preoperative planning and are useful in monitoring the response to treatment. Besides newer devices, cell-based treatments are promising tools which have recently enriched the treatment portfolio. However, the need for proctectomy is still disturbingly high in CD patients with complex perianal fistulae. Conclusions. Perianal CD can impair quality of life and lead to need for proctectomy. A staged approach is reasonable. Treatment success can be improved by multimodal treatment and collaborative management by experienced gastroenterologists and surgeons. PMID:25431776

  14. Facial bite wounds: management update.

    PubMed

    Stefanopoulos, P K; Tarantzopoulou, A D

    2005-07-01

    Bite wounds are frequently located on the face; injuries inflicted by dogs are most common, especially in children. Bacteriology of infected dog and cat bite wounds includes Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus aureus, viridans streptococci, Capnocytophaga canimorsus, and oral anaerobes. Infected human bites yield a similar spectrum of bacteria except for Pasteurellae and C. canimorsus; instead human bites are frequently complicated by Eikenella corrodens. Antibiotic therapy against these bacteria is indicated both for infected bite wounds and fresh wounds considered at risk for infection. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (and other combinations of extended-spectrum penicillins with beta-lactamase inhibitors) and moxifloxacin offer the best in vitro coverage of the pathogenic flora. Initial wound management consisting in irrigation and debridement is at least equally important with antibiotics for prevention of infection. The need for prophylaxis against systemic infectious complications, particularly tetanus, should also be evaluated. Primary surgical repair is the treatment of choice for most clinically uninfected facial bite wounds, whereas delayed closure should be reserved for certain high risk or already infected wounds. Avulsive injuries with significant tissue loss represent the most difficult cases for definitive management and are also those most likely to require hospitalization.

  15. Surgical Scar Revision: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Dahiya, Naveen; Gupta, Somesh

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods. PMID:24761092

  16. Transdermal CO2 application in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Heinig, Birgit; Uhlemann, Christine

    2004-06-01

    Chronic wounds are a challenge to treatment. In this retrospective study, the effect of transdermal CO2 application on wound healing in chronic ulcers was investigated and compared to the effect of CO2 on acute surgical wounds. Eighty-six patients (52 females and 34 males) with chronic wounds of different origin except arterial occlusive disease were included. In addition, 17 patients (5 females, 12 males) with wide excision wounds after surgical therapy of acne inversa were considered. The indication for CO2 application was a wound at risk for infection. Treatment was performed with a Carboflow device once daily for 30 to 60 minutes. There was clinical evidence of improvement of granulation and reduction of discharge and malodor within 1 week of treatment in both chronic and acute wounds. Only 9 patients, all diabetics, needed an additional systemic antibiosis. The treatment was well tolerated. No adverse effects have been noted. Transdermal CO2 application is a useful method to reduce the risk of infection and improve wound healing in both chronic and certain acute wounds. Systematic prospective trials are needed.

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-3 (MKP-3) in the surgical wound is necessary for the resolution of postoperative pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Skopelja-Gardner, Sladjana; Saha, Madhurima; Alvarado-Vazquez, Perla Abigail; Liponis, Brenna S; Martinez, Elena; Romero-Sandoval, E Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase-3 (MKP-3) and its substrates (extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK] and p38) play an important role in pathophysiological mechanisms of acute postoperative and chronic neuropathic pain in the spinal cord. This study aimed to understand the role of MKP-3 and its target MAPKs at the site of surgical incision in nociceptive behavior. Wild-type (WT) and MKP-3 knockout (KO) mice underwent unilateral plantar hind paw incision. Mechanical allodynia was assessed by using von Frey filaments. Peripheral ERK-1/2 and p38 phosphorylation were measured by Western blot. Cell infiltration was determined using hematoxylin and eosin histological staining. Peripheral phosphorylated ERK-1/2 (p-ERK-1/2) inhibition was performed in MKP-3 KO mice. In WT mice, mechanical hypersensitivity was observed on postoperative day 1 (0.69±0.17 g baseline vs 0.13±0.08 g day 1), which resolved normally by postoperative day 12 (0.46±0.08 g, N=6). In MKP-3 KO mice, this hypersensitivity persisted at least 12 days after surgery (0.19±0.06 g; N=6). KO mice displayed higher numbers of infiltrating cells (51.4±6 cells/0.1 mm2) than WT mice (8.7±1.2 cells/0.1 mm2) on postoperative day 1 (vs 5–6 cells/0.1 mm2 at baseline) that returned to baseline 12 days after surgery (10–12 cells/0.1 mm2). In WT mice, peripheral p-p38 and p-ERK-1/2 expression increased (5- and 3-fold, respectively) on postoperative days 1 and 5, and returned to basal levels 7–12 days after surgery (N=3 per group). Peripheral p-p38 levels in MKP-3 KO mice followed a similar expression pattern as WT mice. Peripheral p-ERK-1/2 levels in MKP-3 KO mice remained elevated 12 days after surgery (2.5-fold, N=3 per group). Administration of PD98059 (MEK inhibitor, N=8, vehicle N=9) reduced p-ERK-1/2 expression in the incised tissue and blocked hypersensitivity in MKP-3 KO mice (N=6). The findings of this study suggest that MKP-3 is pivotal for normal resolution of acute

  18. Surgical robotics through a keyhole: from today's translational barriers to tomorrow's "disappearing" robots.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Hani; Nandi, Dipankar; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2013-03-01

    In the last century, engineering advances have transformed the practice of surgery. Keyhole surgical techniques offer a number of advantages over traditional open approaches including less postoperative pain, fewer wound complications, and reduced length of stay in hospital. However, they also present considerable technical challenges, particularly to surgeons performing new operative approaches, such as those through natural orifices. Advances in surgical robots have improved surgical visualization, dexterity, and manipulation consistency, thus greatly enhancing surgical performance and patient care. Clinically, however, robotic surgery is still in its infancy, and its use has remained limited to relatively few operations. In the paper, we will discuss the economic-, clinical-, and research-related factors that may act as barriers to the widespread utilization and development of surgical robots. In overcoming these barriers through a synergistic effort of both engineering and medicine, we highlight our future vision of robotic surgery, in both the short and long term.

  19. Augmented versus non-augmented open surgical repair of fresh tendo-achilles injury: a prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sabyasachi; Sarkar, Partha Sarathi; Latif, Abdul; Bhattacharyya, Arunangsu

    2012-11-01

    Injuries to the tendo-achilles in our country are mostly open injuries due to fall or slippage into the Indian type of lavatory pan. After thorough debridement open repair of the tendoachilles is done by non-augmented or augmented method. We studied about the augmented versus non-augmented open surgicalrepair of fresh tendo-achilles injuries. This was a prospective randomised study. It is evaluated from the study that the mean operative time was about 29 minutes longer (p < 0.001) and there was about 7 cm longer (p < 0.001) incision needed in augmented repair group which is statistically significant. The study shows that, the functional outcome of non-augmented repair group is better at 6 months follow-up but at 9 months follow-up functional outcomes are comparable in both non-augmented and augmented repair groups. The time for full functional recovery is more in augmented repair group. So, it is safer to use non-augmented repair technique in the treatment of fresh cases of tendo-achilles injuries due to less operative time, smaller incision, less complications and early functional recovery.

  20. [Surgical site infections].

    PubMed

    Sganga, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are recognized as a common surgical complication, occurring in about 2-5% of all surgical procedures. SSIs represent the third most frequent nosocomial infection, accounting for 14-16% of all infections observed in hospitalized patients and up to 38% of those observed among surgical patients. Knowledge of incidence, epidemiology, classification, process of wound healing, and pathogenesis of surgical site infection is of great importance. Given the high economic burden that infections provoke, beyond the increased morbidity and mortality, it appears mandatory to improve our tools in order to reduce their incidence, as a reduction of only 0.1% can result in a considerable saving of economic resources to be allocated to other activities, such as screening and prevention programs.

  1. Use of the wound healing trajectory as an outcome determinant for acute wound healing.

    PubMed

    Franz, M G; Kuhn, M A; Wright, T E; Wachtel, T L; Robson, M C

    2000-01-01

    Accurate and clinically practical methods for measuring the progress of acute wound healing is necessary before interventions designed to optimize and even accelerate acute wound healing can be applied. Complete wound closure rates and operative wound closure severity are irrelevant to most acute wounds since most are closed at the time of primary tissue repair and remain closed throughout healing. Analogous to chronic wound closure, the rate of increase of incision tensile strength progressively decreases as time passes and 100% unwounded tissue strength is never achieved making the endpoint definition of "healed" vague. Conceptualizing acute wound healing in terms of its design elements with reintegration into a final outcome lends itself to the description of acute wound healing as a mathematical trajectory. Frequently such an equation is a rate expressing the change in an acute healing parameter, most often tensile strength, over time. Such an approach also normalizes misinterpretations in analysis or errors in theory developed by measuring healing parameters at fixed points in time. Distributions of fractional strength gain times (e.g., 85% normal strength) can be determined using statistical methodology similar that used for failure time of survival analysis. Preclinical studies show that acute wound healing trajectories can be shifted to the left from a "normal" or "impaired" curve to an accelerated or more "ideal" curve. A useful method for measuring acute wound healing outcomes is therefore required before the basic science of acute wound healing is inevitably applied to the problem of acute surgical wounds.

  2. Analysis of in hospital mortality and long-term survival excluding in hospital mortality after open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Jun Gyo; Cho, Yong-Pil; Han, Young Jin; Noh, Min Su

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to confirm the factors that affect the mortality associated with the open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) and to analyze the long-term survival rates. Methods A retrospective review was performed on a prospectively collected database that included 455 consecutive patients who underwent open surgical repair for AAA between January 2001 and December 2012. We divided our analysis into in-hospital and postdischarge periods and analyzed the risk factors that affected the long-term survival of rAAA patients. Results Of the 455 patients who were initially screened, 103 were rAAA patients, and 352 were non-rAAA (nAAA) patients. In the rAAA group, 25 patients (24.2%) died in the hospital and 78 were discharged. Long-term survival was significantly better in the nAAA group (P = 0.001). The 2-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates of the rAAA patients were 87%, 73.4%, and 54.1%, respectively. Age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–.08; P < 0.001) and aneurysm rupture (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.12–.44; P = 0.01) significantly affected long-term survival. Conclusion Preoperative circulatory failure is the most common cause of death for in-hospital mortality of rAAA patients. After excluding patients who have died during the perioperative period, age is the only factor that affects the survival of rAAA patients. PMID:27904852

  3. Microwave Tissue Soldering for Immediate Wound Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong H.; Phan, Chau T.; Byerly, Diane; Dusl, John; Sognier, Marguerite A.; Carl, James

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the immediate sealing of traumatic wounds is under development. A portable microwave generator and handheld antenna are used to seal wounds, binding the edges of the wound together using a biodegradable protein sealant or solder. This method could be used for repairing wounds in emergency settings by restoring the wound surface to its original strength within minutes. This technique could also be utilized for surgical purposes involving solid visceral organs (i.e., liver, spleen, and kidney) that currently do not respond well to ordinary surgical procedures. A miniaturized microwave generator and a handheld antenna are used to deliver microwave energy to the protein solder, which is applied to the wound. The antenna can be of several alternative designs optimized for placement either in contact with or in proximity to the protein solder covering the wound. In either case, optimization of the design includes the matching of impedances to maximize the energy delivered to the protein solder and wound at a chosen frequency. For certain applications, an antenna could be designed that would emit power only when it is in direct contact with the wound. The optimum frequency or frequencies for a specific application would depend on the required depth of penetration of the microwave energy. In fact, a computational simulation for each specific application could be performed, which would then match the characteristics of the antenna with the protein solder and tissue to best effect wound closure. An additional area of interest with potential benefit that remains to be validated is whether microwave energy can effectively kill bacteria in and around the wound. Thus, this may be an efficient method for simultaneously sterilizing and closing wounds.

  4. How wounds heal

    MedlinePlus

    ... care to prevent infection. Continue Reading Stages of Wound Healing Wounds heal in stages. The smaller the wound, ... How lacerations heal References Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound healing. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox ...

  5. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  6. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: Experience in 45 Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Kathryn A.; Stanley, Bryden J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report experience with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in 45 consecutive dogs admitted with extensive cutaneous wounds and to determine if NPWT is feasible in veterinary hospital practice. Study Design Prospective descriptive study Animals Dogs (n = 45) Methods Collected data were organized into 6 categories: patient data, wound data, NPWT data, adjunctive treatments, complications, and final outcome Results Wounds (53 in 45 dogs) were largely traumatic in origin, and distributed fairly evenly to the trunk, proximal and distal aspects of the limbs. Most wounds (34 dogs, 76%) had no granulation tissue and were treated a mean of 4.2 days after wounding, whereas 11 dogs had granulating wounds that were initially treated a mean of 87 days after wounding. Median NPWT use was 3 days with a mean hospitalization of 7.8 days. Most wounds (33; 62%) were closed surgically after NPWT and were healed by 14 days. The other 18 wounds healed (mean, 21 days) by second intention after hospital discharge. Overall, 96% of the wounds healed; 2 dogs died before definitive closure could be attempted. Conclusion NPWT is applicable to a wide variety of canine wounds is well tolerated, allows for several days between dressing changes, and can used to optimize the wound bed for surgical closure or second intention healing. PMID:24512302

  7. Management of gunshot wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ordog, G.; Drew, R.

    1987-01-01

    Management of Gunshot Wounds provides a review of wound ballistics and a systemic review of gunshot wound management of all major body areas and systems. This volume includes information on pre-hospital care, nursing care, and care of infants, children, and the elderly patient with gunshot wounds. This volume also features information on: lead toxicity; complications of gunshot wounds; socioeconomic aspects of gunshot wounds; the forensic and pathological aspects of gunshot wounds; future directions in the care of gunshot wounds.

  8. Telemedicine in wound care.

    PubMed

    Chanussot-Deprez, Caroline; Contreras-Ruiz, José

    2008-12-01

    Telemedical wound care is one of the applications of teledermatology. We present our experience using telemedicine in the successful assessment and treatment of three patients with hard-to-heal ulcers. Three patients were seen at the PEMEX General Hospital in Veracruz, Mexico. The first patient was a 53-year-old man with hypertension, morbid obesity, chronic venous insufficiency, recurrent erysipelas, leg ulcers and lymphoedema. There was one ulcer on his left lower leg (20 x 10 cm) and one on his right leg (9 x 7 cm). The second patient was a 73-year-old woman with class III obesity and ulcers in her right leg, secondary to surgical debridement of bullous erysipelas. The third patient was a 51-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis with one ulcer on each leg and chronic lymphostasis. Photographs with a digital camera were taken and sent weekly via email to a wound care specialist in Mexico City. The photographs allowed the expert to diagnose and evaluate the chronic wounds periodically. In the present cases, telemedicine allowed us to have a rapid evaluation, diagnosis and treatment. The images were of enough quality to be useful and small enough to be sent via regular email to the remote physician who immediately gave his feedback. The expert was confident to give therapeutic recommendations in this way, and we considered this method to be very cost-effective, saving the patient and the health care system, especially in transportation.

  9. Quantitative Peptidomics Study Reveals That a Wound-Induced Peptide from PR-1 Regulates Immune Signaling in Tomato[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Lan; Lee, Chi-Ying; Cheng, Kai-Tan; Chang, Wei-Hung; Huang, Rong-Nan; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Many important cell-to-cell communication events in multicellular organisms are mediated by peptides, but only a few peptides have been identified in plants. In an attempt to address the difficulties in identifying plant signaling peptides, we developed a novel peptidomics approach and used this approach to discover defense signaling peptides in plants. In addition to the canonical peptide systemin, several novel peptides were confidently identified in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and quantified to be induced by both wounding and methyl jasmonate (MeJA). A wounding or wounding plus MeJA-induced peptide derived from the pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR-1) family was found to induce significant antipathogen and minor antiherbivore responses in tomato. This study highlights a role for PR-1 in immune signaling and suggests the potential application of plant endogenous peptides in efforts to defeat biological threats in crop production. As PR-1 is highly conserved across many organisms and the putative peptide from At-PR1 was also found to be bioactive in Arabidopsis thaliana, our results suggest that this peptide may be useful for enhancing resistance to stress in other plant species. PMID:25361956

  10. Influence of surgical implantation angle of left ventricular assist device outflow graft and management of aortic valve opening on the risk of stroke in heart failure patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivukula, V. Keshav; McGah, Patrick; Prisco, Anthony; Beckman, Jennifer; Mokadam, Nanush; Mahr, Claudius; Aliseda, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    Flow in the aortic vasculature may impact stroke risk in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) due to severely altered hemodynamics. Patient-specific 3D models of the aortic arch and great vessels were created with an LVAD outflow graft at 45, 60 and 90° from centerline of the ascending aorta, in order to understand the effect of surgical placement on hemodynamics and thrombotic risk. Intermittent aortic valve opening (once every five cardiac cycles) was simulated and the impact of this residual native output investigated for the potential to wash out stagnant flow in the aortic root region. Unsteady CFD simulations with patient-specific boundary conditions were performed. Particle tracking for 10 cardiac cycles was used to determine platelet residence times and shear stress histories. Thrombosis risk was assessed by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian metrics and a newly developed thrombogenic potential metric. Results show a strong influence of LVAD outflow graft angle on hemodynamics in the ascending aorta and consequently on stroke risk, with a highly positive impact of aortic valve opening, even at low frequencies. Optimization of LVAD implantation and management strategies based on patient-specific simulations to minimize stroke risk will be presented

  11. A comparison of surgical procedures and postoperative cares for minimally invasive laparoscopic gastrectomy and open gastrectomy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hong-Na; Hu, Jun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive, laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG) has assumed an ever-expanding role in gastric cancer treatment. Accumulating data so far seem to suggest that LG is at least a viable alternative of conventional open gastrectomy (OG) in different contexts. However, even though reviews and meta-analyses have compared the advantages and limitations of each option, it is still controversial whether LG is a better alternative to OG, especially in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). The major goal of this study is to evaluate the readouts of LG, in comparison with OG. A literature search was performed for studies published from 2009 to 2013. Medical records of 20868 gastric cancer patients from 32 independent studies were reviewed and analyzed. All 32 studies concluded that LG is at least comparable with OG. LG is superior to OG in offering less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and lower risk of complications, although LG is probably inferior in operative time, and not different from OG in mortality. Considering the merits and the potential future technical improvement, it is reasonable to speculate that LG may eventually replace OG in most clinical contexts. PMID:26379823

  12. High Mobility Group Box-1 Protein and Outcomes in Critically Ill Surgical Patients Requiring Open Abdominal Management

    PubMed Central

    Malig, Michelle S.; Jenne, Craig N.; Ball, Chad G.; Roberts, Derek J.; Xiao, Zhengwen

    2017-01-01

    Background. Previous studies assessing various cytokines in the critically ill/injured have been uninformative in terms of translating to clinical care management. Animal abdominal sepsis work suggests that enhanced intraperitoneal (IP) clearance of Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) improves outcome. Thus measuring the responses of DAMPs offers alternate potential insights and a representative DAMP, High Mobility Group Box-1 protein (HMGB-1), was considered. While IP biomediators are being recognized in critical illness/trauma, HMGB-1 behaviour has not been examined in open abdomen (OA) management. Methods. A modified protocol for HMGB-1 detection was used to examine plasma/IP fluid samples from 44 critically ill/injured OA patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial comparing two negative pressure peritoneal therapies (NPPT): Active NPPT (ANPPT) and Barker's Vacuum Pack NPPT (BVP). Samples were collected and analyzed at the time of laparotomy and at 24 and 48 hours after. Results. There were no statistically significant differences in survivor versus nonsurvivor HMGB-1 plasma or IP concentrations at baseline, 24 hours, or 48 hours. However, plasma HMGB-1 levels tended to increase continuously in the BVP cohort. Conclusions. HMGB-1 appeared to behave differently between NPPT cohorts. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relationship of HMGB-1 and outcomes in septic/injured patients. PMID:28286376

  13. Field surgery on a future conventional battlefield: strategy and wound management.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, J. M.; Cooper, G. J.; Haywood, I. R.; Milner, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    Most papers appearing in the surgical literature dealing with wound ballistics concern themselves with wound management in the civilian setting. The pathophysiology of modern war wounds is contrasted with ballistic wounds commonly encountered in peacetime, but it should be noted that even in peacetime the modern terrorist may have access to sophisticated military weaponry, and that patients injured by them may fall within the catchment area of any civilian hospital. Management problems associated with both wound types are highlighted; areas of controversy are discussed. The orthodox military surgical approach to ballistic wounds is expounded and defended. Images Figure 2 Figure Figure 4 PMID:1996857

  14. Hidradenitis Suppurativa and Wound Management.

    PubMed

    Dini, Valentina; Oranges, Teresa; Rotella, Luca; Romanelli, Marco

    2015-09-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, burdensome, debilitating disease of the hair follicle. It presents with recurrent painful inflamed and noninflamed lesions usually in specific body areas such as axillary, inguinal, perineal, and genital areas. It is associated with a large range of other diseases and conditions, such as obesity, arthropathy, inflammatory bowel diseases, and sqaumous cell carcinoma. Medical therapy may be systemic or topical, mainly based on antibiotics, retinoids, hormones and immunosuppressive drugs, including biological therapies. Surgical and laser therapies may be a valid therapeutic approach in order to treat locally recurring lesions. The aim of this article is to review the wound healing options after skin excision and laser treatments, with a focus on lesions left to heal by secondary intention, analyzing the efficacy of moist wound dressings, negative pressure wound therapy, bioactive dressings, such as platelet-rich plasma gel and hylarunoic acid scaffold, or autologous keratinocyte suspension in platelet concentrate and skin-grafting tecniques.

  15. Dermabond wound closure in primary hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Ashish; Parker, Salim; Goel, Vivek; Alderman, Phillip M

    2008-06-01

    Cyanoacrylate glues have been used in various surgical specialties for primary wound closure or as a supplement to other methods. We assessed the overall results and safety of this technique following primary hip arthroplasty. Ninety-three patients undergoing primary total hip replacement were studied. The surgical wound had been closed with subcuticular vicryl followed by the application of topical dermabond adhesive, without any additional dressings. The mean follow-up was 7.2 months. One patient suffered wound dehiscence on the third post operative day. Two patients had serous oozing from the wound for the initial 3-4 days. This technique provides an immediate water tight seal in a sterile operative environment and provides a barrier to micro organisms. It has good tensile strength, aesthetic value and patient satisfaction.

  16. Use of Multiple Adjunctive Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Modalities to Manage Diabetic Lower-Extremity Wounds

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Various treatment options exist for wound healing; however, clinical assessment of the patient and the wound environment must be considered before determining an optimal wound treatment plan. Negative pressure wound therapy alone and/or with an instilled topical solution can be effective in adjunctive management of acute and chronic wounds. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has also been shown to contribute to the wound-healing process. A pilot evaluation using a multistep approach of adjunctive negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and a dwell time, standard negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy was explored to manage postsurgical, diabetic lower-extremity wounds with a significant bioburden. Methods: Three diabetic patients with lower-extremity ulcers were treated after surgical intervention. Multistep wound therapy consisted of (1) negative pressure wound therapy with instillation of normal saline with a 20-minute dwell time, followed by 2 hours of negative pressure at −150 mm Hg for 3 to 4 days; (2) 1 to 3 weeks of continuous negative pressure at −150 mm Hg; and (3) multiple treatments of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Results: After surgery, wound closure was achieved within 4 weeks postinitiation of multistep wound therapy. All patients regained limb function and recovered with no long-term sequelae. Conclusions: In these 3 cases, a multistep wound therapy approach after surgery resulted in successful outcomes; however, larger prospective studies are needed to demonstrate the potential efficacy of this approach in the postsurgical management of complex, diabetic lower-extremity wounds. PMID:28077984

  17. Surgical management of traumatic cardiac fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Michael A.; Chesler, Elliot; Du Plessis, Louis

    1969-01-01

    Seven cases of traumatic intracardiac lesions following penetrating stab wounds of the heart are presented. The surgical management and complications encountered in these cases are discussed. Images PMID:5348320

  18. Microwave Tissue Soldering for Immediate Wound Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong H.; Plan, Chau T.; Byerly, Diane; Dusl, John; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the immediate sealing of traumatic wounds is under development. A portable microwave generator and handheld antenna are used to seal wounds, binding the edges of the wound together using a biodegradable protein sealant or solder. This method could be used for repairing wounds in emergency settings, by restoring the wound surface to its original strength within minutes. This technique could also be utilized for surgical purposes involving solid visceral organs (i.e., liver, spleen, and kidney) that currently do not respond well to ordinary surgical procedures. A miniaturized microwave generator and a handheld antenna are used to deliver microwave energy to the protein solder, which is applied to the wound. The antenna can be of several alternative designs optimized for placement either in contact with or proximity to the protein solder covering the wound. In either case, optimization of the design includes the matching of impedances to maximize the energy delivered to the protein solder and wound at a chosen frequency. For certain applications, an antenna could be designed that would emit power only when it is in direct contact with the wound. The optimum frequency or frequencies for a specific application would depend on the required depth of penetration of the microwave energy. In fact, a computational simulation for each specific application could be performed, which would then match the characteristics of the antenna with the protein solder and tissue to best effect wound closure. An additional area of interest with potential benefit that remains to be validated is whether microwave energy can effectively kill bacteria in and around the wound. Thus, this may be an efficient method for simultaneously sterilizing and closing wounds. Using microwave energy to seal wounds has a number of advantages over lasers, which are currently in experimental use in some hospitals. Laser tissue welding is unsuitable for emergency use because its large, bulky

  19. Medical museum, 2nd surgical hospital.

    PubMed

    Hawk, Alan J

    2013-12-01

    When his unit, the 2nd Surgical Hospital (MA), was established at An Khe in January 1966, MAJ Rich began collecting retrieved foreign bodies along with documentation of the wound. A museum displaying these objects was established at one end of the operating room Quonset hut. During Rich's tour of duty, there were 324 cases where the patient was wounded by a punji stick, representing 38% wounds because of hostile action.

