Science.gov

Sample records for open-loop control

  1. Open-loop control of class-2 tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns open-loop control laws for reconfiguration of tensegrity towers. By postulating the control strategy as an equilibrium tracking control, very little control energy is required. Several different reconfiguration scenarios are possible for different string connectivity schemes. This includes unit radius control, twist angle control and truncation parameter control. All these control laws allow a nonuniform distribution of the control parameters among units. By defining a wave--like reference signal and injecting it in the open--loop control law, we demonstrate the concept of self--propelled tensegrity structure that are capable of locomotion.

  2. A sliding mode control proposal for open-loop unstable processes.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rubén; Camacho, Oscar; González, Luis

    2004-04-01

    This papers presents a sliding mode controller based on a first-order-plus-dead-time model of the process for controlling open-loop unstable systems. The proposed controller has a simple and fixed structure with a set of tuning equations as a function of the desired performance. Both linear and nonlinear models were used to study the controller performance by computer simulations.

  3. Optimal open-loop and feedback control using single gimbal control moment gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelscher, Brian R.; Vadali, Srinvas R.

    1993-01-01

    Methods for control of spacecraft maneuvers through the use of single gimbal control moment gyroscopes are developed. The development employs an integrated model of the spacecraft dynamics with the control moment gyroscope dynamics. Smooth and continuous open-loop control profiles are obtained which minimize a weighted function of maneuver time, magnitude of control effort, and proximity to singular gimbal configurations. Closed-loop state feedback control laws are derived by invoking Lyapunov stability theory. The schemes are presented for implementing the commanded state feedback: gimbal rate control and gimbal acceleration control. The appropriate handling of singular gimbal configurations is also discussed.

  4. Open-loop quantum control as a resource for secure communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, Davide

    2016-05-01

    Properties of unitary time evolution of quantum systems can be applied to define quantum cryptographic protocols. Dynamics of a qubit can be exploited as a data encryption/decryption procedure by means of timed measurements, implementation of an open-loop control scheme over a qubit increases robustness of a protocol employing this principle.

  5. A sliding mode control proposal for open-loop unstable processes.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rubén; Camacho, Oscar; González, Luis

    2004-04-01

    This papers presents a sliding mode controller based on a first-order-plus-dead-time model of the process for controlling open-loop unstable systems. The proposed controller has a simple and fixed structure with a set of tuning equations as a function of the desired performance. Both linear and nonlinear models were used to study the controller performance by computer simulations. PMID:15098584

  6. Multiple Model-Informed Open-Loop Control of Uncertain Intracellular Signaling Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Perley, Jeffrey P.; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L.; Buzzard, Gregery T.; Rundell, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  7. Multiple model-informed open-loop control of uncertain intracellular signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Perley, Jeffrey P; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L; Buzzard, Gregery T; Rundell, Ann E

    2014-04-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  8. Learning tensegrity locomotion using open-loop control signals and coevolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Iscen, Atil; Caluwaerts, Ken; Bruce, Jonathan; Agogino, Adrian; SunSpiral, Vytas; Tumer, Kagan

    2015-01-01

    Soft robots offer many advantages over traditional rigid robots. However, soft robots can be difficult to control with standard control methods. Fortunately, evolutionary algorithms can offer an elegant solution to this problem. Instead of creating controls to handle the intricate dynamics of these robots, we can simply evolve the controls using a simulation to provide an evaluation function. In this article, we show how such a control paradigm can be applied to an emerging field within soft robotics: robots based on tensegrity structures. We take the model of the Spherical Underactuated Planetary Exploration Robot ball (SUPERball), an icosahedron tensegrity robot under production at NASA Ames Research Center, develop a rolling locomotion algorithm, and study the learned behavior using an accurate model of the SUPERball simulated in the NASA Tensegrity Robotics Toolkit. We first present the historical-average fitness-shaping algorithm for coevolutionary algorithms to speed up learning while favoring robustness over optimality. Second, we use a distributed control approach by coevolving open-loop control signals for each controller. Being simple and distributed, open-loop controllers can be readily implemented on SUPERball hardware without the need for sensor information or precise coordination. We analyze signals of different complexities and frequencies. Among the learned policies, we take one of the best and use it to analyze different aspects of the rolling gait, such as lengths, tensions, and energy consumption. We also discuss the correlation between the signals controlling different parts of the tensegrity robot. PMID:25951199

  9. On Sequence Learning Models: Open-loop Control Not Strictly Guided by Hick’s Law

    PubMed Central

    Pavão, Rodrigo; Savietto, Joice P.; Sato, João R.; Xavier, Gilberto F.; Helene, André F.

    2016-01-01

    According to the Hick’s law, reaction times increase linearly with the uncertainty of target stimuli. We tested the generality of this law by measuring reaction times in a human sequence learning protocol involving serial target locations which differed in transition probability and global entropy. Our results showed that sigmoid functions better describe the relationship between reaction times and uncertainty when compared to linear functions. Sequence predictability was estimated by distinct statistical predictors: conditional probability, conditional entropy, joint probability and joint entropy measures. Conditional predictors relate to closed-loop control models describing that performance is guided by on-line access to past sequence structure to predict next location. Differently, joint predictors relate to open-loop control models assuming global access of sequence structure, requiring no constant monitoring. We tested which of these predictors better describe performance on the sequence learning protocol. Results suggest that joint predictors are more accurate than conditional predictors to track performance. In conclusion, sequence learning is better described as an open-loop process which is not precisely predicted by Hick’s law. PMID:26975409

  10. Parallelization of the Volterra algorithm for linear optimal open loop control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.; Utku, S.; Salama, M.

    1989-07-01

    If and when the time variation of optimal controls of a linear system subject to known forces is required, they can be obtained by the computationally advantageous open loop Volterra formulation (as opposed to the costlier Riccati formulation). For the computation, the Volterra equation is discretized in the time domain via such schemes as trapezoidal integration or SIMPSON's rule and the resulting linear system is solved to obtain the control vector values at discrete time points within the control time T. In the case of very large order systems (degrees of freedom ˜ 5000) a parallel technique is absolutely neccessary, and this paper enunciates an efficient parallel stratagem with efficiencies in the range of 80% and 100%. The algorithm uses ‘ s + 1’ processors, ‘ s’ being the number of intervals within the control time T, and typically each processor characterizes one time point.

