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  1. Effect of Wedge Insertion Angle on Posterior Tibial Slope in Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Kazu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Kentaro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a well-established surgery for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) wherein the lower extremity is realigned to shift the load distribution from the medial compartment of the knee to the lateral compartment. However, this surgery is known to affect the posterior tibial slope angle (PTSA), which could lead to abnormal knee kinematics and instability, and eventually to knee OA. Although PTSA control is as important as coronal realignment, few appropriate measurements for this parameter have been reported. The placement of a wedge spacer might have an effect on PTSA. Purpose: To elucidate the relationship between the PTSA and the direction of insertion of a wedge spacer. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study assessed 43 knees from 34 patients who underwent medial opening wedge HTO for knee OA. Pre- and postoperative lateral radiographs of the knee as well as postoperative computed tomography scans were performed to evaluate the relationship among PTSA, wedge insertion angle (WIA), and opening gap ratio (distance of the anterior opening gap/distance of the posterior opening gap at the osteotomy site). Results: The PTSA significantly increased from 9.0° ± 2.8° preoperatively to 13.2° ± 4.1° postoperatively (P < .001), resulting in a mean ΔPTSA of 4.7° ± 4.5°. The mean opening gap ratio was 0.86 ± 0.11, and the mean WIA was 25.9° ± 8.4°. The WIA and opening gap ratio were both highly correlated with ΔPTSA (r = 0.71 and 0.72, respectively), implying that a smaller WIA or smaller gap ratio leads to less increase in posterior slope. Conclusion: The direction of wedge insertion is highly correlated with PTSA increase, which suggests that the PTSA can be controlled for by adjusting the direction of wedge insertion during surgery. Clinical Relevance: Study results suggest that it is possible to adjust the PTSA by controlling the WIA during surgery. Proper

  2. Change in Posterior Tibial Slope After Open-Wedge and Closed-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nha, Kyung-Wook; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ahn, Hyeong-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-11-01

    It is unclear whether open- or closed-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) results in significant changes in posterior tibial slope, with no consensus on the magnitude of such changes. Furthermore, methods of measuring posterior tibial slope differ among studies. This meta-analysis was therefore designed to evaluate whether posterior tibial slope increases after open-wedge HTO and decreases after closed-wedge HTO and to quantify the magnitudes of the slope changes after open- and closed-wedge HTO using various methods of measuring posterior tibial slope. Posterior tibial slope increases after open-wedge and decreases after closed-wedge HTO. The magnitude of change is similar for the 2 methods, and the value obtained for posterior tibial slope change is affected by the method of measurement. Meta-analysis. Multiple comprehensive databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and KoreaMed, were searched for studies that evaluated the posterior slope of the proximal tibia in patients who had undergone open- and/or closed-wedge HTO. Studies were included that compared pre- and postoperative posterior tibial slopes, regardless of measurement method, including anterior and posterior tibial cortex or tibial shaft axis as a reference line, in patients who underwent open- or closed-wedge HTO. The quality of each included study was appraised with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Twenty-seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled data, which included subgroups of 3 methods, showed that posterior tibial slope increased 2.02° (95% CI, 2.66° to 1.38°; P = .005) after open-wedge HTO and decreased 2.35° (95% CI, 1.38° to 3.32°; P < .001) after closed-wedge HTO. This meta-analysis confirmed that posterior tibial slope increased after open-wedge HTO and decreased after closed-wedge HTO when the results of a variety of measurement methods were pooled. The magnitude of change after open- and closed-wedge HTO was similar and small (approximately 2°), suggesting

  3. Resorbability of rigid beta-tricalcium phosphate wedges in open-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a retrospective radiological study.

    PubMed

    Kraal, T; Mullender, M; de Bruine, J H D; Reinhard, R; de Gast, A; Kuik, D J; van Royen, B J

    2008-06-01

    The open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is a well accepted treatment modality for patients with osteoarthritis of the medial compartment associated with genu varum. To fill in the osteotomy gap 30% macroporosity rigid beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) is frequently used as a stable resorbable bone substitute. However, the resorbability of these beta-TCP wedges is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate this. Twenty-one OWHTO procedures in seventeen patients were performed with the use of 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges. The osteotomies were fixed using an angle-stable locking plate. Conventional AP and lateral radiographs were examined in order to assess the resorbability of the 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges as a function of time. A radiological classification system consisting of five phases was used to monitor the resorption of the 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges. The mean duration of follow-up was 62 months (+/-23 range of 28-99). In all 21 cases, remnants of the 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges were still present at maximum follow-up. Although the boundaries between 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges and bone remained slightly visible, all osteotomies were completely consolidated and full osseointegration took place. In 16 out of 21 knees the fixation system was removed after a mean duration of 32 months (+/-19 range of 6-62). In six out of 21 knees a conversion to a knee arthroplasty was performed after a mean duration of 56 months (+/-18 range of 37-82). The OWHTO did not interfere with the placement of knee prostheses. Complete resorption of 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges did not take place up to 8 years after operation.

  4. Comparison of clinical and radiological outcomes between opening-wedge and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy: A comprehensive meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingfeng; Lin, Jun; Jin, Zhicheng; Cai, Xiaobin; Gao, Weiyang

    2017-01-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) has been widely used for clinical treatment of osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee, and both opening-wedge and closing-wedge HTO are the most commonly used methods. However, it remains unclear which technique has better clinical and radiological outcomes in practice. To systematically evaluate this issue, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis by pooling all available data for the opening-wedge HTO and closing-wedge HTO techniques from the electronic databases including PubMed, Embase, Wed of Science and Cochrane Library. A total of 22 studies encompassing 2582 cases were finally enrolled in the meta-analysis. There was no significant difference regarding surgery time, duration of hospitalization, knee pain VAS, Lysholm score and HSS knee score (clinical outcomes) between the opening-wedge and closing-wedge HTO groups (P > 0.05). However, the opening-wedge HTO group showed wider range of motion than the closing-wedge HTO group (P = 0.003). Moreover, as for Hip-Knee-Ankle angle and mean angle of correction, no significant difference was observed between the opening-wedge and closing-wedge HTO groups (P > 0.05), while the opening-wedge HTO group showed greater posterior tibial slope angle (P < 0.001) and lesser patellar height than the closing-wedge HTO group (P < 0.001). On light of the above analysis, we believe that individualized surgical approach should be introduced based on the clinical characteristics of each patient. PMID:28182736

  5. Posterior tibial slope changes after opening- and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a comparative prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Ducat, A; Sariali, E; Lebel, B; Mertl, P; Hernigou, P; Flecher, X; Zayni, R; Bonnin, M; Jalil, R; Amzallag, J; Rosset, P; Servien, E; Gaudot, F; Judet, T; Catonné, Y

    2012-02-01

    Valgus high tibial osteotomy is considered to be an effective treatment for unicompartmental medial osteoarthritis. It is generally admitted that tibial slope increases after open-wedge high tibial osteotomy and decreases after closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy. However, the effects on posterior tibial slope of closing- or opening-wedge osteotomies remain controversial. We analyzed the modifications of tibial slope after opening- and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomies and compared the results of these two procedures. We hypothesized that there was no difference in postoperative tibial slope between opening and closing-wedge osteotomies. This prospective consecutive nonrandomized multicenter study was conducted between January 2008 and March 2009 and included 321 patients: 205 men and 116 women. A total of 224 patients underwent an opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy and 97 a closing-wedge osteotomy. The mean age was 52 years ± 9 and the mean body mass index was 28kg/m(2) ± 5. The main etiology was primary arthritis. Posterior tibial slope was measured preoperatively and at the last follow-up on a lateral radiograph in relation to the posterior tibial cortex. In the opening-wedge group, a definite 0.6° increase in tibial slope (P=0.016) was observed. In the closing-wedge group, a definite 0.7° decrease in tibial slope (P=0.02) was found. Fourteen percent of the opening-wedge osteotomies increased tibial slope by 5° or more versus only 2% of the closed-wedge osteotomies (P<0.001). Twelve percent of the closing-wedge high tibial osteotomies led to a decrease of 5° or more of the tibial slope versus 7% of the opening-wedge osteotomies (P<0.02). These results confirm what is generally reported in the literature, i.e., an increase in tibial slope in opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy and a decrease in the slope in closing-wedge osteotomies. These tibial slope changes appear to be very limited in this series, less than 1° on average. However, there was a bias

  6. Opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a seven - to twelve-year study

    PubMed Central

    PIPINO, GENNARO; INDELLI, PIER FRANCESCO; TIGANI, DOMENICO; MAFFEI, GIUSEPPE; VACCARISI, DAVIDE

    2016-01-01

    Purpose medial opening-wedge osteotomy is a widely performed procedure used to treat moderate isolated medial knee osteoarthritis. Historically, the literature has contained reports showing satisfactory mid-term results when accurate patient selection and precise surgical techniques were applied. This study was conducted to investigate the clinical and radiographic seven- to twelve-year results of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy in a consecutive series of patients affected by varus knee malalignment with isolated medial compartment degenerative joint disease. Methods we reviewed a case series of 147 medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomies at an average follow-up of 9.5 years. Endpoints for evaluation included the reporting of adverse effects, radiographic evidence of bone union, radiographic changes in the correction angle during union, and clinical and functional final outcomes. Results good or excellent results were obtained in 94% of the cases: the patients reported no major complications related to the opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy surgical technique, bone graft resorption, implant choice or postoperative rehabilitation protocol. At final follow-up, the average hip-knee angle was 4° of valgus without major loss of correction during the healing process. A statistically significant change in the patellar height was detected postoperatively, with a trend towards patella infera. Conclusions medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy is still a reliable method for correcting varus deformity while producing stable fixation, thus allowing satisfactory stability, adequate bone healing and satisfactory mid- to long-term results. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic cases series. PMID:27386441

  7. Total knee arthroplasty after failed high tibial osteotomy: a systematic review of open versus closed wedge osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae Hwi; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Bhandare, Nikhl N; Suh, Dong Won; Lee, Jong Seong; Chang, Yong Suk; Yeom, Ji Woong; Nha, Kyung Wook

    2016-08-01

    Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) has become increasingly popular as an alternative to lateral closing wedge osteotomy for the treatment of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis with varus deformity. The present systematic review was conducted to provide an objective analysis of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) outcomes following previous knee osteotomy (medial opening wedge vs. lateral closing wedge). A literature search of online databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library database) was made, in addition to manual search of major orthopaedic journals. The methodological quality of each of the studies was assessed on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and Effective Practice and Organization of Care. A total of ten studies were included in the review. There were eight studies with Level IV and two studies with Level III evidence. Eight studies reported clinical and radiologic scores. Comparative studies between TKA following medial opening and lateral closing wedge HTO did not demonstrate statistically significant clinical and radiologic differences. The revision rates were similar. However, more technical issues during TKA surgery after lateral closing wedge HTO were mentioned than the medial open wedge group. The quadriceps snip, tibial tubercle osteotomy, and lateral soft tissue release were more frequently needed in the lateral closing wedge HTO group. In addition, because of loss of proximal tibia bone geometry in the lateral closing wedge HTO group, concerns such as tibia stem impingement in the lateral tibial cortex was noted. The present systematic review suggests that TKA after medial opening and lateral closing wedge HTO showed similar performance. Clinical and radiologic outcome including revision rates did not statistically differ from included studies. However, there are more surgical technical concerns in TKA conversion from lateral closing wedge HTO than from the medial opening wedge HTO group. IV.

  8. Control of posterior tibial slope and patellar height in open-wedge valgus high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Hinterwimmer, Stefan; Beitzel, Knut; Paul, Jochen; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Sauerschnig, Martin; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2011-04-01

    Valgus-producing open-wedge high tibial osteotomy is an established treatment for varus malalignment and medial osteoarthritis, with reproducible results in the frontal plane. However, an undesirable but often accepted increase in posterior tibial slope and decrease in patellar height are still routinely seen. To evaluate the influence of valgus open-wedge high tibial osteotomy on posterior tibial slope and patellar height when special techniques are used to minimize unwanted changes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Twenty-five patients, 3 women and 22 men (mean age, 40.2 years), underwent valgus open-wedge high tibial osteotomy. Several technical steps were taken to prevent an increase in posterior tibial slope during the osteotomy. To minimize patellar height changes, the tibial tuberosity was left on either the proximal or distal fragment, depending on the desired patellofemoral effect. The medial and lateral posterior slope was measured using the proximal posterior cortex as a reference; the patellar height was assessed with the Caton-Deschamps Index and compared on preoperative and postoperative radiographs. No significant posterior tibial slope changes were observed. Patellar height increased with both types of tibial tuberosity osteotomy. With the proximal osteotomy, the Caton-Deschamps Index increased from 0.95 to 0.97; with the distal osteotomy, it increased from 0.89 to 0.95. The change was not significant with either osteotomy. The posterior tibial slope did not change on the medial side, measuring 4.2 preoperatively and postoperatively. The lateral slope decreased from 5.4 to 5.1. There was no correlation between the correction in the coronal plane and the changes in the sagittal plane. Open-wedge high tibial osteotomy can be performed without significant changes in patellar height or posterior tibial slope if specific intraoperative methods are used to prevent their occurrence. Analysis and control of sagittal changes in valgus open-wedge high

  9. 3D Surgical Printing Cutting Guides for Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: Do It Yourself.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mañanes, Rubén; Burró, Juan Arnal; Manaute, Jose Rojo; Rodriguez, Francisco Chana; Martín, Javier Vaquero

    2016-11-01

    Opening wedge osteotomy has recently gained popularity, thanks to the recent implementation of locking plates, which have shown equivalent stability with greater reproducibility, accuracy, and longevity than the closing wedge techniques and a lower prosthetic conversion rate. We present a new "do-it-yourself" cutting guides system for tibial opening osteotomy. Using a conventional computed tomography digital image, a positioning guide and wedge spacers were printed in three dimensions (3D) for implementing the osteotomy and obtaining the planned correction. The surgeon makes the whole process in a do-it-yourself style. This new technique was used in eight cases. Previous opening osteotomies with the standard technique were used as control (20 cases). Surgical time, fluoroscopic time, and accuracy of the axial correction were measured. The use of a custom positioning guide reduced the surgical (31 minutes less) and fluoroscopic times (6.9 times less) while achieving a high-axis correction accuracy compared with the standard technique. Digitally planned and executed osteotomies under 3D printed osteotomy positioning guides help the surgeon to minimize human error while reducing surgical time. The reproducibility of this technique is very robust, allowing a transfer of the steps planned in a virtual environment to the operating table.

  10. Medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy: the effect of the cortical hinge on posterior tibial slope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joon Ho; Bae, Ji Hoon; Lim, Hong Chul; Shon, Won Yong; Kim, Cheol Woong; Cho, Jae Woo

    2009-12-01

    High tibial osteotomy can affect the posterior tibial slope in the sagittal plane because of the triangular configuration of the proximal tibia. However, the effect of the location of cortical hinge on posterior tibial slope has not been previously described. Posterolateral location of the cortical hinge will increase posterior tibial slope after medial open wedge osteotomy, and lateral location of the cortical hinge will not affect the change of the posterior tibial slope. Controlled laboratory study. We performed incomplete valgus open wedge osteotomy on 12 paired knees of 6 fresh-frozen human cadavers (age, 63.4 + or - 7.5 years) using an OrthoPilot navigation system. The left and right legs of each specimen were randomly assigned to a posterolateral (group A) or a lateral (group B) cortical hinge group. Changes in mean medial proximal tibial angle, posterior tibial slope, and opening wedge angle were measured and compared after surgery. In group A, mean medial proximal tibial angle changed from 84.37 degrees + or - 2.8 degrees to 93.48 degrees + or - 3.06 degrees (P = .028); mean posterior tibial slope increased significantly from 8.71 degrees + or - 0.81 degrees to 12.16 degrees + or - 0.84 degrees (P = .031); and mean wedge angle was 1.92 degrees + or - 0.46 degrees . In group B, mean medial proximal tibial angle changed from 82.98 degrees + or - 2.53 degrees to 90.89 degrees + or - 3.25 degrees (P = .027); mean posterior tibial slope changed from 9.19 degrees + or - 1.11 degrees to 9.78 degrees + or - 1.27 degrees (P = .029); and mean wedge angle was 7.25 degrees + or - 0.72 degrees . The location of the intact cortical hinge affects the posterior tibia slope. During medial open wedge osteotomy, the change of posterior tibial slope was larger in the posterolateral than in the lateral cortical hinge group. To prevent the unintentional increase of the posterior tibial slope, special attention should be paid to locate the intact cortical hinge on the lateral

  11. Radiological outcomes in a randomized trial comparing opening wedge and closing wedge techniques of high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Nerhus, Tor Kjetil; Ekeland, Arne; Solberg, Geir; Sivertsen, Einar Andreas; Madsen, Jan Erik; Heir, Stig

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in radiological variables in a prospective randomized study comparing opening wedge (OW) and closing wedge (CW) techniques of high tibial osteotomy (HTO). Our hypothesis was that there would be no differences in joint line angles or correction accuracy between the two groups, that patellar height would increase after CW HTO and decrease after OW HTO, and that leg length and posterior tibial slope would decrease after CW HTO and increase after OW HTO. Radiological data were collected from 70 patients participating in an ongoing prospective randomized clinical trial comparing OW and CW HTOs. Digital standing hip-knee-ankle (HKA) radiographs as well as lateral radiographs in 30° of flexion were obtained preoperatively and at 6 months for each patient. Joint line angles, HKA angle, leg length, Insall-Salvati index, Miura-Kawamura index and posterior tibial slope were measured using medical planning software. The complete preoperative radiological examinations of the first 50 patients were used in a study of intra- and inter-rater reliability of the measurements. The mean posterior slope was reduced by 2.5° in CW HTO, whereas it remained unchanged in OW HTO (p < 0.001). Mean leg length decreased 5.7 mm in CW HTO and increased 3.1 mm in OW HTO (p < 0.001). Changes in joint line angles, patellar height indexes and the correction accuracy showed no significant differences comparing the two techniques. Frontal plane reliability measurement intra- and inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) varied from 0.81 to 0.99. Sagittal plane intra- and inter-rater ICC varied from 0.60 to 0.87. Posterior tibial slope intra- and inter-rater ICC showed the lowest values (0.70 and 0.60, respectively) corresponding to a smallest real difference of 4.5° and 5.5°, respectively. Posterior tibial slope and leg length changes were significantly different in CW compared to OW HTOs. We recommend that possible alterations

  12. Sagittal realignment osteotomy for increased posterior tibial slope after opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A 40 year old welder who underwent opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy for correction of alignment in a varus knee developed persistent pain with loss of knee extension. The posterior tibial slope increased from 9 degrees to 20 degrees after the osteotomy and caused the anteromedial knee pain and limited extension. The patient then underwent a revision osteotomy using a closing wedge technique to correct tibial slope. The osteotomy was performed, first from the medial cortex in the lateral direction, and second in the anteroposterior direction to remove the tibial bone in wedge shape and obtain full extension of the knee. The posterior tibial slope decreased to 8 degrees after the revision osteotomy and the patients returned to pain-free daily life. We reviewed this unique technique for correction of sagittal malalignment using a closing-wedge osteotomy for revision after opening-wedge osteotomy. PMID:19941664

  13. Unintended Rotational Changes of the Distal Tibia After Biplane Medial Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki-Mo; Lee, Jong-Hee; Park, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jeong Lae; Han, Seung-Beom

    2016-01-01

    This study involved 35 knees undergoing biplane medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) to assess the axial rotation of the distal tibia. The distal tibiae were internally rotated by 3.0° ± 7.1° after OWHTO. The opening width showed a Pearson correlation coefficient of -0.743 (P < .001), and the tuberosity osteotomy angle showed that of -0.678 (P < .001) with distal tibial rotation. However, changes in hip-knee-ankle angle, medial proximal tibial angle, and posterior tibial slope were not significantly correlated with the change in distal tibial rotation. In conclusion, there was an unintended tendency of increasing internal rotation of the distal tibia after biplane medial OWHTO, and this tendency was positively related to the opening width and tuberosity osteotomy angle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Personalized implant for high tibial opening wedge: combination of solid freeform fabrication with combustion synthesis process.

    PubMed

    Zhim, Fouad; Ayers, Reed A; Moore, John J; Moufarrège, Richard; Yahia, L'Hocine

    2012-09-01

    In this work a new generation of bioceramic personalized implants were developed. This technique combines the processes of solid freeform fabrication (SFF) and combustion synthesis (CS) to create personalized bioceramic implants with tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA). These porous bioceramics will be used to fill the tibial bone gap created by the opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO). A freeform fabrication with three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique was used to fabricate a metallic mold with the same shape required to fill the gap in the opening wedge osteotomy. The mold was subsequently used in a CS process to fabricate the personalized ceramic implants with TCP and HA compositions. The mold geometry was designed on commercial 3D CAD software. The final personalized bioceramic implant was produced using a CS process. This technique was chosen because it exploits the exothermic reaction between P₂O₅ and CaO. Also, chemical composition and distribution of pores in the implant could be controlled. To determine the chemical composition, the microstructure, and the mechanical properties of the implant, cylindrical shapes were also fabricated using different fabrication parameters. Chemical composition was performed by X-ray diffraction. Pore size and pore interconnectivity was measured and analyzed using an electronic microscope system. Mechanical properties were determined by a mechanical testing system. The porous TCP and HA obtained have an open porous structure with an average 400 µm channel size. The mechanical behavior shows great stiffness and higher load to failure for both ceramics. Finally, this personalized ceramic implant facilitated the regeneration of new bone in the gap created by OWHTO and provides additional strength to allow accelerated rehabilitation.

  15. Sagittal osteotomy inclination in medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Lim, Hong-Chul; Bae, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jae Gyoon; Yun, Se-Hyeok; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Yoon, Jung-Ro

    2017-03-01

    Unlike postoperative changes in posterior tibial slope after medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy, sagittal osteotomy inclination has not been examined. It has been recommended that the osteotomy line in the sagittal plane be parallel to the medial posterior tibial slope. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of parallel osteotomy in medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy. To determine the sagittal osteotomy inclination, the angle between the medial joint line and the osteotomy line was measured in the lateral radiograph. A positive angle value indicates that the osteotomy is anteriorly inclined relative to the medial posterior tibial slope. Correlation between the sagittal osteotomy inclination and posterior tibial slope was also evaluated. The mean sagittal osteotomy inclination was 15.1 ± 7.5°. The majority 87.1 % of knees showed an anterior-inclined osteotomy. There was a significantly positive correlation between the postoperative posterior tibial slope and the sagittal osteotomy inclination (r, 0.33; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.19-0.46; P < 0.001). The postoperative change in posterior tibial slope also showed a significantly positive correlation with the sagittal osteotomy inclination (r, 0.35; 95 % CI 0.21-0.47; P < 0.001). Although parallel osteotomy in the sagittal plane relative to the medial joint line was planned, only 12.9 % of cases achieved osteotomy parallel to the medial posterior tibial slope in the sagittal plane. Because of high rate of the anterior-inclined osteotomy and their correlations with posterior tibial slope, surgeons should make all efforts to perform parallel osteotomy relative to medial posterior tibial slope. IV.

  16. Factors influencing posterior tibial slope and tibial rotation in opening wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Matthias; Villa, Vincent; Reischl, Nikolaus; Demey, Guillaume; Goy, Damien; Neyret, Philippe; Gautier, Emanuel; Magnussen, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is an accepted treatment option for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis with associated varus lower limb axis in younger, more active patients. A concern with the use of this technique is that posterior tibial slope (PTS) and tibial rotation can be altered. We hypothesized that there is a tendency to increase the PTS and internal rotation of the distal tibia during the procedure and that certain intra-operative parameters may influence the amount of change that can be expected. A cadaveric model and surgical navigation system were used to evaluate the influence of certain intra-operative factors of the degree of PTS and tibial rotation change observed during medial opening HTO. Parameters evaluated included: degree of osteotomy opening, knee flexion angle, location of limb support (thigh versus foot), performance of a posteromedial release, the status of the lateral cortical hinge, and the degree of osteoarthritis present in the knee. Combining measurements of all specimens and parameters, a mean PTS increase of 2.7° ± 3.9° and a mean tibial internal rotation of 1.5° ± 2.9° were observed. Clinically, significant changes in tibial slope (>2°) occurred in 50.4 % of corrections, while significant changes in tibial rotation (>5°) occurred in only 11.9 % of corrections. Patients with significant osteoarthritis and concomitant flexion contracture, cases where large corrections were required, and procedures in which the lateral cortical hinge was disrupted were associated with increased PTS change. The other factors evaluated did not exert a significant influence of the degree of PTS change observed. Surgeons should be vigilant for possible PTS change, particularly in high-risk situations as outlined above. Routine use of an intra-operative measure of PTS is recommended to avoid inadvertent slope change.

  17. The SPECT/CT Evaluation of Compartmental Changes after Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Byung Kag; Kim, Dong Whan; Sim, Jae Ang; Lee, Beom Koo; Lee, Yong Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate compartmental changes using combined single-photon emission computerized tomography and conventional computerized tomography (SPECT/CT) after open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) for providing clinical guidance for proper correction. Materials and Methods Analysis was performed using SPECT/CT from around 1 year after surgery on 22 patients who underwent OWHTO. Postoperative mechanical axis was measured and classified into 3 groups: group I (varus), group II (0°–3° valgus), and group III (>3° valgus). Patella location was evaluated using Blackburne-Peel (BP) ratio. On SPECT/CT, the knee joint was divided into medial, lateral, and patellofemoral compartments and the brighter signal was marked as a positive signal. Results Increased signal activity in the medial compartment was observed in 12 cases. No correlation was observed between postoperative mechanical axis and medial signal increase. Lateral increased signal activity was observed in 3 cases, and as valgus degree increased, lateral compartment’s signal activity increased. Increased signal activity of the patellofemoral joint was observed in 7 cases, and significant correlation was observed between changes in BP ratio and increased signal activity. Conclusions For the treatment of medial osteoarthritis, OWHTO requires overcorrection that does not exceed 3 valgus. In addition, the possibility of a patellofemoral joint problem after OWHTO should be kept in mind. PMID:27894172

  18. Biomechanical Study of the Fixation Plates For Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kug Jin; Song, Eun Kyoo; Seon, Jong Keun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the mechanical stability of three types of plate systems for opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. Materials and Methods Forty-eight fresh frozen porcine tibia specimens were assigned to three different fixation device groups: Aescular group (16 specimens) was fixed with Aescular plates; Puddu group (16 specimens) with a Puddu plate, and TomoFix group (16 specimens) with a TomoFix plate. We compared axial displacements under compression loads from 200 to 2,000 N and maximal loads at failure among 8 specimens per group. We also compared displacements under cyclic load after 100 cycles at a compressive load of 2,000 N among 8 specimens per group. Results In all three groups, displacement under compression load increased with the increase in the axial compressive load; however, no significant intergroup differences were observed in the mean values under tested loading conditions. The mean maximal loads at failure were not significantly different (6,055, 6,798, and 6,973 N in the Aescular, Puddu, and TomoFix groups, respectively; p=0.41). While the TomoFix group showed less extension and strain during the cyclic load test, the mean values showed no significant differences among groups. Conclusions All three plate systems were found to provide fixation stability suitable for bearing axial compression and cyclic loads while walking. PMID:26389072

  19. Second-look arthroscopic assessment of cartilage regeneration after medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woon-Hwa; Takeuchi, Ryohei; Chun, Chung-Woo; Lee, Jung-Su; Ha, Jae-Hun; Kim, Ji-Hyae; Jeong, Jae-Heon

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate regeneration of the articular cartilage after medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy for knees with medial-compartment osteoarthritis and to assess the clinical outcome and cartilage regeneration according to the postoperative limb alignment at 2 years postoperatively. The study involved 159 knees in 159 patients. For evaluation of cartilage degeneration, the International Cartilage Repair Society grading system was used for arthroscopic grading on initial arthroscopy during high tibial osteotomy. The patients underwent a second-look arthroscopic evaluation of the articular cartilage at the time of removal of the plate, an average of 2 years after the initial osteotomy. For evaluation of cartilage regeneration, the articular cartilage was classified into 2 stages as no regenerative change (grade 1) or white scattering with fibrocartilage, partial coverage with fibrocartilage, or even coverage with fibrocartilage (grade 2) on second-look arthroscopy. Maturation of the cartilage regeneration was defined as even coverage with fibrocartilage. "Immaturation" of the cartilage regeneration was defined as white scattering with fibrocartilage or partial coverage with fibrocartilage. Clinical evaluations were performed by use of Knee Society scores preoperatively and at 2 years postoperatively. We divided the knees into 3 groups according to the postoperative limb alignment. Group A comprised knees with a mechanical tibiofemoral angle of 0° or less. Group B comprised knees with a mechanical tibiofemoral angle greater than 0° and less than 6°. Group C comprised knees with a mechanical tibiofemoral angle of 6° or greater. Grade 2 regeneration was achieved in the medial femoral condyle articular cartilage in 92% of knees and in the medial tibial plateau articular cartilage in 69% of knees. Maturation of the cartilage regeneration was found in the medial femoral condyle articular cartilage in 4% of knees and in the medial

  20. Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: plate position and biomechanics of the medial tibial plateau.

    PubMed

    Martinez de Albornoz, Pilar; Leyes, Manuel; Forriol, Francisco; Del Buono, Angelo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-11-01

    To ascertain whether changing position and size of the spacer may modify the load and displacement of the tibial plateau when performing an opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. Fifteen sawbones tibia models were used. In the axial plane, the anterior, medial, and posterior thirds of the tibial plateau were marked, and the medial and posterior thirds were called "point 1" and "point 2", respectively. A 7.5-mm-stainless steel indenter was used to apply the load over these two points: the load applied to point 1 simulated the load to that site when the knee was extended, and the load to point 2 simulated the load to the same area when the knee was flexed. Maximum load (N) and displacement (mm) were calculated. The system was shown to withstand higher loads with less displacement when the plate was posterior than it could do with the plate in the middle position. Significant differences were also found when comparing the anterior and middle position of the plate with the greatest displacement when the plate was anterior. The differences were increased when comparing the anterior and posterior positions of the plate. No statistical differences (n.s.) were found when using different spacers. The maximum stiffness was achieved if the plate was posterior and in point 1 indenter position, in which the force vector stands on the points of the lateral and medial supports (Fμ = 198.8 ± 61.5 N). The lowest stiffness was observed when the plate was anterior, and the force was applied to point 2 (Fμ = 29.7 ± 5.1 N). Application of the plate in a more posterior position provides greater stability.

  1. Effect of soft tissue laxity of the knee joint on limb alignment correction in open-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Park, Sung-Chul; Park, Hyung-Joon; Han, Seung-Beom

    2016-12-01

    Open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) cannot always accurately correct limb alignment, resulting in under- or over-correction. This study assessed the relationship between soft tissue laxity of the knee joint and alignment correction in open-wedge HTO. This prospective study involved 85 patients (86 knees) undergoing open-wedge HTO for primary medial osteoarthritis. The mechanical axis (MA), weight-bearing line (WBL) ratio, and joint line convergence angle (JLCA) were measured on radiographs preoperatively and after 6 months, and the differences between the pre- and post-surgery values were calculated. Post-operative WBL ratios of 57-67 % were classified as acceptable correction. WBL ratios <57 and >67 % were classified as under- and over-corrections, respectively. Preoperative JLCA correlated positively with differences in MA (r = 0.358, P = 0.001) and WBL ratio (P = 0.003). Difference in JLCA showed a stronger correlation than preoperative JLCA with differences in MA (P < 0.001) and WBL ratio (P < 0.001). Difference in JLCA was the only predictor of both difference in MA (P < 0.001) and difference in WBL ratio (P < 0.001). The difference between pre- and post-operative JLCA differed significantly between the under-correction, acceptable-correction, and over-correction groups (P = 0.033). Preoperative JLCA, however, did not differ significantly between the three groups. Neither preoperative JLCA nor difference in JLCA correlated with change in posterior slope. Preoperative degree of soft tissue laxity in the knee joint was related to the degree of alignment correction, but not to alignment correction error, in open-wedge HTO. Change in soft tissue laxity around the knee from before to after open-wedge HTO correlated with both correction amount and correction error. Therefore, a too large change in JLCA from before to after open-wedge osteotomy may be due to an overly large reduction in JLCA following osteotomy, suggesting alignment over

  2. Evaluation of Patellar Position before and After Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: Radiographic and Computed Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Moghtadaei, Mehdi; Otoukesh, Babak; Bodduhi, Bahram; Ahmadi, Keyvan; Yeganeh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Genovarum is a common orthopedic problem. Its optimal prompt treatment is an issue of importance. Aim: This study was conducted to determine the radiographic changes in patella bone before and after open wedge high tibial osteotomy. Material and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 43 patients were enrolled and underwent open wedge high tibial osteotomy and the radiographic and CT-scan indices including Q-Angle, Congruence Angle, Insall-Salvati index, and TTTG were measured and compared before and after surgery. Results: The result revealed that all indices including Q-Angle, Congruence Angle, Insull-Salvati index, and TTTG were not significantly differed across the study (P > 0.05). There was no difference between DLFA values before and after the operation (P> 0.05), while MPTA values were significantly different before and after operation (p <0.001). Conclusions: Totally it may be concluded that imaging indices are not differed after open wedge high tibial osteotomy and monitoring for them is not necessary and they would have no prognostic role. PMID:27703292

  3. The effects of different hinge positions on posterior tibial slope in medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jo, Ho-Seung; Park, Jin-Sung; Byun, June-Ho; Lee, Young-Bok; Choi, Young-Lac; Cho, Seong-Hee; Moon, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Hwang, Sun-Chul

    2017-04-07

    The purpose of this study was to determine the standard hinge position to minimize effects from medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) on the posterior tibial slope. Sixteen cadaveric knees underwent medial open-wedge osteotomy using either the standard or the low hinge position. To define the standard hinge position, a line 3 cm inferior to the medial tibial plateau towards the fibular head and located its intersection with a longitudinal line 1 cm medial to the fibular shaft was drawn. Low hinge position was defined as the point 1 cm inferior to the standard position. After tibial osteotomy, computed tomography scans of each knee were taken and three-dimensional models were constructed to characterize hinge position orientation and measure the osteotomy site effects on posterior tibial slope, medial proximal tibial angle, and gap ratio (the ratio of the anterior to posterior gap in the opened wedge). In two low hinge position specimens, the tibial lateral cortex hinge fracture occurred. Osteotomy through the low hinge position resulted in significantly greater posterior tibial slope compared to the standard hinge position (mean ± standard deviation) (11.2 ± 3.0° and 5.6 ± 2.5°, respectively; p < 0.001). Medial proximal tibial angle was also significantly greater for low compared to standard hinge position (95.4 ± 3.5° and 88.0 ± 3.5°, respectively; p < 0.001). Gap ratio was not significantly different between the two groups. Hinge position significantly affects the posterior tibial slope and medial proximal tibial angle following medial open-wedge HTO. Accurate hinge position is crucial to prevent complications from changes in posterior tibial slope and medial proximal tibial angle after surgery.

  4. The Effect of Hinge Position on Posterior Tibial Slope in Medial Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sang Won; Park, Sin Hyung; Lee, Byung Hoon; Oh, Minkyung; Chang, Minho; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Wang, Joon Ho

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate whether hinge position affects the change in posterior tibial slope in medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO). We retrospectively evaluated 19 knees from 17 patients who underwent medial open-wedge HTO by 3-dimensional computed tomography scan before and after surgery. A 3-dimensional image model was constructed by applying reverse-engineering software to the computed tomography DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) files. The hinge axis (i.e., the position of the hinge compared with the anteroposterior axis on an axial view), posterior tibial slope, medial-proximal tibial angle, and gap ratio (i.e., the ratio of anterior gap to posterior gap in the opened wedge) were measured. The mean hinge axis was 4.92° ± 3.86°. Posterior tibial slope increased from 7.29° ± 2.56° preoperatively to 10.48° ± 3.01° postoperatively (P = .001). The mean medial-proximal tibial angle was 85.96° ± 1.97° preoperatively and 93.13° ± 3.17° postoperatively (P = .001). The mean gap ratio was 62.48% ± 7.26%. Linear regression analysis determined that the hinge axis (P = .0001) was a significant factor changing posterior tibial slope. Hinge position affected the change in posterior tibial slope in medial open-wedge HTO; in particular, a posterolateral hinge position led to an increase in posterior tibial slope. Level IV, therapeutic study. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Posterior tibial slope in medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy: 2-D versus 3-D navigation.

    PubMed

    Yim, Ji Hyeon; Seon, Jong Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo

    2012-10-01

    Although opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is used to correct deformities, it can simultaneously alter tibial slope in the sagittal plane because of the triangular configuration of the proximal tibia, and this undesired change in tibial slope can influence knee kinematics, stability, and joint contact pressure. Therefore, medial opening-wedge HTO is a technically demanding procedure despite the use of 2-dimensional (2-D) navigation. The authors evaluated the posterior tibial slope pre- and postoperatively in patients who underwent navigation-assisted opening-wedge HTO and compared posterior slope changes for 2-D and 3-dimensional (3-D) navigation versions. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups based on the navigation system used: group A (2-D guidance for coronal alignment; 17 patients) and group B (3-D guidance for coronal and sagittal alignments; 17 patients). Postoperatively, the mechanical axis was corrected to a mean valgus of 2.81° (range, 1°-5.4°) in group A and 3.15° (range, 1.5°-5.6°) in group B. A significant intergroup difference existed for the amount of posterior tibial slope change (Δ slope) pre- and postoperatively (P=.04).Opening-wedge HTO using navigation offers accurate alignment of the lower limb. In particular, the use of 3-D navigation results in significantly less change in the posterior tibial slope postoperatively than does the use of 2-D navigation. Accordingly, the authors recommend the use of 3-D navigation systems because they provide real-time intraoperative information about coronal, sagittal, and transverse axes and guide the maintenance of the native posterior tibial slope. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy and Combined Arthroscopic Surgery in Severe Medial Osteoarthritis and Varus Malalignment: Minimum 5-Year Results

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Moon-Jib; Shin, Yong-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the radiologic and functional outcomes of medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) combined with arthroscopic procedure in patients with medial osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods From June 1996 to March 2010, 26 patients (32 knees) who underwent medial open wedge osteotomy and arthroscopic operation for medial osteoarthritis were retrospectively reviewed. Measurements included hip-knee-ankle (HKA) angle, femorotibial angle, medial proximal tibial angle, posterior tibial slope angle, and Kellgren-Lawrence grade. Clinical evaluation was performed using Lysholm knee scoring scale and knee and function score of the American Knee Society. Results Differences between the mean preoperative and postoperative measurements were significant in all angles including the HKA angle (−5.7° and +5.5°), femorotibial angle (−1.9° and +9.8°), and medial proximal tibial angle (82.9° and 90.5°) (p<0.05). Mean Lysholm knee scoring scale was 63.6 preoperatively and 88.7 at the last follow-up, mean Knee Society knee score was 61.2 and 86.6, and mean function score was 59.3 and 87.2, respectively. All differences were significant (p<0.05). Conclusions Medial open wedge HTO in combination with arthroscopic procedure is an effective treatment method for medial osteoarthritis to treat varus deformity and an intra-articular lesion. PMID:27894173

  7. A retrospective analysis of medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy for varus osteoarthritic knee.

    PubMed

    Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Numkanisorn, Surin; Chareancholvanich, Keerati; Harnroongroj, Thossart

    2012-07-01

    Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO) has proven to be an effective treatment for varus osteoarthritic knees. Various methods of fixation with different implant types and using either bone grafts or bone substitutes have been reported. We performed non-locking T-buttress plate fixation with autologous iliac bone graft augmentation, which is defined here as the traditional method, and locking compression plate fixation without any bone graft or bone substitute. We aimed to compare bone union and complications of these two MOWHTO techniques. Between June 2005 and December 2007, 50 patients who underwent MOWHTO (a total of 60 knees) were retrospectively reviewed and classified into two groups: group A, which consisted of 26 patients (30 knees) was treated using T-buttress plate fixation with autologous iliac bone graft augmentation and group B, which consisted of 24 patients (30 knees) was operated upon using a medial high tibial locking compression plate without any augmentation. Demographic characteristics and radiographic outcomes, including union rate, time to union, medial osteotomy defects, and complications, were collected and compared between the two groups. The progress of all patients was followed for at least 2 years. All osteotomies united within 12 weeks after surgery. Group B had slightly longer time to union than group A (10.3 weeks and 9.5 weeks, respectively; P = 0.125). A significantly higher incidence of medial defects after osteotomy was reported in the locking compression plate group (P = 0.001). A total of 5 (8.3%) knees had complications. In group A, one knee had a superficial wound infection and another knee had a lateral tibial plateau fracture without significant loss of correction. In group B, one knee had screw penetration into the knee joint and two knees had local irritation that required the removal of the hardware. Locking compression plate fixation without the use of bone grafts or bone substitutes provides a satisfactory

  8. Remodeling potentials of biphasic calcium phosphate granules in open wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Ozalay, Metin; Sahin, Orcun; Akpinar, Sercan; Ozkoc, Gurkan; Cinar, Murat; Cesur, Necip

    2009-06-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) has proved to be an effective bone substitute, but it's effectiveness and remodeling potential in open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) has not been analyzed yet. This study sought to evaluate the bone healing and remodeling potentials of BCP granules using a radiographic rating system in biplanar OWHTO. Fifteen patients (15 knees) underwent biplanar OWHTO. Bone gaps were filled with BCP granules. For radiographic evaluation, remodeling was divided into four phases. Phase 1 was accepted as rounded osteotomy sites, with clear distinction between BCP and bone, phase 2 was accepted as whitened osteotomy sites, with distinction between BCP and bone still visible, phase 3 was accepted as distinction between BCP and bone not visible and cloudy bone formation and phase 4 was accepted as full reformation of BCP granules (4A-BCP visible, 4B-disappearence of BCP) with no sign of osteotomy. Bone union was confirmed with clinical (full weight bearing without pain) and radiographic evaluation (cortical bridging callus on radiographs and phase 3 or greater remodeling). The time to full remodeling and the starting point of the consolidation on anteroposterior radiographs were noted. Complications were also noted at each clinical follow-up. Mean follow-up was 27.2 months. The mean age was 55.8 years. At clinical follow-up, there were no wound healing problems, no loss of corrections, no infections, and no complications. All osteotomies successfully healed. According to the radiologic classification system, at the 6th week, 73.3% (11/15) of patients were in phase 1 and the remaining 26.7% (4/15) were in phase 2. At 12-month follow-up, 46.7 (7/15) of the patients were still in phase 3. After 2 years, all radiographs showed to be in phase 4A. Radiographic union was noted to progress from lateral to medial and finally central. BCP can be successfully used as a bone substitute. The radiographic remodeling and consolidation process of BCP was found to

  9. Comparison of theoretical fixation stability of three devices employed in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: a finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of unicompartmental osteoarthritis and symptomatic varus malalignment. We hypothesized that different fixation devices generate different fixation stability profiles for the various wedge sizes in a finite element (FE) analysis. Methods Four types of fixation were compared: 1) first and 2) second generation Puddu plates, and 3) TomoFix plate with and 4) without bone graft. Cortical and cancellous bone was modelled and five different opening wedge sizes were studied for each model. Outcome measures included: 1) stresses in bone, 2) relative displacement of the proximal and distal tibial fragments, 3) stresses in the plates, 4) stresses on the upper and lower screw surfaces in the screw channels. Results The highest load for all fixation types occurred in the plate axis. For the vast majority of the wedge sizes and fixation types the shear stress (von Mises stress) was dominating in the bone independent of fixation type. The relative displacements of the tibial fragments were low (in μm range). With an increasing wedge size this displacement tended to increase for both Puddu plates and the TomoFix plate with bone graft. For the TomoFix plate without bone graft a rather opposite trend was observed. For all fixation types the occurring stresses at the screw-bone contact areas pulled at the screws and exceeded the allowable threshold of 1.2 MPa for at least one screw surface. Of the six screw surfaces that were studied, the TomoFix plate with bone graft showed a stress excess of one out of twelve and without bone graft, five out of twelve. With the Puddu plates, an excess stress occurred in the majority of screw surfaces. Conclusions The different fixation devices generate different fixation stability profiles for different opening wedge sizes. Based on the computational simulations, none of the studied osteosynthesis fixation types warranted an intransigent full

  10. Changes in posterior tibial slope angle in patients undergoing open-wedge high tibial osteotomy for varus gonarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Omer; Yucel, Bulent; Mutlu, Serhat; Orman, Osman; Mutlu, Harun

    2017-01-01

    In this study, postoperative changes in the posterior tibial slope angle and clinical outcomes following open-wedge high tibial osteotomy were evaluated. This study included 39 knees (18 left, 21 right) of 35 patients (three male, 32 female; median age, 53 years; age range 37-64 years) with symptomatic isolated medial joint osteoarthritis who underwent open-wedge high tibial osteotomy and fixation with a Puddu plate. The patients were clinically assessed according to the Lysholm knee score, a visual analogue pain scale, and a patient satisfaction questionnaire. Radiological assessment was made according to the changes in the posterior tibial slope angle and the correlation between these changes and clinical signs. The median follow-up period was 11 years (range 7-14 years). Significant improvements were observed in the preoperative and postoperative clinical scores of the Lysholm knee scale, visual analogue pain scale, and patient satisfaction questionnaire (p < 0.05). Radiological assessment showed that the posterior tibial slope angle was significantly higher during the postoperative and follow-up periods (p  0.05). There was no correlation between the postoperative Lysholm scores and the increase in the posterior tibial slope angle (p = n.s.). We conclude that both the conventional Puddu plate design and its anteromedial plate placement are what increase the tibial slope after an opening-wedge proximal tibial osteotomy. Therefore, current new plate design may help preserve the posterior tibial slope angle. IV.

  11. Open-wedge high tibial osteotomy: incidence of lateral cortex fractures and influence of fixation device on osteotomy healing.

    PubMed

    Dexel, Julian; Fritzsche, Hagen; Beyer, Franziska; Harman, Melinda K; Lützner, Jörg

    2017-03-01

    Open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is an established treatment for young and middle-aged patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment. Although not intended, a lateral cortex fracture might occur during this procedure. Different fixation devices are available to repair such fractures. This study was performed to evaluate osteotomy healing after fixation with two different locking plates. Sixty-nine medial open-wedge HTO without bone grafting were followed until osteotomy healing. In patients with an intact lateral hinge, no problems were noted with either locking plate. A fracture of the lateral cortex occurred in 21 patients (30.4 %). In ten patients, the fracture was not recognized during surgery but was visible on the radiographs at the 6-week follow-up. Lateral cortex fracture resulted in non-union with the need for surgical treatment in three out of eight (37.5 %) patients using the newly introduced locking plate (Position HTO Maxi Plate), while this did not occur with a well-established locking plate (TomoFix) (0 out of 13, p = 0.023). With regard to other adverse events, no differences between both implants were observed. In cases of lateral cortex fracture, fixation with a smaller locking plate resulted in a relevant number of non-unions. Therefore, it is recommended that bone grafting, another fixation system, or an additional lateral fixation should be used in cases with lateral cortex fracture. III.

  12. Tibial nerve neuropathy following medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy-case report of a rare technical complication.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-Soo; Sim, Hyun-Bo; Yoon, Jung-Ro

    2017-03-21

    A 63-year-old woman developed tibial nerve injury caused by an overlong K wire and 4.5-mm cortical lag screw through the first distal hole below the osteotomy during medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO), leading to a lack of sensation on the sole of the foot with no disturbances in motor functions. The temporary lag screw in the first distal hole below the osteotomy is often inserted by an excessive length in order to compress the potentially fractured opposite cortex. By doing so, posterior neurovascular structures including the tibial nerve and the popliteal vessels can be injured. To avoid this type of injury during medial opening-wedge HTO, proper knee position and appropriate Hohmann retractor position in combination with meticulous insertion of the K wire or screw under fluoroscopic control are essential. In addition, our study reinforces the fact that different presentations of injury to the tibial nerve should be carefully considered in the absence of common diagnostic features, including weakness of the toe flexors and posterior tibial muscle of the leg with intractable pain.

  13. Comparison of Lateral Closing-Wedge Versus Medial Opening-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy on Knee Joint Alignment and Kinematics in the ACL-Deficient Knee.

    PubMed

    Ranawat, Anil S; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Pearle, Andrew D; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A; Weeks, Kenneth D; Khamaisy, Saker

    2016-12-01

    Lateral closing-wedge (LCW) and medial opening-wedge (MOW) high tibial osteotomies (HTOs) correct varus knee alignment and stabilize the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knee. Tibiofemoral and patellofemoral alignment and kinematics after HTO are not well quantified. To compare the effect of LCW and MOW HTO on tibiofemoral and patellofemoral alignment in the ACL-deficient knee. Controlled laboratory study. Anterior drawer, Lachman, and pivot-shift tests were performed on cadaveric specimens (N = 16), and anterior tibial translation and tibial rotation were measured for the native and ACL-sectioned knee. The right and left knee of each cadaveric specimen underwent an LCW and MOW HTO, respectively, and stability testing was repeated. All cadavers underwent pre- and postosteotomy computerized tomography with 3-dimensional computer modeling to determine the effect of HTO on posterior tibial slope, as well as tibial and patellofemoral axial plane alignment (tibial axial rotation and patellar axial tilt). Correction to neutral coronal alignment was obtained with both osteotomy techniques; however, larger posterior tibial slope neutralization was achieved with LCW compared with MOW (mean ± SD, 11° ± 3.8° vs 5° ± 5°). LCW demonstrated a greater decrease in anterior tibial translation (P < .05) during Lachman testing, with translation values approximating those of the native knee, especially for the lateral compartment. A similar decrease in anterior tibial translation with LCW was not found during anterior drawer testing. Anterior tibial translation did not improve for either the Lachman or the anterior drawer test after MOW. Osteotomy type did not affect tibial rotation with pivot shift. Relative to MOW, LCW resulted in greater tibial axial rotation and patellar axial tilt (7.7° ± 4° and 5.6° ± 3.9° [LCW], 2.8° ± 2.3° and 2.4° ± 0.9° [MOW], respectively; P < .05). LCW shows more reproducible posterior tibial slope neutralization and decreased

  14. Comparison between two angular stable locking plates for medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy: Decisive wedge locking plate versus TomoFix™.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-Soo; Kim, Keong-Ho; Sim, Hyun-Bo; Yoon, Jung-Ro

    2016-11-01

    An adequate stable fixation implant should be used for medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO) to promote rapid bone healing without complications. This study compared the radiographic and clinical outcomes as well as plate-specific complications between two angular stable locking plates in patients following MOWHTO. This prospective study involved 97 patients (50 with DWL(®), group I; 47 with TomoFix™, group II) undergoing MOWHTO for primary medial compartment osteoarthritis between 2010 and 2013. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed by using the HSS and WOMAC scores, and calculating mechanical femorotibial angle (mFTA), medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA), joint line convergence angle (JLCA), and posterior tibial slope (PTS) on radiographs both preoperatively and after 3 years. A statistically significant difference was observed for the MPTA at the last follow-up between the two groups (P = 0.033). Additionally, the last follow-up MPTA of group I was associated with the osteotomy technique (P = 0.004) and preoperative JLCA (P = 0.034) whereas the last follow-up MPTA of group II was associated with gender (P = 0.001) and BMI (P = 0.008). Furthermore, the results showed that group I had a higher rate of non-union (4%) compared to that in group II (0%). Both locking plates are useful tools in the treatment of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis with varus deformity in young, active patients. However, under special consideration of the complication we found in present study, the TomoFix™ seems to be a better alternative in using the MOWHTO for highly demanding patients. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fixator-assisted Technique Enables Less Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis in Medial Opening-wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: A Novel Technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Ryu, Keun Jung; Kim, Jae Hwa; Kim, Hae Hwa; Soung, Sahyun; Shin, Soowan

    2015-10-01

    Opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy is a well-established procedure in the management of medial osteoarthritis of the knee and correction of proximal tibia vara. Recently, surgical approaches using less invasive plate osteosynthesis have been used with the goal of minimizing complications from more extensive soft tissue exposures. However, to our knowledge, less invasive fixator-assisted plate osteosynthesis has not been tested in the setting of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy. The purposes of this study were (1) to assess the complications associated with use of a fixator-assisted less invasive plate osteosynthesis technique to stabilize an opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy in the treatment of proximal tibial vara; and (2) to evaluate the ability of this technique to achieve correction of the proximal tibial deformity and achieve osseous union. From June 2011 to June 2013, a total of 157 limbs in 83 patients who underwent fixator-assisted high tibial osteotomy for (1) idiopathic genu vara; or (2) osteoarthritis of the knee with proximal tibia vara were initially enrolled. Of these, eight limbs (5%) were excluded on the way; thus, 149 limbs in 77 patients were evaluated. During the period in question, no other techniques were used for proximal tibial osteotomy. The surgical procedures included less preparation of soft tissue, proximal tibial osteotomy, application of a temporary external fixator, correction of alignment, and final fixation with the help of an external fixator. Complications were assessed by chart review and the alignment in both coronal and sagittal planes was compared pre- and postoperatively. Radiographic review to confirm osseous union and alignment was performed by two of the authors not involved in clinical care of the patient. Delayed union was described as union occurring later than 4 months. Thirty limbs out of 149 tibiae (20%) showed complications, all of which were resolved without leaving any sequela. Twenty-seven limbs out of 149

  16. Robotic device-assisted knee extension training during the early postoperative period after opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Kubota, Shigeki; Sugaya, Hisashi; Hyodo, Kojiro; Ogawa, Kaishi; Taniguchi, Yu; Kanamori, Akihiro; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-08-05

    Maintenance or restoration of a good range of motion of the knee is one of the most important outcomes following knee surgery. According to previous studies, opening wedge high tibial osteotomy enables better recovery of range of motion in knee flexion than that achievable after total knee arthroplasty or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. However, few reports provide a detailed description of the postoperative recovery of knee extension range of motion after opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. We describe our experience with a knee extension training program using a single-joint hybrid assistive limb device (HAL-SJ; Cyberdyne Inc., Tsukuba, Japan) during the acute recovery phase after opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. The HAL-SJ is a wearable robotic device that facilitates voluntary control of knee joint motion. A 67-year-old Japanese woman who underwent opening wedge high tibial osteotomy for spontaneous osteonecrosis of the left medial femoral condyle received HAL-SJ-based knee extension training postoperatively. Our experience with this patient revealed that knee extension training with the HAL-SJ during the acute phase following opening wedge high tibial osteotomy is feasible. Furthermore, the patient's knee extension range of motion improved to values similar to those seen during the preoperative stage, and her flexion range of motion was improved at 3 months after the surgery. HAL-SJ-based knee extension training could be used as a novel post-opening wedge high tibial osteotomy rehabilitation modality. Further exploration of individualized optimal settings of the HAL-SJ is required to improve its safety and efficacy.

  17. Open wedge high tibial osteotomies: Calcium-phosphate ceramic spacer versus autologous bonegraft.

    PubMed

    Gouin, F; Yaouanc, F; Waast, D; Melchior, B; Delecrin, J; Passuti, N

    2010-10-01

    Valgus tibial osteotomy (VTO) is a well-known procedure for the treatment of medial compartment femoro-tibial osteoarthritis. Good and very good results have been reported with calcium phosphate wedges, which avoid the inconveniences of autologous grafts use. The hypothesis of this study is that with equivalent results in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee, the use of calcium phosphate wedges (BMCaPh) to fill the bone defect created by osteotomy would result in fewer specific complications and less pain associated with autologous grafts (AUTO) harvesting. This prospective, controlled, randomised study included one arm that received a macroporous, biphasic calcium phosphate wedge (BMCaPh group) and one arm that received an autologous tricortical graft (AUTO group) for filling. The same plate with locked screws was used for fixation in all cases. All patients underwent at least two years of clinical and radiographic post-operative follow-up. Forty patients were included. Loss of correction occurred in six of the twenty-two patients in the BMCaPh group (27%), resulting in three early surgical revisions, compared to one loss of correction in the AUTO group. Lateral cortical hinge tears were a risk factor for loss of correction for the entire cohort and in the BMCaPh group. (relative risk 13.3 [1.9-92]. Moreover, union took significantly longer and pain lasted significantly longer in the BMCaPh group, although results were comparable at 6 months. A significant number of undesirable events (loss of correction) occurred in this study, limiting the number of included patients. Nevertheless, the results show that although there was no difference in the two groups for overall complications, number of revisions all causes combined, or clinical results, filling with BMCaPh was less tolerated and increased the risk of loss of correction when local mechanical conditions of the knee were unfavourable (lateral cortical hinge tears). Moreover, although it is not possible

  18. Utilizing reamer irrigator aspirator (RIA) autograft for opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: A new surgical technique and report of three cases☆

    PubMed Central

    Seagrave, Richard A.; Sojka, John; Goodyear, Adam; Munns, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The lateral closing wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) was popularized by Coventry in the 1960s. In the 1990s the medial opening wedge osteotomy gained popularity because it could achieve greater valgus correction and it did not require dissociation of the fibula from the tibia, an important consideration when treating varus knees with lateral and posterolateral ligament deficiencies (Noyes’ double-varus and triple-varus knees). However, it has the disadvantage of requiring bone graft to fill bony defects. Recently, the reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA; Synthes, Paoli, PA) system was developed, and as a result of this procedure, a large amount of usable autogenous bone graft can be collected safely for use. To our knowledge, there is no published series combining opening wedge HTO with the use of RIA obtained autogenous bone graft. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a novel technique in which a series of three patients underwent opening wedge HTO using ipsilateral, retrograde femur RIA graft to fill the bone defect. All patients had satisfactory clinical and radiologic outcomes following the new technique at latest follow up. DISCUSSION Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy is a well-documented and accepted orthopedic procedure, however, has the disadvantage of requiring varying amounts of bone graft. Traditionally, iliac crest or tricortical allograft have been the grafting modalities of choice, however both have inherent drawbacks to their use. In our series, the use of RIA autograft is a safe and reliable harvest technique for high tibial osteotomy, providing abundant and quality autogenous bone graft. CONCLUSION All three of our patients achieved radiographic union with high clinical patient satisfaction without any major complications. We feel this novel technique is a safe and acceptable operative solution grafting opening wedge osteotomies about the knee. PMID:24412805

  19. Modified biplanar open-wedge high tibial osteotomy with rigid locking plate to treat varus knee*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-ning; Zhang, Jie; Lv, Cheng-yu; Leng, Ping; Wang, Ying-zhen; Wang, Xiang-da; Wang, Chang-yao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To introduce and characterize the modified biplanar opening high tibial osteotomy with rigid fixation to treat varus knee in young and active patients. Methods: Between June 2001 to July 2008, 18 patients with monocompartmental degeneration of the knee combined with a varus malalignment of the leg had the modified biplanar opening high tibial osteotomy and the osteotomy was fixed with the locking plates (Locking Compression Plate System). The mean varus deformity before operation was 11.5° (5°~19°) and no degenerative changes were found in other departments. Stability of the knee was normal in 15 patients, but ruptures in anterior cruciate ligaments or lateral collateral ligament were presented in the remaining 3 patients. Preoperative symptom was mainly limited in the pain of medial compartment. The preoperative and follow-up data for the range of motion and Lysholm score were determined. Subjective satisfactory examination was also applied to the patients for the operation they selected. Results: All of the patients were followed up with an average of 32.5 months (12~82 months). There was no ununion or delayed union in this group during the follow-up period. No complications like broken plate, nerve injury, or blood vessel injury occurred. The postoperative average corrected degree was 9.5° (5.5°~18°). No degenerations developed in the three departments of the knee. The Lysholm scores before and after surgery were 42.5 and 77.5, respectively (P<0.01). The overall fineness rate was 83.3%. The subjective satisfactory survey demonstrated that about 83.3% patients showed satisfactory on the operation. There was no obvious difference in the range of motion before and after operation, but significant changes were found in the Lysholm score and varus degree from preoperative to follow-up. Conclusion: Proximal opening high tibial osteotomy performed in conjunction with the special rigid locking plate yielded good results for symptomatic genu varum. This

  20. Medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy fixation with short plate without any graft, synthetic material or spacer.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Faik; Sever, Cem; Kacıra, Burkay K; Demirayak, Mehmet; Acar, Mehmet Ali; Toker, Serdar

    2014-12-01

    Medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO) is an effective surgical procedure for patients who have medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee with varus deformity of the limb. The abnormal load on the medial compartment of the knee is directed to the lateral compartment with this procedure. A gap occurs on the proximal tibia while providing adequate correction. Filling this gap with bone grafts or synthetic materials has gained wide acceptance for preventing bone union problems or osteotomy site collapse. The aim of this study is to report our results of MOWHTOs performed without any bone graft or any other synthetic materials. We evaluated 41 MOWHTOs that have been performed between 2009 and 2012 with no use of any grafts or synthetic materials and spacer. Age of the patients ranged from 43 to 67. Thirty-five of the patients were females and three of them were males. The follow-up time was 6 months. Seven knees had opening at the osteotomy site <10 mm, 26 knees had 10-12.5 mm, and eight knees had >12.5 mm (range 7.5-14 mm, mean 11.07 mm). All osteotomies united without loss of correction. The mean bone union time was 12.8 weeks. We did not have any major complication regarding the technique. The results of our study have shown that we can achieve satisfactory and good results by performing MOWHTO procedure without using any bone grafts or synthetic materials and spacer.