  20. Histological effects of occlusive dressing on healing of incisional skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoto; Kiyosawa, Tomoharu

    2014-12-01

    Occlusive dressing is widely accepted and used to manage skin ulcers. However, with respect to its application to incisional wounds, most studies have been conducted about the clinical effects on incisional healing of surgical sites. Studies of the histological effects of occlusive dressing for incisional wounds have been few. The aim of this study was to clarify the histological effects of occlusive dressings on healing of incisional skin wounds. Rat dorsal skin was incised down to the panniculus and sutured immediately. Dressing types included 2-octyl cyanoacrylate and hydrocolloid materials as occlusive dressings and no-dressing as the open therapy. Histological examination and dermoscopic observation were performed 1, 2, 4 and 7 days after surgery. The findings from each dressing type were compared. In the open therapy group, the upper portion of the edge of incision was necrosed minimally and finally healed with wide scar formation. However, in the occlusive dressing groups, micronecrosis of the incision edge seen in the no-dressing group was not observed, healing was more rapid and the remaining scar was finer. Occlusive dressing can prevent micronecrosis of the incision edge, resulting in rapid and excellent healing. This study shows that the efficacy of and supports the use of occlusive dressing in incisional wound management.

  1. Facial gunshot wound debridement: debridement of facial soft tissue gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Shvyrkov, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Over the period 1981-1985 the author treated 1486 patients with facial gunshot wounds sustained in combat in Afghanistan. In the last quarter of 20th century, more powerful and destructive weapons such as M-16 rifles, AK-47 and Kalashnikov submachine guns, became available and a new approach to gunshot wound debridement is required. Modern surgeons have little experience in treatment of such wounds because of rare contact with similar pathology. This article is intended to explore modern wound debridement. The management of 502 isolated soft tissue injuries is presented. Existing principles recommend the sparing of damaged tissues. The author's experience was that tissue sparing lead to a high rate of complications (47.6%). Radical primary surgical debridement (RPSD) of wounds was then adopted with radical excision of necrotic non-viable wound margins containing infection to the point of active capillary bleeding and immediate primary wound closure. After radical debridement wound infection and breakdown decreased by a factor of 10. Plastic operations with local and remote soft tissue were made on 14, 7% of the wounded. Only 0.7% patients required discharge from the army due to facial muscle paralysis and/or facial skin impregnation with particles of gunpowder from mine explosions. Gunshot face wound; modern debridement.

  2. Epidermal Graft Accelerates the Healing of Acute Wound: A Self-controlled Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bystrzonowski, Nicola; Hachach-Haram, Nadine; Richards, Toby; Mosahebi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Wound care represents a significant socioeconomic burden, with over half of chronic wounds taking up to a year to heal. Measures to accelerate wound healing are beneficial to patients and also reduce the cost and burden of wound management. Epidermal grafting (EG) is an emerging option for autologous skin grafting in the outpatient setting to improve wound healing. Although several case series have previously reported good clinical outcome with EG, the healing rate in comparison to conservative wound management is not known. In this report, we compare the weekly healing rate of 2 separate wounds in the same patient, one treated with EG and the other with dressings. The treated wound showed accelerated healing, with the healing rate being the highest at the first 2 weeks after EG. The average healing time of the treated wound was 40% faster compared with the control wound. EG accelerates healing of acute wounds, potentially reducing the healthcare cost and surgical burden. PMID:27975024

  3. Opioid-sparing effect of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors on surgical outcomes after open colorectal surgery within an enhanced recovery after surgery protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the opioid-sparing effect of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors on short-term surgical outcomes after open colorectal surgery. METHODS: Patients undergoing open colorectal resection within an enhanced recovery after surgery protocol from 2011 to 2015 were reviewed. Patients with combined general anesthesia and epidural anesthesia, and those with acute colonic obstruction or perforation were excluded. Patients receiving selective COX-2 inhibitor were compared with well-matched individuals without such a drug. Outcome measures included numeric pain score and morphine milligram equivalent (MME) consumption on postoperative day (POD) 1-3, gastrointestinal recovery (time to tolerate solid diet and time to defecate), complications and length of postoperative stay. RESULTS: There were 75 patients in each group. Pain score on POD 1-3 was not significantly different between two groups. However, MME consumption and MME consumption per kilogram body weight on POD 1-3 was significantly less in patients receiving a selective COX-2 inhibitor (P < 0.001). Median MME consumption per kilogram body weight on POD 1-3 was 0.09, 0.06 and nil, respectively in patients receiving a selective COX-2 inhibitor and 0.22, 0.25 and 0.07, respectively in the comparative group (P < 0.001), representing at least 59% opioid reduction. Patients prescribing a selective COX-2 inhibitor had a shorter median time to resumption of solid diet [1 (IQR 1-2) d vs 2 (IQR 2-3) d; P < 0.001] and time to first defecation [2 (IQR 2-3) d vs 3 (IQR 3-4) d; P < 0.001]. There was no significant difference in overall postoperative complications between two groups. However, median postoperative stay was significantly 1-d shorter in patients prescribing a selective COX-2 inhibitor [4 (IQR 3-5) d vs 5 (IQR 4-6) d; P < 0.001]. CONCLUSION: Perioperative administration of oral selective COX-2 inhibitors significantly decreased intravenous opioid consumption, shortened time to gastrointestinal

  4. Comparative clinical study of ultrasound-guided A1 pulley release vs open surgical intervention in the treatment of trigger finger

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Vasileios S; Malahias, Michael-Alexander; Kaseta, Maria-Kyriaki; Sourlas, Ioannis; Babis, George C

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided release of the first annular pulley and compare results with the conventional open operative technique. METHODS In this prospective randomized, single-center, clinical study, 32 patients with trigger finger or trigger thumb, grade II-IV according to Green classification system, were recruited. Two groups were formed; Group A (16 patients) was treated with an ultrasound-guided percutaneous release of the affected A1 pulley under local anesthesia. Group B (16 patients) underwent an open surgical release of the A1 pulley, through a 10-15 mm incision. Patients were assessed pre- and postoperatively (follow-up: 2, 4 and 12 wk) by physicians blinded to the procedures. Treatment of triggering (primary variable of interest) was expressed as the “success rate” per digit. The time for taking postoperative pain killers, range of motion recovery, QuickDASH test scores (Greek version), return to normal activities (including work), complications and cosmetic results were assessed. RESULTS The success rate in group A was 93.75% (15/16) and in group B 100% (16/16). Mean times in group A patients were 3.5 d for taking pain killers, 4.1 d for returning to normal activities, and 7.2 and 3.9 d for complete extension and flexion recovery, respectively. Mean QuickDASH scores in group A were 45.5 preoperatively and, 7.5, 0.5 and 0 after 2, 4, and 12 wk postoperatively. Mean times in group B patients were 2.9 d for taking pain killers, 17.8 d for returning to normal activities, and 5.6 and 3 d for complete extension and flexion recovery. Mean QuickDASH scores in group B were 43.2 preoperatively and, 8.2, 1.3 and 0 after 2, 4, and 12 wk postoperatively. The cosmetic results found excellent or good in 87.5% (14/16) of group A patients, while in 56.25% (9/16) of group B patients were evaluated as fair or poor. CONCLUSION Treatment of the trigger finger using ultrasonography resulted in fewer absence of work days, and better

  5. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Reduces Pseudomonas Wound Contamination More Than Staphylococcus Aureus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    bioluminescent bacteria were used to evaluate the effectiveness of various irrigation pressures to remove bacteria from a wound. This approach has... bioluminescent bacteria and imaging technology to compare the effect of NPWT and WTD therapy on bacterial contamination of large, complex musculoskeletal wounds...is to determine if negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) treatment results in fewer bacteria than wet-to-dry (WTD) dressings in a contaminated open

  6. Gunshot wounds -- aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000737.htm Gunshot wounds - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... or body are likely to cause more damage. Wound Care If the wound was severe, you may ...

  7. Poststernotomy mediastinitis: a review of conventional surgical treatments, vacuum-assisted closure therapy and presentation of the Lund University Hospital mediastinitis algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Johan; Malmsjö, Malin; Gustafsson, Ronny; Ingemansson, Richard

    2006-12-01

    Poststernotomy mediastinitis, also commonly called deep sternal wound infection, is one of the most feared complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The overall incidence of poststernotomy mediastinitis is relatively low, between 1% and 3%, however, this complication is associated with a significant mortality, usually reported to vary between 10% and 25%. At the present time, there is no general consensus regarding the appropriate surgical approach to mediastinitis following open-heart surgery and a wide range of wound-healing strategies have been established for the treatment of poststernotomy mediastinitis during the era of modern cardiac surgery. Conventional forms of treatment usually involve surgical revision with open dressings or closed irrigation, or reconstruction with vascularized soft tissue flaps such as omentum or pectoral muscle. Unfortunately, procedure-related morbidity is relatively frequent when using conventional treatments and the long-term clinical outcome has been unsatisfying. Vacuum-assisted closure is a novel treatment with an ingenious mechanism. This wound-healing technique is based on the application of local negative pressure to a wound. During the application of negative pressure to a sternal wound several advantageous features from conventional surgical treatment are combined. Recent publications have demonstrated encouraging clinical results, however, observations are still rather limited and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This review provides an overview of the etiology and common risk factors for deep sternal wound infections and presents the historical development of conventional therapies. We also discuss the current experiences with VAC therapy in poststernotomy mediastinitis and summarize the current knowledge on the mechanisms by which VAC therapy promotes wound healing. Finally, we suggest a structured algorithm for using VAC therapy for treatment of poststernotomy mediastinitis in clinical

  8. Combat Wound Initiative Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Stasis Ulcer 4 16.0 15 60.0 4.0 5 20.0 Decubitus Ulcer 8 66.7 2 16.7 8.3 8.3 Plaster Cast Pressure Sore 6 85.7 0 0 I 14.3 0 0 Arterial Insufficiency...causes were emolled including: failed primary surgical closure, traumatic wounds, arterial and venous insufficiency ulcers , pressure sores, and... Ulcer 2 40.0 3 60.0 0 0 0 0 Bum 6 85.7 0 0 14.3 0 0 ESWT Treatments 0.001 Mean 2.3 :t 0.2 3.6 :t 0.3 3.4 :t 0.3 5.6 :t 0.7 Healing 0.001

  9. Dietary L-arginine and cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Naderpour, Masoud; Rad, Jafar Soleimani; Ayat, Esmail; Mesgari, Mehran; Farahani, Ramin M; Roshangar, Leila; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2008-01-01

    Skin wound healing has been the subject of extensive studies and various drugs have been used in an attempt to improve wound healing. There are conflicting data regarding the effects of L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide, on wound healing. We examined the 1-week rate of cutaneous wound healing and collagen deposition in three groups of rats who received a (1) L-arginine (2% in drinking water)-supplemented diet from three days before until the seventh day following injury (Group 1), (2) L-arginine-supplemented diet for three days before injury (Group 2), and (3) a standard diet without L-arginine supplementation (Group 3). The wound length and width were measured each day and then the open wound area and cumulative percentage of open wound area reduction were calculated. Wound biopsy samples were examined with Trichrome-Masson stain in a subgroup of animals. Results showed that Group 1 rats had a significantly lower cumulative percentage of open wound area reduction on day 7 compared to other two groups (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.05). Relatively higher degrees of wound collagen deposit (day 7) were noted in groups 2 and 3. It may be concluded that L-arginine (2% in water) administered three days before until the seventh day following skin wound induction may diminish the rate of skin wound healing and collagen deposition.

  10. The role of growth factors in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Steed, D L

    1997-06-01

    Growth factors applied topically to wounds can accelerate healing by stimulating granulation tissue formation and enhancing epithelialization. This has been suggested by several different studies of topically applied growth factors. It is clear, however, that topical growth factor therapy should not be considered as a substitute for good wound care, including surgical debridement or revascularization.

  11. 21 CFR 878.4020 - Occlusive wound dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Occlusive wound dressing. 878.4020 Section 878.4020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4020 Occlusive wound...

  12. 21 CFR 878.4020 - Occlusive wound dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Occlusive wound dressing. 878.4020 Section 878.4020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4020 Occlusive wound...

  13. 21 CFR 878.4020 - Occlusive wound dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Occlusive wound dressing. 878.4020 Section 878.4020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4020 Occlusive wound...

  14. 21 CFR 878.4020 - Occlusive wound dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Occlusive wound dressing. 878.4020 Section 878.4020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4020 Occlusive wound...

  15. 21 CFR 878.4018 - Hydrophilic wound dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrophilic wound dressing. 878.4018 Section 878.4018 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4018 Hydrophilic wound...

  16. 21 CFR 878.4020 - Occlusive wound dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Occlusive wound dressing. 878.4020 Section 878.4020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4020 Occlusive wound...

  17. 21 CFR 878.4018 - Hydrophilic wound dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrophilic wound dressing. 878.4018 Section 878.4018 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4018 Hydrophilic wound...

  18. 21 CFR 878.4018 - Hydrophilic wound dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrophilic wound dressing. 878.4018 Section 878.4018 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4018 Hydrophilic wound...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4018 - Hydrophilic wound dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrophilic wound dressing. 878.4018 Section 878.4018 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4018 Hydrophilic wound...

  20. 21 CFR 878.4018 - Hydrophilic wound dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophilic wound dressing. 878.4018 Section 878.4018 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4018 Hydrophilic wound...

  1. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  2. The Falklands war: Army field surgical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D. S.; Batty, C. G.; Ryan, J. M.; McGregor, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    In the recent Falklands campaign four Army Field Surgical Teams were deployed in the two phases of the war. They functioned as Advanced Surgical Centres and operated on 233 casualties. There were 3 deaths. The patterns of wounding and the methods of casualty management are discussed and compared with other recent campaigns. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6614760

  3. A vapour-permeable film dressing used on superficial wounds.

    PubMed

    Meuleneire, Frans

    2014-08-12

    Films are an extremely versatile dressing type that can be effectively used in the treatment of many superficial wounds, such as skin grafts, surgical wounds and superficial burns; they provide an optimal moist environment to promote healing, act as a barrier to bacteria, and afford protection from urine and faecal contamination. Unfortunately, many film dressings are difficult to handle and use traditional adhesives, which can cause trauma to the wound and surrounding skin, as well as increased wound pain at dressing removal. Mepitel® Film is a new, easy-to-use wound dressing designed with Safetac® technology that helps to minimise dressing-related trauma and pain and assist undisturbed wound healing. This article presents case studies that examine Mepitel Film's use on a variety of wounds, and reviews the findings of research that was undertaken to evaluate the benefits of using this recently developed dressing.

  4. Elements affecting wound healing time: An evidence based analysis.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hanan; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Carroll, Matthew; Walker, Judi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the predominant client factors and comorbidities that affected the time taken for wounds to heal. A prospective study design used the Mobile Wound Care (MWC) database to capture and collate detailed medical histories, comorbidities, healing times and consumable costs for clients with wounds in Gippsland, Victoria. There were 3,726 wounds documented from 2,350 clients, so an average of 1.6 wounds per client. Half (49.6%) of all clients were females, indicating that there were no gender differences in terms of wound prevalence. The clients were primarily older people, with an average age of 64.3 years (ranging between 0.7 and 102.9 years). The majority of the wounds (56%) were acute and described as surgical, crush and trauma. The MWC database categorized the elements that influenced wound healing into 3 groups--factors affecting healing (FAH), comorbidities, and medications known to affect wound healing. While there were a multitude of significant associations, multiple linear regression identified the following key elements: age over 65 years, obesity, nonadherence to treatment plan, peripheral vascular disease, specific wounds associated with pressure/friction/shear, confirmed infection, and cerebrovascular accident (stroke). Wound healing is a complex process that requires a thorough understanding of influencing elements to improve healing times.© 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  5. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Joseph C.; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  6. An update on the evaluation and management of plantar puncture wounds and Pseudomonas osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Inaba, A S; Zukin, D D; Perro, M

    1992-02-01

    The management of children who present to the ED with plantar puncture wounds is dependent upon the nature of the injury, the examination of the puncture site, and the potential risk of a retained foreign body. Not all patients will require wound enlargement and a search for a retained foreign body. Close follow-up of all children who are being treated as outpatients is of vital importance in detecting an early development of an infectious complication. Pseudomonas osteomyelitis should be suspected in all patients who present with foot pain, swelling, and a decreased ability to bear weight after sustaining a nail puncture through a sneaker. The current consensus favors open surgical débridement followed by a course of intravenous antibiotics. The exact duration of the postoperative antibiotic course is still being debated.

  7. Dermabond efficacy in total joint arthroplasty wounds.

    PubMed

    Miller, Adam G; Swank, Michael L

    2010-10-01

    The goals of wound closure are a low infection rate and timely healing. Total joint arthroplasty (TJA) requires mobile recovery, and, therefore, a high-tension wound care environment. We conducted a study to compare the efficacy of high-viscosity Dermabond (Ethicon, Somerville, New Jersey) and the efficacy of surgical staples in healing high-tension, mobile surgical sites of TJA. Of 236 total knee arthroplasties and 223 total hip arthroplasties (459 surgeries total), 250 were performed with Dermabond and 209 with staples. According to χ2 analysis, case and control infection rates were equivalent. Signs of acute inflammation (redness, drainage, dehiscence) also were statistically equivalent. Absence of staples accounted for a significant decrease in tape blisters and skin abscesses. Dermabond is superior to staples in high-tension wound care.

  8. Effects of wound closure on wound healing in gynecologic surgery: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Cedric E; Umek, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    A systematic review was undertaken using the Cochrane and PubMed databases to answer the question of how wound closure affects wound healing after gynecologic surgery. Leaving the vaginal vault open after vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy is as safe as closing it. When closing the vaginal vault, there is no difference between sutures and staples. Nonclosure of the peritoneum is a safe method after vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy. After laparotomy there is no difference between continuous and interrupted sutures regarding wound infection and/or dehiscence. After vertical midline incisions it is possible to close Camper's fascia, use drainage or close the skin only. The overall wound complication rate after laparoscopic surgery is lower when using transcutaneous as compared to subcuticular sutures. Adhesive paper tapes save time when closing smaller skin incisions. In conclusion, specific wound closure techniques improve wound healing after gynecologic operations.

  9. Ten years' experience with pediatric gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Barlow, B; Niemirska, M; Gandhi, R P

    1982-12-01

    Gunshot wounds in children have become a significant source of morbidity and mortality in our community in the last 10 yr. One hundred eight children, 16 yr of age and younger, were admitted to the Pediatric Surgical Service for gunshot wounds during this period; only 1 child was admitted for a gunshot wound in the 10 yr preceding this review. Rapid resuscitation and triage of major injuries directly to the operating room achieved a 94% survival. Review of the circumstances of injury revealed that 42% of the gunshot wounds were inflicted by children and 40% were known to have been intentional. Only 20% of the patients had known drug involvement; in general this was involvement in drug selling, not in drug abuse. Social service intervention can offer significant benefit to these children, but ultimately gun control laws with strict enforcement are needed to stop this type of violence toward children.

  10. [Combined penetrating wounds of the heart, abdomen and trunk--case report].

    PubMed

    Martinović, Zeljko; Martinović, Cvita

    2010-01-01

    This is an overview of a forty-year-old male with combined penetrating knife inflicted stab wounds to the left chest, heart, abdomen and trunk. Presented are clinical manifestations, course of first aid and overall surgical help given to the injured with multiple stab wounds. Efficiency of rapid diagnostics and surgical approach to penetrating stab wound of the heart is pointed out. Postoperative course and definitive outcome of treatment are presented.

  11. A bioactive molecule in a complex wound healing process: platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kaltalioglu, Kaan; Coskun-Cevher, Sule

    2015-08-01

    Wound healing is considered to be particularly important after surgical procedures, and the most important wounds related to surgical procedures are incisional, excisional, and punch wounds. Research is ongoing to identify methods to heal non-closed wounds or to accelerate wound healing; however, wound healing is a complex process that includes many biological and physiological events, and it is affected by various local and systemic factors, including diabetes mellitus, infection, ischemia, and aging. Different cell types (such as platelets, macrophages, and neutrophils) release growth factors during the healing process, and platelet-derived growth factor is a particularly important mediator in most stages of wound healing. This review explores the relationship between platelet-derived growth factor and wound healing.

  12. Heterotopic ossification in wartime wounds.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Jonathan Agner; Potter, Benjamin Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) refers to the formation of mature lamellar bone in nonosseous tissue. In the setting of high-energy wartime extremity wounds, HO is expected to complicate up to 64% of patients, has a predilection for the residual limbs of amputees, and remains a significant source of disability. Although the inciting events and the definitive cell(s) of origin continue to remain elusive, animal models and human histology samples suggest that HO formation follows a predictable sequence of events culminating in endochondral ossification. Primary prophylaxis is not medically or logistically practical in most cases because patients have generally sustained massive wounds and are undergoing serial debridements during an intercontinental aeromedical evacuation. Surgical excision of symptomatic lesions is warranted only after an appropriate trial of conservative measures and is associated with low recurrence rates in appropriately selected patients. Future research regarding prognostication and defining the early molecular biology of ectopic bone may permit individualized prophylaxis and development of novel targeted therapies.

  13. Skin wound healing modulation by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2010-07-25

    Skin wound healing is a multi stage phenomenon that requires the activation, recruitment or activity of numerous cell types as keratinocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblast and inflammatory cells. Among the latter, macrophages appear to be central to this process. They colonize the wound at its very early stage and in addition to their protective immune role seem to organize the activity of other cell types at the following stages of the healing. Their benefit to this process is however controversial, as macrophages are described to promote the speed of healing but may also favour the fibrosis resulting from it in scars. Moreover wound healing defects are associated with abnormalities in the inflammatory phase. In this review, we summarise our knowledge on what are the Wound Associated Macrophages, and how they interact with the other cell types to control the reepithelisation, angiogenesis and the extracellular matrix remodelling. We believe this knowledge may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention on skin wounds.

  14. Critical limb ischemia: medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Slovut, David Paul; Sullivan, Timothy M

    2008-08-01

    Chronic critical limb ischemia (CLI), defined as > 2 weeks of rest pain, ulcers, or tissue loss attributed to arterial occlusive disease, is associated with great loss of both limb and life. Therapeutic goals in treating patients with CLI include reducing cardiovascular risk factors, relieving ischemic pain, healing ulcers, preventing major amputation, improving quality of life and increasing survival. These aims may be achieved through medical therapy, revascularization, or amputation. Medical therapy includes administration of analgesics, local wound care and pressure relief, treatment of infection, and aggressive therapy to modify atherosclerotic risk factors. For patients who are not candidates for revascularization, and who are unwilling or unable to undergo amputation, treatments such as intermittent pneumatic compression or spinal cord stimulation may offer symptom relief and promote wound healing. Revascularization offers the best option for limb salvage. The decision to perform surgery, endovascular therapy, or a combination of the two modalities ('hybrid' therapy) must be individualized. Patients who are relatively fit and able to withstand the rigors of an open procedure may benefit from the long-term durability of surgical repair. In contrast, frail patients with a limited life expectancy may experience better outcomes with endovascular reconstruction. Hybrid therapy is an attractive option for patients with limited autologous conduit, as it permits complete revascularization with a less extensive procedure, shorter duration of operation, and decreased risk of peri-operative complications. Amputation should be considered for patients who are non-ambulatory, demented, or unfit to undergo revascularization.

  15. Healing of Chronic Wounds through Systemic Effects of Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañedo, L.; Trigos, I.; García-Cantú, R.; Godina-Nava, J. J.; Serrano, G.

    2002-08-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF) were configured to interact with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). These ELF were applied in the arm to five patients with chronic wounds resistant to medical and surgical treatment. Wound healing began in all patients during the first two weeks after ELF exposure permiting their previously unresponsive chronic wounds to function as internal controls. All lesions were cured or healed >70% in less than four months. Systemic effects were explained by ELF activation of PBMC and their transportation through the blood to the affected site. This therapy is effective in selected patients with chronic wounds.

  16. [The clinical estimation of ketoprofen lysine salt effect on the intensitivity of acute pain syndrome in the oral cavity during surgical procedures and postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Durnovo, E A; Shashurina, S V; Bespalova, N A; Khomutinnikova, N E; Gliavina, I A; Marochkina, M S; Iartseva, A V

    2013-01-01

    Is studying and control of the clinical efficacy and safety of ketoprofen lysine salt (КLS) (the commercial name is "Oki" manufacturer by Dompe CPA, Italy) in the form of sachets and solutions for application in postoperative period after dental surgeries procedures. The comparison of the analgetic effect of systemic and local forms of the "Oki" drug, depending on the type and extent of surgery procedures. Was carried out surgical treatment and patients examination in the postoperative period. Surgical procedures included: vestibulolasty, vestibulolasty with apically-displaced flap, vestibulolasty with apically-displaced flap and a free palatal mucogingival graft, removal impacted and dystopic teeth, periodontal surgery. The research was conducted in the Surgical stomatology and Maxillofacial surgery Department (stomatological policlinic of the Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy). Was noted rapid advanced of anesthesia when using sachets and solutions of the ketoprofen lysine salt (the commercial name is "Oki" manufacturer by Dompe CPA, Italy) in postoperative period after dental surgical procedures. Was noted a more advanced of analgetic effect in the application therapy by DCI solution when open surgical wound presented. Analgetic effect was observed after 20-30 min and was maintained in the postoperative period to an average of 8 hours. Local application sachets and solution of the ketoprofen lysine salt (KLS ), in our opinion, is the most appropriate and is highly effective when open surgical wound presented. Ketoprofen lysine salt (KLS) has a neutral pH and does not irritate the gastrointestinal tract, that determines the safety of its used.

  17. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds.

  18. Defined and refined: criteria for identifying wound infection revisited.

    PubMed

    Cutting, Keith F; White, Richard

    2004-03-01

    Clinical criteria for the identification of wound infection are regularly based on a list created by Cutting and Harding (1994). This list was established from empirical data generated in a large, multidisciplinary clinical practice, and is now widely accepted as a seminal article in wound care. Both Cutting (1998) and Gardner et al (2001) have conducted validation exercises on these wound infection criteria, based on the assumption that the criteria broadly apply to most wound types. Although many of the original criteria do apply across the spectrum of wound types, the major categories of wounds should be considered separately to avoid the possibility of overlooking the presence of infection. The focus of this article is a review of the published literature on wound infection criteria for acute and surgical wounds, diabetic foot ulcers, venous and arterial leg ulcers, pressure ulcers and burns. All known criteria for each wound type are presented, as well as an outline of the ongoing research project to refine the criteria by wound type using a Delphi panel technique. No attempt has been made to correlate visual signs and symptoms with microbiological sampling techniques. It is clear that there are subtle variations between infection criteria for wound types and that these should be recognized if treatment is to be given appropriately and promptly, and morbidity avoided.