  11. Influences of Frailty Syndrome on Open-loop and Closed-loop Postural Control Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Mohler, Jane; Wendel, Chris; Najafi, Bijan

    2014-01-01

    Background As the population of older adults quickly increases, the incidence of frailty syndrome, a reduction in physiological reserve across multiple physiological systems, likewise increases. To date, impaired balance has been associated with frailty; however, the underlying frailty-related postural balance mechanisms remain unclear. Objective The aim of the current study was to use open-loop (postural muscles) and closed-loop (postural muscles plus sensory feedback) (OLCL) mechanisms to explore differences in postural balance mechanisms between non-frail (n = 44), pre-frail (n = 59), and frail individuals (n = 19). Methods One-hundred and twenty-two older adults (age ≥ 65 years) without major mobility disorders were recruited, and frailty was measured using Fried's criteria. Each participant performed two 15-second trials of Romberg balance assessment, once with eyes-open, and once with eyes-closed. Body-worn sensors were used to estimate center-of-gravity (COG) plots. Body sway (traditional stabilogram analysis) and OLCL (stabilogram diffusion analysis) parameters were derived using COG plots and compared between groups using ANOVA. Frailty and pre-frailty were estimated using a multiple variable logistic regression while controlling for age, BMI, body sway, and OLCL parameters. Results Between-group differences in parameters of interest were more pronounced during eyes-closed condition. During eyes-closed, open-loop duration was approximately 33% and 22% shorter in frail and pre-frail, when compared to non-frail controls (mean = 1.9±1.1 sec, p = 0.01). The average rate of sway during open-loop was 164% and 66% higher, respectively in frail and pre-frail when compared to non-frail subjects (0.03±0.02 cm2/sec, p < 0.001). Results also suggest that OLCL parameters can predict frail and pre-frail categories when compared to non-frail controls. Using this method, frailty was identified with a sensitivity and specificity of 97% and 85% (as compared to non

  12. Open-Loop HIRF Experiments Performed on a Fault Tolerant Flight Control Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Daniel M.

    1997-01-01

    During the third quarter of 1996, the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory was established at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to study the effects of High Intensity Radiated Fields on complex avionic systems and control system components. This new facility provided a link and expanded upon the existing capabilities of the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory at LaRC that were constructed and certified during 1995-96. The scope of the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory is to place highly integrated avionics instrumentation into a high intensity radiated field environment, interface the avionics to a real-time flight simulation that incorporates aircraft dynamics, engines, sensors, actuators and atmospheric turbulence, and collect, analyze, and model aircraft performance. This paper describes the layout and functionality of the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory, and the open-loop calibration experiments that led up to the commencement of closed-loop real-time flight experiments.

  13. Experimental evaluation of open-loop UpLink Power Control using ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dissanayake, Asoka

    1995-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the implementation of open-loop up-link power control using a beacon signal in the down-link frequency band as the control parameter. A power control system was developed and tested using the ACTS satellite. ACTS carries beacon signals in both up- and down-link bands with which the relationship between the up- and down-link fading can be established. A power controlled carrier was transmitted to the ACTS satellite from a NASA operated ground station and the transponded signal was received at COMSAT Laboratories using a terminal that was routinely used to monitor the two ACTS beacon signals. The experiment ran for a period of approximately six months and the collected data were used to evaluate the performance of the power control system. A brief review of propagation factors involved in estimating the up-link fade using a beacon signal in the down-link band are presented. The power controller design and the experiment configuration are discussed. Results of the experiment are discussed.

  14. Electromagnetic design of magneto-rheological mount and its open-loop semi-active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Li, Yinong; Deng, Zhaoxue

    2009-07-01

    Magneto-Rheological mount is a new type of semi-active and intelligent vibration isolator. It can adjust damping to reduce unwanted vibration from engine by supplying required input currents. The performance of Magneto-Rheological (MR) mount is much better than the conventional rubber mount or hydraulic mount due to its controllability and flexibility. In this paper, a novel MR engine mount with the flow mode-type for a sedan is devised, manufactured and characterized. Some important parameters are optimized to meet the requirements of MR mount by using Electromagnetic design methodology.. Electromagnetic finite element analysis verifies the effectiveness of the magnetic circuit design. The dynamic performances of MR engine mount in frequency domain are investigated experimentally. The results show that the dynamic stiffness and phase lag of MR engine mount can change continuously. They are frequency-dependent. In additional, a open-loop control strategy based on engine rotational speed measurement is proposed and the control system is performed in hardware and software. The experimental and theoretical results identified the effectiveness of such a semi-active vibration isolation system.

  15. Turbidity management during flushing-flows: A model for open-loop control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovet, Ophelie; Litrico, Xavier; Belaud, Gilles

    2012-04-01

    Fixed algae developments induce strong constraints for the management of open-channel networks. They cause clogging issues on hydraulic devices and can sometimes lead to water quality alteration. An original strategy to limit the algal biomass is to carry out regular flushes. A flush is performed by increasing the hydraulic shear conditions using the hydraulic structures of the canal. Consequently to the shear stress increase, a part of the fixed algae is detached, then re-suspended into the water column, and finally transported into the canal network. This leads to a peak of turbidity that needs to be controlled. The present paper proposes a quasi-linear model of the turbidity response to a discharge increase, that can be used for automatic controller design. The model parameters are identified on a real network. The calibration is based on continuous monitoring of water turbidity. Flushes are simulated on the whole branch and on an intermediate reach in order to test the ability of the model to simulate the propagation of a turbidity peak. Then, the model is used to develop an open-loop controller of turbidity for flush design. The efficiency of a flush will depend on its amplitude and duration. The design objective consists in maximizing the algae detachment without exceeding a maximal turbidity level, and using as little water as possible. The designed flush is finally tested on a nonlinear model.

  16. Open-loop control of combustion instabilities in a model gas turbine combustor*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Christopher; Menon, Suresh

    2003-05-01

    The effect of premixer-induced inlet swirl on the stability of a model swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed gas turbine combustor has been numerically investigated using the large-eddy simulation methodology. The unsteady vortex-flame and acoustic-flame interactions are captured in this study using a thin-flame model that includes an ability to account for the variation in inlet equivalence ratio. Comparisons are made, based on fluid particle trajectories, between the structure of the recirculation regions. It is shown that only for high swirl does a region of flow recirculation, often called vortex breakdown(VB), occur in the centreline region of the dump combustor. This VB region helps to stabilize the flame and results in significant attenuation of the fluctuating pressure amplitudes, p'. The reduced p' amplitudes are accompanied by reduced longitudinal flame-front oscillations and reduced coherence in the shed vortices. A methodology for open-loop control based on the modulation of incoming fuel-air equivalence ratio is investigated. It is demonstrated that combustor pressure fluctuations respond much more rapidly to these changes compared to earlier studies of inlet swirl number modulation. The impact of these changes on flame stability and overall dynamics is analysed and discussed. Finally, the impact of imperfect mixedness in the incoming fuel-air mixture is also analysed and it is shown that the pressure oscillation amplitude is actually reduced under these conditions.

  17. Open-loop control of noise amplification in a separated boundary layer flow

    SciTech Connect

    Boujo, E. Gallaire, F.; Ehrenstein, U.