  1. Management of Osteoarthritis Knee by Graduated Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy in 40-60 Years Age Group Using Limb Reconstruction System: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan Kumar; Chugh, Ankush; Singh, Randhir

    2015-01-01

    Background With i ncrease in elderly population, osteoarthritis has become major concern nowadays. Knee joint is most commonly affected joint. A number of methods have been developed in the last few years which help in treating the osteoarthritis knee, which includes non pharmacological, pharmacological and surgical methods. Among the most promising techniques with renewed interest for osteoarthritis knee with deformity is the use of high tibial osteotomy. Uni-compartmental osteoarthritis knee with deformity especially in relatively younger age group (less than 60 years) constitutes the main indication. Aim The aim of present study was to evaluate management of osteoarthritis knee by graduated open wedge high tibial osteotomy in 40-60 years age group using limb reconstruction system. Materials and Methods Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy leaving the lateral cortex intact which acts as a hinge, was done in 30 patients and stabilized by Limb Reconstruction System. Distraction was started at 7th day at the rate of 1 mm/day and continued till proper alignment was achieved. Results Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy stabilized by unilateral external fixator is a good method for unicompartmental osteoarthritis knee with deformity as it gives precise control over final limb alignment and its ability to perform a residual correction. Deformity correction can be quantified at the time of correction as it is not acute correction. Gradual deformity correction can be done over time by distraction histogenesis with the help of unilateral external fixator. It is also a good method in young patients requiring large correction. Conclusion Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy is having many benefits over closed wedge osteotomy and stabilization by unilateral external fixator also has its added benefits. It is less invasive, no internal hardware present and safer in terms of neurovascular complications. PMID:26557580

  2. Improvement of the knee center of rotation during walking after opening wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungsoo; Feng, Jun; Nha, Kyung Wook; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2015-06-01

    Accurate measurement of the center of rotation of the knee joint is indispensable for prediction of joint kinematics and kinetics in musculoskeletal models. However, no study has yet identified the knee center of rotations during several daily activities before and after high tibial osteotomy surgery, which is one surgical option for treating knee osteoarthritis. In this study, an estimation method for determining the knee joint center of rotation was developed by applying the optimal common shape technique and symmetrical axis of rotation approach techniques to motion-capture data and validated for typical activities (walking, squatting, climbing up stairs, walking down stairs) of 10 normal subjects. The locations of knee joint center of rotations for injured and contralateral knees of eight subjects with osteoarthritis, both before and after high tibial osteotomy surgery, were then calculated during walking. It was shown that high tibial osteotomy surgery improved the knee joint center of rotation since the center of rotations for the injured knee after high tibial osteotomy surgery were significantly closer to those of the normal healthy population. The difference between the injured and contralateral knees was also generally reduced after surgery, demonstrating increased symmetry. These results indicate that symmetry in both knees can be recovered in many cases after high tibial osteotomy surgery. Moreover, the recovery of center of rotation in the injured knee was prior to that of symmetry. This study has the potential to provide fundamental information that can be applied to understand abnormal kinematics in patients, diagnose knee joint disease, and design a novel implants for knee joint surgeries.

  3. RADIOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF THE OPENING WEDGE PROXIMAL TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos Francisco Bittencourt; Camara, Eduardo Kastrup Bittencourt; Vieira, Luiz Antonio; Adolphsson, Fernando; Rodarte, Rodrigo Ribeiro Pinho

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To radiographically evaluate individuals who underwent opening wedge proximal tibial osteotomy, with the aim of analyzing the proximal tibial slope in the frontal and sagittal planes, and the patellar height. Method: The study included 22 individuals who were operated at the National Traumatology and Orthopedics Institute (INTO) for correction of varus angular tibial deviation using the opening wedge osteotomy (OWO) technique with the Orthofix monolateral external fixator. Patients with OWO whose treatment was completed between January 2000 and December 2006 were analyzed. The measurement technique consisted of using anteroposterior radiographs with loading and lateral views with the operated knees flexed at 30°. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the pre and postoperative tibial slope and patellar height values in the patients evaluated. Conclusion: Opening wedge proximal tibial osteotomy is a technique that avoids the problems presented by high proximal tibial osteotomy, since it is done without causing changes to the extensor mechanism, ligament imbalance or distortions in the proximal tibia. PMID:27022577

  4. Patellar height and posterior tibial slope after open- and closed-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a radiological study on 100 patients.

    PubMed

    El-Azab, Hosam; Glabgly, Parpakorn; Paul, Jochen; Imhoff, Andreas B; Hinterwimmer, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    Valgus high tibial osteotomy (HTO) may be associated with changes in the patellar height and posterior tibial slope. Patellar height increases and posterior tibial slope decreases after closed-wedge HTO, whereas patellar height decreases and tibial slope increases after open-wedge osteotomy. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Lateral radiographs of 100 knees were assessed for patellar height (PH) (Insall-Salvati index [ISI], Caton-De Champ index [CDI], and Blackburne-Peel index [BPI]) as well as posterior tibial slope. Measurements were done before HTO (50 closed wedge [CW], 50 open wedge [OW]), direct postoperatively, and before removal of the hardware. In the CW group, all 3 PH indices were increased direct postoperatively and at removal of the hardware, with changes in CDI and BPI being significant (P<.05). The effect size (ES) for the direct postoperative PH increase was medium (ES = 0.48) according to CDI. In the OW group, all 3 indices showed a significant (P <.05) PH decrease direct postoperatively and at hardware removal. The ES for the direct postoperative PH decrease was large according to CDI (ES = 0.92) and BPI (ES = 0.80). There were no significant changes between the 2 follow-up measurements (P > .05) with a small ES each. Posterior tibial slope showed a significant (P <.05) decrease of 3.1 degrees +/- 3.4 degrees after CW HTO and a significant (P <.05) increase of 2.1 degrees +/- 3.6 degrees after OW HTO direct postoperatively. These changes did not change at the second follow-up. In CW HTO, the correlations between frontal plane correction and PH changes were moderate (CDI: r = .57; BPI: r = .64). In OW HTO, these correlations were weak (CDI: r = .44; BPI: r = .46). According to ISI, there was no correlation (CW: r = .11; OW: r = .16). There was no correlation between PH changes and slope changes (CDI) and no correlation between frontal plane HTO correction and slope changes in both CW and OW HTO. The results confirm our hypothesis for PH and

  5. Increase in posterior tibial slope would result in correction loss in frontal plane after medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Asada, Shigeki; Akagi, Masao; Mori, Shigeshi; Matsushita, Tetsunao; Hashimoto, Kazuki; Hamanishi, Chiaki

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the causes of the increase in the posterior tibial slope during open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) and to investigate whether its changes influenced the correction angle in frontal plane. We retrospectively reviewed 20 patients (26 knees) treated with open-wedge HTO. They were divided into the following two groups. Group A consisted of the knees whose opening gaps were fixed using a spacer plate having the trapezoidal block with a 2° posterior slope. In Group B, anterior and posterior opening gaps were fixed separately. The posterior tibial slope and the hip-knee-ankle angle were measured based on CT data. The relationship between the correction rate in frontal plane and the changes of posterior tibial slope was investigated. Increase in the posterior tibial slope was 2.1 ± 2.5° in Group A and 0.2 ± 1.2° in Group B, which showed a statistical difference (P = 0.02). The difference between the hip-knee-ankle angles before and after operation was 5.2 ± 2.3° in Group A and 5.5 ± 2.5° in Group B. The correction rate was statistically correlated with the changes of posterior tibial slope (R = -0.55, P = 0.003). To avoid increase in the posterior tibial slope, the trapezoidal block with a only 2° posterior slope in a spacer plate was not sufficient, and it was necessary to fix anterior and posterior gaps separately. The correction angle in frontal plane had a trade-off relationship with the changes in posterior tibial slope. Thus, we thought that increase in the posterior tibial slope might result in correction loss. Therapeutic study, Retrospective comparative study, Level III.

  6. ACL injury while jumping rope in a patient with an unintended increase in the tibial slope after an opening wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang Am; Lee, Su Chan; Hwang, Seung Hyun; Song, Moon Bok

    2009-08-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is an accepted surgical technique for the treatment of medial compartmental arthrosis of the knee in younger patients. Compared to total knee arthroplasty, HTO may be a good choice in patients who wish to continue with heavy labor and/or impact sports. Based on the rehabilitation protocol after HTO, impact sports, such as running, jumping rope, and full sports activities, are generally permitted 6 months postoperatively. Jumping rope is an excellent form of aerobic exercise, and when done properly, jumping rope can lead to a dramatic improvement in rehabilitation and full sports activities. However, an adequate evaluation should be performed prior to initiating impact sports. We present the case of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament that occurred in a patient with an unintended increase in the tibial slope after an opening wedge HTO who was jumping rope.

  7. Complication rate following high tibial open-wedge osteotomy with spacer plates for incipient osteoarthritis of the knee with varus malalignment.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Gohm, Alexander; Schlick, Bernd; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2015-07-01

    Medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) with spacer plates is recommended to correct varus malalignment of the knee with symptomatic overload of the medial compartment. Fifty-five knees in 50 patients were assessed. Intra- and post-operative complications were recorded, and Tegner, Lysholm and IKDC scores were used to evaluate functional results. Radiological parameters consisted of medial proximal tibial angle (aMPTA), femorotibial angle (aFTA), posterior proximal tibial angle, lateral distal femur angle, mechanical axis deviation (MAD) and osteoarthritis score (Jäger and Wirth). Duration of follow-up was 5.0 ± 1.4 years. Overall and implant-related complication rates were 27.3 and 10.9 %, respectively. No statistical association could be detected between overall and implant-related complication rates and age, gender, wedge size, angle of correction or body mass index. Mean improvement in Lysholm score was 26.8. Overall IKDC scores at follow-up were A25, B26, C2 and D2. Post-operative correction of MPTA and FTA averaged to 89.6° and 173° and to 89° and 173.5° at follow-up, respectively. Initial MAD of 21.8 mm was corrected to 11.8 mm at follow-up. Osteoarthritis score increased from 1.4 ± 0.9 to 1.9 ± 0.9 points. HTO with spacer plates improves knee function and is an effective procedure in selected patients. Overall and implant-related complication rates should be considered and seem to be lower with a smaller angle of correction corresponding to incipient osteoarthritis and less varus deformity. Retrospective case series, Level IV.

  8. Transcuneiform and opening wedge medial cuneiform osteotomy with closing wedge cuboid osteotomy in relapsed clubfoot.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Margaret; Nicol, Richard O

    2003-01-01

    Ten patients (13 feet) aged 4 to 11 years with idiopathic clubfeet underwent bony correction for resistant supination and adduction deformities. A closing wedge cuboid osteotomy and medial cuneiform opening wedge and transcuneiform osteotomy were performed in all cases. The average improvement in anteroposterior talo-first metatarsal angle of 22 degrees, calcaneo-fifth metatarsal angle of 13 degrees, and lateral calcaneo-first metatarsal of 9 degrees confirmed the clinically satisfactory correction in all feet. However, one foot required repeat surgery 2 years after the index procedure.

  9. Is a synthetic augmentation in medial open wedge high tibial osteotomies superior to no augmentation in terms of bone-healing?

    PubMed

    Ferner, Felix; Dickschas, Joerg; Ostertag, Helmut; Poske, Ulrich; Schwitulla, Judith; Harrer, Joerg; Strecker, Wolf

    2016-01-01

    Medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO) is an established method to treat unicompartimental osteoarthritis of the knee joint. However, augmentation of the created tibial gap after osteotomy is controversially discussed. We performed a prospective investigation of 49 consecutive cases of MOWHTO at our department. Patients were divided into two groups: group A consisted of 19 patients while group B consisted of 30 patients. In group A, the augmentation of the opening gap after osteotomy was filled with a synthetic bone graft, whereas group B received no augmentation. As an indicator for bone healing we investigated the non-union rate in our study population and compared the non-union-rate between the two groups. The non-union rate was 28% in group A (five of 19 patients had to undergo revision) which received synthetic augmentation, while it was 3.3% in group B (one of 30 patients had to undergo revision) which received no augmentation. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (p-value 0.027). With regard to bone healing after MOWHTO, synthetic augmentation was not superior to no augmentation in terms of non-union rates after surgery. In fact, we registered a significantly higher rate of non-union after augmentation with synthetic bone graft. III. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Complications and Short-Term Outcomes of Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy Using a Locking Plate for Medial Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seung-Suk; Kim, Ok-Gul; Seo, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Do-Hoon; Kim, Youn-Gu; Lee, In-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate complications and radiologic and clinical outcomes of medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO) using a locking plate. Materials and Methods This study reviewed 167 patients who were treated with MOWHTO using a locking plate from May 2012 to June 2014. Patients without complications were classified into group 1 and those with complications into group 2. Medical records, operative notes, and radiographs were retrospectively reviewed to identify complications. Clinically, Oxford Knee score and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome score (KOOS) were evaluated. Results Overall, complications were observed in 49 patients (29.3%). Minor complications included lateral cortex fracture (15.6%), neuropathy (3.6%), correction loss (2.4%), hematoma (2.4%), delayed union (2.4%), delayed wound healing (2.4%), postoperative stiffness (1.2%), hardware irritation (1.2%), tendinitis (1.2%), and hardware failure without associated symptoms (0.6%). Major complications included hardware failure with associated symptoms (0.6%), deep infection (0.6%), and nonunion (0.6%). At the first-year follow-up, there were no significant differences in radiologic measurements between groups 1 and 2. There were no significant differences in knee scores except for the KOOS pain score. Conclusions Our data showed that almost all complications of the treatment were minor and the patients recovered without any problems. Most complications did not have a significant impact on radiologic and clinical outcomes. PMID:27894176

  11. Modified Iliac Crest Reconstruction with Bone Cement for Reduction of Donor Site Pain and Morbidity after Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seong; Park, Yong Jee; Wang, Lih; Chang, Yong Suk; Shetty, Gautam M.; Nha, Kyung Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was to determine the efficacy of iliac crest reconstruction using bone cement in reducing pain and morbidity at the donor site in patients undergoing open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) with tricortical iliac crest autologous graft. Materials and Methods Thirty-three patients who underwent iliac crest reconstruction using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement (group A) and thirty patients who had no iliac crest reconstruction (group B) were enrolled in this study. All patients were evaluated for pain and functional disability related to graft harvesting using the pain and functional visual analogue scale (VAS) score during hospital stay and at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. Results There was significant difference between the two groups in terms of pain and function. The pain VAS score was significantly lower in group A than group B during the first 2 weeks postoperatively (p=0.04) and the functional VAS score was also significantly lower in group A during the first 2 weeks postoperatively (p<0.001) in terms of breathing, sitting up from the supine position, and standing up with crutches from the sitting position. Conclusions Iliac crest donor site reconstruction using PMMA bone cement in patients undergoing OWHTO significantly decreased pain and improved function during the first 2 weeks postoperatively when compared to patients who underwent OWHTO without iliac crest reconstruction. PMID:27894174

  12. [Biphasic ceramic wedge and plate fixation with locked adjustable screws for open wedge tibial osteotomy].

    PubMed

    Lavallé, F; Pascal-Mousselard, H; Rouvillain, J L; Ribeyre, D; Delattre, O; Catonné, Y

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this radiological study was to evaluate the use of a biphasic ceramic wedge combined with plate fixation with locked adjustable screws for open wedge tibial osteotomy. Twenty-six consecutive patients (27 knees) underwent surgery between December 1999 and March 2002 to establish a normal lower-limb axis. The series included 6 women and 20 men, mean age 50 years (16 right knees and 11 left knees). Partial weight-bearing with crutches was allowed on day 1. A standard radiological assessment was performed on day 1, 90, and 360 (plain AP and lateral stance films of the knee). A pangonogram was performed before surgery and at day 360. Presence of a lateral metaphyseal space, development of peripheral cortical bridges, and osteointegration of the bone substitute-bone interface were evaluated used to assess bone healing. The medial tibial angle between the line tangent to the tibial plateau and the anatomic axis of the tibia (beta) was evaluated to assess preservation of postoperative correction. The HKA angle was determined. Three patients were lost to follow-up and 23 patients (24 knees) were retained for analysis. At last follow-up, presence of peripheral cortical bridges and complete filling of the lateral metaphyseal space demonstrated bone healing in all patients. Good quality osteointegration was achieved since 21 knees did not present an interface between the bone substitute and native bone (homogeneous transition zone). The beta angle was unchanged for 23 knees. A normal axis was observed in patients (16 knees) postoperatively. Use of a biphasic ceramic wedge in combination with plate fixation with locked adjustable screws is a reliable option for open wedge tibial osteotomy. The bone substitute fills the gap well. Tolerance and integration are optimal. Bone healing is achieved. Plate fixation with protected weight bearing appears to be a solid assembly, maintaining these corrections.

  13. Minimizing alteration of posterior tibial slope during opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: a protocol with experimental validation in paired cadaveric knees.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Robert W; DeBerardino, Thomas; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    The High Tibial Osteotomy (HTO) is a reliable procedure in addressing uni- compartmental arthritis with associated coronal deformities. With osteotomy of the proximal tibia, there is a risk of altering the tibial slope in the sagittal plane. Surgical techniques continue to evolve with trends towards procedure reproducibility and simplification. We evaluated a modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique in 18 paired cadaveric knees with the goals of maintaining sagittal slope, increasing procedure efficiency, and decreasing use of intraoperative fluoroscopy. Nine paired cadaveric knees (18 legs) underwent iBalance medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomies. In each pair, the right knee underwent an HTO using the modified technique, while all left knees underwent the traditional technique. Independent observers evaluated postoperative factors including tibial slope, placement of hinge pin, and implant placement. Specimens were then dissected to evaluate for any gross muscle, nerve or vessel injury. Changes to posterior tibial slope were similar using each technique. The change in slope in traditional iBalance technique was -0.3° ±2.3° and change in tibial slope using the modified iBalance technique was -0.4° ±2.3° (p=0.29). Furthermore, we detected no differences in posterior tibial slope between preoperative and postoperative specimens (p=0.74 traditional, p=0.75 modified). No differences in implant placement were detected between traditional and modified techniques. (p=0.85). No intraoperative iatrogenic complications (i.e. lateral cortex fracture, blood vessel or nerve injury) were observed in either group after gross dissection. Alterations in posterior tibial slope are associated with HTOs. Both traditional and modified iBalance techniques appear reliable in coronal plane corrections without changing posterior tibial slope. The present modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique may increase the efficiency of the operation and decrease radiation

  14. Minimizing Alteration of Posterior Tibial Slope During Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: a Protocol with Experimental Validation in Paired Cadaveric Knees

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W; DeBerardino, Thomas; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The High Tibial Osteotomy (HTO) is a reliable procedure in addressing uni- compartmental arthritis with associated coronal deformities. With osteotomy of the proximal tibia, there is a risk of altering the tibial slope in the sagittal plane. Surgical techniques continue to evolve with trends towards procedure reproducibility and simplification. We evaluated a modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique in 18 paired cadaveric knees with the goals of maintaining sagittal slope, increasing procedure efficiency, and decreasing use of intraoperative fluoroscopy. Methods Nine paired cadaveric knees (18 legs) underwent iBalance medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomies. In each pair, the right knee underwent an HTO using the modified technique, while all left knees underwent the traditional technique. Independent observers evaluated postoperative factors including tibial slope, placement of hinge pin, and implant placement. Specimens were then dissected to evaluate for any gross muscle, nerve or vessel injury. Results Changes to posterior tibial slope were similar using each technique. The change in slope in traditional iBalance technique was -0.3° ±2.3° and change in tibial slope using the modified iBalance technique was -0.4° ±2.3° (p=0.29). Furthermore, we detected no differences in posterior tibial slope between preoperative and postoperative specimens (p=0.74 traditional, p=0.75 modified). No differences in implant placement were detected between traditional and modified techniques. (p=0.85). No intraoperative iatrogenic complications (i.e. lateral cortex fracture, blood vessel or nerve injury) were observed in either group after gross dissection. Discussion & Conclusions Alterations in posterior tibial slope are associated with HTOs. Both traditional and modified iBalance techniques appear reliable in coronal plane corrections without changing posterior tibial slope. The present modification of the Arthrex iBalance technique may increase the

  15. Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis Progression and Alignment Changes after Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy Do Not Affect Clinical Outcomes at Mid-term Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Goshima, Kenichi; Sawaguchi, Takeshi; Shigemoto, Kenji; Iwai, Shintaro; Nakanishi, Akira; Ueoka, Ken

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) with respect to the patellofemoral joint and to assess whether patellofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) progression and alignment changes after OWHTO affect clinical outcomes. Inclusion criteria were consecutive patients who underwent OWHTO from March 2005 to September 2013. Exclusion criteria were loss to follow-up within 2 years and absence of second-look arthroscopy findings at the time of plate removal. The clinical parameters, including anterior knee pain while climbing stairs, Japanese Orthopedic Association score, and Oxford Knee Score, were evaluated. Radiological outcomes, including weight-bearing line ratio, modified Blackburne-Peel ratio, posterior tibial slope, tilting angle, lateral shift ratio, and patellofemoral OA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade), were evaluated preoperatively and at the final follow-up. Cartilage status (International Cartilage Repair Society grade) was evaluated at the initial HTO and at plate removal. Fifty-three patients (60 knees) were included in this study. The mean follow-up was 58.2 ± 22.4 months. Two knees (3%) presented with mild anterior knee pain after OWHTO. The mean Japanese Orthopedic Association score (66.9 ± 11.2 to 91.2 ± 9.7) significantly improved (P < .001), and the mean Oxford Knee Score at the final follow-up was 42.0 ± 5.3. The mean modified Blackburne-Peel ratio (0.9 ± 0.1 to 0.7 ± 0.1, P < .001) and tilting angle (6.8 ± 3.7 to 5.6 ± 3.4, P = .033) significantly decreased after OWHTO, whereas no significant changes in posterior tibial slope (P = .511) and lateral shift ratio (P = .522) were observed. Radiologically, patellofemoral OA had progressed in 15 knees (27%), and arthroscopically patellofemoral cartilage degeneration had progressed in 27 knees (45%). However, there was no significant correlation between changes in patellofemoral alignment and clinical outcomes. Changes in patellofemoral alignment and

  16. A matched-pair comparison of two different locking plates for valgus-producing medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy: peek-carbon composite plate versus titanium plate.

    PubMed

    Cotic, Matthias; Vogt, Stephan; Hinterwimmer, Stefan; Feucht, Matthias J; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Schuster, Tibor; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2015-07-01

    The first purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographic outcome of two different locking plates used for valgus-producing medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO). The second purpose was to histologically evaluate peek-carbon wear for biocompatibility. Twenty-six consecutive patients undergoing open-wedge HTO using the first-generation PEEKPower HTO-Plate® (Group I) were matched with 26 patients after open-wedge HTO with the TomoFix™ plate (Group II). Clinical scores (visual analogue scale for pain, WOMAC, Lysholm score) were obtained preoperatively and at a minimum follow-up of 24 months postoperatively. Fixation stability was evaluated radiographically by comparing the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) and tibial slope 2 days after open-wedge HTO and after implant removal. Tissue samples of Group I were collected at the time of implant removal for histologic evaluation. Implant-related complications occurred in 15 % (n = 4) of Group I and 0 % of Group II. Out of them, 3 implant replacements were excluded from statistical analyses. After a final median follow-up of 25 months (range 24-31), the clinical scores in both groups showed significant improvements compared to preoperatively (visual analogue scale, WOMAC, Lysholm score; p < 0.001), without significant group differences (visual analogue scale, n.s.; WOMAC, n.s.; Lysholm score, n.s.). No significant differences between baseline and follow-up measurements for MPTA and tibial slope were observed within each group (MPTA: Gr. I, n.s.; Gr. II, n.s.; tibial slope: Gr. I, n.s.; Gr. II, n.s.) or between the two groups (MPTA, n.s.; tibial slope, n.s.). In histologic samples, CF PEEK abrasion did not induce inflammation or tissue necrosis. The first-generation PEEKPower HTO-Plate® provided a higher rate of implant-related complications compared to the TomoFix™ plate at a minimum follow-up of 24 months after valgus-producing open-wedge HTO. Therefore, it is not recommended to use the

  17. COMPLICATIONS FOLLOWING MEDIAL OPENING WEDGE OSTEOTOMY OF THE KNEE: RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    de Mello Junior, Wilson Alves; Arruda, Luciano Rodrigo Peres; Coluccini, André Muller; da Silva Nunes, Rodrigo Pereira; Pedro, Márcio do Amaral Camargo; de Souza, Márcio Regis; Zabeu, José Luis Amin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively survey the most frequent complications from medial opening wedge high-tibial osteotomy. This procedure is becoming increasingly important in treating knee arthrosis, as one of the options for young and active patients. Despite satisfactory results and its benefits, it is not a complication-free procedure. Methods: All cases of medial opening wedge high-tibial osteotomy above the tibial tubercle with fixation using a Puddu plate that were performed at the Celso Pierro Hospital and Maternity Hospital, Pontifical Catholic University of Campinas (PUC-Campinas) and the Wilson Mello Institute, Campinas, between October 1, 1987, and October 30, 2008, were evaluated retrospectively. Patients with less than 12 months of follow-up or incomplete medical files, and those who underwent bilateral osteotomy, were excluded. Results: Out of the 67 cases evaluated, 55 were males and 12 were females, with a mean age of 49.5 years. The mean wedge size was 10.15 mm and the most common complications were moderate to severe pain (13.04%), stiffness (6.52%), material breakage (4.4%), intraoperative fracture of the lateral cortical bone (4.4%) and infection (4.4%). It was observed that patients with delayed consolidation of the osteotomy had a greater chance of presenting complications (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Complications from medial wedge osteotomy are more frequent when associated with delayed consolidation. PMID:27026988

  18. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 223 - Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening 17 Figure 17 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND.... 223, Fig. 17 Figure 17 to Part 223—Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening ER21MY12.001 ...

  19. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 223 - Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening 17 Figure 17 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND.... 223, Fig. 17 Figure 17 to Part 223—Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening ER21MY12.001 ...

  20. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 223 - Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening 17 Figure 17 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND.... 223, Fig. 17 Figure 17 to Part 223—Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening ER21MY12.001 ...

  1. A comparison of wedge and needle hepatic biopsy in open bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Padoin, Alexandre Vontobel; Mottin, Cláudio Corá; Moretto, Myriam; Berleze, Diovanne; Kupski, Carlos; Glock, Luiz; Reichel, Carlos Luiz; da Silva, Vinicius Duval; da Silva, Jefferson Braga

    2006-02-01

    Morbidly obese patients, despite normal laboratory tests and no clinical evidence of liver disease, present a high prevalence of hepatic histological changes. Liver biopsy is able to provide the diagnosis, staging and assessment of follow-up of hepatic disease, thus helping to define clinical management. There is no agreement on which biopsy technique provides better material for analysis. Considering that subcapsular fibrosis is a common finding, sampling from deeper sites is necessary to achieve an adequate histological assessment. A study was done in 264 consecutive morbidly obese patients who underwent open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass between July 2001 and Sept 2004, in whom an intraoperative liver biopsy was taken. The first 107 were wedge biopsies, and the last 157 were needle biopsies. The histological degree of steatosis, presence of fibrosis and adequacy of material from the 2 biopsy techniques were compared. Degree of steatosis in both sampling techniques showed no statistical difference (P=0.132). The presence of fibrosis in wedge biopsies (46.1% fibrosis, n 41) was significantly higher than in needle biopsies (13.7% fibrosis, n 20), P<0.001. As expected, sample size of needle biopsies was smaller than that obtained by the wedge technique (P<0.001), but there was no difference in the quality of material obtained (P=0.95). Needle biopsies were as effective as wedge biopsies in assessing the degree of steatosis in morbidly obese patients. More important, the presence of subcapsular fibrosis in needle biopsies was less than in wedge biopsies, suggesting an adequate tissue sample by the less invasive technique.

  2. Distal femoral varus osteotomy: problems associated with the lateral open-wedge technique.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Matthias; Wahl, Peter; Bouaicha, Samy; Jakob, Roland P; Gautier, Emanuel

    2011-06-01

    Varisation osteotomies on the distal femur are an established treatment method for valgus osteoarthritis of the knee in younger patients. Osteotomy can be done in a lateral open-wedge or medial closed-wedge manner. We retrospectively studied 14 patients treated by the lateral open-wedge technique, fixed with the Tomofix plate, with a mean duration of follow-up of 45 ± 3.4 months. We observed often delayed osteotomy healing after 3, 6 and 12 months, no secondary dislocations, and frequent troublesome irritation due to the plate being on the iliotibial band. However, outcome was satisfactory once the osteotomy healed and the plate was removed. Based on the often slow healing of the osteotomy and frequent irritation due to the plate, this procedure has been abandoned by the authors, and the medial closing-wedge osteotomy adopted as the alternative treatment.

  3. Measurement of photoneutron dose produced by wedge filters of a high energy linac using polycarbonate films.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Hashemi-Malayeri, Bijan; Raisali, Gholamreza; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Sharafi, Ali Akbar; Torkzadeh, Falamarz

    2008-05-01

    Radiotherapy represents the most widely spread technique to control and treat cancer. To increase the treatment efficiency, high energy linacs are used. However, applying high energy photon beams leads to a non-negligible dose of neutrons contaminating therapeutic beams. In addition, using conventional linacs necessitates applying wedge filters in some clinical conditions. However, there is not enough information on the effect of these filters on the photoneutrons produced. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of photoneutron dose equivalent due to the use of linac wedge filters. A high energy (18 MV) linear accelerator (Elekta SL 75/25) was studied. Polycarbonate films were used to measure the dose equivalent of photoneutrons. After electrochemical etching of the films, the neutron dose equivalent was calculated using Hp(10) factor, and its variation on the patient plane at 0, 5, 10, 50 and 100 cm from the center of the X-ray beam was determined. By increasing the distance from the center of the X-ray beam towards the periphery, the photoneutron dose equivalent decreased rapidly for the open and wedged fields. Increasing of the field size increased the photoneutron dose equivalent. The use of wedge filter increased the proportion of the neutron dose equivalent. The increase can be accounted for by the selective absorption of the high energy photons by the wedge filter.

  4. Comparison of Cable Method and Miniaci Method Using Picture Archiving and Communication System in Preoperative Planning for Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seong-Dae; Zhang, GuoFeng; Kim, Hee-June; Lee, Byoung-Joo; Kyung, Hee-Soo

    2016-12-01

    The purpose was to compare the accuracy of Miniaci method using picture archiving and communication system (PACS) with a cable method in high tibial osteotomy (HTO). This study analyzed 47 patients (52 knees) with varus deformity and medial osteoarthritis. From 2007 to 2013, patients underwent HTO using either a cable method (20 knees) or Miniaci method based on a PACS image (32 knees). In the cable method, the 62.5% point of the mediolateral tibial plateau width was located using an electrocautery cord under fluoroscopy (cable group). The Miniaci method used preoperative radiographs to shift the weight bearing axis (PACS group). Full-length lower limb radiographs obtained preoperatively and at the sixth postoperative week were used to compare the percentage of crossing point of the weight bearing line on the tibial plateau with respect to the medial border. The weight bearing line on the tibial plateau was corrected from a preoperative 11.0±7.0% to a postoperative 47.2±7.4% in the cable group and from 12.7±4.9% to 59.5±5.3% in the PACS group. The mechanical femorotibial angle was corrected from varus 8.9±3.7° to valgus 0.3±4.0° in the cable group and from varus 9.0±3.3° to valgus 2.9±2.6° in the PACS group. In HTO, correction based on the Miniaci method using a PACS was more accurate than correction using the cable method.

  5. Comparison of Cable Method and Miniaci Method Using Picture Archiving and Communication System in Preoperative Planning for Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seong-Dae; Zhang, GuoFeng; Kim, Hee-June; Lee, Byoung-Joo; Kyung, Hee-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to compare the accuracy of Miniaci method using picture archiving and communication system (PACS) with a cable method in high tibial osteotomy (HTO). Materials and Methods This study analyzed 47 patients (52 knees) with varus deformity and medial osteoarthritis. From 2007 to 2013, patients underwent HTO using either a cable method (20 knees) or Miniaci method based on a PACS image (32 knees). In the cable method, the 62.5% point of the mediolateral tibial plateau width was located using an electrocautery cord under fluoroscopy (cable group). The Miniaci method used preoperative radiographs to shift the weight bearing axis (PACS group). Full-length lower limb radiographs obtained preoperatively and at the sixth postoperative week were used to compare the percentage of crossing point of the weight bearing line on the tibial plateau with respect to the medial border. Results The weight bearing line on the tibial plateau was corrected from a preoperative 11.0±7.0% to a postoperative 47.2±7.4% in the cable group and from 12.7±4.9% to 59.5±5.3% in the PACS group. The mechanical femorotibial angle was corrected from varus 8.9±3.7° to valgus 0.3±4.0° in the cable group and from varus 9.0±3.3° to valgus 2.9±2.6° in the PACS group. Conclusions In HTO, correction based on the Miniaci method using a PACS was more accurate than correction using the cable method. PMID:27894175

  6. Opening-wedge osteotomy for angular deformities of long bones in children.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, M M; Peterson, H A

    1994-03-01

    Mild angular deformities associated with a mild limb-length discrepancy of long bones in children can be treated effectively with opening-wedge osteotomy with insertion of a specially prepared autogenous tricortical iliac-crest bone graft and with minimum or no internal fixation. Thirty-one osteotomies in twenty-six children satisfactorily corrected the deformities so that the angulation and length of the bone were comparable with the values on the normal, contralateral side. Physeal arrest or ipsilateral excision of a physeal bar was performed either concomitantly or at a separate operation in twenty-one of the twenty-six patients, to aid in the treatment of the limb-length discrepancy. Opening-wedge osteotomy is applicable for correction when the angular deformity is 25 degrees or less and the limb-length discrepancy is, or will be, twenty-five millimeters or less at maturity.

  7. Outcomes of Opening Wedge Osteotomy to Correct Angular Deformity in Small Finger Clinodactyly

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Samantha L.; Goldfarb, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes and complications in a series of children with clinodactyly treated with opening wedge osteotomy of the abnormal phalanx. Methods We performed a retrospective review of all children with clinodactyly treated at our institution with opening wedge osteotomy of the abnormal middle phalanx between 2003 and 2013. Patients with concomitant pathology or prior surgery in the affected finger were excluded. Pre and postoperative clinical angle, radiographic angle, digital range of motion, and pain were compared, and complications were recorded. Results Thirteen digits in 9 patients were included. All had greater than 20° of preoperative clinical angulation (mean 36°). Mean age at the time of surgery was 11 years and mean duration of follow-up was 25 months (12–43 months). All digits had significant improvement (mean 32°) in clinical and radiographic angles after surgery. This improvement was maintained at final follow-up in 12 digits. Six patients had pain preoperatively and no patient had pain postoperatively. One digit had a recurrent deformity at final follow-up, and 3 digits developed stiffness at the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusions Opening wedge osteotomy is an effective treatment for angulation in children with clinodactyly. We counsel families regarding the risk of distal interphalangeal joint stiffness. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV PMID:25754787

  8. Radiographic analysis of an opening wedge osteotomy of the medial cuneiform.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Michael; Myerson, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Forefoot varus deformity and medial column instability can develop or be present in association with ankle and hindfoot pathology. This study aimed to confirm the utility of medial cuneiform opening wedge osteotomy as part of hindfoot and ankle deformity correction. Patients requiring operative management of flatfoot deformity between January 2002 and December 2007 were prospectively entered in a database. We selected all patients who underwent medial cuneiform opening wedge osteotomy. One hundred and one feet in 86 patients of mean age 36 (range, 9 to 80) years were evaluated. Eighty-one feet had adequate radiographic imaging for assessment. Concomitant procedures were performed. We measured standardized, validated radiographic parameters on pre- and postoperative weightbearing foot radiographs. Variables including concomitant surgical procedures, osteotomy union, malunion, and midfoot arthritis were noted. The mean lateral talus-first metatarsal angle improved from 23 degrees to 1 degrees (p < 0.001); mean medial cuneiform to floor distance improved from 20 mm to 34 mm (p < 0.001); mean talar declination angle improved from 39 degrees to 27 degrees (p < 0.001); mean calcaneal-talar angle improved from 64 degrees to 55 degrees (p < 0.001); calcaneal pitch angle improved from 14 degrees to 23 degrees (p < 0.001); mean first metatarsal declination angle improved from 17 degrees to 26 degrees (p < 0.001); mean talonavicular coverage angle improved from 45 degrees to 18 degrees (p < 0.001); and mean anteroposterior talus-first metatarsal angle improved from 19 degrees to 0 degrees (p < 0.001). Radiographical analysis showed that medial cuneiform opening wedge osteotomy combined with other corrective procedures corrected forefoot varus, elevated first metatarsal and medial column instability radiographic parameters that are most commonly associated with flatfoot deformity.

  9. A regional-scale estimation of ice wedge ice volumes in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, M.; Pollard, W. H.; Grand'Maison, C. B.

    2016-12-01

    Ice wedges are both prominent and environmentally vulnerable features in continuous permafrost environments. As the world's Arctic regions begin to warm, concern over the potential effects of ice wedge melt out has become an immediate issue, receiving much attention in the permafrost literature. In this study we estimate the volume of ice wedge ice for large areas in the Canadian High Arctic through the use of high resolution satellite imagery and the improved capabilities of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The methodology used for this study is similar to that of one performed in Siberia and Alaska by Ulrich et al, in 2014. Utilizing Ulrich's technique, this study detected ice wedge polygons from satellite imagery using ArcGIS. The average width and depth of these ice wedges were obtained from a combination of field data and long-term field studies for the same location. The assumptions used in the analysis of ice wedge volume have been tested, including trough width being representative of ice wedge width, and ice wedge ice content (Pollard and French 1980). This study used specific field sites located near Eureka on Ellesmere Island (N80°01', W85°43') and at Expedition Fiord on Axel Heiberg Island (N79°23', W90°59'). The preliminary results indicate that the methodology used by Ulrich et al, 2014 is transferrable to the Canadian High Arctic, and that ice wedge volumes range between 3-10% of the upper part of permafrost. These findings are similar to previous studies and their importance is made all the more evident by the dynamic nature of ice wedges where it could be argued that they are a key driver of thermokarst terrain. The ubiquitous nature of ice wedges across arctic terrain highlights the importance and the need to improve our understanding of ice wedge dynamics, as subsidence from ice wedge melt-out could lead to large scale landscape change.

  10. Impact of sedimentation on evolution of accretionary wedges: Insights from high-resolution thermomechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannu, Utsav; Ueda, Kosuke; Willett, Sean D.; Gerya, Taras V.; Strasser, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Syntectonic sedimentation history is a potential cause of differentiated accretionary wedge structures along the subduction margin. Recent efforts to model the role of sedimentation on wedge evolution have highlighted the importance of spatiotemporal history of sedimentation on the evolution of the wedge. Moreover, reconstruction of deformation history of the accretionary wedges using reflection seismic and borehole data has further substantiated the impact of sedimentation on wedge evolution. We conduct several numerical experiments using a high-resolution dynamic 2-D thermomechanical plate subduction model to systematically investigate and quantify different effects of sedimentation on accretionary wedge evolution. Models with sedimentation suggest migration of deformation to parts of the wedge lying outside the sedimentation zone leading to emergence/reactivation of out-of-sequence thrusts (OOSTs). Frequency and length of new thrust sheets are correlated with sedimentation in the trench. Models undergo a transition period of 1.5 Myr following the onset of sedimentation, after which they continue to grow under a new steady state. Stabilization of the wedge and increased load on the oceanic plate due to sedimentation create conditions in which smaller wedge-top basins combine to form a large and flat forearc basin. Last but not the least, emergence of OOST in models of accretionary wedges undergoing sedimentation provides important insights in to evolution of potentially tsunamigenic OOSTs like the Megasplay Fault seaward of the Kumano forearc basin.

  11. Generation of high-order optical vortices by optical wedges system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izdebskaya, Ya. V.; Shvedov, V. G.; Volyar, A. V.

    2005-11-01

    The aim of the given report is experimental and theoretical research of the diffraction of a Gaussian beam by the optical wedges system. It is shown that this system is able to form high-order optical vortices. The effectiveness of system is about 90%. It was shown, that each wedge changes a charge of phase singularity as a result of edge diffraction. The value topological charge of the optical vortex formed after system is defined by the number of wedges in the system. Changing mutual orientation corners of wedges we can select required conditions of the vortex core. It was revealed that the optical vortex appears structurally steady if the comer of mutual orientation of wedges equals α = πn (where n-number of wedges).

  12. Crack-opening displacements in center-crack, compact, and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens. [of flat plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The theoretical crack-opening displacements for center-crack, compact, and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens (reported in the ASTM Proposed Recommended Practice for R-Curve Determination (1974)) disagree with experimental measurements in the literature. The disagreement is a result of using approximate specimen configurations and load representation to obtain the theoretical displacements. An improved method of boundary collocation is presented which was used to obtain the theoretical displacements in these three specimen types; the actual specimen configurations and more accurate load representation were used. In the analysis of crack-opening displacements in the compact and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens, the effects of the pin-loaded holes were also included. The theoretical calculations agree with the experimental measurements reported in the literature. Also examined are accurate polynomial expressions for crack-opening displacements in both compact and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens.

  13. Anterior opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal tibia for anterior knee pain in idiopathic hyperextension knees

    PubMed Central

    van Raaij, T. M.

    2006-01-01

    We analysed 20 patients with 24 knees affected by idiopathic genu recurvatum who were treated with an anterior opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal tibia because of anterior knee pain. We managed to attain full satisfaction in 83% of the patients with a mean follow-up of 7.4 years. The mean Hospital for Special Surgery score was 90.3 (range 70.5–99.5), and the mean Knee Society score score was 94.6 (70–100) for function and 87.7 (47–100) for pain. The mean Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index score for knee function was 87.5 (42–100), for stiffness 82.8 (25–100) and for pain 87.3 (55–100). Radiographs showed a significant increase in posterior tibial slope of 9.4 deg and a significant decrease of patellar height according to the Blackburne–Peel method of 0.16 postoperatively. No cases of non-union, deep infection or compartment syndrome were seen. No osteoarthritic changes in the lateral or medial knee compartment were found with more than 5 years’ follow-up in 16 patients with 19 affected knees. Three out of the four dissatisfied patients had a patella infera which led to patellofemoral complaints. One patient in the study underwent a secondary superior displacement of the patella with excellent results. We conclude that in a selected group of patients with idiopathic genu recurvatum and anterior knee pain an opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal tibia can be beneficial. PMID:16521014

  14. Predicting translational deformity following opening-wedge osteotomy for lower limb realignment.

    PubMed

    Barksfield, Richard C; Monsell, Fergal P

    2015-11-01

    An opening-wedge osteotomy is well recognised for the management of limb deformity and requires an understanding of the principles of geometry. Translation at the osteotomy is needed when the osteotomy is performed away from the centre of rotation of angulation (CORA), but the amount of translation varies with the distance from the CORA. This translation enables proximal and distal axes on either side of the proposed osteotomy to realign. We have developed two experimental models to establish whether the amount of translation required (based on the translation deformity created) can be predicted based upon simple trigonometry. A predictive algorithm was derived where translational deformity was predicted as 2(tan α × d), where α represents 50 % of the desired angular correction, and d is the distance of the desired osteotomy site from the CORA. A simulated model was developed using TraumaCad online digital software suite (Brainlab AG, Germany). Osteotomies were simulated in the distal femur, proximal tibia and distal tibia for nine sets of lower limb scanograms at incremental distances from the CORA and the resulting translational deformity recorded. There was strong correlation between the distance of the osteotomy from the CORA and simulated translation deformity for distal femoral deformities (correlation coefficient 0.99, p < 0.0001), proximal tibial deformities (correlation coefficient 0.93-0.99, p < 0.0001) and distal tibial deformities (correlation coefficient 0.99, p < 0.0001). There was excellent agreement between the predictive algorithm and simulated translational deformity for all nine simulations (correlation coefficient 0.93-0.99, p < 0.0001). Translational deformity following corrective osteotomy for lower limb deformity can be anticipated and predicted based upon the angular correction and the distance between the planned osteotomy site and the CORA.

  15. Monolithic integration of high-Q wedge resonators with vertically coupled waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramiro-Manzano, Fernando; Prtljaga, Nikola; Pavesi, Lorenzo; Pucker, Georg; Ghulinyan, Mher

    2013-05-01

    Typical UHQ resonators, microspheres and microtoroids, lack the possibility of integration into lightwave circuits due to their planarity constrains. In this context, CMOS-compatible alternatives in the form of wedge resonators have been proposed. However, the mode retraction from the wedge cavity inhibits the possibility to side couple with integrated waveguides and therefore, halts the full integration within a planar lightwave circuit. In this work, we propose and demonstrate experimentally the complete integration of wedge resonators with vertically coupled dielectric bus waveguides. This coupling scheme permits to use arbitrary gaps, geometries and materials, enables simplified and precise control of the light injection into the cavity and opens the door to an industrial mass-fabrication of UHQ resonators.

  16. Wedge Absorbers for Final Cooling for a High-Energy High-Luminosity Lepton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Mohayai, Tanaz; Snopok, Pavel; Summers, Don

    2016-06-01

    A high-energy high-luminosity muon collider scenario requires a "final cooling" system that reduces transverse emittance to ~25 microns (normalized) while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. Ionization cooling using high-field solenoids (or Li Lens) can reduce transverse emittances to ~100 microns in readily achievable configurations, confirmed by simulation. Passing these muon beams at ~100 MeV/c through cm-sized diamond wedges can reduce transverse emittances to ~25 microns, while increasing longitudinal emittance by a factor of ~5. Implementation will require optical matching of the exiting beam into downstream acceleration systems.

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin–Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy. PMID:25426430

  18. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin-Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy.

  19. A Novel Closed-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy Procedure to Treat Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Hybrid Technique and Rehabilitation Measures

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Ryohei; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Miyasaka, Yasuyuki; Sasaki, Yohei; Kuniya, Takashi; Tsukahara, So

    2014-01-01

    High tibial valgus osteotomy (HTO) is an established treatment for medial-compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. We have combined medial open and lateral closed-wedge HTO (hybrid closed-wedge HTO) to overcome the limitations of traditional closed-wedge HTO. Our new hybrid procedure has the following advantages: (1) the bone block removed is smaller in size; (2) the procedure yields optimal geometric characteristics for bone healing; (3) there is no step-off at the lateral osteotomy site; (4) the lateral cortex of the proximal and distal fragments is attached firmly by the oblique osteotomy; and (5) early full weight-bearing walking is possible. This procedure is effective in treating medial-compartment osteoarthritis accompanied by patellofemoral osteoarthritis. The indications for this procedure include a willingness and ability to comply with the postoperative rehabilitation program; a diagnosis of either medial-compartment osteoarthritis or complicated patellofemoral osteoarthritis; and preferably, an age of 70 years or younger, although this is not a strict constraint. Patients are permitted to stand using both legs on the day after surgery and walk with full weight bearing within 2 weeks of undergoing our novel HTO procedure. We describe the details of this surgical technique and the postoperative rehabilitation program for the patients who undergo this treatment. PMID:25264504

  20. Clinical and radiological outcome after mini-open Latarjet technique with fixation of coracoid with Arthrex wedge mini-plate.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Deepak; Goyal, Ankit; Joshi, Deepak; Jain, Vineet; Mohindra, Mukul; Mehta, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Technical faults leading to coracoid fractures during screw insertion and coracoid graft osteolysis are concerns with standard screw fixation techniques in Latarjet procedure. The purpose of this study is to share our experience using Arthrex wedge profile plate with mini-open technique for graft fixation, that ensures better load distribution between coracoid graft and glenoid. We did retrospective analysis of 24 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability after failed arthroscopic Bankart's repair. Arthroscopic examination of affected shoulder was done in lateral position before making patient supine for open Latarjet. A low profile wedge plate (Arthrex) with two screws was used for the procedure. CT analysis was performed post-operatively at 6 months to see graft union and results were evaluated using the Rowe and Walch Duplay score. Mean follow-up time was 26 months. Postoperatively, mean forward elevation was 170.6 + 4.6° (loss of average 5.9°) and mean external rotation was 42.5 + 5.3° (loss of average 3.1°). All patients returned to their previous occupation. None reported to be having any recurrent subluxation. Functional assessment done using Rowe score and Walch Duplay score showed statistically significant improvement (p value 0.034). There were no implant-related complications and no case of coracoid graft osteolysis. Mini-open Latarjet with graft fixation with Arthrex mini-plate provides satisfactory outcome in patients who require reoperation due to dramatic bone loss and failed soft tissue reconstruction. The modified incision improves exposure enabling plate fixation and the secure fixation accelerates rehabilitation.

  1. Clinical and radiological outcome after mini-open Latarjet technique with fixation of coracoid with Arthrex wedge mini-plate

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Deepak; Goyal, Ankit; Joshi, Deepak; Jain, Vineet; Mohindra, Mukul; Mehta, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Background Technical faults leading to coracoid fractures during screw insertion and coracoid graft osteolysis are concerns with standard screw fixation techniques in Latarjet procedure. The purpose of this study is to share our experience using Arthrex wedge profile plate with mini-open technique for graft fixation, that ensures better load distribution between coracoid graft and glenoid. Methods We did retrospective analysis of 24 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability after failed arthroscopic Bankart's repair. Arthroscopic examination of affected shoulder was done in lateral position before making patient supine for open Latarjet. A low profile wedge plate (Arthrex) with two screws was used for the procedure. CT analysis was performed post-operatively at 6 months to see graft union and results were evaluated using the Rowe and Walch Duplay score. Results Mean follow-up time was 26 months. Postoperatively, mean forward elevation was 170.6 + 4.6° (loss of average 5.9°) and mean external rotation was 42.5 + 5.3° (loss of average 3.1°). All patients returned to their previous occupation. None reported to be having any recurrent subluxation. Functional assessment done using Rowe score and Walch Duplay score showed statistically significant improvement (p value 0.034). There were no implant-related complications and no case of coracoid graft osteolysis. Conclusions Mini-open Latarjet with graft fixation with Arthrex mini-plate provides satisfactory outcome in patients who require reoperation due to dramatic bone loss and failed soft tissue reconstruction. The modified incision improves exposure enabling plate fixation and the secure fixation accelerates rehabilitation. PMID:26908972

  2. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges

    PubMed Central

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10−3 S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10−1 S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front. PMID:27386526

  3. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges.

    PubMed

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-05-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10(-3) S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10(-1) S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front.

  4. PRE-OPERATIVE PLANNING AND SURGICAL TECHNIQUE OF THE OPEN WEDGE SUPRACONDYLAR OSTEOTOMY FOR CORRECTION OF VALGUS KNEE AND FIXATION WITH A FIXED-ANGLE IMPLANT

    PubMed Central

    Paccola, Cleber Antonio Jansen

    2015-01-01

    The step-by-step preoperative planning for supracondylar opening wedge osteotomy of the femur for precise correction of the load axis of the lower limb using a fixed-angle implant (95° AO blade plate) is presented. The surgical technique and the use of a bone graft from the same site for filling in the defect are also presented. PMID:27026976

  5. The development of a high response aerodynamic wedge probe and use on a high-speed research compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. C. P.

    A high-response aerodynamic wedge probe has been developed for performance testing of high-speed, axial-flow research compressors and fans. The miniature probe incorporates flush-mounted high response silicon piezoresistive pressure transducers, with both a dynamic and steady state measurement capability. New information on wedge probe aerodynamic sensitivity is given, along with details of an important reduction algorithm facilitating successful use on dynamic data. An electronic compensation scheme was used to overcome the inherent temperature sensitivity of the transducers. Previously unreported transducer output nonlinearities were revealed. The 30 degree included angle wedge probe has a frequency response in excess of 100 kHz. Time resolved rotor wakes were measured with the wedge probe applied to the 9-kHz high-speed blade of an axial-flow research compressor. Compared with rotating wake data obtained using a crossed hot wire anemometer probe, the rotor wakes were found to be highly unsteady in terms of both amplitude and spatial friction.

  6. High-Speed Ion Flow, Substorm Current Wedge, and Multiple Pi 2 Pulsations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    5.76 65.8 22.96 -20.5 03 6. 66 23 -2 20 3 .5 .19 D.6 Figure 12. Magnetic field data measured on the ISEE 1 satellite in the GSE...ISMC-TR-99-04 AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TR-99(8570)- 3 iHigh-Speed Ion Flow, Substorm Current Wedge, land Multiple Pi 2 Pulsations >0 December 1998...and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188), Washington, DC 20S03. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 20 December 1998 3

  7. Phase-Shift Master-Slave Mechanisms for High Angular-Speed Wedge-Prism Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappuis, Olivier; Clavel, Reymond

    2013-02-01

    Laser micro-machining requires high dynamic laser spot trajectory and accuracy to control the laser beam scanning. A well-known technique to scan a laser beam over a specimen is to use a pair of wedge-prisms. However, it is difficult to master-slave the phase-shift between two rotating prisms at high angular-speed. We present here two drive mechanisms that decouple the phase-shift control and the angular-speed control. These mechanisms simplify the required control architecture and are suitable to achieve a high-dynamic trajectory. These concepts are based on differential timing belts and gears mechanisms that modify the phase-shift between the prisms without interrupting the rotation. This article focuses on the kinematic and mechanical design aspects of such mechanisms.

  8. Optimal clinical implementation of the Siemens virtual wedge.

    PubMed

    Walker, C P; Richmond, N D; Lambert, G D

    2003-01-01

    Installation of a modern high-energy Siemens Primus linear accelerator at the Northern Centre for Cancer Treatment (NCCT) provided the opportunity to investigate the optimal clinical implementation of the Siemens virtual wedge filter. Previously published work has concentrated on the production of virtual wedge angles at 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees as replacements for the Siemens hard wedges of the same nominal angles. However, treatment plan optimization of the dose distribution can be achieved with the Primus, as its control software permits the selection of any virtual wedge angle from 15 degrees to 60 degrees in increments of 1 degrees. The same result can also be produced from a combination of open and 60 degrees wedged fields. Helax-TMS models both of these modes of virtual wedge delivery by the wedge angle and the wedge fraction methods respectively. This paper describes results of timing studies in the planning of optimized patient dose distributions by both methods and in the subsequent treatment delivery procedures. Employment of the wedge fraction method results in the delivery of small numbers of monitor units to the beam's central axis; therefore, wedge profile stability and delivered dose with low numbers of monitor units were also investigated. The wedge fraction was proven to be the most efficient method when the time taken for both planning and treatment delivery were taken into consideration, and is now used exclusively for virtual wedge treatment delivery in Newcastle. It has also been shown that there are no unfavorable dosimetric consequences from its practical implementation.

  9. Biomechanical Analysis of a Novel Wedge Locking Plate in a Porcine Tibial Model

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jeong-Ku; Yeom, Chul Hyun; Jang, Ho Su; Song, Han Eui; Lee, Sung Jae; Kim, Kang Hee; Chung, Kyu Sung; Bhat, Mahendar Gururaj

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to analyze biomechanical properties of a novel wedge locking plate in medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) in a porcine tibial model. Methods A uniform 8-mm OWHTO was performed in 12 porcine tibiae. Six of them were subsequently fixed with the plate without a wedge, whereas the other 6 were additionally reinforced with a metal wedge of 8 mm. Biomechanical properties (stiffness, displacement of the osteotomy gap, and failure load) were evaluated under axial load. The different modes of failure were also investigated. Results The plate showed an axial stiffness of 2,457 ± 450 N/mm with a wedge and 1,969 ± 874 N/mm without a wedge. The maximum failure load was 5,380 ± 952 N with a wedge and 4,354 ± 607 N without a wedge. The plate with a wedge had a significantly greater failure load and significantly less displacement of medial gap at failure than that without a wedge (p = 0.041 and p = 0.002, respectively). The axial stiffness was not different between the two types of fixation. Most failures were caused by lateral cortex breakage and there was no implant failure. Conclusions The novel wedge locking plate showed excellent biomechanical properties and an additional wedge provided significant improvement. This plate can be a good fixation method for OWHTO. PMID:27904718

  10. Opening-wedge osteotomy, allografting with dual buttress plate fixation for severe genu recurvatum caused by partial growth arrest of the proximal tibial physis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Chin; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Ching-Jen

    2004-07-01

    Injuries to the proximal tibial physis are among the least common epiphyseal injuries. We present a case of severe genu recurvatum deformity (45 degrees) with leg length discrepancy (4 cm) following a neglected proximal tibial physeal injury incurred 6 years previously. The 16-year-old patient was successfully treated by open-wedge osteotomy, allograft reconstruction, and dual buttress plate fixation. At 3 years' follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic, fully active with a full range of motion (0 - 140 degrees) of the leg, and equal leg lengths. There were no signs of genu recurvatum clinically.

  11. Nano Conductive Ceramic Wedged Graphene Composites as Highly Efficient Metal Supports for Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Lv, Haifeng; Peng, Tao; He, Daping; Mu, Shichun

    2014-01-01

    A novel conductive ceramic/graphene nanocomposite is prepared to prohibit the re-stacking of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) by wedging zirconium diboride (ZrB2) nanoparticles (NPs) into multiple layer nanosheets using a simple solvothermal method. Surprisingly, the RGO/ZrB2 nanocomposite supported Pt NPs shows very excellent catalytic activity. Its electrochemical surface area (ECSA) is up to 148 m2g−1 (very approaches the geometry surface area of 155 m2g−1), much greater than that of the previous report (usually less than 100 m2g−1). The mass activity is as high as 16.8 A/g−1, which is almost 2 times and 5 times that of Pt/RGO (8.6 A/g−1) and Pt/C (3.2 A/g−1), respectively, as benchmarks. Moreover, after 4000 cycles the catalyst shows only 61% of ECSA loss, meaning a predominantly electrochemical stability. The remarkably improved electrochemical properties with much high Pt utilization of the new catalyst show a promising application in low temperature fuel cells and broader fields. PMID:24495943

  12. The role of subducting bathymetric highs on the oceanic crust to deformation of accretionary wedge and earthquake segmentation in the Java forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Mukti, M.; Deighton, I.

    2014-12-01

    Stratigraphic and structural observations of newly acquired seismic reflection data along the offshore south Java reveal the structural style of deformation along the forearc and the role of subducting bathymetric highs to the morphology of the forearc region. The forearc region can be divided in to two major structural units: accretionary wedge and forearc and forearc basin where a backthrust marks the boundary between the accretionary wedge and the forearc basin sediments. The continuous compression in the subduction zone has induced younger landward-vergent folds and thrusts within the seaward margin of the forearc basin sediments, which together with the backthrust is referred as the Offshore South Java Fault Zone (OSJFZ), representing the growth of the accretionary wedge farther landward. Seaward-vergent imbricated thrusts have deformed the sediments in the accretionary wedge younging seaward, and have developed fold-thrust belts in the accretionary wedge toward trench. Together with the backthrusts, these seaward-vergent thrusts characterize the growth of accretionary wedge in South of Java trench. Based on these new results, we suggest that accretionary wedge mechanic is not the first order factor in shaping the morphology of the accretionary wedge complex. Instead the subducting bathymetric highs play the main role in shaping the forearc that are manifested in the uplift of the forearc high and intense deformation along the OSJFZ. These subducting highs also induce compression within the accretionary sediments, evident from landward deflection of the subduction front at the trench and inner part of accretionary wedge in the seaward margin of the forearc basin. Intense deformation is also observed on the seaward portion of the accretionary wedge area where the bathymetric highs subducted. We suggest that these subducted bathymetric features define the segment boundaries for megathrust earthquakes, and hence reducing the maximum size of the earthquakes in the

  13. The safety and efficacy of a new adjustable plate used for proximal tibial opening wedge osteotomy in the treatment of unicompartmental knee osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Alex C; Incavo, Stephen J; Beynnon, Bruce D; Abate, Joseph A; Urse, John S; Kelly, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Twenty opening wedge tibial osteotomies were performed using the Osteotrac plate, which consists of a two-piece plate with a one-way ratcheting mechanism with two degrees of freedom. A variety of concomitant procedures were performed including osteochondral transfer, tibial tubercle medialization, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The change in tibiofemoral alignment in the coronal plane and the shift in lower extremity mechanical axis were determined. The average lateral shift in the lower extremity mechanical axis was 24% of the tibial plateau width. The average change in the mechanical tibiofemoral angle was 7 degrees of valgus. Union rate at the osteotomy site was 95%. No deep infections, clinical deep venous thrombosis, or device failures occurred. The Osteotrac plate provides safe and effective fixation and intraoperative adjustability to achieve and maintain a lateral shift of the lower extremity mechanical axis and valgus correction of the tibiofemoral alignment in patients with varus knees undergoing proximal tibial opening wedge osteotomy and associated meniscal and chondral procedures.

  14. Nonlinear thermal and moisture response of ice-wedge polygons to permafrost disturbance increases heterogeneity of high Arctic wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Etienne; Fortier, Daniel; Lévesque, Esther

    2016-03-01

    Low-center polygonal terrains with gentle sloping surfaces and lowlands in the high Arctic have a potential to retain water in the lower central portion of ice-wedge polygons and are considered high-latitude wetlands. Such wetlands in the continuous permafrost regions have an important ecological role in an otherwise generally arid region. In the valley of the glacier C-79 on Bylot Island (Nunavut, Canada), thermal erosion gullies were rapidly eroding the permafrost along ice wedges affecting the integrity of the polygons by breaching and collapsing the surrounding rims. Intact polygons were characterized by a relative homogeneity in terms of topography, snow cover, maximum active layer thaw depth, ground moisture content and vegetation cover (where eroded polygons responded nonlinearly to perturbations, which resulted in differing conditions in the latter elements). The heterogeneous nature of disturbed terrains impacted active layer thickness, ground ice aggradation in the upper portion of permafrost, soil moisture, vegetation dynamics and carbon storage.