  19. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris

    2012-05-01

    Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review.

  20. Wound contraction effects and antibacterial properties of Tualang honey on full-thickness burn wounds in rats in comparison to hydrofibre

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Full-thickness burn wounds require excision and skin grafting. Multiple surgical procedures are inevitable in managing moderate to severe full-thickness burns. Wound bed preparations prior to surgery are necessary in order to prevent wound infection and promote wound healing. Honey can be used to treat burn wounds. However, not all the honey is the same. This study aims to evaluate the wound contraction and antibacterial properties of locally-produced Tualang honey on managing full-thickness burn wounds in vivo. Methods Thirty-six female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups. Under anaesthesia, three full-thickness burn wounds were created on the dorsum of the rats. The full-thickness burn wounds were inoculated with a specific organism (104), namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 12), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 12), or Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 12). The three burn wounds were dressed with Tualang honey, hydrofibre and hydrofibre silver respectively. Swab samples were obtained every 3 days (day 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21) for quantitative and semi-quantitative microbiological analyses. Clinical assessments, including observations concerning the appearance and wound size, were measured at the same time. Results There was a rapid 32.26% reduction in wound size by day 6 (p = 0.008) in the Tualang honey-treated wounds, and 49.27% by day 15 (p = 0.005). The wounds remained smaller by day 18 (p < 0.032). Tualang honey-treated rats demonstrated a reduction in bacterial growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated wounds (p = 0.005). However, hydrofibre silver and hydrofibre-treated wounds are superior to honey-treated wounds with Acinetobacter baumannii (p = 0.035). There was no statistical significant of antibacterial property in Klebsiella pneumonia inoculated wounds. Conclusions Tualang honey has better results with regards to its control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its wound contraction effects on full-thickness burn wound in vivo

  1. [Gunshot wounds: forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Lorin de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy

    2012-02-01

    Gunshot wounds are among the most complex traumatic lesions encountered in forensic pathology. At the time of autopsy, careful scrutiny of the wounds is essential for correct interpretation of the lesions. Complementary pathological analysis has many interests: differentiation between entrance and exit wounds, estimation of firing distance, differentiation between vital and post mortem wounds and wounds dating. In case of multiple headshots, neuropathological examination can provide arguments for or against suicide. Sampling of gunshot wounds at autopsy must be systematic. Pathological data should be confronted respectively to autopsy and death scene investigation data and also ballistic studies. Forensic pathologist must be aware of the limits of optic microscopy.

  2. Nutritional Aspects of Gastrointestinal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Kaushik; Kavalukas, Sandra L.; Barbul, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Although the wound healing cascade is similar in many tissues, in the gastrointestinal tract mucosal healing is critical for processes such as inflammatory bowel disease and ulcers and healing of the mucosa, submucosa, and serosal layers is needed for surgical anastomoses and for enterocutaneous fistula. Failure of wound healing can result in complications including infection, prolonged hospitalization, critical illness, organ failure, readmission, new or worsening enterocutaneous fistula, and even death. Recent Advances: Recent advances are relevant for the role of specific micronutrients, such as vitamin D, trace elements, and the interplay between molecules with pro- and antioxidant properties. Our understanding of the role of other small molecules, genes, proteins, and macronutrients is also rapidly changing. Recent work has elucidated relationships between oxidative stress, nutritional supplementation, and glucose metabolism. Thresholds have also been established to define adequate preoperative nutritional status. Critical Issues: Further work is needed to establish standards and definitions for measuring the extent of wound healing, particularly for inflammatory bowel disease and ulcers. In addition, a mounting body of evidence has determined the need for adequate preoperative nutritional supplementation for elective surgical procedures. Future Directions: A large portion of current work is restricted to model systems in rodents. Therefore, additional clinical and translational research is needed in this area to promote gastrointestinal wound healing in humans, particularly those suffering from critical illness, patients with enterocutaneous fistula, inflammatory bowel disease, and ulcers, and those undergoing surgical procedures. PMID:27867755

  3. Postoperative irradiation impairs or enhances wound strength depending on time of administration

    SciTech Connect

    Vegesna, V.; McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R.

    1995-08-01

    Irradiation can complicate surgical wound healing, yet little is known of the importance of the time between surgery and irradiation on this process. This study investigated the impact of post-operative irradiation on gain in wound tensile strength in a murine skin model. Irradiation on the same day as wounding or to 2-day-old wounds reduced wound tensile strength. In contrast, postoperative irradiation delivered at 7, 9 and 14 days transiently enhanced wound tensile strength, as measure d 3 but not 4 or 5 weeks later. This effect was independent of the inclusion (hemi-body) or exclusion (skin alone) of the hematopoietic system in the field of irradiation. Radiation-enhanced wound tensile strength was greater and occurred earlier after higher radiation doses. Even though the effect of irradiation in enhancing wound tensile strength is transitory, it could be important in assisting early wound healing. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Non-surgical deep intrauterine transfer of superfine open pulled straw (SOPS)-vitrified porcine embryos: evaluation of critical steps of the procedure.

    PubMed

    Gomis, J; Cuello, C; Sanchez-Osorio, J; Gil, M A; Parrilla, I; Angel, M A; Maside, C; del Olmo, D; Vazquez, J M; Roca, J; Martinez, E A

    2012-10-01

    Previous trials achieved extremely poor results when using the one-step warming method in a syringe in combination with non-surgical deep intrauterine transfer (NET) of superfine open pulled straw (SOPS)-vitrified embryos. This study aimed to assess the effect of the warming procedure on the in vitro and in vivo development of SOPS-vitrified embryos. The effect of the passage of the vitrified-warmed (VW) embryos through the NET catheter was also evaluated. Groups of 4 to 6 morulae and blastocysts, collected from weaned sows, were SOPS-vitrified in 1 μL of vitrification medium, warmed by the one-step warming method in a dish or in a 1-mL syringe and cultured in vitro for 48 h to evaluate the embryo survival (ES) and hatching rates (HR). Warming in syringe had a deleterious effect (P < 0.05) on the in vitro ES (60.5 ± 10.4%) and HR (39.6 ± 9.5%) of VW embryos in comparison with embryos warmed in a dish (85.4 ± 10.6% and 69.0 ± 8.4%, respectively). This decreased embryonic development was due to the increased time required between the removal of the straws from the liquid nitrogen and the contact of the embryos with the warming medium when the warming was performed in a syringe in comparison with that for the warming in a dish. After verifying that the passage of VW embryos through the NET catheter does not have a damaging effect on their further in vitro development, the negative effect of warming in a syringe was also confirmed after NET. Fifteen fresh and SOPS-vitrified embryos warmed in a syringe or in a dish were transferred to each recipient (n = 28) and recovered 24 h later to assess their developmental progression. All embryos from the syringe group were found to have degenerated at recovery. The in vivo ES and HR from the dish group (80.4 ± 3.4% and 14.2 ± 7.2%, respectively) were lower (P < 0.05) than those from the fresh group (94.0 ± 4.1% and 36.8 ± 7.8%, respectively). Combining the warming in a dish and the NET procedure, 35 VW embryos were

  5. Silk sericin ameliorates wound healing and its clinical efficacy in burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Palapinyo, Sirinoot; Srichana, Teerapol; Chottanapund, Suthat; Muangman, Pornprom

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silk sericin, a protein from silkworm cocoon, on scratch wound healing in vitro. For applicable result in clinical use, we also study the efficacy of sericin added to a standard antimicrobial cream, silver zinc sulfadiazine, for open wound care in the treatment of second-degree burn wounds. In vitro scratch assays show that sericin at concentration 100 μg/mL can promote the migration of fibroblast L929 cells similar to epidermal growth factor (positive control) at 100 μg/mL. After 1 day of treatment, the length of scratch in wounds treated with sericin was significantly shorter than the length of negative control wounds (culture medium without sericin). For clinical study, a total of 29 patients with 65 burn wounds which covered no less than 15 % of total body surface area were randomly assigned to either control (wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine cream) or treatment (wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine with added sericin cream) group in this randomized, double-blind, standard-controlled study. The results showed that the average time to reach 70 % re-epithelialization of the burned surface and complete healing in the treatment group was significantly shorter, approximately 5-7 days, than in the control group. Regarding time for complete healing, control wounds took approximately 29.28 ± 9.27 days, while wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine with added sericin cream took approximately 22.42 ± 6.33 days, (p = 0.001). No infection or severe reaction was found in any wounds. This is the first clinical study to show that silk sericin is safe and beneficial for burn wound treatment when it is added to silver sulfadiazine cream.

  6. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers.

  7. Wound care centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of dressings as your wound heals. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Depending on the type of wound, your doctor may recommend hyperbaric oxygen therapy . Oxygen is important for healing. During this ...

  8. EPIDERMAL DELETION OF HIF-2α STIMULATES WOUND CLOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Cowburn, Andrew S.; Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Southwood, Mark; Nizet, Victor; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Johnson, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    Wound closure requires a complex series of micro-environmentally influenced events. A key aspect of wound closure is the migration of keratinocytes across the open wound. It has been found previously that the response to hypoxia via the HIF-1α transcription factor is a key feature of wound closure. The need for hypoxic response is likely due to interrupted wound vasculature as well as infection, and in this work, we investigated the need for a highly related hypoxic response transcription factor, HIF-2α. This factor was deleted tissue-specifically in mice, and the resulting mice were found to have an accelerated rate of wound closure. This is correlated with a reduced bacterial load and inflammatory response in these mice. This indicates that manipulating or reducing the HIF-2α response in keratinocytes could be a useful means to accelerate wound healing and tissue repair. PMID:24037341

  9. Studies on Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    therapy on wound repair have been amply demonstrated. Increased oxygen supply promotes wound healing whereas decreased oxygen supply retards repair...appmarn as early as 6 hms afte the a~ddton of DMF (Figl. 2). The increase was linea during the 24 hrs period of observaumoe in order toconfimn if the...Examine the effect of superoxide on collagen synthesis in vivo, * Examine the effect of increased superoxide levels on wound healing , and * Develop strategies to administer superoxide to wounds.

  10. Honey in wound care: effects, clinical application and patient benefit.

    PubMed

    Lay-flurrie, Karen

    The use of honey in wound management has enjoyed a resurgence. This is largely due to the growing clinical problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the combined difficulties for the practitioner in managing chronic wound types, such as burns, leg ulcers or surgical wounds, that may become infected, for example, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas. The associated costs of treating such wounds are escalating as a result. While the use of honey as a wound dressing has been recognized, at least since Egyptian times circa 2000 BC, it is only more recently, due to the development and licensing of modern honey wound dressings, that such dressings have become more widely available and used in wound management. This article focuses on the use of honey in the treatment of infected wounds and burns. It will examine the effects of honey at the wound bed and its clinical applications, along with the current dressings available. Also discussed are the practical considerations, if, like any wound dressing, honey is to be used safely, appropriately and for the benefit of the patient.

  11. Raman spectroscopy and the spectral correlation index for predicting wound healing outcome: towards in vivo application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Adam G.; Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2016-03-01

    Combat wounds are sometimes confounded by healing complications that are not as prevalent in civilian wounds due to their high energy etiology. One complication of wound healing is dehiscence, where a surgically closed wound reopens after closure. This complication can have serious consequences for the patient, but knowledge about the molecular composition of the wound bed beyond what is readily visible may help clinicians mitigate these complications. It is necessary to develop techniques that can be used in vivo to assess and predict wound healing pointof- care so that care-takers can decide the best way to make informed clinical decisions regarding their patient's healing. Raman spectroscopy is a perfect candidate for predicting wound healing due to its ability to provide a detailed molecular fingerprint of the wound bed noninvasively. Here, we study the spectral correlation index, a measure of orthogonality, with ten reference tissue components to stratify wounds based on how they heal. We analyze these indexes over time to show the modulation of these tissue components over the wound healing process. Results show that qualitative observation of the spectra cannot reveal major differences between the dehisced and normal healing wounds, but the spectral correlation index can. Analysis of the spectral correlations across the wound healing process demonstrates the changes throughout the wound healing process, showing that early differences in tissue components may portend wound healing. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy coupled with the spectral correlation index presents as a possible point-of-care tool for enabling discrimination of wounds with impaired healing.

  12. A cross-sectional study of chronic wound-related pain and itching.

    PubMed

    Paul, Julia

    2013-07-01

    Persons with chronic wounds may experience wound-related itch (pruritus) and pain. A cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the occurrence of itch and pain in chronic wounds and the relationship of the intensity between these factors. Patients in an outpatient wound care center, 18 years and older with an open wound, were recruited consecutively over a 5-month period. The 199 participants (112 [56%] men) had a mean age of 67 years (range 21-98 years); one wound per person was addressed and included venous (31), arterial (23), neuropathic (31), pressure-related (33), traumatic (37), and "other" (41) wounds. Wound-related pain and itch data were obtained using a modified Paul-Pieper Itching Questionnaire and Characteristics of Itch Questionnaire. Responses were hand-recorded and coded without personal identifiers and analyzed using descriptive statistics, and associations among data were assessed using Pearson chi-square, Mantel-Haenszel chi-square, and Cochran-Armitage trend tests. Wound-related itch was significantly associated with participant age (P = 0.011) and employment status (P = 0.003). Wound-related pain was significantly associated only with education level (P = 0.048). Persons with venous wounds had both the largest proportion with wound-related itch (45.2%) and the largest proportion with wound-related pain (61.2%) out of all of the wound types. Persons with diabetic neuropathy had both the smallest proportion with wound-related itch (16.1%) and the smallest proportion with wound-related pain (35.4%) among all of the wound types. Associations between wound type and wound-related itch or pain were not significant. When venous wounds were compared to all other wound types combined, wound-related itch was significantly associated (P = 0.021) with wound type - ie, venous wound type and itch was statistically significant when venous wounds were compared to a combination of all other wound types. Wound-related pain and itch occurred together in 35

  13. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Wound Healing and Care KidsHealth > For Teens > Wound Healing and Care Print A A A What's in ... mouth, or sunken eyes. There's good news about wound healing when you're a teen: Age is on ...

  14. The wound watch: an objective staging system for wounds in the diabetic (db/db) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pietramaggiori, G; Scherer, S; Orgill, D P

    2013-01-01

    As in cancer biology, in wound healing there is a need for objective staging systems to decide for the best treatment and predictors of outcome. We developed in the diabetic (db/db) wound healing model, a staging system, the "wound watch," based on the quantification of angiogenesis and cell proliferation in open wounds. In chronic wounds, there is often a lack of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis that leads to impaired healing. The wound watch addresses this by quantifying the proliferative phase of wound healing in two dimensions (cellular division and angiogenesis). The results are plotted in a two-dimensional graph to monitor the course of healing and compare the response to different treatments.

  15. Wound healing: a new approach to the topical wound care.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ferdi; Ermertcan, Aylin Türel

    2011-06-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex and well-coordinated interaction between inflammatory cells and mediators, establishing significant overlap between the phases of wound healing. Wound healing is divided into three major phases: inflammatory phase, proliferative phase, and remodeling phase. Unlike the acute wound, the nonhealing wound is arrested in one of the phases of healing, typically the inflammatory phase. A systematic approach to the management of the chronic nonhealing wound emphasizes three important elements of wound bed preparation in chronic wounds: debridement, moisture, and countering bacterial colonization and infection. In this article, wound-healing process and new approaches to the topical wound care have been reviewed.

  16. The Golden Spiral Flap: A New Flap Design that Allows for Closure of Larger Wounds under Reduced Tension – How Studying Nature’s Own Design Led to the Development of a New Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sharad P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper details the study of biodynamic excisional skin tension lines on the scalp and the development of a new flap technique for closure of scalp wounds. Recently, a study by this author, on pigskin, replicated whorls by placing tissue under rapid stretch using saline tissue expanders, by recreating rapid dermo-epidermal shear of skin – thereby concluding that the golden spiral pattern is nature’s own pattern for rapid expansion. Given the relationship between tissue expansion and stretch has been shown to cause deformation gradients that have both elastic and growth factors, the author set out to test the hypothesis that a golden spiral pattern therefore would be more efficient at closing wounds under less tension when compared with standard semicircular rotational flap patterns. The author conducted a series of experiments, both on pigskin (to first confirm the hypothesis, using a recently developed computerized tensiometer) and later a clinical study. This paper presents a new random pivotal flap technique for skin closures on the head and neck: the golden spiral flap. Biomechanics, planning, and advantages of this new flap are described in this paper. PMID:27900320

  17. The Golden Spiral Flap: A New Flap Design that Allows for Closure of Larger Wounds under Reduced Tension - How Studying Nature's Own Design Led to the Development of a New Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sharad P

    2016-01-01

    This paper details the study of biodynamic excisional skin tension lines on the scalp and the development of a new flap technique for closure of scalp wounds. Recently, a study by this author, on pigskin, replicated whorls by placing tissue under rapid stretch using saline tissue expanders, by recreating rapid dermo-epidermal shear of skin - thereby concluding that the golden spiral pattern is nature's own pattern for rapid expansion. Given the relationship between tissue expansion and stretch has been shown to cause deformation gradients that have both elastic and growth factors, the author set out to test the hypothesis that a golden spiral pattern therefore would be more efficient at closing wounds under less tension when compared with standard semicircular rotational flap patterns. The author conducted a series of experiments, both on pigskin (to first confirm the hypothesis, using a recently developed computerized tensiometer) and later a clinical study. This paper presents a new random pivotal flap technique for skin closures on the head and neck: the golden spiral flap. Biomechanics, planning, and advantages of this new flap are described in this paper.

  18. Progress in corneal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-01-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal epithelium, and

  19. Antimicrobial effect of continuous lidocaine infusion in a Staphylococcus aureus-induced wound infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Wang, Ming-Jiuh; Chiu, Kuan-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Continuous infusion of local anesthetics in surgical wounds has been shown to be an effective technique for postoperative analgesia. To investigate the potential antimicrobial effect of continuous local anesthetic infusion, we adapted a mouse model of surgical wound infection to examine effects on antibacterial response. Forty male BALB/c mice were randomized into 2 groups. An incision wound was made over the dorsal flank and instilled with Staphylococcus aureus. An osmotic pump was then implanted to deliver either 0.9% NaCl or 2% lidocaine continuously. Each wound was cultured postoperatively at 2 days, and the colony count of S. aureus was determined. Results showed that the number of colony-forming units of S. aureus measured in wounds treated with lidocaine displayed a nearly 10-fold reduction compared to the wounds in the saline group (P=0.009). The demonstrated antibacterial activity indicates that local anesthetic infusion may play a role in prophylaxis for surgical wound infections.

  20. Critical Review of Noninvasive Optical Technologies for Wound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Maanasa; Rodriguez, Suset; Solis, Elizabeth; Lei, Jiali; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Noninvasive imaging approaches can provide greater information about a wound than visual inspection during the wound healing and treatment process. This review article focuses on various optical imaging techniques developed to image different wound types (more specifically ulcers). Recent Advances: The noninvasive optical imaging approaches in this review include hyperspectral imaging, multispectral imaging, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser Doppler imaging, laser speckle imaging, spatial frequency domain imaging, and fluorescence imaging. The various wounds imaged using these techniques include open wounds, chronic wounds, diabetic foot ulcers, decubitus ulcers, venous leg ulcers, and burns. Preliminary work in the development and implementation of a near-infrared optical scanner for wound imaging as a noncontact hand-held device is briefly described. The technology is based on NIRS and has demonstrated its potential to differentiate a healing from nonhealing wound region. Critical Issues: While most of the optical imaging techniques can penetrate few hundred microns to a 1–2 mm from the wound surface, NIRS has the potential to penetrate deeper, demonstrating the potential to image internal wounds. Future Directions: All the technologies are currently at various stages of translational efforts to the clinic, with NIRS holding a greater promise for physiological assessment of the wounds internal, beyond the gold-standard visual assessment. PMID:27602254

  1. Anesthesia, Microcirculation and Wound Repair in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bentov, Itay; Reed, May J.

    2014-01-01

    Age related changes in skin contribute to impaired wound healing after surgical procedures. Changes in skin with age include decline in thickness and composition, a decrease in the number of most cell types and diminished microcirculation. The microcirculation provides tissue perfusion, fluid homeostasis, and delivery of oxygen and other nutrients. It also controls temperature and the inflammatory response. Surgical incisions cause further disruption of the microvasculature of aged skin. Perioperative management can be modified to minimize insults to aged tissues. Judicious use of fluids, maintenance of normal body temperature, pain control and increased tissue oxygen tension are examples of adjustable variables that support the microcirculation. Anesthetic agents influence the microcirculation from a combination of effects on cardiac output, arterial pressure and local micro-vascular changes. We examine the role of anesthetic management in optimizing the microcirculation and potentially improving post-operative wound repair in older persons. PMID:24195972

  2. The prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Skerritt, Louise; Moore, Zena

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care.

  3. Sutureless Adult Voluntary Male Circumcision with Topical Anesthetic: A Randomized Field Trial of Unicirc, a Single-Use Surgical Instrument

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization has solicited rapid and minimally invasive techniques to facilitate scale-up of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC). Study design Non-blinded randomized controlled field trial with 2:1 allocation ratio. Participants 75 adult male volunteers. Setting Outpatient primary care clinic. Intervention Open surgical circumcision under local anesthetic with suturing vs. Unicirc disposable instrument under topical anesthetic and wound sealing with cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive. Primary Outcome Intraoperative duration. Secondary Outcomes Intraoperative and postoperative pain; adverse events; time to healing; patient satisfaction; cosmetic result. Results The intraoperative time was less with the Unicirc technique (median 12 vs. 25 min, p < 0.001). Wound healing and cosmetic results were superior in the Unicirc group. Adverse events were similar in both groups. Conclusions VMMC with Unicirc under topical anesthetic and wound sealing with cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive is rapid, heals by primary intention with superior cosmetic results, and is potentially safer and more cost-effective than open surgical VMMC. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02443792 PMID:27299735

  4. Penetrating chest wound of the foetus.

    PubMed

    Wandaogo, Albert; Tapsoba, Toussaint Wendlamita; Ouédraogo, Isso; Béré, Bernadette; Ouédraogo, S F; Bandré, E

    2016-01-01

    Traumas of the foetus caused by stabbings are rare but actually life-threatening for both the foetus and the mother. We report a case of penetrating chest wound on a baby taken from the obstetrics unit to the paediatric surgical department. His mother was assaulted by his father, a mentally sick person with no appropriate follow-up. The foetus did not show any sign of vital distress. Surgical exploration of the wound has revealed a section of the 10 th rib, a laceration of the pleura and a tearing of the diaphragm. A phrenorraphy and a pleural drainage were performed. The new-born and its mother were released from hospital after 5 days and the clinical control and X-ray checks 6 months later showed nothing abnormal. We insisted a medical, psychiatric follow-up be initiated for the father. As regards pregnant women with penetrating wounds, the mortality rate of the foetus is 80%. The odds are good for our newborn due to the mild injuries and good professional collaboration of the medical staff. Penetrating transuterine wounds of the foetus can be very serious. The health care needed should include many fields due to the mother and the foetus' lesions extreme polymorphism. In our case, it could have prevented by a good psychiatric followed up of the offender.

  5. Evaluation of a foam dressing for acute and chronic wound exudate management.

    PubMed

    Bullough, Lindsay; Johnson, Sue; Forder, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the use of a foam dressing for exudate management in both chronic and acute wounds, such as surgical wounds, pressure ulcers, diabetic ulcers, trauma wounds, and leg ulcers. The primary objective of the study was to observe patients' wound progression in terms of wound size and the condition of the wound bed, when using this foam dressing as either a primary or secondary dressing. The outcome of the evaluation demonstrated that ActivHeal Foam Contact dressing effectively managed exudate. It was also observed that the dressing can assist in autolysis and support improvements in peri-wound status. Choosing an appropriate dressing to manage a wound is essential. Clinicians working in the NHS are under pressure to deliver good-quality clinical outcomes, and the ActivHeal Foam Contact dressing supports this outcome.

  6. [Errors in wound management].

    PubMed

    Filipović, Marinko; Novinscak, Tomislav

    2014-10-01

    Chronic ulcers have adverse effects on the patient quality of life and productivity, thus posing financial burden upon the healthcare system. Chronic wound healing is a complex process resulting from the interaction of the patient general health status, wound related factors, medical personnel skill and competence, and therapy related products. In clinical practice, considerable improvement has been made in the treatment of chronic wounds, which is evident in the reduced rate of the severe forms of chronic wounds in outpatient clinics. However, in spite of all the modern approaches, efforts invested by medical personnel and agents available for wound care, numerous problems are still encountered in daily practice. Most frequently, the problems arise from inappropriate education, of young personnel in particular, absence of multidisciplinary approach, and inadequate communication among the personnel directly involved in wound treatment. To perceive them more clearly, the potential problems or complications in the management of chronic wounds can be classified into the following groups: problems mostly related to the use of wound coverage and other etiology related specificities of wound treatment; problems related to incompatibility of the agents used in wound treatment; and problems arising from failure to ensure aseptic and antiseptic performance conditions.

  7. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  8. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing.

  9. [Advances in the treatment of wound bacterial infection with phage].

    PubMed

    Cui, Zelong

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of wound bacterial infection is an extremely difficult problem in clinic, especially in patients with large wounds which are infected by multidrug resistant, pan-resistant or omni-resistant bacteria. In recent years, with a grim prospect of antibiotic resistance, phage therapy is re-valued by researchers after being ignored for nearly half a century. Phage therapy has made great achievements in prevention and control of bacterial infection of open wounds. This review is mainly focused on the latest research progress of phage therapy in wound bacterial infection.

  10. [Advances in wound care].

    PubMed

    Raffoul, Wassim

    2008-03-05

    Wound care made great progress during last years related to several factors. The first is an awakening of the importance of wounds. The progress made in the comprehension of the physiopathology of wounds led to innovations in all stages of this complex process which is the wound healing. Autologus platelet concentrate producing growth factors are in use to stimulate the first phase of the healing. The second phase which is the phase of proliferation and secretion is currently better managed with new categories of bandages which are true local treatments. The nutrition became one of the pillars of wound treatments especially among old patients. The reconstructive surgery took great steps since the physiology and the vascular anatomy of the skin and soft tissues are better known. Finally the bio-engineering has entered the treatment of the wound there is more than 20 years ago and methods have improved and become more reliable.