    2013-12-15

    Linear optimal gains are computed for the subcritical two-dimensional separated boundary-layer flow past a bump. Very large optimal gain values are found, making it possible for small-amplitude noise to be strongly amplified and to destabilize the flow. The optimal forcing is located close to the summit of the bump, while the optimal response is the largest in the shear layer. The largest amplification occurs at frequencies corresponding to eigenvalues which first become unstable at higher Reynolds number. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations show that a low level of noise is indeed sufficient to trigger random flow unsteadiness, characterized here by large-scale vortex shedding. Next, a variational technique is used to compute efficiently the sensitivity of optimal gains to steady control (through source of momentum in the flow, or blowing/suction at the wall). A systematic analysis at several frequencies identifies the bump summit as the most sensitive region for control with wall actuation. Based on these results, a simple open-loop control strategy is designed, with steady wall suction at the bump summit. Linear calculations on controlled base flows confirm that optimal gains can be drastically reduced at all frequencies. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations also show that this control allows the flow to withstand a higher level of stochastic noise without becoming nonlinearly unstable, thereby postponing bypass transition. In the supercritical regime, sensitivity analysis of eigenvalues supports the choice of this control design. Full restabilization of the flow is obtained, as evidenced by direct numerical simulations and linear stability analysis.

  18. Neural approximation of open-loop feedback rate control in satellite networks.

    PubMed

    Baglietto, Marco; Davoli, Franco; Marchese, Mario; Mongelli, Maurizio

    2005-09-01

    A resource allocation problem for a satellite network is considered, where variations of fading conditions are added to those of traffic load. Since the capacity of the system is finite and divided in finite discrete portions, the resource allocation problem reveals to be a discrete stochastic programming one, which is typically NP-Hard. In practice, a good approximation of the optimal solution could be obtained through the adoption of a closed-form expression of the performance measure in steady-state conditions. Once we have summarized the drawbacks of such optimization strategy, we address two novel optimization approaches. The first one derives from Gokbayrak and Cassandras and is based on the minimization over the discrete constraint set using an estimate of the gradient, obtained through a "relaxed continuous extension" of the performance measure. The computation of the gradient estimation is based on infinitesimal perturbation analysis (IPA). Neither closed forms of the performance measures, nor additional feedbacks concerning the state of the system and very mild assumptions about the stochastic environment are requested. The second one is the main contribution of the present work, and is based on an open-loop feedback control (OLFC) strategy, aimed at providing optimal reallocation strategies as functions of the state of the network. The optimization approach leads us to a functional optimization problem, and we investigate the adoption of a neural network-based technique, in order to approximate its solution. As is shown in the simulation results, we obtain near-optimal reallocation strategies with a small real time computational effort and avoid the suboptimal transient periods introduced by the IPA gradient descent algorithm. PMID:16252826

  19. Analysis of open loop higher harmonic control at high airspeeds on a modern four-bladed articulated rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Leyland, Jane

    1991-01-01

    The effects of open loop higher harmonic control (HHC) on rotor hub loads, performance, and push rod loads of a Sikorsky S-76 helicopter rotor at high airspeeds (up to 200 knots) and moderate lift (10,000 lbs) were studied analytically. The analysis was performed as part of a wind tunnel pre-test prediction and preparation procedure, as well as to provide analytical results for post-test correlation efforts. The test associated with this study is to be concluded in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) at the NASA Ames Research Center. The results from this analytical study show that benefits from HHC can be achieved at high airspeeds. These results clear the way for conducting (with the requirement of safe pushrod loads) an open loop HHC test a high airspeeds in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel using an S-76 rotor as the test article.

  20. Adaptive optics in nonlinear microscopy implemented with open-loop control and EMCCD-based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei

    Nonlinear microscopy, with its unique advantages over conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, has been widely adopted to study biological processes at the cellular level. However, like all other high-resolution optical imaging techniques, nonlinear microscopy suffers from focal degradation due to optical aberrations in the sample as a result of refractive index mismatch. Optical aberrations distort the wavefront of the excitation beam, causing the focal spot to be larger than the diffraction limit. Since the fluorescence efficiency scales nonlinearly with the profile of the focusing excitation beam, aberrations further degrade the image brightness in addition to resolution. In this dissertation I describe the design, characterization and experimentation of an adaptive optics (AO) nonlinear laser scanning microscope implemented with open-loop control and an EMCCD-based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (EMCCD SHWFS) for aberration compensation. Adaptive optics (AO), originally designed for ground-based astronomical observatories to correct for the aberrations from atmospheric turbulence while imaging distant stars and planets, has benefited many biomedical imaging platforms. We integrated a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) into our nonlinear laser scanning microscope. With an accurate open-loop control mechanism, which predicts the control voltages and generates a prescribed surface shape on the MEMS DM, known aberrations in the system can be compensated for with this computationally simple and inherently fast method. The use of a nonlinear guide star imbedded within the sample can reflect the sample aberration. However, the low level of nonlinear fluorescence signal is usually detected by photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and is below the sensitivity of a conventional charge-coupled device (CCD) based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. This dissertation also describes the design of an EMCCD SHWFS to measure the wavefront distortion from the

  1. Open loop pneumatic control of a Lysholm engine or turbine exhaust pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Plonski, B.A.

    1981-07-17

    A Lysholm engine, or helical screw expander, is currently being evaluated at the University of California, Berkeley for staging with a conventional turbine in geothermal energy conversion. A pneumatic closed loop, proportional-integral control system was implemented to control the Lysholm engine's exhaust pressure for performance testing of the engine at constant inlet/outlet pressure ratios. The control system will also be used to control the exhaust pressure of the conventional turbine during future testing of the staged Lysholm-turbine system. Analytical modeling of the control system was performed and successful tuning was achieved by applying Ziegler-Nichol's tuning method. Stable control and quick response, of approximately 1 minute, was demonstrated for load and set point changes in desired exhaust pressures.

  2. Interleaved DC-DC Converter with Discrete Duty Cycle and Open Loop Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroics, K.; Sokolovs, A.

    2016-08-01

    The authors present the control principle of the multiphase interleaved DC-DC converter that can be used to vastly reduce output current ripple of the converter. The control algorithm can be easily implemented by using microcontroller without current loop in each phase. The converter works in discontinuous conduction mode (DCM) but close to boundary conduction mode (BCM). The DC-DC converter with such a control algorithm is useful in applications that do not require precise current adjustment. The prototype of the converter has been built. The experimental results of the current ripple are presented in the paper.

  3. Coupled rotor-flexible fuselage vibration reduction using open loop higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computer facility. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselae vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control is required.

  4. Neuro-inspired spike-based motion: from dynamic vision sensor to robot motor open-loop control through spike-VITE.

    PubMed

    Perez-Peña, Fernando; Morgado-Estevez, Arturo; Linares-Barranco, Alejandro; Jimenez-Fernandez, Angel; Gomez-Rodriguez, Francisco; Jimenez-Moreno, Gabriel; Lopez-Coronado, Juan

    2013-11-20

    In this paper we present a complete spike-based architecture: from a Dynamic Vision Sensor (retina) to a stereo head robotic platform. The aim of this research is to reproduce intended movements performed by humans taking into account as many features as possible from the biological point of view. This paper fills the gap between current spike silicon sensors and robotic actuators by applying a spike processing strategy to the data flows in real time. The architecture is divided into layers: the retina, visual information processing, the trajectory generator layer which uses a neuroinspired algorithm (SVITE) that can be replicated into as many times as DoF the robot has; and finally the actuation layer to supply the spikes to the robot (using PFM). All the layers do their tasks in a spike-processing mode, and they communicate each other through the neuro-inspired AER protocol. The open-loop controller is implemented on FPGA using AER interfaces developed by RTC Lab. Experimental results reveal the viability of this spike-based controller. Two main advantages are: low hardware resources (2% of a Xilinx Spartan 6) and power requirements (3.4 W) to control a robot with a high number of DoF (up to 100 for a Xilinx Spartan 6). It also evidences the suitable use of AER as a communication protocol between processing and actuation.