  15. Long-term outcomes of wedge resection at the limbus for high irregular corneal astigmatism after repaired corneal laceration

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jun; Zheng, Guang-Ying; Wen, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Zhu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical value of wedge resection at corneal limbus in patients with traumatic corneal scarring and high irregular astigmatism. METHODS Patients with traumatic corneal astigmatism received wedge resection at least 6mo after suture removal from corneal wound. The uncorrected distance visual acuities (UCVA) and best corrected distance visual acuities (BCVA), pre- and post-operation astigmatism, spherical equivalent (SE), safety and complications were evaluated. RESULTS Ten eyes (10 patients) were enrolled in this study. Mean follow-up time after wedge resection was 37.8±15.4mo (range, 20-61mo). The mean UCVA improved from +1.07±0.55 logMAR to +0.43±0.22 logMAR (P=0.000) and the mean BCVA from +0.50±0.30 logMAR to +0.15±0.17 logMAR (P=0.000). The mean astigmatism power measured by retinoscopy was -2.03±2.27 D postoperatively and -2.83±4.52 D preoperatively (P=0.310). The mean SE was -0.74±1.61 D postoperatively and -0.64±1.89 D preoperatively (P=0.601). Two cases developed mild pannus near the sutures. No corneal perforation, infectious keratitis or wound gape occurred. CONCLUSION Corneal-scleral limbal wedge resection with compression suture is a safe, effective treatment for poor patients with high irregular corneal astigmatism after corneal-scleral penetrating injury. Retinoscopy can prove particularly useful for high irregular corneal astigmatism when other measurements are not amenable. PMID:27366685

  16. Rethinking wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Stabilizing CO2 emissions at current levels for fifty years is not consistent with either an atmospheric CO2 concentration below 500 ppm or global temperature increases below 2 °C. Accepting these targets, solving the climate problem requires that emissions peak and decline in the next few decades, and ultimately fall to near zero. Phasing out emissions over 50 years could be achieved by deploying on the order of 19 'wedges', each of which ramps up linearly over a period of 50 years to ultimately avoid 1 GtC y-1 of CO2 emissions. But this level of mitigation will require affordable carbon-free energy systems to be deployed at the scale of tens of terawatts. Any hope for such fundamental and disruptive transformation of the global energy system depends upon coordinated efforts to innovate, plan, and deploy new transportation and energy systems that can provide affordable energy at this scale without emitting CO2 to the atmosphere. 1. Introduction In 2004, Pacala and Socolow published a study in Science arguing that '[h]umanity can solve the carbon and climate problem in the first half of this century simply by scaling up what we already know how to do' [1]. Specifically, they presented 15 options for 'stabilization wedges' that would grow linearly from zero to 1 Gt of carbon emissions avoided per year (GtC y-1 1 Gt = 1012 kg) over 50 years. The solution to the carbon and climate problem, they asserted, was 'to deploy the technologies and/or lifestyle changes necessary to fill all seven wedges of the stabilization triangle'. They claimed this would offset the growth of emissions and put us on a trajectory to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at 500 ppm if emissions decreased sharply in the second half of the 21st century. The wedge concept has proven popular as an analytical tool for considering the potential of different technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. In the years since the paper was published, it has been cited more than 400 times, and

  17. High-enthalpy shock/boundary-layer interaction on a double wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jean-Paul

    1999-11-01

    Interaction between a shock wave and a boundary layer at a compression corner can produce a region of separated flow. The length of separation is important in determining aerodynamic forces, and the heat transfer at reattachment is important for the design of thermal protection systems. The effects of high-enthalpy flow on these phenomenon, particularly separation length, are not well known. Experiments to measure separation length and reattachment heating are performed in the T5 Hypervelocity Shock Tunnel using nitrogen test gas and a double-wedge geometry which allows greater control over local flow conditions at separation and, at high incidence angle, may produce real-gas effects due to dissociation behind the leading shock. Local external flow conditions were found by computational reconstruction of the inviscid nonequilibrium flow field.Application of results from asymptotic theory to a simple model for separation leads to a new scaling parameter which approximately accounts for wall temperature effects on separation length for a laminar nonreacting boundary layer and extends previous results to arbitrary viscosity law. A. classification is introduced which divides mechanisms for real-gas effects into those acting internal and external to viscous regions of the flow, with internal mechanisms further subdivided into those arising upstream and downstream of separation. Application of the ideal dissociating gas model to a scaling law based on local external flow parameters and a nonreacting boundary layer shows that external mechanisms due to dissociation decrease separation length at low incidence but depend on the free-stream dissociation at high incidence, and have only a small effect on peak heating. A limited numerical study of reacting boundary layers shows that internal mechanisms due to recombination in the upstream boundary layer cause a slight decrease in separation length and a large increase in heat flux relative to a nonreacting boundary layer with

  18. CarD uses a minor groove wedge mechanism to stabilize the RNA polymerase open promoter complex.

    PubMed

    Bae, Brian; Chen, James; Davis, Elizabeth; Leon, Katherine; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2015-09-08

    A key point to regulate gene expression is at transcription initiation, and activators play a major role. CarD, an essential activator in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is found in many bacteria, including Thermus species, but absent in Escherichia coli. To delineate the molecular mechanism of CarD, we determined crystal structures of Thermus transcription initiation complexes containing CarD. The structures show CarD interacts with the unique DNA topology presented by the upstream double-stranded/single-stranded DNA junction of the transcription bubble. We confirm that our structures correspond to functional activation complexes, and extend our understanding of the role of a conserved CarD Trp residue that serves as a minor groove wedge, preventing collapse of the transcription bubble to stabilize the transcription initiation complex. Unlike E. coli RNAP, many bacterial RNAPs form unstable promoter complexes, explaining the need for CarD.

  19. Surface dose and build-up region measurements with wedge filters for 6 and 18 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Hatice; Ozbek, Nurdan; Okutan, Murat; Cakir, Aydin; Acar, Hilal

    2010-02-01

    High-energy photons are most commonly used in radiotherapy to treat cancer. Wedge filters are required to obtain homogeneous dose distribution in the patient. Different wedge filter types create different surface doses. In this study, the effect of the virtual and physical wedge filters on the surface and build-up region doses was examined for 6- and 18-MV high-energy photon beams. The measurements were made in a water equivalent phantom in the build-up region at a 100-cm source-to-surface distance for various field sizes using virtual and physical wedge filters having different angles. A parallel-plate ion chamber was used to measure the percent depth doses. The percentage dose at the surface increased as the field size increased for open, virtual, and physical wedged beams. For open, physical, and virtual wedged beams, the surface doses were found to be 15.4%, 9.9%, and 15.9% with 6-MV photons and 10.6%, 8.8%, 11.9% with 18-MV photons, respectively, at 10 x 10 cm(2) field size. Build-up doses of virtual wedged beams were similar to those of open beams. Surface and buildup doses of physical wedged beams were lower than those of open and virtual wedged beams.

  20. Clinical, radiological and histological evaluation of biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramic wedges filling medial high tibial valgisation osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Rouvillain, J L; Lavallé, F; Pascal-Mousselard, H; Catonné, Y; Daculsi, G

    2009-10-01

    We report clinical, radiological and histological findings following high tibial valgisation osteotomy (HTVO) using micro-macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate wedges fixed with a plate and locking screws. From 1999 to 2002, 43 knees were operated on and studied prospectively. All underwent clinical and radiological follow-up at days 1, 90, and 365 to evaluate consolidation and bone substitute interfaces. Additionally, biopsies were taken for histology at least 1 year after implantation from 10 patients who requested plate removal. Radiologically, consolidation was observed in 98% of cases. At 1 year, correction was unchanged in 95% of cases. Histological analysis revealed considerable MBCP resorption and bone ingrowth, both into the pores and replacing the bioceramic material. Polarised light microscopy confirmed normal bony architecture with trabecular and/or dense lamellar bone growth at the expense of the wedge implants. X-ray and micro-CT scan revealed a well organised and mineralised structure in the newly-formed bone. This study shows that using MBCP wedges in combination with orientable locking screws and a plate is a simple, safe and fast surgical technique for HTVO. The is the first study to examine the results by histological analysis, which confirmed good outcomes.

  1. Wedged multilayer Laue Lens.

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, R.; Liu, C.; Qian, J.; Kewish, C. M.; Macrander, A. T.; Yan, H.; Kang, H. C.; Maser, J.; Stephenson, G. B.

    2008-05-01

    A multilayer Laue lens (MLL) is an x-ray focusing optic fabricated from a multilayer structure consisting of thousands of layers of two different materials produced by thin-film deposition. The sequence of layer thicknesses is controlled to satisfy the Fresnel zone plate law and the multilayer is sectioned to form the optic. An improved MLL geometry can be created by growing each layer with an in-plane thickness gradient to form a wedge, so that every interface makes the correct angle with the incident beam for symmetric Bragg diffraction. The ultimate hard x-ray focusing performance of a wedged MLL has been predicted to be significantly better than that of a nonwedged MLL, giving subnanometer resolution with high efficiency. Here, we describe a method to deposit the multilayer structure needed for an ideal wedged MLL and report our initial deposition results to produce these structures.

  2. High-energy rate forgings of wedges. Characterization of processing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Thomas Bither; Everhart, Wesley; Switzner, Nathan T; Balch, Dorian K.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2014-05-01

    The wedge geometry is a simple geometry for establishing a relatively constant gradient of strain in a forged part. The geometry is used to establish gradients in microstructure and strength as a function of strain, forging temperature, and quenching time after forging. This geometry has previously been used to benchmark predictions of strength and recrystallization using Sandias materials model for type 304L austenitic stainless steel. In this report, the processing conditions, in particular the times to forge and quench the forged parts, are summarized based on information recorded during forging on June 18, 2013 of the so-called wedge geometry from type 316L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn austenitic stainless steels.

  3. Base pressure associated with incompressible flow past wedges at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warpinski, N. R.; Chow, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    A model is suggested to study the viscid-inviscid interaction associated with steady incompressible flow past wedges of arbitrary angles. It is shown from this analysis that the determination of the nearly constant pressure (base pressure) prevailing within the near wake is really the heart of the problem and this pressure can only be determined from these interactive considerations. The basic free streamline flow field is established through two discrete parameters which should adequately describe the inviscid flow around the body and the wake. The viscous flow processes such as boundary-layer buildup along the wedge surface, jet mixing, recompression, and reattachment which occurs along the region attached to the inviscid flow in the sense of the boundary-layer concept, serve to determine the aforementioned parameters needed for the establishment of the inviscid flow. It is found that the point of reattachment behaves as a saddle point singularity for the system of equations describing the viscous recompression process. Detailed results such as the base pressure, pressure distributions on the wedge surface, and the wake geometry as well as the influence of the characteristic Reynolds number are obtained. Discussion of these results and their comparison with the experimental data are reported.

  4. Viscid-inviscid interaction associated with incompressible flow past wedges at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warpinski, N. R.; Chow, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical method is suggested for the study of the viscid inviscid interaction associated with incompressible flow past wedges with arbitrary angles. It is shown that the determination of the nearly constant pressure (base pressure) prevailing within the near wake is really the heart of the problem, and the pressure can only be established from these interactive considerations. The basic free streamline flow field is established through two discrete parameters which adequately describe the inviscid flow around the body and the wake. The viscous flow processes such as the boundary layer buildup, turbulent jet mixing, and recompression are individually analyzed and attached to the inviscid flow in the sense of the boundary layer concept. The interaction between the viscous and inviscid streams is properly displayed by the fact that the aforementioned discrete parameters needed for the inviscid flow are determined by the viscous flow condition at the point of reattachment. It is found that the reattachment point behaves as a saddle point singularity for the system of equations describing the recompressive viscous flow processes, and this behavior is exploited for the establishment of the overall flow field. Detailed results such as the base pressure, pressure distributions on the wedge, and the geometry of the wake are determined as functions of the wedge angle.

  5. [Utilization of a porous alumina ceramic spacer in tibial valgus open-wedge osteotomy: fifty cases at 16 months mean follow-up].

    PubMed

    Bové, J C

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study the behavior of an inert porous alumina ceramic spacer used with a plate fixation for open-wedge tibial valgus osteotomy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee and genu varum. The population included 50 patients who underwent surgery between October 1994 and December 2000. There were 31 women and 19 men, mean age 55 years at surgery (26 right knees and 24 left knees). Patients were reviewed at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and one year, then every 2 years. Clinical and radiological data were available for all patients. Mean follow-up was 16 months. Two patients were lost to follow-up at 5 and 6 months. The results of the open-wedge tibial osteotomy were in agreement with the usual outcome reported in the literature concerning pain relief, functional recovery, joint motion, angle correction, and good preservation of the clinical and radiological result. Three fracture lines were observed on the lateral tibial plateau but did not affect final outcome or angle correction. There was however one case with loss of correction due to fracture of the screws. Radiographically, at 6 months, there were 9 thin lucent lines around the spacer (24%) which did not affect final outcome. Bone healing was achieved at 3 months on the average in all cases except 2 (4%) where healing was achieved at 8 and 13 months. The porous alumine spacer is a reliable biocompatible and mechanically stable element helpful for achieving bone healing. Integration into bone tissue was radiographically satisfactory. There were no specific complications related to use of the spacer.

  6. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  7. CarD uses a minor groove wedge mechanism to stabilize the RNA polymerase open promoter complex

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Brian; Chen, James; Davis, Elizabeth; Leon, Katherine; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    A key point to regulate gene expression is at transcription initiation, and activators play a major role. CarD, an essential activator in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is found in many bacteria, including Thermus species, but absent in Escherichia coli. To delineate the molecular mechanism of CarD, we determined crystal structures of Thermus transcription initiation complexes containing CarD. The structures show CarD interacts with the unique DNA topology presented by the upstream double-stranded/single-stranded DNA junction of the transcription bubble. We confirm that our structures correspond to functional activation complexes, and extend our understanding of the role of a conserved CarD Trp residue that serves as a minor groove wedge, preventing collapse of the transcription bubble to stabilize the transcription initiation complex. Unlike E. coli RNAP, many bacterial RNAPs form unstable promoter complexes, explaining the need for CarD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08505.001 PMID:26349034

  8. Grounding-zone wedges (GZWs) on high-latitude continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Christine; Dowdeswell, Julian

    2014-05-01

    inferred for GZWs on the Greenland, Norwegian, Canadian and Barents Sea margins. However, no significant relationship between GZW length and thickness exists for the GZWs described from the Antarctic margin. GZWs typically possess a semi-transparent to chaotic acoustic character, which reflects the delivery of diamictic subglacial debris. Many GZWs contain low-amplitude, seaward-dipping internal reflections, which indicate sediment progradation and wedge-growth through continued delivery of basal sediments from the flow of active ice. The formation of GZWs is inferred to require high rates of sediment delivery to a relatively stable, fast-flowing ice margin. Ice-margin stabilisation, and consequently GZW formation, is dependent on a number of factors, including the ice-sheet mass balance, sea-level fluctuations, and the rate of inland-ice delivery to the grounding-zone. GZWs may be formed preferentially by glaciers with termini ending as floating ice shelves, which restrict vertical accommodation space and prevent the build-up of high-amplitude moraine ridges. The basal topography of the continental shelf can also act as a control on GZW formation. The majority of high-latitude GZWs are located at topographic or lateral pinning points within cross-shelf troughs, which encourage ice-margin stabilisation through reducing iceberg calving and increasing basal and lateral drag.

  9. Tectonic wedges: geometry and kinematic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Torres, L. M.; Ramon-Lluch, R.; Eguiluz, L.

    1994-10-01

    The geometry of several tectonic wedge combinations was studied in an outcrop in the Basque Basin, Western Pyrenees. Three types of tectonic wedges were distinguished: simple, double and triple wedge. On the surface the geometry of the observed tectonic wedges is always highly elemental: emergent thrust, horse or klippe. The final stage in the evolution of a tectonic wedge is its delamination. This can occur by the spreading of the thrusts which conform the wedge, or by the development of back thrusts associated to them. The relative age of the back thrust with respect to the thrust indicates whether the original structure was a simple thrust or a tectonic wedge. If this criterion is applied to the Pyrenean Orogen, this range corresponds to a tectonic wedge.

  10. Evaluation of the use of very high resolution aerial imagery for accurate ice-wedge polygon mapping (Adventdalen, Svalbard).

    PubMed

    Lousada, Maura; Pina, Pedro; Vieira, Gonçalo; Bandeira, Lourenço; Mora, Carla

    2017-09-24

    The main objective of this paper is to verify the accuracy of delineating and characterizing ice-wedge polygonal networks with features exclusively extracted from remotely sensed images of very high resolution. This kind of mapping plays a key role for quantifying ice-wedge degradation in warming permafrost. The evaluation of mapping a network is performed in this study with two sets of aerial images that are compared to ground reference data determined by fieldwork on the same network, located in Adventdalen, Svalbard (78°N). One aerial dataset is obtained from a photogrammetric survey with RGB+NIR imagery of 20cm/pixel, the other from an UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) survey that acquired RGB images of 6cm/pixel of spatial resolution. Besides evaluating the degree of matching between the delineations, the morphometric and topological features computed for the differently mapped versions of the network are also confronted, to have a more solid basis of comparison. The results obtained are similar enough to admit that remotely sensed images of very high resolution are an adequate support to provide extensive characterizations and classifications of this kind of patterned ground. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagumennyi, Ia V.; Dimitrieva, N. F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the problem of evolution of diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle is analyzed numerically. The governing set of fundamental equations is solved using original solvers from the open source OpenFOAM package on supercomputer facilities. Due to breaking of naturally existing diffusion flux of a stratifying agent by the impermeable surface of the wedge a complex multi-level vortex system of compensatory fluid motions is formed around the obstacle. Sharp edges of the obstacle generate extended high-gradient horizontal interfaces which are clearly observed in laboratory experiments by high-resolution Schlieren visualization. Formation of an intensive pressure depression zone in front of the leading vertex of the wedge is responsible for generation of propulsive force resulting in a self-displacement of the obstacle along the neutral buoyancy horizon in a stably stratified environment. The size of the pressure deficiency area near the sharp vertex of a concave wedge is about twice that for a convex one. This demonstrates a more intensive propulsion mechanism in case of the concave wedge and, accordingly, a higher velocity of its self-movement in a continuously stratified medium.

  12. On sound scattering by rigid edges and wedges in a flow, with applications to high-lift device aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Michel; Moreau, Stéphane; Kucukcoskun, Korcan

    2016-02-01

    Exact analytical solutions for the scattering of sound by the edge of a rigid half-plane and by a rigid corner in the presence of a uniform flow are considered in this work, for arbitrary source and observer locations. Exact Green's functions for the Helmholtz equation are first reviewed and implemented in a quiescent propagation space from reference expressions of the literature. The effect of uniform fluid motion is introduced in a second step and the properties of the field are discussed for point dipoles and quadrupoles. The asymptotic regime of a source close to the scattering edge/wedge and of an observer far from it in terms of acoustic wavelengths is derived in both cases. Its validity limits are assessed by comparing with the exact solutions. Typically the asymptotic directivity is imposed by Green's function but not by the source itself. This behaviour is associated with a strong enhancement of the radiation with respect to what the source would produce in free field. The amplification depends on the geometry, on the source type and on the source distance to the edge/wedge. Various applications in aeroacoustics of wall-bounded flows are addressed, more specifically dealing with high-lift device noise mechanisms, such as trailing-edge or flap side-edge noise. The asymptotic developments are used to highlight trends that are believed to play a role in airframe noise.

  13. Optimized dynamic rotation with wedges.

    PubMed

    Rosen, I I; Morrill, S M; Lane, R G

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic rotation is a computer-controlled therapy technique utilizing an automated multileaf collimator in which the radiation beam shape changes dynamically as the treatment machine rotates about the patient so that at each instant the beam shape matches the projected shape of the target volume. In simple dynamic rotation, the dose rate remains constant during rotation. For optimized dynamic rotation, the dose rate is varied as a function of gantry angle. Optimum dose rate at each gantry angle is computed by linear programming. Wedges can be included in the optimized dynamic rotation therapy by using additional rotations. Simple and optimized dynamic rotation treatment plans, with and without wedges, for a pancreatic tumor have been compared using optimization cost function values, normal tissue complication probabilities, and positive difference statistic values. For planning purposes, a continuous rotation is approximated by static beams at a number of gantry angles equally spaced about the patient. In theory, the quality of optimized treatment planning solutions should improve as the number of static beams increases. The addition of wedges should further improve dose distributions. For the case studied, no significant improvements were seen for more than 36 beam angles. Open and wedged optimized dynamic rotations were better than simple dynamic rotation, but wedged optimized dynamic rotation showed no definitive improvement over open beam optimized dynamic rotation.

  14. High strain gradient plasticity associated with wedge indentation into face-centered cubic single crystals: Geometrically necessary dislocation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysar, Jeffrey W.; Gan, Yong X.; Morse, Timothy L.; Chen, Xi; Jones, Milton E.

    2007-07-01

    Experimental studies on indentation into face-centered cubic (FCC) single crystals such as copper and aluminum were performed to reveal the spatially resolved variation in crystal lattice rotation induced due to wedge indentation. The crystal lattice curvature tensors of the indented crystals were calculated from the in-plane lattice rotation results as measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Nye's dislocation density tensors for plane strain deformation of both crystals were determined from the lattice curvature tensors. The least L2-norm solutions to the geometrically necessary dislocation densities for the case in which three effective in-plane slip systems were activated in the single crystals associated with the indentation were determined. Results show the formation of lattice rotation discontinuities along with a very high density of geometrically necessary dislocations.

  15. Single-stage closing-opening wedge osteotomy of spine to correct severe post-tubercular kyphotic deformities of the spine: a 3-year follow-up of 17 patients.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, S; Vijay, Kamath; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad

    2010-04-01

    The correction of severe post-tubercular kyphosis (PTK) is complex and has the disadvantage of being multiple staged with a high morbidity. Here, we describe the procedure and results of closing-opening osteotomy for correction of PTK which shortens the posterior column and opens the anterior column appropriately to correct the deformity without altering the length of the spinal cord. Seventeen patients with PTK (10 males; 7 females) with an average age of 18.3 +/- 10.6 years (range 4-40 years) formed the study group. There were ten thoracolumbar, one lumbar and six thoracic deformities. The number of vertebrae involved ranged from 2 to 5 (average 2.8). Preoperative kyphosis averaged 69.2 degrees +/- 25.1 degrees (range 42 degrees -104 degrees ) which included ten patients with deformity greater than 60 degrees . The average vertebral body loss was 2.01 +/- 0.79 (range 1.1-4.1). The neurological status was normal in 13 patients, Frankel's grade D in three patients and grade C in one. Posterior stabilization with pedicle screw instrumentation was followed by a preoperatively calculated wedge resection. Anterior column reconstruction was performed using rib grafts in four, tricortical iliac bone graft in five, cages in six, and bone chips alone and fibular graft in one patient each. Average operating time was 280 min (200-340 min) with an average blood loss of 820 ml (range 500-1,600 ml). The postoperative kyphosis averaged 32.4 degrees +/- 19.5 degrees (range 8 degrees -62 degrees ). The percentage correction of kyphosis achieved was 56.8 +/- 14.6% (range 32-83%). No patient with normal preoperative neurological status showed deterioration in neurology after surgery. The last follow-up was at an average of 43 +/- 4 months (range 32-64 months). The average loss of correction at the last follow-up was 5.4 degrees (range 3 degrees -9 degrees ). At the last follow-up, the mean preoperative pain visual analogue scale score decreased significantly from 9.2 (range 8

  16. Progression of medial compartmental osteoarthritis 2-8 years after lateral closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, M R; Gorter, J; Demmer, A; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; Brouwer, R W

    2016-07-07

    The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the progression of medial osteoarthritis (OA) following lateral closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO). Secondary outcomes included functional and pain scores. This prospective cohort study analysed 298 patients treated with lateral closing-wedge HTO surgery for medial compartmental OA. OA progression was measured by comparing the minimum joint space width (mJSW) and Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) score on radiographs preoperatively and postoperatively. The WOMAC score and NRS score for pain were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively to assess secondary outcomes. Failure was defined as revision surgery; survival was estimated. Mean follow-up was 5.2 ± 1.8 years (range 2-8.5). Mean preoperative mJSW was 3.4 ± 1.6 mm, which changed nonsignificantly (p = 0.51) to 3.4 ± 1.7 mm postoperatively. Mean annual joint space narrowing was 0.02 ± 0.34 mm/year. Progression to 1 KL grade or more was seen in 132 (44 %) patients, and annual risk of KL progression was 8.6 %. No KL progression was seen in 56 % of patients. Mean NRS decreased from 7.3 ± 1.5 to 3.5 ± 2.5 (p < 0.001). WOMAC scores decreased from 48.0 ± 17.2 to 23.6 ± 19.7 (p < 0.001). Failure was seen in 21 patients. Compared to demographic data in the literature, valgus high tibial osteotomy seems to reduce the progression of OA, reduces pain and improves knee function in patients with medial compartment OA and a varus alignment. III.

  17. Penetrating eye injury from a metal wedge.

    PubMed

    Kozielec, G F; To, K

    1999-01-01

    The authors describe a patient with a penetrating ocular injury from a metal wedge, a common hand tool used by road service technicians for the purpose of opening a locked car door. The patient had a penetrating eye injury from a metal wedge when its sharp end released from a car door lock and retracted upward, striking the right eye. No report exists of ocular injury using a metal wedge for its intended purpose of opening a car door lock. The use of polycarbonate lenses might afford some protection.

  18. Evaluation of a high-precision gear measuring machine for helix measurement using helix and wedge artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Yohan

    2016-08-01

    High-precision gears are required for advanced motion and power transmission. The reliability of the measured value becomes important as the gear accuracy increases, and the establishment of a traceability system is needed. Therefore, a high-precision gear measuring machine (GMM) with a smaller uncertainty is expected to improve the gear calibration uncertainty. For this purpose, we developed a prototype of a high-precision GMM that adopts a direct drive mechanism and other features. Then, the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified using gear artifacts. Recently, some new measurement methods using simple shapes such as spheres and planes have been proposed as standards. We have verified the tooth profile measurement using a sphere artifact and reported the results that the developed GMM had a high capability in tooth profile measurement. Therefore, we attempted to devise a new evaluation method for helix measurement using a wedge artifact (WA) whose plane was treated as the tooth flank, and the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified. The results will provide a part of information to fully assess measurement uncertainty as our future work. This paper describes the evaluation results of the developed GMM for helix measurement using both a helix artifact and the WA, and discusses the effectiveness of the WA as a new artifact to evaluate the GMMs.

  19. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  20. Wedge wetting by electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mußotter, Maximilian; Bier, Markus

    2017-09-01

    The wetting of a charged wedgelike wall by an electrolyte solution is investigated by means of classical density functional theory. As in other studies on wedge wetting, this geometry is considered as the most simple deviation from a planar substrate, and it serves as a first step toward more complex confinements of fluids. By focusing on fluids containing ions and surface charges, features of real systems are covered that are not accessible within the vast majority of previous theoretical studies concentrating on simple fluids in contact with uncharged wedges. In particular, the filling transition of charged wedges is necessarily of first order, because wetting transitions of charged substrates are of first order and the barrier in the effective interface potential persists below the wetting transition of a planar wall; hence, critical filling transitions are not expected to occur for ionic systems. The dependence of the critical opening angle on the surface charge, as well as the dependence of the filling height, of the wedge adsorption, and of the line tension on the opening angle and on the surface charge are analyzed in detail.

  1. Portal dosimetry in wedged beams.

    PubMed

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel; Camargo, Priscilla; Mans, Anton; Wendling, Markus; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Van Herk, Marcel; Mijnheer, Ben

    2015-05-08

    Portal dosimetry using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is often applied to verify high-energy photon beam treatments. Due to the change in photon energy spectrum, the resulting dose values are, however, not very accurate in the case of wedged beams if the pixel-to-dose conversion for the situation without wedge is used. A possible solution would be to consider a wedged beam as another photon beam quality requiring separate beam modeling of the dose calculation algorithm. The aim of this study was to investigate a more practical solution: to make aSi EPID-based dosimetry models also applicable for wedged beams without an extra commissioning effort of the parameters of the model. For this purpose two energy-dependent wedge multiplication factors have been introduced to be applied for portal images taken with and without a patient/phantom in the beam. These wedge multiplication factors were derived from EPID and ionization chamber measurements at the EPID level for wedged and nonwedged beams, both with and without a polystyrene slab phantom in the beam. This method was verified for an EPID dosimetry model used for wedged beams at three photon beam energies (6, 10, and 18 MV) by comparing dose values reconstructed in a phantom with data provided by a treatment planning system (TPS), as a function of field size, depth, and off-axis distance. Generally good agreement, within 2%, was observed for depths between dose maximum and 15 cm. Applying the new model to EPID dose measurements performed during ten breast cancer patient treatments with wedged 6 MV photon beams showed that the average isocenter underdosage of 5.3% was reduced to 0.4%. Gamma-evaluation (global 3%/3 mm) of these in vivo data showed an increase in percentage of points with γ ≤ 1 from 60.2% to 87.4%, while γmean reduced from 1.01 to 0.55. It can be concluded that, for wedged beams, the multiplication of EPID pixel values with an energy-dependent correction factor provides good agreement

  2. Evaluating the dose to the contralateral breast when using a dynamic wedge versus a regular wedge.

    PubMed

    Weides, C D; Mok, E C; Chang, W C; Findley, D O; Shostak, C A

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of secondary cancers in the contralateral breast after primary breast irradiation is several times higher than the incidence of first time breast cancer. Studies have shown that the scatter radiation to the contralateral breast may play a large part in the induction of secondary breast cancers. Factors that may contribute to the contralateral breast dose may include the use of blocks, the orientation of the field, and wedges. Reports have shown that the use of regular wedges, particularly for the medial tangential field, gives a significantly higher dose to the contralateral breast compared to an open field. This paper compares the peripheral dose outside the field using a regular wedge, a dynamic wedge, and an open field technique. The data collected consisted of measurements taken with patients, solid water and a Rando phantom using a Varian 2300CD linear accelerator. Ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), diodes, and films were the primary means for collecting the data. The measurements show that the peripheral dose outside the field using a dynamic wedge is close to that of open fields, and significantly lower than that of regular wedges. This information indicates that when using a medial wedge, a dynamic wedge should be used.

  3. Differences in wedge factor determination in air using a PMMA mini-phantom or a brass build-up cap.

    PubMed

    Heukelom, S; Lanson, J H; Mijnheer, B J

    1997-12-01

    The head scatter dose contribution to the output of a treatment machine has been determined for an open and wedged 60Co gamma-ray beam and for open and wedged x-ray beams of 4, 8, and 16 MV. From those data wedge factor values "in air" have been deduced, expressed as the ratio of the dose to water, measured in air, for the situation with and without wedge, for the same number of monitor units (or treatment time for 60Co). The measurements have been performed using a polymethyl-metacrylate (PMMA) and a graphite-walled ionization chamber inserted in a brass build-up cap and in a PMMA mini-phantom, respectively. Absolute wedge factor values deduced with both detector systems and based on the ratio of ionization chamber readings, differ for the investigated photon beams, up to 3.5% for the 4 MV x-ray beam. The deviations results from the difference in composition between the detector materials and water and can be taken into account by conversion of the ionization chamber readings for both the open and wedged photon beams to the absorbed dose to water. For the brass build-up cap detector system the ratio of the conversion factors for the wedged and open beam changes the ratio of the ionization chamber readings up to about 3.6% for the 4 MV x-ray beam. For the mini-phantom the conversion factors for the wedged and open beam are almost equal for all photon beams. Consequently, for that system wedge factors based on ionization chamber readings or dose values are the same. With respect to the wedge factor variation with field size a somewhat larger increase has been determined for the 60Co and 4 MV photon beam using the brass build-up cap: about 1% for field sizes varying between 5 cm x 5 cm and 15 cm x 15 cm. This effect has to be related to an apparent more pronounced variation of the head scatter dose contribution with field size for the wedged photon beams if the brass build-up cap detection system is used. It can be concluded that determination of wedge factors "in

  4. Geometry and kinematics of extensional structural wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Baoling; He, Dengfa; Zhang, Yongsheng; Sun, Yanpeng; Huang, Jingyi; Zhang, Wenjun

    2017-03-01

    Structural wedges in the compressive environment have been recognized and studied in different locations. However, extension structural wedges are less well-understood. Based on the normal fault-bend folding theory and inclined shear model, this paper quantitatively analyses deformations related to extensional structural wedges and builds a series of geometric models for them. An extensional structural wedge is a fault-block held by two or more normal faults, the action of which would fold its overlying strata. Extensional structural wedges of different shapes will lead to different deformation results for the overlying strata, and this paper illustrates both the triangular and quadrangular wedges and their related deformations. This paper also discusses differences between the extensional structural wedges and the normal fault-bend-folding. By analysing two seismic sections from Langfang-Gu'an Sag, East China, this paper provides two natural examples of the triangular and quadrangular extensional structural wedges, where the models can reasonably explain the overlying distinct highs and lows without obvious faults. The establishment of a geometric model of extensional structural wedges can provide reference and theoretical bases for future quantitative analysis of deformations in the extensional environment.

  5. Salt wedge dynamics lead to enhanced sediment trapping within side embayments in high-energy estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellen, Brian; Woodruff, Jonathan D.; Ralston, David K.; MacDonald, D. G.; Jones, D. S.

    2017-03-01

    Off-river coves and embayments provide accommodation space for sediment accumulation, particularly for sandy estuaries where high energy in the main channel prevents significant long-term storage of fine-grained material. Seasonal sediment inputs to Hamburg Cove in the Connecticut River estuary (USA) were monitored to understand the timing and mechanisms for sediment storage there. Unlike in freshwater tidal coves, sediment was primarily trapped here during periods of low discharge, when the salinity intrusion extended upriver to the cove entrance. During periods of low discharge and high sediment accumulation, deposited sediment displayed geochemical signatures consistent with a marine source. Numerical simulations reveal that low discharge conditions provide several important characteristics that maximize sediment trapping. First, these conditions allow the estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) to be located in the vicinity of the cove entrance, which increases sediment concentrations during flood tide. Second, the saltier water in the main channel can enter the cove as a density current, enhancing near-bed velocities and resuspending sediment, providing an efficient delivery mechanism. Finally, higher salinity water accumulates in the deep basin of the cove, creating a stratified region that becomes decoupled from ebb currents, promoting retention of sediment in the cove. This process of estuarine-enhanced sediment accumulation in off-river coves will likely extend upriver during future sea level rise.

  6. SU-E-T-143: Effect of Physical and Virtual Wedges on the Surface Dose at Various SSD for 6 and 15 MV Photon Beam.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Girigesh; Sinha, S N; Ashokkumar, S; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, M; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Yadav, R S

    2012-06-01

    To study the effect of the virtual wedge and physical wedge filters on the surface and build-up region doses for 6 and 15MV high-energy photon beams for different field sizes and various source to surface distance(SSD). The measurements were made in water equivalent (PMMA) solid phantom in the build-up region at various SSD for various field sizes using virtual and physical wedge filters having different angles. A parallel-plate ion chamber (Markus) was used to measure the percent depth doses at surface and buildup region. Plane parallel ion chamber with fixed plate separation on the surface and buildup region would perturbate the dose measured, to get the proper dose over response correction factor was used. The percentage depth dose at surface (PDD0) increased as the field size increased for open, virtual, and physical wedged beams. For open, 30 degree physical, and virtual wedged beams, the surface doses were found to be 15.4%, 11.2%, and 15.2% with 6-MV photons and 11.2%, 9.4%, 11.2% with 15-MV photons, respectively, at 10 × 10 cm(2) field size at 100cm SSD.As SSD increases percentage depth dose at surface (PDD0) decreases for open,physical and virtual wedge field. Percentage depth dose at surface (PDD0) of virtual wedged beams were similar to those of open beams. PDD0 of physical wedged beams were lower than those of open and virtual wedged beams. Surface doses for both PW and VW increases with field size and small increase in surface dose for both PW and VW fields as wedge angle increases especially for large fields. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. High efficient coupling between wedged-shaped fiber and planar lightwave circuit chip using gradient refractive-index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Qu, Shuting; Xiao, Jinbiao; Sun, Xiaohan

    2006-10-01

    Planar lightwave circuit (PLC) chips based on III-V semiconductor MQW rib waveguide promise to be not only a solution to information access, but also direct the issues of bandwidth, pin count, reliability and complexity. Nanopositioning and precision alignment addresses vital importance in high-efficient connectivity between PLC chips and fiber arrays. Refractive-index mismatching between fused silica and III-V compound is one of the most serious problem which remains unsolved on one hand as well as mode field mismatching which can be mitigated in other hand through gradient geometry structure such as tapered spot size converter (SSC) and specialty fibers such as wedge-shaped fiber (WSF). Spherical gradient refractive-index (SGRIN) media intervened between WSF and MQW rib waveguide is put forward. The GRIN media virtually eliminates the reflection losses associated with the fused silica-air interface and III-V semiconductor-air interface. The beam spot emitted from WSF are observed by digital camera and the fundamental mode of MQW rib waveguide was calculated out. Lightwave propagation and mode field evolution in the WSF-SGRIN-PLC system is simulated by FDTD method with the coupling loss of 8.54dB at a wavelength of 1.55μm. An LED signal is injected into WSF, transmitted along GRIN media and PLC waveguide and output through single mode fiber (SMF). Optical power meter-based measurement verifies the whole system coupling loss to be consistent with the numeric estimation. The approach provides an experimental prototype for coupling and packaging technique of integrated photonic devices, hence supplying foundation for photonic network.

  8. Computer-assisted navigation decreases the change in the tibial posterior slope angle after closed-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Dae Kyung; Ko, Young Wan; Kim, Sang Jun; Baek, Jong Hun; Song, Sang Jun

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the change in tibial posterior slope angle (PSA) between patients treated via computer-assisted and conventional closed-wedge high tibial osteotomy (CWHTO). It was hypothesized that a decrease in the PSA would be less in the computer-assisted group than in the conventional group. Data on a total of 75 computer-assisted CWHTOs (60 patients) and 75 conventional CWHTOs (49 patients) were retrospectively compared using matched pair analysis. The pre- and postoperative mechanical axis (MA) and the PSA were radiographically evaluated. The parallel angle was defined as the angle between the joint line and the osteotomy surface. The data were compared between the two groups. The postoperative radiographic MA averaged 1.3° ± 2.6° valgus in the computer-assisted group and 0.3° ± 3.1° varus in the conventional group. The change in PSA averaged -0.8° ± 0.9° in the computer-assisted group and -4.0° ± 2.2° in the conventional group. The parallel angle averaged 0.2° ± 3.0° in the computer-assisted group and 6.2° ± 5.3° in the conventional group. Computer-assisted CWHTO using four guide pins could avoid inadvertent change in the PSA. The navigation can be used in anticipation of decreasing the risk of change in the PSA in CWHTO, especially in patients whose preoperative PSA is small. The special attention should be paid to locate the hinge axis acutely and to make the parallel proximal and distal osteotomy surfaces during CWHTO. III.

  9. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Iyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  10. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Lyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0, 30, 45, and 60. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  11. Sojourner, Wedge, & Shark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image taken near the end of daytime operations on Sol 50 shows the Sojourner rover between the rocks 'Wedge' (foreground) and 'Shark' (behind rover). The rover successfully deployed its Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer on Shark on Sol 52.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  12. Comparison of Mechanical Axis and Dynamic Range Assessed with Weight Bearing Radiographs and Navigation System in Closed Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Dae Kyung; Lee, Jong Whan; Cho, Seong Jin; Song, Sang Jun

    2017-09-01

    To compare navigation and weight bearing radiographic measurements of mechanical axis (MA) before and after closed wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) and to evaluate post-osteotomy changes in MA assessed during application of external varus or valgus force. Data from 30 consecutive patients (30 knees) who underwent computer-assisted closed-wedge HTO were prospectively analyzed. Pre- and postoperative weight bearing radiographic evaluation of MA was performed. Under navigation guidance, pre- and post-osteotomy MA values were measured in an unloaded position. Any change in the post-osteotomy MA in response to external varus or valgus force, which was named as dynamic range, was evaluated with the navigation system. The navigation and weight bearing radiographic measurements were compared. Although there was a positive correlation between navigation and radiographic measurements, the reliability of navigation measurements of coronal alignment was reduced after osteotomy and wedge closing. The mean post-osteotomy MA value measured with the navigation was 3.5°±0.8° valgus in an unloaded position. It was 1.3°±0.8° valgus under varus force and 5.8°±1.1° valgus under valgus force. The average dynamic range was >±2°. Potential differences between the postoperative MAs assessed by weight bearing radiographs and the navigation system in unloaded position should be considered during computer-assisted closed wedge HTO. Care should be taken to keep the dynamic range within the permissible range of alignment goal in HTO.

  13. Ice-wedge networks and "whale-hole" ponds in frozen ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plug, Lawrence J.

    The patterns of ice-wedge networks and of whale-hole ponds in frozen ground self-organize by strong interactions between pattern elements. Mechanisms for the consistent spacing (15--25 m) and orientation between ice wedges are examined in a model encapsulating the opening of fractures under a combination of thermally-induced tensile stress, stress reduction near open fractures, and heterogeneity of frozen ground and insulating snow. Modeled networks are similar to ice-wedge networks on the Espenberg coastal plain, Bering Land-Bridge National Park, Alaska, at the level of variation among Espenberg networks, as indicated by: (i) comparisons of distributions of relative orientation and spacing between wedges; and (ii) application of nonlinear spatial forecasting to modeled and Espenberg network patterns. Spacing in modeled networks is sensitive to fracture depth and weakly sensitive to thermally-induced tensile stress and substrate strength, consistent with the narrow range of spacing between natural ice wedges in different regions. In an extended model that includes recurring fractures over thousands of winters, networks similar to natural ice-wedge networks form. The annual pattern of fractures diverges from the ice-wedge pattern, with only ½--¾ of wedges fracturing in a single year at a steady-state reached after approximately 103 y. Short-lived sequences of extreme stress from cooling can permanently alter the spacing between and the fracture frequency of modeled ice wedges, suggesting that the existence and characteristics of existing and relic natural ice-wedge networks reflect extreme, not mean, climate conditions. Ponds on the Espenberg beach-ridge plain, approximately 2 m across and 1 m deep and surrounded by raised rings of ice-rich permafrost 2 m across and 0.5 m high, form through an interplay between localized bacterial decomposition of peat, thawing of frozen ground and frost heaving of peat in rings. Groups of hundreds of ponds at Espenberg assemble

  14. High-resolution 3D numerical modeling of thrust wedges: Influence of décollement strength on transfer zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, Jonas B.; Gerya, Taras; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    mechanics and dynamics of thin-skinned compressible thrust wedges with prescribed offsets in the backstop, i.e., transfer zones, are investigated using a three-dimensional finite difference numerical model with a visco-brittle/plastic rheology. The main questions addressed are as follows: (i) What is the influence of the initial length of the backstop offset and (ii) what is the effect of the frictional strength of the main décollement on the structural evolution of the brittle wedges along such transfer zones? Results show that the shorter the backstop offset, the earlier these two thrust planes connect, forming a curved frontal thrust along the entire width of the model. Younger, in-sequence thrusts are formed parallel to this curved shape. Long backstop offsets produce strongly curved thrust faults around the indenting corner. Simulations with a weak basal friction evolve toward almost linear frontal thrusts orthogonal to the bulk shortening direction. Increased basal drag in models with a strong décollement favors propagation of the backstop offset into a transfer zone up to the frontal thrust. These simulations revealed that surface tapers of the wedge in front of the backstop promontory are larger than what the critical wedge theory predicts, whereas the tapers on the other side of the transfer zone are smaller than analytical values. This difference is amplified with increasing length of the backstop offset and/or strength of the décollement. Modeled surface elevation schemes reproduce well the topographic patterns of natural orogenic systems such as the topographic low along the Minab-Zendan transform/transfer fault between the Zagros and Makran.

  15. The Substorm Current Wedge Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, Larry; McPherron, Robert; Apatenkov, Sergey; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Birn, Joachim; Lester, Mark; Nakamura, Rumi; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Sergeev, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Almost 40 years ago the concept of the substorm current wedge was developed to explain the magnetic signatures observed on the ground and in geosynchronous orbit during substorm expansion. In the ensuing decades new observations, including radar and low-altitude spacecraft, MHD simulations, and theoretical considerations have tremendously advanced our understanding of this system. The AMPTE/IRM, THEMIS and Cluster missions have added considerable observational knowledge, especially on the important role of fast flows in producing the stresses that generate the substorm current wedge. Recent detailed, multi-spacecraft, multi-instrument observations both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere have brought a wealth of new information about the details of the temporal evolution and structure of the current system. In this paper, we briefly review recent in situ and ground-based observations and theoretical work that have demonstrated a need for an update of the original picture. We present a revised, time-dependent picture of the substorm current wedge that follows its evolution from the initial substorm flows through substorm expansion and recovery, and conclude by identifying open questions.

  16. Sojourner APXS & Wedge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-08-27

    This image of the rock "Wedge" was taken from the Sojourner rover's rear color camera on Sol 37. The position of the rover relative to Wedge is seen in MRPS 83349. The segmented rod visible in the middle of the frame is the deployment arm for the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). The APXS, the bright, cylindrical object at the end of the arm, is positioned against Wedge and is designed to measure the rock's chemical composition. This was done successfully on the night of Sol 37. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00906

  17. Micromachine Wedge Stepping Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Schriner, H.K.

    1998-11-04

    A wedge stepping motor, which will index a mechanism, has been designed and fabricated in the surface rnicromachine SUMMiT process. This device has demonstrated the ability to index one gear tooth at a time with speeds up to 205 teeth/see. The wedge stepper motor has the following features, whi:h will be useful in a number of applications. o The ability to precisely position mechanical components. . Simple pulse signals can be used for operation. o Only 2 drive signals are requixed for operation. o Torque and precision capabilities increase with device size . The device to be indexed is restrained at all times by the wedge shaped tooth that is used for actuation. This paper will discuss the theory of operation and desi=m of the wedge stepping motor. The fabrication and testing of I he device will also be presented.

  18. Ultrasonic transducer with laminated coupling wedge

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1976-08-03

    An ultrasonic transducer capable of use in a high-temperature environment incorporates a laminated metal coupling wedge including a reflecting edge shaped as a double sloping roof and a transducer crystal backed by a laminated metal sound absorber disposed so as to direct sound waves through the coupling wedge and into a work piece, reflections from the interface between the coupling wedge and the work piece passing to the reflecting edge. Preferably the angle of inclination of the two halves of the reflecting edge are different.

  19. Wedges for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer device is provided which is used in ultrasonic inspection of the material surrounding a threaded hole and which comprises a wedge of plastic or the like including a curved threaded surface adapted to be screwed into the threaded hole and a generally planar surface on which a conventional ultrasonic transducer is mounted. The plastic wedge can be rotated within the threaded hole to inspect for flaws in the material surrounding the threaded hole.

  20. The Cosmonaut Sea Wedge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solli, K.; Kuvaas, B.; Kristoffersen, Y.; Leitchenkov, G.; Guseva, J.; Gandyukhin, V.

    2007-01-01

    A set of multi-channel seismic profiles (~15000 km) acquired by Russia, Norway and Australia has been used to investigate the depositional evolution of the Cosmonaut Sea margin of East Antarctica. We recognize a regional sediment wedge below the upper part of the continental rise. The wedge, herein termed the Cosmonaut Sea Wedge, is positioned stratigraphically underneath the inferred glaciomarine section and extends for at least 1200 km along the continental margin and from 80 to about 250 km seaward or to the north. Lateral variations in the growth pattern of the wedge indicate several overlapping depocentres, which at their distal northern end are flanked by elongated mounded drifts and contourite sheets. The internal stratification of the mounded drift deposits suggests that westward flowing bottom currents reworked the marginal deposits. The action of these currents together with sea-level changes is considered to have controlled the growth of the wedge. We interpret the Cosmonaut Sea Wedge as a composite feature comprising several bottom current reworked fan systems.

  1. Fastening of a High-Strength Composite rod with a Splitted and Wedged end in a Potted Anchor 1. Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnautov, A. K.; Terrasi, G. P.; Kulakov, V. L.; Portnov, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of fastening of high-strength unidirectional CFRP/epoxy rods in potted anchors was investigated experimentally. The rods had splitted ends, in which duralumin wedges were glued. The experiments, performed for three types of contact between the composite rods and the potted material, showed that the most effective were full adhesion and adhesion-friction contacts, when the maximum load-carrying capacity of CFRP rods under tension could be reached. The full friction contact was ineffective because of the shear failure of CFRP rods inside the anchorage zone.

  2. Seismic rupture propagation beneath potential landslide wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, A.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-12-01

    During 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0), much larger slip and tsunami occurred than expectation at outer-wedge (toe of the trench landward slope) of Japan trench (eg. Ide et al., 2011). Similarly, outer-wedge deformation was pointed out in northern segment of 1986 Meiji-Sanriku earthquake (Ms 7.2), and it was discussed that earthquake-related landslide induced large tsunami (eg. Kanamori, 1972; Tanioka and Satake, 1996). Many landslides and normal faults, potential tsunami genesis, are developed at outer-wedge of Japan trench (Henry et al., 1989). Some steep normal-faults turn to horizon at deep portion, and land sliding may be prevented by basal friction. If seismic rupture propagates to basal fault of the outer-wedge, triggered gravity collapse will enlarge deformation of the outer-wedge to cause large tsunamis. It was considered that seismogenic fault locks at deep portion under inner-wedge of the plate subduction zone, and outer-wedge was classified into aseismic zone classically. Seismic rupture propagation to outer-wedge is still uncertain. Seismic slip at the outer-wedge was found from the drilled core during IODP Nankai trough seismogenic zone drilling project (NanTroSEIZE) in Nankai trough, southwest Japan. Samples were obtained from the frontal thrust (438 mbsf), which connects the deep plate boundary to the seafloor at the toe of the accretionary wedge, and from a megasplay fault (271 mbsf) that branches from the plate boundary décollement. Higher vitrinite reflectance of 0.57 % and 0.37 % than the host rock of 0.24 % were found at splay and plate boundary faults zones respectively. These correspond with 300-400 °C and > 20°C of host rock. Local high temperature zone less than several cm thick may be caused by frictional shear heat at fault zone (Sakaguchi, et al., 2011). Shear velocity and durations can be estimated from thermal property of the sediment and distribution of the vitrinite anomaly (Hamada et al., 2011). This result shows that seismic

  3. The decay of highly excited open strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D.; Turok, N.; Wilkinson, R.; Jetzer, P.

    1988-01-01

    The decay rates of leading edge Regge trajectory states are calculated for very high level number in open bosonic string theories, ignoring tachyon final states. The optical theorem simplifies the analysis while enabling identification of the different mass level decay channels. The main result is that (in four dimensions) the greatest single channel is the emission of a single photon and a state of the next mass level down. A simple asymptotic formula for arbitrarily high level number is given for this process. Also calculated is the total decay rate exactly up to N=100. It shows little variation over this range but appears to decrease for larger N. The formalism is checked in examples and the decay rate of the first excited level calculated for open superstring theories. The calculation may also have implications for high spin meson resonances.

  4. Taper Angle Evolution in Taiwan Accretionary Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Chi, W.; Liu, C.

    2011-12-01

    Liwen Chena,b, Wu-Cheng Chia, Char-Shine Liuc aInstitute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan bInstitute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan cInstitute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan The critical taper model, originally developed using onland Taiwan as an example, is governed by force balance of a horizontal compressional wedge. This model has been successfully applied to many mountainous regions around the world. Among them, Taiwan is located in an oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and the Chinese Passive margin. Previous critical taper angle studies of Taiwan are mainly focusing on utilizing land data. In this study we want to extend these studies to offshore region from the subduction zone to collision zone. Here we study the varying taper angles of the double-vergent wedge derived from 1,000 km of reflection seismic profiles in both the pro-wedge and retro-wedge locations. These profiles were collected in the last two decades. For the retro-wedge, the topography slope angle changes from 2 to 8.8 degrees; some of the steep slope suggests that some part of the retrowedge is currently in a super-critical angle state. Such dramatic changes in taper angle probably strongly affect regional sedimentary processes, including slumping, in addition to structural deformation. These complex processes might even help develop a mélange or re-open a closed basin. We are currently working on studying the taper angle evolution of the pro-wedge from subduction to arc-continent collision zone in the offshore region. Though further works are needed, our preliminary results show that the evolution of wedge angles and the geometry of the wedge are closely linked and inseparable. The structures of the subducting plate might have strong influence on the deformation style of the over-riding plate. It would be interesting to combine the angle variation with the structure interpretation of the accretionary wedge

  5. Long polymers near wedges and cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N -step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d =2 ), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d =3 , of sizes ranging up to N =106 steps. We find that the critical exponent γα, which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α , is in good agreement with the theory for d =2 . We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γα, as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions.

  6. Fastening of a High-Strength Composite Rod with a Splitted and Wedged End in a Potted Anchor 2. Finite-Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulakov, V. L.; Terrasi, G. P.; Arnautov, A. K.; Portnov, G. G.; Kovalov, A. O.

    2014-03-01

    A finite element analysis is carried out to determine the stress-strain state of anchors for round rods made of a high- modulus, high-strength unidirectional carbon-fiber reinforced plastic. The rods have splitted ends in which Duralumin wedges are glued. Three types of contact between the composite rods and a potted epoxy compound are considered: adhesion, adhesion-friction, and friction ones. The corresponding three-dimensional problems in the elastic statement are solved by the finite-element method (FEM) with account of nonlinear Coulomb friction. An analysis of stresses on the surface of the composite rod revealed the locations of high concentrations of operating stresses. The results of FEM calculations agree with experimental data.

  7. Substorm Current Wedge Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; McPherron, R. L.; Amm, O.; Apatenkov, S.; Baumjohann, W.; Birn, J.; Lester, M.; Nakamura, R.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Sergeev, V.

    2015-07-01

    Almost 40 years ago the concept of the substorm current wedge was developed to explain the magnetic signatures observed on the ground and in geosynchronous orbit during substorm expansion. In the ensuing decades new observations, including radar and low-altitude spacecraft, MHD simulations, and theoretical considerations have tremendously advanced our understanding of this system. The AMPTE/IRM, THEMIS and Cluster missions have added considerable observational knowledge, especially on the important role of fast flows in producing the stresses that generate the substorm current wedge. Recent detailed, multi-spacecraft, multi-instrument observations both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere have brought a wealth of new information about the details of the temporal evolution and structure of the current system. While the large-scale picture remains valid, the new details call for revision and an update of the original view. In this paper we briefly review the historical development of the substorm current wedge, review recent in situ and ground-based observations and theoretical work, and discuss the current active research areas. We conclude with a revised, time-dependent picture of the substorm current wedge that follows its evolution from the initial substorm flows through substorm expansion and recovery.

  8. Europa Wedge Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image shows an area of crustal separation on Jupiter's moon, Europa. Lower resolution pictures taken earlier in the tour of NASA's Galileo spacecraft revealed that dark wedge-shaped bands in this region are areas where the icy crust has completely pulled apart. Dark material has filled up from below and filled the void created by this separation.

    In the lower left corner of this image, taken by Galileo's onboard camera on December 16, 1997, a portion of one dark wedge area is visible, revealing a linear texture along the trend of the wedge. The lines of the texture change orientation slightly and reflect the fact that we are looking at a bend in the wedge. The older, bright background, visible on the right half of the image, is criss-crossed with ridges. A large, bright ridge runs east-west through the upper part of the image, cutting across both the older background plains and the wedge. This ridge is rough in texture, with numerous small terraces and troughs containing dark material.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northwest. This image, centered at approximately 16.5 degrees south latitude and 196.5 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 10 kilometers square (about 6.5 miles square). The resolution of this image is about 26 meters per picture element. This image was taken by the solid state imaging system from a distance of 1250 kilometers (750 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  9. Europa Wedge Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image shows an area of crustal separation on Jupiter's moon, Europa. Lower resolution pictures taken earlier in the tour of NASA's Galileo spacecraft revealed that dark wedge-shaped bands in this region are areas where the icy crust has completely pulled apart. Dark material has filled up from below and filled the void created by this separation.

    In the lower left corner of this image, taken by Galileo's onboard camera on December 16, 1997, a portion of one dark wedge area is visible, revealing a linear texture along the trend of the wedge. The lines of the texture change orientation slightly and reflect the fact that we are looking at a bend in the wedge. The older, bright background, visible on the right half of the image, is criss-crossed with ridges. A large, bright ridge runs east-west through the upper part of the image, cutting across both the older background plains and the wedge. This ridge is rough in texture, with numerous small terraces and troughs containing dark material.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northwest. This image, centered at approximately 16.5 degrees south latitude and 196.5 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 10 kilometers square (about 6.5 miles square). The resolution of this image is about 26 meters per picture element. This image was taken by the solid state imaging system from a distance of 1250 kilometers (750 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  10. Opening the high-energy frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1988-12-01

    I review the scientific motivation for an experimental assault on the 1-TeV scale, elaborating the idea of technicolor as one interesting possibility for what may be found there. I then summarize some of the discovery possibilities opened by a high-luminosity, multi-TeV proton-proton collider. After a brief resume of the experimental environment anticipated at the SSC, I report on the status of the SSC R D effort and discuss the work to be carried out over the course of the next year. 37 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  11. High-torque open-end wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giandomenico, A.; Dame, J. M.; Behimer, H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A wrench is described that is usable where limited access normally requires an open-end wrench, but which has substantially the high-torque capacity and small radial clearance characteristics of a closed-end wrench. The wrench includes a sleeve forming a nut-engageable socket with a gap in its side, and an adaptor forming a socket with a gap in its side, the adaptor closely surrounding the sleeve and extending across the gap in the sleeve. The sleeve and adaptor have surfaces that become fully engaged when a wrench handle is applied to the adaptor to turn it so as to tighten a nut engaged by the sleeve.

  12. Using high-resolution stratigraphy and structural analysis to constrain polyphase tectonics in wedge-top basins: Inferences from the late Tortonian Scillato Basin (central-northern Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gugliotta, C.; Gasparo Morticelli, M.

    2012-10-01

    The present paper aims to show, both from a stratigraphic and structural points of view, the main features of a wedge-top syntectonic basin which evolved recording polyphase and non-coaxial tectonics. The study area is the Scillato Basin (SB), a roughly N-S-oriented structural depression located in the central-northern sector of the Sicililian Maghrebides. There, an approximately 1300 m-thick upper Serravallian to upper Tortonian succession of clastic units outcrops as a portion of the Neogene syntectonic covers of the Sicilian fold and thrust belt. Within the outcropping succession the upper Tortonian Terravecchia Fm represents the main topic of this paper. A multidisciplinary approach was carried out through an integration of sedimentology, facies, stratal pattern and structural analyses; this was applied to the formation enabling one to recognize in the Scillato Basin a fining to coarsening upward succession, deposited recording an early transgressive and a late regressive depositional stage. In our model these two main depositional stages developed and are directly relatable to a two-step structural evolution of the basin. During the first step, a NW-SE-oriented structural depression existed, enclosed between structural highs and accommodating the lower and middle portion of the upper Tortonian succession. Subsequently, during the second step, the NW-SE depression was non-coaxially deformed by superimposition of high-angle transpressive faults (many of which were SE-dipping), developed in response to the upward propagation of structures enucleated at deeper structural levels. This step was recorded in the basin by development of both depositional and structural interferences recognizable along the upper portion of the Scillato Basin succession. A comparison between field data and deep geophysical data interpreted at the preliminary stage, raises questions about the late Miocene geological evolution of this sector of the Sicilian chain, including: (i) the syn

  13. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  14. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  15. Recognition and characterization of networks of water bodies in the Arctic ice-wedge polygonal tundra using high-resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skurikhin, A. N.; Gangodagamage, C.; Rowland, J. C.; Wilson, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic lowland landscapes underlain by permafrost are often characterized by polygon-like patterns such as ice-wedge polygons outlined by networks of ice wedges and complemented with polygon rims, troughs, shallow ponds and thermokarst lakes. Polygonal patterns and corresponding features are relatively easy to recognize in high spatial resolution satellite imagery by a human, but their automated recognition is challenging due to the variability in their spectral appearance, the irregularity of individual trough spacing and orientation within the patterns, and a lack of unique spectral response attributable to troughs with widths commonly between 1 m and 2 m. Accurate identification of fine scale elements of ice-wedge polygonal tundra is important as their imprecise recognition may bias estimates of water, heat and carbon fluxes in large-scale climate models. Our focus is on the problem of identification of Arctic polygonal tundra fine-scale landscape elements (as small as 1 m - 2 m width). The challenge of the considered problem is that while large water bodies (e.g. lakes and rivers) can be recognized based on spectral response, reliable recognition of troughs is more difficult. Troughs do not have unique spectral signature, their appearance is noisy (edges are not strong), their width is small, and they often form connected networks with ponds and lakes, and thus they have overlapping spectral response with other water bodies and surrounding non-water bodies. We present a semi-automated approach to identify and classify Arctic polygonal tundra landscape components across the range of spatial scales, such as troughs, ponds, river- and lake-like objects, using high spatial resolution satellite imagery. The novelty of the approach lies in: (1) the combined use of segmentation and shape-based classification to identify a broad range of water bodies, including troughs, and (2) the use of high-resolution WorldView-2 satellite imagery (with resolution of 0.6 m) for this

  16. Sharp Thermal Transition in the Forearc Mantle Wedge as a Consequence of Nonlinear Mantle Wedge Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, I.; Wang, K.; Jiangheng, H.