  11. The role of sutures and fibrin sealant in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Spotnitz, W D; Falstrom, J K; Rodeheaver, G T

    1997-06-01

    Sutures and fibrin sealant are important surgical aids for facilitating wound closure and creating an optimal setting for wound healing. Most commonly, sutures are used to close wounds because suture material provides the mechanical support necessary to sustain closure. A wide variety of suturing material is available, and the surgeon can choose among sutures with a range of attributes to find the one best suited to his or her needs. Considerations when choosing an appropriate suture for wound closure and healing include strength of suture, holding power of tissue, absorbability, risk of infection, and inflammatory reaction associated with the suture material. Other factors to be considered include type of incision, suturing technique, and appearance of wound site. Fibrin sealant, in contrast, is a biologic tissue adhesive that can function as a useful adjunct to sutures. Fibrin sealant can be used in conjunction with sutures or tape to promote optimal wound integrity, or it can be used independently to seal wound sites where sutures cannot control bleeding or would aggravate bleeding. This adhesive can effectively seal tissue planes and eliminate potential spaces. Fibrin sealant has been used clinically in many surgical applications, although an FDA-approved commercially available product does not yet exist in the United States. Clinically, fibrin sealant has resulted in a low rate of infection and has promoted healing. Further study is needed to determine the best fibrin sealant mixtures both to achieve hemostasis and to encourage healing. It may even be desirable to use different sealant formulations for particular clinical situations.

  12. Serum amyloid P inhibits dermal wound healing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The repair of open wounds depends on granulation tissue formation and contraction, which is primarily mediated by myofibroblasts. A subset of myofibroblasts originates from bone-marrow-derived monocytes which differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. Serum amyloid P (SAP) inhibits ...

  13. Negative pressure wound therapy as an adjunct in healing of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Langer, Vijay; Bhandari, Prem S; Rajagopalan, Satyamoorthy; Mukherjee, Mrinal K

    2015-08-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has emerged as a cutting-edge technology and provides an alternative solution to the problem of wounds. This study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of this technique in the treatment of chronic wounds. A prospective clinical study was used to evaluate our experience in use of NPWT in the healing of pressure ulcers and chronic wounds over 2 years. The primary end point of the study group was the time taken for appearance of healthy granulation tissue and full reepithelialisation without drainage. All patients with sepsis were excluded from the study. The statistical analysis of the data was carried out. Of the 60 patients studied, 41 had associated comorbidities including diabetes mellitus. The commonest site of occurrence was the lower limb. Coverage in the form of a flap was required at presentation in 63·33% of patients. However, after initiation of NPWT, none of them required the procedure and they healed spontaneously either by secondary intention or by skin grafting. The time taken for appearance of healthy granulation tissue was 14·36 ± 4·24 days. Complete healing of wounds occurred by 33·1 ± 10·22 days. There was a statistically significant difference in the volume of the wounds before and after the intervention (P = 0·000). Complications resulting from NPWT were minimal. This technique is an excellent adjunct to surgical debridement.

  14. Innovation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in medicine requires unique partnerships between academic research, biotech or pharmaceutical companies, and health-care providers. While innovation in medicine has greatly increased over the past 100 years, innovation in wound care has been slow, despite the fact that chronic wounds are a global health challenge where there is a need for technical, process and social innovation. While novel partnerships between research and the health-care system have been created, we still have much to learn about wound care and the wound-healing processes.

  15. Burn Wound Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    wound invasion was identified only Nine of 97 patients (9%) with histologic burn wound after septic or cardiogenic shock had been present in invasion...051= ADA12589 Th JouRHAL oP TRAUMA Vol. 21, No. 9 Copyright 0 1981 by The Williams & Wilkins Co. ,r, Prin U.S.A. . Burn Wound Infection WILLIAM F...admitted to a burn center during a 3-year period C had histologically confirmed bacterial or tungal burn wound invasion. Nine of t X Q these 97

  16. INTRATHORACIC COMBAT WOUNDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    THORAX, BATTLES), (*BATTLES, THERAPY), (*MILITARY MEDICINE, BATTLES), SURGERY, WARFARE, VIETNAM, ETIOLOGY, WEAPONS, HEMORRHAGE, MORTALITY RATES , LUNG, SPLEEN, LIVER, PATHOLOGY, WOUNDS AND INJURIES, CASUALTIES, (U)CASUALTIES

  17. Inflammation in Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruilong; Liang, Helena; Clarke, Elizabeth; Jackson, Christopher; Xue, Meilang

    2016-01-01

    Non-healing chronic wounds present a major biological, psychological, social, and financial burden on both individual patients and the broader health system. Pathologically extensive inflammation plays a major role in the disruption of the normal healing cascade. The causes of chronic wounds (venous, arterial, pressure, and diabetic ulcers) can be examined through a juxtaposition of normal healing and the rogue inflammatory response created by the common components within chronic wounds (ageing, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and bacterial colonisation). Wound bed care through debridement, dressings, and antibiotics currently form the basic mode of treatment. Despite recent setbacks, pharmaceutical adjuncts form an interesting area of research. PMID:27973441

  18. Utilizing reamer irrigator aspirator (RIA) autograft for opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: A new surgical technique and report of three cases☆

    PubMed Central

    Seagrave, Richard A.; Sojka, John; Goodyear, Adam; Munns, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The lateral closing wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) was popularized by Coventry in the 1960s. In the 1990s the medial opening wedge osteotomy gained popularity because it could achieve greater valgus correction and it did not require dissociation of the fibula from the tibia, an important consideration when treating varus knees with lateral and posterolateral ligament deficiencies (Noyes’ double-varus and triple-varus knees). However, it has the disadvantage of requiring bone graft to fill bony defects. Recently, the reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA; Synthes, Paoli, PA) system was developed, and as a result of this procedure, a large amount of usable autogenous bone graft can be collected safely for use. To our knowledge, there is no published series combining opening wedge HTO with the use of RIA obtained autogenous bone graft. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a novel technique in which a series of three patients underwent opening wedge HTO using ipsilateral, retrograde femur RIA graft to fill the bone defect. All patients had satisfactory clinical and radiologic outcomes following the new technique at latest follow up. DISCUSSION Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy is a well-documented and accepted orthopedic procedure, however, has the disadvantage of requiring varying amounts of bone graft. Traditionally, iliac crest or tricortical allograft have been the grafting modalities of choice, however both have inherent drawbacks to their use. In our series, the use of RIA autograft is a safe and reliable harvest technique for high tibial osteotomy, providing abundant and quality autogenous bone graft. CONCLUSION All three of our patients achieved radiographic union with high clinical patient satisfaction without any major complications. We feel this novel technique is a safe and acceptable operative solution grafting opening wedge osteotomies about the knee. PMID:24412805

  19. Acute Ultraviolet Radiation Perturbs Epithelialization but not the Biomechanical Strength of Full-thickness Cutaneous Wounds.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Patricia L; Lerche, Catharina M; Wulf, Hans Christian; Jorgensen, Lars N; Liedberg, Ann-Sofie H; Hansson, Christer; Ågren, Magnus S

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that priming of the skin with ultraviolet radiation (UVR) before being injured would enhance wound healing. Four groups, each comprising 20 immunocompetent hairless mice, were exposed to simulated solar irradiation in escalating UVR doses; 0 standard erythema dose (SED) = control, 1 SED, 3 SED and 5 SED. Twenty-four hours after UV irradiation, inflammation was quantified by skin reflectance (erythema) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) tissue levels, and two 6 mm full-thickness excisional wounds and one 3 cm incisional wound were inflicted. Epidermal hyperplasia was assessed by quantitative histology. Five days after wounding, wound coverage by neoepithelium and wound width of the excisional wounds was quantified in hematoxylin-eosin sections, and breaking strength was measured in strips from incisional wounds. Erythema (P < 0.001), MPO levels (P < 0.0005) and epidermal cell layers (P < 0.001) increased dose-dependently by UV exposure of dorsal skin. In the excisional wounds, epithelial coverage decreased (P = 0.024) by increasing the UVR dose, whereas there was no significant difference (P = 0.765) in wound MPO levels. Neither wound width (P = 0.850) nor breaking strength (P = 0.320) differed among the groups. Solar-simulated UVR 24 h before wounding impaired epithelialization but was not detrimental for surgical incisional wound healing.

  20. Principles of Basic Wound Evaluation and Management in the Emergency Department

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    secondary to human bites, cat bites, and some dog bites, as well as wounds with underlying open fractures and exposed joints and tendons [80–82]. Sutures...history Predisposing medical issues should also be elicited as they may compli- cate wound healing or have led to the initial wounding (eg, seizure...24 DEBOARD et al syncope). Specific factors that may impair wound healing and increase the risk of infection include extremes of age, diabetes mellitus

  1. [Emergency care for acute wound entering of plutonium and americium into the body (real case)].

    PubMed

    Krasniuk, V I; Gasteva, G N; Blinov, A P; Kuz'menko, L G

    2005-01-01

    The article describes a case of slowly soluble plutonium and americium compounds entering human body via skin wound. During the wound healing, the authors followed features of biokinetics of the radioactive substances, determined the major route of their excretion, evaluated efficiency of surgical d-bridement and complexation medicine (pentacin). clinical and biophysicdata collected could serve to increase efficiency of urgent therapeutic and prophylactic measures aimed to individuals with wounds contaminated with radioactive substances.

  2. The role of allogenic keratin - derived dressing in wound healing in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Konop, Marek; Sulejczak, Dorota; Czuwara, Joanna; Kosson, Piotr; Misicka, Aleksandra; Lipkowski, Aandrzej W; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2016-12-20

    Keratin is an interesting protein needed for wound healing and tissue recovery. We have recently proposed a new, simple and inexpensive method to obtain fur and hair keratin-derived biomaterials suitable for medical application. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of the fur keratin derived protein (FKDP) dressing in the allogenic full-thickness surgical skin wound model.

  3. A comparison of minimally invasive posterior cervical decompression and open anterior cervical decompression and instrumented fusion in the surgical management of degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Syed F; Spurgas, Morgan P; Szewczyk, Benjamin S; Yim, Benjamin; Ata, Ashar; German, John W

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimally invasive posterior cervical decompression (miPCD) has been described in several case series with promising preliminary results. The object of the current study was to compare the clinical outcomes between patients undergoing miPCD with anterior cervical discectomy and instrumented fusion (ACDFi). METHODS A retrospective study of 74 patients undergoing surgery (45 using miPCD and 29 using ACDFi) for myelopathy was performed. Outcomes were categorized into short-term, intermediate, and long-term follow-up, corresponding to averages of 1.7, 7.7, and 30.9 months, respectively. Mean scores for the Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck visual analog scale (VAS) score, SF-12 Physical Component Summary (PCS), and SF-12 Mental Component Summary (MCS) were compared for each follow-up period. The percentage of patients meeting substantial clinical benefit (SCB) was also compared for each outcome measure. RESULTS Baseline patient characteristics were well-matched, with the exception that patients undergoing miPCD were older (mean age 57.6 ± 10.0 years [miPCD] vs 51.1 ± 9.2 years [ACDFi]; p = 0.006) and underwent surgery at more levels (mean 2.8 ± 0.9 levels [miPCD] vs 1.5 ± 0.7 levels [ACDFi]; p < 0.0001) while the ACDFi patients reported higher preoperative neck VAS scores (mean 3.8 ± 3.0 [miPCD] vs 5.4 ± 2.6 [ACDFi]; p = 0.047). The mean PCS, NDI, neck VAS, and MCS scores were not significantly different with the exception of the MCS score at the short-term follow-up period (mean 46.8 ± 10.6 [miPCD] vs 41.3 ± 10.7 [ACDFi]; p = 0.033). The percentage of patients reporting SCB based on thresholds derived for PCS, NDI, neck VAS, and MCS scores were not significantly different, with the exception of the PCS score at the intermediate follow-up period (52% [miPCD] vs 80% [ACDFi]; p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS The current report suggests that the optimal surgical strategy in patients requiring dorsal surgery may be enhanced by the adoption of a minimally invasive

  4. The passage of bacteria through surgical drapes.

    PubMed Central

    Blom, A.; Estela, C.; Bowker, K.; MacGowan, A.; Hardy, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    The passage of bacteria through surgical drapes is a potential cause of wound infection. Previous studies have shown that liquids and human albumin penetrate certain types of drapes. We studied the passage of bacteria through seven different types of surgical drape and an operating tray. Bacteria easily penetrated all the woven re-usable fabrics within 30 min. The disposable non-woven drapes proved to be impermeable, as did the operating tray. We recommend the use of non-woven disposable drapes or woven drapes with an impermeable operating tray in all surgical cases. PMID:11103158

  5. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... of collagen. So they're tougher and less flexible than the skin around them. Caring for Serious Wounds at Home Serious wounds don't heal overnight. It can take weeks for the body to build new tissue. So after you leave ...

  6. Multimodal imaging and detection strategy with 124 I-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody cG250 for accurate localization and confirmation of extent of disease during laparoscopic and open surgical resection of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Povoski, Stephen P; Hall, Nathan C; Murrey, Douglas A; Sharp, David S; Hitchcock, Charles L; Mojzisik, Cathy M; Bahnson, Eamonn E; Knopp, Michael V; Martin, Edward W; Bahnson, Robert R

    2013-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 85% to 90% of all primary kidney malignancies, with clear cell RCC (ccRCC) constituting approximately 70% to 85% of all RCCs. This study describes an innovative multimodal imaging and detection strategy that uses (124)I-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 ((124)I-cG250) for accurate preoperative and intraoperative localization and confirmation of extent of disease for both laparoscopic and open surgical resection of ccRCC. Two cases presented herein highlight how this technology can potentially guide complete surgical resection and confirm complete removal of all diseased tissues. This innovative (124)I-cG250 (ie, (124)I-girentuximab) multimodal imaging and detection approach, which would be clinically very useful to urologic surgeons, urologic medical oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists, and pathologists who are involved in the care of ccRCC patients, holds great potential for improving the diagnostic accuracy, operative planning and approach, verification of disease resection, and monitoring for evidence of disease recurrence in ccRCC patients.

  7. Optic chiasm compression from mass effect and thrombus formation following unsuccessful treatment of a giant supraclinoid ICA aneurysm with the Pipeline device: open surgical bailout with STA-MCA bypass and parent vessel occlusion.

    PubMed

    Abla, Adib A; Zaidi, Hasan A; Crowley, R Webster; Britz, Gavin W; McDougall, Cameron G; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-07-01

    Pipeline Embolization Devices (PEDs) have been shown to be effective for intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms, and are now approved by the FDA specifically for this use. Potential pitfalls, however, have not yet been described in the pediatric neurosurgical literature. The authors report on a 10-year-old boy who presented to the Barrow Neurological Institute after progressive visual decline. He had undergone placement of a total of 7 telescoping PEDs at another facility for a large ICA aneurysm. Residual filling of the aneurysm and significant expansion of intraaneurysmal thrombus with chiasmal compression on admission images were causes for concern. The patient underwent a surgical bailout with a superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass, with parent artery occlusion. Postoperative vascular imaging was notable for successful occlusion of the parent vessel, with no evidence of filling of the aneurysm. Reports on the pitfalls of PEDs in the neurosurgical literature are scarce. To the authors' knowledge this represents the first paper describing a successful open surgical bailout for residual aneurysmal filling and expansion of thrombus after placement of a PED.

  8. The choice of antibiotic in open fractures in a teaching hospital in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Alonge, T O; Salawu, S A; Adebisi, A T; Fashina, A N

    2002-06-01

    Open fracture wounds may be contaminated, and the use of an appropriate antibiotic in the early stages of management reduces the risk of osteomyelitis developing. Environmental factors influence both the type of micro-organisms that are isolated from these wounds and the antibiotics that are chosen to manage the wounds. Before this study, the choice of antibiotic in the management of open fractures in our hospital was based on tradition and 'best guess' antibiotics. In a prospective study of 52 open fractures seen in the accident and emergency unit of University College Hospital, Ibadan, between January and June 2000, the positive bacterial culture yield was more than 70%. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest microbial isolate, accounting for 37.5% of total isolates. The antibiotic sensitivity pattern revealed high efficacies for pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone against the isolated micro-organisms. In comparative costs, these antibiotics are cheaper than the combination of the 'best guess' antibiotics that were used previously. On the strength of this finding, we have suggested a change in the antibiotic policy of the hospital with regard to the antibiotic regimen to be used to complement the surgical management of open fractures.

  9. A surgical glove port technique for laparoscopic-assisted ovariohysterectomy for pyometra in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Becher-Deichsel, Anja; Aurich, Jörg E; Schrammel, Nadine; Dupré, Gilles

    2016-07-15

    The objective of the study was to describe the feasibility of a glove port technique for laparoscopic-assisted surgical treatment of canine pyometra. In this retrospective case series, a total of 10 female dogs (median age 7 years, range 5.5-10.5 years; median weight 37.0 kg, range 12.9-64.0 kg) with pyometra were included. A multiaccess port was created from a surgical glove attached to an Alexis wound retractor and placed in the ventral midline between the middle and caudal third of the distance between umbilicus and pubic rim. A vessel sealing device was used for transection of the ovarian pedicle. The port size was selected on the basis of maximum uterine diameter determined by ultrasound. Median incision length was 5.0 cm (range 3.1-7.7 cm) for a maximum uterine diameter of 4.0 cm (range 2.0-7.0 cm). Median surgical time was 57 minutes (range 48-65 minutes). No case had to be converted to open celiotomy. Complications included one case of minor, self-limiting splenic trauma by the endoscope. In eight dogs, the distended uterine horns endangered safe access to the ovarian pedicle, and the vessel sealing device was inserted through a second cannula placed periumbilically. Extension of the original incision was necessary to exteriorize organs in two dogs. All dogs recovered quickly and were discharged either on the day of surgery or 1 day thereafter. In conclusion, a surgical glove port technique in combination with an Alexis wound retractor is feasible for surgical laparoscopic treatment of canine pyometra up to a diameter of 7 cm.

  10. Outcome of primary closure of abdominal wounds following laparotomy for peritonitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Kache, Stephen Akau; Mshelbwala, Philip M.; Ameh, Emmanuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary wound closure following laparotomy for peritonitis is generally believed to be associated with wound complications and long hospital stay. Open wound management has long been the most common practice after laparotomy for peritonitis. Primary closure (PC), however, has recently been advocated to reduce cost and morbidity. This study determined the incidence and severity of wound complications and their impact on hospital stay and overall outcome when PC of abdominal wounds is done following laparotomy for peritonitis. Patients and Methods: A prospective review of patients who had PC of abdominal wounds following laparotomy for peritonitis over a 6-year period. Results: Fifty-six children were analysed (35 boys and 21 girls), aged 11 months to 13 years (median: 8 years). The indication for laparotomy was typhoid intestinal perforation 47 (83.9%), perforated appendicitis 4 (7.1%), complicated cholecystitis 3 (5.3%) and penetrating abdominal injury with bowel perforation and intestinal obstruction with bowel perforation, 1 (1.8%) each, respectively. Postoperatively, 34 patients had wound complications. Nine patients (16.1%) had superficial wound infection alone, 12 (21.4%) had superficial wound infection with partial wound dehiscence, 6 (10.7%) had deep wound infection, 7 (12.5%) had deep wound infection with complete wound dehiscence, whereas 22 (39.3%) had no wound complication. Overall, wound complications in 13 (23.2%) patients were considered to be severe, but none resulted in mortality. Hospital stay in patients who developed wound complications was 8–37 days (median: 25 days) and 6–22 days (median: 10 days) in patients who had no wound complications (P = 0.02). Conclusion: The rate of wound complications following PC of dirty abdominal wounds remain but PC is safe and gives good healing outcomes. PMID:28051048

  11. MID TERM RESULTS AFTER OPEN HEART SURGERY IN HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS AWAITING KIDNEY TRANSPLANT: DOES CARDIOVASCULAR SURGICAL INTERVENTION PRIOR TO TRANSPLANTATION PROLONG SURVIVAL?

    PubMed

    Ozbek, C; Sever, K; Demirhan, O; Mansuroglu, D; Kurtoglu, N; Ugurlucan, M; Sevmis, S; Karakayali, H

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mid and long term postoperative outcomes between the hemodialysis-dependent patients awaiting kidney transplantat who underwent open heart surgery in our department during the last five years, and those who did not receive a renal transplant, to determine the predictors of mortality, and assess the possible contribution of post heart surgery kidney transplantation to survival. The patients were separated into two groups: those who underwent a transplantation after open heart surgery were included in the Tp+ group, and those who did not in the Tp- group Between June 2008 and December 2012, 127 dialysis dependent patients awaiting kidney transplant and who underwent open heart surgery were separated into two groups. Those who underwent transplantation after open heart surgery were determined as Tp+ (n=33), and those who did not as Tp- (n=94). Both groups were compared with respect to preoperative paramaters including age, sex, diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HT), hyperlipidemia (HL), obesity, smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), peripheral vascular disease (PVD), left ventricle ejection fraction (EF), Euroscore; operative parameters including cross clamp time, perfusion time, number of grafts, use of internal mammary artery (IMA); postoperative parameters including revision, blood transfusion, ventilation time, use of inotropic agents, length of stay in the intensive care unit and hospital, and follow up findings. Problems encountered during follow up were recorded. Predictors of mortality were determined and the survival was calculated. Among the preoperative parameters, when compared with the Tp- group, the Tp+ group had significantly lower values in mean age, presence of DM, obesity, PVD, and Euroscore levels, and higher EF values. Assessment of postoperative values showed that blood transfusion requirement and length of hospital stay were significantly lower in the Tp+ group compared to the Tp

  12. An open question.

    PubMed

    Ayling, John

    2004-01-01

    The lungs are surrounded by the pleural membranes. The visceral pleura directly covers the lung and is separated from the parietal pleura by a layer of surfactant, which reduces friction during respiratory movement. A potential space exists between these two layers, and they may become separated by fluid or air. A lung can collapse to the size of a fist under pressure from either. Standard treatment in the field for an open chest wound is an occlusive dressing. The first thing that can be used to occlude the wound is a gloved hand. After placing the dressing, evaluate the breath sounds and determine if they have improved. The dressing should be taped down on three sides, leaving one side open to relieve the pressure during exhalation (one-way valve). "Burping" the dressing involves lifting one side to make sure any pressure buildup is relieved, as occasionally the dressing can become adhered to the skin, which may lead to a tension pneumothorax. If, after ensuring the occlusive dressing is properly in place, the respiratory rate increases, distress level worsens, oxygen saturations fall and breath sounds decrease, then needle decompression is required. A neurovascular bundle is located underneath each rib, and it is important to avoid damage to that bundle by performing a decompression over the top of a rib. If the patient is intubated before the development of a tension pneumothorax, carefully evaluate the breath sounds (especially if the left-side sounds are diminished) to determine if the ET tube needs to be withdrawn a centimeter. The rescuer performing ventilation will usually recognize a tension pneumothorax by the difficulty in bagging the patient. Remember, when you perform a needle thoracentesis, you are creating an open chest wound. Early signs and symptoms of a tension pneumothorax include diminished or absent breath sounds, severe dyspnea, narrowing pulse pressure, tachycardia and restlessness. Neck veins may be distended, but this can be a normal

  13. Expert advice provided through telemedicine improves healing of chronic wounds: prospective cluster controlled study.

    PubMed

    Zarchi, Kian; Haugaard, Vibeke B; Dufour, Deirdre N; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2015-03-01

    Telemedicine is widely considered as an efficient approach to manage the growing problem of chronic wounds. However, to date, there is no convincing evidence to support the clinical efficacy of telemedicine in wound management. In this prospective cluster controlled study, we tested the hypothesis that advice on wound management provided by a team of wound-care specialists through telemedicine would significantly improve the likelihood of wound healing compared with the best available conventional practice. A total of 90 chronic wound patients in home care met all study criteria and were included: 50 in the telemedicine group and 40 in the conventional group. Patients with pressure ulcers, surgical wounds, and cancer wounds were excluded. During the 1-year follow-up, complete wound healing was achieved in 35 patients (70%) in the telemedicine group compared with 18 patients (45%) in the conventional group. After adjusting for important covariates, offering advice on wound management through telemedicine was associated with significantly increased healing compared with the best available conventional practice (telemedicine vs. conventional practice: adjusted hazard ratio 2.19; 95% confidence interval: 1.15-4.17; P=0.017). This study strongly supports the use of telemedicine to connect home-care nurses to a team of wound experts in order to improve the management of chronic wounds.

  14. Chemokine Involvement in Fetal and Adult Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Swathi; Watson, Carey L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; King, Alice; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fetal wounds heal with a regenerative phenotype that is indistinguishable from surrounding skin with restored skin integrity. Compared to this benchmark, all postnatal wound healing is impaired and characterized by scar formation. The biologic basis of the fetal regenerative phenotype can serve as a roadmap to recapitulating regenerative repair in adult wounds. Reduced leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated, in part, through changes in the chemokine milieu, is a fundamental feature of fetal wound healing. Recent Advances: The contributions of chemokines to wound healing are a topic of active investigation. Recent discoveries have opened the possibility of targeting chemokines therapeutically to treat disease processes and improve healing capability, including the possibility of achieving a scarless phenotype in postnatal wounds. Critical Issues: Successful wound healing is a complex process, in which there is a significant interplay between multiple cell types, signaling molecules, growth factors, and extracellular matrix. Chemokines play a crucial role in this interplay and have been shown to have different effects in various stages of the healing process. Understanding how these chemokines are locally produced and regulated during wound healing and how the chemokine milieu differs in fetal versus postnatal wounds may help us identify ways in which we can target chemokine pathways. Future Directions: Further studies on the role of chemokines and their role in the healing process will greatly advance the potential for using these molecules as therapeutic targets. PMID:26543680

  15. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  16. Fetal skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Edward P; Longaker, Michael T; Lorenz, H Peter

    2009-01-01

    The developing fetus has the ability to heal wounds by regenerating normal epidermis and dermis with restoration of the extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture, strength, and function. In contrast, adult wounds heal with fibrosis and scar. Scar tissue remains weaker than normal skin with an altered ECM composition. Despite extensive investigation, the mechanism of fetal wound healing remains largely unknown. We do know that early in gestation, fetal skin is developing at a rapid pace and the ECM is a loose network facilitating cellular migration. Wounding in this unique environment triggers a complex cascade of tightly controlled events culminating in a scarless wound phenotype of fine reticular collagen and abundant hyaluronic acid. Comparison between postnatal and fetal wound healing has revealed differences in inflammatory response, cellular mediators, cytokines, growth factors, and ECM modulators. Investigation into cell signaling pathways and transcription factors has demonstrated differences in secondary messenger phosphorylation patterns and homeobox gene expression. Further research may reveal novel genes essential to scarless repair that can be manipulated in the adult wound and thus ameliorate scar.