  5. Neuro-inspired spike-based motion: from dynamic vision sensor to robot motor open-loop control through spike-VITE.

    PubMed

    Perez-Peña, Fernando; Morgado-Estevez, Arturo; Linares-Barranco, Alejandro; Jimenez-Fernandez, Angel; Gomez-Rodriguez, Francisco; Jimenez-Moreno, Gabriel; Lopez-Coronado, Juan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a complete spike-based architecture: from a Dynamic Vision Sensor (retina) to a stereo head robotic platform. The aim of this research is to reproduce intended movements performed by humans taking into account as many features as possible from the biological point of view. This paper fills the gap between current spike silicon sensors and robotic actuators by applying a spike processing strategy to the data flows in real time. The architecture is divided into layers: the retina, visual information processing, the trajectory generator layer which uses a neuroinspired algorithm (SVITE) that can be replicated into as many times as DoF the robot has; and finally the actuation layer to supply the spikes to the robot (using PFM). All the layers do their tasks in a spike-processing mode, and they communicate each other through the neuro-inspired AER protocol. The open-loop controller is implemented on FPGA using AER interfaces developed by RTC Lab. Experimental results reveal the viability of this spike-based controller. Two main advantages are: low hardware resources (2% of a Xilinx Spartan 6) and power requirements (3.4 W) to control a robot with a high number of DoF (up to 100 for a Xilinx Spartan 6). It also evidences the suitable use of AER as a communication protocol between processing and actuation. PMID:24264330

  6. Neuro-Inspired Spike-Based Motion: From Dynamic Vision Sensor to Robot Motor Open-Loop Control through Spike-VITE

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Peña, Fernando; Morgado-Estevez, Arturo; Linares-Barranco, Alejandro; Jimenez-Fernandez, Angel; Gomez-Rodriguez, Francisco; Jimenez-Moreno, Gabriel; Lopez-Coronado, Juan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a complete spike-based architecture: from a Dynamic Vision Sensor (retina) to a stereo head robotic platform. The aim of this research is to reproduce intended movements performed by humans taking into account as many features as possible from the biological point of view. This paper fills the gap between current spike silicon sensors and robotic actuators by applying a spike processing strategy to the data flows in real time. The architecture is divided into layers: the retina, visual information processing, the trajectory generator layer which uses a neuroinspired algorithm (SVITE) that can be replicated into as many times as DoF the robot has; and finally the actuation layer to supply the spikes to the robot (using PFM). All the layers do their tasks in a spike-processing mode, and they communicate each other through the neuro-inspired AER protocol. The open-loop controller is implemented on FPGA using AER interfaces developed by RTC Lab. Experimental results reveal the viability of this spike-based controller. Two main advantages are: low hardware resources (2% of a Xilinx Spartan 6) and power requirements (3.4 W) to control a robot with a high number of DoF (up to 100 for a Xilinx Spartan 6). It also evidences the suitable use of AER as a communication protocol between processing and actuation. PMID:24264330

  7. Open-Loop Acquisition Of Frequency In BPSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Biren N.; Holmes, Jack K.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed open-loop analog/digital signal-processing system would be Costas-loop error detector functioning in closed-loop manner overall. Detector estimates difference between frequency of input signal and internal reference oscillator. Estimate used to close frequency-control loop. Precise symbol timing not necessary. Performance better than systems that effect open-loop acquisition using integrators instead of low-pass filters in arms of Costas loops and in which performance varies with symbol timing.

  8. Open Loop Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Tamera L.

    1995-01-01

    My project is designing a flight control program utilizing 'C' language. It consists of paths made up of fixed radius arcs and straight lines. Arcs will be defined by a center, a radius and turn angle. Straight lines will be defined by an end way point and an inbound course. Way points will be pre-defined such that the location of the end of each leg accurately matches the beginning of the next leg. The simulation paths will closely match paths normally flown by the Transport System Research Vehicle (TSRV), but will necessarily be defined identically in terms of type and number of way points.

  9. Open-loop, closed-loop and compensatory control: performance improvement under pressure in a rhythmic task

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kunlin; Sternad, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    According to explicit monitoring theories, the phenomenon of choking under pressure is due to actors focusing their attention on the execution of the skill. This step-by-step perceptually guided control may then interfere with automatic execution. In order to examine the changes in control at the sensorimotor level, we examined the rhythmic task of ball bouncing which affords detailed quantification of indicators of control based on previous research. The hypothesis was that under psychological pressure perceptually guided control should lead to decreased performance due to over-emphasis on closed-loop control and decreased compensatory control. In two experiments of different difficulty psychological stress was induced via setting up a fake competition. Results showed that, contrary to the hypothesis, performance accuracy and consistency improved together with an increase in compensatory control. Indicators for open- and closed-loop processes did not change. Only under more challenging conditions in Experiment 2, enhanced performance under pressure was accompanied by more active, closed-loop and less passive control. The results are discussed in light of task demands and the continuous rhythmic nature of the task: in more challenging tasks, control appears to be more prone to disturbance due to psychological stress. The different control demands in continuous rhythmic tasks may be less prone to interference due to psychological stress than in discrete tasks. PMID:19943039

  10. Compensation of decoherence from telegraph noise by means of an open-loop quantum-control technique

    SciTech Connect

    Gutmann, Henryk; Wilhelm, Frank K.; Kaminsky, William M.; Lloyd, Seth

    2005-02-01

    With the growing efforts in isolating solid-state qubits from external decoherence sources, the origins of noise inherent to the material start to play a relevant role. One representative example is charged impurities in the device material or substrate, which typically produce telegraph noise and can hence be modeled as bistable fluctuators. In order to demonstrate the possibility of the active suppression of the disturbance from a single fluctuator, we theoretically implement an elementary bang-bang control protocol, a protocol based on sudden pulses. We numerically simulate the random walk of the qubit state on the Bloch sphere with and without bang-bang compensation by means of a stochastic Schroedinger equation and compare it with an analytical saddle-point solution of the corresponding Langevin equation in the long-time limit. We find that the deviation with respect to the noiseless case is significantly reduced when bang-bang pulses are applied, being scaled down approximately by the ratio of the bang-bang period to the typical flipping time of the bistable fluctuation. Our analysis gives not only the effect of bang-bang control on the variance of these deviations, but also their entire distribution. As a result, we expect that bang-bang control works as a high-pass filter on the spectrum of noise sources. This indicates how the influence of 1/f noise ubiquitous to the solid-state world can be reduced.