    2009-12-01

    A sharp landward increase in seismic attenuation over a few tens of kilometres distance in the forearc mantle wedge has been reported for a number of subduction zones, including Alaska, Costa Rica, central Andes, Hikurangi, and NE Japan. The low attenuation in the wedge nose is commonly interpreted as to indicate a cold state, and the high attenuation further landward to indicate high temperature and/or partial melting. Beneath the arc, the high temperature at shallow depths may be caused by transient melt migration, but at larger depths the mantle wedge must be hot enough to generate melt. Thus, the landward change in the thermal state of the forearc mantle wedge is large and sharp. We use a two-dimensional steady-state thermal model and the subduction-interface weakening approach of Wada et al. (2008) to investigate how slab-driven mantle wedge flow controls the thermal transition. We observe that the sharpness of the transition increases with the increasing nonlinearity of the flow system. In an isoviscous mantle wedge with a uniform interface strength, there is no spontaneous transition in the flow and thermal fields. In a diffusion-creep mantle wedge, even with a uniform interface strength, the strong temperature dependence of the mantle rheology always results in full slab-mantle decoupling along the weakened part of the interface and hence complete stagnation of the overlying mantle, giving rise to a cold wedge nose that does not participate in the wedge flow. On the other hand, the interface immediately downdip of the zone of decoupling is fully coupled, and the overlying mantle is driven to flow at a rate compatible with the subduction rate. The flow system thus shows a bimodal behaviour. In a dislocation-creep mantle wedge, its stress-dependence results in an additional feedback effect, making the bimodal behaviour more pronounced than in the diffusion-creep mantle wedge, with an abrupt change from decoupling to coupling along the subduction interface

  17. Coherently Opening a High-Q Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufarelli, Tommaso; Ferraro, Alessandro; Serafini, Alessio; Bose, Sougato; Kim, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    We propose a general framework to effectively "open" a high-Q resonator, that is, to release the quantum state initially prepared in it in the form of a traveling electromagnetic wave. This is achieved by employing a mediating mode that scatters coherently the radiation from the resonator into a one-dimensional continuum of modes such as a waveguide. The same mechanism may be used to "feed" a desired quantum field to an initially empty cavity. Switching between an open and "closed" resonator may then be obtained by controlling either the detuning of the scatterer or the amount of time it spends in the resonator. First, we introduce the model in its general form, identifying (i) the traveling mode that optimally retains the full quantum information of the resonator field and (ii) a suitable figure of merit that we study analytically in terms of the system parameters. Then, we discuss two feasible implementations based on ensembles of two-level atoms interacting with cavity fields. In addition, we discuss how to integrate traditional cavity QED in our proposal using three-level atoms.

  18. Mechanics of injection wedges in collision orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. B.; Schulmann, K.

    2003-04-01

    Instantaneously juxtaposed lithospheric sections, marked by different geothermal gradient and lithological make-up, are examined to identify zones of highly contrasting strength in adjacent transposed crust and lithospheric mantle. Three types of geotherms and four reference lithospheric segments: thin crust/hot geotherm (rift), thin crust/mean geotherm (relaxed rift), standard crust/hot geotherm (arc), standard crust/mean geotherm (normal crust), are compared with variable permutations of cratonic, standard and rifted lithosphere thicknesses. This permits identification of strong brittle-elastic or plastic mantle, lower and upper crust juxtaposed against plastic rocks of a weak adjacent lithosphere. Vertical positions of shallow dipping detachment zones thus delineate possible areas of hot or cold injection wedges which include: (i) Single shallow wedge (or Flake), (ii) Double shallow and deep wedge, (iii) Deep lithospheric crocodile, (iv) Crustal thickening due to shallow strength differences, (v) Mantle Lithosphere thickening, or wedging, due to deep mantle strength differences and (vii) Exchange tectonics as an extreme wedging process, in which horizontal mass exchange is approximately equal. Rheological calculations are compared to a database of seismic profiles in which the geometry of detachment zones and proposed thermal conditions and lithological make-ups have been presented.

  19. Penetrable Wedge Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-03

    F -A276 232 GE F Formpproved P-W-=nQb,3;t- OBM No. 0704 -0188 foI rll it 1 Ilthisl buridllenli 1i to :iudrrg th ftirnu reviwing Wwtru"t.Of S.aching...geometries. (2) Numerical " solutions" are still proliferating, but are too messy and remoxed from the physics to offer any important insight into the wave...mathematical solution of the impedance boundary wedge. III. PHYSICAL IMPEDANCE BOUNDARY CONDITION The coupled difference equations (14), (17), and (18) on page

  20. Tumor Targeting, Trifunctional Dendritic Wedge

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a newly designed trifunctional theranostic agent for targeting solid tumors. This agent combines a dendritic wedge with high boron content for boron neutron capture therapy or boron MRI, a monomethine cyanine dye for visible-light fluorescent imaging, and an integrin ligand for efficient tumor targeting. We report photophysical properties of the new agent, its cellular uptake and in vitro targeting properties. Using live animal imaging and intravital microscopy (IVM) techniques, we observed a rapid accumulation of the agent and its retention for a prolonged period of time (up to 7 days) in fully established animal models of human melanoma and murine mammary adenocarcinoma. This macromolecular theranostic agent can be used for targeted delivery of high boron load into solid tumors for future applications in boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:25350602

  1. Microtopographic characterization of ice-wedge polygon landscape in Barrow, Alaska: a digital map of troughs, rims, centers derived from high resolution (0.25 m) LiDAR data

    SciTech Connect

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-07-03

    The dataset represents microtopographic characterization of the ice-wedge polygon landscape in Barrow, Alaska. Three microtopographic features are delineated using 0.25 m high resolution digital elevation dataset derived from LiDAR. The troughs, rims, and centers are the three categories in this classification scheme. The polygon troughs are the surface expression of the ice-wedges that are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The elevated shoulders of the polygon interior immediately adjacent to the polygon troughs are the polygon rims for the low center polygons. In case of high center polygons, these features are the topographic highs. In this classification scheme, both topographic highs and rims are considered as polygon rims. The next version of the dataset will include more refined classification scheme including separate classes for rims ad topographic highs. The interior part of the polygon just adjacent to the polygon rims are the polygon centers.

  2. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  3. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  4. Life at the wedge: the activity and diversity of arctic ice wedge microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Roland C; Radtke, Kristin J; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of polygonal terrain on Mars underlain by ice heightens interest in the possibility that this water-bearing habitat may be, or may have been, a suitable habitat for extant life. The possibility is supported by the recurring detection of terrestrial microorganisms in subsurface ice environments, such as ice wedges found beneath tundra polygon features. A characterization of the microbial community of ice wedges from the high Arctic was performed to determine whether this ice environment can sustain actively respiring microorganisms and to assess the ecology of this extreme niche. We found that ice wedge samples contained a relatively abundant number of culturable cells compared to other ice habitats (∼10(5) CFU·mL(-1)). Respiration assays in which radio-labeled acetate and in situ measurement of CO(2) flux were used suggested low levels of microbial activity, though more sensitive techniques are required to confirm these findings. Based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, bacterial and archaeal ice wedge communities appeared to reflect surrounding soil communities. Two Pseudomonas sp. were the most abundant taxa in the ice wedge bacterial library (∼50%), while taxa related to ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota occupied 90% of the archaeal library. The tolerance of a variety of isolates to salinity and temperature revealed characteristics of a psychrotolerant, halotolerant community. Our findings support the hypothesis that ice wedges are capable of sustaining a diverse, plausibly active microbial community. As such, ice wedges, compared to other forms of less habitable ground ice, could serve as a reservoir for life on permanently cold, water-scarce, ice-rich extraterrestrial bodies and are therefore of interest to astrobiologists and ecologists alike. .

  5. Geochemistry of rare high-Nb basalt lavas: Are they derived from a mantle wedge metasomatised by slab melts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastie, Alan R.; Mitchell, Simon F.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Minifie, Matthew J.; Millar, Ian L.

    2011-09-01

    Compositionally, high-Nb basalts are similar to HIMU (high U/Pb) ocean island basalts, continental alkaline basalts and alkaline lavas formed above slab windows. Tertiary alkaline basaltic lavas from eastern Jamaica, West Indies, known as the Halberstadt Volcanic Formation have compositions similar to high-Nb basalts (Nb > 20 ppm). The Halberstadt high-Nb basalts are divided into two compositional sub-groups where Group 1 lavas have more enriched incompatible element concentrations relative to Group 2. Both groups are derived from isotopically different spinel peridotite mantle source regions, which both require garnet and amphibole as metasomatic residual phases. The Halberstadt geochemistry demonstrates that the lavas cannot be derived by partial melting of lower crustal ultramafic complexes, metasomatised mantle lithosphere, subducting slabs, continental crust, mantle plume source regions or an upper mantle source region composed of enriched and depleted components. Instead, their composition, particularly the negative Ce anomalies, the high Th/Nb ratios and the similar isotopic ratios to nearby adakite lavas, suggests that the Halberstadt magmas are derived from a compositionally variable spinel peridotite source region(s) metasomatised by slab melts that precipitated garnet, amphibole, apatite and zircon. It is suggested that high-Nb basalts may be classified as a distinct rock type with Nb > 20 ppm, intraplate alkaline basalt compositions, but that are generated in subduction zones by magmatic processes distinct from those that generate other intraplate lavas.

  6. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light–matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (∼90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ∼0.004λvac3 in an exposed single-mode waveguide–resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light–matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon–matter coupling. PMID:26284499

  7. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Kress, Stephan J P; Antolinez, Felipe V; Richner, Patrizia; Jayanti, Sriharsha V; Kim, David K; Prins, Ferry; Riedinger, Andreas; Fischer, Maximilian P C; Meyer, Stefan; McPeak, Kevin M; Poulikakos, Dimos; Norris, David J

    2015-09-09

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light-matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (~90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ~0.004λvac(3) in an exposed single-mode waveguide-resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light-matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon-matter coupling.

  8. Bouncing and bursting in a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Etienne; Cohen, Caroline; Quere, David

    2015-11-01

    Placed into an inhomogeneous confined medium, non-wetting drops tend to be expelled from the tightest regions, where their contact with the walls would be maximized. They preferentially explore more open areas which are favorable from the point of view of capillary energy. Following this principle, one may thus use the geometry of confined environments to control fluid droplets in various ways : displacing, filtering, fragmenting... In this communication, we present experimental results on the dynamics of Leidenfrost drops launched into a wedge formed by two quasi-horizontal glass plates. Influenced by the gradient of confinement, these non-wetting liquid pucks approach the apex of the wedge to a minimal distance where they bounce back. At higher impact velocity, we observe that drops tend to penetrate deeper into the wedge but often burst into a large number of small fragments. We also discuss ways to control the deviation of droplets from their initial trajectory. We propose scaling law analyses to explain the characteristics of the observed bouncing and bursting phenomena.

  9. Inelastic wedge billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Martin; Olafsen, Jeffrey S.

    2017-06-01

    Billiards are simple systems used to investigate Hamiltonian dynamics in physics. When real billiards are examined experimentally, the energy dissipated in each collision must be replaced by an external stimulus to maintain the dynamics. We focus on a specific system of a driven billiard using a wedge shaped boundary to examine nonlinear and chaotic behavior. Mathematical models such as the logistic map are simple low dimensional systems that exhibit nonlinear and chaotic behavior as a single parameter is varied. This logistic map can then be used to identify a very specific mathematical parameter known as the Lyapunov exponent, which helps in identifying chaos more clearly. In the current experiment, the dynamics of a particle free to move near a horizontally shaken vertical boundary will be examined for the presence of chaos. The goal of the research is to extract a Lyapunov exponent between any two trajectories in the system. In addition, the manner in which the dynamics evolve freely through dissipative collisions provides a testbed for measurements of the velocity dependent coefficients of restitution for the billiard. A better description of hard sphere coefficients of restitution would be beneficial to a host of experiments and numerical simulations in granular physics.

  10. Ancient Yedoma carbon loss: primed by ice wedge thaw?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, K. L.; Vonk, J. E.; Mann, P. J.; Zimov, N.; Bulygina, E. B.; Davydova, A.; Spencer, R. G.; Holmes, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Northeast Siberian permafrost is dominated by frozen Yedoma deposits containing ca. 500 Gt of carbon, nearly a quarter of northern permafrost organic carbon (OC). Yedoma deposits are Pleistocene-age alluvial and/or aeolian accumulations characterized by high ice wedge content (~50%), making them particularly vulnerable to a warming climate and to surface collapse upon thaw. Dissolved OC in streams originating primarily from Yedoma has been shown to be highly biolabile, relative to waters containing more modern OC. The cause of this biolability, however, remains speculative. Here we investigate the influence of ice wedge input upon the bioavailability of Yedoma within streams from as a potential cause of Yedoma carbon biolability upon release into the Kolyma River from the thaw-eroding river exposures of Duvannyi Yar, NE Siberia. We measured biolability on (1) ice wedge, Kolyma, and Yedoma leachate controls; (2) ice wedge and Kolyma plus Yedoma OC (8 g/L); and (3) varying ratios of ice wedge water to Kolyma river water. Biolability assays were conducted using both 5-day BOD (biological oxygen demand) and 11-day BDOC (biodegradable dissolved organic carbon) incubations. We found that ancient DOC in Yedoma soil leachate alone was highly biolabile with losses of 52±0.1% C over a 5-day BOD incubation. Similarly, DOC contained in pure ice wedge water was found to be biolabile, losing 21±0% C during a 5-day BOD incubation. Increased ice wedge contributions led to higher overall C losses in identical Yedoma soil leachates, with 8.9±0.6% losses of Yedoma C with 100% ice wedge water, 7.1±1% (50% ice wedge/ 50% Kolyma) and 5±0.3% with 100% Kolyma River water. We discuss potential mechanisms for the increased loss of ancient C using associated measurements of nutrient availability, carbon quality (CDOM/FDOM) and extracellular enzyme activity rates. Our initial results indicate that ice wedge meltwater forming Yedoma streams makes Yedoma OC more bioavailable than it would

  11. Effect of Mantle Wedge Hybridization by Sediment Melt on Geochemistry of Arc Magma and Arc Mantle Source - Insights from Laboratory Experiments at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, A.; Dasgupta, R.; Tsuno, K.; Nelson, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Generation of arc magmas involves metasomatism of the mantle wedge by slab-derived H2O-rich fluids and/or melts and subsequent melting of the modified source. The chemistry of arc magmas and the residual mantle wedge are not only regulated by the chemistry of the slab input, but also by the phase relations of metasomatism or hybridization process in the wedge. The sediment-derived silica-rich fluids and hydrous partial melts create orthopyroxene-rich zones in the mantle wedge, due to reaction of mantle olivine with silica in the fluid/melt [1,2]. Geochemical evidence for such a reaction comes from pyroxenitic lithologies coexisting with peridotite in supra-subduction zones. In this study, we have simulated the partial melting of a parcel of mantle wedge modified by bulk addition of sediment-derived melt with variable H2O contents to investigate the major and trace element chemistry of the magmas and the residues formed by this process. Experiments at 2-3 GPa and 1150-1300 °C were conducted on mixtures of 25% sediment-derived melt and 75% lherzolite, with bulk H2O contents varying from 2 to 6 wt.%. Partial reactive crystallization of the rhyolitic slab-derived melt and partial melting of the mixed source produced a range of melt compositions from ultra-K basanites to basaltic andesites, in equilibrium with an orthopyroxene ± phlogopite ± clinopyroxene ± garnet bearing residue, depending on P and bulk H2O content. Model calculations using partition coefficients (from literature) of trace elements between experimental minerals and silicate melt suggest that the geochemical signatures of the slab-derived melt, such as low Ce/Pb and depletion in Nb and Ta (characteristic slab signatures) are not erased from the resulting melt owing to reactive crystallization. The residual mineral assemblage is also found to be similar to the supra-subduction zone lithologies, such as those found in Dabie Shan (China) and Sanbagawa Belt (Japan). In this presentation, we will also

  12. Deformation of the Calabrian accretionary wedge and relative kinematics of the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops: Insights from multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution reflection and wide-angle seismics and analog modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellong, David; Gutscher, Marc-Andre; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Graindorge, David; Kopp, Heidrun; Moretti, Milena; Marsset, Bruno; Mercier de Lepinay, Bernard; Dominguez, Stephane; Malavieille, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Recently acquired swath bathymetric data in the Ionian Sea document in unprecedented detail the morphostructure and dynamics of the Calabrian accretionary wedge. A boundary zone between the eastern and western lobes of the accretionary wedge is examined here. Relative displacement between the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops is expected to cause dextral strike-slip deformation between the lobes. A wide-angle seismic profile was acquired in Oct. 2014 with the R/V Meteor (DIONYSUS survey) recorded by 25 Ocean-bottom seismometers (Geomar and Ifremer instruments) and 3 land-stations (INGV stations). Inversion and forward modeling of these seismic data reveal a 5-10 km deep asymmetric rift zone between the Malta Escarpment and the SW tip of Calabria. Analog modeling was performed to test if the origin of this rift could be related to the relative kinematics of the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops. Modeling, using two independently moving backstops, produces a zone of dextral transtension and subsidence in the accretionary wedge between two lobes. This corresponds well to the asymmetric rift observed in the southward prolongation of the straits of Messina faults. Paradoxically however, this dextral displacement does not appear to traverse the external Calabrian accretionary wedge, where prominent curved lineaments observed indicate a sinistral sense of motion. One possible explanation is that the dextral kinematic motion is transferred into a region of crisscrossing faults in the internal portion of the Eastern lobe. The bathymetry and high-resolution reflection seismic images indicate ongoing compression at the deformation front of both the western and eastern lobes. Together with the analog modeling results, these observations unambiguously demonstrate that the western lobe remains tectonically active.

  13. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended.

  14. New machining and testing method of large angle infrared wedge mirror parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ying; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Fumei; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Xuanmin; Zengqi, Xu; Li, Wenting; Zhang, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Large angle wedge parts were widely used in the optical system that was used for achieving a wide range of scanning. Due to the parts having the characteristic of large difference in the thickness of both ends and high density, the accuracy of the wedge angle was hard to ensure to reach second level in optical processing. Generally, wedge mirror angle was measured by contact comparison method which was easy to damage the surface. In view of the existence of two practical problems, in this paper, based on theoretical analysis, by taking three key measures that were the accurate positioning for the central position of the large angle wedge part, the accuracy control of angle precision machined of wedge mirror and fast and non destructive laser assisted absolute measurement of large angle wedge, the qualified rate of parts were increased to 100%, a feasible, controllable and efficient process route for large angle infrared wedge parts was found out.

  15. Dynamic Open Inquiry Performances of High-School Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Sadeh, Irit

    2010-01-01

    In examining open inquiry projects among high-school biology students, we found dynamic inquiry performances expressed in two criteria: "changes occurring during inquiry" and "procedural understanding". Characterizing performances in a dynamic open inquiry project can shed light on both the procedural and epistemological…

  16. The effect of wedge position and inlet geometry on shock wave reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. E.; da Silva, N. P.; Skews, B. W.; Paton, R. T.

    2017-02-01

    Experiments were conducted in a shock tube to determine the effect of planar wedge inlet geometry on the shock wave reflection pattern that occurred on a wedge. High-speed schlieren imaging was used to visualize the experiments conducted in air with a nominal incident shock strength of Mach 1.31. The experimental test pieces consisted of a wedge mounted above the floor of the shock tube where the underside wedge angle was varied. The upper wedge angle was fixed at 30°, resulting in a Mach reflection. The underside wedge angle was either 30° or 90°, corresponding to a conventional and blunt wedge respectively. For the cases presented here, the reflected shock from the initial interaction reflects off of the shock tube floor and diffracts around the wedge apex. A density gradient is formed at the wedge apex due to this process and results in a vortex being shed for the 90° wedge. It was shown by simple measurements that the diffracted wave could reach the triple point of the upper Mach reflection if the wedge were of sufficient length.

  17. Wedge Heat-Flux Indicators for Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2003-01-01

    Wedge indicators have been proposed for measuring thermal radiation that impinges on specimens illuminated by flash lamps for thermographic inspection. Heat fluxes measured by use of these indicators would be used, along with known thermal, radiative, and geometric properties of the specimens, to estimate peak flash temperatures on the specimen surfaces. These indicators would be inexpensive alternatives to high-speed infrared pyrometers, which would otherwise be needed for measuring peak flash surface temperatures. The wedge is made from any suitable homogenous material such as plastic. The choice of material is governed by the equation given. One side of the wedge is covered by a temperature sensitive compound that decomposes irreversibly when its temperature exceeds a rated temperature (T-rated). The uncoated side would be positioned alongside or in place of the specimen and exposed to the flash, then the wedge thickness at the boundary between the white and blackened portions measured.

  18. Fine scale monitoring of ice ablation following convective heat transfer: case study based on ice-wedge thermo-erosion on Bylot Island (Canadian High Arctic) and laboratory observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, E.; Fortier, D.

    2011-12-01

    the excavated channel just before the water got in contact with the ice surface. The field experiment where flowing water at Tw = 277 K, Ti = 273 K with a water discharge of 0.01 m3 s-1 resulted in a measured Ar of 0.01 to 0.02 m min-1. Water discharge and temperature difference between water and the melting ice were fundamental to ice ablation rate. The recent climate warming in the Canadian High Arctic will likely strongly contribute to the interaction and importance of the thermo-erosion and gullying processes in the High Arctic. Combined factors such as earlier or faster snowmelt, precipitation changes during the summer and positive feedback effects will probably increase the hydrological input to gullies and therefore enhance their development by thermo-erosion. Costard F. et al. 2003. Fluvial thermal erosion investigations along a rapidly eroding river bank: Application to the Lena River (central Siberia). Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 28: 1349-1359. Fortier D. et al. 2007. Observation of rapid drainage system development by thermal erosion of ice wedges on Bylot island, Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Permafrost and Periglacial Processes 18: 229-243.

  19. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer having liquid/wedge and gas/wedge interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic liquid densitometer that uses a material wedge having two sections, one with a liquid/wedge interface and another with a gas/wedge interface. It is preferred that the wedge have an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the liquid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the liquid. Ultrasonic signals are internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a liquid is determined by immersing the wedge into the liquid and measuring reflections of ultrasound at the liquid/wedge interface and at the gas/wedge interface.

  20. Geophysical Surveys for Detecting Distribution and Shape of Ice Wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Matsuoka, N.; Ikeda, A.

    2006-12-01

    Recent development of applied geophysical methods has shown detailed structure in various periglacial features. However, these methods have been rarely applied to studies in ice wedges. Thus, we attempted to display distribution and shape of ice wedges using a ground penetrating radar (GPR) and a direct current (DC) resistivity meter. The surveys were performed at a comprehensive monitoring site of ice-wedging in Adventdalen, Svalbard, where troughs and small cracks form polygonal patterns on the ground. Unknown structure below such new cracks is also focused in this study. We obtained 37 GPR profiles using 250 MHz signal. 2-D resistivity surveys were also performed along 14 GPR profiles. The electrodes were placed at 1 m intervals and their combination followed the Wenner array. In addition, shallow boreholes were dug across 5 troughs/cracks to estimate the width of ice wedge. The analyzed results show parabolic patterns formed by the multiple radar waveforms and largely increasing gradients of DC resistivity below the troughs and small cracks. The strong reflections of the radar signals and the starting zones of the increasing resistivity lay about 1 m deep, which corresponded to the top of ice wedges (0.7-0.9 m deep) revealed by the drilling. In the GPR profiles, a relatively flat pattern of the reflection was sandwiched by a pair of parabolic patterns below each well-developed trough, whereas a sharp parabolic pattern was detected below each small crack. These results mean that the presence of narrow ice wedges is detectable by the GPR method and the top of a parabolic pattern roughly corresponds to one edge of an ice wedge table. In the DC resistivity profiles, a high resistivity core exists below each trough and crack. The high resistivity probably resulted from ice having lower unfrozen water content than the surrounding silt materials. The heights of the cores indicate that the ice wedges were formed at least between 1 m and 3 m deep. The cores are, however

  1. Coherent beam combination using self-phase locked stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugate mirrors with a rotating wedge for high power laser generation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangwoo; Cha, Seongwoo; Oh, Jungsuk; Lee, Hwihyeong; Ahn, Heekyung; Churn, Kil Sung; Kong, Hong Jin

    2016-04-18

    The self-phase locking of a stimulated Brillouin scattering-phase conjugate mirror (SBS-PCM) allows a simple and scalable coherent beam combination of existing lasers. We propose a simple optical system composed of a rotating wedge and a concave mirror to overcome the power limit of the SBS-PCM. Its phase locking ability and the usefulness on the beam-combination laser are demonstrated experimentally. A four-beam combination is demonstrated using this SBS-PCM scheme. The relative phases between the beams were measured to be less than λ/24.7.

  2. Comparison of dosimetric characteristics of Siemens virtual and physical wedges for ONCOR linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Attalla, Ehab M; Abo-Elenein, H S; Ammar, H; El-Desoky, Ismail

    2010-07-01

    Dosimetric properties of virtual wedge (VW) and physical wedge (PW) in 6- and 10-MV photon beams from a Siemens ONCOR linear accelerator, including wedge factors, depth doses, dose profiles, peripheral doses, are compared. While there is a great difference in absolute values of wedge factors, VW factors (VWFs) and PW factors (PWFs) have a similar trend as a function of field size. PWFs have stronger depth dependence than VWF due to beam hardening in PW fields. VW dose profiles in the wedge direction, in general, match very well with those of PW, except in the toe area of large wedge angles with large field sizes. Dose profiles in the nonwedge direction show a significant reduction in PW fields due to off-axis beam softening and oblique filtration. PW fields have significantly higher peripheral doses than open and VW fields. VW fields have similar surface doses as the open fields, while PW fields have lower surface doses. Surface doses for both VW and PW increase with field size and slightly with wedge angle. For VW fields with wedge angles 45° and less, the initial gap up to 3 cm is dosimetrically acceptable when compared to dose profiles of PW. VW fields in general use less monitor units than PW fields.

  3. Calculating dose distributions and wedge factors for photon treatment fields with dynamic wedges based on a convolution/superposition method.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; McCullough, E C; Mackie, T R

    1998-01-01

    A convolution/superposition based method was developed to calculate dose distributions and wedge factors in photon treatment fields generated by dynamic wedges. This algorithm used a dual source photon beam model that accounted for both primary photons from the target and secondary photons scattered from the machine head. The segmented treatment tables (STT) were used to calculate realistic photon fluence distributions in the wedged fields. The inclusion of the extra-focal photons resulted in more accurate dose calculation in high dose gradient regions, particularly in the beam penumbra. The wedge factors calculated using the convolution method were also compared to the measured data and showed good agreement within 0.5%. The wedge factor varied significantly with the field width along the moving jaw direction, but not along the static jaw or the depth direction. This variation was found to be determined by the ending position of the moving jaw, or the STT of the dynamic wedge. In conclusion, the convolution method proposed in this work can be used to accurately compute dose for a dynamic or an intensity modulated treatment based on the fluence modulation in the treatment field.

  4. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  5. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  6. Calibration of the Wedge Prism

    Treesearch

    Charles B. Briscoe

    1957-01-01

    Since the introduction of plotless cruising in this country by Grosenbaugh and the later suggestion of using a wedge prism as an angle gauge by Bruce this method of determining basal area has been widely adopted in the South. One of the factors contributing to the occasionally unsatisfactory results obtained is failure to calibrate the prism used. As noted by Bruce the...

  7. Wedge immersed thermistor bolometer measures infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyfus, M. G.

    1965-01-01

    Wedge immersed-thermistor bolometer measures infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The thermistor flakes are immersed by optical contact on a wedge-shaped germanium lens whose narrow dimension is clamped between two complementary wedge-shaped germanium blocks bonded with a suitable adhesive.

  8. Ice wedges as climate archives - opportunities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Dereviagin, Alexander; Wetterich, Sebastian; Schirrmeister, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Permafrost regions are assumed to play a major role for Global Climate Change as they are susceptible to recent warming in particular with regard to the potential release of stored fossil carbon. Permafrost serves as archive of past environmental and climate conditions (such as sedimentation processes, temperature and precipitation regimes as well as landscape and ecosystem development) over tens of thousands of years that can be traced by the study of the frozen deposits, paleontological content and ground ice. Ground ice comprises all types of ice contained in frozen ground, including pore ice, segregation ice and ice wedges. Here, we focus on ice wedges as the most promising climate archive that can be studied by stable water isotope methods analogously to glacier ice. They may be identified by their vertically oriented foliations. Ice wedges form by the repeated filling of wintertime thermal contraction cracks by snow melt water in spring. As the melt water quickly refreezes at negative ground temperature no isotopic fractionation takes place. Hence, the isotopic composition (δ18O, δD, d excess) of wedge ice is assumed to be representative of annual cold period climate conditions, i.e. winter and spring. Ice wedges are widely distributed in non-glaciated high northern latitudes, are diagnostic of permafrost and, in general, indicative of cold and stable climate conditions. They are found in continuous and discontinuous permafrost zones and may also have formed during and survived interglacials. They may provide unique paleo information that is not captured by other climate archives. Usually, ice wedges are dated by radiocarbon dating of organic material incorporated in the ice, but also 36Cl/Cl ratios have been successfully used to date ice wedges. Nevertheless reliable age determination is challenging when studying ice wedges. Here we tackle the potential of ice wedges from the Siberian and American Arctic to trace past climate changes from stable isotope

  9. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Edward S.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  10. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, E.S.

    1980-05-09

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  11. Open Globe Injuries Presenting With Normal or High Intraocular Pressure.

    PubMed

    Margo, Jordan A; Feldman, Samantha; Addis, Hampton; Bodanapally, Uttam K; Ellish, Nancy; Saeedi, Osamah

    2016-07-01

    To determine the frequency, clinical characteristics, and visual outcomes of patients who present with high or normal intraocular pressure (IOP) and open globe injuries. Retrospective chart review. University of Maryland Medical Center, a level 1 trauma center. All cases of open globe injury presenting to The University of Maryland Medical Center from July 2005 to January 2014. Demographics, initial physical examination, computed tomography findings, IOP of the affected and unaffected eyes, and follow-up evaluations. (1) IOP 10 mm Hg or greater and (2) visual acuity. Of 132 eyes presenting with open globe injury, IOP was recorded in 38 (28%). Mean IOP for the affected and unaffected eyes was 14±10.3 mm Hg and 16.6±4.1 mm Hg, respectively. Twenty-three (59.4%) eyes had IOP greater than 10 mm Hg. Six eyes (16.2%) had IOP greater than 21 mm Hg. Using bivariate analysis, IOP greater than 10 mm Hg was associated with posterior open globe injury (P=0.01), posterior hemorrhage (P=0.04), and intraconal retrobulbar hemorrhage (P=0.05). Adjusting for age, sex, and race, IOP greater than 10 mm Hg was associated with the presence of posterior open globe injury on clinical examination (P=0.04). Higher presenting IOP was found to predict light perception or worse vision (P=0.01). Multivariate analysis showed that poor presenting vision was the best predictor of poor final vision (P<0.01). High IOP does not exclude open globe injury. It is a frequent finding in patients with open globe injuries and may be associated with posterior injury and poor visual prognosis.

  12. Wedge immersed thermistor bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyfus, M. G. (Inventor)

    1964-01-01

    An immersed thermistor bolometer for the detection of ultraviolet, visible, and infrared radiation is described. Two types of immersed bolometers are discussed. The immersion of thermistor flakes in a lens, or half immersed by optical contact on a lens, is examined. Lens materials are evaluated for optimum immersion including fused aluminum oxide, beryllium oxide, and germanium. The application of the bolometer to instruments in which the entrance pupil of the immersion optics has a high aspect ratio is considered.

  13. Slow waves moving near the openings in highly stressed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzev, Michail; Makarov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    In situ experiments have shown the unusual deformation waves near the openings on high depth of the construction. Process of the wave spreading is beginning after the mining and has two stages of the zonal mesocracking structure formation and development [1]. Extending in a radial direction, the wave poorly fades with distance. For phenomenon modelling the theoretical decision for non-Eucledian models about opening of round cross-section in strongly compressed rock massif is used [2]. The decision qualitatively repeats behaviour of a wave in a rock mass, adjustment of phenomenological parametres is executed. References [1] Vladimir V. Makarov, Mikhail A. Guzev, Vladimir N. Odintsev, Lyudmila S. Ksendzenko (2016) Periodical zonal character of damage near the openings in highly-stressed rock mass conditions. Journal of Rock Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering. Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 164-169. [2] M.A. Guzev, V.V. Makarov, 2007. Deforming and failure of the high stressed rocks around the openings, RAS Edit., Vladivostok, 2007, P. 232 (in Russian).

  14. Maladaptively high and low openness: the case for experiential permeability.

    PubMed

    Piedmont, Ralph L; Sherman, Martin F; Sherman, Nancy C

    2012-12-01

    The domain of Openness within the Five-Factor Model (FFM) has received inconsistent support as a source for maladaptive personality functioning, at least when the latter is confined to the disorders of personality included within the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR; APA, ). However, an advantage of the FFM relative to the DSM-IV-TR is that the former was developed to provide a reasonably comprehensive description of general personality structure. Rather than suggest that the FFM is inadequate because the DSM-IV-TR lacks much representation of Openness, it might be just as reasonable to suggest that the DSM-IV-TR is inadequate because it lacks an adequate representation of maladaptive variants of both high and low Openness. This article discusses the development and validation of a measure of these maladaptive variants, the Experiential Permeability Inventory. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Seamount subduction underneath an accretionary wedge: modelling mass wasting and wedge collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannu, Utsav; Ueda, Kosuke; Willett, Sean; Gerya, Taras; Strasser, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Seamounts (h >1 km) and knolls (h = 500 m-1000 m) cover about one-fifth of the total ocean floor area. These topographical highs of the ocean floor eventually get subducted. Subduction of these topographical features leads to severe deformation of the overriding plate and can cause extensive tectonic erosion and mass wasting of the frontal prism, which can ultimately cause a forearc wedge collapse. Large submarine landslides and the corresponding wedge collapse have previously been reported, for instance, in the northern part of the Hikurangi margin where the landslide is known as the giant Ruatoria debris avalanche, and have also been frequently reported in several seismic sections along the Costa Rica margin. Size and frequency relation of landslides suggest that the average size of submarine landslides in margins with rough subducting plates tends to be larger. However, this observation has not yet been tested or explained by physical models. In numerical subduction models, landslides take place, if at all, on a much larger timescale (in the order of 104-105 years, depending on the time steps of the model) than in natural cases. On the other hand, numerical models simulating mass wasting events such as avalanches and submarine landslides, typically model single events at a much smaller spatio-temporal domain, and do not consider long-term occurrence patterns of freely forming landslides. In this contribution, we present a multi-scale nested numerical approach to emulate short-term landslides within long-term progressive subduction. The numerical approach dynamically produces instantaneous submarine landslides and the resulting debris flow in the spatially and temporally refined inner model. Then we apply these convoluted changes in topography (e.g. due to the submarine landslide etc.) back to an outer larger-scale model instance that addresses wedge evolution. We use this approach to study the evolution of the accretionary wedge during seamount subduction.

  16. The Influence of Localized Glacial Erosion on Exhumation Paths in Accreting Coulomb Wedges: Insights from Particle Velocimetry Analysis of Sandbox Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, P. J.; Davis, K.; Haq, S. S. B.; Ridgway, K.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial erosion can have an impact on the location and development of faults in mountain belts. The rapid removal and deposition of rock, in some cases, is thought to affect the initiation of slip on older fault structures, or cause the development of new structures within the older part of the wedge. We present cross-sectional data from both erosional and non-erosional sandbox models of Coulomb wedges in order to quantify the impact of localized erosion on the location of and slip on deformational structures, as well as the general path of material through a wedge. To do this, we employ Lagrangian particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) using the open-source Python PTV toolkit trackpy, among a suite of other data analysis tools. We are able to extract robust and reliable sets of particle trajectories from a series of images without the need for predefined markers or marker-beds, instead identifying and tracking natural variations in sand color as individual particles. By comparing the motion of particles in cross-section to the local surface topography over an entire experiment, we determine a high-resolution record of exhumation rates, in addition to simple uplift rates. These comparisons are further informed by the use of high-definition Eulerian particle image velocimetry (PIV), which provides quantitative data about the distribution of deformation and instantaneous material displacements throughout a cross-sectional view of a Coulomb wedge. This allows us to interpret these pathways in relation to the behavior of active structures and general wedge morphology. In our experiments, we observe that localized glacial erosion has an impact on material pathways, in the form of an increased rate of exhumation locally, more vertical trajectories towards surface below the zone of erosion, and reactivation of older structures to maintain force balance within the entire wedge.

  17. Some Historical Treatments should not be Forgotten: A Review of Cast Wedging and A Trick to Normalize Non-Standardized Digital X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Nathan A.; Lee, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cast wedging is a simple and reproducible method of manipulating a sub-optimally reduced fracture producing a correction and a final alignment that is amenable to definitive closed treatment. Multiple successful techniques have been previously described in the literature (opening wedge, closing wedge and combination). Technical Note: We present a simple reproducible method of templating and executing a proper cast wedging technique using digital imaging systems that are not controlled for magnification with an illustrative case. Conclusion: Renewed interest in cast wedging can provide a cost effective treatment with proven clinical outcomes in an ever changing and uncertain reimbursement climate. PMID:27298956

  18. Assessment of computerized treatment planning system accuracy in calculating wedge factors of physical wedged fields for 6 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Wazir; Maqbool, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Hussain, Amjad; Tahir, Sajjad; Matiullah; Rooh, Gul; Ahmad, Tanveer; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2011-07-01

    Wedge filters are commonly used in external beam radiotherapy to achieve a uniform dose distribution within the target volume. The main objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the beam modifier algorithm of Theraplan plus (TPP version 3.8) treatment planning system and to confirm that either the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and wedged cross-sectional data or not. In this regard the effect of beam hardening and beam softening was studied with physical wedges for 6 MV photons. The Normalized Wedge Factors (NWFs) were measured experimentally as well as calculated with the Theraplan plus, as a function of depth and field size in a water phantom for 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° wedge filters. The beam hardening and softening was determined experimentally by deriving the required coefficients for all wedge angles. The TPP version 3.8 requires wedge transmission factor at single depth and multiple field sizes. Without incorporating the hardening and softening coefficients the percent difference between measured and calculated NFWs was as high as 7%. After the introduction of these parameters into the algorithm, the agreement between measured and TPP (V 3.8) calculated NWFs were improved to within 2 percent for various depths. Similar improvement was observed in TPP version 3.8 while calculating NWFs for various field sizes when the required coefficients were adjusted. In conclusion, the dose calculation algorithm of TPP version 3.8 showed good accuracy for a 6 MV photon beam provided beam hardening and softening parameters are taken into account. From the results, it is also concluded that, the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and

  19. Decollement controls on pro versus retro wedge deformation in mountain belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grool, Arjan; Huismans, Ritske S.; Ford, Mary

    2017-04-01

    Doubly vergent orogens have a pro-wedge (lower plate) and a retro-wedge (upper plate). Most shortening is accommodated on the pro-wedge while retro-wedge shortening is typically limited. For example, the Eastern Pyrenees have experienced about 145 km of convergence, of which about 125 km (86%) was accommodated in the pro-wedge and about 20 km (14%) in the retro-wedge. Strain partitioning between pro- and retro-wedge is influenced by several factors, some of which have been identified in past work: Extensional inheritance and syn-orogenic sedimentation can help to increase the percentage of total shortening accommodated in the retro-wedge while erosion promotes pro-wedge shortening. We use high-resolution 2D numerical models to investigate factors that control pro- versus retro-wedge shortening. For a total convergence similar to the Eastern Pyrenees, our models predict that variations in extensional inheritance and syn-orogenic sedimentation will result in a maximum of 10% of total shortening being accommodated in the retro-wedge. Here, we investigate the role of 1) the rheology and 2) distribution of a decollement layer. Our models show that: 1) Decollement rheology has a first order control on strain distribution between the pro- and the retro-wedge. After 145 km of total convergence, a model with a weak frictional (φ=2, shale-like) decollement will only accommodate 9% of total shortening in the retro-wedge. In contrast in models with a weak viscous (μ=1018, salt-like) decollement retro-wedge shortening amounts to 18% and a stronger, but still weak, viscous decollement (μ=1019) leads to 21%. 2) Décollement distribution influences the timing of the first outward propagation of thick-skinned deformation in the retro-wedge. In the Eastern Pyrenees, thick-skinned deformation propagated out into the retro-wedge within 145 km of total convergence. In models with a decollement on both sides of the orogen this only occurred after 240 km. If, as in the Eastern

  20. Open tube guideway for high speed air cushioned vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, R. S. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    This invention is a tubular shaped guideway for high-speed air-cushioned supported vehicles. The tubular guideway is split and separated such that the sides of the guideway are open. The upper portion of the tubular guideway is supported above the lower portion by truss-like structural members. The lower portion of the tubular guideway may be supported by the terrain over which the vehicle travels, on pedestals or some similar structure.

  1. NASA/GE Collaboration on Open Rotors - High Speed Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.

    2011-01-01

    A low-noise open rotor system is being tested in collaboration with General Electric and CFM International, a 50/50 joint company between Snecmaand GE. Candidate technologies for lower noise will be investigated as well as installation effects such as pylon integration. Current test status for the 8x6 SWT high speed testing is presented as well as future scheduled testing which includes the FAA/CLEEN test entry. The tunnel blockage and propeller thrust calibration configurations are shown.

  2. Experimental simulation of frost wedging-induced crack propagation in alpine rockwall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Hailiang; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Frost wedging is widely presumed to be the principal mechanism responsible for shattering jointed low-porosity rocks in high alpine rockwalls. The interaction of ice and rock physics regulates the efficacy of frost wedging. In order to better understand temporal aspects of this interaction, we present results of a series of laboratory experiments monitoring crack widening as a result of ice formation in an artificial crack (4mm wide, 80mm deep) cut 20 mm from the end of a rectangular granite block. Our results indicate that i) freezing direction plays a key role in determining the magnitude of crack widening; in short-term (1 day) experiments, maximum crack widening during top-down freezing (associated with 'autumn' conditions) was around 0.11mm, while inside-out freezing (resulting from 'spring' conditions) produced only 0.02 mm of deformation; ii) neither ice, nor water pressure (direct tension and hydraulic fracturing respectively) caused measurable irreversible crack widening during short-term tests, as the calculated maximum stress intensity at the crack tip was less than the fracture toughness of our granite sample; iii) development of ice pressure is closely related to the mechanical properties of the fracture in which it forms, and as such, the interaction of ice and rock is intrinsically dynamic; iv) irreversible crack widening (about 0.03mm) was only observed following a long-term (53 day) experiment representing a simplified transition from autumn to winter conditions. We suggest this is the result of stress corrosion aided by strong opening during freezing, and to a lesser degree by ice segregation up to one week after the initial freezing period, and downward migration of liquid water during the remainder of the test. Our results suggest the fundamental assumption of frost wedging, that rapid freezing from open ends of cracks can seal water inside the crack and thus cause damage through excessive stresses induced by volumetric expansion seems

  3. Wedge scattering by the method of iteration

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, D.; DeRaad, L.L. Jr.; St-Cyr, G.J.

    1993-07-01

    We have investigated scattering from the classic wedge and have shown that the method of iteration of the surface current integral equation predicts currents and backscattered fields that are good approximations to the Sommerfeld solution. The method of iteration has also been applied to truncated wedges on flat surfaces with the result that the scattering from this wedge is been to be very much different from the Sommerfeld solution. These results and their implications for ocean backscatter are reported herein.

  4. Wedge locality and asymptotic commutativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we study twist deformed quantum field theories obtained by combining the Wightman axiomatic approach with the idea of spacetime noncommutativity. We prove that the deformed fields with deformation parameters of opposite sign satisfy the condition of mutual asymptotic commutativity, which was used earlier in nonlocal quantum field theory as a substitute for relative locality. We also present an improved proof of the wedge localization property discovered for the deformed fields by Grosse and Lechner, and we show that the deformation leaves the asymptotic behavior of the vacuum expectation values in spacelike directions substantially unchanged.

  5. Effect of a trade between boattail angle and wedge size on the performance of a nonaxisymmetric wedge nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, George T., Jr.; Bare, E. Ann; Burley, James R., II

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effect of a boattail angle and wedge-size trade on the performance of nonaxisymmetric wedge nozzles installed on a generic twin-engine fighter aircraft model. Test data were obtained at static conditions and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.25. Angle of attack was held constant at 0 deg. High-pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust, and the nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to slightly over 15.0. For the configurations studied, the results indicate that wedge size can be reduced without affecting aeropropulsive performance.

  6. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2013-09-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI passbands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high-resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (˜1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. We also conclude that the variable TW Horologii and the blue straggler candidate HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km s-1.

  7. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, Rodney J.

    1996-01-01

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources.

  8. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, R.J.

    1996-10-22

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode is disclosed. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources. 12 figs.

  9. The opening of a high care hostel for problem drinkers.

    PubMed

    Bretherton, H

    1992-12-01

    This paper gives a personal and practice based account by one of the Team Leaders of the opening of a high-care hostel for problem drinkers in North London. The hostel, Rugby House, was set up to provide detoxification and assessment facilities for thirteen residents. It was part of the Rugby House Project, an alcohol agency in the voluntary sector. The paper explores the processes involved in setting up a new project; how the new paid employees turn a committee's vision into practice; how a group of individuals become a team; the importance of clarity about boundaries and underlying values and assumptions; the need for openness about negative as well as positive feelings; and the recognition that some of the experiences of staff will resonate with those of the residents for whom giving up drinking is a major life change.

  10. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  11. High-Quality Broadband BVRI Photometry of Benchmark Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.

    Photometric techniques are often used to observe stars and it can be demonstrated that fundamental stellar properties can be observationally determined using calibrated sets of photometric data. Many of the most powerful techniques utilized to calibrate stellar photometry employ the use of stars in clusters since the individual stars are believed to have many common properties such as age, composition, and approximate distance. Broadband photometric Johnson/Cousins BVRI observations are presented for several nearby open clusters. The new photometry has been tested for consistency relative to archival work and shown to be both accurate and precise. The careful use of a regular routine when making photometric observations, along with the monitoring of instrumental systems and the use of various quality control techniques when making observations or performing data reductions, will enhance an observer's ability to produce high-quality photometric measurements. This work contains a condensed review of the history of photometry, along with a brief description of several popular photometric systems that are often utilized in the field of stellar astrophysics. Publications written by Taylor or produced during the early Taylor and Joner collaboration are deemed especially relevant to the current work. A synopsis of seven archival publications is offered, along with a review of notable reports of VRI photometric observations for the nearby Hyades open star cluster. The body of this present work consists of four publications that appeared between the years 2005 and 2008, along with a soon to be submitted manuscript for a fifth publication. Each of these papers deals specifically with high-quality broadband photometry of open clusters with new data being presented for the Hyades, Coma, NGC 752, Praesepe, and M67. It is concluded that the VRI photometry produced during the Taylor and Joner collaborative investigations forms a high-quality data set that has been: (1) stable for

  12. Stacking and metamorphism of continuous segments of subducted lithosphere in a high-pressure wedge: The example of Alpine Corsica (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Beyssac, Olivier; Malavieille, Jacques; Molli, Giancarlo; Beltrando, Marco; Compagnoni, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Alpine Corsica consists of a stack of variably metamorphosed units of continental and Tethys-derived rocks. It represents an excellent example of high-pressure (HP) orogenic belt, such as the Western Alps, exposed over a small and accessible area. Compared to the Western Alps, the geology of Alpine Corsica is poorly unraveled. During the 1970s-80s, based on either lithostratigraphic or metamorphic field observations, various classifications of the belt have been proposed, but these classifications have been rarely matched together. Furthermore, through time, the internal complexity of large domains has been progressively left aside in the frame of large-scale geodynamic reconstructions. As a consequence, major open questions on the internal structure of the belt have remained unsolved. Apart from a few local studies, Alpine Corsica has not benefited of modern developments in petrology and basin research. This feature results in several uncertainties when combining lithostratigraphic and metamorphic patterns and, consequently, in the definition of an exhaustive architecture of the belt. In this paper we provide a review on the geology of Alpine Corsica, paying particular attention to the available lithostratigraphic and metamorphic classifications of the metamorphic terranes. These data are completed by a new and exhaustive metamorphic dataset obtained by means of thermometry based on Raman Spectroscopy of Carbonaceous Material (RSCM). This technique provides reliable insights on the peak temperature of the metamorphic history for CM-bearing metasediments. A detailed metamorphic characterization of metasediments, which have been previously largely ignored due to retrogression or to the lack of diagnostic mineralogy, is thus obtained and fruitfully coupled with the available lithostratigraphic data. Nine main tectono-metamorphic units are defined, from subgreenschist (ca. 280-300 °C) to the lawsonite-eclogite-facies (ca. 500-550 °C) condition. These units are

  13. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  14. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  15. The Gray Institute 'open' high-content, fluorescence lifetime microscopes.

    PubMed

    Barber, P R; Tullis, I D C; Pierce, G P; Newman, R G; Prentice, J; Rowley, M I; Matthews, D R; Ameer-Beg, S M; Vojnovic, B

    2013-08-01

    We describe a microscopy design methodology and details of microscopes built to this 'open' design approach. These demonstrate the first implementation of time-domain fluorescence microscopy in a flexible automated platform with the ability to ease the transition of this and other advanced microscopy techniques from development to use in routine biology applications. This approach allows easy expansion and modification of the platform capabilities, as it moves away from the use of a commercial, monolithic, microscope body to small, commercial off-the-shelf and custom made modular components. Drawings and diagrams of our microscopes have been made available under an open license for noncommercial use at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~atdgroup. Several automated high-content fluorescence microscope implementations have been constructed with this design framework and optimized for specific applications with multiwell plates and tissue microarrays. In particular, three platforms incorporate time-domain FLIM via time-correlated single photon counting in an automated fashion. We also present data from experiments performed on these platforms highlighting their automated wide-field and laser scanning capabilities designed for high-content microscopy. Devices using these designs also form radiation-beam 'end-stations' at Oxford and Surrey Universities, showing the versatility and extendibility of this approach.

  16. Two critical tapers in a single wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, J.; Burg, J.-P.; Brun, J.-P.

    2009-04-01

    Thrust involving a ductile décollement (e.g. salt, over-pressured shales) like Zagros, Jura, Pakistan Salt Ranges, Cascades and Makran have in common a small cross-sectional taper, attributed to large thrust spacing and fast frontward propagation above the ductile décollement. Such a low cross-sectional taper has been analytically explained by approximating the ductile layer as a horizon with negligible shear strength. We tested the development of thrust wedges involving a ductile basal décollement of uniform shear strength by means of laboratory experiments. The model consists of a sand layer with initial wedge geometry and a basal ductile décollement of constant thickness and shear strength made of silicone putty. 30% of bulk shortening is applied to the wedge at constant velocity. Thrusting starts in the middle of the wedge, followed by in-sequence frontward propagation. The back part of the wedge, between backstop and the closest thrust, remains undeformed; it passively advances over the base without internal deformation. It appears that both domains have different critical tapers. The inner domain is in a critical state from the onset of shortening (i.e. the initial wedge is already critical), while the frontal domain steadily acquires a state of critical taper by thrusting. This result is at variance with the classical assumption that shortening of a wedge made of homogeneous layers creates a single critical taper. The experimental thrust wedges do show other features characteristic for weak décollement wedges like narrow cross-sectional taper, large thrust spacing and variety in thrust geometries. Application of the results to natural thrust wedges like the Jura Mountains could shed new light on their development and geometry at depth.

  17. Highly reversible open framework nanoscale electrodes for divalent ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Richard Y; Wessells, Colin D; Huggins, Robert A; Cui, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The reversible insertion of monovalent ions such as lithium into electrode materials has enabled the development of rechargeable batteries with high energy density. Reversible insertion of divalent ions such as magnesium would allow the creation of new battery chemistries that are potentially safer and cheaper than lithium-based batteries. Here we report that nanomaterials in the Prussian Blue family of open framework materials, such as nickel hexacyanoferrate, allow for the reversible insertion of aqueous alkaline earth divalent ions, including Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+). We show unprecedented long cycle life and high rate performance for divalent ion insertion. Our results represent a step forward and pave the way for future development in divalent batteries.

  18. Experimental investigation of hypersonic flow induced separation over double wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Tokitada

    2009-09-01

    Flow separation occurs over the compression corners generated by deflected control surfaces on hypersonic re-entry vehicles and in the inlet of scram jet engines. Configurations like a double wedge and double cone model are useful for studying the separated flow features. Flow fields around concave corners are relatively complicated and produce several classical viscous flow features depending on the combination of the first and second wedge or cone half apex angles. Particularly characteristic phenomena are mainly shock/boundary layer, shock/shock interaction, unsteady shear layers and non-linear shock oscillations. Although most of these basic gas dynamics characteristics are well known, it is not clear what happens at high enthalpy conditions. This paper reports a result of flow fields over a double wedge at a stagnation enthalpy of 4.8 MJ/kg. The experiment was carried out in a free piston shock tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 6.99. Schlieren and double exposure holographic interferometry were applied to visualize the flow field over the double wedge.

  19. Isolating active orogenic wedge deformation in the southern Subandes of Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jonathan R.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Foster, James H.; Bevis, Michael; Echalar, Arturo; Caccamise, Dana; Heck, Jacob; Kendrick, Eric; Ahlgren, Kevin; Raleigh, David; Smalley, Robert; Vergani, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    A new GPS-derived surface velocity field for the central Andean backarc permits an assessment of orogenic wedge deformation across the southern Subandes of Bolivia, where recent studies suggest that great earthquakes (>Mw 8) are possible. We find that the backarc is not isolated from the main plate boundary seismic cycle. Rather, signals from subduction zone earthquakes contaminate the velocity field at distances greater than 800 km from the Chile trench. Two new wedge-crossing velocity profiles, corrected for seasonal and earthquake affects, reveal distinct regions that reflect (1) locking of the main plate boundary across the high Andes, (2) the location of and loading rate at the back of orogenic wedge, and (3) an east flank velocity gradient indicative of décollement locking beneath the Subandes. Modeling of the Subandean portions of the profiles indicates along-strike variations in the décollement locked width (WL) and wedge loading rate; the northern wedge décollement has a WL of ~100 km while accumulating slip at a rate of ~14 mm/yr, whereas the southern wedge has a WL of ~61 km and a slip rate of ~7 mm/yr. When compared to Quaternary estimates of geologic shortening and evidence for Holocene internal wedge deformation, the new GPS-derived wedge loading rates may indicate that the southern wedge is experiencing a phase of thickening via reactivation of preexisting internal structures. In contrast, we suspect that the northern wedge is undergoing an accretion or widening phase primarily via slip on relatively young thrust-front faults.

  20. Open air demolition of facilities highly contaminated with plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, E.R.; Lackey, M.B.; Stevens, J.M.; Zinsli, L.C.

    2007-07-01

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than 'hands on' techniques. (authors)

  1. OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2007-05-31

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques.

  2. The OpenCourseWare Model: High-Impact Open Educational Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    OpenCourseWare (OCW) is one among several models for offering open educational resources (OER). This article explains the OCW model and its position within the broader OER context. OCW primarily represents publication of existing course materials already in use for teaching purposes. OCW projects are most often institutional, carrying the…

  3. The OpenCourseWare Model: High-Impact Open Educational Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    OpenCourseWare (OCW) is one among several models for offering open educational resources (OER). This article explains the OCW model and its position within the broader OER context. OCW primarily represents publication of existing course materials already in use for teaching purposes. OCW projects are most often institutional, carrying the…

  4. Capillarity driven motion of solid film wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.; Miksis, M.J.; Voorhees, P.W.; Davis, S.H.

    1997-06-01

    A solid film freshly deposited on a substrate may form a non-equilibrium contact angle with the substrate, and will evolve. This morphological evolution near the contact line is investigated by studying the motion of a solid wedge on a substrate. The contact angle of the wedge changes at time t = 0 from the wedge angle {alpha} to the equilibrium contact angle {beta}, and its effects spread into the wedge via capillarity-driven surface diffusion. The film profiles at different times are found to be self-similar, with the length scale increasing as t{sup 1 4}. The self-similar film profile is determined numerically by a shooting method for {alpha} and {beta} between 0 and 180. In general, the authors find that the film remains a wedge when {alpha} = {beta}. For {alpha} < {beta}, the film retracts, whereas for {alpha} > {beta}, the film extends. For {alpha} = 90{degree}, the results describe the growth of grain-boundary grooves for arbitrary dihedral angles. For {beta} = 90{degree}, the solution also applies to a free-standing wedge, and the thin-wedge profiles agree qualitatively with those observed in transmission electron microscope specimens.

  5. ExpertEyes: open-source, high-definition eyetracking.

    PubMed

    Parada, Francisco J; Wyatte, Dean; Yu, Chen; Akavipat, Ruj; Emerick, Brandi; Busey, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    ExpertEyes is a low-cost, open-source package of hardware and software that is designed to provide portable high-definition eyetracking. The project involves several technological innovations, including portability, high-definition video recording, and multiplatform software support. It was designed for challenging recording environments, and all processing is done offline to allow for optimization of parameter estimation. The pupil and corneal reflection are estimated using a novel forward eye model that simultaneously fits both the pupil and the corneal reflection with full ellipses, addressing a common situation in which the corneal reflection sits at the edge of the pupil and therefore breaks the contour of the ellipse. The accuracy and precision of the system are comparable to or better than what is available in commercial eyetracking systems, with a typical accuracy of less than 0.4° and best accuracy below 0.3°, and with a typical precision (SD method) around 0.3° and best precision below 0.2°. Part of the success of the system comes from a high-resolution eye image. The high image quality results from uncasing common digital camcorders and recording directly to SD cards, which avoids the limitations of the analog NTSC format. The software is freely downloadable, and complete hardware plans are available, along with sources for custom parts.

  6. The acoustical structure of highly porous open-cell foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    This work concerns both the theoretical prediction and measurement of structural parameters in open-cell highly porous polyurethane foams. Of particular interest are the dynamic flow resistance, thermal time constant, and mass structure factor and their dependence on frequency and geometry of the cellular structure. The predictions of cell size parameters, static flow resistance, and heat transfer as accounted for by a Nusselt number are compared with measurement. Since the static flow resistance and inverse thermal time constant are interrelated via the 'mean' pore size parameter of Biot, only two independent measurements such as volume porosity and mean filament diameter are required to make the predictions for a given fluid condition. The agreements between this theory and nonacoustical experiments are excellent.

  7. The acoustical structure of highly porous open-cell foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    This work concerns both the theoretical prediction and measurement of structural parameters in open-cell highly porous polyurethane foams. Of particular interest are the dynamic flow resistance, thermal time constant, and mass structure factor and their dependence on frequency and geometry of the cellular structure. The predictions of cell size parameters, static flow resistance, and heat transfer as accounted for by a Nusselt number are compared with measurement. Since the static flow resistance and inverse thermal time constant are interrelated via the 'mean' pore size parameter of Biot, only two independent measurements such as volume porosity and mean filament diameter are required to make the predictions for a given fluid condition. The agreements between this theory and nonacoustical experiments are excellent.

  8. Pressure Distributions About Finite Wedges in Bounded and Unbounded Subsonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, Patrick L; Prasse, Ernst I

    1953-01-01

    An analytical investigation of incompressible flow about wedges was made to determine effects of tunnel-wedge ratio and wedge angle on the wedge pressure distributions. The region of applicability of infinite wedge-type velocity distribution was examined for finite wedges. Theoretical and experimental pressure coefficients for various tunnel-wedge ratios, wedge angles, and subsonic Mach numbers were compared.

  9. Distribution and activity of ice wedges across the forest-tundra transition, western Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokelj, S. V.; Lantz, T. C.; Wolfe, S. A.; Kanigan, J. C.; Morse, P. D.; Coutts, R.; Molina-Giraldo, N.; Burn, C. R.

    2014-09-01

    Remote sensing, regional ground temperature and ground ice observations, and numerical simulation were used to investigate the size, distribution, and activity of ice wedges in fine-grained mineral and organic soils across the forest-tundra transition in uplands east of the Mackenzie Delta. In the northernmost dwarf-shrub tundra, ice wedge polygons cover up to 40% of the ground surface, with the wedges commonly exceeding 3 m in width. The largest ice wedges are in peatlands where thermal contraction cracking occurs more frequently than in nearby hummocky terrain with fine-grained soils. There are fewer ice wedges, rarely exceeding 2 m in width, in uplands to the south and none have been found in mineral soils of the tall-shrub tundra, although active ice wedges are found there throughout peatlands. In the spruce forest zone, small, relict ice wedges are restricted to peatlands. At tundra sites, winter temperatures at the top of permafrost are lower in organic than mineral soils because of the shallow permafrost table, occurrence of phase change at 0°C, and the relatively high thermal conductivity of icy peat. Due to these factors and the high coefficient of thermal contraction of frozen saturated peat, ice wedge cracking and growth is more common in peatlands than in mineral soil. However, the high latent heat content of saturated organic active layer soils may inhibit freezeback, particularly where thick snow accumulates, making the permafrost and the ice wedges in spruce forest polygonal peatlands susceptible to degradation following alteration of drainage or climate warming.

  10. Open-source, high-throughput ultrasound treatment chamber.

    PubMed

    Yddal, Torstein; Cochran, Sandy; Gilja, Odd Helge; Postema, Michiel; Kotopoulis, Spiros

    2015-02-01

    Studying the effects of ultrasound on biological cells requires extensive knowledge of both the physical ultrasound and cellular biology. Translating knowledge between these fields can be complicated and time consuming. With the vast range of ultrasonic equipment available, nearly every research group uses different or unique devices. Hence, recreating the experimental conditions and results may be expensive or difficult. For this reason, we have developed devices to combat the common problems seen in state-of-the-art biomedical ultrasound research. In this paper, we present the design, fabrication, and characterisation of an open-source device that is easy to manufacture, allows for parallel sample sonication, and is highly reproducible, with complete acoustic calibration. This device is designed to act as a template for sample sonication experiments. We demonstrate the fabrication technique for devices designed to sonicate 24-well plates and OptiCell™ using three-dimensional (3D) printing and low-cost consumables. We increased the pressure output by electrical impedance matching of the transducers using transmission line transformers, resulting in an increase by a factor of 3.15. The devices cost approximately €220 in consumables, with a major portion attributed to the 3D printing, and can be fabricated in approximately 8 working hours. Our results show that, if our protocol is followed, the mean acoustic output between devices has a variance of <1%. We openly provide the 3D files and operation software allowing any laboratory to fabricate and use these devices at minimal cost and without substantial prior know-how.