  17. Stress and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I

    1979-01-01

    An experiment was performed to compare the effects of stressors--cold, heat and noise--on primary wound activity (i.e., wound closure in the first 24 h after wound infliction) and on rate of healing in mice. A significant correlation was found between reduced primary wound activity and a faster rate of healing. Conversely, a correlation was found between relatively greater primary wound activity and a slower rate of healing. A possible explanation of this correlation is a compensatory mechanism inherent to the skin healing process. This mechanism is visualized as (1) stress exposure affecting the skin by (a) causing it to become thinner and tauter and (b) causing it to have less elastic recoil; therefore, (2) when a square wound is produced in stressed skin, (a) the wound does not recoil readily or gapes soon after cutting and (b) a longer wound perimeter results. Because there is evidence that rate of healing is governed by cells on the wound perimeter, the greater the perimeter, the greater the number of cells that will undergo rapid mitosis and the faster will be the rate of healing. Therefore, stressed skin will heal at a faster rate, compensating for the loss of elasticity and cellular depletion caused by stress. This study is of interest to anthropology because it deals with dynamic adaptation, trying to grasp the meaning of the elusive endocrine interface between environmental stimulation and a measurable physical entity like healing. This work may have revealed a functional complex that is common to the healing of all mammalian skin, whereby retarding effects of stress on the healing process are obviated.

  18. Bacteriology of War Wounds at the Time of Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus isolates were methi- cillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Conspicuously absent were streptococci (especially Streptococcus ...gangrene between World War I and the Korean War. Implementation of penicillin use after wounding during World War II probably led to the diminution of S...obtained 5 days after surgical therapy and implementation of antimicrobial treatment (typi- cally penicillin with streptomycin sulfate, chloramphenicol so

  19. Bacteriology of war wounds at the time of injury.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clinton K; Roop, Stuart A; Hospenthal, Duane R; Dooley, David P; Wenner, Kimberly; Hammock, John; Taufen, Neil; Gourdine, Emmett

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial contamination of war wounds occurs either at the time of injury or during the course of therapy. Characterization of the bacteria recovered at the time of initial trauma could influence the selection of empiric antimicrobial agents used to prevent infection. In the spring of 2004, U.S. military casualties who presented to the 31st Combat Support Hospital in Baghdad, Iraq, with acute traumatic injuries resulting in open wounds underwent aerobic culture of their wounds to identify the bacteria colonizing the wounds. Forty-nine casualties with 61 separate wounds were evaluated. Wounds were located predominantly in the upper and lower extremities and were primarily from improvised explosive devices or mortars. Thirty wounds (49%) had bacteria recovered on culture, with 40 bacteria identified. Eighteen casualties (20 wounds) had undergone field medical therapy (irrigation and/or antimicrobial treatment); six of these had nine bacterial isolates on culture. Of the 41 wounds from 31 patients who had received no previous therapy, 24 grew 31 bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria (93%), mostly skin-commensal bacteria, were the predominant organisms identified. Only three Gram-negative bacteria were detected, none of which were characterized as broadly resistant to antimicrobial agents. The only resistant bacteria recovered were two isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Our assessment of war wound bacterioly soon after injury reveals a predominance of Gram-positive organisms of low virulence and pathogenicity. The presence of MRSA in wounds likely reflects the increasing incidence of community-acquired MRSA bacteria. These data suggest that the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics with efficacy against more resistant, Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp., is unnecessary in early wound management.

  20. Robotic, laparoscopic and open surgery for gastric cancer compared on surgical, clinical and oncological outcomes: a multi-institutional chart review. A study protocol of the International study group on Minimally Invasive surgery for GASTRIc Cancer—IMIGASTRIC

    PubMed Central

    Desiderio, Jacopo; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Nguyen, Ninh T; Zhang, Shu; Reim, Daniel; Alimoglu, Orhan; Azagra, Juan-Santiago; Yu, Pei-Wu; Coburn, Natalie G; Qi, Feng; Jackson, Patrick G; Zang, Lu; Brower, Steven T; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Facy, Olivier; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Coratti, Andrea; Annecchiarico, Mario; Bazzocchi, Francesca; Avanzolini, Andrea; Gagniere, Johan; Pezet, Denis; Cianchi, Fabio; Badii, Benedetta; Novotny, Alexander; Eren, Tunc; Leblebici, Metin; Goergen, Martine; Zhang, Ben; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Liu, Tong; Al-Refaie, Waddah; Ma, Junjun; Takiguchi, Shuji; Lequeu, Jean-Baptiste; Trastulli, Stefano; Parisi, Amilcare

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastric cancer represents a great challenge for healthcare providers and requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach in which surgery plays a major role. Minimally invasive surgery has been progressively developed, first with the advent of laparoscopy and recently with the spread of robotic surgery, but a number of issues are currently being debated, including the limitations in performing an effective extended lymph node dissection, the real advantages of robotic systems, the role of laparoscopy for Advanced Gastric Cancer, the reproducibility of a total intracorporeal technique and the oncological results achievable during long-term follow-up. Methods and analysis A multi-institutional international database will be established to evaluate the role of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches in gastric cancer, comprising of information regarding surgical, clinical and oncological features. A chart review will be conducted to enter data of participants with gastric cancer, previously treated at the participating institutions. The database is the first of its kind, through an international electronic submission system and a HIPPA protected real time data repository from high volume gastric cancer centres. Ethics and dissemination This study is conducted in compliance with ethical principles originating from the Helsinki Declaration, within the guidelines of Good Clinical Practice and relevant laws/regulations. A multicentre study with a large number of patients will permit further investigation of the safety and efficacy as well as the long-term outcomes of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches for the management of gastric cancer. Trial registration number NCT02325453; Pre-results. PMID:26482769

  1. A Plutonium-Contaminated Wound, 1985, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC /TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Eugene H. Carbaugh, CHP, Staff Scientist, Internal Dosimetry Manager, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    2012-02-02

    A hand injury occurred at a U.S. facility in 1985 involving a pointed shaft (similar to a meat thermometer) that a worker was using to remove scrap solid plutonium from a plastic bottle. The worker punctured his right index finger on the palm side at the metacarpal-phalangeal joint. The wound was not through-and- through, although it was deep. The puncture wound resulted in deposition of ~48 kBq of alpha activity from the weapons-grade plutonium mixture with a nominal 12 to 1 Pu-alpha to {sup 241}Am-alpha ratio. This case clearly showed that DTPA was very effective for decorporation of plutonium and americium. The case is a model for management of wounds contaminated with transuranics: (1) a team approach for dealing with all of the issues surrounding the incident, including the psychological, (2) early surgical intervention for foreign-body removal, (3) wound irrigation with DTPA solution, and (4) early and prolonged DTPA administration based upon bioassay and in vivo dosimetry.

  2. Efficacy of Hydrofiber Silver Dressing in the Treatment of Posttraumatic Skin Wounds in Children.

    PubMed

    Glavan, Nedeljka; Jonjić, Nives

    2015-09-01

    Three case reports on conservative treatment of posttraumatic open conquassant wounds in children are presented. In 2 cases, the wounds opened after rejection of a previously applied skin graft, whereas in the third case, the wound was consequential to toe amputation and treated conservatively. Based on the authors' long-standing favorable experience with this type of dressing in healing of deep burns in children, treatment was continued with the use of a hydrofiber supportive silver-containing dressing (AQUACEL Ag, ConvaTec, Bridgewater, NJ). From the beginning of treatment, wound dressing was performed on an outpatient basis and without antibiotic therapy. The wounds healed within 4-8 weeks. The process of wound healing and treatment, the mechanisms that may compromise it, and the possibilities offered by hydrofiber silver dressing in conservative treatment of posttraumatic conquassant skin wounds are discussed.

  3. Gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge for preventing sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Targońska, Sylwia; Stążka, Janusz; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of sternal wound infection (SWI) after cardiac surgery ranges from 0.5% to 8% and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and treatment cost. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis is not sufficient to fully prevent the contamination of the surgical access site. One of the most effective methods for the prevention of wound infection seems to be the use of gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge, which is successfully used in abdominal and orthopedic surgery. Surgically implantable topical antibiotics can reduce wound infection in cardiac patients as well, but the efficacy of SWI prevention in cardiac surgery still raises many questions. PMID:26336388

  4. Gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge for preventing sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kozioł, Małgorzata; Targońska, Sylwia; Stążka, Janusz; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2014-03-01

    The frequency of sternal wound infection (SWI) after cardiac surgery ranges from 0.5% to 8% and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and treatment cost. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis is not sufficient to fully prevent the contamination of the surgical access site. One of the most effective methods for the prevention of wound infection seems to be the use of gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge, which is successfully used in abdominal and orthopedic surgery. Surgically implantable topical antibiotics can reduce wound infection in cardiac patients as well, but the efficacy of SWI prevention in cardiac surgery still raises many questions.

  5. Wound healing efficacy of a 660-nm diode laser in a rat incisional wound model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryoichi; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the optimum usage parameters of low reactive-level laser therapy (LLLT) in a rat incisional wound model. In Sprague-Dawley rats, surgical wounds of 15-mm length were made in the dorsal thoracic region. They were divided into groups to receive 660-nm diode laser irradiation 24 h after surgery at an energy density of 0 (control), 1, 5, or 10 J/cm(2). Tissue sections collected on postoperative day 3 were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and an antibody for ED1 to determine the number of macrophages around the wound. Samples collected on day 7 were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and observed via polarized light microscopy to measure the area occupied by collagen fibers around the wound; day 7 skin specimens were also subjected to mechanical testing to evaluate tensile strength. On postoperative day 3, the numbers of macrophages around the wound were significantly lower in the groups receiving 1 and 5 J/cm(2) irradiation, compared to the control and 10 J/cm(2) irradiation groups (p < 0.01). The area occupied by collagen fibers in day 7 was largest in 5 J/cm(2) group, followed by 1 J/cm(2) group, although this difference was not significant. The day 7 tensile test demonstrated significantly greater rupture strength in healing tissues from 1 and 5 J/cm(2) irradiation groups, compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Thus, LLLT with a 660-nm diode laser with energy density of 1 and 5 J/cm(2) enhanced wound healing in a rat incisional wound model. However, a higher radiation energy density yielded no significant enhancement.

  6. Scars and Wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Problems Dry Skin Itching Skin Color Changes Pressure Sores Scars and Wounds Treatments and Side Effects Managing ... purple bruising of skin Scaly, broken skin (see Pressure Sores ) Crusts, scabs, or cuts in the skin Bleeding ...

  7. Cuts and puncture wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2009:chap 39. Simon BC, Hern HG. Wound management principles. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al., eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  8. Wound healing trajectories in burn patients and their impact on mortality.

    PubMed

    Nitzschke, Stephanie L; Aden, James K; Serio-Melvin, Maria L; Shingleton, Sarah K; Chung, Kevin K; Waters, J A; King, Booker T; Burns, Christopher J; Lundy, Jonathan B; Salinas, José; Wolf, Steven E; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2014-01-01

    The rate of wound healing and its effect on mortality has not been well described. The objective of this article is to report wound healing trajectories in burn patients and analyze their effects on in-hospital mortality. The authors used software (WoundFlow) to depict burn wounds, surgical results, and healing progression at multiple time points throughout admission. Data for all patients admitted to the intensive care unit with ≥ 20% TBSA burned were collected retrospectively. The open wound size (OWS), which includes both unhealed burns and unhealed donor sites, was measured. We calculated the rate of wound closure (healing rate), which we defined as the change in OWS/time. We also determined the time delay (DAYS) from day of burn until day on which there was a reduction in OWS < 10%. Data are medians [interquartile range]. There were 38 patients with complete data; 25 had documentation of successful healing (H), and 13 did not (NH). H differed from NH on age (38 years [32-57] vs 63 [51-74]), body mass index (27 [21-28] vs 32 [19-52]), 24-hour fluid resuscitation (12 L [10-16] vs 18 [15-20]), pressors during first 48 hours (72% vs 100%), use of renal replacement therapy (32% vs 92%), and mortality (4% vs 100%). Repeated measures analysis of covariance showed a significant difference between survivors and nonsurvivors on OWS as a function of time (P<.001). Patients with a positive healing rate (+2%/day) after postburn day 20 had 100% survival whereas those with a negative healing rate (-2%/day) had 100% mortality. For H patients, median DAYS was 41 (28-54); median DAYS/TBSA was 1.3 (1.0-1.9). Survivors had a 0.62% drop in OWS/day, or 4.3%/week. In this cohort of patients with ≥ 20% TBSA, there was a difference in mortality after postburn day 20, between patients with a positive healing rate (+2%/day, 100% survival) and those with a negative healing rate (-2%/day, 100% mortality, P < .05).

  9. Puncture wounds of the foot.

    PubMed

    Haverstock, Brent D

    2012-04-01

    Puncture wounds often appear benign but can cause significant pedal morbidity. Podiatric physicians who treat such wounds should educate local emergency room, urgent care center, and primary care physicians as to the potential complications associated with puncture wounds. Timely referral, recognition of the potential complications, and appropriate treatment ensure that the wound does not advance beyond a puncture wound. If complications have developed, aggressive treatment is required to eradicate the infection and prevent pedal amputation.

  10. Role of Surgical Dressings in Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Beaver, Walter B; Griffin, William L; Mason, J Bohannon; Odum, Susan M

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare efficacy of an occlusive antimicrobial barrier dressing and a standard surgical dressing in patients who underwent primary total joint arthroplasty. Two hundred sixty-two patients were randomized to receive either an occlusive dressing or a standard dressing. Wounds were closed in identical fashion. Outcomes included wound complications, dressing changes, and patient satisfaction. With use of occlusive dressing (vs standard dressing), wound complications (including skin blistering) were significantly (P = 0.15) reduced; there were significantly (P < .0001) fewer dressing changes; and patient satisfaction was significantly (P < .0001) higher. Use of occlusive dressings can reduce wound complications and promote wound healing after total joint arthroplasty.

  11. Adjuvant combined ozone therapy for extensive wound over tibia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Prasham; Shyam, Ashok K; Shah, Sambhav

    2011-07-01

    Disinfectant and antibacterial properties of ozone are utilized in the treatment of nonhealing or ischemic wounds. We present here a case of 59 years old woman with compartment syndrome following surgical treatment of stress fracture of proximal tibia with extensively infected wound and exposed tibia to about 4/5 of its extent. The knee joint was also infected with active pus draining from a medial wound. At presentation the patient had already taken treatment for 15 days in the form of repeated wound debridements and parenteral antibiotics, which failed to heal the wound and she was advised amputation. Topical ozone therapy twice daily and ozone autohemotherapy once daily were given to the patient along with daily dressings and parenteral antibiotics. Within 5 days, the wound was healthy enough for spilt thickness skin graft to provide biological dressing to the exposed tibia bone. Topical ozone therapy was continued for further 5 days till the knee wound healed. On the 15(th) day, implant removal, intramedullary nailing, and latissimus dorsi pedicle flap were performed. Both the bone and the soft tissue healed without further complications and at 20 months follow-up, the patient was walking independently with minimal disability.

  12. Adjuvant combined ozone therapy for extensive wound over tibia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Prasham; Shyam, Ashok K; Shah, Sambhav

    2011-01-01

    Disinfectant and antibacterial properties of ozone are utilized in the treatment of nonhealing or ischemic wounds. We present here a case of 59 years old woman with compartment syndrome following surgical treatment of stress fracture of proximal tibia with extensively infected wound and exposed tibia to about 4/5 of its extent. The knee joint was also infected with active pus draining from a medial wound. At presentation the patient had already taken treatment for 15 days in the form of repeated wound debridements and parenteral antibiotics, which failed to heal the wound and she was advised amputation. Topical ozone therapy twice daily and ozone autohemotherapy once daily were given to the patient along with daily dressings and parenteral antibiotics. Within 5 days, the wound was healthy enough for spilt thickness skin graft to provide biological dressing to the exposed tibia bone. Topical ozone therapy was continued for further 5 days till the knee wound healed. On the 15th day, implant removal, intramedullary nailing, and latissimus dorsi pedicle flap were performed. Both the bone and the soft tissue healed without further complications and at 20 months follow-up, the patient was walking independently with minimal disability. PMID:21772635

  13. Single cell wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Verboon, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    Cell wounding is a common event in the life of many cell types, and the capacity of the cell to repair day-to-day wear-and-tear injuries, as well as traumatic ones, is fundamental for maintaining tissue integrity. Cell wounding is most frequent in tissues exposed to high levels of stress. Survival of such plasma membrane disruptions requires rapid resealing to prevent the loss of cytosolic components, to block Ca2+ influx and to avoid cell death. In addition to patching the torn membrane, plasma membrane and cortical cytoskeleton remodeling are required to restore cell function. Although a general understanding of the cell wound repair process is in place, the underlying mechanisms of each step of this response are not yet known. We have developed a model to study single cell wound repair using the early Drosophila embryo. Our system combines genetics and live imaging tools, allowing us to dissect in vivo the dynamics of the single cell wound response. We have shown that cell wound repair in Drosophila requires the coordinated activities of plasma membrane and cytoskeleton components. Furthermore, we identified an unexpected role for E-cadherin as a link between the contractile actomyosin ring and the newly formed plasma membrane plug. PMID:21922041

  14. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  15. Fibronectin and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Grinnell, F

    1984-01-01

    I have tried to briefly review the evidence (summarized in Table II) indicating that fibronectin is important in cutaneous wound healing. Fibronectin appears to be an important factor throughout this process. It promotes the spreading of platelets at the site of injury, the adhesion and migration of neutrophils, monocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells into the wound region, and the migration of epidermal cells through the granulation tissue. At the level of matrix synthesis, fibronectin appears to be involved both in the organization of the granulation tissue and basement membrane. In terms of tissue remodeling, fibronectin functions as a nonimmune opsonin for phagocytosis of debris by fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and under some circumstances, macrophages. Fibronectin also enhances the phagocytosis of immune-opsonized particles by monocytes, but whether this includes phagocytosis of bacteria remains to be determined. In general, phagocytosis of bacteria has not appeared to involve fibronectin. On the contrary, the presence of fibronectin in the wound bed may promote bacterial attachment and infection. Because of the ease of experimental manipulations, wound healing experiments have been carried out on skin more frequently than other tissues. As a result, the possible role of fibronectin has not been investigated thoroughly in the repair of internal organs and tissues. Nevertheless, it seems reasonable to speculate that fibronectin plays a central role in all wound healing situations. Finally, the wound healing problems of patients with severe factor XIII deficiencies may occur because of their inability to incorporate fibronectin into blood clots.

  16. Phytochemicals in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Sharad, Shashwat; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Traditional therapies, including the use of dietary components for wound healing and skin regeneration, are very common in Asian countries such as China and India. The increasing evidence of health-protective benefits of phytochemicals, components derived from plants is generating a lot of interest, warranting further scientific evaluation and mechanistic studies. Recent Advances: Phytochemicals are non-nutritive substances present in plants, and some of them have the potential to provide better tissue remodeling when applied on wounds and to also act as proangiogenic agents during wound healing. Critical Issues: In this review, we briefly discuss the current understanding, important molecular targets, and mechanism of action(s) of some of the phytochemicals such as curcumin, picroliv, and arnebin-1. We also broadly review the multiple pathways that these phytochemicals regulate to enhance wound repair and skin regeneration. Future Directions: Recent experimental data on the effects of phytochemicals on wound healing and skin regeneration establish the potential clinical utility of plant-based compounds. Additional research in order to better understand the exact mechanism and potential targets of phytochemicals in skin regeneration is needed. Human studies a2nd clinical trials are pivotal to fully understand the benefits of phytochemicals in wound healing and skin regeneration. PMID:27134766

  17. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, J.E.; Mills, C.D.; Barbul, A.; Thirkill, C.E.; Henry, W.L. Jr.; Mastrofrancesco, B.; Caldwell, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of (guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis.

  18. Successful closure of feline axillary wounds by reconstruction of the elbow skin fold.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, C H

    2007-02-01

    This report describes the successful closure of five chronic feline axillary wounds. The aetiology was known to be forelimb entrapment in a neck collar in three cases and was suspected in the others. Each cat underwent a single surgical procedure during which the wound was debrided, the normal structure of the elbow skin fold was restored and the remaining skin defect was closed primarily. None of the cats had undergone any previous reconstruction attempts. No postoperative complications were observed and the wounds healed uneventfully. Cats have well-developed elbow skin folds, allowing a wide range of limb motion to occur. Having a forelimb trapped in a neck collar not only creates a wound in the axilla but also disrupts the normal anatomy of the skin fold. This report demonstrates that restoring the elbow skin fold before closing the wound may improve the chances of a successful reconstruction at the first surgical intervention.

  19. Surgical Adhesive Drape (IO-ban) as Postoperative Surgical Site Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Hasan R; Snyder, Rita; McGowan, Jason E; Jha, Ribhu T; Nair, Mani N

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective chart analysis. Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the senior author’s (MNN) experience applying a widely available surgical drape as a postoperative sterile surgical site dressing for both cranial and spinal procedures. Summary of Background Data: Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication of spine surgery that can result in significant morbidity. There is wide variation in wound care management in practice, including dressing type. Given the known bactericidal properties of the surgical drape, there may be a benefit of continuing its use immediately postoperatively. Methods: All of the senior author’s cases from September 2014 through September 2015 were reviewed. These were contrasted to the previous year prior to the institution of a sterile surgical drape as a postoperative dressing. Results: Only one surgical case out of 157 operative interventions (35 cranial, 124 spinal) required operative debridement due to infection. From September 2013 to September 2014, prior to the institution of a sterile surgical drape as dressing, the author had five infections out of 143 operations (46 cranial, 97 spinal) requiring intervention. Conclusion: The implementation of a sterile surgical drape as a closed postoperative surgical site dressing has led to a decrease in surgical site infections. The technique is simple and widely available, and should be considered for use to diminish surgical site infections. PMID:26798570

  20. Aquacel Surgical Dressing after Thigh Lift: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bocchiotti, Maria A.; Baglioni, Elisabetta A.; Spaziante, Luca; Frenello, Ambra

    2016-01-01

    Background: The postoperative dressing in patients undergoing thigh lift is often difficult, not very resistant to movement, and uncomfortable for the patient, and often exposes surgical site to infection, maceration, or delay in wound healing. Methods: We included 40 patients in a case–control crossover study with no period effects, who were treated both by Aquacel Surgical and a traditional wound dressing. Surveys with a 10-point scale evaluation were used to assess nontraumatic removal level, ease of application, adhesion, and strength of the 2 treatments. We reported the number of days necessary for wound healing, the number of infection cases, and wound-related complications. Costs of the 2 medications were also considered. Ten days after surgery, patients answered a questionnaire with 6 multiple-choice questions to assess comfort, pain at dressing change, pruritus, strength, and number of dressing changes. Results: Compared with controls, surveys revealed Aquacel Surgical to be less traumatic to remove, easier to apply, and to be more adherent and stronger. Significant acceleration of the wound healing was also evident with Aquacel Surgical compared with the traditional dressing. Nonsignificant differences were reported about the risk of infection and wound-related complications between the 2 treatments. A statistical analysis of costs revealed that Aquacel Surgical is significantly more expensive than the traditional medication. Conclusion: We recommend the use of Aquacel Surgical in all the surgery procedures where the risk of wound dehiscence and maceration is high. PMID:27757328

  1. RGTA OTR 4120, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan mimetic, increases wound breaking strength and vasodilatory capability in healing rat full-thickness excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Tong, Miao; Zbinden, Mariken M; Hekking, Ineke J M; Vermeij, Marcel; Barritault, Denis; van Neck, Johan W

    2008-01-01

    ReGeneraTing Agents (RGTAs), a family of polymers engineered to protect and stabilize heparin-binding growth factors, have been shown to promote tissue repair and regeneration. In this study, the effects of one of these polymers, RGTA OTR4120, on healing of full-thickness excisional wounds in rats were investigated. Two 1.5 cm diameter circular full-thickness excisional wounds were created on the dorsum of a rat. After creation of the wounds, RGTA OTR4120 was applied. The progress of healing was assessed quantitatively by evaluating the wound closure rate, vasodilatory capability, and wound breaking strength. The results showed a triple increase of the local vascular response to heat provocation in the RGTA OTR4120-treated wounds as compared with vehicle-treated wounds. On days 14 and 79 after surgery, the wounds treated with RGTA OTR4120 gained skin strength 12% and 48% of the unwounded skin, respectively, and displayed a significantly increased gain in skin strength when compared with control animals. These results raise the possibility of efficacy of RGTA OTR4120 in accelerating surgically cutaneous wound healing by enhancing the wound breaking strength and improving the microcirculation.

  2. War wounds of the foot and ankle: causes, characteristics, and initial management.

    PubMed

    Bluman, Eric M; Ficke, James R; Covey, Dana C

    2010-03-01

    Foot and ankle trauma sustained in the Global War on Terror have unique causes and characteristics. At least one-quarter of all battle injuries involve the lower extremity. These severe lower extremity wounds require specialized early treatment. Ballistic mechanisms cause almost all injuries, and as such, most combat foot and ankle wounds are open in nature. Wounds are characteristically caused by blast mechanisms, but high velocity gunshot injuries are also common. The severe and polytraumatic nature of injuries sustained frequently call for damage control orthopaedics to be utilized. Cautious early treatment of irregular and highly exudative ballistic wounds with subatmospheric wound dressings may ease their early management.

  3. [SURGICAL HAND WASHING: HANDSCRUBBING OR HANDRUBBING].