  11. Determination of all feasible robust PID controllers for open-loop unstable plus time delay processes with gain margin and phase margin specifications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Jay

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes a novel alternative method to graphically compute all feasible gain and phase margin specifications-oriented robust PID controllers for open-loop unstable plus time delay (OLUPTD) processes. This method is applicable to general OLUPTD processes without constraint on system order. To retain robustness for OLUPTD processes subject to positive or negative gain variations, the downward gain margin (GM(down)), upward gain margin (GM(up)), and phase margin (PM) are considered. A virtual gain-phase margin tester compensator is incorporated to guarantee the concerned system satisfies certain robust safety margins. In addition, the stability equation method and the parameter plane method are exploited to portray the stability boundary and the constant gain margin (GM) boundary as well as the constant PM boundary. The overlapping region of these boundaries is graphically determined and denotes the GM and PM specifications-oriented region (GPMSOR). Alternatively, the GPMSOR characterizes all feasible robust PID controllers which achieve the pre-specified safety margins. In particular, to achieve optimal gain tuning, the controller gains are searched within the GPMSOR to minimize the integral of the absolute error (IAE) or the integral of the squared error (ISE) performance criterion. Thus, an optimal PID controller gain set is successfully found within the GPMSOR and guarantees the OLUPTD processes with a pre-specified GM and PM as well as a minimum IAE or ISE. Consequently, both robustness and performance can be simultaneously assured. Further, the design procedures are summarized as an algorithm to help rapidly locate the GPMSOR and search an optimal PID gain set. Finally, three highly cited examples are provided to illustrate the design process and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. User adaptation in long-term, open-loop myoelectric training: implications for EMG pattern recognition in prosthesis control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiayuan; Zhang, Dingguo; Jiang, Ning; Sheng, Xinjun; Farina, Dario; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Recent studies have reported that the classification performance of electromyographic (EMG) signals degrades over time without proper classification retraining. This problem is relevant for the applications of EMG pattern recognition in the control of active prostheses. Approach. In this study we investigated the changes in EMG classification performance over 11 consecutive days in eight able-bodied subjects and two amputees. Main results. It was observed that, when the classifier was trained on data from one day and tested on data from the following day, the classification error decreased exponentially but plateaued after four days for able-bodied subjects and six to nine days for amputees. The between-day performance became gradually closer to the corresponding within-day performance. Significance. These results indicate that the relative changes in EMG signal features over time become progressively smaller when the number of days during which the subjects perform the pre-defined motions are increased. The performance of the motor tasks is thus more consistent over time, resulting in more repeatable EMG patterns, even if the subjects do not have any external feedback on their performance. The learning curves for both able-bodied subjects and subjects with limb deficiencies could be modeled as an exponential function. These results provide important insights into the user adaptation characteristics during practical long-term myoelectric control applications, with implications for the design of an adaptive pattern recognition system.

  13. Open-loop dereverberation of multichannel room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bowon; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark A.; Goudeseune, Camille

    2003-04-01

    We are developing the audio display for a CAVE-type virtual reality theater, a 3-m cube with displays covering all six rigid faces. The user's headgear continuously reports ear positions so headphones would be possible, but we nevertheless prefer loudspeakers because this enhances the sense of total immersion. Because sounds produced at the loudspeakers are distorted by the room impulse responses, we therefore face the problem of controlling the sound at the listener's two ears. Our proposed solution consists of open-loop acoustic point control, i.e., dereverberation. The room impulse responses from each loudspeaker to each ear of the listener are inverted using multichannel inversion methods, to create exactly the desired sound field at the listener's ears. Because the actual room impulse responses cannot be measured in real time (as the listener walks around), instead the impulse responses simulated by the image-source method is used. A new evaluation criterion is proposed to quantitatively evaluate both the simulation and the open-loop dereverberation. The actual impulse responses used for this evaluation are measured with a starter pistol, since this best approximates the point source assumed by the image-source method.

  14. Open loop model for WDM links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D, Meena; Francis, Fredy; T, Sarath K.; E, Dipin; Srinivas, T.; K, Jayasree V.

    2014-10-01

    Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) techniques overfibrelinks helps to exploit the high bandwidth capacity of single mode fibres. A typical WDM link consisting of laser source, multiplexer/demultiplexer, amplifier and detectoris considered for obtaining the open loop gain model of the link. The methodology used here is to obtain individual component models using mathematical and different curve fitting techniques. These individual models are then combined to obtain the WDM link model. The objective is to deduce a single variable model for the WDM link in terms of input current to system. Thus it provides a black box solution for a link. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) associated with each of the approximated models is given for comparison. This will help the designer to select the suitable WDM link model during a complex link design.

  15. Open-loop heat-recovery dryer

    DOEpatents

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward Evan

    2013-11-05

    A drying apparatus is disclosed that includes a drum and an open-loop airflow pathway originating at an ambient air inlet, passing through the drum, and terminating at an exhaust outlet. A passive heat exchanger is included for passively transferring heat from air flowing from the drum toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the ambient air inlet toward the drum. A heat pump is also included for actively transferring heat from air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the drum. A heating element is also included for further heating air flowing from the heat pump toward the drum.

  16. RPC gas recovery by open loop method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Avinash; Kalmani, S. D.; Mondal, N. K.; Satyanarayana, B.

    2009-05-01

    RPC detectors require to be flushed with small but continuous flow of gas mixture. Dealing with large number of detectors, gas consumption to very large volumes. Gas flow is a running expense and constituent gases are too expensive to be treated as consumables. Exhaust gas mixture from detectors is a potential environmental hazard if discharged directly into the atmosphere. Storage of gases on a large scale also leads to inventory- and safety-related problems. A solution to these problems is the recovery and reuse of exhaust gas mixture from RPC detectors. Close loop method employs recirculation of exhausted gas mixture after purification, analysis and addition of top-up quantities. In open loop method, under consideration here, individual component gases are separated from gas mixture and reused as source. During open loop process, gases liquefiable at low pressures are separated from ones liquefiable at high pressure. The gas phase components within each group are successively separated by either fractional condensation or gravity separation. Gas mixture coming from RPC exhaust is first desiccated by passage through molecular sieve adsorbent type (3A+4A). Subsequent scrubbing over basic activated alumina removes toxic and acidic contaminants such as S 2F 10 produced during corona (arcing) discharge. In the first stage of separation isobutane and freon are concentrated by diffusion and liquefied by fractional condensation by cooling upto -30 °C. Liquefied gases are returned to source tanks. In the second stage of separation, argon and sulphur hexafluoride, the residual gases, are concentrated by settling due to density difference. SF 6 is stored for recovery by condensation at high pressure while argon is further purified by thermal cracking of crossover impurities at 1000 °C followed by wet scrubbing.

  17. Alpha-canonical form representation of the open loop dynamics of the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duyar, Almet; Eldem, Vasfi; Merrill, Walter C.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    1991-01-01

    A parameter and structure estimation technique for multivariable systems is used to obtain a state space representation of open loop dynamics of the space shuttle main engine in alpha-canonical form. The parameterization being used is both minimal and unique. The simplified linear model may be used for fault detection studies and control system design and development.