  11. Stability of two angular stable locking plates for open wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO): TomoFix™ versus LOQTEQ® HTO plate.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Wolf; Wall, Alexander; Paulin, Thomas; Park, Hi Un; Heymann, Lydia

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test the mechanical stability of LOQTEQ® HTO plate in comparison to the TomoFix™ internal plate fixator. An unstable fracture gap model with two standardized polyoxymethylene (POM) cylinders was used for this study. With this model 5 LOQTEQ® HTO plates and 5 TomoFix™ were cyclically loaded. The start load was 100 N and increased by 50 N after each successful completed cycle. Each load step included 250,000 cycles. All tests were performed in accordance with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Specification and Test Method for Metallic Bone Plates F382-99(2003)e1. The mean fatigue strength of the LOQTEQ® HTO Plate was 155 % of the value gained by the TomoFix™ implant. This difference was statistically significant (t test <0.001). There was also a significant difference in the cycles but both implants survived. The LOQTEQ® HTO Plate system survived 1,520,336.8 (±121,687.7) cycles, whereas the TomoFix™ group passed on average 847,802,600 (±134,660.7) cycles. In both groups, the only failure mode was plate breakage in a shaft hole. The results of the present study showed that fatigue strength of the LOQTEQ® HTO plate was significantly higher in comparison to TomoFix™. These results justify the clinical use of the LOQTEQ® HTO plate.

  12. Two brittle ductile transitions in subduction wedges, as revealed by topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, C.; Brandon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction wedges contain two brittle ductile transitions. One transition occurs within the wedge interior, and a second transition occurs along the decollement. The decollement typically has faster strain rates, which suggests that the brittle ductile transition along the decollement will be more rearward (deeper) than the transition within the interior. However, the presence of distinct rheologies or other factors such as pore fluid pressure along the decollement may reverse the order of the brittle-ductile transitions. We adopt a solution by Williams et al., (1994) to invert for these brittle ductile transitions using the wedge surface topography. At present, this model does not include an s point or sediment loading atop the wedge. The Hellenic wedge, however, as exposed in Crete presents an ideal setting to test these ideas. We find that the broad high of the Mediterranean ridge represents the coulomb frictional part of the Hellenic wedge. The rollover in topography north of the ridge results from curvature of the down going plate, creating a negative alpha depression in the vicinity of the Strabo, Pliny, and Ionian 'troughs' south of Crete. A steep topographic rise out of these troughs and subsequent flattening reflects the brittle ductile transition at depth in both the decollement and the wedge interior. Crete exposes the high-pressure viscous core of the wedge, and pressure solution textures provide additional evidence for viscous deformation in the rearward part of the wedge. The location of the decollement brittle ductile transition has been previously poorly constrained, and Crete has never experienced a subduction zone earthquake in recorded history. Williams, C. A., et al., (1994). Effect of the brittle ductile transition on the topography of compressive mountain belts on Earth and Venus. Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth

  13. Deformation of brittle-ductile thrust wedges in experiments and nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, J. H. W.; Brun, J. P.; Sokoutis, D.

    2003-10-01

    Even though the rheology of thrust wedges is mostly frictional, a basal ductile decollement is often involved. By comparison with purely frictional wedges, such brittle-ductile wedges generally display anomalous structures such as backward vergence, widely spaced thrust units, and nonfrontward sequences of thrust development. Laboratory experiments are used here to study the deformation of brittle-ductile thrust wedges. Results are compared with natural systems in the Jura Mountains and the northern Pakistan Salt Range and Potwar Plateau. Two series of three models are used to illustrate the effects of varying the basal wedge angle (β) and shortening rate (V). These two parameters directly control variations in relative strength between brittle and ductile layers (BD coupling). Wedges with strong BD coupling (low β and high V) give almost regular frontward sequences with closely spaced thrust units and, as such, are not significantly different from purely frictional wedges. Weak BD coupling (high β and low V) gives dominantly backward thrusting sequences. Intermediate BD coupling produces frontward-backward oscillating sequences. The spacing of thrust units increases as coupling decreases. Back thrusts develop in parts of a wedge where BD coupling is weak, regardless of the thrust sequence. Wedges with weak BD coupling need large amounts of bulk shortening (more than 30%) to attain a state of equilibrium, at which stable sliding along the base occurs. On this basis, we argue that a state of equilibrium has not yet been attained in at least some parts of the Jura Mountains and eastern Salt Range and Potwar Plateau thrust systems.

  14. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Porosity Open Cell Nickel Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, Alan D.; Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of high-porosity open cell nickel foam samples was measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using a standard steady-state technique. The samples, measuring 23.8 mm, 18.7 mm, and 13.6 mm in thickness, were constructed with layers of 1.7 mm thick foam with a porosity of 0.968. Tests were conducted with the specimens subjected to temperature differences of 100 to 1000 K across the thickness and at environmental pressures of 10(exp -4) to 750 mm Hg. All test were conducted in a gaseous nitrogen environment. A one-dimensional finite volume numerical model was developed to model combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in the foam. The radiation heat transfer was modeled using the two-flux approximation. Solid and gas conduction were modeled using standard techniques for high porosity media. A parameter estimation technique was used in conjunction with the measured and predicted thermal conductivities at pressures of 10(exp -4) and 750 mm Hg to determine the extinction coefficient, albedo of scattering, and weighting factors for modeling the conduction thermal conductivity. The measured and predicted conductivities over the intermediate pressure values differed by 13%.

  15. A Study in Wedge Waves with Applications in Acoustic Delay- line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Po-Hsien; Wang, Wen-Chi; Yang, Che-Hua

    The acoustic delay line is usually used to supply protection from dangerous environment, to enhance signal intensity by fit geometry of analyte, or to achieve specific angle/focusing by Snell's law, but rarely to avoid noise from coupling agent and to raise spatial resolution by reducing contact area. This study is focused on wedge waves with applications in delay-line to solve the knot of traditionally transducer measurement. Wedge waves are guided acoustic waves propagating along the tip of a wedge. The advantages of wedge being used in acoustic delay line are wedge waves has large motion amplitude of anti-symmetric flexural (ASF) mode, low energy attenuation and the velocity of ASF more is regular weather frequency varied or not. According the characteristic of wedge wave and vibration direction of particle, the acoustical wedge delay line with high signal- noise-ratio, approximate point-like contact area, without coupling agent and in/out vibration measurement by specific experimental setup is developed.

  16. Semi-analytical solutions of groundwater flow in multi-zone (patchy) wedge-shaped aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samani, Nozar; Sedghi, Mohammad M.

    2015-03-01

    Alluvial fans are potential sites of potable groundwater in many parts of the world. Characteristics of alluvial fans sediments are changed radially from high energy coarse-grained deposition near the apex to low energy fine-grained deposition downstream so that patchy wedge-shaped aquifers with radial heterogeneity are formed. The hydraulic parameters of the aquifers (e.g. hydraulic conductivity and specific storage) change in the same fashion. Analytical or semi-analytical solutions of the flow in wedge-shaped aquifers are available for homogeneous cases. In this paper we derive semi-analytical solutions of groundwater flow to a well in multi-zone wedge-shaped aquifers. Solutions are provided for three wedge boundary configurations namely: constant head-constant head wedge, constant head-barrier wedge and barrier-barrier wedge. Derivation involves the use of integral transforms methods. The effect of heterogeneity ratios of zones on the response of the aquifer is examined. The results are presented in form of drawdown and drawdown derivative type curves. Heterogeneity has a significant effect on over all response of the pumped aquifer. Solutions help understanding the behavior of heterogeneous multi-zone aquifers for sustainable development of the groundwater resources in alluvial fans.

  17. A specially curved wedge for eliminating wedge angle effect in unsteady shock reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2017-08-01

    A curved wedge with a specific shape is designed and manufactured to guarantee the wedge angle unvaried during the cylindrically converging shock moving along the wedge. Thus the variation of the wedge angle caused by the wedge will be eliminated in unsteady shock reflection. Different initial wedge angles are considered to observe regular reflection and Mach reflection. When Mach reflection occurs, it is found that direct Mach reflection is persisted over the wedge without wave pattern transitions, which differs from our previous work with varied wedge angles [Zhang et al. "Reflection of cylindrical converging shock wave over a plane wedge," Phys. Fluids 28, 086101 (2016)]. Moreover, the Mach stem is nearly straight when the wedge angle is relatively large, and the trajectory of triple point can be well predicted by three-shock theory. It is believed that the straight Mach stem results from the coupling effect of the converging shock and the convexly curved wedge, which exert opposite effects on the Mach stem curvature. As the wedge angle reduces, the three-shock theory prediction deviates from the present results owing to the curved Mach stem. Stronger vortices are produced near the wall, which are caused by the interaction of two shear layers, and whether the stronger vortices will be generated near the wall depends on the reflection number of the shock wave over the tube wall and wedge. The length of disturbed shock front in the Mach reflection is found to increase nonlinearly due to the unsteady feature of the flow. The growth rate of length reduces as the shock converges because of the geometrical contraction effect. Further the lengths of the Mach stem and the disturbed shock front are compared, and the results show that although the difference exists between them, both of them show a similar variation tendency. Compared with our previous work with varied wedge angles, the variation of the wedge angle has great effects on the Mach stem length and wave

  18. Numerical simulation of vortex-wedge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Ho; Lee, Duck-Joo

    1994-06-01

    Interactions between vortical flows and a solid surface cause one of the primary sources of noise and unsteady loading. The mechanism of the interaction is studied numerically for a single Rankine vortex impinging upon a wedge. An Euler-Lagrangian method is employed to calculate the unsteady, viscous, incompressible flows in two dimensions. A random vortex method is used to describe the vorticity dominant field. A fast vortex method is used to reduce the computational time in the calculation of the convection velocity of each vortex particle. A Schwarz-Christoffel transformation is used to map the numerical domain onto the physical domain. Vortex partical plots, velocity vectors, and streamlines are presented at selected times for both inviscid and viscous interactions. It is observed that the incident rankine vortex distorts and is split by the wedge as it nears and passes the wedge, and the vortices generated from the leading edge toward the underside of the wedge form into a single vortex. The vorticity orientation of the shed vortex is opposite to that of the incident vortex. It is found that the convection velocity of the shed vortex is changed wheen it comes off the leading edge of the wedge, and the strength of the shed vortex varies with the time during the vortex-wedge interaction. This strength variation is presumed to influence the shed vortex convection velocity. The overall features for the interaction agree well with the experimental results of Ziada and Rockwell.

  19. Aerodynamic Analysis Over Double Wedge Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, U. S.; Ajay, V. S.; Rajat, R. H.; Samanyu, S.

    2017-05-01

    Aeronautical studies are being focused more towards supersonic flights and methods to attain a better and safer flight with highest possible performance. Aerodynamic analysis is part of the whole procedure, which includes focusing on airfoil shapes which will permit sustained flight of aircraft at these speeds. Airfoil shapes differ based on the applications, hence the airfoil shapes considered for supersonic speeds are different from the ones considered for Subsonic. The present work is based on the effects of change in physical parameter for the Double wedge airfoil. Mach number range taken is for transonic and supersonic. Physical parameters considered for the Double wedge case with wedge angle (ranging from 5 degree to 15 degree. Available Computational tools are utilized for analysis. Double wedge airfoil is analysed at different Angles of attack (AOA) based on the wedge angle. Analysis is carried out using fluent at standard conditions with specific heat ratio taken as 1.4. Manual calculations for oblique shock properties are calculated with the help of Microsoft excel. MATLAB is used to form a code for obtaining shock angle with Mach number and wedge angle at the given parameters. Results obtained from manual calculations and fluent analysis are cross checked.

  20. Open Principle for Large High-Resolution Solar Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sliepen, Guus

    2009-04-01

    Vacuum solar telescopes solve the problem of image deterioration inside the telescope due to refractive index fluctuations of the air heated by the solar light. However, such telescopes have a practical diameter limit somewhat over 1 m. The Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) was the pioneering demonstrator of the open-telescope technology without need of vacuum, now pursued in the German GREGOR. Important ingredients for this technology are primary beam completely open to natural wind flow, stiff but still open design by principal stiff overall geometries in combination with carefully designed joints and completely open-foldable dome constructions based on tensioned strong cloth. Further developments to large sizes are made within the framework of the design study for a European Solar Telescope (EST).

  1. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Two Wedge Airfoil Sections Including Unsteady Flow Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick J.

    1959-01-01

    A two-dimensional wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted on a 20-percent-thick single-wedge airfoil section. Steady-state forces and moments were determined from pressure measurements at Mach numbers from 0.70 to about 1.25. Additional information on the flows about the single wedge is provided by means of instantaneous pressure measurements at Mach numbers up to unity. Pressure distributions were also obtained on a symmetrical double-wedge or diamond-shaped profile which had the same leading-edge included angle as the single-wedge airfoil. A comparison of the data on the two profiles to provide information on the effects of the afterbody showed that with the exception of drag, the single-wedge profile proved to be aerodynamically superior to the diamond profile in all respects. The lift effectiveness of the single-wedge airfoil section far exceeded that of conventional thin airfoil sections over the speed range of the investigation. Pitching-moment irregularities, caused by negative loadings near the trailing edge, generally associated with conventional airfoils of equivalent thicknesses were not exhibited by the single-wedge profile. Moderately high pulsating pressures existing over the base of the single-wedge airfoil section were significantly reduced as the Mach number was increased beyond 0.92 and the boundaries of the dead airspace at the base of the model converged to eliminate the vortex street in the wake. Increasing the leading-edge radius from 0 to 1 percent of the chord had a minor effect on the steady-state forces and generally raised the level of pressure pulsations over the forward part of the single-wedge profile.

  2. Dual Double-Wedge Pseudo-Depolarizer with Anamorphic PSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter; Thompson, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A polarized scene, which may occur at oblique illumination angles, creates a radiometric signal that varies as a function of viewing angle. One common optical component that is used to minimize such an effect is a polarization scrambler or depolarizer. As part of the CLARREO mission, the SOLARIS instrument project at Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a new class of polarization scramblers using a dual double-wedge pseudo-depolarizer that produces an anamorphic point spread function (PSF). The SOLARIS instrument uses two Wollaston type scramblers in series, each with a distinct wedge angle, to image a pseudo-depolarized scene that is free of eigenstates. Since each wedge is distinct, the scrambler is able to produce an anamorphic PSF that maintains high spatial resolution in one dimension by sacrificing the spatial resolution in the other dimension. This scrambler geometry is ideal for 1-D imagers, such as pushbroom slit spectrometers, which require high spectral resolution, high spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to polarized light. Moreover, the geometry is applicable to a wide range of scientific instruments that require both high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) and low sensitivity to polarized scenes

  3. Recent circum-Arctic ice-wedge degradation and its hydrological impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljedahl, A. K.; Boike, J.; Daanen, R. P.; Fedorov, A. N.; Frost, G. V., Jr.; Grosse, G.; Hinzman, L. D.; Iijima, Y.; Jorgenson, J. C.; Matveyeva, N.; Necsoiu, M.; Raynolds, M. K.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Schulla, J.; Tape, K. D.; Walker, D. A.; Wilson, C. J.; Yabuki, H.; Zona, D.

    2016-12-01

    Ice-wedges are common permafrost features formed over hundreds to thousands of years of repeated frost cracking and ice vein growth. We used field and remote sensing observations to assess changes in areas dominated by ice-wedges, and we simulated the effects of those changes on watershed-scale hydrology. We show that top melting of ice-wedges and subsequent ground subsidence has occurred at multiple sites in the North American and Russian Arctic. At most sites, melting ice-wedges have initially resulted in increased wetness contrast across the landscape, evident as increased surface water in the ice-wedge polygon troughs and somewhat drier polygon centers. Most areas are becoming more heterogeneous with wetter troughs, more small ponds (themokarst pits forming initially at ice-wedge intersections and then spreading along the troughs) and drier polygon centers. Some areas with initial good drainage, such as near creeks, lake margins, and in hilly terrain, high-centered polygons form an overall landscape drying due to a drying of both polygon centers and troughs. Unlike the multi-decadal warming observed in permafrost temperatures, the ice-wedge melting that we observed appeared as a sub-decadal response, even at locations with low mean annual permafrost temperatures (down to -14 °C). Gradual long-term air and permafrost warming combined with anomalously warm summers or deep snow winters preceded the onset of the ice-wedge melting. To assess hydrological impacts of ice-wedge melting, we simulated tundra water balance before and after melting. Our coupled hydrological and thermal model experiments applied over hypothetical polygon surfaces suggest that (1) ice-wedge melting that produces a connected trough-network reduces inundation and increases runoff, and that (2) changing patterns of snow distribution due to differential ground subsidence has a major control on ice-wedge polygon tundra water balance despite an identical snow water equivalent at the landscape

  4. Open ISEmeter: An open hardware high-impedance interface for potentiometric detection

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador, C.; Carbajo, J.; Mozo, J. D.; Alvarez, J. L.

    2016-05-15

    In this work, a new open hardware interface based on Arduino to read electromotive force (emf) from potentiometric detectors is presented. The interface has been fully designed with the open code philosophy and all documentation will be accessible on web. The paper describes a comprehensive project including the electronic design, the firmware loaded on Arduino, and the Java-coded graphical user interface to load data in a computer (PC or Mac) for processing. The prototype was tested by measuring the calibration curve of a detector. As detection element, an active poly(vinyl chloride)-based membrane was used, doped with cetyltrimethylammonium dodecylsulphate (CTA{sup +}-DS{sup −}). The experimental measures of emf indicate Nernstian behaviour with the CTA{sup +} content of test solutions, as it was described in the literature, proving the validity of the developed prototype. A comparative analysis of performance was made by using the same chemical detector but changing the measurement instrumentation.

  5. Early complications after high tibial osteotomy: a comparison of two techniques.

    PubMed

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Patt, Thomas W; Kleinhout, Miriam Y; van der Vis, Harm M; Albers, G H Rob

    2008-01-01

    This prospective cohort study compared opening wedge high tibial osteotomy with use of the Puddu plate and the Vitoss synthetic cancellous bone versus closing wedge high tibial osteotomy with use of the AO/ASIF L-plate, focusing on complications (nonunions, infections, loss of correction, reoperations) and patient satisfaction (visual linear analog scale). During a 10-month period, we performed high tibial osteotomy for 40 patients experiencing medial knee osteoarthritis and a varus deformity. The average follow-up was 11 months. The complication rate in patients treated with the opening wedge technique was significantly higher regarding tibial nonunion, loss of correction, and material failure. Patients in the closing wedge group were more satisfied with the postoperative result. This study found that the Puddu plate, despite 6 weeks of non-weight bearing facilitating the osseous consolidation with Vitoss cement, was not able to maintain the correction during the time required for bone healing.

  6. Wettability patterning for high-rate, pumpless fluid transport on open, non-planar microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Aritra; Ganguly, Ranjan; Schutzius, Thomas M; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2014-05-07

    Surface tension driven transport of liquids on open substrates offers an enabling tool for open micro total analysis systems that are becoming increasingly popular for low-cost biomedical diagnostic devices. The present study uses a facile wettability patterning method to produce open microfluidic tracks that - due to their shape, surface texture and chemistry - are capable of transporting a wide range of liquid volumes (~1-500 μL) on-chip, overcoming viscous and other opposing forces (e.g., gravity) at the pertinent length scales. Small volumes are handled as individual droplets, while larger volumes require repeated droplet transport. The concept is developed and demonstrated with coatings based on TiO2 filler particles, which, when present in adequate (~80 wt.%) quantities within a hydrophobic fluoroacrylic polymer matrix, form composites that are intrinsically superhydrophobic. Such composite coatings become superhydrophilic upon exposure to UV light (390 nm). A commercial laser printer-based photo-masking approach is used on the coating for spatially selective wettability conversion from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic. Carefully designed wedge-patterned surface tension confined tracks on the open-air devices move liquid on them without power input, even when acting against gravity. Simple designs of wettability patterning are used on versatile substrates (e.g., metals, polymers, paper) to demonstrate complex droplet handling tasks, e.g., merging, splitting and metered dispensing, some of which occur in 3-D geometries. Fluid transport rates of up to 350 μL s(-1) are attained. Applicability of the design on metal substrates allows these devices to be used also for other microscale engineering applications, e.g., water management in fuel cells.

  7. Geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling: Application to orogenic wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Willett, S. D.; Gerya, T.; Ruh, J.

    2015-09-01

    Coupled geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling is presented in a new implementation that combines two established thermo-mechanical and landscape evolution models. A finite-difference marker-in-cell technique is used to solve for the thermo-mechanical problem including complex visco-plastic rheologies in high resolution. Each timestep is synchronously solved with a fluvial landscape evolution model that includes numerical solution of fluvial incision and analytical hillslope processes for both diffusive and slope-limited processes on an adaptive grid. The implementation is successful in modeling large deformation at different scales. We demonstrate high degrees of coupling through processes such as exhumation of rocks with different erodibilities. Sensitivity of the coupled system evolution to surface parameters, and mechanical parameters, is explored for the established case of development of compressive wedges. The evolution of wedge models proves to be primarily sensitive to erodibility and the degree of river network integration. Relief follows deformation in propagating forward with wedge growth. We apply the method to a large-scale model of continental collision, in which a close relationship between deep tectonics, fluvial network evolution, and uplift and erosion can be demonstrated.

  8. Silurian Extrusion Wedge Tectonics in the Central Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmer, J. C.; Glodny, J.; Drüppel, K.; Greiling, R. O.

    2015-12-01

    The Scandian fold-thrust belt of the central Scandinavian Caledonides host the high-grade metamorphic Seve Nappe Complex bounded on top by a normal sense shear zone and at the base by a reverse sense shear zone. Rb-Sr multimineral geochronology in synkinematic assemblages indicates simultaneous movements at the normal-sense roof shear zone and at the reverse-sense floor shear zone between 434 Ma and 429 Ma. Pressure temperature pseudosection calculations provide evidence for eclogite facies metamorphic conditions and nearly isothermal decompression at ~670 ± 50 °C from 17.5 to 14.5 kbar in garnet-kyanite mica schists during reverse-sense shearing, and from 15 to 11 kbar in garnet mica schists during normal-sense shearing. These and other published data and the presence of decompression-related pegmatites dated at 434 Ma and 429 Ma indicate that the Seve nappes form a 1-2 km thin extrusion wedge that extends along strike for at least 150 km. Devonian ductile extensional to transtensional deformation of the more internal parts of the orogen did not affect the early to mid-Silurian extrusion wedge that was preserved in the more external parts of the orogen due to foreland-directed nappe displacements in the order of >400 km. This wedge marks an early stage of exhumation of (ultra-)high-pressure metamorphic rocks and orogenic wedge formation in this part of the Scandinavian Caledonides predating the ≥10 km thick, post-415 Ma exhumation processes of ultrahigh-pressure rocks in southwestern Norway.

  9. Is there still a place for cast wedging in pediatric forearm fractures?

    PubMed

    Samora, Julie Balch; Klingele, Kevin E; Beebe, Allan C; Kean, John R; Klamar, Jan; Beran, Matthew C; Willis, Leisel M; Yin, Han; Samora, Walter P

    2014-01-01

    Forearm fractures are common skeletal injuries in childhood and can usually be treated nonoperatively with closed reduction and casting. Trends toward increasing operative treatment of these fractures have emerged. We aim to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of cast wedging for treatment of pediatric forearm fractures. We performed a prospective chart review of patients with forearm fractures, including distal radius (DR) fractures, treated with cast wedging at a single large pediatric hospital from June 2011 to September 2012. Inclusion criteria specified open distal radial physis, closed injury, loss of acceptable reduction, and availability of clinical and radiographic data from injury to cast removal. Exclusion criteria included pathologic fractures, neurovascular injury, fracture dislocations, open fractures, and closed DR physis. Reductions were performed and patients followed according to standard protocol at our institution, including placement into long-arm casts, initial follow-up visit within 5 to 10 days postinjury, and weekly visits for 2 weeks thereafter. If alignment were deemed unacceptable within 3 weeks of injury, cast wedging was utilized. Radiographic measurements of alignment included both radius and ulna on the injury film, postreduction, prewedge, postwedge, and final films. Radiographic technique was standardized, with repeatability testing demonstrating a precision of ±2 degrees. Over 15 months, our hospital treated 2124 forearm or DR fractures with closed reduction and casting. There were 60 fractures treated either with percutaneous fixation (36) or open treatment (24). A total of 79 forearm or DR fractures were treated with cast wedging secondary to loss of reduction, of which 70 patients had complete clinical and radiographic data. Average age was 8.4 years (range, 3 to 14 y), with 25 females and 45 males. Significant improvement in angulation for both-bone forearm fracture from prewedge to final films was seen in 69 children, with

  10. The formation of grounding zone wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal, Katarzyna; Worster, Grae

    2016-11-01

    Ice sheets are generally lubricated by a layer of sub-glacial sediment, or till, which plays a central role in determining their large-scale dynamics. Sub-glacial till has been found to accumulate into distinctive sedimentary wedges at ice-sheet grounding zones, separating floating ice shelves from grounded ice sheets. These grounding-zone wedges have important implications for stabilizing ice sheets against grounding-zone retreat in response to rising sea levels. We develop a theoretical model of wedge formation in which we treat both ice and till as viscous fluids spreading under gravity into an inviscid ocean and present a fluid-mechanical explanation of the formation of these wedges in terms of the jump in hydrostatic loading and unloading of till across the grounding zone. We also conduct a series of fluid-mechanical experiments in a confined setting in which we find that the underlying layer of less viscous fluid accumulates spontaneously in a similar wedge-shaped region at the experimental grounding line. We also extend our theory to more natural, unconfined settings in two dynamical regimes in which the overlying ice is resisted dominantly either by vertical shear or by extensional stresses and compare our findings with available geophysical data. Currently at Northwestern University.

  11. Quench propagation delay due to copper wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; McInturff, A.D.; Hanft, R.W.; Mazur, P.O.

    1986-01-01

    The superconducting magnet design style selected for the SSC dipoles is 16.6 m long and incorporates copper wedges in the windings in order to achieve the required magnetic field uniformity. Recent studies of quench propagation in a 4 m model, SLN-012 at BNL, have been carried out in order to prove the feasibility of self-protection for these magnets in the event of a quench. This feature would dispense with an active protection system like the one used in the Fermilab Energy Saver. These studies, however, require the knowledge of how the copper wedges affect the transverse spreading of normal zones needed in the self-protecting scheme. It is not clear that such information can be obtained with the short (1 m long) prototypes about to be tested since the time for the normal zone to cross over a wedge might be of the order of or longer than the time it takes for it to reach the other side of the wedge by propagation along the cable. Well instrumented long prototype magnets are months away from availability. Calculations that take into account the effect of the Kapton insulation, helium in the interstices and other significant details do not exist or have not been tested. Therefore we have measured the delay that the copper wedges introduce in the transverse (azimuthal) propagation of the normal zone in an experimental simulation of these magnets.

  12. Evaluation method of lead measurement accuracy of gears using a wedge artefact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komori, Masaharu; Takeoka, Fumi; Kubo, Aizoh; Okamoto, Kazuhiko; Osawa, Sonko; Sato, Osamu; Takatsuji, Toshiyuki

    2009-02-01

    The reduction of the vibration and noise of gears is an important issue in mechanical devices such as vehicles and wind turbines. The characteristics of the vibration and noise of gears are markedly affected by deviations of the tooth flank form of micrometre order; therefore, a strict quality control of the tooth flank form is required. The accuracy of the lead measurement for a gear-measuring instrument is usually evaluated using a master gear or a lead master. However, it is difficult to manufacture masters with high accuracy because the helix is a complicated geometrical form. In this paper, we propose a method of evaluating a gear-measuring instrument using a wedge artefact, which includes a highly precise plane surface. The concept of the wedge artefact is described and a mathematical model of the measuring condition of the wedge artefact is constructed. Theoretical measurement results for the wedge artefact are calculated. The wedge artefact is designed and produced on the basis of the theoretical measurement results. A measurement experiment using the wedge artefact is carried out and its effectiveness is verified.

  13. The wedge hot-film anemometer in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A commercial wedge hot-film probe is studied to determine its heat transfer response in transonic to low supersonic flows of high unit Reynolds number. The results of this study show that its response in this flow regime differs from the response of cylindrical type sensors. Whereas the cylindrical sensor has the same sensitivity to velocity as to density for free-stream Mach numbers exceeding 1.3, the wedge probe sensitivity to velocity is always greater than its sensitivity to density over the entire flow regime. This property requires determination of three fluctuation components due to density, velocity, and temperature, in a transonic or supersonic turbulent flow. Sensitivity equations are derived based on the observed behavior of the wedge probe. Both the durability and the frequency response of the probe are excellent, the square wave insertion test indicating frequency response near 130 kHz. The directional response of the probe at sonic speed is poor and requires further examination before Reynolds stress measurements are attempted with dual sensor probes.

  14. Stability of Supersonic Boundary Layers Over Blunt Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2006-01-01

    Receptivity and stability of supersonic boundary layers over blunt flat plates and wedges are numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and at a high Reynolds number of 10(exp 6)/inch. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. Computations are performed for a flat plate with leading edge thicknesses of 0.0001, 0.001, 0.005 and 0.01 inches that give Reynolds numbers based on the leading edge thickness ranging from 1000 to 10000. Calculations are also performed for a wedge of 10 degrees half angle with different leading edge radii 0.001 and 0.01 inches. The linear stability results showed that the bluntness has a strong stabilizing effect on the stability of two-dimensional boundary layers. The transition Reynolds number for a flat plate with a leading edge thickness of 0.01 inches is about 3.5 times larger than it is for the Blasius boundary layer. It was also revealed that boundary layers on blunt wedges are far more stable than on blunt flat plates.

  15. Shock interaction mechanisms on a double wedge at Mach 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durna, Ahmet Selim; El Hajj Ali Barada, Mohamad; Celik, Bayram

    2016-09-01

    Present computational study investigates formation and interaction mechanisms of shocks and boundary layer for low enthalpy Mach 7 flows of nitrogen over double wedges, which have fixed fore and various aft angles of 30° and 45°-60°, respectively. We use a density based finite-volume Navier-Stokes solver to simulate low enthalpy Mach 7 flows of nitrogen over double wedges. The solver is first and second order accurate in time and space, respectively. The meshes used in simulations of two-dimensional laminar flows consist of multiple blocks of structured mesh. Depending on the intensity, impingement angle, and impingement location of transmitted shock wave, the resulting adverse pressure gradient related disturbances on the wedge surface can trigger complex flow physics both in subsonic and supersonic regions. We observe a strong interaction between the deformation of the boundary layer and the bow shock as well as the transmitted shock for high aft angles. Comparison of the obtained results in terms of general flow physics shows that there exists an aft angle threshold value for such interaction which is in the range of 45°-50°.

  16. Rainfall induced groundwater mound in wedge-shaped promontories: The Strack-Chernyshov model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacimov, A. R.; Kayumov, I. R.; Al-Maktoumi, A.

    2016-11-01

    An analytical solution to the Poisson equation governing Strack's discharge potential (squared thickness of a saturated zone in an unconfined aquifer) is obtained in a wedge-shaped domain with given head boundary conditions on the wedge sides (specified water level in an open water body around a porous promontory). The discharge vector components, maximum elevation of the water table in promontory vertical cross-sections, quantity of groundwater seeping through segments of the wedge sides, the volume of fresh groundwater in the mound are found. For acute angles, the solution to the problem is non-unique and specification of the behaviour at infinity is needed. A ;basic; solution is distinguished, which minimizes the water table height above a horizontal bedrock. MODFLOW simulations are carried out in a finite triangular island and compare solutions with a constant-head, no-flow and ;basic; boundary condition on one side of the triangle. Far from the tip of an infinite-size promontory one has to be cautious with truncation of the simulated flow domains and imposing corresponding boundary conditions. For a right and obtuse wedge angles, there are no positive solutions for the case of constant accretion on the water table. In a particular case of a confined rigid wedge-shaped aquifer and incompressible fluid, from an explicit solution to the Laplace equation for the hydraulic head with arbitrary time-space varying boundary conditions along the promontory rays, essentially 2-D transient Darcian flows within the wedge are computed. They illustrate that surface water waves on the promontory boundaries can generate strong Darcian waves inside the porous wedge. Evaporation from the water table and sea-water intruded interface (rather than a horizontal bed) are straightforward generalizations for the Poissonian Strack potential.

  17. Transforming High School Classrooms with Free/Open Source Software: "It's Time for an Open Source Software Revolution"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffman, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Free/Open Source Software (FOSS) applications meet many of the software needs of high school science classrooms. In spite of the availability and quality of FOSS tools, they remain unknown to many teachers and utilized by fewer still. In a world where most software has restrictions on copying and use, FOSS is an anomaly, free to use and to…

  18. Transforming High School Classrooms with Free/Open Source Software: "It's Time for an Open Source Software Revolution"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffman, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Free/Open Source Software (FOSS) applications meet many of the software needs of high school science classrooms. In spite of the availability and quality of FOSS tools, they remain unknown to many teachers and utilized by fewer still. In a world where most software has restrictions on copying and use, FOSS is an anomaly, free to use and to…

  19. OpenCourseWare Resources for Advanced High School Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Steve

    2008-01-01

    In 2000, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) faculty first proposed putting the course materials from all 1,800 MIT classes online, free of charge. The idea behind MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) was to use the Internet for more than just distance learning. When MIT began placing the course materials online in 2002 and 2003, the audience…

  20. High Resolution Structure of the Open NaK Channel

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Amer; Jiang, Youxing

    2008-01-01

    We report the crystal structure of the non-selective cation channel NaK from b. cereus at a resolution of 1.6 Å. The structure reveals the intracellular gate in an open state compared to the closed form reported previously, making NaK the only channel for which the three-dimensional structures of both conformations are known. Channel opening follows a conserved mechanism of inner helix bending utilizing a flexible glycine residue, the gating hinge, seen in MthK and most other tetrameric cation channels. Additionally, distinct inter and intra-subunit rearrangements involved in channel gating are seen and characterized for the first time along with inner helix twisting motions. Furthermore, we identify a residue deeper within the cavity of the channel pore, Phe92, which likely forms a constriction point within the open pore, restricting ion flux through the channel. Mutating this residue to Ala causes a subsequent increase in ion conduction rates as measured by 86Rb flux assays. The structures of both the open and closed conformations of the NaK channel correlate very well with those of equivalent K+ channel conformations, namely MthK and KcsA, respectively. PMID:19098917

  1. OpenCourseWare Resources for Advanced High School Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Steve

    2008-01-01

    In 2000, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) faculty first proposed putting the course materials from all 1,800 MIT classes online, free of charge. The idea behind MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) was to use the Internet for more than just distance learning. When MIT began placing the course materials online in 2002 and 2003, the audience…

  2. Testing the critical Coulomb wedge theory on hyper-extended rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, Michael; Manatschal, Gianreto; Kusznir, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Deformation of hyper-extended continental crust and its relationship with the underlying mantle is a key process in the evolution of rifted margins. Recent studies have focused on hyper-extension in rifted margins using different approaches such as numerical modelling, seismic interpretation, potential field methods and field observations. However many fundamental questions about the observed structures and their evolution during the formation of hyper-extended margins are still debated. In this study an observation driven approach has been used to characterise geometrical and physical attributes of the continental crust termination, considered as a hyper-extended wedge, in order to test the applicability of critical Coulomb wedge theory to hyper-extended margins. The Coulomb wedge theory was first developed on accretionary prisms and on fold and thrust belts, but it has also been applied in extensional settings. Coulomb wedge theory explains the evolution of the critical aperture angle of the wedge as a function of basal sliding without deformation in the overlying wedge. This critical angle depends on the frictional parameters of the material, the basal friction, the surface slope, the basal dip and the fluid pressure. If the evolution of hyper-extended wedges could be described by the critical Coulomb wedge theory, it would have a major impact in the understanding of the structural and physical evolution of rifted domains during the hyper-extension processes. On seismic reflection lines imaging magma-poor hyper-extended margins, the continental crust termination is often shown to form a hyper-extended wedge. ODP Sites 1067, 900 and 1068 on the Iberian margin as well as field observations in the Alps give direct access to the rocks forming the hyper-extended wedge, which are typically composed of highly deformed and hydrated continental rocks underlain by serpentinised mantle. The boundary between the hydrated continental and mantle rocks corresponds to a

  3. A review of dynamics modelling of friction wedge suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Spiryagin, Maksym; Sun, Yan Quan

    2014-11-01

    Three-piece bogies with friction wedge suspensions are the most widely used bogies in heavy haul trains. Fiction wedge suspensions play a key role in these wagon systems. This article reviews current techniques in dynamic modelling of friction wedge suspension with various motivations: to improve dynamic models of friction wedge suspensions so as to improve general wagon dynamics simulations; to seek better friction wedge suspension models for wagon stability assessments in complex train systems; to improve the modelling of other friction devices, such as friction draft gear. Relevant theories and friction wedge suspension models developed by using commercial simulation packages and in-house simulation packages are reviewed.

  4. OpenACC to FPGA: A Framework for Directive-based High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seyong; Kim, Jungwon; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a directive-based, high-level programming framework for high-performance reconfigurable computing. It takes a standard, portable OpenACC C program as input and generates a hardware configuration file for execution on FPGAs. We implemented this prototype system using our open-source OpenARC compiler; it performs source-to-source translation and optimization of the input OpenACC program into an OpenCL code, which is further compiled into a FPGA program by the backend Altera Offline OpenCL compiler. Internally, the design of OpenARC uses a high- level intermediate representation that separates concerns of program representation from underlying architectures, which facilitates portability of OpenARC. In fact, this design allowed us to create the OpenACC-to-FPGA translation framework with minimal extensions to our existing system. In addition, we show that our proposed FPGA-specific compiler optimizations and novel OpenACC pragma extensions assist the compiler in generating more efficient FPGA hardware configuration files. Our empirical evaluation on an Altera Stratix V FPGA with eight OpenACC benchmarks demonstrate the benefits of our strategy. To demonstrate the portability of OpenARC, we show results for the same benchmarks executing on other heterogeneous platforms, including NVIDIA GPUs, AMD GPUs, and Intel Xeon Phis. This initial evidence helps support the goal of using a directive-based, high-level programming strategy for performance portability across heterogeneous HPC architectures.

  5. High School Open On-Line Courses (HOOC): A Case Study from Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canessa, Enrique; Pisani, Armando

    2013-01-01

    The first implementation of complete high school, open on-line courses (HOOC) aiming to support the training and basic scientific knowledge of young students from the Liceo Ginnasio Dante Alighieri in Gorizia, Italy, is discussed. Using the open source and automated recording system openEyA, HOOC give a student the opportunity to watch on-line, at…

  6. High School Open On-Line Courses (HOOC): A Case Study from Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canessa, Enrique; Pisani, Armando

    2013-01-01

    The first implementation of complete high school, open on-line courses (HOOC) aiming to support the training and basic scientific knowledge of young students from the Liceo Ginnasio Dante Alighieri in Gorizia, Italy, is discussed. Using the open source and automated recording system openEyA, HOOC give a student the opportunity to watch on-line, at…

  7. Wedge Shock and Nozzle Exhaust Plume Interaction in a Supersonic Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Heath, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the nozzle exhaust plume. Aft body shock waves that interact with the exhaust plume contribute to the near-field pressure signature of a vehicle. The plume and shock interaction was studied using computational fluid dynamics and compared with experimental data from a coaxial convergent-divergent nozzle flow in an open jet facility. A simple diamond-shaped wedge was used to generate the shock in the outer flow to study its impact on the inner jet flow. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the opposite plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the nozzle exhaust plume was modified by the presence of the wedge. Both the experimental results and computational predictions show changes in plume deflection.

  8. Two-dimensional meniscus in a wedge

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M.; Pinczewski, W.V.; Oren, P.E.

    1995-03-15

    This paper presents a closed-form analytical solution of the augmented Young-Laplace equation for the meniscus profile in a two-dimensional wedge-shaped capillary. The solution is valid for monotonic forms of disjoining pressure which are repulsive in nature. In the limit of negligible disjoining pressure, it is shown to reduce to the classical solution of constant curvature. The character of the solution is examined and examples of practical interest which demonstrate the application of the solution to the computation of the meniscus profile in a wedge-shaped capillary are discussed.

  9. COAST: Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, W.; Johnson, H. P.; Kent, G.; Keranen, K. M.; Tobin, H. J.; Trehu, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Cascadia margin is the site of active subduction, where the Juan de Fuca plate subducts under the North American plate at a rate of ~35 mm/yr. This system is of great scientific and societal interest, as it is capable of very large (Mw~9) earthquakes, creates volcanic hazards in the Cascades, and hosts periodic episodic tremor and slip (ETS) episodes. Despite evidence that the system has generated large megathrust earthquakes, limited seismicity creates large uncertainties in the position, structure, and physical state of the plate boundary. The COAST (Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects) project conducted an open-access, open-participation 2D seismic survey of the Cascadia subduction margin off Grays Harbor, WA, that will provide benchmark seismic images to address key scientific issues regarding the location, physical state, fluid budget, and associated methane systems of the subducting plate boundary and overlying crust. We collected seismic reflection, multibeam bathymetric, sidescan sonar, gravity, and magnetic data on the Cascadia subduction margin from the R/V Langseth in July 2012 in a high-priority GeoPRISMS corridor off Grays Harbor, Washington. The cruise was open-participation, with an organized shipboard education and training program, and the data are open-access, with immediate, full release to the community of all geophysical data. Project goals include (1) determining the location of the offshore plate boundary, (2) constraining sediment subduction and plate boundary roughness, (3) estimating pore fluid pathways, (4) determining controls on methane distribution, and (5) imaging compressional and extensional structures that may pose geohazards on the Cascadia margin. Initial observations include the following: (1) The Pleistocene accretionary wedge is well imaged and shows landward-vergent thrust faulting throughout our survey area. An outboard series of ramp-and-thrust structures gives way to a region characterized by folds that separate

  10. American Society of Biomechanics Clinical Biomechanics Award 2013: tibiofemoral contact location changes associated with lateral heel wedging--a weight bearing MRI study.

    PubMed

    Barrance, Peter J; Gade, Venkata; Allen, Jerome; Cole, Jeffrey L

    2014-11-01

    Vertically open magnetic resonance imaging permits study of knee joint contact during weight bearing. Lateral wedging is a low cost intervention for knee osteoarthritis that may influence load distribution and contact. This study assessed the ability of feedback-assisted weight bearing magnetic resonance imaging to detect changes in tibiofemoral contact associated with lateral wedging. One knee in each of fourteen subjects with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis was studied, without specification of compartmental involvement. Knees were imaged during upright standing and at 20° knee flexion. Bilateral external heel wedges were used to provide non-wedged and 5° lateral wedging conditions. Computer modeling was used to measure the medial and lateral compartment contact patch center coordinates on the tibial plateau and the respective contact areas. Lateral heel wedging in flexion was associated with a significant anterior shift of the contact patch of the lateral femoral condyle. Changes with knee flexion were similar to previous reports: both medial and lateral contact centers moved posteriorly with flexion, and lateral condyle contact also moved laterally. Lateral condyle contact area significantly reduced with flexion, while lateral wedging did not significantly affect contact areas. In symptomatic knee osteoarthritis patients standing in knee flexion, weight bearing magnetic resonance imaging recorded an anterior shift of lateral condyle contact in response to lateral heel wedging. Future studies may investigate lateral wedging effects more specifically in candidates for this clinical intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of a multibeam Fizeau wedge interferometer for Doppler wind lidar.

    PubMed

    McKay, Jack A

    2002-03-20

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer is the standard instrument for the direct detection Doppler lidar measurement of atmospheric wind speeds. The multibeam Fizeau wedge has some practical advantages over the Fabry-Perot, such as the linear fringe pattern, and is evaluated for this application. The optimal Fizeau must have a resolving power of 10(6) or more. As the multibeam Fizeau wedge is pushed to such high resolving power, the interference fringes of the device become complicated by asymmetry and secondary maxima. A simple condition for the interferometer plate reflectance, optical gap, and wedge angle reveals whether a set of parameters will yield simple, Airy-like fringes or complex Fizeau fringes. Tilting of the Fizeau wedge improves the fringe shape and permits an extension of the regime of Airy-like fringes to higher resolving power. Sufficient resolving power for the wind lidar application is shown to be possible with a large-gap, low-finesse multibeam Fizeau wedge. Liabilities of the multibeam Fizeau wedge in the wind lidar application include a smaller acceptance solid angle and calibration sensitivity to localized deviations of the plates from the ideal.

  12. Operational characteristics of Wedge and Strip image readout systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.; Malina, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Application of the Wedge and Strip readout system in microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer and FAUST space astronomy programs is discussed. Anode designs with high resolution (greater than 600 x 600 pixels) in imaging and spectroscopy applications have been developed. Extension of these designs to larger formats (100 mm) with higher resolution (3000 x 3000 pixels) are considered. It is shown that the resolution and imaging are highly stable, and that the flat field performance is essentially limited by photon statistics. Very high speed event response has also been achieved with output pulses having durations of less than 10 nanoseconds.

  13. Highly dynamically evolved intermediate-age open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, Andrés E.; Dias, Wilton S.; Sampedro, Laura M.

    2017-04-01

    We present a comprehensive UBVRI and Washington CT1T2 photometric analysis of seven catalogued open clusters, namely: Ruprecht 3, 9, 37, 74, 150, ESO 324-15 and 436-2. The multiband photometric data sets in combination with 2MASS photometry and Gaia astrometry for the brighter stars were used to estimate their structural parameters and fundamental astrophysical properties. We found that Ruprecht 3 and ESO 436-2 do not show self-consistent evidence of being physical systems. The remained studied objects are open clusters of intermediate age (9.0 ≤ log(t yr-1) ≤ 9.6), of relatively small size (rcls ∼ 0.4-1.3 pc) and placed between 0.6 and 2.9 kpc from the Sun. We analysed the relationships between core, half-mass, tidal and Jacoby radii as well as half-mass relaxation times to conclude that the studied clusters are in an evolved dynamical stage. The total cluster masses obtained by summing those of the observed cluster stars resulted to be ∼10-15 per cent of the masses of open clusters of similar age located closer than 2 kpc from the Sun. We found that cluster stars occupy volumes as large as those for tidally filled clusters.

  14. The effects of tibia profile, distraction angle, and knee load on wedge instability and hinge fracture: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Weng, Pei-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hsien; Luo, Chu-An; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Tsuang, Yang-Hwei; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Lin, Shang-Chih

    2017-04-01

    Several plate systems for high tibial osteotomy (HTO) have been developed to stabilize the opening wedge of an osteotomized tibia. Among them, the TomoFix system, having a quasi-straight and T-shaped design, has been widely adopted in the literature. However, this system is implemented by inserting a lag (i.e., cortical) screw through the proximal combi-hole, to deform the plate and pull the distal tibia toward the plate. This process potentially induces plate springback and creates an elastic preload on the osteotomized tibia, especially at the lateral hinge of the distracted wedge. Using the finite-element method, this study aims to investigate the contoured effect of lag-screw application on the biomechanical behavior of the tibia-plate construct. Two tibial profiles (normal and more concave), three distraction angles (6°, 9°, and 12°), and three knee loads (intraoperative: contouring plate; postoperative: weight and nonweight bearing) are systematically varied in this study. The wedge instability and fracture risk at the lateral hinge are chosen as the comparison indices. The results show the necessity of preoperative planning for a precontoured procedure, rather than elastic deformation using a lag screw. Within the intraoperative period, a more concave tibial profile and/or reduced distraction angle (i.e., 6° or 9°) necessitate a higher compressive load to elastically deform the plate, thereby deteriorating the lateral-hinge fracture risk. A precontoured plate is recommended in the case that the proximal tibia is highly concave and the distraction angle is insufficient to stretch the tibial profile.

  15. High Power/High Voltage Rechargeable Batteries Open New Opportunities for Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borthomieu, Y.; Brochard, P.; Lagattu, B.; Netchev, K.

    2008-09-01

    Scientific missions probes, new generation of launchers and satellites are increasingly requesting high power (permanent or pulses). The introduction of a range of rechargeable cells capable of delivering up and receiving high current addresses these needs and opens new horizons for future space missions power supply.Moreover, high power is often linked to high voltage and such need becomes more and more common for space & defence applications. The aim of the high voltage is to carry reasonable current in the harness of the electrical systems.This paper presents Saft answers to these demands, for existing launchers and also for in development ones, as well as for other markets with similar needs, such as military equipment or underwater vehicles.

  16. 38. INTERIOR VIEW, DENISON MULTIPRESS FOR INSERTION OF WEDGES ONTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. INTERIOR VIEW, DENISON MULTI-PRESS FOR INSERTION OF WEDGES ONTO HANDLES AND CUTTING OFF SCRAP END OF HANDLE FOLLOWING WEDGE INSERTION, BRIAN KIMBLE, OPERATOR - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  17. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and wedges...

  18. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and wedges...

  19. Thermal Evolution of Diapirs with Complex Mantle Wedge Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, R. T.; Kincaid, C.

    2016-12-01

    Subduction of oceanic lithosphere drives heat and mass exchange between Earth's interior and surface. One proposed transport mechanism for thermally and chemically distinct material through the wedge is the diapir model. The dominant driver of flow in the upper mantle is a mode of forced convection responding to motion of a tabular slab. A set of 4D laboratory experiments was conducted exploring the relationship between buoyancy flux and subduction parameters and subsequent effects on diapir transport. Variable subduction styles tested include downdip and rollback motion, slab gaps, slab steepening and backarc extension. The mantle is modeled using viscous glucose syrup with an Arrhenius type temperature dependent viscosity. Diapirs representing homogeneous mechanically mixed melange layer are introduced as buoyant fluid injected at multiple point sources situated along the surface of the sinking slab. Laboratory data is collected using high definition time-lapse photography and quantified using image velocimetry techniques. Here we present results from numerical simulation of the thermal evolution of spherical mantle wedge diapirs using 2D axisymmetric advection-diffusion model with internal diapir flow described by an analytic potential flow solution. A suite of wedge temperature profiles are used as thermal forcing on diapirs traversing the wedge along experimentally observed 4D ascent pathways. Scaling arguments suggest that for systems with Péclet number on the order of 15 advective heat transport is expected to dominate over diffusive heat transport, but the range of observed P-T-t paths and vigorous internal flow complicate this assumption. Interactions between modes of free (diapiric) and forced (wedge) convection lead to complex spatio-temporal variability in slab-to-arc connectivity patterns. Rollback induced toroidal flow, along trench changes in dip, convergence rate and backarc extension all produce a significant ( 500 km) trench-parallel transport

  20. Johnstone's "Wedge" and Theory of Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Carroll C.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the views of a scholar in speech communication on Henry Johnstone's ideas about rhetoric. Concludes that rhetoric that "appeals" wedges apart percipient and objects of perception, or that it forces a person to examine what he or she knows or is, as well as examining the proffered rhetoric. (NKA)

  1. Late Holocene stable-isotope based winter temperature records from ice wedges in the Northeast Siberian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Laepple, Thomas; Dereviagin, Alexander Yu.

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic is currently undergoing an unprecedented warming. This highly dynamic response on changes in climate forcing and the global impact of the Arctic water, carbon and energy balances make the Arctic a key region to study past, recent and future climate changes. Recent proxy-based temperature reconstructions indicate a long-term cooling over the past about 8 millennia that is mainly related to a decrease in solar summer insolation and has been reversed only by the ongoing warming. Climate model results on the other hand show no significant change or even a slight warming over this period. This model-proxy data mismatch might be caused by a summer bias of the used climate proxies. Ice wedges may provide essential information on past winter temperatures for a comprehensive seasonal picture of Holocene Arctic climate variability. Polygonal ice wedges are a widespread permafrost feature in the Arctic tundra lowlands. Ice wedges form by the repeated filling of thermal contraction cracks with snow melt water, which quickly refreezes at subzero ground temperatures and forms ice veins. As the seasonality of frost cracking and infill is generally related to winter and spring, respectively, the isotopic composition of wedge ice is indicative of past climate conditions during the annual cold season (DJFMAM, hereafter referred to as winter). δ18O of ice is interpreted as proxy for regional surface air temperature. AMS radiocarbon dating of organic remains in ice-wedge samples provides age information to generate chronologies for single ice wedges as well as regionally stacked records with an up to centennial resolution. In this contribution we seek to summarize Holocene ice-wedge δ18O based temperature information from the Northeast Siberian Arctic. We strongly focus on own work in the Laptev Sea region but consider as well literature data from other regional study sites. We consider the stable-isotope composition of wedge ice, ice-wedge dating and chronological

  2. Radiotherapy treatment planning with dynamic wedges--an algorithm for generating wedge factors and beam data.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S J; Foster, K R

    1995-09-01

    If the jaws of a linear accelerator are moved under computer control during irradiation, dose distributions similar to those with wedge filters can be produced. Varian linear accelerators utilize this effect to give a 'dynamic wedge', using segmented treatment tables (STTs). An algorithm is described to generate the dose per monitor unit at any point in a beam, using the STT values. Dynamically wedged beams are modelled as the superposition of static asymmetric beams, using an algorithm based on beam data measured for symmetric beams. Predictions of wedge factors, depth doses and profiles generated using the algorithm are compared with measurements. Good agreement is found between predictions and measurements. The calculation time is typically 5 ms/dose point on a PC with a 486DX processor.

  3. Benchmarking numerical models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Schreurs, Guido; Albertz, Markus; Gerya, Taras V.; Kaus, Boris; Landry, Walter; le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Mishin, Yury; Egholm, David L.; Cooke, Michele; Maillot, Bertrand; Thieulot, Cedric; Crook, Tony; May, Dave; Souloumiac, Pauline; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    We report quantitative results from three brittle thrust wedge experiments, comparing numerical results directly with each other and with corresponding analogue results. We first test whether the participating codes reproduce predictions from analytical critical taper theory. Eleven codes pass the stable wedge test, showing negligible internal deformation and maintaining the initial surface slope upon horizontal translation over a frictional interface. Eight codes participated in the unstable wedge test that examines the evolution of a wedge by thrust formation from a subcritical state to the critical taper geometry. The critical taper is recovered, but the models show two deformation modes characterised by either mainly forward dipping thrusts or a series of thrust pop-ups. We speculate that the two modes are caused by differences in effective basal boundary friction related to different algorithms for modelling boundary friction. The third experiment examines stacking of forward thrusts that are translated upward along a backward thrust. The results of the seven codes that run this experiment show variability in deformation style, number of thrusts, thrust dip angles and surface slope. Overall, our experiments show that numerical models run with different numerical techniques can successfully simulate laboratory brittle thrust wedge models at the cm-scale. In more detail, however, we find that it is challenging to reproduce sandbox-type setups numerically, because of frictional boundary conditions and velocity discontinuities. We recommend that future numerical-analogue comparisons use simple boundary conditions and that the numerical Earth Science community defines a plasticity test to resolve the variability in model shear zones.

  4. Benchmarking analogue models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido; Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Boutelier, Jennifer; Burberry, Caroline; Callot, Jean-Paul; Cavozzi, Cristian; Cerca, Mariano; Chen, Jian-Hong; Cristallini, Ernesto; Cruden, Alexander R.; Cruz, Leonardo; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Da Poian, Gabriela; Garcia, Victor H.; Gomes, Caroline J. S.; Grall, Céline; Guillot, Yannick; Guzmán, Cecilia; Hidayah, Triyani Nur; Hilley, George; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Koyi, Hemin A.; Lu, Chia-Yu; Maillot, Bertrand; Meriaux, Catherine; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Pan, Chang-Chih; Pillot, Daniel; Portillo, Rodrigo; Rosenau, Matthias; Schellart, Wouter P.; Schlische, Roy W.; Take, Andy; Vendeville, Bruno; Vergnaud, Marine; Vettori, Matteo; Wang, Shih-Hsien; Withjack, Martha O.; Yagupsky, Daniel; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    We performed a quantitative comparison of brittle thrust wedge experiments to evaluate the variability among analogue models and to appraise the reproducibility and limits of model interpretation. Fifteen analogue modeling laboratories participated in this benchmark initiative. Each laboratory received a shipment of the same type of quartz and corundum sand and all laboratories adhered to a stringent model building protocol and used the same type of foil to cover base and sidewalls of the sandbox. Sieve structure, sifting height, filling rate, and details on off-scraping of excess sand followed prescribed procedures. Our analogue benchmark shows that even for simple plane-strain experiments with prescribed stringent model construction techniques, quantitative model results show variability, most notably for surface slope, thrust spacing and number of forward and backthrusts. One of the sources of the variability in model results is related to slight variations in how sand is deposited in the sandbox. Small changes in sifting height, sifting rate, and scraping will result in slightly heterogeneous material bulk densities, which will affect the mechanical properties of the sand, and will result in lateral and vertical differences in peak and boundary friction angles, as well as cohesion values once the model is constructed. Initial variations in basal friction are inferred to play the most important role in causing model variability. Our comparison shows that the human factor plays a decisive role, and even when one modeler repeats the same experiment, quantitative model results still show variability. Our observations highlight the limits of up-scaling quantitative analogue model results to nature or for making comparisons with numerical models. The frictional behavior of sand is highly sensitive to small variations in material state or experimental set-up, and hence, it will remain difficult to scale quantitative results such as number of thrusts, thrust spacing

  5. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge provides mechanical support to the perianal region during the labor and delivery...

  6. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not located...

  7. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  8. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  9. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  10. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  11. High Throughput PBTK: Open-Source Data and Tools for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presentation on High Throughput PBTK at the PBK Modelling in Risk Assessment meeting in Ispra, Italy Presentation on High Throughput PBTK at the PBK Modelling in Risk Assessment meeting in Ispra, Italy

  12. Formation of high overburden dumps in open-casts

    SciTech Connect

    S.G. Molotilov; V.K. Norri

    2007-09-15

    The specificity of formation of high overburden dumps in opencast excavations and ravines is considered. It is proposed to exercise high dumping and deformation control in piled rocks by using a new dumping complex supporting high efficiency and safety of dumping operations.

  13. Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S.; White, Michael A.; Jones, Gregory V.; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2011-04-01

    Design and implementation of effective climate change adaptation activities requires quantitative assessment of the impacts that are likely to occur without adaptation, as well as the fraction of impact that can be avoided through each activity. Here we present a quantitative framework inspired by the greenhouse gas stabilization wedges of Pacala and Socolow. In our proposed framework, the damage avoided by each adaptation activity creates an 'adaptation wedge' relative to the loss that would occur without that adaptation activity. We use premium winegrape suitability in the western United States as an illustrative case study, focusing on the near-term period that covers the years 2000-39. We find that the projected warming over this period results in the loss of suitable winegrape area throughout much of California, including most counties in the high-value North Coast and Central Coast regions. However, in quantifying adaptation wedges for individual high-value counties, we find that a large adaptation wedge can be captured by increasing the severe heat tolerance, including elimination of the 50% loss projected by the end of the 2030-9 period in the North Coast region, and reduction of the projected loss in the Central Coast region from 30% to less than 15%. Increased severe heat tolerance can capture an even larger adaptation wedge in the Pacific Northwest, including conversion of a projected loss of more than 30% in the Columbia Valley region of Washington to a projected gain of more than 150%. We also find that warming projected over the near-term decades has the potential to alter the quality of winegrapes produced in the western US, and we discuss potential actions that could create adaptation wedges given these potential changes in quality. While the present effort represents an initial exploration of one aspect of one industry, the climate adaptation wedge framework could be used to quantitatively evaluate the opportunities and limits of climate adaptation

  14. Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Diffenbaugh, Noah; White, Michael A; Jones, Gregory V; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2011-01-01

    Design and implementation of effective climate change adaptation activities requires quantitative assessment of the impacts that are likely to occur without adaptation, as well as the fraction of impact that can be avoided through each activity. Here we present a quantitative framework inspired by the greenhouse gas stabilization wedges of Pacala and Socolow. In our proposed framework, the damage avoided by each adaptation activity creates an 'adaptation wedge' relative to the loss that would occur without that adaptation activity. We use premium winegrape suitability in the western United States as an illustrative case study, focusing on the near-term period that covers the years 2000 39. We find that the projected warming over this period results in the loss of suitable winegrape area throughout much of California, including most counties in the high-value North Coast and Central Coast regions. However, in quantifying adaptation wedges for individual high-value counties, we find that a large adaptation wedge can be captured by increasing the severe heat tolerance, including elimination of the 50% loss projected by the end of the 2030 9 period in the North Coast region, and reduction of the projected loss in the Central Coast region from 30% to less than 15%. Increased severe heat tolerance can capture an even larger adaptation wedge in the Pacific Northwest, including conversion of a projected loss of more than 30% in the Columbia Valley region of Washington to a projected gain of more than 150%. We also find that warming projected over the near-term decades has the potential to alter the quality of winegrapes produced in the western US, and we discuss potential actions that could create adaptation wedges given these potential changes in quality. While the present effort represents an initial exploration of one aspect of one industry, the climate adaptation wedge framework could be used to quantitatively evaluate the opportunities and limits of climate adaptation

  15. Process Based Explanations for Correlations Between the Structural and Seismic Segmentation of the Cascadia Subduction Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, C. W.; Brandon, M. T.; Willett, S. D.

    2006-12-01

    Variations in the geological and geophysical characteristics of the Cascadia subduction wedge, the region between the trench and arc, result in along-strike wedge segmentation. We focus on explaining the large-scale structural segmentation and how processes causing this segmentation influence segmentation with respect to the seismic behavior of the wedge and subduction thrust. The relationships we develop illustrate the fundamental interplay of processes controlling long-term structure and short-term seismic behavior. Our conclusions are based on the results of numerical models designed to simulate the growth and evolution of the Cascadia subduction wedge through the accretion of a thin layer of sediment to the basaltic Coast Range Terrane (CRT) of the Cascadia margin. Two aspects of wedge structural segmentation are of interest: (1) segmentation with respect to the location or absence of large, continental shelf, forearc basins, and (2) segmentation with respect to the Coastal Range (CR) structural high. Our models illustrate that the form of the submarine portion of the Cascadia wedge, including the basins or lack thereof, is a consequence of the frictional behavior of this region of wedge, subduction thrust strength, wedge strength, and dip thrust. We propose that basin segments have stronger wedge material, a weaker thrust, or a steeper thrust than basin free segments. The presence of basins is significant because they stabilize the margin and prevent subduction and accretion related deformation. This stabilization allows the thrust to preferentially support thermally induced, fluid overpressures and undergo fault healing thus increasing the likelihood of large coseismic slip within basin segments. While no historical earthquake data supporting this argument exists for Cascadia, such behavior has been observed in many margins (Song and Simons, 2003; Wells et al., 2003). It is reasonable to assume that large earthquakes in Cascadia will have the same association

  16. High-frequency EPR applications of open nonradiative resonators.

    PubMed

    Annino, G; Fittipaldi, M; Martinelli, M; Moons, H; Van Doorslaer, S; Goovaerts, E

    2009-09-01

    A new class of open single-mode cavities, the nonradiative (NR) resonators, has recently been proposed in order to overcome the limitations of standard cylindrical cavities and Fabry-Perot resonators at millimeter wavelengths. This paper presents the first applications of a NR resonator in W-band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. It consists of a cylindrical cavity having a lateral aperture that represents about 35% of its total height. Electron-spin-echo measurements performed on different samples show that the signal-to-noise ratio and the optimal pulse length obtained with the proposed device are comparable to those obtained with the closed cavity used in the commercial W-band spectrometer, at both cryogenic and room temperature. Similar results have been obtained for paramagnetic species optically activated by means of an optical fiber inserted in the aperture of the resonator. The insertion losses estimated for the probe employed with the NR resonator are higher than those of the commercial probe, hence, demonstrating that the proposed cavity holds the promise of improved resonator performance.