    PubMed

    Santacatalina Mas, Roser; Peix Sagues, Ma Teresa; Miranda Salmerón, Josep; Claramunt Jofre, Marta; López López, Alba; Salas Marco, Elena

    2016-02-01

    The importance of protocols for preoperative antisepsis of the hands is given by the risk of transferring bacteria from the hands of the surgical team to the patient during surgery and it is relationship with infection of surgical wound site (SSI). Careful surgical scrub reduces the number of bacteria on the skin, but does not eliminate them completely, remaining transient microorganisms on hands after the surgical scrub. There fore if micropuncture in surgical gloves occurs, the correct preoperative preparation of hands and double gloving will be essential to reduce the risk of bacterial transmission to patients. The protocols for surgical hand antisepsis are two: Surgical scrub with antiseptic soap (hand scrubbing). Surgical scrub by rubbing alcohol (handrubbing). The hand antisepsis by rubbing with an alcohol solution has proved to be significantly more effective compared to soap solutions. We must also see that in surgical hand antisepsis with soap, you must rinse them with water. And often hospitals' taps and keys are contaminated by Pseudomonas spp., including P. aeuinosa.

  4. The TopClosure® 3S System, for skin stretching and a secure wound closure.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris; Carmel, Narin-Nard; Silberman, Adi; Li, Ming Sen; Li, Yong Zhong

    2012-07-01

    The principle of stretching wound margins for primary wound closure is commonly practiced and used for various skin defects, leading at times to excessive tension and complications during wound closure. Different surgical techniques, skin stretching devices and tissue expanders have been utilized to address this issue. Previously designed skin stretching devices resulted in considerable morbidity. They were invasive by nature and associated with relatively high localized tissue pressure, frequently leading to necrosis, damage and tearing of skin at the wound margins. To assess the clinical effectiveness and performance and, to determine the safety of TopClosure® for gradual, controlled, temporary, noninvasive and invasive applications for skin stretching and secure wound closing, the TopClosure® device was applied to 20 patients for preoperative skin lesion removal and to secure closure of a variety of wound sizes. TopClosure® was reinforced with adhesives, staples and/or surgical sutures, depending on the circumstances of the wound and the surgeon's judgment. TopClosure® was used prior to, during and/or after surgery to reduce tension across wound edges. No significant complications or adverse events were associated with its use. TopClosure® was effectively used for preoperative skin expansion in preparation for dermal resection (e.g., congenital nevi). It aided closure of large wounds involving significant loss of skin and soft tissue by mobilizing skin and subcutaneous tissue, thus avoiding the need for skin grafts or flaps. Following surgery, it was used to secure closure of wounds under tension, thus improving wound aesthetics. A sample case study will be presented. We designed TopClosure®, an innovative device, to modify the currently practiced concept of wound closure by applying minimal stress to the skin, away from damaged wound edges, with flexible force vectors and versatile methods of attachment to the skin, in a noninvasive or invasive manner.

  5. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing.

  6. Topical application of dressing with amino acids improves cutaneous wound healing in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Giovanni; D'Antona, Giuseppe; Dioguardi, Francesco Saverio; Rezzani, Rita

    2010-09-01

    The principal goal in treating surgical and non-surgical wounds, in particular for aged skin, is the need for rapid closure of the lesion. Cutaneous wound healing processes involve four phases including an inflammatory response with the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. If inflammation develops in response to bacterial infection, it can create a problem for wound closure. Reduced inflammation accelerates wound closure with subsequent increased fibroblast function and collagen synthesis. On the contrary, prolonged chronic inflammation results in very limited wound healing. Using histological and immunohistochemical techniques, we investigated the effects of a new wound dressing called Vulnamin that contains four essential amino acids for collagen and elastin synthesis plus sodium ialuronate (Na-Ial), compared with Na-Ial alone, in closure of experimental cutaneous wounds of aged rats. Our results showed that the application of Vulnamin dressings modulated the inflammatory response with a reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) immunolocalisation, while increasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) immunolocalisation. Furthermore, the dressing increased the distribution density of fibroblasts and aided the synthesis of thin collagen fibers resulting in a reduction in healing time. The nutritive approach using this new wound dressing can provide an efficacious and safe strategy to accelerate wound healing in elderly subjects, simplifying therapeutic procedures and leading to an improved quality of life.

  7. Wound healing after laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, D A; Meyers, A

    1995-10-01

    Compared with scalpel wounds, CO2 laser wounds show delays in inflammation, collagen production, reepithelialization, and tensile strength in the early stages of healing. Some of these delays are similar to those seen with electrocautery and burn wounds. Later stages compensate for these early deficiencies, because scalpel and laser wounds become more similar in epithelialization and wound strength over time. Healed CO2 laser wounds tend to have less scar contraction than scalpel wounds. Débridement of initial laser wound char, tissue cooling techniques during lasering, and pulsed modes of laser delivery all seem to result in more rapid, favorable healing. Similar wound healing trends have been seen with the CO2 laser in bone, with other lasers, and with laser vascular and neural anastomosis. Biostimulation with low-level laser energy is a complex subject of ongoing investigations.

  8. Performance Assessment of Suture Type, Water Temperature, and Surgeon Skill in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

    2010-05-01

    This study assessed performance of seven suture types in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha implanted with acoustic microtransmitters. Nonabsorbable (Ethilon) and absorbable (Monocryl) monofilament and nonabsorbable (Nurolon, silk) and absorbable (Vicryl, Vicryl Plus, Vicryl Rapide) braided sutures were used to close incisions in Chinook salmon. Monocryl exhibited greater suture retention than all other suture types 7 d after surgery. Both monofilament suture types were retained better than all braided suture types at 14 d. Incision openness and tag retention did not differ among suture types. Wound inflammation was similar for Ethilon, Monocryl, and Nurolon at 7 d. Wound ulceration was lower for Ethilon, Monocryl, and Nurolon than for all other suture types at 14 d post-surgery. Fish held in 12°C water had more desirable post-surgery healing characteristics (i.e., higher suture and tag retention and lower incision openness, wound inflammation, and ulceration) at 7 and 14 d after surgery than those held in 17°C water. The effect of surgeon was a significant predictor for all response variables at 7 d. This result emphasizes the importance of including surgeon as a variable in telemetry study analyses when multiple surgeons are used. Monocryl performed better with regard to post-surgery healing characteristics in the study fish. The overall results support the conclusion that Monocryl is the best suture material to close incisions created during surgical implantation of acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon.

  9. Surgical treatment for bacterial meningitis after spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Min; Ren, Liang; Zhao, Zhen-Qi; Zhao, Yan-Rui; Zheng, Yin-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Bacterial meningitis (BM) has been recognized as a rare complication of spinal surgery. However, there are few reports on the management of postoperative BM in patients who have undergone spinal surgery. The initial approach to the treatment of patients suspected with acute BM depends on the stage at which the syndrome is recognized, the speed of the diagnostic evaluation, and the need for antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy. Patient concerns: Here, we report the case of a patient with lumbar spinal stenosis and underwent a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at L4–L5. The dura mater was damaged intraoperatively. After the surgery, the patient displayed dizziness and vomiting. A CSF culture revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Diagnoses: The patient was diagnosed with postoperative BM. Interventions: Antibiotic was administered intravenously depends on the organism isolated. Nevertheless, the patient's clinical condition continued to deteriorate. The patient underwent 2 open revision surgeries for dural lacerations and cyst debridement repair. Outcomes: The patient's mental status returned to normal and her headaches diminished. The patient did not have fever and the infection healed. Lessons: Surgical intervention is an effective method to treat BM after spinal operation in cases where conservative treatments have failed. Further, early surgical repair of dural lacerations and cyst debridement can be a treatment option for selected BM patients with complications including pseudomeningocele, wound infection, or cerebrospinal fluid leakage. PMID:28296723

  10. Fibrin sealant combined with fibroblasts and platelet-derived growth factor enhance wound healing in excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Mogford, Jon E; Tawil, Bill; Jia, Shengxian; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that the fibrinogen-thrombin formulation of fibrin sealant combined with fibroblasts and PDGF-BB enhance cutaneous wound healing. Four formulations varying in fibrinogen and thrombin concentration were applied to full-thickness biopsy wounds in the rabbit ear cutaneous wound healing model with or without cultured rabbit dermal fibroblasts (RDFs; 3 x 10(5) cells/wound) embedded in the fibrinogen component. At post-wounding day 7, there was no difference in the diluted vs. non-diluted formulations for either the promotion of granulation tissue coverage of the open wounds or total granulation tissue area when tested without embedded cells. Including the RDFs, the highest degree of wound coverage by granulation tissue was observed in the combined dilution formulation (17.3 mg/mL fibrinogen, 167 U/mL thrombin; n=10 wounds) that was 167% (p<0.05) of the nondiluted FS containing cells (50 mg/mL fibrinogen, 250 U/mL thrombin; n=10 wounds). Inclusion of fibroblasts increased granulation tissue area within the wounds vs. FS alone (p<0.05) for each diluted formulation although no differences in this parameter were observed within each group (FS alone or with embedded cells). However, addition of the vulnerary growth factor PDGF-BB (3 mg; n=4) with the embedded RDFs in the combined dilution formulation increased granulation tissue area over two-fold (p<0.01) over FS alone. Additionally, the presence of the RDFs promoted incorporation of the granulation tissue with and epithelial migration over the FS suggesting an active interaction between cells delivered to the wound by FS and the host repair cells. The findings suggest the progress of cutaneous defect repair can be enhanced by ex vivo cell delivery in fibrin sealant.

  11. α-Gal Nanoparticles in Wound and Burn Healing Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Galili, Uri

    2017-01-01

    Significance: Rapid recruitment and activation of macrophages may accelerate wound healing. Such accelerated healing was observed in wounds and burns of experimental animals treated with α-gal nanoparticles. Recent Advances: α-Gal nanoparticles present multiple α-gal epitopes (Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R). α-Gal nanoparticles applied to wounds bind anti-Gal (the most abundant antibody in humans) and generate chemotactic complement peptides, which rapidly recruit macrophages. Fc/Fc receptor interaction between anti-Gal coating the α-gal nanoparticles and recruited macrophages activates macrophages to produce cytokines that accelerate healing. α-Gal nanoparticles applied to burns and wounds in mice and pigs producing anti-Gal, decreased healing time by 40–60%. In mice, this accelerated healing avoided scar formation. α-Gal nanoparticle-treated wounds, in diabetic mice producing anti-Gal, healed within 12 days, whereas saline-treated wounds became chronic wounds. α-Gal nanoparticles are stable for years and may be applied dried, in suspension, aerosol, ointments, or within biodegradable materials. Critical Issues: α-Gal nanoparticle therapy can be evaluated only in mammalian models producing anti-Gal, including α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mice and pigs or Old World primates. Traditional experimental animal models synthesize α-gal epitopes and lack anti-Gal. Future Directions: Since anti-Gal is naturally produced in all humans, it is of interest to determine safety and efficacy of α-gal nanoparticles in accelerating wound and burn healing in healthy individuals and in patients with impaired wound healing such as diabetic patients and elderly individuals. In addition, efficacy of α-gal nanoparticle therapy should be studied in healing and regeneration of internal injuries such as surgical incisions, ischemic myocardium following myocardial infarction, and injured nerves. PMID:28289553

  12. [Liver gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Botoi, G; Blăjan, I; Nemeş, S

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the 6 cases of liver shot wounds that were in supervision of the general surgery unit, County Hospital of Baia Mare, between the years 1990-1997. The patients were males, most of them being 20 to 30 years old. In 3 situations hunting rifles were involved, all followed by retention of metal foreign body. The wounds were plurivisceral in 5 of the 6 cases, the most frequently wounded was the right liver lobe. All the patients presented serious traumatic shock and haemorrhagic shock. Livertectomy was used in 40% of the cases being imposed by the dilacerant and transfixiant character of the wounds and also by the retention of foreign bodies in parenchime. We registered 2 demises, both in the first postoperatory hours. The paper proposes a few criteria that allow the application of a conservatory treatment:rapid favourable answer at deshocking therapy; hemodynamic stability; minimal hemoperitoneus (echographical and tomographical); absence of associated visceral wounds or, when they exist, of serious physiopathological consequences; access to performant means of imagistics.

  13. Kinetic and Reaction Pathway Analysis in the Application of Botulinum Toxin A for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Lebeda, Frank J.; Dembek, Zygmunt F.; Adler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A relatively new approach in the treatment of specific wounds in animal models and in patients with type A botulinum toxin is the focus of this paper. The indications or conditions include traumatic wounds (experimental and clinical), surgical (incision) wounds, and wounds such as fissures and ulcers that are signs/symptoms of disease or other processes. An objective was to conduct systematic literature searches and take note of the reactions involved in the healing process and identify corresponding pharmacokinetic data. From several case reports, we developed a qualitative model of how botulinum toxin disrupts the vicious cycle of muscle spasm, pain, inflammation, decreased blood flow, and ischemia. We transformed this model into a minimal kinetic scheme for healing chronic wounds. The model helped us to estimate the rate of decline of this toxin's therapeutic effect by calculating the rate of recurrence of clinical symptoms after a wound-healing treatment with this neurotoxin. PMID:22174710

  14. [Specific features of wounds with a self-defense traumatic weapon "Osa"].

    PubMed

    Khodov, A M; Zolotov, A S; Filipchenkov, L S

    2012-01-01

    Specific features and outcomes of wounds with a traumatic weapon of self-defense "Osa" were analyzed in 24 patients. Mean age of the wounded was from 21 to76 years. In 20 patients there was a single wound, in 4 patients it was multiple, in 7--blunt, in 12--perforating and 5 patients had gutter wounds. All the patients were treated according to the principles of field military surgery. Five patients had severe wounds: penetrating fracture of the skull (2 of them died), fracture of the shoulder (1 case), injury of the main artery (1 case), of the pleura (1 case). The wounds were closed up by primary intention in 19 patients, by second intention in 4 patients. The authors' experience shows that a traumatic weapon of self-defense "Osa" rather often caused permanent harm to health and can be mortal. Active surgical strategy in treatment of such patients prevents the development of serious infectious complications.

  15. Choice of wound care in diabetic foot ulcer: A practical approach

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Karakkattu Vijayan; Tiwari, Shalbha; Purandare, Vedavati Bharat; Khedkar, Sudam; Bhosale, Shilpa Sameer; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the consequence of multiple factors including peripheral neuropathy, decreased blood supply, high plantar pressures, etc., and pose a significant risk for morbidity, limb loss and mortality. The critical aspects of the wound healing mechanism and host physiological status in patients with diabetes necessitate the selection of an appropriate treatment strategy based on the complexity and type of wound. In addition to systemic antibiotics and surgical intervention, wound care is considered to be an important component of diabetic foot ulcer management. This article will focus on the use of different wound care materials in diabetic foot. From a clinical perspective, it is important to decide on the wound care material depending on the type and grade of the ulcer. This article will also provide clinicians with a simple approach to the choice of wound care materials in diabetic foot ulcer. PMID:25126400

  16. [Application of therapy in negative pressure complex wounds in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Fernández Sánchez, Rosario; Muñoz-Miguelsanz, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been widely used in the adult patient, contrary to what happens in children, with just a few long series papers. NPWT avoids long and expensive hospital admissions, reducing the hospital costs; it also decreases the family dynamics and allows for an early return to everyday activities. In this article, we present three clinical cases consisting of a toddler, a child and a teenager with complex wounds treated with NPWT in the pediatric surgery department of the Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital in Granada. The results were excellent, with a good adherence to treatment in all cases, achieving a complete closure in two cases; the third case needed a deferred surgical closure after surgical site preparation, and showed a decrease of the wound size after the NPWT. Moreover, successful pain management was achieved during the wound cleansing, which was done under an ambulatory regime. No general anesthesia was needed. From our experience, we propose the NPWT as an alternative therapy to the classic surgical approach for this type of complex lesions in children, which offers the same advantages and results than in adults.

  17. Bilayer Cryogel Wound Dressing and Skin Regeneration Grafts for the Treatment of Acute Skin Wounds.

    PubMed

    Priya, S Geetha; Gupta, Ankur; Jain, Era; Sarkar, Joyita; Damania, Apeksha; Jagdale, Pankaj R; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Gupta, Kailash C; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-06-22

    In this study, the potential of cryogel bilayer wound dressing and skin regenerating graft for the treatment of surgically created full thickness wounds was evaluated. The top layer was composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine (PVP-I) cryogel and served as the antiseptic layer, while the bottom regenerative layer was made using gelatin cryogel. Both components of the bilayer showed typical features of a cryogel interconnected macropore network, rapid swelling, high water uptake capacity of about 90%. Both PVP and gelatin cryogel showed high tensile strength of 45 and 10 kPa, respectively. Gelatin cryogel sheets were essentially elastic and could be stretched without any visible deformation. The antiseptic PVP-I layer cryogel sheet showed sustained iodine release and suppressed microbial growth when tested with skin pathogens (zone of inhibition ∼2 cm for sheet of 0.9 cm diameter). The gelatin cryogel sheet degraded in vitro in weeks. The gelatin cryogel sheet supported cell infiltration, attachment, and proliferation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Microparticles loaded with bioactive molecules (mannose-6-phosphate and human fibrinogen) were also incorporated in the gelatin cryogel sheets for their role in enhancing skin regeneration and scar free wound healing. In vivo evaluation of healing capacity of the bilayer cryogel was checked in rabbits by creating full thickness wound defect (diameter 2 cm). Macroscopic and microscopic observation at regular time intervals for 4 weeks demonstrated better and faster skin regeneration in the wound treated with cryogel bilayer as compared to untreated defect and the repair was comparable to commercial skin regeneration scaffold Neuskin-F. Complete skin regeneration was observed after 4 weeks of implantation with no sign of inflammatory response. Defects implanted with cryogel having mannose-6-phosphate showed no scar formation, while the wound treated with bilayer incorporated with human fibrinogen microparticles showed

  18. Wound cleaning and wound healing: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Robert G; Unverdorben, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Chronic wounds present a significant societal burden in their cost of care, and they reduce patient quality of life. Key components of wound care include such measures as debridement, irrigation, and wound cleaning. Appropriate care removes necrotic tissue and reduces wound bioburden to enhance wound healing. Physical cleaning with debridement and irrigation is of documented efficacy. Wounds may be washed with water, saline, or Ringer's solution or cleaned with active ingredients, such as hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, acetic acid, alcohol, ionized silver preparations, chlorhexidine, polyhexanide/betaine solution, or povidone-iodine--the majority of which are locally toxic and of limited or no proven efficacy in enhancing wound healing. Although the consensus opinion is that these topical cleaning agents should not be routinely used, recent clinical evidence suggests that polyhexanide/betaine may be nontoxic and effective in enhancing wound healing. Further well-designed studies are needed.

  19. Systematic Assessment and Targeted Improvement of Services Following Yearlong Surgical Outcomes Surveys

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-23

    Heart Attack; Cardiac Arrest; Congestive Heart Failure; Atrial Fibrillation; Angina; Deep Vein Thrombosis; Pulmonary Embolism; Respiratory Arrest; Respiratory Failure; Pneumonia; Gastrointestinal Bleed; Stomach Ulcer; Delirium; Stroke; Nerve Injury; Surgical Wound Infection

  20. Surgical Reconstruction of Radiation Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Patients with cancer receive benefits from radiation therapy; however, it may have adverse effects on normal tissue such as causing radiation-induced ulcer and osteoradionecrosis. The most reliable method to treat a radiation ulcer is wide excision of the affected tissue, followed by coverage with well-vascularized tissue. As usual, radiation-induced skin ulcers are due to therapeutic irradiation for residual cancer or lymph nodes; the locations of radiation ulcers are relatively limited, including the head, neck, chest wall, lumbar, groin, and sacral areas. Thus, suitable reconstructive methods vary according to functional and aesthetic conditions. I reviewed the practices and surgical results for radiation ulcers over the past 30 years, and present the recommended surgical methods for these hard-to-heal ulcers. Recent Advances: At a minimum, flaps are required to treat radiation ulcers. Surgeons can recommend earlier debridement, followed by immediate coverage with axial-pattern musculocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps. Free flaps are also a useful soft tissue coverage option. The choice of flap varies with the location and size of the wounds. Critical Issues: The most crucial procedure is the complete resection of the radiation-affected area, followed by coverage with well-vascularized tissue. Future Directions: Recent developments in perforator flap techniques, which are defined as flaps with a blood supply from isolated perforating vessels of a stem artery, have allowed the surgeons to successfully resurface these difficult wounds with reduced morbidity. PMID:24761342

  1. Treatment of open hand injuries: does timing of surgery matter? A single-centre prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Juon, Bettina H; Iseli, Michelle; Kreutziger, Janett; Constantinescu, Mihai A; Vögelin, Esther

    2014-10-01

    The 6-hour paradigm for surgical treatment of open injuries should be re-evaluated in the era of systematic use of antiseptic solutions and systemic antibiotics. The current study investigates prospectively the impact of timing of surgery on the outcome of open hand injuries. The prospective evaluation included adult patients presenting with open hand injuries between 1 September 2009 and 30 June 2010 to the emergency department of the University Hospital of Berne, Switzerland. Multiple trauma, bilateral hand injuries, bite injuries, and infections were excluded. All patients underwent a standardised treatment protocol with antiseptic solution, sterile dressing, antibiotic prophylaxis, and surgical treatment upon admission. Demographic data, injury details, and delay from trauma to therapy were recorded. Microbiology was gained at surgery. Outcome measurements included infections, complications, pain, and function (clinically, DASH, Mayo score). From 116 patients (mean age 43 years) six patients suffered an infection (5.2%). The observed infections were statistically not associated with delay to surgery, treatment protocol, or to injury complexity. Neither complications, pain, nor functional outcome were statistically associated with delay to surgery, wound disinfection, or administration of antibiotics. In conclusion, early or late timing of surgical treatment of open hand injuries did not show any impact on outcome (infections, complications, pain, function) in this prospective single-centre patient evaluation.

  2. [The organization of surgical care in Russian army during 1812 Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Gliantsev, S P

    2012-01-01

    The article considers the characteristics of surgical care to warriors of Russian army during 1812 Great Patriotic War. Such conditions are analyzed as damaging action of French weapons, types of combat wounds, organization and forces of military sanitary service of Russian troops, surgeons' support with means of supplying surgical care to the wounded and arsenal of surgical aids. On the basis of given materials analysis a preliminary conclusion is made that surgical care in Russian army in 1812 not only was on the sufficiently high level but it played a specified role in the victory of Russian weapon.

  3. Continuous delivery of stromal cell-derived factor-1 from alginate scaffolds accelerates wound healing.

    PubMed

    Rabbany, Sina Y; Pastore, Joseph; Yamamoto, Masaya; Miller, Tim; Rafii, Shahin; Aras, Rahul; Penn, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Proper wound diagnosis and management is an increasingly important clinical challenge and is a large and growing unmet need. Pressure ulcers, hard-to-heal wounds, and problematic surgical incisions are emerging at increasing frequencies. At present, the wound-healing industry is experiencing a paradigm shift towards innovative treatments that exploit nanotechnology, biomaterials, and biologics. Our study utilized an alginate hydrogel patch to deliver stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), a naturally occurring chemokine that is rapidly overexpressed in response to tissue injury, to assess the potential effects SDF-1 therapy on wound closure rates and scar formation. Alginate patches were loaded with either purified recombinant human SDF-1 protein or plasmid expressing SDF-1 and the kinetics of SDF-1 release were measured both in vitro and in vivo in mice. Our studies demonstrate that although SDF-1 plasmid- and protein-loaded patches were able to release therapeutic product over hours to days, SDF-1 protein was released faster (in vivo K(d) 0.55 days) than SDF-1 plasmid (in vivo K(d) 3.67 days). We hypothesized that chronic SDF-1 delivery would be more effective in accelerating the rate of dermal wound closure in Yorkshire pigs with acute surgical wounds, a model that closely mimics human wound healing. Wounds treated with SDF-1 protein (n = 10) and plasmid (n = 6) loaded patches healed faster than sham (n = 4) or control (n = 4). At day 9, SDF-1-treated wounds significantly accelerated wound closure (55.0 +/- 14.3% healed) compared to nontreated controls (8.2 +/- 6.0%, p < 0.05). Furthermore, 38% of SDF-1-treated wounds were fully healed at day 9 (vs. none in controls) with very little evidence of scarring. These data suggest that patch-mediated SDF-1 delivery may ultimately provide a novel therapy for accelerating healing and reducing scarring in clinical wounds.

  4. Wound healing and treating wounds: Differential diagnosis and evaluation of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Morton, Laurel M; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    Wounds are an excellent example of how the field of dermatology represents a cross-section of many medical disciplines. For instance, wounds may be caused by trauma, vascular insufficiency, and underlying medical conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, and rheumatologic and inflammatory disease. This continuing medical education article provides an overview of wound healing and the pathophysiology of chronic wounds and reviews the broad differential diagnosis of chronic wounds. It also describes the initial steps necessary in evaluating a chronic wound and determining its underlying etiology.

  5. The use of honey as a topical dressing to treat a large, devitalized wound in a stumptail macaque (Macaca arctoides).

    PubMed

    Staunton, Christine J; Halliday, Lisa C; Garcia, Kelly D

    2005-07-01

    There are many reasons wounds are managed as open wounds rather than by primary closure. Indications include gross contamination, infection, and skin loss leading to insufficient adjacent tissue for wound closure. The most common method of managing an open wound is with wet-to-dry dressings. Wet-to-dry dressings provide mechanical debridement and promote the movement of viscous exudates away from the wound. Wet-to-dry bandages ideally are changed every 12 to 24 h. For nonhuman primates, it is desirable to develop wound management techniques that limit animal handling for bandage changes and thus the frequency of sedation. Anecdotal reports on the use of honey to treat wounds date back to 2000 B.C. Recently, scientific inquiries have found merit to these reports. Honey accelerates healing because of its direct effects on tissue and antibacterial properties. In addition, dressings with honey can be changed relatively infrequently. Honey decreases inflammatory edema, hastens sloughing of devitalized tissue, attracts macrophages which cleanse the wound, provides a local cellular energy source, and protectively covers the wound. A high osmolarity, acidity, and hydrogen peroxide content confer honey with antibacterial properties. Here we describe the use of honey to manage a bite wound in a stumptail macaque (Macaca arctoides). The wound healed rapidly: after 2 weeks of treatment, there was markedly less exudate and no necrotic tissue. This report describes how honey may be helpful in the management of open wounds in nonhuman primates by minimizing the need for sedation for bandage changes.