  18. Development of individual insulin infusion profiles for open loop infusion systems.

    PubMed

    Strack, T; Krause, U; Schulz, G; Beyer, J; Beutelspacher, F; Nagel, J

    1984-04-01

    A computer controlled syringe-type insulin infusion pump storing up to 254 different infusion rates, eight different meal programs and two different basal rates automatically changeable during 24 h in EPROM was used for insulin infusion applying a wavy step profile. This profile approaching the physiological postprandial insulin secretion of the B-cell was calculated by an algorithm following the biphasic insulin secretion model proposed by E. Cerasi . The computer program for the open loop infusion device simulated the feed-back structure of a closed loop insulin secretion control by an algorithm based upon a theoretical postprandial blood sugar profile. Fifteen unstable juvenile onset insulin requiring diabetics could be well controlled after two to three days of an intravenous open loop insulin infusion program. The programs consisted of two constant basal rates and superimposed wavy step profile programs activated at the beginning of each meal. The preabsorptive bolus or cephalic phase was an additional tool both for improved postprandial blood sugar control and further reduction of insulin consumption. The programmable insulin infusion device proved as a valuable tool for the study of a sophisticated insulin infusion profile suitable as well for open loop as for closed loop insulin infusion systems.

  19. Real-time open-loop frequency response analysis of flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, J. T.; West, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A technique has been developed to compare the open-loop frequency response of a flight test aircraft real time with linear analysis predictions. The result is direct feedback to the flight control systems engineer on the validity of predictions and adds confidence for proceeding with envelope expansion. Further, gain and phase margins can be tracked for trends in a manner similar to the techniques used by structural dynamics engineers in tracking structural modal damping.

  20. Symbolic Formulation of Large-scale Open-loop Multibody Systems for Vibration Analysis Using Absolute Joint Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xuedong; Luo, Xin; Huang, Qingjiu

    A novel symbolic formulation is presented to model dynamics of large-scale open-loop holonomic multibody systems, by using absolute joint coordinates and via matrix transformation, instead of solving constraint equations. The resulting minimal set of second-order linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) can be used for linear vibration analysis and control directly. The ODEs are generated in three steps. Firstly, a set of linearized ODEs are formulated in terms of absolute coordinates without considering any constraint. Secondly, an overall transform matrix representing constraint topology for the entire constrained system is generated. Finally, matrices for a minimal set of ODEs for the open-loop holonomic multibody system are obtained via matrix transformation. The correctness and efficiency of the presented algorithm are verified by numerical experiments on various cases of holonomic multibody systems with different open-loop topologies, including chain topology and tree topology. It is indicated that the proposed method can significantly improve efficiency without losing computational accuracy.

  1. Adjustment of Open-Loop Settings to Improve Closed-Loop Results in Type 1 Diabetes: A Multicenter Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dassau, Eyal; Brown, Sue A.; Basu, Ananda; Pinsker, Jordan E.; Kudva, Yogish C.; Gondhalekar, Ravi; Patek, Steve; Lv, Dayu; Schiavon, Michele; Lee, Joon Bok; Dalla Man, Chiara; Hinshaw, Ling; Castorino, Kristin; Mallad, Ashwini; Dadlani, Vikash; McCrady-Spitzer, Shelly K.; McElwee-Malloy, Molly; Wakeman, Christian A.; Bevier, Wendy C.; Bradley, Paige K.; Kovatchev, Boris; Cobelli, Claudio; Zisser, Howard C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Closed-loop control (CLC) relies on an individual's open-loop insulin pump settings to initialize the system. Optimizing open-loop settings before using CLC usually requires significant time and effort. Objective: The objective was to investigate the effects of a one-time algorithmic adjustment of basal rate and insulin to carbohydrate ratio open-loop settings on the performance of CLC. Design: This study reports a multicenter, outpatient, randomized, crossover clinical trial. Patients: Thirty-seven adults with type 1 diabetes were enrolled at three clinical sites. Interventions: Each subject's insulin pump settings were subject to a one-time algorithmic adjustment based on 1 week of open-loop (i.e., home care) data collection. Subjects then underwent two 27-hour periods of CLC in random order with either unchanged (control) or algorithmic adjusted basal rate and carbohydrate ratio settings (adjusted) used to initialize the zone-model predictive control artificial pancreas controller. Subject's followed their usual meal-plan and had an unannounced exercise session. Main Outcomes and Measures: Time in the glucose range was 80–140 mg/dL, compared between both arms. Results: Thirty-two subjects completed the protocol. Median time in CLC was 25.3 hours. The median time in the 80–140 mg/dl range was similar in both groups (39.7% control, 44.2% adjusted). Subjects in both arms of CLC showed minimal time spent less than 70 mg/dl (median 1.34% and 1.37%, respectively). There were no significant differences more than 140 mg/dL. Conclusions: A one-time algorithmic adjustment of open-loop settings did not alter glucose control in a relatively short duration outpatient closed-loop study. The CLC system proved very robust and adaptable, with minimal (<2%) time spent in the hypoglycemic range in either arm. PMID:26204135

  2. Improved Speech Coding Based on Open-Loop Parameter Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Ya-Chin; Longman, Richard W.

    2000-01-01

    A nonlinear optimization algorithm for linear predictive speech coding was developed early that not only optimizes the linear model coefficients for the open loop predictor, but does the optimization including the effects of quantization of the transmitted residual. It also simultaneously optimizes the quantization levels used for each speech segment. In this paper, we present an improved method for initialization of this nonlinear algorithm, and demonstrate substantial improvements in performance. In addition, the new procedure produces monotonically improving speech quality with increasing numbers of bits used in the transmitted error residual. Examples of speech encoding and decoding are given for 8 speech segments and signal to noise levels as high as 47 dB are produced. As in typical linear predictive coding, the optimization is done on the open loop speech analysis model. Here we demonstrate that minimizing the error of the closed loop speech reconstruction, instead of the simpler open loop optimization, is likely to produce negligible improvement in speech quality. The examples suggest that the algorithm here is close to giving the best performance obtainable from a linear model, for the chosen order with the chosen number of bits for the codebook.

  3. Open-loop characteristics of magnetic suspension systems using electromagnets mounted in a planar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.; Britcher, Colin P.

    1992-01-01

    The open-loop characteristics of a Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS) were studied and numerical results are presented. The LGMSS considered provides five-degree-of-freedom control. The suspended element is a cylinder that contains a core composed of permanent magnet material. The magnetic actuators are air core electromagnets mounted in a planar array. Configurations utilizing five, six, seven, and eight electromagnets were investigated and all configurations were found to be controllable from coil currents and observable from suspended element positions. Results indicate that increasing the number of coils has an insignificant effect on mode shapes and frequencies.