  17. Crossing the boundary: experimental investigation of water entry conditions of V-shaped wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Tingben; Yohann, Daniel; Vincent, Lionel; Jung, Sunghwan; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Seabirds that plunge-dive at high speeds exhibit remarkable abilities to withstand and mitigate impact forces. To minimize these forces, diving birds streamline their shape at impact, entering water with their sharp beak first. Here, we investigate the impact forces on rigid V-shaped wedges crossing the air-water interface at high Weber numbers. We vary the impact velocity V by adjusting the height from which the wedge is dropped. Both a high-speed camera and a force transducer are used to characterize the impact. We found that the splash base and air cavity show little dependence on the impact velocity when rescaling by inertial time d / V , where d is the breadth of the wedge. The peak impact force occurs at time tp smaller than the submersion time ts such that the ratio tp /ts is almost constant for all wedges and impact velocities V. We also found that the maximum impact force, like drag force, scales as AV2 , where A is the cross-sectional area of the wedge. We then propose analytical models of the impact force and splash dynamics. The theoretical predictions agree well with our experimental results. We conclude by commenting on the relevance of these results to understanding the mechanics of diving seabirds. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation.

  18. Computer dosimetry for flattened and wedged fast-neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, K R; Smith, A R; Almond, P R; Otte, V A; Smathers, J B

    1976-01-01

    Beam flattening by the use of polyethylene filters has been developed for the 50-MeV d in equilibrium Be fast-neutron therapy beam at the Texas A&M Variable-Energy Cyclotron (TAMVEC) as a result of the need for a more uniform dose distribution at depth within the patient. A computer algorithm has been developed that allows the use of a modified decrement line method to calculate dose distributions; standards decrement line methods do not apply because of off-axis peaking. The dose distributions for measured flattened beams are transformed into distributions that are physically equivalent to an unflattened distribution. In the transformed space, standard decrement line theory yields a distribution for any field size which, by applying the inverse transformation, generates the flattened dose distribution, including the off-axis peaking. A semiempirical model has been constructed that allows the calculation of dose distributions for wedged beams from open-beam data.

  19. The effect of décollement dip on geometry and kinematics of model accretionary wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyi, Hemin A.; Vendeville, Bruno C.

    2003-09-01

    We conducted a series of sand-box models shortened asymmetrically above a frictional-plastic décollement to study the influence of amount and sense of the décollement dip on the geometry and kinematics of accretionary wedges. Model results illustrate that the amount and direction of décollement dip strongly influence the geometry and mode of deformation of the resulting wedge. In general, for models having similar décollement frictional parameters, the resulting wedge is steeper, grows higher and is shorter when shortened above a décollement that dips toward the hinterland. At 42% bulk shortening, the length/height ratio of wedges formed above a 5°-dipping décollement was equal to 2.4 whereas this ratio was equal to 3 for wedges shortened above a horizontal décollement. Moreover, models with a hinterland dipping décollement undergo larger amounts of layer parallel compaction (LPC) and area loss than models shortened above a non-dipping décollement. The effect of décollement dip on wedge deformation is most pronounced when basal friction is relatively high (μ b=0.55), whereas its effect is less significant in models where the basal décollement has a lower friction (μ b=0.37). Model results also show that increasing basal slope has a similar effect to that of increasing basal friction; the wedge grows taller and its critical taper steepens.

  20. Crustal and Fault Strengths from Critical Taper Measurements: Insights into the behavior of Accretionary Wedges using Distinct-Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, L.; Suppe, J.

    2012-12-01

    It is increasingly clear that many major faults are weak relative to quasistatic friction because of dynamical effects involving the microprocesses of high-velocity friction and the energetics of large-scale fault rupture. Even at the toes of accretionary wedges where velocity strengthening is expected, large displacements can occur dynamically. We seek to better understand the relationship between the large-scale strength of such faults and of the crust containing them over a timescale much greater than seismic cycles. Critical-taper theory provides straightforward quantitative relationships between accretionary wedge geometry and absolute basal fault and wedge strengths with minimal assumptions. Wedge tapers constrain the far-field stresses under which detachments slip and wedges grow during wedge-growing events, whether they are dynamical or quasistatic. To date most applications of wedge mechanics to accretionary wedges involve analog and numerical modeling with largely conceptual insight, for example illuminating the role of geological heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate that recent theoretical advances that are successful in extracting absolute wedge and detachment strengths from the geometry of active wedges can also be applied to extract large-scale strengths in distinct element numerical models in both mechanically homogeneous and heterogeneous wedges. The distinct element method (DEM) is an ideal tool for the study and modeling of critical taper wedges: model wedges can be initially cohesive (bonded) or cohesionless. Faults and folds form naturally as the result of progressive bond breakage during shortening and wedge growth. Heterogeneity can be introduced by creating layered groups of particles of differing mechanical properties. The DEM suffers to some extent in that macro material properties cannot be directly prescribed but rather must be defined by a modest number of micro-properties and the process in necessarily iterative and developing a wide

  1. Jane Austen in the High School Classroom (Open to Suggestion).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritzer, Penelope

    1996-01-01

    Argues that Jane Austen's novels lend themselves to the high school curriculum, and that students will discover a leisurely, rural world in which the concerns of the young people are often similar to theirs. (SR)

  2. Jane Austen in the High School Classroom (Open to Suggestion).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritzer, Penelope

    1996-01-01

    Argues that Jane Austen's novels lend themselves to the high school curriculum, and that students will discover a leisurely, rural world in which the concerns of the young people are often similar to theirs. (SR)

  3. Analysis of high-quality modes in open chaotic microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, W.; Yamilov, A.; Cao, H.

    2005-08-15

    We present a numerical study of the high-quality modes in two-dimensional dielectric stadium microcavities. Although the classical ray mechanics is fully chaotic in a stadium billiard, all of the high-quality modes show a 'strong scar' around unstable periodic orbits. When the deformation (ratio of the length of the straight segments over the diameter of the half circles) is small, the high-quality modes correspond to whispering-gallery-type trajectories and their quality factors decrease monotonically with increasing deformation. At large deformation, each high-quality mode is associated with multiple unstable periodic orbits. Its quality factor changes nonmonotonically with the deformation, and there exists an optimal deformation for each mode at which its quality factor reaches a local maximum. This unusual behavior is attributed to the interference of waves propagating along different constituent orbits that could minimize light leakage out of the cavity.

  4. An Experimental Investigation of Transonic Flow Past Two-Dimensional Wedge and Circular-Arc Sections Using A Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Arthur Earl, Jr

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of interferometer measurements of the flow field near two-dimensional wedge and circular-arc sections of zero angle of attack at high-subsonic and low-supersonic velocities. Both subsonic flow with local supersonic zone and supersonic flow with detached shock wave have been investigated. Pressure distributions and drag coefficients as a function of Mach number have been obtained. The wedge data are compared with the theoretical work on flow past wedge sections of Guderley and Yoshihara, Vincenti and Wagner, and Cole. Pressure distributions and drag coefficients for the wedge and circular-arc sections are presented throughout the entire transonic range of velocities.

  5. Starting of generic inlet with blunted wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovoy, V.; Mosharov, V.; Radchenko, V.; Skuratov, A.; Struminskaya, I.

    2017-06-01

    Bluntness e¨ect of gas-compressing wedges on starting and §ow structure in an air inlet was investigated experimentally. The inlet was of internal compression type with §at walls and rectangular cross section. The experiments were carried out in the wind tunnel UT-1M at Mach numbers M = 5 and 8 and Reynolds numbers Re∞L from 2.8 · 106 to 23 · 106. The §ow characteristics were measured by panoramic optical methods. Data demonstrating in§uence of wedge bluntness radius on the inlet starting were obtained at di¨erent Mach and Reynolds numbers as well as at di¨erent contraction ratios. Ambiguity of the §ow regime in the inlet under certain conditions was found.

  6. Electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, Brian T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1988-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from pyramidal and wedge absorbers used to line the walls of modern anechoic chambers is measured and compared with theoretically predicted values. The theoretical performance for various angles of incidence is studied. It is shown that a pyramidal absorber scatters electromagnetic energy more as a random rough surface does. The apparent reflection coefficient from an absorber wall illuminated by a plane wave can be much less than the normal absorber specifications quoted by the manufacturer. For angles near grazing incidence, pyramidal absorbers give a large backscattered field from the pyramid side-faces or edges. The wedge absorber was found to give small backscattered fields for near-grazing incidence. Based on this study, some new guidelines for the design of anechoic chambers are advocated because the specular scattering models used at present do not appear valid for pyramids that are large compared to the wavelength.

  7. Wedge assembly for electrical transformer component spacing

    DOEpatents

    Baggett, Franklin E.; Cage, W. Franklin

    1991-01-01

    A wedge assembly that is easily inserted between two surfaces to be supported thereby, and thereafter expanded to produce a selected spacing between those surfaces. This wedge assembly has two outer members that are substantially identical except that they are mirror images of each other. Oppositely directed faces of these of these outer members are substantially parallel for the purpose of contacting the surfaces to be separated. The outer faces of these outer members that are directed toward each other are tapered so as to contact a center member having complementary tapers on both faces. A washer member is provided to contact a common end of the outer members, and a bolt member penetrates this washer and is threadably received in a receptor of the center member. As the bolt member is threaded into the center member, the center member is drawn further into the gap between the outer members and thereby separates these outer members to contact the surfaces to be separated. In the preferred embodiment, the contacting surfaces of the outer member and the center member are provided with guide elements. The wedge assembly is described for use in separating the secondary windings from the laminations of an electrical power transformer.

  8. Interior impedance wedge diffraction with surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    The exact impedance wedge solution is evaluated asymptotically using the method of steepest descents for plane wave illumination at normal incidence. Uniform but different impedances on each face are considered for both soft and hard polarizations. The asymptotic solution isolates the incident, singly reflected, multiply reflected, diffracted, and surface wave fields. Multiply reflected fields of any order are permitted. The multiply reflected fields from the exact solution are written as ratios of auxiliary Maliuzhinets functions, whereas a geometrical analysis gives the reflected fields as products of reflection coefficients. These two representations are shown to be identical in magnitude, phase and the angular range over which they exist. The diffracted field includes four Fresnel transition functions as in the perfect conductor case, and the expressions for the appropriate discontinuities at the shadow boundaries are presented. The surface wave exists over a finite angular range and only for certain surface impedances. A surface wave transition field is included to retain continuity. Computations are presented for interior wedge diffractions although the formulation is valid for both exterior and interior wedges.

  9. Two open access, high-quality datasets from anesthetic records.

    PubMed

    Cumin, David; Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Harrison, Michael J; Merry, Alan F

    2013-01-01

    To provide a set of high-quality time-series physiologic and event data from anesthetic cases formatted in an easy-to-use structure. With ethics committee approval, data from surgical operations under general anesthesia were collected, including physiologic data, drug administrations, events, and clinicians' comments. These data were de-identified, formatted in a combined CSV/XML structure and made publicly available. Two separate datasets were collected containing physiologic time-series data and time-stamped events for 34 patients. For 20 patients, the data included 400 physiologic signals collected over 20 h, 274 events, and 597 drug administrations. For 14 patients, the data included 23 physiologic signals collected over 69 h, with 286 time stamped comments. Data reuse potentially saves significant time and financial costs. However, there are few high-quality repositories for accessible physiologic data and clinical interventions from surgical cases. De-identifying records assists with overcoming problems of privacy and storing the data in a format which is easily manipulated with computing resources facilitates access by the wider research community. It is hoped that additional high-quality data will be added. Future work includes developing tools to explore and visualize the data more efficiently, and establishing quality control measures. An approach to collecting and storing high-quality datasets from surgical operations under anesthesia such that they can be easily accessed by others for use in research has been demonstrated.

  10. Wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide with long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Chengcheng; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel design of wedge hybrid plasmonic terahertz (THz) waveguide consisting of a silicon (Si) nanowire cylinder above a triangular gold wedge with surrounded high-density polyethylene as cladding. It features long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode confinement. The mode properties of wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide are comprehensively characterized in terms of propagation length (L), normalized mode area (Aeff /A0), figure of merit (FoM), and chromatic dispersion (D). The designed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide enables an ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area which is more than one-order of magnitude smaller compared to previous rectangular one. When choosing the diameter of Si nanowire cylinder, a smaller diameter (e.g. 10 μm) is preferred to achieve longer L and higher FoM, while a larger diameter (e.g. 60 μm) is favorable to obtain smaller Aeff /A0 and higher FoM. We further study the impacts of possible practical fabrication errors on the mode properties. The simulated results of propagation length and normalized mode area show that the proposed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide is tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, variation of wedge tip angle, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:26155782

  11. Thin anisotropic layer in the mantle wedge beneath Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, I.

    2008-12-01

    A wide variety of seismic anisotropy has been observed in subduction zones, including trench-parallel and trench-perpendicular shear-wave splittings (e.g., Nakajima and Hasegawa, 2004; Long and van der Hilst, 2005). Geodynamic modeling has been proposed to explain such complex anisotropy in the upper mantle of subduction zones (e.g., Wiens and Smith, 2003; Kneller et al. 2005): however, their origin remains still controversial because of the poor vertical resolution afforded by these seismic data. One of the key questions that might resolve this problem is the origin of the anisotropic signature within the upper mantle. We tested the distribution of seismic anisotropy in the mantle wedge beneath Northeast Japan based on the deformation mechanisms: a lattice-preferred orientation and seismic anisotropy are generated by deformation via dislocation creep in the upper mantle, but not by diffusion creep or frictional sliding. Based on the thermal structure and stress field of the upper mantle beneath Northeast Japan, deformation throughout most of the mantle wedge is inferred to be controlled by diffusion creep, and the region of dislocation creep is limited to a thin layer of 10-20 km thickness within a region of relatively high stress and low temperature located above the subducting slab and beneath the island arc crust. The relatively short delay time recorded in Northeast Japan is consistent with the occurrence of a thin anisotropic layer within the mantle wedge. We therefore conclude that the seismic anisotropy observed in the subduction zone upper mantle is largely caused by a very thin (~10-20 km thick) but strong anisotropic layer. Since the mantle flow in this region is mainly coupled with the downgoing plate, being approximately parallel to the down-dip direction of the subducting slab, a change in the dominant olivine LPO arising from spatial variations in temperature and water content is a plausible mechanism to create the complex anisotropy observed in the

  12. Separation over a flat plate-wedge configuration at oceanic Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of flow over a two-dimensional flat plate-wedge configuration is presented. The investigation encompasses a range of Reynolds numbers characteristics of conditions encountered by deep submersible oceanic vehicles. Flow separation, similar to that found on high speed aircraft control surfaces, is reported and discussed in light of the laminar or transitional nature of the separated shear layer. As discovered in previous high Mach number studies of plate-wedge or ramp configurations, the dependency of the size of the separated region on free stream Reynolds number is reversed for laminar and transitional types of flow separation.

  13. Seismic evidence for a cold serpentinized mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Vidale, J. E.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    Mount St Helens is the most active volcano within the Cascade arc; however, its location is unusual because it lies 50 km west of the main axis of arc volcanism. Subduction zone thermal models indicate that the down-going slab is decoupled from the overriding mantle wedge beneath the forearc, resulting in a cold mantle wedge that is unlikely to generate melt. Consequently, the forearc location of Mount St Helens raises questions regarding the extent of the cold mantle wedge and the source region of melts that are responsible for volcanism. Here using, high-resolution active-source seismic data, we show that Mount St Helens sits atop a sharp lateral boundary in Moho reflectivity. Weak-to-absent PmP reflections to the west are attributed to serpentinite in the mantle-wedge, which requires a cold hydrated mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens (<∼700 °C). These results suggest that the melt source region lies east towards Mount Adams. PMID:27802263

  14. Investigation of turbulent wedges generated by different single surface roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traphan, Dominik; Meinlschmidt, Peter; Lutz, Otto; Peinke, Joachim; Gülker, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    It is known that small faults on rotor blades of wind turbines can cause significant power loss. In order to better understand the governing physical effects, in this experimental study, the formation of a turbulent wedge over a flat plate induced by single surface roughness elements is under investigation. The experiments are performed at different ambient pressure gradients, thus allowing conclusions about the formation of a turbulent wedge over an airfoil. With respect to typical initial faults on operating airfoils, the roughness elements are modified in both size and shape (raised or recessed). None intrusive experimental methods, such as stereoscopic PIV and LDA, enable investigations based on temporally and spatially highly resolved velocity measurements. In this way, a spectral analysis of the turbulent boundary layer is performed and differences in coherent structures within the wedge are identified. These findings are correlated with global measurements of the wedge carried out by infrared thermography. This correlation aims to enable distinguishing the cause and main properties of a turbulent wedge by the easy applicable method of infrared thermography, which is of practical relevance in the field of condition monitoring of wind turbines.

  15. Seismic evidence for a cold serpentinized mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens.

    PubMed

    Hansen, S M; Schmandt, B; Levander, A; Kiser, E; Vidale, J E; Abers, G A; Creager, K C

    2016-11-01

    Mount St Helens is the most active volcano within the Cascade arc; however, its location is unusual because it lies 50 km west of the main axis of arc volcanism. Subduction zone thermal models indicate that the down-going slab is decoupled from the overriding mantle wedge beneath the forearc, resulting in a cold mantle wedge that is unlikely to generate melt. Consequently, the forearc location of Mount St Helens raises questions regarding the extent of the cold mantle wedge and the source region of melts that are responsible for volcanism. Here using, high-resolution active-source seismic data, we show that Mount St Helens sits atop a sharp lateral boundary in Moho reflectivity. Weak-to-absent PmP reflections to the west are attributed to serpentinite in the mantle-wedge, which requires a cold hydrated mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens (<∼700 °C). These results suggest that the melt source region lies east towards Mount Adams.

  16. Seismic evidence for a cold serpentinized mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Vidale, J. E.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.

    2016-11-01

    Mount St Helens is the most active volcano within the Cascade arc; however, its location is unusual because it lies 50 km west of the main axis of arc volcanism. Subduction zone thermal models indicate that the down-going slab is decoupled from the overriding mantle wedge beneath the forearc, resulting in a cold mantle wedge that is unlikely to generate melt. Consequently, the forearc location of Mount St Helens raises questions regarding the extent of the cold mantle wedge and the source region of melts that are responsible for volcanism. Here using, high-resolution active-source seismic data, we show that Mount St Helens sits atop a sharp lateral boundary in Moho reflectivity. Weak-to-absent PmP reflections to the west are attributed to serpentinite in the mantle-wedge, which requires a cold hydrated mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens (<~700 °C). These results suggest that the melt source region lies east towards Mount Adams.

  17. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  18. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.

    2015-12-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  19. Impulse Response of a Density Contrast Wedge Using Normal Coordinates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Dezhang

    The exact impulse solutions of a point source for a penetrable wedge (rhonerho ', upsilon = upsilon ') and a shallow water wedge using normal coordinates are presented. This is the extension of Biot and Tolstoy's exact solution in normal coordinates for a rigid wedge. Our solutions reduce to known solutions for rigid (rho'toinfty ), free (rho'to 0), and homogeneous (rho' = rho) wedges. The direct, reflected, transmitted and diffracted waves are well separated in time domain. The reflected (transmitted) part can be described by the direct waves traveling from the images around the image circle to the receiver, the amplitude depends on the number of times that the actual wave is reflected from the wedge walls. The diffracted part of the solution is not the solution for an ideal wedge (rigid or free) multiplied by an impedance factor. Transmission of acoustic wave in a wedge shaped waveguide (shallow water wedge) can also be solved in a normal mode formulation. An array of sources can excite single mode transmission in the waveguide. Alternatively, a combination of the wedge solution for a set of source positions can also be chosen to excite a single mode. The normal mode technique and wedge solution using normal coordinates give the same signal amplitudes. We compare our wedge solutions with the laboratory experimental measurements given by Tindle et al. The good agreements of the theoretical predictions with their experimental data suggests that the exact solution of an isovelocity wedge can be applied for a more general penetrable wedge by incorporating the total reflections if the velocity contrast is as close enough to 1.0.

  20. Ivrea mantle wedge and arc of the Western Alps (II): Kinematic evolution of the Alps-Apennines orogenic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Stefan; Kissling, Eduard; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Molli, Giancarlo

    2017-04-01

    Integration of geological and geophysical data on the deep structure of the Alps (Kissling et al. 2017) reveals that the deep-seated Ivrea mantle played a crucial role during the formation of the arc of the Western Alps. Exhumation of the mantle beneath the Ivrea Zone to shallow crustal depths during Mesozoic rifting led to the formation of a strong Ivrea mantle wedge; its strength exceeds that of surrounding mostly quartz-bearing units, and consequently allows for indentation and wedging of a quasi-rigid Ivrea mantle wedge into the Western Alps during Alpine orogeny. A first early stage (pre-35 Ma) of the West-Alpine orogenic evolution is characterized by top-NNW thrusting in sinistral transpression causing at least some 260km displacement of internal Western Alps and E-W-striking Alps farther east, together with the Adria micro-plate, towards N to NNW with respect to stable Europe. It is during the second stage (35-25 Ma) that the Ivrea mantle wedge played a crucial role by accentuating the arc. This stage is associated with top-WNW thrusting in the external zones of the central portion of the arc and lateral indentation and wedging of the Ivrea mantle slice beneath the already existing nappe pile towards WNW by some 100-150km. The final stage of arc formation (25-0 Ma) is associated with orogeny in the Apennines leading to oroclinal bending in the southernmost Western Alps that by now became parts of the Apenninic orogen, in connection with the 50° counterclockwise rotation of the Corsica-Sardinia block and the Ligurian Alps. The lithological composition of some tectonic units originating from the Alpine Tethys (Piemont-Liguria Ocean) found in the Alps and the northern Apennines has much in common. The non-metamorphic parts of the Piemont-Liguria derived units form the upper plate of the Western Alps that is devoid of Austroalpine elements, while the lower plate includes highly metamorphic units derived from the same Piemont-Liguria Ocean. This points to a

  1. Varus Deformity of the Distal Tibia From Physeal Growth Arrest Treated Using a Titanium Metal Porous Wedge.

    PubMed

    Bridgforth, Andrew B; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Park, Joseph S

    2016-10-01

    During a cheerleading event, a 14-year-old female sustained a right ankle physeal fracture that was treated nonoperatively with casting. She developed a distal medial tibial physeal arrest, and as the onset of menses was at age 16, she subsequently developed a varus distal tibial deformity. At the age of 19, she was no longer able to participate in collegiate cheerleading due to lateral ankle pain, ankle instability, and peroneal subluxation. After failing conservative treatment, she underwent an ankle arthroscopy, Broström-Gould procedure, peroneal retinacular repair with peroneal tenolysis, and a distal tibial medial opening wedge osteotomy using a porous titanium metal wedge and a one-third tubular plate. At 6-month follow-up, her osteotomy site showed abundant callus formation, and her lateral ankle pain had almost completely resolved. At 22-month follow-up, there were no residual ankle instability or pain complaints, and she had returned to collegiate cheerleading. This case report highlights a very useful, previously not described, application of porous titanium metal wedges for medial supramalleolar opening wedge osteotomies of the tibia. Such wedges are familiar to many foot and ankle orthopaedic surgeons and continue to have expanding indications. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case report. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interaction Mechanism on a Double Wedge Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Bayram; Barada, Mohammad Adel El Hajj Ali; Durna, Ahmet Selim

    2015-11-01

    A hypersonic test series by Swantek & Austin report complex shock wave boundary layer interaction mechanisms and unsteady surface heat flux from a double wedge geometry in a low enthalpy Mach 7 flow. In order to understand the physics of the flow and the heat transfer, we study the flow computationally and compare the results for the double wedge geometries, whose second angle is higher and lower than the maximum deflection angle at Mach 7. Apart from the numbers of comprehensive computational studies on the subject available in open literature, our study aims to describe the flow physics by taking the influence of both boundary layers that are formed on the two walls of the wedge into account. In addition to describing the flow and heat transfer mechanisms, we investigate the time for the flows to reach steady state. We evaluate the interaction mechanisms in term of instant and time average surface heat flux distributions. We perform all computations using a finite volume based compressible Navier-Stokes solver, rhoCentralFoam, which is one of the several compressible flow solvers of an open source software, openFOAM.

  3. Wedge energy bands of monolayer black phosphorus: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Park, Minwoo; Bae, Hyeonhu; Lee, Seunghan; Yang, Li; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-08-03

    On the basis of first-principles calculations, we present intriguing electronic properties of halogen-striped functionalized monolayer black phosphorus. The halogen-striped monolayer black phosphorus is found to have a wedge energy band with the energy-momentum relation of [Formula: see text] when the stripe-stripe distance is smaller than ~40 Å. Our tight-binding study shows that the wedge energy band occurs when 2-atom basis 1D lattices are periodically repeated aligned with each other in a 2D lattice. We also discuss the possible applications of this wedge energy band in electron supercollimation with high mobility or severely anisotropic electronic transport, which can be used for the development of optics-like nano-electronics.

  4. Heat conduction and thermal elasticity equations for operating elements of metal ceramic cases (MCC) containing sector- and wedge-shaped foreign inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veremeichuk, N. S.; Gladysh, R. V.; Volos, V. A.; Filippov, V. V.; Zakala, L. M.; Brezden, M. V.

    1993-02-01

    Partly degenerate differential heat conduction and thermal elasticity equations with coefficients of the generalized function type are derived for investigation of thermal processes in inhomogeneous operating MCC elements containing sector- and wedge-shaped foreign through inclusions during their manufacture and operation. The process of finding solutions for the derived equations is illustrated by an example of the heat conduction problem for a plate with a wedge-shaped inclusion having the opening angle 2ϕ 0.

  5. Orogenic wedge growth during collision — constraints on mechanics of a fossil wedge from its kinematic record (Rhenohercynian FTB, Central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesch, A.; Oncken, O.

    1999-08-01

    The kinematic evolution of the Rhenohercynian fold-and-thrust belt of, the Central-European Variscides can be reconstructed from incremental strain and palaeostress data, synkinematic metamorphism, geochronology, synorogenic sediments, and the geometry of shortening. This data set allows to infer the mechanical development with respect to the Mohr-Coloumb theory of critically tapered orogenic wedges. Growth of the Rhenohercynian orogenic wedge was kinematically partitioned into a broad orogen-normal moving and a narrow obliquely moving domain. The ratio of the final widths of these domains varies from 1.6 to 2.3. This low ratio indicates strong basal coupling. Growth averages are 14 km/Ma of shortening and a strain rate of 6×10 -16 s -1. The mode of mass transfer from lower to upper plate, which controlled the accretion geometry and the particle paths, evolved in the long term from dominantly basal to frontal accretion. This evolution was accompanied by a decrease in taper from precollisional 18°-28° to final 5°-8°. 4-6 accretionary subsystems assemble the wedge. Each is characterised by a sequence of basal to frontal accretion, both rooting in a common detachment. The development of the subsystems is supported by the observation of stepwise migration of a foreland-bulge ponding flysch subbasins. These features imply shorter termed (ca. 2 Ma) cyclic mass transfer above a high friction detachment with episodes of basal accretion followed by episodes of a quickly forward-propagating thrust front. Transfer of the basal detachment from ductile mid-crustal to brittle conditions via a crustal ramp and particle flow across the ramp provoked large-scale adjustment of wedge geometry. Internal wedge thickening is spatially and chronologically related to the formation of the ramp and was supported by surficial erosion of ca. 3 kbar for keeping a critical taper. Three growth stages of the wedge can be reconstructed. The high taper of the precollisional stage plots in the

  6. An automated optical wedge calibrator for Dobson ozone spectrophotometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. D.; Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Dobson ozone spectrophotometer measures the difference of intensity between selected wavelengths in the ultraviolet. The method uses an optical attenuator (the 'Wedge') in this measurement. The knowledge of the relationship of the wedge position to the attenuation is critical to the correct calculation of ozone from the measurement. The procedure to determine this relationship is time-consuming, and requires a highly skilled person to perform it correctly. The relationship has been found to change with time. For reliable ozone values, the procedure should be done on a Dobson instrument at regular intervals. Due to the skill and time necessary to perform this procedure, many instruments have gone as long as 15 years between procedures. This article describes an apparatus that performs the procedure under computer control, and is adaptable to the majority of existing Dobson instruments. Part of the apparatus is usable for normal operation of the Dobson instrument, and would allow computer collection of the data and real-time ozone measurements.

  7. Knee abduction angular impulses during prolonged running with wedged insoles.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Worobets, Jay T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2013-07-01

    Wedged insoles may produce immediate effects on knee abduction angular impulses during running; however, it is currently not known whether these knee abduction angular impulse magnitudes are maintained throughout a run when fatigue sets in. If changes occur, this could affect the clinical utility of wedged insoles in treating conditions such as patellofemoral pain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether knee abduction angular impulses are altered during a prolonged run with wedged insoles. It was hypothesized that knee abduction angular impulses would be reduced following a prolonged run with wedged insoles. Nine healthy runners participated. Runners were randomly assigned to either a 6-mm medial wedge condition or a 6-mm lateral wedge condition and then ran continuously overground for 30 min. Knee abduction angular impulses were quantified at 0 and 30 min using a gait analysis procedure. After 2 days, participants returned to perform the same test but with the other wedge type. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate main effects of wedge condition and time and interactions between wedge condition and time (α = 0.05). Paired t-tests were used for post hoc analysis (α = 0.01). No interaction effects (p = 0.958) were found, and knee abduction angular impulses were not significantly different over time (p = 0.384). Lateral wedge conditions produced lesser knee abduction angular impulses than medial conditions at 0 min (difference of 2.79 N m s, p = 0.006) and at 30 min (difference of 2.76 N m s, p < 0.001). It is concluded that significant knee abduction angular impulse changes within wedge conditions do not occur during a 30-min run. Additionally, knee abduction angular impulse differences between wedge conditions are maintained during a 30-min run.

  8. Plastic deformation of a wedge by a sliding punch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepershin, R. I.

    2016-11-01

    We present a self-similar solution of the problem of deformation of an ideally plastic wedge by a sliding punch with regard to contact friction; such a solution generalizes the well-known solutions of the problem of wedge penetration into a plastic half-space and of compression of an ideally plastic wedge by a plane punch. The problem is of interest for modeling the processes of plastic deformation of rough surfaces of metal pieces by a rigid tool.

  9. Vibration frequencies of a constrained cantilever wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, W. Lionel, Jr.; Lu, Yangshan

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the solution for the natural frequencies of a beam tapered in one direction, or a wedge, with both a rotational and a translational constraint at a position along the length of the beam. The eigenfrequencies were determined using an incremental search and bisection method, accurate to the fourth decimal place. The taper ratio was varied from 1.4 to 5.0 and the dimensionless spring constants were varied from 0 to 1000. Graphs are provided to illustrate some results.

  10. Tectonic Surfing: Evidence of Rapid Landward Transport in the Cascadia Subduction Wedge, NW Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, R. J.; Brandon, M. T.; Campbell, K. A.; Nesbitt, E. A.; Pazzaglia, F. J.

    2003-12-01

    There is considerable evidence now that over the last 15 m.y., the Cascadia subduction wedge along the Olympic Peninsula has been in a flux steady state, where the accretionary influx is balanced with the erosional outflux from the forearc high. This steady state condition implies that the size and shape of the wedge have also been in steady state as well. If correct, we can use the steady-state flux Fa ˜45 km2/m.y. and the present shape of the wedge to predict the average transit time τ through the wedge, given by τ (x) = A(x) /Fa, where x is the landward distance from the front of the wedge and A(x) is the area of the wedge seaward of x. Given the present bathymetry of the wedge, z(x), we can relate age to depth (τ to z) for accreted material moving through the wedge. These relationships predict an age-depth history that is remarkably similar to that determined for the Coastal unit of the Olympic Structural Complex (OSC) (Hoh assemblage), which consists of accreted sediments presently exposed along the west coast of the Olympic Peninsula. For this comparison, we have determined new estimates of paleo-water depth using paleobathymetric interprations for benthic forams by Ingle (1980), together with published benthic foram reports by W. Rau. The Coastal OSC was deposited at 16.5 Ma at water depths >2000 m, which is similar to the 2500 m depth of the modern trench. The Coastal OSC is highly deformed and imbricated, consistent with its origin by subduction accretion. Thermal indicators show that the unit never experienced temperatures > ˜100 C, so this structural unit must have been accreted near the front of the wedge and transported landward just beneath the surface of the wedge. Exploration wells on the shelf west of the Olympic Peninsula drilled through a coherently bedded sequence and into the underlying Coastal OSC. The base of the coherent sequence is middle and late Miocene (15 to 10 Ma) and was deposited at >2000 m water depth, which indicates

  11. Spot size effects in miniaturized moving-optical-wedge interferometer.

    PubMed

    Al-Saeed, Tarek A; Khalil, Diaa A

    2011-06-10

    In this paper we study the effect of diffraction on the performance of a miniaturized moving-optical-wedge interferometer. By using the Gaussian model, we calculate the degradation of the interferometer visibility due to diffraction effects. We use this model to optimize the detector size required to obtain maximum visibility and study its effect on resolution of Fourier transform spectrometers based on a moving-optical-wedge interferometer. A comparison between these effects in Michelson and wedge interferometers is also presented showing the advantage of the moving-optical-wedge interferometer in suppressing the diffraction effects with respect to the Michelson interferometer.

  12. Impingement of water droplets on wedges and double-wedge airfoils at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, John S

    1954-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the equations of motion of water droplets impinging on a wedge in a two-dimensional supersonic flow field with a shock wave attached to the wedge. The closed-form solution yields analytical expressions for the equation of the droplet trajectory, the local rate of impingement and the impingement velocity at any point on the wedge surface, and the total rate of impingement. The analytical expressions are utilized to determine the impingement on the forward surfaces of diamond airfoils in supersonic flow fields with attached shock waves. The results presented include the following conditions: droplet diameters from 2 to 100 microns, pressure altitudes from sea level to 30,000 feet, free-stream static temperatures from 420 degrees r, free stream Mach numbers from 1.1 to 2.0, semiapex angles for the wedge from 1.14 degrees to 7.97 degrees, thickness-to-chord ratios for the diamond airfoil from 0.02 to 0.14, chord lengths from 1 to 20 feet, and angles of attack from zero to the inverse tangent of the airfoil thickness-to-chord ratio.

  13. Open high-level data formats and software for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deil, Christoph; Boisson, Catherine; Kosack, Karl; Perkins, Jeremy; King, Johannes; Eger, Peter; Mayer, Michael; Wood, Matthew; Zabalza, Victor; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Hassan, Tarek; Mohrmann, Lars; Ziegler, Alexander; Khelifi, Bruno; Dorner, Daniela; Maier, Gernot; Pedaletti, Giovanna; Rosado, Jaime; Contreras, José Luis; Lefaucheur, Julien; Brügge, Kai; Servillat, Mathieu; Terrier, Régis; Walter, Roland; Lombardi, Saverio

    2017-01-01

    In gamma-ray astronomy, a variety of data formats and proprietary software have been traditionally used, often developed for one specific mission or experiment. Especially for ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs), data and software are mostly private to the collaborations operating the telescopes. However, there is a general movement in science towards the use of open data and software. In addition, the next-generation IACT instrument, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), will be operated as an open observatory. We have created a Github organisation at https://github.com/open-gamma-ray-astro where we are developing high-level data format specifications. A public mailing list was set up at https://lists.nasa.gov/mailman/listinfo/open-gamma-ray-astro and a first face-to-face meeting on the IACT high-level data model and formats took place in April 2016 in Meudon (France). This open multi-mission effort will help to accelerate the development of open data formats and open-source software for gamma-ray astronomy, leading to synergies in the development of analysis codes and eventually better scientific results (reproducible, multi-mission). This write-up presents this effort for the first time, explaining the motivation and context, the available resources and process we use, as well as the status and planned next steps for the data format specifications. We hope that it will stimulate feedback and future contributions from the gamma-ray astronomy community.

  14. High School Teachers' Openness to Adopting New Practices: The Role of Personal Resources and Organizational Climate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stacy R; Pas, Elise T; Loh, Deanna; Debnam, Katrina J; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2017-03-01

    Although evidence-based practices for students' social, emotional, and behavioral health are readily available, their adoption and quality implementation in schools are of increasing concern. Teachers are vital to implementation; yet, there is limited research on teachers' openness to adopting new practices, which may be essential to successful program adoption and implementation. The current study explored how perceptions of principal support, teacher affiliation, teacher efficacy, and burnout relate to teachers' openness to new practices. Data came from 2,133 teachers across 51 high schools. Structural equation modeling assessed how organizational climate (i.e., principal support and teacher affiliation) related to teachers' openness directly and indirectly via teacher resources (i.e., efficacy and burnout). Teachers with more favorable perceptions of both principal support and teacher affiliation reported greater efficacy, and, in turn, more openness; however, burnout was not significantly associated with openness. Post hoc analyses indicated that among teachers with high levels of burnout, only principal support related to greater efficacy, and in turn, higher openness. Implications for promoting teachers' openness to new program adoption are discussed.

  15. Kees Zwaan, open principle, future of high-resolution solar telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, R. H.; Bettonvil, F. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    It was around the 1970s that during site-test campaigns masts were erected up till 30 m height with sensors at several heights for the measurement of temperature fluctuations. Kees Zwaan discovered that the fluctuations decrease drastically at heights from about 15 m and upward when there is some wind. The conclusion from this experience was the open telescope principle: a telescope completely free in the air 15 m or more above the ground. The Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) was the pioneering demonstrator of the open-telescope technology. Now that larger high-resolution telescopes come in view, it is time to analyze again the principle: the essentials for proper working of the open principle and the design consequences for the new generation of high-resolution solar telescopes.

  16. Cornelis Zwaan, open principle, and the future of high-resolution solar telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sliepen, Guus

    2008-07-01

    It was in the years around 1970 that during site-test campaigns for JOSO masts were erected up till 30 m height with sensors at several heights for the measurement of temperature fluctuations. Cornelis (Kees) Zwaan discovered that the fluctuations decrease drastically at heights from about 15 m and upward when there is some wind. The conclusion from this experience was the open telescope principle: the telescope should be completely free in the air 15 m or more above the ground. The Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) was the pioneering demonstrator of the open-telescope technology. Now that larger high-resolution telescopes come in view, it is time to analyze again the principle: (i) the essentials for proper working of the open principle; (ii) the differences with nighttime observations particularly concerning the seeing; (iii) the design consequences for the new generation of high-resolution solar telescopes.

  17. Integrated Analysis Platform: An Open-Source Information System for High-Throughput Plant Phenotyping1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Klukas, Christian; Chen, Dijun; Pape, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput phenotyping is emerging as an important technology to dissect phenotypic components in plants. Efficient image processing and feature extraction are prerequisites to quantify plant growth and performance based on phenotypic traits. Issues include data management, image analysis, and result visualization of large-scale phenotypic data sets. Here, we present Integrated Analysis Platform (IAP), an open-source framework for high-throughput plant phenotyping. IAP provides user-friendly interfaces, and its core functions are highly adaptable. Our system supports image data transfer from different acquisition environments and large-scale image analysis for different plant species based on real-time imaging data obtained from different spectra. Due to the huge amount of data to manage, we utilized a common data structure for efficient storage and organization of data for both input data and result data. We implemented a block-based method for automated image processing to extract a representative list of plant phenotypic traits. We also provide tools for build-in data plotting and result export. For validation of IAP, we performed an example experiment that contains 33 maize (Zea mays ‘Fernandez’) plants, which were grown for 9 weeks in an automated greenhouse with nondestructive imaging. Subsequently, the image data were subjected to automated analysis with the maize pipeline implemented in our system. We found that the computed digital volume and number of leaves correlate with our manually measured data in high accuracy up to 0.98 and 0.95, respectively. In summary, IAP provides a multiple set of functionalities for import/export, management, and automated analysis of high-throughput plant phenotyping data, and its analysis results are highly reliable. PMID:24760818

  18. P-wave anisotropy, mantle wedge flow and olivine fabrics beneath Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Dapeng

    2017-09-01

    We present a new 3-D anisotropic P-wave velocity (Vp) model for the crust and upper mantle of the Japan subduction zone obtained by inverting a large number of high-quality P-wave traveltime data of local earthquakes and teleseismic events. By assuming orthorhombic anisotropy with a vertical symmetry axis existing in the modeling space, isotropic Vp tomography and 3-D Vp azimuthal and radial anisotropies are determined simultaneously. According to a simple flow field and the obtained Vp anisotropic tomography, we estimate the distribution of olivine fabrics in the mantle wedge. Our results show that the forearc mantle wedge above the subducting Pacific slab beneath NE Japan exhibits an azimuthal anisotropy with trench-parallel fast velocity directions (FVDs) and Vhf > Vv > Vhs (here Vv is Vp in the vertical direction, Vhf and Vhs are P-wave velocities in the fast and slow directions in the horizontal plane), where B-type olivine fabric with vertical trench-parallel flow may dominate. Such an anisotropic feature is not obvious in the forearc mantle wedge above the Philippine Sea (PHS) slab under SW Japan, probably due to higher temperatures and more fluids there associated with the young and warm PHS slab subduction. Trench-normal FVDs and Vhf > Vv > Vhs are generally revealed in the mantle wedge beneath the arc and backarc in Japan, where E-type olivine fabric with FVD-parallel horizontal flow may dominate. Beneath western Honshu, however, the mantle wedge exhibits an anisotropy of Vv > Vhf > Vhs and so C-type olivine fabric may dominate, suggesting that the water content is the highest there, because both the PHS and Pacific slabs exist there and their dehydration reactions release abundant fluids to the overlying mantle wedge.

  19. Oxidation sharpening, template stripping, and passivation of ultra-sharp metallic pyramids and wedges.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyungsoon; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2014-02-26

    Ultra-sharp metallic pyramids and wedges with tunable tip angles and 5-nm tip radii are replicated from oxidation-sharpened silicon templates with high throughput (80 million pyramids per wafer). Atomic layer deposition of Al2 O3 shells can protect these sharp pyramidal tips for subsequent usage in near-field imaging.

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations on melamine wedges.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S

    2008-09-01

    Melamine wedges are often used as acoustic lining material for anechoic chambers. It was proposed here to study the effects of the mounting conditions on the acoustic properties of the melamine wedges used in the large anechoic chamber at the LMA. The results of the impedance tube measurements carried out show that the mounting conditions must be taken into account when assessing the quality of an acoustic lining. As it can be difficult to simulate these mounting conditions in impedance tube experiments, a numerical method was developed, which can be used to complete the experiments or for parametric studies. By combining the finite and the boundary element method, it is possible to investigate acoustic linings with almost no restrictions as to the geometry, material behavior, or mounting conditions. The numerical method presented here was used to study the acoustic properties of the acoustic lining installed in the anechoic chamber at the LMA. Further experiments showed that the behavior of the melamine foam is anisotropic. Numerical simulations showed that this anisotropy can be used to advantage when designing an acoustic lining.

  1. Molecular Depth Profiling by Wedged Crater Beveling

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dan; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy are employed to characterize a wedge-shaped crater eroded by a 40keV C60+ cluster ion beam on an organic film of Irganox 1010 doped with Irganox 3114 delta layers. From an examination of the resulting surface, the information about depth resolution, topography and erosion rate can be obtained as a function of crater depth for every depth in a single experiment. It is shown that when measurements are performed at liquid nitrogen temperature, a constant erosion rate and reduced bombardment induced surface roughness is observed. At room temperature, however, the erosion rate drops by ~1/3 during the removal of the 400 nm Irganox film and the roughness gradually increased to from 1 nm ~4 nm. From SIMS lateral images of the beveled crater and AFM topography results, depth resolution was further improved by employing glancing angles of incidence and lower primary ion beam energy. Sub-10 nm depth resolution was observed under the optimized conditions on a routine basis. In general, we show that the wedge-crater beveling is an important tool for elucidating the factors that are important for molecular depth profiling experiments. PMID:21744861

  2. Which Type of Inquiry Project Do High School Biology Students Prefer: Open or Guided?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeh, Irit; Zion, Michal

    2012-10-01

    In teaching inquiry to high school students, educators differ on which method of teaching inquiry is more effective: Guided or open inquiry? This paper examines the influence of these two different inquiry learning approaches on the attitudes of Israeli high school biology students toward their inquiry project. The results showed significant differences between the two groups: Open inquiry students were more satisfied and felt they gained benefits from implementing the project to a greater extent than guided inquiry students. On the other hand, regarding documentation throughout the project, guided inquiry students believed that they conducted more documentation, as compared to their open inquiry peers. No significant differences were found regarding `the investment of time', but significant differences were found in the time invested and difficulties which arose concerning the different stages of the inquiry process: Open inquiry students believed they spent more time in the first stages of the project, while guided inquiry students believed they spent more time in writing the final paper. In addition, other differences were found: Open inquiry students felt more involved in their project, and felt a greater sense of cooperation with others, in comparison to guided inquiry students. These findings may help teachers who hesitate to teach open inquiry to implement this method of inquiry; or at least provide their students with the opportunity to be more involved in inquiry projects, and ultimately provide their students with more autonomy, high-order thinking, and a deeper understanding in performing science.

  3. Colluvial wedge imaging using traveltime and waveform tomography along the Wasatch Fault near Mapleton, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddensiek, M.-L.; Sheng, J.; Crosby, T.; Schuster, G. T.; Bruhn, R. L.; He, R.

    2008-02-01

    Four high-resolution seismic surveys were conducted across the Wasatch Fault Zone near Mapleton, Utah. The objective was twofold: (1) To use velocity tomograms and reflection images to delineate fault structures and colluvial wedges to more than twice the depth of the Mapleton Megatrench excavated by URS personnel, (2) to assess the strengths and limitations of traveltime and waveform tomography by synthetic studies and comparison of the tomogram to the ground truth seen in the Megatrench log. Four out of the five faults within the trench area are accurately identified in the migrated image and in the tomograms, and the main fault's dip angle is estimated to be between 71 and 80°. Two additional faults are interpreted outside the trench. The faults can be delineated down to 30 m below the surface, which is 20 m deeper than the excavated trench. Five out of six colluvial wedges found in the trench log were seen as low-velocity zones (LVZs) in the tomogram, however the biggest colluvial wedge could not be identified by either tomography method. Waveform tomography prevailed over ray-based traveltime tomography by more clearly recovering the faults and LVZs. A newly discovered LVZ at a depth of 18-21 m below the surface possibly represents a colluvial wedge and is estimated to be less than 21000 years old. If this LVZ is a colluvial wedge, the earthquake history obtained by trenching can be extended from 13500 to 21000 yr with seismic tomography. Our results further demonstrate the capability of tomography in identifying faults, and show that waveform tomography more accurately resolves colluvial wedges compared to traveltime tomography. However, despite the successful recovery of most faults and some, but not all, colluvial wedges, both tomography methods show many more LVZs besides the wedges, so that an unambiguous interpretation cannot be made. A major part of the ambiguity in the tomograms is due to the many major faults, which result in an uneven raypath

  4. Needle core vs open biopsy for diagnosis of intermediate- and high-risk neuroblastoma in children.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Saif F; Mathur, Shawn; Magliaro, Thomas J; Larimer, Emily L; Ferrell, Lauren B; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A; Patterson, Danielle M; Louis, Chrystal U; Russell, Heidi V; Nuchtern, Jed G; Kim, Eugene S

    2012-06-01

    Open biopsy has been the mainstay for definitive diagnosis of neuroblastoma in pediatric patients. However, needle core biopsy may represent a faster, less invasive, and safer alternative to open biopsy in children. The purpose of this study was to compare safety and efficacy between needle core and open biopsy in the diagnosis of patients with intermediate- and high-risk neuroblastoma at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children with intermediate- and high-risk neuroblastoma who underwent open or needle core biopsies from 2002 to 2010. Data collected included patient demographics, tumor size, sample adequacy for diagnosis and risk stratification (histology and cytogenetics), length of hospital stay, time to initiate chemotherapy after biopsy, need for repeat biopsy, and both intraoperative and postoperative complications. Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analysis. During the study period, 7 patients underwent needle core primary biopsies (5 intermediate-risk primary tumors and 2 high-risk primary tumors), and 4 patients underwent needle core biopsy for metastatic tumors, whereas 21 patients had open biopsies (10, intermediate risk; 11, high risk). Median age at biopsy and median tumor size were similar in both groups. There was no significant difference in adequacy of biopsy, need for repeat biopsy, time to initiate chemotherapy, length of stay, or minor complications. The rate of major complications differed significantly between the 2 groups with 0% after needle core biopsy vs 48% after open biopsy (P = .027). In children, needle core biopsy is comparable in efficacy with open biopsy in the diagnosis of intermediate- and high-risk neuroblastoma with significantly lower rates of major postoperative complications. These findings warrant a larger scale evaluation of diagnostic needle core biopsies in pediatric patients with solid tumor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lessons Learned from Recently Opened High Schools: A Study of Process and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withycombe, Richard

    This case study of six newly-opened high schools explored: (1) What steps were taken to involve district staff members and community representatives in educational-specifications and design-development work? How effective did these steps prove to be? What impact did this involvement appear to have on the emergent and completed high school project?…

  6. A High-Leverage Language Teaching Practice: Leading an Open-Ended Group Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for more practice-based teacher education, this study investigated the way in which two high-performing novice world language teachers, one in Spanish and one in Latin, implemented a high-leverage teaching practice, leading an open-ended group discussion. Observational data revealed a number of constituent micro-practices. The…

  7. A High-Leverage Language Teaching Practice: Leading an Open-Ended Group Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for more practice-based teacher education, this study investigated the way in which two high-performing novice world language teachers, one in Spanish and one in Latin, implemented a high-leverage teaching practice, leading an open-ended group discussion. Observational data revealed a number of constituent micro-practices. The…

  8. Denudational rate control on orogenic wedge growth - a scaled sandbox approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoth, S.; Adam, J.; Kukowski, N.; Oncken, O.

    2003-04-01

    ) Whereas retro-wedge denudation promotes orogenic growth, pro-wedge denudation retards it. The latter may be faster in achieving a geometrical steady state than the former. (3) High frontal accretion rates are not necessarily associated with high and wide mountain ranges (eg. Borneo). (4) Focused denudation leads to localised particle paths as is the case in glacial-dominated orogens (eg. Denali Range, Southern Alaska). (5) The tectonic response to a denudation signal depends on the state of accretion and the work balance between in-sequence and out-of-sequence thrusting and is therefore non-uniform. (6) Characteristic particle paths are produced by a combination of denudation and the basal and internal mechanical parameters of an orogenic wedge.

  9. OpenMM 4: A Reusable, Extensible, Hardware Independent Library for High Performance Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Peter; Friedrichs, Mark S; Chodera, John D; Radmer, Randall J; Bruns, Christopher M; Ku, Joy P; Beauchamp, Kyle A; Lane, Thomas J; Wang, Lee-Ping; Shukla, Diwakar; Tye, Tony; Houston, Mike; Stich, Timo; Klein, Christoph; Shirts, Michael R; Pande, Vijay S

    2013-01-08

    OpenMM is a software toolkit for performing molecular simulations on a range of high performance computing architectures. It is based on a layered architecture: the lower layers function as a reusable library that can be invoked by any application, while the upper layers form a complete environment for running molecular simulations. The library API hides all hardware-specific dependencies and optimizations from the users and developers of simulation programs: they can be run without modification on any hardware on which the API has been implemented. The current implementations of OpenMM include support for graphics processing units using the OpenCL and CUDA frameworks. In addition, OpenMM was designed to be extensible, so new hardware architectures can be accommodated and new functionality (e.g., energy terms and integrators) can be easily added.

  10. OpenMM 4: A Reusable, Extensible, Hardware Independent Library for High Performance Molecular Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, Peter; Friedrichs, Mark S.; Chodera, John D.; Radmer, Randall J.; Bruns, Christopher M.; Ku, Joy P.; Beauchamp, Kyle A.; Lane, Thomas J.; Wang, Lee-Ping; Shukla, Diwakar; Tye, Tony; Houston, Mike; Stich, Timo; Klein, Christoph; Shirts, Michael R.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2012-01-01

    OpenMM is a software toolkit for performing molecular simulations on a range of high performance computing architectures. It is based on a layered architecture: the lower layers function as a reusable library that can be invoked by any application, while the upper layers form a complete environment for running molecular simulations. The library API hides all hardware-specific dependencies and optimizations from the users and developers of simulation programs: they can be run without modification on any hardware on which the API has been implemented. The current implementations of OpenMM include support for graphics processing units using the OpenCL and CUDA frameworks. In addition, OpenMM was designed to be extensible, so new hardware architectures can be accommodated and new functionality (e.g., energy terms and integrators) can be easily added. PMID:23316124

  11. Unscented Kalman filter with open-loop compensation for high dynamic GNSS carrier tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Chen, Xi; Han, Shuai; Meng, Wei-Xiao; Zhang, Yi

    2009-12-01

    Because of the limit of the loop-band, traditional carrier tracking loop of GNSS receiver can't work in high dynamic conditions with large Doppler frequency, for which an open-loop carrier tracking method based on UKF is proposed. Upon this new tracking loop, the four-dimensionality UKF phase estimator and a compensator is designed to modify the estimative values. By simulating the high dynamic trace of the plat of GNSS receiver, this new method is compared to the closed loop mainly in the aspects of tracking errors, compensation effects and unlocking probability. Simulations show that (1) the proposed open-loop compensation method can give attention to the precision and the dynamics better, with high stability, (2) compared with the closed loop, the open-loop carrier tracking method can improve the tracking precision, with 50% decrease of the tracking errors; and (3) the convergence of this new method is much better, leading to lower unlocking probability.

  12. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention.... External mechanical support of the perianal region is intended to help prevent the occurrence of external...

  13. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  14. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  15. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  16. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention... hemorrhoids associated with vaginal childbirth. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  17. 28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK TO OUTSIDE, SHOWN TO RIGHT OF THE WEDGE. PHOTO TAKEN AT SOUTH SWING SPAN. - George P. Coleman Memorial Bridge, Spanning York River at U.S. Route 17, Yorktown, York County, VA

  18. Ground penetrating radar estimates of permafrost ice wedge depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsekian, A.; Slater, L. D.; Nolan, J. T.; Grosse, G.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical ground ice wedges associated with polygonal patterning in permafrost environments form due to frost cracking of soils under harsh winter conditions and subsequent infilling of cracks with snow melt water. Ice wedge polygon patterns have implications for lowland geomorphology, hydrology, and vulnerability of permafrost to thaw. Ice wedge dimensions may exceed two meters width at the surface and several meters depth, however few studies have addressed the question of ice wedge depth due to challenges related to measuring the vertical dimension below the ground. Vertical exposures where ice wedges maybe observed are limited to rapidly retreating lake, river, and coastal bluffs. Coring though the ice wedges to determine vertical extent is possible, however that approach is time consuming and labor intensive. Many geophysical investigations have noted signal anomalies related to the presence of ice wedges, but no reliable method for extracting wedge dimensions from geophysical data has been yet proposed. Here we present new evidence that ground penetrating radar (GPR) may be a viable method for estimating ice wedge depth. We present three new perspectives on processing GPR data collected over ice wedges that show considerable promise for use as a fast, cost effective method for evaluating ice wedge depth. Our novel approaches include 1) a simple frequency-domain analysis, 2) an S-transform frequency domain analysis and 3) an analysis of the returned signal power as a radar cross section (RCS) treating subsurface ice wedges as dihedral corner retro-reflectors. Our methods are demonstrated and validated using finite-difference time domain FDTD) GPR forward models of synthetic idealized ice wedges and field data from permafrost sites in Alaska. Our results indicate that frequency domain and signal power data provide information that is easier to extract from raw GPR data than similar information in the time domain. We also show that we can simplify the problem by

  19. Drumhead model of 2D wetting, filling and wedge covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, D. B.; Parry, A. O.; Wood, A. J.

    2002-10-01

    Recent work has demonstrated novel fluid interfacial behaviour occurring at filling or wedge-wetting transitions in two- and three-dimensional systems. In particular, in two dimensions (2D) studies of filling in shallow wedges, for both pure and impure systems, reveal simple covariance relations which relate criticality at filling to strong-fluctuation regime wetting and restrict the allowed critical singularities. Here we introduce a drumhead interfacial model of filling in acute wedges which can be adapted to include an orientation-dependent surface tension. We calculate the excess wedge free energy and scaling form of the mid-point height probability distribution function (PDF) and demonstrate that the covariance relations are the same as found in the shallow wedge approximation. Connections with exact Ising model results and a bubble model interpretation of the interfacial height PDF at wetting are made.

  20. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-15

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria.

  1. Compact optical isolator for fibers using birefringent wedges.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, M; Asama, K

    1982-12-01

    A new type of optical isolator for fibers is proposed in this paper. A birefringent wedge used to separate and combine the polarized light is developed, giving the isolator low forward loss and high isolation. The antire-flection process at the fiber endface reduces the forward loss and reflected return. A forward loss of 0.8 dB, a backward loss of 35 dB, and a reflected return of -32 dB were obtained. These characteristics were measured from fiber to fiber using multimode fibers with 50-/microm core diam at a wavelength of 1.3 microm. Details of the design, fabrication, and characteristics of this isolator are presented.

  2. On the instability of hypersonic flow past a wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Stephen; Hall, Philip

    1988-01-01

    The instability of a compressible flow past a wedge is investigated in the hypersonic limit. Particular attention is given to the Tollmien-Schlichting waves governed by triple-deck theory though some discussion of inviscid modes is given. It is shown that the attached shock has a significant effect on the growth rates of Tollmien-Schlichting waves. Moreover, the presence of the shock allows for more than one unstable Tollmien-Schlichting wave. Indeed, an infinite discrete spectrum of unstable waves is induced by the shock, but these modes are unstable over relatively small but high frequency ranges. The shock is shown to have little effect on the inviscid modes considered by previous authors and an asymptotic description of inviscid modes in the hypersonic limit is given.

  3. High voltage, high power operation of the plasma erosion opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, J.M.; Boller, J.R.; Ottinger, P.F.; Weber, B.V.; Young, F.C.

    1987-04-07

    A Plasma Erosion Opening Switch (PEOS) is used as the opening switch for a vacuum inductive storage system driven by a 1.8-MV, 1.6-TW pulsed power generator. A 135-nH vacuum inductor is current charged to approx.750 kA in 50 ns through the closed PEOS which then opens in <10 ns into an inverse ion diode load. Electrical diagnostics and nuclear activations from ions accelerated in the diode yield a peak load voltage (4.25 MV) and peak load power (2.8 TW) that are 2.4 and 1.8 times greater than ideal matched load values for the same generator pulse.

  4. Configuration and Generation of Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning

    The substorm current wedge (SCW), a core element of substorm dynamics coupling the magnetotail to the ionosphere, is crucial in understanding substorms. It has been suggested that the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the SCW are caused by either pressure gradients or flow vortices, or both. Our understanding of FAC generations is based predominately on numerical simulations, because it has not been possible to organize spacecraft observations in a coordinate system determined by the SCW. This dissertation develops an empirical inversion model of the current wedge and inverts midlatitude magnetometer data to obtain the parameters of the current wedge for three solar cycles. This database enables statistical data analysis of spacecraft plasma and magnetic field observations relative to the SCW coordinate. In chapter 2, a new midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index is developed and calculated for three solar cycles of data. The MPB index is processed to determine the substorm onset time, which is shown to correspond to the auroral breakup onset with at most 1-2 minutes difference. Substorm occurrence rate is found to depend on solar wind speed while substorm duration is rather constant, suggesting that substorm process has an intrinsic pattern independent of external driving. In chapter 3, an SCW inversion technique is developed to determine the strength and locations of the FACs in an SCW. The inversion parameters for FAC strength and location, and ring current strength are validated by comparison with other measurements. In chapter 4, the connection between earthward flows and auroral poleward expansion is examined using improved mapping, obtained from a newly-developed dynamic magnetospheric model by superimposing a standard magnetospheric field model with substorm current wedge obtained from the inversion technique. It is shown that the ionospheric projection of flows observed at a fixed point in the equatorial plane map to the bright aurora as it expands poleward

  5. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    DOE PAGES

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; ...

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack.more » This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.« less

  6. Substorm Current Wedge at Earth and Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Slavin, J. A.; Sundberg, T.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews magnetospheric substorms and dipolarizations observed at both Earth and Mercury. It briefly discusses new insights into the physics of the substorm current wedge (SCW) that have been revealed the past few years. The formation and evolution of the SCW are closely tied to the braking of flows convecting flux away from the reconnection site and the resultant near-planet flux pileup that creates the dipolarization. At Earth, the SCW plays a critical role in substorms, coupling magnetospheric to ionospheric motions, deflecting incoming plasma flows, and regulating the dissipation of pressure built up in the near-Earth magnetosphere during dipolarization. The lack of a conducting boundary at Mercury provides a natural experiment to examine the role of an ionosphere on regulating magnetospheric convection. Energetic particles may play a much greater role within substorms at Mercury than at Earth, providing another opportunity for comparative studies.