  6. Spectroscopic Biomarkers for Monitoring Wound Healing and Infection in Wounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    civilian trauma center. The parameters bearing the most weight will be used to diagnose trauma wounds and predict patient outcome. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...are most important for a correct initial assessment of the wound along with a more accurate wound healing prediction. The parameters bearing the

  7. The wound/burn guidelines - 1: Wounds in general.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuji; Hasegawa, Minoru; Maekawa, Takeo; Le Pavoux, Andres; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Ito, Takaaki; Isei, Taiki; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kadono, Takafumi; Kodera, Masanari; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Sakai, Keisuke; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Manabu; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Koma; Madokoro, Naoki; Yamasaki, Osamu; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-04-01

    The Japanese Dermatological Association determined to prepare the Wound/Burn Guidelines focusing on treatments, catering to needs for the clinical practice of dermatology. Among these guidelines, "Wounds in General" was intended to explain knowledge necessary "to heal wounds" without specifying particular disorders.

  8. [Surgical management of animal bites in children].

    PubMed

    Touzet-Roumazeille, S; Jayyosi, L; Plenier, Y; Guyot, E; Guillard, T; François, C

    2016-10-01

    Children represent a population at risk, because of their short size, their naivety and their attraction to animals. The face and hands are the most specific locations in young children. Wounds are often multiple. In more than half the cases, the child knows the animal, which are dogs and cats by frequency argument. The bite episode occurs mostly when the child is alone with the pet without direct supervision, while playing or stroking the animal. As in all bites, pediatric lesions are infectious, functional and aesthetic emergencies, but the goal of this work was primarily to make a point on principles of surgical management of animal bites in children, highlighting pediatric specificities. Animal bites require psychological, anesthetic and surgical treatment, adapted to the child, in a specialized structure. Hospitalization and general anesthesia are more frequent in children. Any suspicion of mistreatment (and/or abuse) should lead to the child's hospitalization, even if wounds do not justify monitoring in a surgical environment. Emergency surgery is essential to limit functional and aesthetic consequences. The healing capacities of the child and the frequent lack of co-morbidity allow a conservative surgical treatment with suture, repositioning skin flaps and controlled healing in the first place. Immobilization, drainage, and antibiotics will complete the surgery. The healing process, however, leads to a specific management during scar remodeling phase and growth. Psychological care of the child and parents should not be forgotten, and has to start at the same time as surgical treatment at in acute phase.

  9. [Atypical maxillofacial shot wound].

    PubMed

    Malachovský, I; Straka, L; Novomeský, F; Statelová, D; Janícková, M; Stilla, J; Urbanová, E

    2011-01-01

    Maxillofacial shot wounds belong to the relatively less frequent injuries. The soft tissues might be affected in particular, however the most of injuries are combined with infliction of hard tissues. Shot wounds by the bow or crossbow are very rare. They might result as a consequence of either accident or suicide. In the literature some cases of a suicidal experiments had been published, all of these cases were due to arrow from the crossbow. There was no injury being documented due to arrow from the bow. The authors present a case of maxillofacial injury done by shoot of arrow from the bow in the course of a child's play.

  10. Wound Healing Devices Brief Vignettes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Caesar A.; Hare, Marc A.; Perdrizet, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The demand for wound care therapies is increasing. New wound care products and devices are marketed at a dizzying rate. Practitioners must make informed decisions about the use of medical devices for wound healing therapy. This paper provides updated evidence and recommendations based on a review of recent publications. Recent Advances: The published literature on the use of medical devices for wound healing continues to support the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, and most recently electrical stimulation. Critical Issue: To inform wound healing practitioners of the evidence for or against the use of medical devices for wound healing. This information will aid the practitioner in deciding which technology should be accepted or rejected for clinical use. Future Directions: To produce high quality, randomized controlled trials or acquire outcome-based registry databases to further test and improve the knowledge base as it relates to the use of medical devices in wound care. PMID:27076996

  11. A prospective comparison of octyl-2-cyanoacrylate and suture in standardized facial wounds.

    PubMed

    Handschel, J G K; Depprich, R A; Dirksen, D; Runte, C; Zimmermann, A; Kübler, N R

    2006-04-01

    Regarding the cosmetic results of wound closure using tissue adhesives as opposed to sutured wounds, most published studies are performed on children and with non-standardized lacerations, which makes it difficult to transfer the results to facial incisional wounds in adults. There are also conflicting conclusions about the cosmetic results. The purpose of this randomized prospective study was to compare the cosmetic outcomes of wound closure with sutures and octyl-2-cyanoacrylate in standardized facial wounds in adults. To compare very similar facial wounds, the infraorbital cut (lower eyelid incision) was used in 45 patients. The assessment was performed by patients and surgeons blind to the data. Phase-shifting profilometry was used to measure the profile of the scars. No early complications were observed in any group. The wound depth in the tissue adhesive group was significantly greater than in the suture group. There were no differences in the overall cosmetic results among all patients in the two groups. Interestingly, in the younger patients the result of the sutured wounds was superior to that of the adhesive-treated patients. The Dermabond skin adhesive provides a means of closure of facial surgical wounds without early complications, but adjustment of the edges of the wound and the cosmetic result in younger patients are less successful than with thin sutures.

  12. Effect of cultured autologous oral keratinocyte suspension in fibrin glue on oral wound healing in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lis, G J; Zarzecka, J; Litwin, J A; Jasek, E; Cichocki, T; Zapała, J

    2012-09-01

    The effect of cultured autologous oral keratinocyte suspension in fibrin glue on the healing of surgically produced oral mucosal wounds was assessed in the rabbit model. Using the light microscope and a digital image analysis system, the epithelization parameters (marginal epithelization and percentage of wound re-epithelization) were measured in haematoxylin-eosin stained sections of the wound area and compared with those of wounds treated with fibrin glue alone and untreated ones. The epithelization was significantly higher in keratinocytes plus fibrin glue-treated wounds on postoperative days 3 and 7. No significant differences were observed on postoperative day 1, when the healing process had just begun, and on postoperative day 14, when re-epithelization was completed or nearly completed in all groups. The inflammatory infiltration of the wounded mucosa was weakest in keratinocyte-treated wounds and strongest in untreated wounds. In conclusion, suspension of cultured autologous oral keratinocytes in fibrin glue significantly accelerates oral wound healing in the rabbit model and could be beneficial in the treatment of oral wounds in patients.

  13. The effects of topical collagen treatment on wound breaking strength and scar cosmesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sinno, Hani; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Lutfy, Justyn; Jardin, Barbara; Winocour, Sebastian; Brimo, Fadi; Beckman, Lorne; Watters, Kevin; Philip, Anie; Williams, Bruce; Prakash, Satya

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Topical application of collagen has been suggested to enhance wound healing; however, its long-term effect on wounds has not been studied in a rat model. HYPOTHESIS: Topical application of collagen type I will not facilitate incision healing or cosmesis in rats up to 28 days postwounding. METHODS: The effects of bovine collagen type I (6 mg/mL) on the rat surgical paired skin incision model were examined. Each rat served as its own control in which topical collagen was applied to one incision while normal saline (0.9%) was applied to the other incision. Rats were euthanized three (n=6), seven (n=6) and 28 (n=5) days after wounding. Tissue harvested from each time point was examined for maximal breaking strength, and for biochemical and histological analysis. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences (ie, P<0.05) in maximum wound breaking strength between the collagen- and saline-treated wounds at all time points. Histological analysis revealed a similar infiltration of inflammatory cells and fibroblasts in the wound edges of all incisions when matched with time of wounding. Western blot analysis revealed no differences in fibronectin or collagen I content in all wounds in each rat. CONCLUSIONS: The topical application of collagen did not facilitate wound healing from three to 28 days in the rat wound model. PMID:23997586

  14. A comparison of wound healing following treatment with Lavandula x allardii honey or essential oil.

    PubMed

    Lusby, Patricia E; Coombes, Alex L; Wilkinson, Jenny M

    2006-09-01

    The increased interest in complementary therapies has led to the investigation of products traditionally believed to have a beneficial effect in wound healing. Two such products are honey and lavender essential oil. In this study a rat excisional wound model was used to investigate the action of Lavandula x allardii honey and essential oil, and a standard therapeutic honey (Medihoney). Four 8 mm wounds were created surgically on the dorsal surface of each rat and honey or essential oil applied to the wounds twice a day for 4 days. Wound healing was analysed by wound contraction and capillary volume at 5 and 12 days post-surgery. Although no statistically significant difference in wound contraction was observed for the essential oil or honey treated wounds relative to the untreated control, both honeys were shown to reduce the capillary volume in the wound site at day 12 with no difference between the honeys (control 154 +/- 14 microm(3) vs L. x allardii honey 77 +/- 18 microm(3) and Medihoney 89 +/- 39 microm(3), p < 0.001; mean +/- SD). This suggests that scar maturation in these animals was more advanced than in other groups. These data suggest that L. x allardii honey, but not essential oil, has a beneficial action in wound healing.

  15. Combat-Related Invasive Fungal Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    Combat-related invasive fungal (mold) wound infections (IFIs) have emerged as an important and morbid complication following explosive blast injuries among military personnel. Similar to trauma-associated IFI cases among civilian populations, as in agricultural accidents and natural disasters, these infections occur in the setting of penetrating wounds contaminated by environmental debris. Specific risk factors for combat-related IFI include dismounted (patrolling on foot) blast injuries occurring mostly in southern Afghanistan, resulting in above knee amputations requiring resuscitation with large-volume blood transfusions. Diagnosis of IFI is based upon early identification of a recurrently necrotic wound following serial debridement and tissue-based histopathology examination with special stains to detect invasive disease. Fungal culture of affected tissue also provides supportive information. Aggressive surgical debridement of affected tissue is the primary therapy. Empiric antifungal therapy should be considered when there is a strong suspicion for IFI. Both liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole should be considered initially for treatment since many of the cases involve not only Mucorales species but also Aspergillus or Fusarium spp., with narrowing of regimen based upon clinical mycology findings. PMID:25530825

  16. A prospective pilot study to evaluate wound outcomes and levels of serum C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 in the wound fluid of patients with trauma-related chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Yang, Fan; Li, Zhanfei; Yi, Chengla; Bai, Xiangjun

    2014-06-01

    If surgical closure of chronic wounds is an option, choosing an appropriate time to definitely close these wounds remains a challenge. Although the underlying mechanisms of nonhealing are not completely understood, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in wound fluid have been found to be markers of the systemic and local inflammation state of chronic wounds. The purpose of this prospective, descriptive pilot study was to evaluate the effect of debridement, systemic antibiotics, and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on the outcomes of trauma-related chronic wounds and changes in local inflammation responses, measured using CRP and IL-6 levels as indicators of cytokine regulation. Between June 2012 and May 2013, 20 consecutive patients (14 men, six women, mean age 40 [range 17-56] years) with various trauma-related, nonhealing chronic wounds were enrolled in the study after failing to heal for an average of 8.5 (range 6-16) weeks using a protocol of regular debridement and gauze dressings. Before the start of the study, wounds were cultured, and laboratory values for white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophils, and levels of serum CRP and IL-6 in the wound fluid obtained. Wounds were surgically debrided and NPWT (continuous at 125 mm Hg) applied. All patients were prescribed systemic antibiotics, and mean time interval between NPWT dressing changes was 5 (range 3-7) days. During an average mean NPWT treatment time of 13 (range 5-20) days, CRP and IL-6 concentrations decreased from 66.4 mg/L to 10.4 mg/L and 44.1 pg/mL to 8.6 pg/mL, respectively (P <0.001). The presence/absence of bacteria, WBC, and neutrophil counts did not change. No complications were noted, and all wounds were successfully closed using various surgical procedures. In this study, clinical wound improvement and a significant decrease in wound fluid CRP and IL-6 levels were observed. Studies with a larger sample size and a more robust study design may help elucidate the

  17. The History of Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jayesh B.

    2012-01-01

    The history of wound healing is, in a sense, the history of humankind. This brief history of wound healing has been compiled for the benefit of readers. It is amazing to see that some of the basic principles of wound healing have been known since 2000 bc. PMID:24525756

  18. Wound Drainage Culture (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Wound Drainage Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Wound Drainage Culture Print A A A What's in this article? ... de heridas What It Is A wound drainage culture is a test to detect germs such as ...

  19. [Atypical wounds: definition and classification].

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Kolić, Maja

    2012-10-01

    Wound represents disruption of the anatomic and physiologic continuity of the skin. Regarding the healing process, wounds can be classified as acute or chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if healing does not occur within the expected period according to its etiology and localization. Chronic wounds can be classified as typical and atypical. Typical wounds include ischemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic ulcers and two separate entities: diabetic foot and decubitus ulcers. Eighty percent of chronic wounds localized on the lower leg are the result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent the cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the remainder is mostly neuropathic ulcer. Ninety-five percent of chronic wounds manifest as one of the above mentioned entities. Other forms of chronic wounds represent atypical chronic wounds, which can be caused by autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, vascular diseases and vasculopathies, metabolic and genetic diseases, neoplasm, external factors, psychiatric disorders, drug related reactions, etc. Numerous systemic diseases can present with atypical wounds. The primary cause of the wound can be either systemic disease itself (Crohn's disease) or aberrant immune response due to systemic disease (pyoderma gangrenosum, paraneoplastic syndrome).

  20. Surgical infection in art.

    PubMed

    Meakins, J L

    1996-12-01

    The earliest images of medicine and surgery in Western art are from the late Middle Ages. Although often attractive, at that time they were illustrative and mirrored the text on how to diagnose or treat a specific condition. These drawings in medieval manuscripts represent management of abscesses, perianal infection and fistulas, amputation, and wound dressings. With the Renaissance, art in all its forms flourished, and surgeons were represented at work draining carbuncles, infected bursae, and mastoiditis; managing ulcers, scrofula, and skin infections; and performing amputations. Specific diagnosis can be made, such as streptococcal infection in the discarded leg of the miraculous transplantation performed by Saints Cosmas and Damian and in the works of Rembrandt van Rijn and Frederic Bazille. Evocations of cytokine activity are evident in works by Albrecht Dürer, Edvard Munch, and James Tissot. The iconography of society's view of a surgeon is apparent and often not complimentary. The surgeon's art is a visual art. Astute observation leads to early diagnosis and better results in surgical infection and the septic state. Learning to see what we look at enhances our appreciation of the world around us but, quite specifically, makes us better clinicians.

  1. Using multimodal imaging techniques to monitor limb ischemia: a rapid noninvasive method for assessing extremity wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthra, Rajiv; Caruso, Joseph D.; Radowsky, Jason S.; Rodriguez, Maricela; Forsberg, Jonathan; Elster, Eric A.; Crane, Nicole J.

    2013-03-01

    Over 70% of military casualties resulting from the current conflicts sustain major extremity injuries. Of these the majority are caused by blasts from improvised explosive devices. The resulting injuries include traumatic amputations, open fractures, crush injuries, and acute vascular disruption. Critical tissue ischemia—the point at which ischemic tissues lose the capacity to recover—is therefore a major concern, as lack of blood flow to tissues rapidly leads to tissue deoxygenation and necrosis. If left undetected or unaddressed, a potentially salvageable limb may require more extensive debridement or, more commonly, amputation. Predicting wound outcome during the initial management of blast wounds remains a significant challenge, as wounds continue to "evolve" during the debridement process and our ability to assess wound viability remains subjectively based. Better means of identifying critical ischemia are needed. We developed a swine limb ischemia model in which two imaging modalities were combined to produce an objective and quantitative assessment of wound perfusion and tissue viability. By using 3 Charge-Coupled Device (3CCD) and Infrared (IR) cameras, both surface tissue oxygenation as well as overall limb perfusion could be depicted. We observed a change in mean 3CCD and IR values at peak ischemia and during reperfusion correlate well with clinically observed indicators for limb function and vitality. After correcting for baseline mean R-B values, the 3CCD values correlate with surface tissue oxygenation and the IR values with changes in perfusion. This study aims to not only increase fundamental understanding of the processes involved with limb ischemia and reperfusion, but also to develop tools to monitor overall limb perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a clinical setting. A rapid and objective diagnostic for extent of ischemic damage and overall limb viability could provide surgeons with a more accurate indication of tissue viability. This may

  2. Soft tissue sarcoma resection volume associated with wound-healing complications.

    PubMed

    Geller, David S; Hornicek, Francis J; Mankin, Henry J; Raskin, Kevin A

    2007-06-01

    Limb-salvage surgery has become the standard of care for most soft tissue sarcomas. While primary closure is often possible, it is frequently complicated by wound-healing complications in the setting of previously irradiated tissue and surgical wounds closed under tension. We sought to identify a relationship between the volume of resected soft tissue and the rate of wound-healing complications. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients who were treated over a 17-month period for soft-tissue sarcomas using limb-salvage methods. Of these, 87 patients were treated with primary wound closure and 21 patients underwent primary muscle flap closure at the time of wide surgical excision. Of the 87 patients treated with primary wound closure, the mean volume of resected tissue in the group with wound-healing complications was greater than that the group that healed without complications. The mean volume of resected tissue in the group with wound-healing complications was 919 cm3 +/- 1173 cm3 and the mean volume of resected tissue in the group without wound-healing complications was 456 cm3 +/- 704 cm3. Mean volume of resected tissue in the group of patients treated with primary flap coverage was 1908 cm3, over twice as large as the mean volume of resected tissue in the group of patients treated with primary closure.

  3. Fungal Burn Wound Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    severely limits the may prove to be useful in burn patients. Clotrimazole , applied clinical utility of such a culture. Biopsy and frozen-section and as...useful in wound and permit prompt institution of appropriate the treatment of systemic fungal infections. Clotrimazole is treatment. poorly absorbed

  4. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  5. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, Eric E.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    1999-01-01

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite.

  6. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, E.E.; Lundquist, S.H.

    1999-04-27

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite. 4 figs.

  7. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual…

  8. Antibodies to wounded tissue enhance cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Naomi; Ito, Sachiko; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Isobe, Ken-ichi

    2009-11-01

    The wound repair process is a highly ordered sequence of events that encompasses haemostasis, inflammatory cell infiltration, tissue regrowth and remodelling. Wound healing follows tissue destruction so we hypothesized that antibodies might bind to wounded tissues, which would facilitate the engulfment of damaged tissues by macrophages. Here, we show that B cells, which produce antibodies to damaged tissues, are engaged in the process of wound healing. Splenectomy delayed wound healing, and transfer of spleen cells into splenectomized mice recovered the delay in wound healing. Furthermore, wound healing in splenectomized nude mice was also delayed. Transfer of enriched B220(+) cells by magnetic beads accelerated wound healing in splenectomized mice. We detected immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) binding to wounded tissues by using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled anti-IgG1 6-24 hr after wounding. Splenectomy reduced the amount of IgG1 binding to wounded tissues. Immunoblotting studies revealed several bands, which were reduced by splenectomy. Using immunoprecipitation with anti-IgG bound to protein G we found that the intensity of several bands was lower in the serum from splenectomized mice than in that from sham-operated mice. These bands were matched to myosin IIA, carbamoyl-phosphate synthase, argininosuccinate synthase, actin and alpha-actinin-4 by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

  9. Choosing a Wound Dressing Based on Common Wound Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Ganary; Damstetter, Elizabeth; Phillips, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds are a major healthcare burden.The practitioner should have an appropriate understanding of both the etiology of the wound as well as the optimal type of dressings to use. Fundamental wound characteristics may be used to guide the practitioner's choice of dressings. The identification of optimal dressings to use for a particular wound type is an important element in facilitating wound healing. Recent Advances: Researchers have sought to design wound dressings that aim to optimize each stage in the healing process. In addition, dressings have been designed to target and kill infection-causing bacteria, with the incorporation of antimicrobial agents. Critical Issues: Chronic wounds are frequently dynamic in presentation, and the numerous wound dressings available make dressing selection challenging for the practitioner. Choosing the correct dressing decreases time to healing, provides cost-effective care, and improves patient quality of life. Future Directions: Research into the mechanisms of wound healing has enhanced our ability to heal chronic wounds at a faster rate through the use of moisture-retentive dressings. Newer dressings are incorporating the use of nanotechnology by incorporating miniature electrical sensors into the dressing. These dressings are engineered to detect changes in a wound environment and alert the patient or practitioner by altering the color of the dressing or sending a message to a smartphone. Additional investigations are underway that incorporate biologic material such as stem cells into dressings.

  10. Telemedicine and wound care.

    PubMed

    Ong, Cheri A

    2008-01-01

    Although wound care has been practiced for centuries, telewound care is a relatively new concept. Currently, only a few pilot programs are in existence. Telewound care has yet to achieve the popularity and recognition of its other telemedicine predecessors amongst members of the health care industry and public alike. The tremendous potential of incorporating the technology of telemedicine into wound care needs to be realized. Wound care is a representation of the care of chronic and debilitating conditions that require long-term specialized care. We have seen the positive effects of improved living conditions and advances in health care globally. The result: people are now living longer. Every day a small piece is added to the pie: the percentage of world's elderly and those with chronic medical conditions that would require medical attention is rising. With the escalating costs of health care, and the push of the industry towards outpatient care, this is a part of the health care crisis that is demanding our immediate attention. We have seen positive outcomes in the care of other chronic medial conditions using telemedicine such as home telecare programs. In addition, the effectiveness of several programs using available advances in technology such as the field of radiology has been established. Wound care can build on success created in these fields to create an effective and useful method of care. The aim of this chapter is to recognize the impact of this problem, to introduce several pilot programs in several different aspects of wound care and to build on current resources in order to achieve a novel method of wound care. The goal would be to create a technologically advanced, cost-effective and user-friendly program, and be able to bridge the gap between the sick and available specialized care. Both store-and-forward technology and televideo have a role to play in telewound care, the latter greater in the role of home telecare and teleconsultation, and the

  11. [Physiology and pathophysiology of wound healing of wound defects].

    PubMed

    Mutschler, W

    2012-09-01

    Understanding wound healing involves more than simply stating that there are the three phases of inflammation, proliferation and maturation. Wound healing is a complex series of actions, reactions and interactions among cells and mediators in a sequential and simultaneously ongoing temporal process within a spatial frame. At first this article will attempt to provide a concise summary of the events, cellular components and main influential mediators of wound healing over time. Secondly, the pathophysiology of chronic non-healing wounds is described where an imbalance of stimulating and inhibiting factors causes failure of healing. The most relevant extrinsic and intrinsic determinants are described and related to the cellular and molecular level of disturbed wound healing. A basic understanding of wound healing is a prerequisite for any prophylactic or therapeutic maneuver to maintain or re-establish wound equilibrium to give a satisfactory healing trajectory.

  12. Analysis of the chronic wound microbiota of 2,963 patients by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, Randall D; Hanson, John D; Rees, Eric J; Koenig, Lawrence D; Phillips, Caleb D; Wolcott, Richard A; Cox, Stephen B; White, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which microorganisms impair wound healing is an ongoing controversy in the management of chronic wounds. Because the high diversity and extreme variability of the microbiota between individual chronic wounds lead to inconsistent findings in small cohort studies, evaluation of a large number of chronic wounds using identical sequencing and bioinformatics methods is necessary for clinicians to be able to select appropriate empiric therapies. In this study, we utilized 16S rDNA pyrosequencing to analyze the composition of the bacterial communities present in samples obtained from patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers (N = 910), venous leg ulcers (N = 916), decubitus ulcers (N = 767), and nonhealing surgical wounds (N = 370). The wound samples contained a high proportion of Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas species in 63 and 25% of all wounds, respectively; however, a high prevalence of anaerobic bacteria and bacteria traditionally considered commensalistic was also observed. Our results suggest that neither patient demographics nor wound type influenced the bacterial composition of the chronic wound microbiome. Collectively, these findings indicate that empiric antibiotic selection need not be based on nor altered for wound type. Furthermore, the results provide a much clearer understanding of chronic wound microbiota in general; clinical application of this new knowledge over time may help in its translation to improved wound healing outcomes.

  13. [The value of surgical experience gained during the Great Patriotic War for the modern military surgery].

    PubMed

    Efimenko, N A; Samokhvalov, L M

    2015-05-01

    The surgical experience gained during the Great Patriotic War (1941-1945) is a basis of the modern Russian military surgery, which allows providing any options for surgical care to the wounded. The article describes the main achievements of the military surgeons in our country during the Great Patriotic War, which helped the Soviet (Russian) military field surgery to achieve a leading position in the world of military medicine. The role of the united martial medical doctrine, three editions of "Guidelines for the military surgery", the qualified surgical assistance as a mean that helped to deliver surgical care to the wounded, the introduction of specialized medical care, technology development of medical triage, as well as the origins of the tactics of a multi-stage surgical treatment of combat trauma and special treatment of minimally wounded during the war. The problems in establishing registers of combat injuries. and training military surgeons are analysed.

  14. Surgical adhesives for laser-assisted wound closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Diane E.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Welch, Ashley J.

    2001-10-01

    Solid protein solder-doped polymer membranes were developed for laser-assisted tissue repair. Biodegradable polymer membranes of controlled porosity were fabricated with poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and salt particles, using a solvent-casting and particulate-leaching technique. The membranes provided a porous scaffold that readily absorbed the traditional protein solder composed of serum albumin, indocyanine green dye, and de-ionized water. In vitro investigations were conducted to assess the influence of various processing parameters on the strength of tissue repairs formed using the new membranes. These parameters included PLGA copolymer and PLGA/PEG blend ratios, membrane pore size, initial albumin weight fraction, and laser irradiance used to denature the solder. Altering the PLGA copolymer ratio had little effect on repair strength, however such variations are known to influence the degradation rate of the membranes. The repair strength increased with increased membrane pore size and bovine serum albumin concentration. The addition of PEG during the membrane casting stage increased the flexibility of the membranes but not necessarily the repair strength. Typically, the repair strength increased with increasing irradiance from 12 to 18 W/cm2. The new solder-doped polymer membranes provided all of the benefits associated with solid protein solders including high repair strength and improved edge coaptation. In addition, the flexible, moldable nature of the new membranes offers the capability of tailoring the membranes to a wide range of clinically relevant geometries.