  4. Environmental impacts of open loop geothermal system on groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Koo-Sang; Park, Youngyun; Yun, Sang Woong; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2013-04-01

    Application of renewable energies such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, waves and geothermal heat has gradually increased to reduce emission of CO2 which is supplied from combustion of fossil fuel. The geothermal energy of various renewable energies has benefit to be used to cooling and heating systems and has good energy efficiency compared with other renewable energies. However, open loop system of geothermal heat pump system has possibility that various environmental problems are induced because the system directly uses groundwater to exchange heat. This study was performed to collect data from many documents such as papers and reports and to summarize environmental impacts for application of open loop system. The environmental impacts are classified into change of hydrogeological factors such as water temperature, redox condition, EC, change of microbial species, well contamination and depletion of groundwater. The change of hydrogeological factors can induce new geological processes such as dissolution and precipitation of some minerals. For examples, increase of water temperature can change pH and Eh. These variations can change saturation index of some minerals. Therefore, dissolution and precipitation of some minerals such as quartz and carbonate species and compounds including Fe and Mn can induce a collapse and a clogging of well. The well contamination and depletion of groundwater can reduce available groundwater resources. These environmental impacts will be different in each region because hydrogeological properties and scale, operation period and kind of the system. Therefore, appropriate responses will be considered for each environmental impact. Also, sufficient study will be conducted to reduce the environmental impacts and to improve geothermal energy efficiency during the period that a open loop system is operated. This work was supported by the Energy Efficiency and Resources of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning

  5. Open-Loop Acquisition Of Suppressed Carrier Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Biren N.; Hinedi, Sami M.

    1992-01-01

    Three digital techniques for open-loop acquisition of suppressed carrier signals in presence of binary-phase-shift-keyed (BPSK) modulation representing non-return-to-zero (NRZ) data symbols. Based on assumption that offset, tau, between timing of symbols and clock in receiver unknown, but fixed fraction of symbol period, T. In all three, fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) performed on outputs of integrate-and-dump filters that are parts of Costas-type loops used to demodulate BPSK signals. Timing of integrate-and-dump filters constant. Outputs mixed to obtain an error signal.

  6. Comparing the performance of open loop centroiding techniques in the Raven MOAO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, David R.; Bradley, Colin; Gamroth, Darryl; Kerley, Dan; Lardière, Olivier; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2014-08-01

    Raven is a multi-object adaptive optics (MOAO) demonstrator that will be mounted on the NIR Nasmyth platform of the Subaru telescope in May, 2014. Raven can use three open-loop NGS WFSs and an on-axis LGS WFS to control DMs in two separate science pick-off arms. Centroiding in open loop AO systems like Raven is more difficult than in closed loop AO systems because the Shack-Hartmann spots will not be driven to the same spot on a detector. Rather the spots can fall on any combination of pixels because the WFSs need to have sufficient dynamic range to measure the full turbulence. In this paper, we compare correlation and thresholded center of gravity (tCOG) centroiding methods in simulation, with Raven using its calibration unit, and on-sky. Each method has its own advantages. Correlation centroiding is superior to tCOG centroiding for faint NGSs and for extended sources (Raven open loop WFSs do not contain ADCs so spots will become elongated). We expect that correlation centroiding will push the limiting magnitude of Raven NGSs fainter by roughly one magnitude. Correlation centroiding is computationally more intensive, however, and actually will limit Raven's sampling rate for shorter integrations. Therefore, for bright stars with sufficiently high signal-to-noise, Raven can be run significantly faster and with superior performance using the tCOG method. Here we quantify both the performance and timing differences of these two centroiding methods in simulation, in the lab and on sky using Raven.

  7. Optimization of the open-loop liquid crystal adaptive optics retinal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ningning; Li, Chao; Xia, Mingliang; Li, Dayu; Qi, Yue; Xuan, Li

    2012-02-01

    An open-loop adaptive optics (AO) system for retinal imaging was constructed using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) as the wavefront compensator. Due to the dispersion of the LC-SLM, there was only one illumination source for both aberration detection and retinal imaging in this system. To increase the field of view (FOV) for retinal imaging, a modified mechanical shutter was integrated into the illumination channel to control the size of the illumination spot on the fundus. The AO loop was operated in a pulsing mode, and the fundus was illuminated twice by two laser impulses in a single AO correction loop. As a result, the FOV for retinal imaging was increased to 1.7-deg without compromising the aberration detection accuracy. The correction precision of the open-loop AO system was evaluated in a closed-loop configuration; the residual error is approximately 0.0909λ (root-mean-square, RMS), and the Strehl ratio ranges to 0.7217. Two subjects with differing rates of myopia (-3D and -5D) were tested. High-resolution images of capillaries and photoreceptors were obtained.

  8. Open loop, auto reversing liquid nitrogen circulation thermal system for thermo vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, M. C. A.; Nolakha, Dinesh; Saharkar, B. S.; Kavani, K. M.; Patel, D. R.

    2012-11-01

    In a thermo vacuum chamber, attaining and controlling low and high temperatures (-100 Deg. C to +120 Deg. C) is a very important task. This paper describes the development of "Open loop, auto reversing liquid nitrogen based thermal system". System specifications, features, open loop auto reversing system, liquid nitrogen flow paths etc. are discussed in this paper. This thermal system consists of solenoid operated cryogenic valves, double embossed thermal plate (shroud), heating elements, temperature sensors and PLC. Bulky items like blowers, heating chambers, liquid nitrogen injection chambers, huge pipe lines and valves were not used. This entire thermal system is very simple to operate and PLC based, fully auto system with auto tuned to given set temperatures. This system requires a very nominal amount of liquid nitrogen (approx. 80 liters / hour) while conducting thermo vacuum tests. This system was integrated to 1.2m dia thermo vacuum chamber, as a part of its augmentation, to conduct extreme temperature cycling tests on passive antenna reflectors of satellites.

  9. Laser Safety Method For Duplex Open Loop Parallel Optical Link

    DOEpatents

    Baumgartner, Steven John; Hedin, Daniel Scott; Paschal, Matthew James

    2003-12-02

    A method and apparatus are provided to ensure that laser optical power does not exceed a "safe" level in an open loop parallel optical link in the event that a fiber optic ribbon cable is broken or otherwise severed. A duplex parallel optical link includes a transmitter and receiver pair and a fiber optic ribbon that includes a designated number of channels that cannot be split. The duplex transceiver includes a corresponding transmitter and receiver that are physically attached to each other and cannot be detached therefrom, so as to ensure safe, laser optical power in the event that the fiber optic ribbon cable is broken or severed. Safe optical power is ensured by redundant current and voltage safety checks.

  10. Study of the Open Loop and Closed Loop Oscillator Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Imel, George R.; Baker, Benjamin; Riley, Tony; Langbehn, Adam; Aryal, Harishchandra; Benzerga, M. Lamine

    2015-04-11

    This report presents the progress and completion of a five-year study undertaken at Idaho State University of the measurement of very small worth reactivity samples comparing open and closed loop oscillator techniques.The study conclusively demonstrated the equivalency of the two techniques with regard to uncertainties in reactivity values, i.e., limited by reactor noise. As those results are thoroughly documented in recent publications, in this report we will concentrate on the support work that was necessary. For example, we describe in some detail the construction and calibration of a pilot rod for the closed loop system. We discuss the campaign to measure the required reactor parameters necessary for inverse-kinetics. Finally, we briefly discuss the transfer of the open loop technique to other reactor systems.