  7. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack. This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.

  8. Covariance for Cone and Wedge Complete Filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascón, C.; Parry, A. O.

    2005-03-01

    Interfacial phenomena associated with fluid adsorption in two dimensional systems have recently been shown to exhibit hidden symmetries, or covariances, which precisely relate local adsorption properties in different confining geometries. We show that covariance also occurs in three-dimensional systems and is likely to be verifiable experimentally and in Ising model simulations studies. Specifically, we study complete wetting in wedge (W) and cone (C) geometries as bulk coexistence is approached and show that the equilibrium midpoint heights satisfy lc(h,α)=lw(h/2,α), where h measures the partial pressure and α is the tilt angle. This covariance is valid for both short-ranged and long-ranged intermolecular forces and identifies both leading and next-to-leading-order critical exponents and amplitudes in the confining geometries.

  9. First 13 years of high-{Tc}: Brief review and open questions

    SciTech Connect

    Pavuna, D.

    1999-12-20

    Exactly 13 years ago, in April 1986, appeared the famous paper by Bednorz and Mueller, that announced a striking discovery of high-{Tc} superconductivity in cuprates. Some 40,000 papers later, scientists are still struggling to understand the high-{Tc} superconductivity. Here the author summarizes some of the most relevant recent results and open questions by discussing the observed phenomena in a rather complex electronic phase diagram of high-{Tc} oxides.

  10. Ammonia losses and nitrogen partitioning at a southern High Plains open lot dairy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Richard W.; Cole, N. Andy; Hagevoort, G. Robert; Casey, Kenneth D.; Auvermann, Brent W.

    2015-06-01

    Animal agriculture is a significant source of ammonia (NH3). Cattle excrete most ingested nitrogen (N); most urinary N is converted to NH3, volatilized and lost to the atmosphere. Open lot dairies on the southern High Plains are a growing industry and face environmental challenges as well as reporting requirements for NH3 emissions. We quantified NH3 emissions from the open lot and wastewater lagoons of a commercial New Mexico dairy during a nine-day summer campaign. The 3500-cow dairy consisted of open lot, manure-surfaced corrals (22.5 ha area). Lactating cows comprised 80% of the herd. A flush system using recycled wastewater intermittently removed manure from feeding alleys to three lagoons (1.8 ha area). Open path lasers measured atmospheric NH3 concentration, sonic anemometers characterized turbulence, and inverse dispersion analysis was used to quantify emissions. Ammonia fluxes (15-min) averaged 56 and 37 μg m-2 s-1 at the open lot and lagoons, respectively. Ammonia emission rate averaged 1061 kg d-1 at the open lot and 59 kg d-1 at the lagoons; 95% of NH3 was emitted from the open lot. The per capita emission rate of NH3 was 304 g cow-1 d-1 from the open lot (41% of N intake) and 17 g cow-1 d-1 from lagoons (2% of N intake). Daily N input at the dairy was 2139 kg d-1, with 43, 36, 19 and 2% of the N partitioned to NH3 emission, manure/lagoons, milk, and cows, respectively.

  11. ON THE ORIGIN OF HIGH-ALTITUDE OPEN CLUSTERS IN THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Medina, L. A.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E.; Peimbert, A.; Velazquez, H.

    2016-01-20

    We present a dynamical study of the effect of the bar and spiral arms on the simulated orbits of open clusters in the Galaxy. Specifically, this work is devoted to the puzzling presence of high-altitude open clusters in the Galaxy. For this purpose we employ a very detailed observationally motivated potential model for the Milky Way and a careful set of initial conditions representing the newly born open clusters in the thin disk. We find that the spiral arms are able to raise an important percentage of open clusters (about one-sixth of the total employed in our simulations, depending on the structural parameters of the arms) above the Galactic plane to heights beyond 200 pc, producing a bulge-shaped structure toward the center of the Galaxy. Contrary to what was expected, the spiral arms produce a much greater vertical effect on the clusters than the bar, both in quantity and height; this is due to the sharper concentration of the mass on the spiral arms, when compared to the bar. When a bar and spiral arms are included, spiral arms are still capable of raising an important percentage of the simulated open clusters through chaotic diffusion (as tested from classification analysis of the resultant high-z orbits), but the bar seems to restrain them, diminishing the elevation above the plane by a factor of about two.

  12. On the Origin of High-altitude Open Clusters in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Medina, L. A.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E.; Peimbert, A.; Velazquez, H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a dynamical study of the effect of the bar and spiral arms on the simulated orbits of open clusters in the Galaxy. Specifically, this work is devoted to the puzzling presence of high-altitude open clusters in the Galaxy. For this purpose we employ a very detailed observationally motivated potential model for the Milky Way and a careful set of initial conditions representing the newly born open clusters in the thin disk. We find that the spiral arms are able to raise an important percentage of open clusters (about one-sixth of the total employed in our simulations, depending on the structural parameters of the arms) above the Galactic plane to heights beyond 200 pc, producing a bulge-shaped structure toward the center of the Galaxy. Contrary to what was expected, the spiral arms produce a much greater vertical effect on the clusters than the bar, both in quantity and height; this is due to the sharper concentration of the mass on the spiral arms, when compared to the bar. When a bar and spiral arms are included, spiral arms are still capable of raising an important percentage of the simulated open clusters through chaotic diffusion (as tested from classification analysis of the resultant high-z orbits), but the bar seems to restrain them, diminishing the elevation above the plane by a factor of about two.

  13. Analysis and measurement of electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, B. T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    By modifying the reflection coefficients in the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction a solution that approximates the scattering from a dielectric wedge is found. This solution agrees closely with the exact solution of Rawlins which is only valid for a few minor cases. This modification is then applied to the corner diffraction coefficient and combined with an equivalent current and geometrical optics solutions to model scattering from pyramid and wedge absorbers. Measured results from 12 inch pyramid absorbers from 2 to 18 GHz are compared to calculations assuming the returns add incoherently and assuming the returns add coherently. The measured results tend to be between the two curves. Measured results from the 8 inch wedge absorber are also compared to calculations with the return being dominated by the wedge diffraction. The procedures for measuring and specifying absorber performance are discussed and calibration equations are derived to calculate a reflection coefficient or a reflectivity using a reference sphere. Shaping changes to the present absorber designs are introduced to improve performance based on both high and low frequency analysis. Some prototypes were built and tested.

  14. Non-Coulomb wedges, wrong-way thrusting, and natural hazards in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, Marc-André; Klaeschen, Dirk; Flueh, Ernst; Malavieille, Jacques

    2001-05-01

    Landward vergence in accretionary wedges is an uncommon phenomenon not readily explained by classical Mohr-Coulomb critical wedge theory. Predominantly landward- vergent thrust faults are observed along the Cascadia convergent margin from 45°N to 48°N. We present depth-migrated multichannel seismic images of the internal structure of the accretionary wedge offshore Washington collected during the ORWELL project in 1996. These reveal a high p-wave velocity (≥4 km/s) basal layer that thickens landward and serves as a décollement for a series of overlying landward-vergent thrust faults. Analog modeling using a ductile basal layer consisting of silicone putty produces an array of trenchward-propagating, landward-vergent thrusts and offers a plausible mechanical model for the evolution of these structures. The rheological properties of a basal calcareous mudstone layer offshore Cascadia are discussed in relation to the mechanics of landward vergence and to rapid loading due to the prograding Nitinat and Astoria deep-sea fans. A viscoelastic layer beneath the accretionary wedge is considered to be capable of rupturing during great interplate earthquakes and thus represents an increased risk for both the maximum size of such an event and for the generation of tsunamis.

  15. Accretion in the wake of terrane collision: The Neogene accretionary wedge off Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fruehn, J.; Von Huene, R.; Fisher, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Subduction accretion and repeated terrane collision shaped the Alaskan convergent margin. The Yakutat Terrane is currently colliding with the continental margin below the central Gulf of Alaska. During the Neogene the terrane's western part was subducted after which a sediment wedge accreted along the northeast Aleutian Trench. This wedge incorporates sediment eroded from the continental margin and marine sediments carried into the subduction zone on the Pacific plate. Prestack depth migration was performed on six seismic reflection lines to resolve the structure within this accretionary wedge and its backstop. The lateral extent of the structures is constrained by high-resolution swath bathymetry and seismic lines collected along strike. Accretionary structure consists of variably sized thrust slices that were deformed against a backstop during frontal accretion and underplating. Toward the northeast the lower slope steepens, the wedge narrows, and the accreted volume decreases notwith-standing a doubling of sediments thickness in the trench. In the northeasternmost transect, near the area where the terrane's trailing edge subducts, no frontal accretion is observed and the slope is eroded. The structures imaged along the seismic lines discussed here most likely result from progressive evolution from erosion to accretion, as the trailing edge of the Yakutat Terrane is subducting.

  16. Geodetic observations of megathrust earthquakes and backarc wedge deformation across the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J. R.; Brooks, B. A.; Foster, J. H.; Bevis, M. G.; Echalar, A.; Caccamise, D.; Heck, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) data offer an opportunity to investigate active orogenic wedges yet surface velocity fields are available for only a few examples worldwide. More observations are needed to link deformation processes across multiple timescales and to better understand strain accumulation and release in active wedge settings. Here we present a new GPS velocity field for the central Andes and the backarc orogenic wedge comprising the southern Subandes of Bolivia (SSA), a region previously thought to be mostly isolated from the plate boundary earthquake cycle. The time span of our observations (2000 to mid-2014) includes two megathrust earthquakes along the Chile trench that affected the SSA. The 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake resulted in a regional postseismic decrease in the eastward component of horizontal surface velocities. Preliminary analysis of the deformation field from the April 01 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua, Chile earthquake also indicates a postseismic signal extending into the SSA. We create an interseismic velocity field for the SSA by correcting campaign GPS site velocities for the seasonal cycles estimated from continuous GPS site time series. We remove the effects of both megathrust events by estimating coseismic steps and fitting linear and logarithmic functions to the postseismic GPS site motions. The velocity estimates at most locations increase after correcting for the transients. This finding suggests that forces leading to shortening and earthquakes in the backarc wedge are not as temporally consistent as previously considered.

  17. On the Effect of Structural Response on the Hydrodynamic Loading of a Free-Falling Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Christine; Taravella, Brandon; Judge, Carolyn

    2016-11-01

    High-speed planing craft are subjected to repeated slamming events in waves that can be very extreme depending on the wave topography, impact angle of the ship, forward speed of the ship, encounter angle, and height out of the water. The current work examines this fluid-structure interaction problem through the use of wedge drop experiments and a theoretical prediction. The experimental program consisted of two 20° deadrise angle wedges dropped from a range of heights, 0 . 15 <= H <= 0 . 6 m, while pressures and accelerations of the slam were measured. The first wedge had a rigid bottom, and the second wedge had a flexible bottom. Both experiments are compared with a non-linear boundary value flat cylinder theory in order to determine the effects of flexibility on the hydrodynamic pressure. The code assumes a rigid structure, therefore, the results between the code and the first experiment are in good agreement. The second experiment shows pressure magnitudes that are lower than the predictions due to the energy required to deform the structure. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research and the state of Louisiana Board of Regents Industrial Ties and Reseach Subprogram.

  18. Wedge Versus Core Biopsy at Time Zero: Which Provides Better Predictive Value for Delayed Graft Function With the Remuzzi Histological Scoring System?

    PubMed

    Yong, Z Z; Aitken, E L; Khan, K H; Kingsmore, D B

    2015-01-01

    Histopathological features on time-zero renal biopsies correlate with graft outcome after renal transplantation. With increasing numbers of marginal donors, assessment of pre-implantation graft quality is essential. The clinician's choice of wedge or core biopsy is performed without evidence of efficacy or safety. This study aims to compare the information derived from wedge biopsy versus core biopsy. Prospective evaluation of 37 wedge biopsies and 30 core biopsies was performed. Histopathological data were collected on number of glomeruli and arterioles observed, and Remuzzi scoring for glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and arteriolar narrowing was performed. Clinical data on delayed graft function (DGF) were also collated. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for DGF were compared. Patient demographics between the two cohorts were comparable. No complications of biopsies occurred; 81% of wedge biopsies versus 50% of core biopsies had >10 glomeruli (P = .01), whereas 32% of wedge biopsies and 57% of core biopsies had >2 arterioles (P = .02). Wedge biopsies were more likely to identify pathology with more glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy (P < .01), and interstitial fibrosis (P < .01). There was a non-significant trend toward high Remuzzi scores in wedge biopsy (22% versus 7% with Remuzzi ≥ 4; P = .12). The sensitivity and positive predictive value of Remuzzi ≥ 4 for predicting DGF was better on wedge biopsy (45.5% versus 0%; P < .01 and 62.5% versus 0%; P < .01, respectively). Wedge biopsies were safe and superior to core biopsies for identifying clinically significant histopathological findings on pre-implantation renal biopsy. We believe that the wedge biopsy is the method of choice for time-zero biopsies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Opening the Creative Mind of High Need for Cognitive Closure Individuals through Activation of Uncreative Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Lay See; Leung, Angela K.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the integrative system theory of creativity combining the person, process, and press perspectives, this research offers the first evidence of how high-need-for-cognitive-closure (NFC) individuals' creative mind can be opened up, by making them become more cognizant of uncreative ideas as consensually invalid solutions to creative…

  20. Zinc-Catalyzed Highly Isoselective Ring Opening Polymerization of rac-Lactide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A family of chiral zinc amido-oxazolinate complexes are shown to be highly active and isoselective initiators for the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of rac-lactide, yielding isotactic stereoblock polylactides (PLA) with Pm up to 0.91. This represents the highest isoselectivity observed with zinc-based catalysts for ROP of rac-lactide. PMID:25068079

  1. Building Open Educational Resources from the Ground up: South Africa's Free High School Science Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrides, Lisa; Jimes, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    The relatively new field of open educational resources (OER) is just now receiving more widespread attention and study. As such, there have been few opportunities thus far to share knowledge across program, organizational and national boundaries. This article presents a case study of the development of the South African project Free High School…

  2. "OpenLAB": A 2-Hour PCR-Based Practical for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouakaze, Caroline; Eschbach, Judith; Fouquerel, Elise; Gasser, Isabelle; Kieffer, Emmanuelle; Krieger, Sophie; Milosevic, Sara; Saandi, Thoueiba; Florentz, Catherine; Marechal-Drouard, Laurence; Labouesse, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The Strasbourg University PhD school in Life and Health Sciences launched an initiative called "OpenLAB." This project was developed in an effort to help high school teenagers understand theoretical and abstract concepts in genetics. A second objective of this program is to help students in defining their future orientation and to…

  3. The Fate of an Innovation: Open Education in Victorian High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Ronald Charles

    This study compares open education groups and traditional education groups with respect to student attitudes toward high school; creative thinking of students; collaborative behavior among students; and student preferences for intellectual activities, activities involving change or sameness, and activities involving autonomy or dependence. Groups…

  4. "OpenLAB": A 2-Hour PCR-Based Practical for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouakaze, Caroline; Eschbach, Judith; Fouquerel, Elise; Gasser, Isabelle; Kieffer, Emmanuelle; Krieger, Sophie; Milosevic, Sara; Saandi, Thoueiba; Florentz, Catherine; Marechal-Drouard, Laurence; Labouesse, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The Strasbourg University PhD school in Life and Health Sciences launched an initiative called "OpenLAB." This project was developed in an effort to help high school teenagers understand theoretical and abstract concepts in genetics. A second objective of this program is to help students in defining their future orientation and to…

  5. Opening the Creative Mind of High Need for Cognitive Closure Individuals through Activation of Uncreative Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Lay See; Leung, Angela K.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the integrative system theory of creativity combining the person, process, and press perspectives, this research offers the first evidence of how high-need-for-cognitive-closure (NFC) individuals' creative mind can be opened up, by making them become more cognizant of uncreative ideas as consensually invalid solutions to creative…

  6. Cumulative effects of climate change and ice-wedge degradation, Prudhoe Bay oilfield Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. A.; Kanevskiy, M. Z.; Shur, Y.; Raynolds, M. K.; Buchhorn, M.

    2016-12-01

    Development of Arctic oil & gas resources requires extensive networks of roads, pipelines and other forms of infrastructure. The Prudhoe Bay Oilfield is the largest Arctic oilfield in North America with a long, well-documented history. In a previous publication we analyzed the historical record of high-resolution aerial photos to document the long-term changes to infrastructure extent (1949-2010) for the entire oilfield, and an integrated-geoecological-historical-change-mapping (IGHCM) approach to document terrain changes within 22-km2 areas of the oilfield. We reported the recent widespread expansion of thermokarst, starting in about 1989. Here we examine the annual air-photo record to better pinpoint the years of major change. We also conducted detailed field studies of roadside changes using topographic surveys and soil, vegetation and ice-wedge coring studies. Both sites exhibit extensive ice-wedge degradation that is caused by a combination of a long-term warming trend a series of exceptionally warm summers, and infrastructure-related factors that melted the tops of ice wedges. Near-road thermokarst is enhanced by warmer soils associated with road dust, roadside flooding, near-road pipelines, communication cables, and altered snow regimes. These strongly affect roadside ecosystems and the infrastructure itself. Changes to ecosystems include altered hydrology with the drying of polygon centers and the formation of well-developed high-centered polygons occurs in some areas. Other areas develop extensive flooding and erosion of ice-wedge troughs. An unexpected result of flooding is the stabilization of ice-wedge degradation in some areas because the increased productivity of sedges in the flooded areas is producing large amounts of organic material that protects the tops of ice wedges from further degradation. The large increases in productivity in roadside areas also attract large flocks of waterfowl. Changes to the soils with the addition of thick layers of

  7. Surface acoustic admittance of highly porous open-cell, elastic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents a comprehensive study of the surface acoustic admittance properties of graded sizes of open-cell foams that are highly porous and elastic. The intrinsic admittance as well as properties of samples of finite depth were predicted and then measured for sound at normal incidence over a frequency range extending from about 35-3500 Hz. The agreement between theory and experiment for a range of mean pore size and volume porosity is excellent. The implications of fibrous structure on the admittance of open-cell foams is quite evident from the results.

  8. Open Science CBS Neuroimaging Repository: Sharing ultra-high-field MR images of the brain.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Christine Lucas; Schäfer, Andreas; Trampel, Robert; Villringer, Arno; Turner, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra high field opens the door to quantitative brain imaging at sub-millimeter isotropic resolutions. However, novel image processing tools to analyze these new rich datasets are lacking. In this article, we introduce the Open Science CBS Neuroimaging Repository: a unique repository of high-resolution and quantitative images acquired at 7 T. The motivation for this project is to increase interest for high-resolution and quantitative imaging and stimulate the development of image processing tools developed specifically for high-field data. Our growing repository currently includes datasets from MP2RAGE and multi-echo FLASH sequences from 28 and 20 healthy subjects respectively. These datasets represent the current state-of-the-art in in-vivo relaxometry at 7 T, and are now fully available to the entire neuroimaging community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Wedge Dynamics, Forearc Basins, and Seismogenic Zone of Cascadia Megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Hu, Y.

    2005-12-01

    A dynamic critical wedge theory has been developed to describe stress changes in submarine wedges in great earthquake cycles. For most subduction zones, the theory postulates that the actively deforming outer wedge overlies the updip velocity-strengthening part of the subduction fault, and the less deformed inner wedge overlies the megathrust seismogenic zone. Coseismic shear-stress increase in the velocity-strengthening zone drives the outer wedge into the critical state, causing episodic fold-and-thrust deformation, but the inner wedge stays in the stable regime throughout earthquake cycles, maintaining a stable environment for the development of forearc sedimentary basins. This is consistent with the globally observed correlation of the location of forearc basins with rupture zones of subduction earthquakes [Wells et al., JGR, 2003]. However, northern/central Cascadia is complicated by recent, exceedingly rapid growth of the accretionary prism. Until mid-Pleistocene, the megathrust seismogenic zone was probably mostly beneath the forearc basins, in agreement with the modern global observations. Rapid wedge growth and consequent megathrust warming over the past Ma have caused the seismogenic zone to move seaward by tens of km, to a position consistent with inferences based on contemporary geodetic observations. With much of the seismogenic zone located seaward of the forearc basins and beneath the upper continental slope, the dynamic taper theory predicts that coseismic deformation should cause extensional structures on the upper slope but accretion and thrusting on the lower slope, consistent with structural observations [McNeill et al., JGR, 1998].

  10. SPIM-fluid: open source light-sheet based platform for high-throughput imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Pereira, Hugo; Vale, Tiago; Estrada, Marta Falcão; Brito, Catarina; Moreno, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has recently emerged as the technique of choice for obtaining high quality 3D images of whole organisms/embryos with low photodamage and fast acquisition rates. Here we present an open source unified implementation based on Arduino and Micromanager, which is capable of operating Light Sheet Microscopes for automatized 3D high-throughput imaging on three-dimensional cell cultures and model organisms like zebrafish, oriented to massive drug screening. PMID:26601007

  11. Saltwater wedge variation in a non-anthropogenic coastal karst aquifer influenced by a strong tidal range (Burren, Ireland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perriquet, Marie; Leonardi, Véronique; Henry, Tiernan; Jourde, Hervé

    2014-11-01

    Spatial and temporal changes in saltwater wedges in coastal karst aquifers are still poorly understood, largely due to complex mixing processes in these heterogeneous environments, but also due to anthropogenic forcing such as pumping, which commonly affect natural variations in wedges. The purpose of this study was first to characterize the hydrodynamic functioning of a karst aquifer in an oceanic temperate climate with little anthropogenic pressure but strongly influenced by a high tidal range and second, to evaluate the extent and movements of a saltwater wedge influenced by both the tide and the natural recharge of the aquifer. Variations in specific conductivity combined with water chemistry results from six boreholes and two lakes located in the Bell Harbour catchment (western Ireland) enabled us to assess the extent of the intrusion of the saltwater wedge into the aquifer as a function of both karst recharge and tidal movements at high/low and neap/spring tidal cycles. The marked spatial disparity of the saltwater wedge was analysed as a function of both the hydrodynamic and the structural properties of the karst aquifer. Results showed that the extent of the saltwater wedge depended not only on the intrinsic properties of the aquifer but also on the relative influence of the recharge and the tide on groundwater levels, which have opposite effects. Recharge in the Burren area throughout the year is large enough to prevent saltwater intruding more than about one kilometre from the shore. A strong tidal amplitude seems to be the motor of sudden saltwater intrusion observed in the aquifer near the shore while the position of the groundwater level seems to influence the intensity of the salinity increase. Competition between recharge and the tide thus controls the seawater inputs, hence explaining temporal and spatial changes in the saltwater wedge in this coastal karst aquifer.

  12. Open-foldable domes with high-tension textile membranes: The GREGOR dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, R. H.; Kommers, J. N.; Visser, S.; Bettonvil, F. C. M.; van Schie, A. G. M.; van Leverink, S. J.; Sliepen, G.; Jägers, A. P. L.; Schmidt, W.; Volkmer, R.

    2012-11-01

    Double layers of high-tensioned textile membranes were applied to the completely open-foldable dome for the GREGOR telescope for the first time. Simultaneous climate measurements inside and outside the dome have proven the thermal-insulating capability of this double-layer construction. The GREGOR dome is the result of the continuation of the ESO research on open-foldable domes with textile structures, followed by the research for the DOT dome with high-tensioned textile membranes. It cleared the way to extreme stability required for astronomical practice on high mountain sites with heavy storms and ice formation. The storm Delta with 245 km/h 1-minute mean maximum at the location of the GREGOR caused no problems, nor did other storms afterwards. Opening and closing experiences up to wind speeds of 90 km/h were without problems. New technical developments were implemented and tested at the GREGOR dome, opening the way for application to much larger domes up to the 30 m diameter-class range.

  13. Perspectives on open access high resolution digital elevation models to produce global flood hazard layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeffrey; Trigg, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Global flood hazard models have recently become a reality thanks to the release of open access global digital elevation models, the development of simplified and highly efficient flow algorithms, and the steady increase in computational power. In this commentary we argue that although the availability of open access global terrain data has been critical in enabling the development of such models, the relatively poor resolution and precision of these data now limit significantly our ability to estimate flood inundation and risk for the majority of the planet's surface. The difficulty of deriving an accurate 'bare-earth' terrain model due to the interaction of vegetation and urban structures with the satellite-based remote sensors means that global terrain data are often poorest in the areas where people, property (and thus vulnerability) are most concentrated. Furthermore, the current generation of open access global terrain models are over a decade old and many large floodplains, particularly those in developing countries, have undergone significant change in this time. There is therefore a pressing need for a new generation of high resolution and high vertical precision open access global digital elevation models to allow significantly improved global flood hazard models to be developed.

  14. On the Survival of High-altitude Open Clusters within the Milky Way Galaxy Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Medina, L. A.; Pichardo, B.; Peimbert, A.; Moreno, E.

    2017-01-01

    It is a common assumption that high-altitude open clusters live longer compared to clusters moving close to the Galactic plane. This is because, at high altitudes, open clusters are far from the disruptive effects of in-plane substructures, such as spiral arms, molecular clouds, and the bar. However, an important aspect to consider in this scenario is that orbits of high-altitude open clusters will eventually cross the Galactic plane, where the vertical tidal field of the disk is strong. In this work, we simulate the interaction of open clusters with the tidal field of a detailed Milky Way Galactic model at different average altitudes and galactocentric radii. We find that the life expectancy of clusters decreases as the maximum orbital altitude increases and reaches a minimum at altitudes of approximately 600 pc. Clusters near the Galactic plane live longer because they do not experience strong vertical tidal shocks from the Galactic disk; then, for orbital altitudes higher than 600 pc, clusters again start to live longer due to the decrease in the number of encounters with the disk. With our study, we find that the compressive nature of the tides in the arms region and the bar play an important role in the survival of small clusters by protecting them from disruption: clusters inside the arms can live up to twice as long as those outside the arms at similar galactocentric distances.

  15. Preliminary engineering study: Quick opening valve MSFC high Reynolds number wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    FluiDyne Engineering Corporation has conducted a preliminary engineering study of a quick-opening valve for the MSFC High Reynolds Number Wind Tunnel under NASA Contract NAS8-35056. The subject valve is intended to replace the Mylar diaphragm system as the flow initiation device for the tunnel. Only valves capable of opening within 0.05 sec. and providing a minimum of 11.4 square feet of flow area were considered. Also, the study focused on valves which combined the quick-opening and tight shutoff features in a single unit. A ring sleeve valve concept was chosen for refinement and pricing. Sealing for tight shutoff, ring sleeve closure release and sleeve actuation were considered. The resulting cost estimate includes the valve and requisite modifications to the facility to accommodate the valve as well as the associated design and development work.

  16. Human-like characteristics for high degree of freedom robotic door-opening end-effector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jeremy P.; Campagna, Frank

    2011-05-01

    In the field of military Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV's), military units are forced to sweep largely populated cities and towns in search of hostile enemies. These urban types of operations are referred to as MOUT (Military Operations on Urban Terrain). During urban operations, these UGV's encounter difficulties when opening doors. Current manipulator end effectors have these difficulties, because they are not designed to mimic human hand operations. This paper explains the mechanical nature of the Modular Universal Door Opening End-effector (MUDOE). MUDOE is a result of our development research to improve robotic manipulators ability to negotiate closed doors. The presented solution has the ability to mimic human hand characteristics when opening doors. The end-effector possesses an ability to maintain a high Degree of Freedom (DoF), and grasp the doorknob by applying equally distributed forces to all points of contact.

  17. Equivalent Thermal Conductivity of Open-Cell Ceramic Foams at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. E.; Wang, B.

    2014-01-01

    At high temperature, heat transfer in open-cell foams occurs by thermal radiation through the whole medium as well as by conduction through the solid matrix and air filling the pores. This paper applies the body-centered cubic cell model to predict radiative properties and the thermal conductivity of the open-cell foams. The model is validated by comparing the results with previous published works. Effects of structural characteristic parameters (cell diameter and porosity) and optical properties of the solid matrix (reflectivity and specularity parameter) on extinction coefficients and the radiative conductivity are discussed. The influence of temperature on the thermal conductivities including the effective, radiative, and the equivalent conductivity of open-cell ceramic foams are analyzed.

  18. Stable and Critical Noncohesive Coulomb Wedges: Exact Elastic Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Hu, Y.

    2004-12-01

    The theory of critically tapered Coulomb wedge has been successfully applied to model active fold-and-thrust belts or submarine accretionary prisms. Brittle mountain building is episodic in nature, controlled by changes in basal friction, erosion and sedimentation, and hydrogeology. Sediment accretion may be modulated by great subduction earthquakes. Between deformation episodes and/or during transition between compressional and extensional tectonics, the Coulomb wedges are stable (i.e., supercritical), to which the critical taper theory does not apply. In this work, we provide an exact elastic solution for stable wedges based on Airy stress functions. The stress equilibrium equation and definition of basal friction and basal and internal pore fluid pressure ratios are exactly the same as those used for Dahlen's [1984] exact solution for critical noncohesive Coulomb wedges, but internal friction μ becomes irrelevant. Given elastic - perfectly Coulomb-plastic rheology, for stresses in a wedge on the verge of Coulomb failure there must co-exist a critical taper solution involving μ and a unique equivalent elastic solution not involving μ . Our elastic solution precisely reduces to Dahlen's critical taper solution for critical conditions. For stable conditions, normal stress perpendicular to the surface slope σ z and shear stress τ xz are identical with those in a critical taper, but the slope-parallel normal stress is different. The elastic solution is also generally applicable to purely elastic wedges and useful for modeling geodetic observations. A stable noncohesive Coulomb wedge differs from a general elastic wedge in that its upper and lower surfaces stay at zero curvature during loading. Dahlen, F.A. (1984), Noncohesive critical Coulomb wedges: An exact solution, JGR, 89, 10,125-10,133.

  19. Group sequential designs for stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Grayling, Michael J; Wason, James Ms; Mander, Adrian P

    2017-06-01

    The stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial design has received substantial attention in recent years. Although various extensions to the original design have been proposed, no guidance is available on the design of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. In an individually randomised trial setting, group sequential methods can provide notable efficiency gains and ethical benefits. We address this by discussing how established group sequential methodology can be adapted for stepped-wedge designs. Utilising the error spending approach to group sequential trial design, we detail the assumptions required for the determination of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. We consider early stopping for efficacy, futility, or efficacy and futility. We describe first how this can be done for any specified linear mixed model for data analysis. We then focus on one particular commonly utilised model and, using a recently completed stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial, compare the performance of several designs with interim analyses to the classical stepped-wedge design. Finally, the performance of a quantile substitution procedure for dealing with the case of unknown variance is explored. We demonstrate that the incorporation of early stopping in stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial designs could reduce the expected sample size under the null and alternative hypotheses by up to 31% and 22%, respectively, with no cost to the trial's type-I and type-II error rates. The use of restricted error maximum likelihood estimation was found to be more important than quantile substitution for controlling the type-I error rate. The addition of interim analyses into stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials could help guard against time-consuming trials conducted on poor performing treatments and also help expedite the implementation of efficacious treatments. In future, trialists should consider incorporating early stopping of some kind into

  20. Logistic, ethical, and political dimensions of stepped wedge trials: critical review and case studies.

    PubMed

    Prost, Audrey; Binik, Ariella; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Roy, Anjana; De Allegri, Manuela; Mouchoux, Christelle; Dreischulte, Tobias; Ayles, Helen; Lewis, James J; Osrin, David

    2015-08-17

    Three arguments are usually invoked in favour of stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trials: the logistic convenience of implementing an intervention in phases, the ethical benefit of providing the intervention to all clusters, and the potential to enhance the social acceptability of cluster randomised controlled trials. Are these alleged benefits real? We explored the logistic, ethical, and political dimensions of stepped wedge trials using case studies of six recent evaluations. We identified completed or ongoing stepped wedge evaluations using two systematic reviews. We then purposively selected six with a focus on public health in high, middle, and low-income settings. We interviewed their authors about the logistic, ethical, and social issues faced by their teams. Two authors reviewed interview transcripts, identified emerging issues through qualitative thematic analysis, reflected upon them in the context of the literature, and invited all participants to co-author the manuscript. Our analysis raises three main points. First, the phased implementation of interventions can alleviate problems linked to simultaneous roll-out, but also brings new challenges. Issues to consider include the feasibility of organising intervention activities according to a randomised sequence, estimating time lags in implementation and effects, and accommodating policy changes during the trial period. Second, stepped wedge trials, like parallel cluster trials, require equipoise: without it, randomising participants to a control condition, even for a short time, remains problematic. In stepped wedge trials, equipoise is likely to lie in the degree of effect, effectiveness in a specific operational milieu, and the balance of benefit and harm, including the social value of better evaluation. Third, the strongest arguments for a stepped wedge design are logistic and political rather than ethical. The design is advantageous when simultaneous roll-out is impractical and when it

  1. Analyzing Inquiry Questions of High-School Students in a Gas Chromatography Open-Ended Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blonder, Ron; Mamlock-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an open-ended inquiry experiment for high-school students, based on gas chromatography (GC). The research focuses on identifying the level of questions that students ask during the GC open inquiry laboratory, and it examines whether implementing the advanced inquiry laboratory opens up new directions for…

  2. Analyzing Inquiry Questions of High-School Students in a Gas Chromatography Open-Ended Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blonder, Ron; Mamlock-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an open-ended inquiry experiment for high-school students, based on gas chromatography (GC). The research focuses on identifying the level of questions that students ask during the GC open inquiry laboratory, and it examines whether implementing the advanced inquiry laboratory opens up new directions for…

  3. Fracture and contact problems for an elastic wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Arin, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with the plane elastostatic contact problem for an infinite elastic wedge of arbitrary angle. The medium is loaded through a frictionless rigid wedge of a given symmetric profile. Using the Mellin transform formulation the mixed boundary value problem is reduced to a singular integral equation with the contact stress as the unknown function. With the application of the results to the fracture of the medium in mind, the main emphasis in the study has been on the investigation of the singular nature of the stress state around the apex of the wedge and on the determination of the contact pressure.

  4. Fracture and contact problems for an elastic wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Arin, K.

    1974-01-01

    The plane elastostatic contact problem for an infinite elastic wedge of arbitrary angle is discussed. The medium is loaded through a frictionless rigid wedge of a given symmetric profile. Using the Mellin transform formulation the mixed boundary value problem is reduced to a singular integral equation with the contact stress as the unknown function. With the application of the results to the fracture of the medium in mind, the main emphasis in the study has been on the investigation of the singular nature of the stress state around the apex of the wedge and on the determination of the contact pressure.

  5. Refined numerical solution of the transonic flow past a wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, S.-M.; Fung, K.-Y.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical procedure combining the ideas of solving a modified difference equation and of adaptive mesh refinement is introduced. The numerical solution on a fixed grid is improved by using better approximations of the truncation error computed from local subdomain grid refinements. This technique is used to obtain refined solutions of steady, inviscid, transonic flow past a wedge. The effects of truncation error on the pressure distribution, wave drag, sonic line, and shock position are investigated. By comparing the pressure drag on the wedge and wave drag due to the shocks, a supersonic-to-supersonic shock originating from the wedge shoulder is confirmed.

  6. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jerome P.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  7. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  8. The challenges of numerically simulating analogue brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne; Ellis, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges form when sedimentary and crustal rocks are compressed into thrusts and folds in the foreland of an orogen or at a subduction trench. For over a century, analogue models have been used to investigate the deformation characteristics of such brittle wedges. These models predict wedge shapes that agree with analytical critical taper theory and internal deformation structures that well resemble natural observations. In a series of comparison experiments for thrust wedges, called the GeoMod2004 (1,2) and GeoMod2008 (3,4) experiments, it was shown that different numerical solution methods successfully reproduce sandbox thrust wedges. However, the GeoMod2008 benchmark also pointed to the difficulties of representing frictional boundary conditions and sharp velocity discontinuities with continuum numerical methods, in addition to the well-known challenges of numerical plasticity. Here we show how details in the numerical implementation of boundary conditions can substantially impact numerical wedge deformation. We consider experiment 1 of the GeoMod2008 brittle thrust wedge benchmarks. This experiment examines a triangular thrust wedge in the stable field of critical taper theory that should remain stable, that is, without internal deformation, when sliding over a basal frictional surface. The thrust wedge is translated by lateral displacement of a rigid mobile wall. The corner between the mobile wall and the subsurface is a velocity discontinuity. Using our finite-element code SULEC, we show how different approaches to implementing boundary friction (boundary layer or contact elements) and the velocity discontinuity (various smoothing schemes) can cause the wedge to indeed translate in a stable manner or to undergo internal deformation (which is a fail). We recommend that numerical studies of sandbox setups not only report the details of their implementation of boundary conditions, but also document the modelling attempts that

  9. Complex interactions between diapirs and 4-D subduction driven mantle wedge circulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, R. T.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Analogue laboratory experiments generate 4-D flow of mantle wedge fluid and capture the evolution of buoyant mesoscale diapirs. The mantle is modeled with viscous glucose syrup with an Arrhenius type temperature dependent viscosity. To characterize diapir evolution we experiment with a variety of fluids injected from multiple point sources. Diapirs interact with kinematically induced flow fields forced by subducting plate motions replicating a range of styles observed in dynamic subduction models (e.g., rollback, steepening, gaps). Data is collected using high definition timelapse photography and quantified using image velocimetry techniques. While many studies assume direct vertical connections between the volcanic arc and the deeper mantle source region, our experiments demonstrate the difficulty of creating near vertical conduits. Results highlight extreme curvature of diapir rise paths. Trench-normal deflection occurs as diapirs are advected downward away from the trench before ascending into wedge apex directed return flow. Trench parallel deflections up to 75% of trench length are seen in all cases, exacerbated by complex geometry and rollback motion. Interdiapir interaction is also important; upwellings with similar trajectory coalesce and rapidly accelerate. Moreover, we observe a new mode of interaction whereby recycled diapir material is drawn down along the slab surface and then initiates rapid fluid migration updip along the slab-wedge interface. Variability in trajectory and residence time leads to complex petrologic inferences. Material from disparate source regions can surface at the same location, mix in the wedge, or become fully entrained in creeping flow adding heterogeneity to the mantle. Active diapirism or any other vertical fluid flux mechanism employing rheological weakening lowers viscosity in the recycling mantle wedge affecting both solid and fluid flow characteristics. Many interesting and insightful results have been presented based

  10. Time-delay at higher genus in high-energy open string scattering*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, T.; Rey, S.-J.

    2001-02-01

    We explore some aspects of causal time-delay in open string scattering studied recently by Seiberg, Susskind and Toumbas. By examining high-energy scattering amplitudes at higher order in perturbation theory, we argue that causal time-delay at /Gth order is /1/(G+1) times smaller than the time-delay at tree level. We propose a space-time interpretation of the result by utilizing the picture of the high-energy open string scattering put forward by Gross and Mañes. We argue that the phenomenon of reduced time-delay is attributed to the universal feature of the space-time string trajectory in high-energy scattering that string shape at higher order remains the same as that at tree level but overall scale is reduced. We also discuss implications to the space-time uncertainty principle and make brief comments on causal time-delay behavior in space/time noncommutative field theory.

  11. Laparoscopic versus open radical prostatectomy in high prostate volume cases: impact on oncological and functional results

    PubMed Central

    Alessandro, Sciarra; Alessandro, Gentilucci; Susanna, Cattarino; Michele, Innocenzi; Francesca, Di Quilio; Andrea, Fasulo; heland, Magnus Von; Vincenzo, Gentile; Stefano, Salciccia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and objective: To prospectively compare the laparoscopic versus open approach to RP in cases with high prostate volume and to evaluate a possible different impact of prostate volume. Materials and Methods: From March 2007 to March 2013 a total of 120 cases with clinically localized prostate cancer (PC) and a prostate volume>70cc identified for radical prostatectomy (RP), were prospectively analyzed in our institute. Patients were offered as surgical technique either an open retropubic or an intraperitoneal laparoscopic (LP) approach. In our population, 54 cases were submitted to LP and 66 to open RP. We analyzed the association of the surgical technique with perioperative, oncological and postoperative functional parameters. Results: In those high prostate volume cases, the surgical technique (laparoscopic versus open) does not represent a significant independent factor able to influence positive surgical margins rates and characteristics (p=0.4974). No significant differences (p>0.05) in the overall rates of positive margins was found, and also no differences following stratification according to the pathological stage and nerve sparing (NS) procedure. The surgical technique was able to significantly and independently influence the hospital stay, time of operation and blood loss (p<0.001). On the contrary, in our population, the surgical technique was not a significant factor influencing all pathological and 1-year oncological or functional outcomes (p>0.05). Conclusions: In our prospective non randomized analysis on high prostate volumes, the laparoscopic approach to RP is able to guarantee the same oncological and functional results of an open approach, maintaining the advantages in terms of perioperative outcomes. PMID:27256175

  12. Laparoscopic wedge resection and partial nephrectomy--the Washington University experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    McDougall, E M; Elbahnasy, A M; Clayman, R V

    1998-01-01

    Open partial nephrectomy is an accepted form of treatment for a variety of benign conditions and for localized renal cell carcinoma. To date, there is limited experience with the clinical application of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and wedge resection for benign and malignant disease of the kidney. Herein, we report our clinical experience with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and a review of the current literature. Twelve patients (27-81 years) have undergone laparoscopic wedge resection (3) or attempted polar partial nephrectomy (9) since 1993. In the group of 12 patients, 5 had a mass suspicious for a malignancy, 4 patients had symptomatic polar calyceal dilation with or without stone disease, and 3 patients had an atrophic or hydronephrotic upper pole moiety. Among the patients in the polar nephrectomy group, a third were converted to an open procedure. The remaining 6 patients had a mean operative time of 6.5 hours (5.7-8.3 hours). These patients resumed their oral intake on average 0.8 days postoperatively. In the 2 patients with a mass, the final pathology was oncocytoma (1), and xanthogranulomatous reaction in a renal cyst (1). Postoperative complications included a nephrocutaneous fistula which was endoscopically fulgurated, a retroperitoneal urinoma which was percutaneously drained, and a two-day bout of ileus. The mean hospital stay was 5.3 days (2-9). Their full convalescence was completed in a mean of 4.2 weeks (2-8). Three patients underwent a wedge resection for a superficial < 2 cm mass. The average operative time in this group was 3.5 hours (2-5.4). The mean time to resuming oral intake was 0.7 days (0.3-0.7). The final pathology was oncocytoma (1), oncocytic renal cell cancer (1), and old infarction (1); none of the patients had any complications. The mean hospital stay was 2.7 days (2-4). Convalescence was completed in 4 weeks (range 1-8). Laparoscopic wedge resection and polar partial nephrectomy are feasible, albeit currently tedious

  13. Laparoscopic Wedge Resection and Partial Nephrectomy - The Washington University Experience and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Elbahnasy, Abdelhamid M.; Clayman, Ralph V.

    1998-01-01

    Open partial nephrectomy is an accepted form of treatment for a variety of benign conditions and for localized renal cell carcinoma. To date, there is limited experience with the clinical application of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and wedge resection for benign and malignant disease of the kidney. Herein, we report our clinical experience with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and a review of the current literature. Twelve patients (27 - 81 years) have undergone laparoscopic wedge resection (3) or attempted polar partial nephrectomy (9) since 1993. In the group of 12 patients, 5 had a mass suspicious for a malignancy, 4 patients had symptomatic polar calyceal dilation with or without stone disease, and 3 patients had an atrophic or hydronephrotic upper pole moiety. Among the patients in the polar nephrectomy group, a third were converted to an open procedure. The remaining 6 patients had a mean operative time of 6.5 hours (5.7 - 8.3 hours). These patients resumed their oral intake on average 0.8 days postoperatively. In the 2 patients with a mass, the final pathology was oncocytoma (1), and xanthogranulomatous reaction in a renal cyst (1). Postoperative complications included a nephrocutaneous fistula which was endoscopically fulgurated, a retroperitoneal urinoma which was percutaneously drained, and a two-day bout of ileus. The mean hospital stay was 5.3 days (2-9). Their full convalescence was completed in a mean of 4.2 weeks (2 - 8). Three patients underwent a wedge resection for a superficial < 2 cm mass. The average operative time in this group was 3.5 hours (2 - 5.4). The mean time to resuming oral intake was 0.7 days (0.3 - 0.7). The final pathology was oncocytoma (1), oncocytic renal cell cancer (1), and old infarction (1); none of the patients had any complications. The mean hospital stay was 2.7 days (2- 4). Convalescence was completed in 4 weeks (range 1-8). Laparoscopic wedge resection and polar partial nephrectomy are feasible, albeit currently

  14. Serpentinisation of the Mantle Wedge Controls the Chemistry of Arc Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardley, B. W.

    2008-12-01

    Arc magmas are derived from mantle wedge source regions that are more highly oxidised than other parts of the mantle but the cause of the oxidation is not well understood. Conventionally it has been attributed to influx of water derived from dehydration of the underlying slab, but this possibility has been comprehensively debunked by Frost et al. (1998). A direct link to the introduction of the fluids that flux melting fails to explain the ubiquitous high oxygen fugacity of xenoliths from this region, which point to extensive oxidation of the wedge. If it is not possible to introduce excess oxygen to the mantle wedge, it is likely that the oxidation arises from residual enrichment in oxygen due to dissociation of water and subsequent loss of hydrogen. Serpentinisation is the only geological process that generates sufficiently reducing conditions for water to dissociate, and it allows hydrogen fugacities to rise to sufficiently high levels for hydrogen to be lost as a migrating vapour phase. Because it creates magnetite, serpentinisation results in an increase in the Fe3+ content of the serpentinised rocks, which means that if subsequent heating regenerates less hydrous peridotite assemblages, the magnetite content of their spinel phase will be higher than in the precursor peridotite. For these regenerated peridotites, the greater magnetite content results in a higher oxygen fugacity than for the precursor peridotite. Hence the high Fe3+ signature generated during serpentine growth is carried down by flow in the wedge beyond the temperatures of serpentine breakdown and results in generation of high Fe3+:Fe2+ magmas. The main introduction of slab volatiles to the mantle wedge takes place at low temperatures, probably above 50km depth, where fluids are more abundant than at greater depths. This interpretation is consistent with geological and geophysical evidence for the existence of a serpentine body immediately above the slab in both ancient and modern subduction

  15. AZOrange - High performance open source machine learning for QSAR modeling in a graphical programming environment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Machine learning has a vast range of applications. In particular, advanced machine learning methods are routinely and increasingly used in quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) modeling. QSAR data sets often encompass tens of thousands of compounds and the size of proprietary, as well as public data sets, is rapidly growing. Hence, there is a demand for computationally efficient machine learning algorithms, easily available to researchers without extensive machine learning knowledge. In granting the scientific principles of transparency and reproducibility, Open Source solutions are increasingly acknowledged by regulatory authorities. Thus, an Open Source state-of-the-art high performance machine learning platform, interfacing multiple, customized machine learning algorithms for both graphical programming and scripting, to be used for large scale development of QSAR models of regulatory quality, is of great value to the QSAR community. Results This paper describes the implementation of the Open Source machine learning package AZOrange. AZOrange is specially developed to support batch generation of QSAR models in providing the full work flow of QSAR modeling, from descriptor calculation to automated model building, validation and selection. The automated work flow relies upon the customization of the machine learning algorithms and a generalized, automated model hyper-parameter selection process. Several high performance machine learning algorithms are interfaced for efficient data set specific selection of the statistical method, promoting model accuracy. Using the high performance machine learning algorithms of AZOrange does not require programming knowledge as flexible applications can be created, not only at a scripting level, but also in a graphical programming environment. Conclusions AZOrange is a step towards meeting the needs for an Open Source high performance machine learning platform, supporting the efficient development of

  16. Anomalous intra-plate high-Mg andesites in the Choshi area (Chiba, Central Japan) produced during early stages of Japan Sea opening?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Nguyen; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Jun'ichi; Flower, Martin F. J.

    2009-10-01

    Geochemical and isotopic data are reported for 20 Ma high-magnesian andesite (HMA) lavas erupted on the forearc side of Central Japan in the Choshi coastal area (Chiba). Rarely olivine-phyric (< 3% vol), these rocks have ca. 56 wt.% SiO 2, Na 2O ranging between 3.9 and 4.2 wt.%, and relatively low K 2O/Na 2O ratios (ca. 0.44). Their Mg numbers are relatively high (ca. 0.64) and matched by high Cr (> 345 ppm), high Sr (> 520 ppm), high Sr/Y (ca. 30), and high [La/Yb] N (> 8), conforming to the definition of low-silica adakites, transitional in character to HMA. However, despite slight negative Nb and Ta 'troughs' in a few samples, their incompatible element distribution patterns appear closer to those of intra-plate basalts, apparently confirming previous suggestions that terms such as HMA and adakite cover a diverse range of compositions. Enriched in radiogenic Sr and Nd (ca. 0.7040 to 0.7043 and 0.5128 to 0.51275, respectively), the Choshi HMA shows relatively low 206Pb/ 204Pb (18.25 to 18.35) and 208Pb/ 204Pb (38.37 to 38.48) ratios, resembling those of late Miocene intra-plate basalts in the Japan Sea and SW Japan. In this regard the Choshi HMA differs from those of the 'classic' Middle Miocene (14 to 12 Ma) HMA described from the Setouchi volcanic belt (e.g. Tatsumi, 1981), a short distance to the west which also shows relative high K contents. Although HMAs have been generally attributed to subduction-related processes, the lack of high field strength element (HFSE) depletions cf. large ionic lithophile elements (LILE) in most Choshi HMA suggests an absence of so-called 'subduction signatures'. Accordingly, we suggest that the Choshi HMA probably tapped a fertile (asthenospheric) region of the convecting mantle wedge, primitive melt products having acquired HMA-like character as a result of shallow level modification by interaction with lithospheric components, aided by thermal input resulting from mantle extrusion, during the early stages of Japan Sea opening

  17. Ghost story. I. Wedge states in the oscillator formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Loriano; Maccaferri, Carlo; Scherer Santos, Ricardo J.; Tolla, Driba D.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is primarily devoted to the ghost wedge states in string field theory formulated with the oscillator formalism. Our aim is to prove, using such formalism, that the wedge states can be expressed as |nrangle = exp{[(2-n)/2](Script L0+Script L0†)}|0rangle, separately in the matter and ghost sector. This relation is crucial for instance in the proof of Schnabl's solution. We start from the exponentials in the rhs and wish to prove that they take precisely the form of wedge states. As a guideline we first re-demonstrate this relation for the matter part. Then we turn to the ghosts. On the way we face the problem of `diagonalizing' infinite rectangular matrices. We manage to give a meaning to such an operation and to prove that the eigenvalues we obtain satisfy the recursion relations of the wedge states.

  18. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING EAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  19. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING NORTHWEST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  20. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING SOUTHEAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  1. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING NORTH - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  2. Further research on high open circuit voltage in silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Keavney, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a new research on the use of controlled dopant profiles and oxide passivation to achieve high open circuit voltage V sub oc in silicon solar cells is presented. Ion implantation has been used to obtain nearly optimal values of surface dopant concentration. The concentrations are selected so as to minimize heavy doping effects and thereby provide both high blue response and high V sub oc ion implantation technique has been successfully applied to fabrication of both n-type and p-type emitters. V sub oc of up to 660 mV is reported and AMO efficiency of 16.1% has been obtained.

  3. Modeling Structural and Mechanical Responses to Localized Erosional Processes on a Bivergent Orogenic Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzen, R.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    Critical Coulomb wedge theory established that orogenic and accretionary wedges should develop self-similarly and maintain a critical taper that reflects the balance of strength of the wedge material and a basal décollement. However, a variety of geological processes can perturb that balance, forcing readjustment of the wedge. For example, glacial erosion and landsliding can concentrate erosion on a localized portion of the wedge slope, leaving that portion of the wedge with an out-of-equilibrium slope that would need to re-develop for the wedge to resume self-similar growth. We use the discrete element method to analyze how growing bivergent wedges with different cohesive strengths respond structurally and mechanically to erosional events localized along upper, middle, and lower segments of the pro-wedge. Mechanically, pro-wedge erosion results in a sudden decrease followed by a quick recovery of the mean stress and maximum shear stress throughout the pro-wedge. However, when erosion is localized in the mid- to lower portions of the pro-wedge, a zone of increased mean stress develops where the wedge is concentrating deformation to recover its taper. In contrast, when erosion is localized in the upper axial zone, there is almost no recovery of the wedge taper, reflecting the fact that the material at the top of the wedge is being carried passively in a transition zone between the pro-wedge and retro-wedge. Structurally, wedges composed of lower cohesion material recover their critical taper almost immediately through distributed deformation, while wedges of higher-cohesion material recover more slowly, and incompletely, by concentrating deformation along existing fault surfaces. As a result, localized erosional episodes can have a lasting effect on the wedge morphology when the wedge is composed of higher cohesion material.

  4. Perceptions of low agency and high sexual openness mediate the relationship between sexualization and sexual aggression.

    PubMed

    Blake, Khandis R; Bastian, Brock; Denson, Thomas F

    2016-09-01

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in the saturation of popular Western culture by female hypersexualization. We provide data showing that men have more sexually aggressive intentions toward women who self-sexualize, and that self-sexualized women are vulnerable to sexual aggression if two qualifying conditions are met. Specifically, if perceivers view self-sexualized women as sexually open and lacking agency (i.e., the ability to influence one's environment), they harbor more sexually aggressive intentions and view women as easier to sexually victimize. In Experiment 1, male participants viewed a photograph of a woman whose self-sexualization was manipulated through revealing versus non-revealing clothing. In subsequent experiments, men and women (Experiment 2) and men only (Experiment 3) viewed a photograph of a woman dressed in non-revealing clothing but depicted as open or closed to sexual activity. Participants rated their perceptions of the woman's agency, then judged how vulnerable she was to sexual aggression (Experiments 1 and 2) or completed a sexually aggressive intentions measure (Experiment 3). Results indicated that both men and women perceived self-sexualized women as more vulnerable to sexual aggression because they assumed those women were highly sexually open and lacked agency. Perceptions of low agency also mediated the relationship between women's perceived sexual openness and men's intentions to sexually aggress. These effects persisted even when we described the self-sexualized woman as possessing highly agentic personality traits and controlled for individual differences related to sexual offending. The current work suggests that perceived agency and sexual openness may inform perpetrator decision-making and that cultural hypersexualization may facilitate sexual aggression. Aggr. Behav. 42:483-497, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Propagation of sound in highly porous open-cell elastic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents both theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of attenuation and progressive phase constants of sound in open-cell, highly porous, elastic polyurethane foams. The foams are available commercially in graded pore sizes for which information about the static flow resistance, thermal time constant, volume porosity, dynamic structure factor, and speed of sound is known. The analysis is specialized to highly porous foams which can be efficient sound absorbers at audio frequencies. Negligible effect of internal wave coupling on attenuation and phase shift for the frequency range 16-6000 Hz was predicted and no experimentally significant effects were observed in the bulk samples studied. The agreement between predictions and measurements in bulk materials is excellent. The analysis is applicable to both the regular and compressed elastic open-cell foams.

  6. Google Classroom and Open Clusters: An Authentic Science Research Project for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chelen H.; Linahan, Marcella; Cuba, Allison Frances; Dickmann, Samantha Rose; Hogan, Eleanor B.; Karos, Demetra N.; Kozikowski, Kendall G.; Kozikowski, Lauren Paige; Nelson, Samantha Brooks; O'Hara, Kevin Thomas; Ropinski, Brandi Lucia; Scarpa, Gabriella; Garmany, Catharine D.

    2016-01-01

    STEM education is about offering unique opportunities to our students. For the past three years, students from two high schools (Breck School in Minneapolis, MN, and Carmel Catholic High School in Mundelein, IL) have collaborated on authentic astronomy research projects. This past year they surveyed archival data of open clusters to determine if a clear turnoff point could be unequivocally determined. Age and distance to each open cluster were calculated. Additionally, students requested time on several telescopes to obtain original data to compare to the archival data. Students from each school worked in collaborative teams, sharing and verifying results through regular online hangouts and chats. Work papers were stored in a shared drive and on a student-designed Google site to facilitate dissemination of documents between the two schools.

  7. Wedge and strip image readout systems for photon-counting detectors in space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Chakrabarti, S.; Vallerga, J.

    1986-01-01

    EUV and far UV applications of wedge and strip anodes in photon-counting microchannel plate detector systems are discussed in light of performance data obtained as a result of EUV Explorer spacecraft open face detector and FAUST-Spacelab far UV sealed tube sensor calibrations. CsI quantum detection efficiencies of about 80 percent at 114 A and about 40 percent at 600 and 1300 A have been achieved; a position sensitivity of less than 10 microns is demonstrated, and the position resolution, image linearity, background rate, and flat-field characteristics are discussed.

  8. Orientation of optic axis in wedged photorefractive crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Konstantine; Siahmakoun, Azad Z.

    1996-02-01

    A holographic method for finding the orientation of the optic axis of uniaxial photorefractive crystals is proposed. A theoretical procedure for determining the wedge angle of such crystals has also been developed. Two BaTiO 3 crystals grown by the same vender are examined and the resulting measurements lead to the values of wedge angle with an accuracy of about ±0.1°.

  9. Stereoscopic Display on Computer Monitor Using a Single Wedge Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Tae-Soo; Park, Chan-Young; Lee, Han-Bae; Park, Seung-Han

    2002-02-01

    We propose a novel stereoscopic display technique which uses only a single wedge prism. It can provide good depth perception from a stereoscopic pair image displayed on a computer monitor. One element of the stereoscopic pair image is inversely distorted to correct the deformation induced by the wedge prism. The computer simulation and experimental demonstration show that this technique can be successfully applied to the Internet environment.

  10. Finite Element Analysis of Cross-Wedge Rolling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Dinh Van; Ngung, Dao Minh; Giang, Nguyen Trong

    2010-06-01

    In this study, a non-isothermal simulation model for flat-wedged cross-wedge rolling (CWR) to fabricate a bullet was presented by using three-dimensional thermo-rigid-plastic finite element method (FEM). Both deformation behavior and heat transfer of the process were taken into account. Based on the simulation results, the distributions of temperature, stress, strain areas were analyzed. These results could provide theoretical guidance for net shape and reasonable design of tools.

  11. Three Dimensional FEM Simulation of Wedge — Rolls Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pater, Zbigniew

    2004-06-01

    In this work the new method of cross — wedge rolling is shown. It is based on the rolling of the axisymmetrical products using one flat wedge and two rolls ( profile or smooth). In this article, the results of the numerical simulation of the described method are also provided. On the basis of the calculations, the possibility of producing stepped shafts with cylindrical, spherical and conical surfaces was assumed.

  12. Results of Open-Heart Surgery in High-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chafizadeh, G.N.

    1982-01-01

    Of 732 patients undergoing open heart surgery in Pars Hospital Tehran, 127 were classified in a high risk surgical category. Of these, there were 19 mortalities. Three main groups of patients were studied; Group I consisted of those with congenital disorders, such as Ebstein's anomaly and the medical-necrosis type of ascending aneurysms; Group II consisted of reoperaton cases; and Group III was composed of patients with cardiomegaly who required double or triple-valve surgery. PMID:15226817

  13. Effective median sternotomy closure in high-risk open heart patients.

    PubMed

    Bek, Eugene L; Yun, Kwok L; Kochamba, Gary S; Pfeffer, Thomas A

    2010-04-01

    We describe a novel surgical technique with a median sternotomy closure in high-risk open heart patients. In contrast to conventional sternal closure, in which sternal wires are passed through the intercostal space, the novel technique in sternal closure passes sternal wires transcostally or through costo-chondral joints. Copyright (c) 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between the blue response and open-circuit voltage of high performance silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.; Blakers, A. W.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between the response at blue wavelengths and the open-circuit voltage of high performance silicon solar cells with a virtually 'transparent' emitter is analyzed. It is shown that a one-dimensional cell model cannot simultaneously model the optical collection properties and operating characteristics of such cells. The analysis highlights the importance of surface conditions and shows that previous conclusions regarding bounds on Auger coefficients imposed by correlating these parameters must be treated with caution.

  15. Stem thrust prediction model for W-K-M double wedge parallel expanding gate valves

    SciTech Connect

    Eldiwany, B.; Alvarez, P.D.; Wolfe, K.

    1996-12-01

    An analytical model for determining the required valve stem thrust during opening and closing strokes of W-K-M parallel expanding gate valves was developed as part of the EPRI Motor-Operated Valve Performance Prediction Methodology (EPRI MOV PPM) Program. The model was validated against measured stem thrust data obtained from in-situ testing of three W-K-M valves. Model predictions show favorable, bounding agreement with the measured data for valves with Stellite 6 hardfacing on the disks and seat rings for water flow in the preferred flow direction (gate downstream). The maximum required thrust to open and to close the valve (excluding wedging and unwedging forces) occurs at a slightly open position and not at the fully closed position. In the nonpreferred flow direction, the model shows that premature wedging can occur during {Delta}P closure strokes even when the coefficients of friction at different sliding surfaces are within the typical range. This paper summarizes the model description and comparison against test data.

  16. OpenTopography: Enabling Online Access to High-Resolution Lidar Topography Data and Processing Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Christopher; Nandigam, Viswanath; Baru, Chaitan; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution topography data acquired with lidar (light detection and ranging) technology are revolutionizing the way we study the Earth's surface and overlying vegetation. These data, collected from airborne, tripod, or mobile-mounted scanners have emerged as a fundamental tool for research on topics ranging from earthquake hazards to hillslope processes. Lidar data provide a digital representation of the earth's surface at a resolution sufficient to appropriately capture the processes that contribute to landscape evolution. The U.S. National Science Foundation-funded OpenTopography Facility (http://www.opentopography.org) is a web-based system designed to democratize access to earth science-oriented lidar topography data. OpenTopography provides free, online access to lidar data in a number of forms, including the raw point cloud and associated geospatial-processing tools for customized analysis. The point cloud data are co-located with on-demand processing tools to generate digital elevation models, and derived products and visualizations which allow users to quickly access data in a format appropriate for their scientific application. The OpenTopography system is built using a service-oriented architecture (SOA) that leverages cyberinfrastructure resources at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California San Diego to allow users, regardless of expertise level, to access these massive lidar datasets and derived products for use in research and teaching. OpenTopography hosts over 500 billion lidar returns covering 85,000 km2. These data are all in the public domain and are provided by a variety of partners under joint agreements and memoranda of understanding with OpenTopography. Partners include national facilities such as the NSF-funded National Center for Airborne Lidar Mapping (NCALM), as well as non-governmental organizations and local, state, and federal agencies. OpenTopography has become a hub for high-resolution topography

  17. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Avi C.; Campbell, Malachy T.; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R.; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. PMID:27141917

  18. Modular, flexible, and expandable high-performance image archiving and retrieving open-architecture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. P.