  15. Landing on your own two feet: a case report of bilateral calcaneus and open pilon fractures.

    PubMed

    Tiedeken, Nathan C; Hampton, David; Shaffer, Gene

    2014-01-01

    High energy fractures of the distal tibial plafond and calcaneus have been associated with high functional morbidity and wound complications. Although both of these fractures result from a similar mechanism, they have rarely been reported to occur on an ipsilateral extremity. The combination of these 2 injuries on the same extremity would increase the likelihood of an adverse surgical or functional outcome. We present the case and management strategy of a 43-year-old male with bilateral open pilon fractures and closed calcaneal fractures after falling from a height. A staged protocol was used for the bilateral pilon fractures, with external fixation until operative fixation on day 9. Nonoperative management of the calcaneal fractures resulted in a successful functional outcome at 10 months of follow-up. Treatment of this fracture pattern must incorporate the condition of the soft tissues, an understanding of the fractures, and minimize patient risk factors to optimize the functional and surgical outcomes.

  16. Surgical procedures in pinniped and cetacean species.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Jennifer L; Hendrickson, Dean A

    2013-12-01

    Significant advances in veterinary diagnostic and surgical techniques have been made over the past several decades. Many of these advances, however, have not reached the field of marine mammal medicine. A number of limitations exist: risks of anesthesia, anatomical challenges, difficulties with wound closure, environmental constraints, equipment limitations, and perceived risks. Despite these limitations, surgical treatments have been successfully utilized in marine mammals. While surgery is performed in pinnipeds more frequently than in cetaceans, studies conducted in the 1960s and 1970s on dolphin sleep and hearing demonstrated that general anesthesia can be successfully induced in cetaceans. Since this pioneering work, a small number of successful surgeries have been performed in dolphins under both general anesthesia and heavy sedation. While these surgical procedures in pinnipeds and cetaceans have typically been limited to wound management, dentistry, ophthalmic procedures, fracture repair, and superficial biopsy, a number of abdominal surgeries have also been performed. Recently there have been pioneering successes in the application of minimally invasive surgery in marine mammals. Many of the anatomical challenges that almost prohibit traditional laparotomies in cetacean species and present challenges in pinnipeds can be overcome through the use of laparoscopic techniques. Due to the limited number of pinnipeds and cetaceans in captivity and, thus, the limited case load for veterinarians serving marine mammal species, it is vital for knowledge of surgical procedures to be shared among those in the field. This paper reviews case reports of surgical procedures, both traditional and laparoscopic, in pinnipeds and cetaceans. Limitations to performing surgical procedures in marine mammals are discussed and surgical case reports analyzed in an effort to determine challenges that must be overcome in order to make surgery a more feasible diagnostic and treatment

  17. Filament wound structure and method

    DOEpatents

    Dritt, William S.; Gerth, Howard L.; Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Pardue, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention relates to a filament wound spherical structure comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness.

  18. The Haiti earthquake: the provision of wound care for mass casualties utilizing negative-pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allen; Gialich, Shelby; Kirk, Julie; Edwards, Sheriden; Beck, Brooke; Sorocéanu, Alexandra; Nelson, Scott; Gabriel, Cassie; Gupta, Subhas

    2011-10-01

    Many months after the devastating earthquake in January 2010, wounds remain a major disease burden in Haiti. Since January 2010, through the efforts of corporations, nonprofit charitable organizations, and medical professionals, advanced wound care techniques, including negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT), have been introduced into the wound care regimens of various hospitals in Haiti. In June 2010, the authors completed their second volunteer trip at a Haitian hospital specializing in orthopedic wounds. The medical team was composed of a plastic surgeon, orthopedic surgeon, anesthesiologist, medical assistant, scrub technician, and registered nurse (specializing in plastic surgery and orthopedics). The authors' team supplied NPWT devices, reticulated open-cell foam dressings, and canisters donated by Kinetic Concepts, Inc, San Antonio, Texas, for use at the hospital. This report describes the medical challenges in postearthquake Haiti (including limb salvage and infection), benefits of adjunctive use of NPWT/reticulated open-cell foam, and current wound care status in a Haitian orthopedic hospital. The future role of NPWT in Haiti and during mass catastrophe in a least-developed country is also discussed.

  19. Efficacy of Annona squamosa on wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ponrasu, Thangavel; Suguna, Lonchin

    2012-12-01

    Annona squamosa L. (Annonaceae), commonly known as custard apple, mainly used for its edible fruit, is also recognised with numerous medicinal properties. As there is no report on the efficacy of this plant for wound healing, we examined the efficacy of ethanolic extract of A. squamosa leaves on wound repair in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats. Open excision wounds were made on the back of rats. The drug at a dosage of 100 mg/kg body wt was reconstituted in 200 µl of phosphate buffered saline and applied topically once daily for the treated wounds. The control wounds were left untreated. Wound tissues formed on days 4, 8, 12 and 16 (post-wound) were used to estimate DNA, total protein, total collagen, hexosamine and uronic acid. Levels of lipid peroxides were also evaluated along with tensile strength and period of epithelialisation. A. squamosa L. increased cellular proliferation and collagen synthesis at the wound site as evidenced by increase in DNA, protein and total collagen. The treated wounds were observed to heal much faster as proved by enhanced rates of epithelialisation and wound contraction, which was also confirmed by histopathological examinations. The results strongly substantiate the beneficial effects of the topical application of A. squamosa L. in the acceleration of normal and diabetic wound healing.

  20. Effect of discarded keratin-based biocomposite hydrogels on the wound healing process in vivo.

    PubMed

    Park, Mira; Shin, Hye Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Suhk; Kim, Myung Jin; Kim, In-Shik; Park, Byung-Yong; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2015-10-01

    Biocompatible keratin-based hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation (EBI) were examined in wound healing. As the EBI dose increased to 60 kGy, the tensile strength of the hydrogels increased, while the percentage of elongation of the hydrogels decreased. After 7 days, the dehydrated wool-based hydrogels show the highest mechanical properties (the % elongation of 1341 and the tensile strength of 6030 g/cm(2) at an EBI dose of 30 kGy). Excision wound models were used to evaluate the effects of human hair-based hydrogels and wool-based hydrogels on various phases of healing. On post-wounding days 7 and 14, wounds treated with either human hair-based or wool-based hydrogels were greatly reduced in size compared to wounds that received other treatments, although the hydrocolloid wound dressing-treated wound also showed a pronounced reduction in size compared to an open wound as measured by a histological assay. On the 14th postoperative day, the cellular appearances were similar in the hydrocolloid wound dressing and wool-based hydrogel-treated wounds, and collagen fibers were substituted with fibroblasts and mixed with fibroblasts in the dermis. Furthermore, the wound treated with a human hair-based hydrogel showed almost complete epithelial regeneration, with the maturation of immature connective tissue and hair follicles and formation of a sebaceous gland.

  1. Thiolated Carboxymethyl-Hyaluronic-Acid-Based Biomaterials Enhance Wound Healing in Rats, Dogs, and Horses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guanghui; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Mann, Brenda K.

    2011-01-01

    The progression of wound healing is a complicated but well-known process involving many factors, yet there are few products on the market that enhance and accelerate wound healing. This is particularly problematic in veterinary medicine where multiple species must be treated and large animals heal slower, oftentimes with complicating factors such as the development of exuberant granulation tissue. In this study a crosslinked-hyaluronic-acid (HA-) based biomaterial was used to treat wounds on multiple species: rats, dogs, and horses. The base molecule, thiolated carboxymethyl HA, was first found to increase keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. Crosslinked gels and films were then both found to enhance the rate of wound healing in rats and resulted in thicker epidermis than untreated controls. Crosslinked films were used to treat wounds on forelimbs of dogs and horses. Although wounds healed slower compared to rats, the films again enhanced wound healing compared to untreated controls, both in terms of wound closure and quality of tissue. This study indicates that these crosslinked HA-based biomaterials enhance wound healing across multiple species and therefore may prove particularly useful in veterinary medicine. Reduced wound closure times and better quality of healed tissue would decrease risk of infection and pain associated with open wounds. PMID:23738117

  2. Effect of acetylcysteine on experimental corneal wounds in dogs.

    PubMed

    Aldavood, S J; Behyar, R; Sarchahi, A A; Rad, M A; Noroozian, I; Ghamsari, S M; Sadeghi-Hashjin, G

    2003-01-01

    The effects of 3, 10 and 20% concentrations of acetylcysteine on experimental corneal wound healing in dogs were evaluated. Experimental corneal wounds were induced surgically, up to the depth of the anterior third of the stroma, in both eyes of 18 dogs. One of the eyes was treated topically with 0.9% NaCl solution three times a day. The contralateral eye was treated topically with acetylcysteine (3, 10 and 20% concentrations) in each of 6 cases separately. Corneal wounds were measured by fluorescein staining every day. The mean time of healing in the 3% group was significantly different from control eyes (6.17 +/- 1.94 days). It was 7.19 +/- 0.75 days in the 20% group and 7 +/- 2 days in the 10% group. The last two groups were not significantly different from the controls (9.67 +/- 3.01 days and 8.17 +/- 3.60 days, respectively).

  3. Identifying wound prevalence using the Mobile Wound Care program.

    PubMed

    Walker, Judi; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Mitchell, Eleanor; Steers, Nicole; Khalil, Hanan

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the prevalence of wounds within health care systems is a challenging and complex undertaking. This is often compounded by the clinicians' training, the availability of the required data to collect, incomplete documentation and lack of reporting of this type of data across the various health care settings. To date, there is little published data on wound prevalence across regions or states. This study aims to identify the number and types of wounds treated in the Gippsland area using the Mobile Wound Care (MWC™) program. The MWC program has enabled clinicians in Gippsland to collect data on wounds managed by district nurses from four health services. The main outcomes measured were patient characteristics, wound characteristics and treatment characteristics of wounds in Gippsland. These data create several clinical and research opportunities. The identification of predominant wound aetiologies in Gippsland provides a basis on which to determine a regional wound prospective and the impact of the regional epidemiology. Training that incorporates best practice guidelines can be tailored to the most prevalent wound types. Clinical pathways that encompass the Australian and New Zealand clinical practice guidelines for the management of venous leg ulcers can be introduced and the clinical and economical outcomes can be quantitatively measured. The MWC allows healing times (days) to be benchmarked both regionally and against established literature, for example, venous leg ulcers.

  4. Wound Microbiology and Associated Approaches to Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, P. G.; Duerden, B. I.; Armstrong, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of dermal wounds are colonized with aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms that originate predominantly from mucosal surfaces such as those of the oral cavity and gut. The role and significance of microorganisms in wound healing has been debated for many years. While some experts consider the microbial density to be critical in predicting wound healing and infection, others consider the types of microorganisms to be of greater importance. However, these and other factors such as microbial synergy, the host immune response, and the quality of tissue must be considered collectively in assessing the probability of infection. Debate also exists regarding the value of wound sampling, the types of wounds that should be sampled, and the sampling technique required to generate the most meaningful data. In the laboratory, consideration must be given to the relevance of culturing polymicrobial specimens, the value in identifying one or more microorganisms, and the microorganisms that should be assayed for antibiotic susceptibility. Although appropriate systemic antibiotics are essential for the treatment of deteriorating, clinically infected wounds, debate exists regarding the relevance and use of antibiotics (systemic or topical) and antiseptics (topical) in the treatment of nonhealing wounds that have no clinical signs of infection. In providing a detailed analysis of wound microbiology, together with current opinion and controversies regarding wound assessment and treatment, this review has attempted to capture and address microbiological aspects that are critical to the successful management of microorganisms in wounds. PMID:11292638

  5. Nelson's wound: treatment of spinal cord injury in 19th and early 20th century military conflicts.

    PubMed

    Hanigan, William C; Sloffer, Chris

    2004-01-15

    During the first half of the 19th century, warfare did not provide a background for a systematic analysis of spinal cord injury (SCI). Medical officers participating in the Peninsular and Crimean Wars emphasized the dismal prognosis of this injury, although authors of sketchy civil reports persuaded a few surgeons to operate on closed fractures. The American Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion was the first text to provide summary of results in 642 cases of gunshot wounds of the spine. The low incidence of this injury (0.26%) and the high mortality rate (55%) discouraged the use of surgery in these cases. Improvements in diagnoses and the introduction of x-ray studies in the latter half of the century enabled Sir G. H. Makins, during the Boer War, to recommend delayed intervention to remove bone or bullet fragments in incomplete injuries. The civil experiences of Elsberg and Frazier in the early 20th century promoted a meticulous approach to treatments, whereas efficient transport of injured soldiers during World War I increased the numbers of survivors. Open large wounds or cerebrospinal fluid leakage, signs of cord compression in recovering patients, delayed clinical deterioration, or intractable pain required surgical exploration. Wartime recommendations for urological and skin care prevented sepsis, and burgeoning pension systems provided specialized longterm rehabilitation. By the Armistice, the effective surgical treatment and postoperative care that had developed through decades of interaction between civil and military medicine helped reduce incidences of morbidity and dispel the hopelessness surrounding the combatant with an SCI.

  6. The Use Of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) In The Management Of Enteroatmospheric Fistula--Case Report And Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Jaguścik, Rajmund; Walczak, Dominik A; Porzeżyńska, Joanna; Trzeciak, Piotr W

    2015-10-01

    An enteric fistula that occurs in an open abdomen is called an enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF) and is the most challenging complication for a surgical team to deal with. The treatment of EAF requires a multidisciplinary approach. First of all, sepsis has to be managed. Any fluid, electrolyte and metabolic disorders need to be corrected. Oral intake must be stopped and total parenteral nutrition introduced. The control and drainage of the effluent from the fistula is a separate issue. Since there are no fixed algorithms for the treatment of EAF, surgeons need to develop their own, often highly unconventional solutions. We present the case of a 24-year-old man who developed enteroatmospheric fistula after laparotomy and relaparotomy due to acute necrotic pancreatitis. Both the laparostomy and the fistula were successfully managed using modified negative pressure wound therapy. The literature regarding this issue was also reviewed.

  7. A Novel Surgical Pre-suturing Technique for the Management of Ankyloglossia.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Mayur; Pawar, Babita; Khairnar, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Ankyloglossia or "tongue-tie" is a congenital anomaly caused by tight lingual frenulum that abnormally connects the tongue base to the floor of the mouth. Ankyloglossia can results in difficulty during speech and deglutition. This case series presents a novel surgical technique in the management of ankyloglossia in using presuturing technique in which different sets of sutures are given on lingual frenum before severing it. This results in reduced opening of the wound, minimal bleeding, pain and discomfort. Two male patients with severe ankyloglossia had been managed with this technique and after 2 years of follow-up of these cases showed satisfactory protrusive and lateral movement of the tongue with minimal scarring and discomfort.

  8. A Novel Surgical Pre-suturing Technique for the Management of Ankyloglossia

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Mayur; Pawar, Babita; Khairnar, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Ankyloglossia or “tongue-tie” is a congenital anomaly caused by tight lingual frenulum that abnormally connects the tongue base to the floor of the mouth. Ankyloglossia can results in difficulty during speech and deglutition. This case series presents a novel surgical technique in the management of ankyloglossia in using presuturing technique in which different sets of sutures are given on lingual frenum before severing it. This results in reduced opening of the wound, minimal bleeding, pain and discomfort. Two male patients with severe ankyloglossia had been managed with this technique and after 2 years of follow-up of these cases showed satisfactory protrusive and lateral movement of the tongue with minimal scarring and discomfort. PMID:25598942

  9. [Abdominal gunshot wound: description of 86 cases in Cameroon].

    PubMed

    Bahebeck, J; Masso-Misse, P; Essomba, A; Takongmo, S; Ngo-Nonga, B; Ngo-Nyeki, A R; Sosso, M; Malong, E

    2005-11-01

    Abdominal gunshot wound (AGSW) is a trauma emergency. The purpose of this report is to describe our experience with managing AGSW largely without modem investigational modalities. Data was collected retrospectively by reviewing the surgical reports and clinical charts of patients admitted to live hospitals dealing with AGSW over a 5-year period. Incomplete files and wounds not involving the abdomen were not included. A total of 86 files were analyzed. Patients ranged in age from 10 to 63 years ivith mean age of 32 years and a sex ratio of 5.5. Most patients (87%) underwent surgical exploration. Laboratory revealed no lesions in 22.5% of cases, minor lesions in 9.5% and major lesions justifying surgical repair in 68%. A total of 86 visceral lesions were found in the patients who underwent surgical exploration. The lesion involved the small intestine in 31.5% of case, colon in 24.5%, liver in 23.5%, spleen in 7%, stomach in 6%, and uterus in 2%. The kidney, pancreas, mesenteries, large momentum, and transverse mescaline each accounted for 1% of lesions. Conventional operative techniques were used with a mortality of 5.5% and morbidity of 4%. Based on our findings we conclude that when investigational tools (CT-scan, peritoneal lavage and laparoscopy) are unavailable prolonged watchful waiting increases the risk of mortality and morbidity in patients presenting AGSW associated with suspicious clinical signs. Prompt surgical treatment improves prognosis but is associated with a high rate of cases showing no lesions.

  10. Gunshot wounds to the thigh. Evaluation of vascular and subclinical vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Payne, W K; Gabriel, R A; Massoud, R P

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective review of 173 patient charts, angiograms, surgical reports, and plain radiographs were performed for all patients admitted with gunshot wounds to the thigh from May 1988 to January 1991 at Martin Luther King, Jr. Hospital. A zonal classification of gunshot wounds to the thigh was created and defined to determine if a zonal classification was predictive of a positive angiogram. Associations and relationships of patients with vascular injury are presented.

  11. Full-Thickness Thermal Injury Delays Wound Closure in a Murine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    without the application of a skin graft or a skin substitute graft. Furthermore, the effect of interval burn eschar excision on wound closure is also re...primary intention with surgical closure or the application of a skin graft or skin substitute graft, or (2) healing by secondary intention through a...the closure of severe burns and chronic wounds using cultured human autologous keratinocytes in a nat- ural fibrin matrix. Cell Tissue Bank 2004;5:89

  12. Wound healing: part II. Clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Janis, Jeffrey; Harrison, Bridget

    2014-03-01

    Treatment of all wounds requires adequate wound bed preparation, beginning with irrigation and débridement. Complicated or chronic wounds may also require treatment adjuncts or specialized wound healing products. An extensive body of research and development has introduced novel wound healing therapies and scar management options. In this second of a two-part continuing medical education series on wound healing, the reader is offered an update on current wound healing technologies and recommendations for obtaining optimal outcomes.

  13. Monitoring combat wound healing by IR hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howle, Chris R.; Spear, Abigail M.; Gazi, Ehsan; Crane, Nicole J.

    2016-03-01

    In recent conflicts, battlefield injuries consist largely of extensive soft injuries from blasts and high energy projectiles, including gunshot wounds. Repair of these large, traumatic wounds requires aggressive surgical treatment, including multiple surgical debridements to remove devitalised tissue and to reduce bacterial load. Identifying those patients with wound complications, such as infection and impaired healing, could greatly assist health care teams in providing the most appropriate and personalised care for combat casualties. Candidate technologies to enable this benefit include the fusion of imaging and optical spectroscopy to enable rapid identification of key markers. Hence, a novel system based on IR negative contrast imaging (NCI) is presented that employs an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) source comprising a periodically-poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) crystal. The crystal operates in the shortwave and midwave IR spectral regions (ca. 1.5 - 1.9 μm and 2.4 - 3.8 μm, respectively). Wavelength tuning is achieved by translating the crystal within the pump beam. System size and complexity are minimised by the use of single element detectors and the intracavity OPO design. Images are composed by raster scanning the monochromatic beam over the scene of interest; the reflection and/or absorption of the incident radiation by target materials and their surrounding environment provide a method for spatial location. Initial results using the NCI system to characterise wound biopsies are presented here.

  14. A Cross-sectional, Descriptive, Quality Improvement Project to Assess Undergraduate Nursing Students' Clinical Exposure to Patients With Wounds in an Introductory Nursing Course.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Keves-Foster, Mary Kathryn; Ashare, JoAnn; Zugcic, Mary; Albdour, Maha; Albdour, Dalia

    2016-04-01

    Because nurses frequently participate in decisions related to wound care, learning about wounds and their care during undergraduate education is critical. A cross-sectional, descriptive, quality improvement project was conducted in an introductory baccalaureate nursing course to identify: 1) the types of patients with wounds assigned to beginning students, 2) patient wound care procedures and dressings, and 3) student level of participation in wound care. Data were collected from the weekly notes recorded about students' (N = 49) patient care experiences in 3 acute care hospitals for 9 clinical days during 1 semester. Data were recorded on a paper-and-pencil form by instructors at the end of the clinical day and included type of wound, wound irrigation, dressing, technique of care, and student's participation. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the frequency and distribution of the wound characteristics and care assessed. Of the 284 patients assigned to students, 75 (26.4%) had a wound. The most common wound was a surgical incision (49, 65%) and was closed (36, 73.5%). Twenty-six (26) patients had a pressure ulcer, most commonly Stage II. The most common dressing was dry gauze (29). Damp gauze was used on 18 wounds. Wound irrigation was recorded for 24 wound protocols and performed with a bulb syringe or by pouring the solution from a container. Generally, nonsterile wound care was performed. Twenty-five (25) students performed wound care with the instructor, 16 watched the care performed by another clinician, and 10 participated with another nurse in the wound care. For 22 patients, the wound care was neither observed nor performed because either it was not time for the dressing to be changed or it was only to be changed by a medical team. From these data, it was concluded beginning nursing students had some, but limited, clinical experience with patients with wounds. Students' wound care experiences need further examination, especially across multiple

  15. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  16. Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100110.htm Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series— ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The vaginal opening lies just below the urethral opening, and ...

  17. Laparoscopic versus open left lateral segmentectomy

    PubMed Central

    Carswell, Kirstin A; Sagias, Filippos G; Murgatroyd, Beth; Rela, Mohamed; Heaton, Nigel; Patel, Ameet G

    2009-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic liver surgery is becoming increasingly common. This cohort study was designed to directly compare perioperative outcomes of the left lateral segmentectomy via laparoscopic and open approach. Methods Between 2002 and 2006 43 left lateral segmentectomies were performed at King's College Hospital. Those excluded from analysis included previous liver resections, polycystic liver disease, liver cirrhosis and synchronous operations. Of 20 patients analysed, laparoscopic (n = 10) were compared with open left lateral segmentectomy (n = 10). Both groups had similar patient characteristics. Results Morbidity rates were similar with no wound or chest infection in either group. The conversion rate was 10% (1/10). There was no difference in operating time between the groups (median time 220 minutes versus 179 minutes, p = 0.315). Surgical margins for all lesions were clear. Less postoperative opiate analgesics were required in the laparoscopic group (median 2 days versus 5 days, p = 0.005). The median postoperative in-hospital stay was less in the laparoscopic group (6 days vs 9 days, p = 0.005). There was no mortality. Conclusion Laparoscopic left lateral segmentectomy is safe and feasible. Laparoscopic patients may benefit from requiring less postoperative opiate analgesia and a shorter post-operative in-hospital stay. PMID:19735573

  18. Wound healing after anorectal surgery in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Burke, E C; Orloff, S L; Freise, C E; Macho, J R; Schecter, W P

    1991-10-01

    Medical records of 52 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients who underwent a total of 80 anorectal operations from January 1985 to January 1990 were retrospectively reviewed to determined whether anorectal surgical wounds healed in HIV-infected patients and the mean survival time of these patients after surgery. Twenty-four operations were performed in asymptomatic HIV-infected patients, 19 in HIV-infected patients with persistent lymphadenopathy, and 37 in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Wounds healed in 49 patients (94%). The mortality rate 30 days after surgery was 2%. There were no major complications. The mean survival time of HIV-infected patients after surgery was 15 months. We conclude that anorectal surgical wounds heal in most HIV-infected patients and that the survival time after surgery of HIV-infected patients with anorectal disease justifies appropriate surgical treatment.

  19. Source Control and Graft Preservation Using Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Antibiotic Instillation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Timothy; Grossi, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely used to treat many types of complex wounds, and the advent of the instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d) technique has enhanced this system with the addition of automated treatment with topical solutions. In the field of vascular surgery, NPWT is utilized to help close wounds over underlying grafts; however keeping these wounds free of infection and avoiding large reoperation when infection occurs remains a challenge. In this case report we present a patient who required acute intervention for limb ischemia, with a large wound created in the groin for anastomosis of a prosthetic graft bypass. Postoperatively, the wound became infected, and the challenge became balancing infection control and graft preservation with the patient’s multiple comorbidities including postoperative non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). To avoid a large reoperation, we chose NPWTi-d with automated instillation of an antibiotic solution. There was no reinfection or return to the operating room (OR), the patient was discharged after four weeks and the wound closed on its own shortly thereafter. This case demonstrates that for high-risk surgical patients with known wound infections in the proximity of a bypass graft, NPWTi-d with antibiotic instillation may be an effective augmentation to current treatment strategies and may be considered as a stand-alone technique for wound closure in select cases. PMID:27909643

  20. Clinical challenges of chronic wounds: searching for an optimal animal model to recapitulate their complexity

    PubMed Central

    Nunan, Robert; Harding, Keith G.; Martin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The efficient healing of a skin wound is something that most of us take for granted but is essential for surviving day-to-day knocks and cuts, and is absolutely relied on clinically whenever a patient receives surgical intervention. However, the management of a chronic wound – defined as a barrier defect that has not healed in 3 months – has become a major therapeutic challenge throughout the Western world, and it is a problem that will only escalate with the increasing incidence of conditions that impede wound healing, such as diabetes, obesity and vascular disorders. Despite being clinically and molecularly heterogeneous, all chronic wounds are generally assigned to one of three major clinical categories: leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers or pressure ulcers. Although we have gleaned much knowledge about the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms that underpin healthy, acute wound healing from various animal models, we have learned much less about chronic wound repair pathology from these models. This might largely be because the animal models being used in this field of research have failed to recapitulate the clinical features of chronic wounds. In this Clinical Puzzle article, we discuss the clinical complexity of chronic wounds and describe the best currently available models for investigating chronic wound pathology. We also assess how such models could be optimised to become more useful tools for uncovering pathological mechanisms and potential therapeutic treatments. PMID:25359790