    1992-07-01

    In today''s economy, it takes significant funds to establish a high-performance image archival and retrieval system for any image application. One cost effective approach is to build the system in multiple phases but there is concern that technology is advancing rapidly and the original system may not be able to take advantage of new features. The concept of an open- architecture modular, flexible and expandable system is an essential element to achieving a high-performance image archival and retrieval system within a realistic short period of time. This paper introduces a proposal for a modular, flexible, and expandable image archival and retrieval open-architecture system to stimulate discussion and thinking. It will cover the following areas: (1) data archival and retrieval requirements such as storage capacity and data management, (2) data communication and distribution requirements using local area networks and/or wide area networks, (3) the architectural requirements such as adopting industry standards for hardware and software, and (4) an example of such open-architecture system to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a modular, flexible, and expandable high- performance image archival and retrieval system.

  19. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Avi C; Campbell, Malachy T; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. Optical refractometry based on Fresnel diffraction from a phase wedge.

    PubMed

    Tavassoly, M Taghi; Saber, Ahad

    2010-11-01

    A method that utilizes the Fresnel diffraction of light from the phase step formed by a transparent wedge is introduced for measuring the refractive indices of transparent solids, liquids, and solutions. It is shown that, as a transparent wedge of small apex angle is illuminated perpendicular to its surface by a monochromatic parallel beam of light, the Fresnel fringes, caused by abrupt change in refractive index at the wedge lateral boundary, are formed on a screen held perpendicular to the beam propagation direction. The visibility of the fringes varies periodically between zero and 1 in the direction normal to the wedge apex. For a known or measured apex angle, the wedge refractive index is obtained by measuring the period length by a CCD. To measure the refractive index of a transparent liquid or solution, the wedge is installed in a transparent rectangle cell containing the sample. Then, the cell is illuminated perpendicularly and the visibility period is measured. By using modest optics, one can measure the refractive index at a relative uncertainty level of 10(-5). There is no limitation on the refractive index range. The method can be applied easily with no mechanical manipulation. The measuring apparatus can be very compact with low mechanical and optical noises.

  1. The effects of fluid escape on accretionary wedges 2. Seepage force, slope failure, headless submarine canyons, and vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orange, Daniel L.; Breen, Nancy A.

    1992-06-01

    The high pore pressure gradients inherent to accretionary complexes affect the force balance of the wedge via seepage force, which acts in the direction of flow and is proportional to the pressure (head) gradient. If sufficiently large, this seepage force can offset gravity and friction and lead to failure. At the toe of the wedge sediments are weak, slopes are over-steepened by folding and faulting, and fluid pressure gradients can be high; these conditions are conducive to seepage-induced failure. For the 14-16° slope at the toe of the southern Cascadia wedge, the pore pressure gradient necessary to initiate failure is λ=0.74-0.86. The gradient necessary to cause failure is sensitive to surface slope and sediment strength, but is insensitive to porosity. Reasonable estimates of sediment strength for most accretionary wedges require pore pressure gradients ranging from 10 to 60% of lithostatic to cause failure. These values are within the range of modeled and measured pore pressures in accretionary complexes, suggesting that seepage-induced slope failure should be an expected feature in this environment. If these failure features are observed, then their presence can be used to constrain the pore pressure gradient within the wedge, independent of any assumptions regarding fluid discharge or permeability. If seepage failure repeats and is localized in the same region, then it can lead to channel, gully, and canyon formation. Two convergent margins, southern Cascadia and northern Hispaniola, show many regularly spaced headless canyons that cannot be attributed to downslope erosive flow. We suggest that these canyons are forming from internally driven seepage-induced failure. Both the Oregon and Hispaniola accretionary wedges also contain evidence for non-uniform fluid flow based on the observed and inferred presence of vents. Using Darcy's Law, the pore pressure constraint from the slope failure analysis and an estimate of the total fluid discharge, we examine the

  2. Study of Cavitation in Wakes of Circular Cylinders and Symmetric Wedges Using X-ray Densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koot, Joachim; Wu, Juliana; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation in wakes behind canonical objects can exhibit variation in Strouhal number with a reduction in cavitation number. Circular cylinders of two diameters and symmetric wedges with a wedge angle of 15, 30, and 60 degrees are used to study cavitation in their wakes using X-ray densitometry. Using high speed video and X-ray densitometry, the nature of cavitation is studied in near-wake and a part of the far-wake region. In addition, acoustic measurements are also carried out to understand the spectral content of such wake cavities. Based on void fraction flow field and high-speed video measurements, the effect of cavitation on the Kármán vortex street spacing in the far wake region is studied. The results are the interpreted to explain the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed change in Strouhal number. Office of Naval Research.

  3. Role of Hydrogen in stagnant slabs and big mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Zhao, D.

    2008-12-01

    Eastern China, Europe, and United State (e.g., [7]). According to the BMW model by Zhao [2], the intra-plate volcanisms in Northeast China including Mt. Changbai are different from the hot plumes and they might be generated due to some processes related to the deep-seated dehydration from the stagnant slab. Recent geochemical studies on volcanic rocks and associated mantle xenoliths in Northeast China (e.g., [8]) indicated that there is no geochemical evidence for involvement of subducting slab in most basalts, i.e., no depletion of high field strength elements and no enrichment of large ion lithophile elements. There is no clear evidence for a high-3He/4He mantle plume component in these rocks, i.e., 3He/4He ratios are significantly below the high 3He/4He ratios of mantle plumes such as those beneath Hawaii and Iceland. The geochemical signatures of the deep dehydration should be different from those in the conventional mantle wedge, since the fluids generated at such depths are completely different from those at the shallow depths. Further studies including the element partitioning between fluids and mantle under the deep upper mantle and the transition zone conditions are necessary to clarify the possible role of the Big Mantle Wedge on the intra-plate volcanism. [1] Fukao, et al., J. G. R. 108, doi:10.1029/2001JB000989, 2003. [2] Zhao et al., Chin. Sci. Bulletin 49, 1401, 2004, [3] Ohtani, Elements, 1, 25, 2005. [4] Richard et al., EPSL, 251, 156, 2006. [5] Hae et al., EPSL, 243, 141, 2006. [6] Litasov and Ohtani, PEPI, 134, 105, 2002. [7] Song et al., Nature, 427, 530, 2004. [8] Chen et al., Lithos, 96, 108, 2007

  4. Deriving Animal Behaviour from High-Frequency GPS: Tracking Cows in Open and Forested Habitat

    PubMed Central

    de Weerd, Nelleke; van Langevelde, Frank; van Oeveren, Herman; Nolet, Bart A.; Kölzsch, Andrea; Prins, Herbert H. T.; de Boer, W. Fred

    2015-01-01

    The increasing spatiotemporal accuracy of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) tracking systems opens the possibility to infer animal behaviour from tracking data. We studied the relationship between high-frequency GNSS data and behaviour, aimed at developing an easily interpretable classification method to infer behaviour from location data. Behavioural observations were carried out during tracking of cows (Bos Taurus) fitted with high-frequency GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers. Data were obtained in an open field and forested area, and movement metrics were calculated for 1 min, 12 s and 2 s intervals. We observed four behaviour types (Foraging, Lying, Standing and Walking). We subsequently used Classification and Regression Trees to classify the simultaneously obtained GPS data as these behaviour types, based on distances and turning angles between fixes. GPS data with a 1 min interval from the open field was classified correctly for more than 70% of the samples. Data from the 12 s and 2 s interval could not be classified successfully, emphasizing that the interval should be long enough for the behaviour to be defined by its characteristic movement metrics. Data obtained in the forested area were classified with a lower accuracy (57%) than the data from the open field, due to a larger positional error of GPS locations and differences in behavioural performance influenced by the habitat type. This demonstrates the importance of understanding the relationship between behaviour and movement metrics, derived from GNSS fixes at different frequencies and in different habitats, in order to successfully infer behaviour. When spatially accurate location data can be obtained, behaviour can be inferred from high-frequency GNSS fixes by calculating simple movement metrics and using easily interpretable decision trees. This allows for the combined study of animal behaviour and habitat use based on location data, and might make it possible to detect deviations

  5. OpenMSI: A High-Performance Web-Based Platform for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Greiner, Annette; Cholia, Shreyas; Louie, Katherine; Bethel, E. Wes; Northen, Trent R.; Bowen, Benjamin P.

    2013-10-02

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables researchers to directly probe endogenous molecules directly within the architecture of the biological matrix. Unfortunately, efficient access, management, and analysis of the data generated by MSI approaches remain major challenges to this rapidly developing field. Despite the availability of numerous dedicated file formats and software packages, it is a widely held viewpoint that the biggest challenge is simply opening, sharing, and analyzing a file without loss of information. Here we present OpenMSI, a software framework and platform that addresses these challenges via an advanced, high-performance, extensible file format and Web API for remote data access (http://openmsi.nersc.gov). The OpenMSI file format supports storage of raw MSI data, metadata, and derived analyses in a single, self-describing format based on HDF5 and is supported by a large range of analysis software (e.g., Matlab and R) and programming languages (e.g., C++, Fortran, and Python). Careful optimization of the storage layout of MSI data sets using chunking, compression, and data replication accelerates common, selective data access operations while minimizing data storage requirements and are critical enablers of rapid data I/O. The OpenMSI file format has shown to provide >2000-fold improvement for image access operations, enabling spectrum and image retrieval in less than 0.3 s across the Internet even for 50 GB MSI data sets. To make remote high-performance compute resources accessible for analysis and to facilitate data sharing and collaboration, we describe an easy-to-use yet powerful Web API, enabling fast and convenient access to MSI data, metadata, and derived analysis results stored remotely to facilitate high-performance data analysis and enable implementation of Web based data sharing, visualization, and analysis.

  6. OpenMSI: a high-performance web-based platform for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Rübel, Oliver; Greiner, Annette; Cholia, Shreyas; Louie, Katherine; Bethel, E Wes; Northen, Trent R; Bowen, Benjamin P

    2013-11-05

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables researchers to directly probe endogenous molecules directly within the architecture of the biological matrix. Unfortunately, efficient access, management, and analysis of the data generated by MSI approaches remain major challenges to this rapidly developing field. Despite the availability of numerous dedicated file formats and software packages, it is a widely held viewpoint that the biggest challenge is simply opening, sharing, and analyzing a file without loss of information. Here we present OpenMSI, a software framework and platform that addresses these challenges via an advanced, high-performance, extensible file format and Web API for remote data access (http://openmsi.nersc.gov). The OpenMSI file format supports storage of raw MSI data, metadata, and derived analyses in a single, self-describing format based on HDF5 and is supported by a large range of analysis software (e.g., Matlab and R) and programming languages (e.g., C++, Fortran, and Python). Careful optimization of the storage layout of MSI data sets using chunking, compression, and data replication accelerates common, selective data access operations while minimizing data storage requirements and are critical enablers of rapid data I/O. The OpenMSI file format has shown to provide >2000-fold improvement for image access operations, enabling spectrum and image retrieval in less than 0.3 s across the Internet even for 50 GB MSI data sets. To make remote high-performance compute resources accessible for analysis and to facilitate data sharing and collaboration, we describe an easy-to-use yet powerful Web API, enabling fast and convenient access to MSI data, metadata, and derived analysis results stored remotely to facilitate high-performance data analysis and enable implementation of Web based data sharing, visualization, and analysis.

  7. Deriving Animal Behaviour from High-Frequency GPS: Tracking Cows in Open and Forested Habitat.

    PubMed

    de Weerd, Nelleke; van Langevelde, Frank; van Oeveren, Herman; Nolet, Bart A; Kölzsch, Andrea; Prins, Herbert H T; de Boer, W Fred

    2015-01-01

    The increasing spatiotemporal accuracy of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) tracking systems opens the possibility to infer animal behaviour from tracking data. We studied the relationship between high-frequency GNSS data and behaviour, aimed at developing an easily interpretable classification method to infer behaviour from location data. Behavioural observations were carried out during tracking of cows (Bos Taurus) fitted with high-frequency GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers. Data were obtained in an open field and forested area, and movement metrics were calculated for 1 min, 12 s and 2 s intervals. We observed four behaviour types (Foraging, Lying, Standing and Walking). We subsequently used Classification and Regression Trees to classify the simultaneously obtained GPS data as these behaviour types, based on distances and turning angles between fixes. GPS data with a 1 min interval from the open field was classified correctly for more than 70% of the samples. Data from the 12 s and 2 s interval could not be classified successfully, emphasizing that the interval should be long enough for the behaviour to be defined by its characteristic movement metrics. Data obtained in the forested area were classified with a lower accuracy (57%) than the data from the open field, due to a larger positional error of GPS locations and differences in behavioural performance influenced by the habitat type. This demonstrates the importance of understanding the relationship between behaviour and movement metrics, derived from GNSS fixes at different frequencies and in different habitats, in order to successfully infer behaviour. When spatially accurate location data can be obtained, behaviour can be inferred from high-frequency GNSS fixes by calculating simple movement metrics and using easily interpretable decision trees. This allows for the combined study of animal behaviour and habitat use based on location data, and might make it possible to detect deviations

  8. SU-E-T-362: Enhanced Dynamic Wedge Output Factors for Varian 2300CD and the Case for a Reference Database

    SciTech Connect

    Njeh, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose inhomogeneity in treatment planning can be compensated using physical wedges. Enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) were introduced by Varian to overcome some of the short comings of physical wedges. The objectives of this study were to measure EDW output factors for 6 MV and 20 MV photon energies for a Varian 2300CD. Secondly to review the literature in terms of published enhanced dynamic wedge output factors (EDWOF) for different Varian models and thereby adding credence to the case of the validity of reference databases. Methods: The enhanced dynamic wedge output factors were measured for the Varian 2300CD for both 6 MV and 20 MV photon energies. Twelve papers with published EDWOF for different Varian Linac models were found in the literature. Results: The EDWOF for 6 MV varied from 0.980 for a 5×5 cm 10 degree wedge to 0.424 for 20×20 cm 60 degree wedge. Similarly for 20 MV, the EDWOF varied from 0.986 for 5×5 cm 10 degree wedge to 0.529 for 20×20 cm 60 degree wedge. EDWOF are highly dependent on field size. Comparing our results with the published mean, we found an excellent agreement for 6 MV EDWOF with the percentage differences ranging from 0.01% to 0.57% with a mean of 0.03%. The coefficient of variation of published EDWOF ranged from 0.17% to 0.85% and 0.1% to 0.9% for the for 6 MV and 18MV photon energies respectively. This paper provides the first published EDWOF for 20 MV photon energy. In addition, we have provided the first compendium of EDWOFs for different Varian linac models. Conclusion: The consistency of EDWOF across models and institution provide further support that, a standard data set of basic photon and electron dosimetry could be established, as a guide for future commissioning, beam modeling and quality assurance purposes.

  9. Remote Sensing of Open Water in Northern High Latitudes for use in Hydrologic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podest, E.; McDonald, K. C.; Kimball, J.; Maumenee, N.; Bohn, T.; Lettenmaier, D.; Bowling, L.

    2007-12-01

    In the northern high latitudes open water bodies are common landscape features, having a large influence on hydrologic processes as well as surface-atmosphere carbon exchange and associated impacts on global climate. It is therefore of great importance to assess their spatial extent and temporal character in order to improve hydrologic and ecosystem process modeling. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an effective tool for this purpose since it is particularly sensitive to surface water and it can monitor large inaccessible areas on a temporal basis regardless of atmospheric conditions or solar illumination. We employ multi-temporal L-band SAR data from the Japanese Earth Remote Sensing Satellite (JERS-1) and ALOS PALSAR to map open water bodies across Alaska and Eurasia. A supervised decision tree-based classification approach was used to generate open water maps. For Alaska, we assembled regional-scale monthly JERS-1 SAR mosaics from data acquired during 1998. Digital elevation model (DEM) terrain and slope information were also employed in the decision tree classifier. These supplementary data aided significantly in improving classification performance in topographically complex regions where radar shadowing was prevalent. For study regions in Eurasia, PALSAR data was used in conjunction with JERS-1 imagery to map spatial patterns and seasonal variability in open water characteristics over selected study basins. These results were examined in relation to regional topographic and land cover characteristics. Classification results were also evaluated relative to other open water and land cover classification maps derived from Landsat, AVHRR, MODIS and SRTM. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology; at the University of Montana; at the University of Washington; and at Purdue University under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. Characteristics of a rat model of an open craniocerebral injury at simulated high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Yu, An-Yong; Xu, Quan-Hong; Hu, Sheng-Li; Li, Fei; Chen, Yu-Jie; Yin, Yi; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Jiang-Kai

    2014-01-01

    To establish a rat model of an open craniocerebral injury at simulated high altitude and to examine the characteristics of this model. Rats were divided randomly into a normobaric group and a high-altitude group and their corresponding control groups. A rat model of an open craniocerebral injury was established with a nail gun shot. Simulated high-altitude conditions were established with a hypobaric chamber at 0.6 ATA to mimic pressure at an altitude of 4000 m. Mortality, brain water content (BWC), Evans blue content, pathology, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), partial pressure of brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2), and brainstem auditory-evoked potential were observed after injury. The mortality of the high-altitude group was significantly greater than that of the normobaric group within 72 h after injury (P<0.05). BWC and Evans blue content increased by 48 h after injury (P<0.05); pathological changes in damaged brains were more serious. In contrast, rCBF and PbtO2 had decreased markedly by 72 h (P<0.01); brainstem auditory-evoked potential values were significantly prolonged (P<0.05). Moreover, an inverse correlation between rCBF and BWC and a positive correlation between rCBF and PbtO2 were found. The rat model of an open craniocerebral injury at simulated high altitude can be established successfully using a nail gun shot and a hypobaric chamber. The injury characteristics at high altitude were more serious, rapid, and prolonged than those in the normobaric group. PMID:25191925

  11. Convergence of high order perturbative expansions in open system quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Meng; Song, Linze; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new method to directly calculate high order perturbative expansion terms in open system quantum dynamics. They are first written explicitly in path integral expressions. A set of differential equations are then derived by extending the hierarchical equation of motion (HEOM) approach. As two typical examples for the bosonic and fermionic baths, specific forms of the extended HEOM are obtained for the spin-boson model and the Anderson impurity model. Numerical results are then presented for these two models. General trends of the high order perturbation terms as well as the necessary orders for the perturbative expansions to converge are analyzed.

  12. Opening-mode fracture in siliceous mudstone at high homologous temperature—effect of surface forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, Peter; Aydin, Atilla; Lore, Jason

    In analogy to high-temperature sintering of ceramics and metal powder compacts, the formation of opening-mode fractures in siliceous mudstone during natural in-situ combustion of hydrocarbons is attributed to contractile surface forces between mineral grains and an interstitial melt phase. A comparison between bulk density increase during sintering and created fracture space indicates that fracturing resulted from contraction of the rock matrix due to porosity reduction, grain-scale mass transfer, and high-temperature mineral formation. It is suggested that contractile surface forces between mineral grains and between mineral grains and pore fluid contribute to subcritical fracture formation under a wide range of subsurface conditions.

  13. Measured Two-Dimensional Ice-Wedge Polygon Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Busey, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Ice-wedge polygons are perhaps the most dominant permafrost related features in the arctic landscape. The microtopography of these features, that includes rims, troughs, and high and low polygon centers, alters the local hydrology, as water tends to collect in the low areas. During winter, wind redistribution of snow leads to an increased snowpack depth in the low areas, while the slightly higher areas often have very thin snow cover, leading to differences across the landscape in vegetation communities and soil moisture between higher and lower areas. These differences in local surface conditions lead to spatial variability of the ground thermal regime in the different microtopographic areas and between different types of ice-wedge polygons. To study these features in depth, we established temperature transects across four different types of ice-wedge polygons near Barrow, Alaska. The transects were composed of five vertical array thermistor probes (VATP) beginning in the center of each polygon and extending through the trough to the rim of the adjacent polygon. Each VATP had 16 thermistors from the surface to a depth of 1.5 m. In addition to these 80 subsurface temperature measurement points per polygon, soil moisture, thermal conductivity, heat flux, and snow depth were all measured in multiple locations for each polygon. Above ground, a full suite of micrometeorological instrumentation was present at each polygon. Data from these sites has been collected continuously for the last three years. We found snow cover, timing and depth, and active layer soil moisture to be major controlling factors in the observed thermal regimes. In troughs and in the centers of low-center polygons, the combined effect of typically saturated soils and increased snow accumulation resulted in the highest mean annual ground temperatures (MAGT). Additionally, these areas were the last part of the polygon to refreeze during the winter. However, increased active layer thickness was not

  14. Scalable High Performance Message Passing over InfiniBand for Open MPI

    SciTech Connect

    Friedley, A; Hoefler, T; Leininger, M L; Lumsdaine, A

    2007-10-24

    InfiniBand (IB) is a popular network technology for modern high-performance computing systems. MPI implementations traditionally support IB using a reliable, connection-oriented (RC) transport. However, per-process resource usage that grows linearly with the number of processes, makes this approach prohibitive for large-scale systems. IB provides an alternative in the form of a connectionless unreliable datagram transport (UD), which allows for near-constant resource usage and initialization overhead as the process count increases. This paper describes a UD-based implementation for IB in Open MPI as a scalable alternative to existing RC-based schemes. We use the software reliability capabilities of Open MPI to provide the guaranteed delivery semantics required by MPI. Results show that UD not only requires fewer resources at scale, but also allows for shorter MPI startup times. A connectionless model also improves performance for applications that tend to send small messages to many different processes.

  15. tranSMART: An Open Source Knowledge Management and High Content Data Analytics Platform.

    PubMed

    Scheufele, Elisabeth; Aronzon, Dina; Coopersmith, Robert; McDuffie, Michael T; Kapoor, Manish; Uhrich, Christopher A; Avitabile, Jean E; Liu, Jinlei; Housman, Dan; Palchuk, Matvey B

    2014-01-01

    The tranSMART knowledge management and high-content analysis platform is a flexible software framework featuring novel research capabilities. It enables analysis of integrated data for the purposes of hypothesis generation, hypothesis validation, and cohort discovery in translational research. tranSMART bridges the prolific world of basic science and clinical practice data at the point of care by merging multiple types of data from disparate sources into a common environment. The application supports data harmonization and integration with analytical pipelines. The application code was released into the open source community in January 2012, with 32 instances in operation. tranSMART's extensible data model and corresponding data integration processes, rapid data analysis features, and open source nature make it an indispensable tool in translational or clinical research.

  16. Exploring Infiniband Hardware Virtualization in OpenNebula towards Efficient High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Pais Pitta de Lacerda Ruivo, Tiago; Bernabeu Altayo, Gerard; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Timm, Steven; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Noh, Seo-Young; Raicu, Ioan

    2014-11-11

    has been widely accepted that software virtualization has a big negative impact on high-performance computing (HPC) application performance. This work explores the potential use of Infiniband hardware virtualization in an OpenNebula cloud towards the efficient support of MPI-based workloads. We have implemented, deployed, and tested an Infiniband network on the FermiCloud private Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud. To avoid software virtualization towards minimizing the virtualization overhead, we employed a technique called Single Root Input/Output Virtualization (SRIOV). Our solution spanned modifications to the Linux’s Hypervisor as well as the OpenNebula manager. We evaluated the performance of the hardware virtualization on up to 56 virtual machines connected by up to 8 DDR Infiniband network links, with micro-benchmarks (latency and bandwidth) as well as w a MPI-intensive application (the HPL Linpack benchmark).

  17. tranSMART: An Open Source Knowledge Management and High Content Data Analytics Platform

    PubMed Central

    Scheufele, Elisabeth; Aronzon, Dina; Coopersmith, Robert; McDuffie, Michael T.; Kapoor, Manish; Uhrich, Christopher A.; Avitabile, Jean E.; Liu, Jinlei; Housman, Dan; Palchuk, Matvey B.

    2014-01-01

    The tranSMART knowledge management and high-content analysis platform is a flexible software framework featuring novel research capabilities. It enables analysis of integrated data for the purposes of hypothesis generation, hypothesis validation, and cohort discovery in translational research. tranSMART bridges the prolific world of basic science and clinical practice data at the point of care by merging multiple types of data from disparate sources into a common environment. The application supports data harmonization and integration with analytical pipelines. The application code was released into the open source community in January 2012, with 32 instances in operation. tranSMART’s extensible data model and corresponding data integration processes, rapid data analysis features, and open source nature make it an indispensable tool in translational or clinical research. PMID:25717408

  18. Open Source Drug Discovery: Highly Potent Antimalarial Compounds Derived from the Tres Cantos Arylpyrroles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The development of new antimalarial compounds remains a pivotal part of the strategy for malaria elimination. Recent large-scale phenotypic screens have provided a wealth of potential starting points for hit-to-lead campaigns. One such public set is explored, employing an open source research mechanism in which all data and ideas were shared in real time, anyone was able to participate, and patents were not sought. One chemical subseries was found to exhibit oral activity but contained a labile ester that could not be replaced without loss of activity, and the original hit exhibited remarkable sensitivity to minor structural change. A second subseries displayed high potency, including activity within gametocyte and liver stage assays, but at the cost of low solubility. As an open source research project, unexplored avenues are clearly identified and may be explored further by the community; new findings may be cumulatively added to the present work. PMID:27800551

  19. Coulomb theory applied to accretionary and nonaccretionary wedges: Possible causes for tectonic erosion and/or frontal accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallemand, Serge E.; Schnürle, Philippe; Malavieille, Jacques

    1994-06-01

    Based on observations from both modem convergent margins and sandbox modeling, we examine the possible conditions favoring frontal accretion and/or frontal and basal tectonic erosion. Mean characteristic parameters (μ, μ*b and λ) are used to discuss the mechanical stability of 28 transects across the frontal part of convergent margins where the Coulomb theory is applicable. Natural observations reveal that "typical accretionary wedges" are characterized by low tapers with smooth surface slope and subducting plate, low convergence rates and thick trench sediment, while "nonaccretionary wedges" display large tapers with irregular surface slopes and rough subducting plate, high convergence rates and almost no trench fill. Sandbox experiments were performed to illustrate the effects of seamounts/ridges in the subduction zone on the deformation of an accretionary wedge. These experiments show that a wedge of sand is first trapped and pushed in front of the seamount which acts as a moving bulldozer. This is followed by a tunnelling effect of the subducting seamount through the frontal wedge material, which results in considerable sand reworking. At an advanced subduction stage, the décollement jumps back from a high level in the wedge to its former basal position. We conclude that a high trench sedimentation rate relative to the convergence rate leads to frontal accretion. In contrast, several conditions may favor tectonic erosion of the upper plate. First, oceanic features, such as grabens, seamounts or ridges, may trap upper plate material during their subduction process. Second, destabilization of the upper plate material by internal fluid overpressuring causing hydrofracturing is probably another important mechanism.

  20. Seismological evidence for a sub-volcanic arc mantle wedge beneath the Denali volcanic gap, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.E.; Pasyanos, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Arc volcanism in Alaska is strongly correlated with the 100 km depth contour of the western Aluetian Wadati-Benioff zone. Above the eastern portion of the Wadati-Benioff zone however, there is a distinct lack of volcanism (the Denali volcanic gap). We observe high Poisson's ratio values (0.29-0.33) over the entire length of the Alaskan subduction zone mantle wedge based on regional variations of Pn and Sn velocities. High Poisson's ratios at this depth (40-70 km), adjacent to the subducting slab, are attributed to melting of mantle-wedge peridotites, caused by fluids liberated from the subducting oceanic crust and sediments. Observations of high values of Poisson's ratio, beneath the Denali volcanic gap suggest that the mantle wedge contains melted material that is unable to reach the surface. We suggest that its inability to migrate through the overlying crust is due to increased compression in the crust at the northern apex of the curved Denali fault.

  1. Flight velocity effects on exhaust noise of a wedge nozzle installed on an underwing nacelle on an F-106 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    It is important to know whether the relatively high takeoff speeds of supersonic transport aircraft will change the exhaust noise levels of nozzles from those measured at static conditions. To gain some insight into this question, a modified F-106B aircraft was used to conduct flyover and static tests on a wedge nozzle. Flight velocity had an adverse effect on exhaust noise when compared with static results at the same relative jet velocity but a beneficial effect when compared with static results at the same absolute jet velocity. The wedge nozzle, which has a two-dimensional wedge surface rather than an axisymmetric plug surface, had a higher peak flyover noise level than the plug nozzle.

  2. Modification of the Himalayan Orogenic Wedge by Late Cenozoic Southeastward Flow of Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, K. V.; Whipple, K. X.; Kirby, E.; Arrowsmith, R.; Shirzaei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Continental plateaus are reservoirs of excess gravitational energy that can influence the late-stage geodynamic evolution of adjacent orogenic wedges. In the central Himalaya (80-88˚E), most late Cenozoic deformation has involved roughly N-S shortening within the Himalayan orogenic wedge. Within this region, all 1976-2014 Mw 5 and larger earthquakes had thrust mechanisms associated with slip along major arc-parallel structures within or at the base of the orogenic wedge. In contrast, the segment of the wedge between 88˚E and 91˚E - including easternmost Nepal, the Sikkim region of India, and Bhutan - is characterized by a complex deformation field that includes thrusting on arc-parallel wedge structures but also transcurrent faulting at high angles to the Himalayan arc. In fact, over the same 1976-2014 period, all but one of the Mw 5 and larger earthquakes in this region had transcurrent fault mechanisms, mostly consistent with dextral strike-slip along NW-striking faults. We refer to this region as the central-eastern Himalayan transition zone. Although direct field evidence of the surface breaks of these faults has not been established, the orientations of nodal planes of large earthquakes, as well as alignments of microearthquake arrays, suggest that they may connect northward to a discontinuous family of arc-parallel faults - most showing evidence for oblique slip, with variable normal and dextral-transcurrent components - which we interpret as the long-term structural manifestation of the boundary between the distinctive modern strain fields of Tibet (E-W extension) and the central Himalaya (N-S shortening). In addition, transverse faults of the central-eastern Himalayan transition zone may project southward, beneath sediments near the Ganges and Bhramaputra confluence, as dextral tear faults linking the active thrust front of the central Himalaya to the active thrust front of the Shillong Plateau in northeastern India. We hypothesize that the broadening of

  3. The effect of foot orthoses and in-shoe wedges during cycling: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of foot orthoses and in-shoe wedges in cycling are largely based on theoretical benefits and anecdotal evidence. This review aimed to systematically collect all published research on this topic, critically evaluate the methods and summarise the findings. Methods Study inclusion criteria were: all empirical studies that evaluated the effects of foot orthoses or in-shoe wedges on cycling; outcome measures that investigated physiological parameters, kinematics and kinetics of the lower limb, and power; and, published in English. Studies were located by data-base searching (Medline, CINAHL, Embase and SPORTDiscus) and hand-searching in February 2014. Selected studies were assessed for methodological quality using a modified Quality Index. Data were synthesised descriptively. Meta-analysis was not performed as the included studies were not sufficiently homogeneous to provide a meaningful summary. Results Six studies were identified as meeting the eligibility criteria. All studies were laboratory-based and used a repeated measures design. The quality of the studies varied, with Quality Index scores ranging from 7 to 10 out of 14. Five studies investigated foot orthoses and one studied in-shoe wedges. Foot orthoses were found to increase contact area in the midfoot, peak pressures under the hallux and were perceived to provide better arch support, compared to a control. With respect to physiological parameters, contrasting findings have been reported regarding the effect foot orthoses have on oxygen consumption. Further, foot orthoses have been shown to not provide effects on lower limb kinematics and perceived comfort. Both foot orthoses and in-shoe wedges have been shown to provide no effect on power. Conclusion In general, there is limited high-quality research on the effects foot orthoses and in-shoe wedges provide during cycling. At present, there is some evidence that during cycling foot orthoses: increase contact area under the foot and increase

  4. SU-E-T-562: Scanned Percent Depth Dose Curve Discrepancy for Photon Beams with Physical Wedge in Place (Varian IX) Using Different Sensitive Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffer RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.

  5. Oasis: A high-level/high-performance open source Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Mikael; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian

    2015-03-01

    Oasis is a high-level/high-performance finite element Navier-Stokes solver written from scratch in Python using building blocks from the FEniCS project (fenicsproject.org). The solver is unstructured and targets large-scale applications in complex geometries on massively parallel clusters. Oasis utilizes MPI and interfaces, through FEniCS, to the linear algebra backend PETSc. Oasis advocates a high-level, programmable user interface through the creation of highly flexible Python modules for new problems. Through the high-level Python interface the user is placed in complete control of every aspect of the solver. A version of the solver, that is using piecewise linear elements for both velocity and pressure, is shown to reproduce very well the classical, spectral, turbulent channel simulations of Moser et al. (1999). The computational speed is strongly dominated by the iterative solvers provided by the linear algebra backend, which is arguably the best performance any similar implicit solver using PETSc may hope for. Higher order accuracy is also demonstrated and new solvers may be easily added within the same framework.

  6. Aligning Optical Fibers by Means of Actuated MEMS Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Brian; Ghodssi, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) of a proposed type would be designed and fabricated to effect lateral and vertical alignment of optical fibers with respect to optical, electro-optical, optoelectronic, and/or photonic devices on integrated circuit chips and similar monolithic device structures. A MEMS device of this type would consist of a pair of oppositely sloped alignment wedges attached to linear actuators that would translate the wedges in the plane of a substrate, causing an optical fiber in contact with the sloping wedge surfaces to undergo various displacements parallel and perpendicular to the plane. In making it possible to accurately align optical fibers individually during the packaging stages of fabrication of the affected devices, this MEMS device would also make it possible to relax tolerances in other stages of fabrication, thereby potentially reducing costs and increasing yields. In a typical system according to the proposal (see Figure 1), one or more pair(s) of alignment wedges would be positioned to create a V groove in which an optical fiber would rest. The fiber would be clamped at a suitable distance from the wedges to create a cantilever with a slight bend to push the free end of the fiber gently to the bottom of the V groove. The wedges would be translated in the substrate plane by amounts Dx1 and Dx2, respectively, which would be chosen to move the fiber parallel to the plane by a desired amount Dx and perpendicular to the plane by a desired amount Dy. The actuators used to translate the wedges could be variants of electrostatic or thermal actuators that are common in MEMS.

  7. Seismic reflection images of the accretionary wedge of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, T.H.; Stoffa, P.L. ); McIntosh, K.; Silver, E.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The large-scale structure of modern accretionary wedges is known almost entirely from seismic reflection investigations using single or grids of two-dimensional profiles. The authors will report on the first three-dimensional seismic reflection data volume collected of a wedge. This data set covers a 9-km-wide {times} 22-km-long {times} 6-km-thick volume of the accretionary wedge just arcward of the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica. The three-dimensional processing has improved the imaging ability of the multichannel data, and the data volume allows mapping of structures from a few hundred meters to kilometers in size. These data illustrate the relationships between the basement, the wedge shape, and overlying slope sedimentary deposits. Reflections from within the wedge define the gross structural features and tectonic processes active along this particular convergent margin. So far, the analysis shows that the subdued basement relief (horst and graben structures seldom have relief of more than a few hundred meters off Costa Rica) does affect the larger scale through going structural features within the wedge. The distribution of mud volcanoes and amplitude anomalies associated with the large-scale wedge structures suggests that efficient fluid migration paths may extend from the top of the downgoing slab at the shelf edge out into the lower and middle slope region at a distance of 50-100 km. Offscraping of the uppermost (about 45 m) sediment occurs within 4 km of the trench, creating a small pile of sediments near the trench lower slope. Underplating of parts of the 400-m-thick subducted sedimentary section begins at a very shallow structural level, 4-10 km arcward of the trench. Volumetrically, the most important accretionary process is underplating.

  8. Transanal opening of intersphincteric space (TROPIS) - A new procedure to treat high complex anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Garg, Pankaj

    2017-04-01

    The sepsis in intersphincteric space has important role in pathogenesis of most complex fistula-in-ano. This sepsis is like a small abscess in a closed space. This closed space needs to be drained adequately and then kept open for the fistula-in-ano to heal properly. The aim was to lay open and drain the intersphincteric space through internal opening via transanal approach. This has been tried in submucosal and intersphincteric rectal abscesses but has never been tried in complex fistula-in-ano. All consecutive patients of complex high (involving >1/3 of sphincter complex) fistula-in-ano who were operated were included in the prospective cohort study. Preoperative MRI scan was done in all the patients. Transanal laying open of the intersphincteric space (TROPIS) was done through the internal opening. The external sphincter was not cut. The tracts in the ischiorectal fossa were curetted and cleaned. The incontinence scores were measured. 61 patients with high complex fistula-in-ano were included (follow-up:6-21 months). Male/Female:59/2, age-42.3 ± 9.5 years. 85.2% (52) were recurrent, 83.6% (51) had multiple tracts, 36.1% (22) had horseshoe tract, 34.4% (21) had supralevator extension and 26.2% (16) had associated abscess. 95.1% (58) were posterior fistula out of which 90.2% (55) were in posterior midline. Nine patients were excluded (due to tuberculosis, lost to follow-up). Fistula healed completely in 84.6% (44/52) and didn't heal in 15.4% (9/52). 4/9 of these were reoperated and fistula healed in three patients. Thus overall healing rate was 90.4% (47/52). There was no significant change in incontinence scores. TROPIS is a simple effective sphincter sparing procedure to treat high complex fistula-in-ano including supralevator and horseshoe fistula. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. High Open-Circuit Voltage Solar Cells Based on Organic-Inorganic Lead Bromide Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Edri, Eran; Kirmayer, Saar; Cahen, David; Hodes, Gary

    2013-03-21

    Mesoscopic solar cells, based on solution-processed organic-inorganic perovskite absorbers, are a promising avenue for converting solar to electrical energy. We used solution-processed organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite absorbers, in conjunction with organic hole conductors, to form high voltage solar cells. There is a dire need for low-cost cells of this type, to drive electrochemical reactions or as the high photon energy cell in a system with spectral splitting. These perovskite materials, although spin-coated from solution, form highly crystalline materials. Their simple synthesis, along with high chemical versatility, allows tuning their electronic and optical properties. By judicious selection of the perovskite lead halide-based absorber, matching organic hole conductor, and contacts, a cell with a ∼ 1.3 V open circuit voltage was made. While further study is needed, this achievement provides a general guideline for additional improvement of cell performance.

  10. The Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cell with high open circuit voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Ma, Xun; Jiang, Zhi; Li, Zhishan; Liu, Sijia; Lu, Yilei; Wang, Shurong

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of two different sulfurization processes on the CZTS films were investigated, and the results indicated that a rapid high-temperature crystallization process after sulfurization was beneficial for CZTS thin films to obtain a compact and flat surface with large grains. However, a common sulfurization without rapid high-temperature crystallization process would easily lead to undesirable properties of films, such as rough surface with pin holes, which degenerate the performance of devices. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cell based on a rapid high-temperature process after sulfurization achieved a high open circuit voltage of 722 mV and the best efficiency 3.32% was obtained.

  11. Resonant wedge-plasmon modes in single-crystalline gold nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lin; Sigle, Wilfried; Koch, Christoph T.; Ögüt, Burcu; van Aken, Peter A.; Talebi, Nahid; Vogelgesang, Ralf; Mu, Jianlin; Wen, Xiaogang; Mao, Jian

    2011-05-01

    Using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy we measured surface-plasmon resonances of gold nanoplatelets with different shapes and edge lengths at high spatial resolution. We find equidistant maxima of the energy-loss probability along the platelet edges. The plasmon dispersion of the different geometries is very similar, i.e., hardly dependent on specimen shape. The experimental results are verified by means of finite-difference time-domain calculations which reveal the presence of wedge-plasmon polaritons propagating along the platelet edges. At platelet corners, apart from radiative losses, wedge-plasmon polaritons are partially reflected or transmitted to neighboring edges. The interference of all these contributions leads to the observed plasmon resonance modes. This is an essential step towards a thorough understanding of plasmon eigenmodes in prismatic nanoplatelets.

  12. Hypersonic slender-wedge analysis with gradual change in angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Joshi, S. P.; Rodkiewicz, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of a narrow cross-section wedge wing moving at a high Mach number and subjected to an angle of attack changing exponentially with time is investigated. This type of wedge wing is commonly employed as a lifting surface in hypersonic vehicles. The time history of wall shear, heat transfer, displacement thickness, and viscous induced pressure are determined. Results show that for the same change in angle of attack, the flow attains the final steady state much faster when the change is exponential than when the change is made impulsively. In addition, the unsteady character of the flow is primarily confined to the initial stages of the change in the angle of attack.

  13. All-digital ring-wedge detector applied to fingerprint recognition.

    PubMed

    Berfanger, D M; George, N

    1999-01-10

    An all-digital ring-wedge detector system is presented that simulates the analog multielement array commonly used in coherent optoelectronic processors. The system is applicable with either hard-copy or digital imagery. Using neural-network software, we demonstrate high accuracy for the recognition of fingerprints, including both orientation and wide-scale size-independent sortings by using ring-only and wedge-only input neurons, respectively. Also, the system is applied on windowed subregions of fingerprint imagery, providing a feature set that summarizes localized information about spatial-frequency content and edge-angle correlations. Examples are presented in which this localized spatial-frequency information is used to produce local ridge-orientation maps and to detect regions of poor print quality. In summary, both direct-image data and spatial-transform data are found to be important.

  14. All-Digital Ring-Wedge Detector Applied to Fingerprint Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berfanger, David M.; George, Nicholas

    1999-01-01

    An all-digital ring-wedge detector system is presented that simulates the analog multielement array commonly used in coherent optoelectronic processors. The system is applicable with either hard-copy or digital imagery. Using neural-network software, we demonstrate high accuracy for the recognition of fingerprints, including both orientation and wide-scale size-independent sortings by using ring-only and wedge-only input neurons, respectively. Also, the system is applied on windowed subregions of fingerprint imagery, providing a feature set that summarizes localized information about spatial-frequency content and edge-angle correlations. Examples are presented in which this localized spatial-frequency information is used to produce local ridge-orientation maps and to detect regions of poor print quality. In summary, both direct-image data and spatial-transform data are found to be important.

  15. Open Source High Content Analysis Utilizing Automated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Sean C.; Alibhai, Dominic; West, Lucien; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Garcia, Edwin; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Thinon, Emmanuelle; da Paola, Vincenzo; Murray, Edward J.; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A. A.; Tate, Edward W.; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.

    2017-01-01

    We present an open source high content analysis instrument utilizing automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for assaying protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based readouts of fixed or live cells in multiwell plates. This provides a means to screen for cell signaling processes read out using intramolecular FRET biosensors or intermolecular FRET of protein interactions such as oligomerization or heterodimerization, which can be used to identify binding partners. We describe here the functionality of this automated multiwell plate FLIM instrumentation and present exemplar data from our studies of HIV Gag protein oligomerization and a time course of a FRET biosensor in live cells. A detailed description of the practical implementation is then provided with reference to a list of hardware components and a description of the open source data acquisition software written in µManager. The application of FLIMfit, an open source MATLAB-based client for the OMERO platform, to analyze arrays of multiwell plate FLIM data is also presented. The protocols for imaging fixed and live cells are outlined and a demonstration of an automated multiwell plate FLIM experiment using cells expressing fluorescent protein-based FRET constructs is presented. This is complemented by a walk-through of the data analysis for this specific FLIM FRET data set. PMID:28190060

  16. Numerical simulation of flow around a simplified high-speed train model using OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, I. A.; Ali, M. S. M.; Shaikh Salim, S. A. Z.

    2016-10-01

    Detailed understanding of flow physics on the flow over a high-speed train (HST) can be accomplished using the vast information obtained from numerical simulation. Accuracy of any simulation in solving and analyzing problems related to fluid flow is important since it measures the reliability of the results. This paper describes a numerical simulation setup for the flow around a simplified model of HST that utilized open source software, OpenFOAM. The simulation results including pressure coefficient, drag coefficient and flow visualization are presented and they agreed well with previously published data. This shows that OpenFOAM software is capable of simulating fluid flows around a simplified HST model. Additionally, the wall functions are implemented in order to minimize the overall number of grid especially near the wall region. This resulted in considerably smaller numbers of mesh resolution used in the current study compared to previous work, which leads to achievement of much reasonable time simulation and consequently reduces the total computational effort without affecting the final outcome.

  17. Open Source High Content Analysis Utilizing Automated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Görlitz, Frederik; Kelly, Douglas J; Warren, Sean C; Alibhai, Dominic; West, Lucien; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Garcia, Edwin; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Serwa, Remigiusz A; Thinon, Emmanuelle; da Paola, Vincenzo; Murray, Edward J; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A A; Tate, Edward W; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M W

    2017-01-18

    We present an open source high content analysis instrument utilizing automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for assaying protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based readouts of fixed or live cells in multiwell plates. This provides a means to screen for cell signaling processes read out using intramolecular FRET biosensors or intermolecular FRET of protein interactions such as oligomerization or heterodimerization, which can be used to identify binding partners. We describe here the functionality of this automated multiwell plate FLIM instrumentation and present exemplar data from our studies of HIV Gag protein oligomerization and a time course of a FRET biosensor in live cells. A detailed description of the practical implementation is then provided with reference to a list of hardware components and a description of the open source data acquisition software written in µManager. The application of FLIMfit, an open source MATLAB-based client for the OMERO platform, to analyze arrays of multiwell plate FLIM data is also presented. The protocols for imaging fixed and live cells are outlined and a demonstration of an automated multiwell plate FLIM experiment using cells expressing fluorescent protein-based FRET constructs is presented. This is complemented by a walk-through of the data analysis for this specific FLIM FRET data set.

  18. The evolving energy budget of accretionary wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeck, Jessica; Cooke, Michele; Maillot, Bertrand; Souloumiac, Pauline

    2017-04-01

    The energy budget of evolving accretionary systems reveals how deformational processes partition energy as faults slip, topography uplifts, and layer-parallel shortening produces distributed off-fault deformation. The energy budget provides a quantitative framework for evaluating the energetic contribution or consumption of diverse deformation mechanisms. We investigate energy partitioning in evolving accretionary prisms by synthesizing data from physical sand accretion experiments and numerical accretion simulations. We incorporate incremental strain fields and cumulative force measurements from two suites of experiments to design numerical simulations that represent accretionary wedges with stronger and weaker detachment faults. One suite of the physical experiments includes a basal glass bead layer and the other does not. Two physical experiments within each suite implement different boundary conditions (stable base versus moving base configuration). Synthesizing observations from the differing base configurations reduces the influence of sidewall friction because the force vector produced by sidewall friction points in opposite directions depending on whether the base is fixed or moving. With the numerical simulations, we calculate the energy budget at two stages of accretion: at the maximum force preceding the development of the first thrust pair, and at the minimum force following the development of the pair. To identify the appropriate combination of material and fault properties to apply in the simulations, we systematically vary the Young's modulus and the fault static and dynamic friction coefficients in numerical accretion simulations, and identify the set of parameters that minimizes the misfit between the normal force measured on the physical backwall and the numerically simulated force. Following this derivation of the appropriate material and fault properties, we calculate the components of the work budget in the numerical simulations and in the

  19. Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Tony; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen; Vu, Toni; Hicks, Deanna; O'Brien, Peter; Pritchard, Kathleen

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a prospective cohort of 120 women, radiation measurements were taken from four sites on the body at the time of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze patient and treatment factors associated with the amount of scattered radiation. Results: For standard 50 Gy breast radiotherapy, the minimal dose received by abdominal organs is on average 0.45 Gy, ranging from 0.06 to 1.55 Gy. The use of physical wedges as a compensation technique was the most significant factor associated with increased scattered dose (p < 0.001), resulting in approximately three times more exposure compared with breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dynamic wedge. Conclusions: The amount of radiation that is scattered to a patient's body is consistent with exposure reported to be associated with excess of leukemia. In accordance with the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle, we recommend using breast IMRT or virtual wedging for the radiotherapy of breast cancer receiving high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy.

  20. Correction of the field in the SSC dipoles using superconductor on the wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Talman, R.M.

    1987-09-01

    The SSC colliding beam storage ring requires superconducting magnets capable of producing a magnetic field of 6.6 T which has very high accuracy. For many of the multipoles, that multipole must be reduced (at a radius of 1 centimeter) to the order of 0.2 parts in 10,000. This field accuracy is dictated by the physics of storing very small high-current proton beams at energies ranging from 1 TeV to 20 TeV. Magnetization of the superconductor can cause sextupole field errors of up to 6 parts in 10,000 at an injection field of 0.33 T at a radius of 1 centimeter. Saturation of the magnet iron can induce sextupole field errors of 1 to 2 parts in 10,000 at the full field of 6.6 T. Manufacturing errors can induce other multipole components, both normal and skew. The SSC coil has three wedges separating the superconducting coil blocks on the inner layer of the coil. These wedges must be accurately located. If the wedges have superconductors attached, one can correct all of the magnetic field multipoles (both normal and skew) from N = 1 (dipole) to N = 6 (12 pole). This paper describes this method of correction as it pertains to the SSC dipole magnet. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Computational analysis of asymmetric water entry of wedge and ship section at constant velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Md. Mashiur; Ullah, Al Habib; Afroz, Laboni; Shabnam, Sharmin; Sarkar, M. A. Rashid

    2016-07-01

    Water impact problems receive much attention due to their short duration and large unsteady component of hydrodynamic loads. The effect of water entry has several important applications in various aspects of the naval field. Significant attention has been given to various water entry phenomena such as ship slamming, planning hulls, high-speed hydrodynamics of seaplanes, surface-piercing propellers and the interaction of high-speed liquid drops with structural elements. Asymmetric water entry may be caused by various natural phenomena such as weather conditions or strong winds. Since the determination of hydrodynamic impact load plays a vital role in designing safe and effcient vessels, an accurate and reliable prediction method is necessary to investigate asymmetric water entry problems. In this paper, water entry of a two-dimensional wedge and ship section at constant velocity in asymmetric condition will be analysed numerically and the effects of asymmetric impact on the velocity and pressure distribution will be discussed. The finite volume method is employed to solve the dynamic motion of the wedge in two-phase flow. During the water entry, the air and water interface is described implicitly by the volume of fluid (VOF) scheme. The numerical code and method was first validated for symmetric condition by one of the present author is applied for asymmetric wedge and ship section. The free surface, velocity and pressure distribution for asymmetric water entry are investigated and visualized with contour plots at different time steps.

  2. OpenCL: a viable solution for high-performance medical image reconstruction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegl, Christian; Hofmann, H. G.; Keck, B.; Prümmer, M.; Hornegger, J.

    2011-03-01

    Reconstruction of 3-D volumetric data from C-arm CT projections is a computationally demanding task. For interventional image reconstruction, hardware optimization is mandatory. Manufacturers of medical equipment use a variety of high-performance computing (HPC) platforms, like FPGAs, graphics cards, or multi-core CPUs. A problem of this diversity is that many different frameworks and (vendor-specific) programming languages are used. Furthermore, it is costly to switch the platform, since the code has to be re-written, verified, and optimized. OpenCL, a relatively new industry standard for HPC, promises to enable portable code. Its key idea is to abstract hardware in a way that allows an efficient mapping onto real CPUs, GPUs, and other hardware. The code is compiled for the actual target by the device driver. In this work we investigated the suitability of OpenCL as a tool to write portable code that runs efficiently across different hardware. The problems chosen are back- and forward-projection, the most time-consuming parts of (iterative) reconstruction. We present results on three platforms, a multi-core CPU system and two GPUs, and compare them against manually optimized native implementations. We found that OpenCL allows to share a common framework in one language across platforms. However, considering differences in the underlying architecture, a hardware-oblivious implementation cannot be expected to deliver maximal performance. By optimizing the OpenCL code for the specific hardware we reached over 90% of native performance for both problems, back- and forward-projection, on all platforms.

  3. Zwitterionic ring-opening polymerization for the synthesis of high molecular weight cyclic polymers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Hayley A; Waymouth, Robert M

    2013-11-19

    Cyclic polymers are an intriguing class of macromolecules. Because of the constraints of the cyclic topology and the absence of chain ends, the properties of these molecules differ from those of linear polymers in ways that remain poorly understood. Cyclic polymers present formidable synthetic challenges because the entropic penalty of coupling the chain ends grows exponentially with increasing molecular weight. In this Account, we describe recent progress in the application of zwitterionic ring-opening polymerization (ZROP) as a strategy for the synthesis of high molecular weight, cyclic polymers. Zwitterionic ring-opening polymerization involves the addition of neutral organic nucleophiles to strained heterocyclic monomers; under appropriate conditions, cyclization of the resultant macrozwitterions generates cyclic macromolecules. We discuss the mechanistic and kinetic features of these zwitterionic ring-opening reactions and the conditions that influence the efficiency of the initiation, propagation, and cyclization to generate high molecular weight cyclic polymers. N-Heterocyclic carbenes (NHC) are potent nucleophiles and relatively poor leaving groups, two features that are important for the generation of high molecular weight polymers. Investigations of the nature of the monomer and nucleophile have helped researchers understand the factors that govern the reactivity of these systems and their impact on the molecular weight and molecular weight distributions of the resulting cyclic polymers. We focus primarily on ZROP mediated by N-heterocyclic carbene nucleophiles but also discuss zwitterionic polymerizations with amidine, pyridine, and imidazole nucleophiles. The ZROP of N-carboxyanhydrides with N-hetereocyclic carbenes generates a family of functionalized cyclic polypeptoids. We can synthesize gradient lactone copolymers by exploiting differences in relative reactivity present in ZROP that differ from those of traditional metal-mediated polymerizations

  4. [Evaluation of the bite block wedged between the maxillary and mandibular molars].

    PubMed

    Katoh, H; Nishiyama, J; Takiguchi, M; Yamamoto, M; Fujita, K; Yamasaki, Y

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare our original bite block (T-X Block) wedged between the maxillary and mandibular molars, with the standard gum bite block, in 200 patients whose tracheas were intubated. During emergence from isoflurane anesthesia, no trouble occurred in T-X Block group (n = 100). On the other hand, lip damage and ejection of the bite block were found in 11 and 10 cases, respectively, in gum bite block group (n = 100). As another study, an opening between the maxillary and mandibular incisor edges was measured with T-X Block placed in twenty patients under general anesthesia. The inter-incisal distances in one way of using it as a smaller wedge and in the other way as a bigger one were 21.6 +/- 2.4 and 25.2 +/- 2.6 mm, respectively. Those values were significantly larger than thickness of the gum bite block. T-X Block is very useful because its use causes no complications and makes it easier to insert a naso-gastric tube as well as to clean the oral cavity with suction by giving a larger opening of the mouth.

  5. Open Dislocation of the High Ankle Joint After Fibular Graft Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Anđelković, Slađana Z; Vučković, Čedo Đ; Palibrk, Tomislav D; Milutinović, Suzana M; Bumbaširević, Marko Ž

    2015-01-01

    The free microvascular fibula and soft tissue transfer has become a widely used method for reconstruction of different regions. Donor site morbidity for free fibula microvascular flaps has generally been reported to be low, or at least acceptable. We describe the case of a patient who underwent vascularized free fibula graft harvest for mandibular reconstruction. After 21 months, he had sustained an open dislocation of the left high ankle joint during recreational sports activity. We did not found such case in the published data. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Facilitating the openEHR approach - organizational structures for defining high-quality archetypes.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Christian Dominik; Garde, Sebastian; Knaup, Petra

    2008-01-01

    Using openEHR archetypes to establish an electronic patient record promises rapid development and system interoperability by using or adopting existing archetypes. However, internationally accepted, high quality archetypes which enable a comprehensive semantic interoperability require adequate development and maintenance processes. Therefore, structures have to be created involving different health professions. In the following we present a model which facilitates and governs distributed but cooperative development and adoption of archetypes by different professionals including peer reviews. Our model consists of a hierarchical structure of professional committees and descriptions of the archetype development process considering these different committees.

  7. Glass Microbeads in Analog Models of Thrust Wedges.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Taynara; Gomes, Caroline J S

    2017-01-01

    Glass microbeads are frequently used in analog physical modeling to simulate weak detachment zones but have been neglected in models of thrust wedges. Microbeads differ from quartz sand in grain shape and in low angle of internal friction. In this study, we compared the structural characteristics of microbeads and sand wedges. To obtain a better picture of their mechanical behavior, we determined the physical and frictional properties of microbeads using polarizing and scanning electron microscopy and ring-shear tests, respectively. We built shortening experiments with different basal frictions and measured the thickness, slope and length of the wedges and also the fault spacings. All the microbeads experiments revealed wedge geometries that were consistent with previous studies that have been performed with sand. However, the deformation features in the microbeads shortened over low to intermediate basal frictions were slightly different. Microbeads produced different fault geometries than sand as well as a different grain flow. In addition, they produced slip on minor faults, which was associated with distributed deformation and gave the microbeads wedges the appearance of disharmonic folds. We concluded that the glass microbeads may be used to simulate relatively competent rocks, like carbonates, which may be characterized by small-scale deformation features.

  8. Casimir effect for a semitransparent wedge and an annular piston

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, Kimball A.; Wagner, Jef; Kirsten, Klaus

    2009-12-15

    We consider the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field in a geometry of an infinite wedge closed by a Dirichlet circular cylinder, where the wedge is formed by {delta}-function potentials, so-called semitransparent boundaries. A finite expression for the Casimir energy corresponding to the arc and the presence of both semitransparent potentials is obtained, from which the torque on the sidewalls can be derived. The most interesting part of the calculation is the nontrivial nature of the angular mode functions. Numerical results are obtained which are closely analogous to those recently found for a magnetodielectric wedge, with the same speed of light on both sides of the wedge boundaries. Alternative methods are developed for annular regions with radial semitransparent potentials, based on reduced Green's functions for the angular dependence, which allows calculations using the multiple-scattering formalism. Numerical results corresponding to the torque on the radial plates are likewise computed, which generalize those for the wedge geometry. Generally useful formulas for calculating Casimir energies in separable geometries are derived.

  9. Empirical evidence for two nightside current wedges during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from a comprehensive statistical study of the ionospheric current system and its coupling to the magnetosphere during classical bulge type substorms. We identified 116 substorms and determined the global ionospheric current system before and during the substorm using the SuperMAG initiative and global auroral images obtained by the Polar VIS Earth camera. The westward electrojet (WEJ) display a distinct latitudinal shift between the pre- and post-midnight region and we find evidence that the two WEJ regions are disconnected. This, and other observational facts, led us to propose a new 3D current system configuration that consists of 2 wedge type systems: a current wedge in the pre-midnight region (substorm current wedge), and another current wedge system in the post-midnight region (oval current wedge). There is some local time overlap between the two systems. The former maps to the region inside the near Earth neutral line and is associated with structured BPS type electron precipitation. The latter maps to the inner magnetosphere and is associated with diffuse electron precipitation. We present results of the statistical study, show typical events, results from Biot-Savart simulations, and discuss the implications for our understanding of the 3D current system associated with substorms.

  10. Implementation of enhanced dynamic wedge in the focus rtp system.

    PubMed

    Miften, M; Wiesmeyer, M; Beavis, A; Takahashi, K; Broad, S

    2000-01-01

    The FOCUS RTP system implementation of Varian's enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) is presented. Calculations of both dose distributions and wedge factors (WFs) are based on segmented treatment tables (STTs). Calculating dose requires a "transmission matrix" derived from an STT to model the modified fluence from the source. The dose calculation is then performed using either the Clarkson or convolution/superposition algorithms. An initial "primary dose/monitor unit (MU) fraction" WF estimate at the weight point of symmetric and asymmetric fields is calculated from the STT as the ratio of MU delivered on the axis of the weight point divided by total MU delivered for the treatment field. In our approach, we go beyond this initial estimate with a "scatter dose" correction. This requires measured 60 degrees WFs for 5 fields. Scatter corrections derived from measured WFs are interpolated for other wedge angles and field sizes in much the same way as arbitrary wedge angle STTs are derived from a "golden STT" using the "ratio of tangents" formalism. Dose comparisons with measured distributions show good agreement to within 3% or 3 mm for 6-MV beams and all EDW angles. Agreement with measurements to within 1% is obtained for WFs in all symmetric and asymmetric fields for 6- and 10-MV beams. For large wedge angles and field sizes, this represents a significant improvement over the 3% to 4% errors often observed using the MU fraction model alone.

  11. High-Throughput Metagenomic Technologies for Complex Microbial Community Analysis: Open and Closed Formats

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Deng, Ye; Tringe, Susannah G.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Understanding the structure, functions, activities and dynamics of microbial communities in natural environments is one of the grand challenges of 21st century science. To address this challenge, over the past decade, numerous technologies have been developed for interrogating microbial communities, of which some are amenable to exploratory work (e.g., high-throughput sequencing and phenotypic screening) and others depend on reference genes or genomes (e.g., phylogenetic and functional gene arrays). Here, we provide a critical review and synthesis of the most commonly applied “open-format” and “closed-format” detection technologies. We discuss their characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages within the context of environmental applications and focus on analysis of complex microbial systems, such as those in soils, in which diversity is high and reference genomes are few. In addition, we discuss crucial issues and considerations associated with applying complementary high-throughput molecular technologies to address important ecological questions. PMID:25626903

  12. High-throughput metagenomic technologies for complex microbial community analysis. Open and closed formats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Deng, Ye; Tringe, Susannah G.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-27

    Understanding the structure, functions, activities and dynamics of microbial communities in natural environments is on