  11. Importance of Hydrogeological Conditions on Open-loop Geothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D.; Bae, G.; Kim, S.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    The open-loop geothermal system has been known as an eco-friendly, energy-saving, and cost-efficient alternative for the cooling and heating of buildings with directly using the relatively stable temperature of groundwater. Thus, hydrogeological properties of aquifer, such as hydraulic conductivity and storage, must be important in the system application. The study site is located near Han-river, Korea, and because of the well-developed alluvium it might be a typical site appropriate to this system requiring an amount of groundwater. In this study, the first objective of numerical experiments was to find the best distributions of pumping and injection wells suitable to the hydrogeological conditions of the site for the efficient and sustainable system operation. The aquifer has a gravel layer at 15m depth below the ground surface and the river and the agricultural field, which may be a potential contaminant source, are located at the west and east sides, respectively. Under the general conditions that the regional groundwater flows from the east to the river, the locally reversed well distribution, locating the pumping well at upgradient and the injection well at downgradient of the regional flow, was most sustainable. The gravel layer with high hydraulic conductivity caused a little drawdown despite of an amount of pumping and allowed to stably reinject the used groundwater in all the cases, but it provided a passage transferring the injected heat to the pumping well quickly, particularly in the cases locating the injection well at the upgradient. This thermal interference was more severe in the cases of the short distance between the wells. The high conductive layer is also a reason that the seasonal role conversion of wells for the aquifer thermal energy storage was ineffective in this site. Furthermore, the well distribution vertical to the regional groundwater flow was stable, but not best, and, thus, it may be a good choice in the conditions that the regional

  12. Open-Loop Thrust Profile Development for Tethered Towing of Large Space Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, Lee E. Z.

    Towing objects in space has become an increasingly researched mission concept. Active debris removal, satellite servicing, and asteroid retrieval concepts in many cases rely on a thrusting vehicle to redirect and steer a passive object. Focus is often placed on the method of attachment, considering techniques such as grappling or netting the passive object. However, the actual process of towing, once capture has occurred, has not yet received much attention. This research considers the process of towing in space with the tug and passive object attached by a tether. Tethers are not only an effective way of transmitting forces, but they are utilized on many of the towing concepts considered, especially in orbital debris removal. Because the two end bodies are tethered, there is a potential for collision after any maneuver. To avoid collisions, the maneuver, and therefore thrust profile, must be designed in such a way as to limit separation distance reduction between the end bodies. Open-loop input shaping techniques are developed and employed in order to control the flexible system in both deep space and on-orbit environments. To study the behavior, an active debris removal system is proposed as a case study. This system, called the tethered-tug, considers using the reserve fuel from a recently launched upper stage rocket to rendezvous with, capture, and tow a near-by debris object. The system's performance is considered for five distinct open-loop thrust control profiles including on-off/step, frequency notched, discretized notch, Posicast, and bang-off-bang. Tether property variations are also considered along with off-axis towing, slack tethers, and debris with initial rotation rates. Input shaping is not only necessary but, it can be robust to unknown system properties while nearly zeroing relative motion between the end bodies. When considering on-orbit behavior specifically, the system settles into a tumbling or gravity gradient oscillation formation. This is

  13. Analysis of open-loop conical scan pointing error and variance estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    General pointing error and variance estimators for an open-loop conical scan (conscan) system are derived and analyzed. The conscan algorithm is modeled as a weighted least-squares estimator whose inputs are samples of receiver carrier power and its associated measurement uncertainty. When the assumptions of constant measurement noise and zero pointing error estimation are applied, the variance equation is then strictly a function of the carrier power to uncertainty ratio and the operator selectable radius and period input to the algorithm. The performance equation is applied to a 34-m mirror-based beam-waveguide conscan system interfaced with the Block V Receiver Subsystem tracking a Ka-band (32-GHz) downlink. It is shown that for a carrier-to-noise power ratio greater than or equal to 30 dB-Hz, the conscan period for Ka-band operation may be chosen well below the current DSN minimum of 32 sec. The analysis presented forms the basis of future conscan work in both research and development as well as for the upcoming DSN antenna controller upgrade for the new DSS-24 34-m beam-waveguide antenna.

  14. Use of an open-loop system to increase physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an open-loop system that reinforces physical activity with TV watching to increase children’s physical activity. Non-overweight, sedentary boys and girls (8-12 y) were randomized to a group that received feedback of activity counts + reinforcement for physic...

  15. Open-loop radio science with a suppressed-carrier signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    When a suppressed-carrier signal is squared, the carrier reappears in doubled form. An open-loop receiver can be used to deliver a recording of a band-limited waveform containing this carrier, whose amplitude and phase can be tracked by the radio science experimenter.

  16. Open-loop organization of thalamic reticular nucleus and dorsal thalamus: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Willis, Adam M; Slater, Bernard J; Gribkova, Ekaterina D; Llano, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is a shell of GABAergic neurons that surrounds the dorsal thalamus. Previous work has shown that TRN neurons send GABAergic projections to thalamocortical (TC) cells to form reciprocal, closed-loop circuits. This has led to the hypothesis that the TRN is responsible for oscillatory phenomena, such as sleep spindles and absence seizures. However, there is emerging evidence that open-loop circuits are also found between TRN and TC cells. The implications of open-loop configurations are not yet known, particularly when they include time-dependent nonlinearities in TC cells such as low-threshold bursting. We hypothesized that low-threshold bursting in an open-loop circuit could be a mechanism by which the TRN could paradoxically enhance TC activation, and that enhancement would depend on the relative timing of TRN vs. TC cell stimulation. To test this, we modeled small circuits containing TC neurons, TRN neurons, and layer 4 thalamorecipient cells in both open- and closed-loop configurations. We found that open-loop TRN stimulation, rather than universally depressing TC activation, increased cortical output across a broad parameter space, modified the filter properties of TC neurons, and altered the mutual information between input and output in a frequency-dependent and T-type calcium channel-dependent manner. Therefore, an open-loop model of TRN-TC interactions, rather than suppressing transmission through the thalamus, creates a tunable filter whose properties may be modified by outside influences onto the TRN. These simulations make experimentally testable predictions about the potential role for the TRN for flexible enhancement of cortical activation.

  17. A Novel Open-Loop Tracking Strategy for Photovoltaic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Alexandru, Cătălin

    2013-01-01

    This paper approaches a dual-axis equatorial tracking system that is used to increase the photovoltaic efficiency by maximizing the degree of use of the solar radiation. The innovative aspect in the solar tracker design consists in considering the tracking mechanism as a perturbation for the DC motors. The goal is to control the DC motors, which are perturbed with the motor torques whose computation is based on the dynamic model of the mechanical structure on which external forces act. The daily and elevation angles of the PV module represent the input parameters in the mechanical device, while the outputs transmitted to the controller are the motor torques. The controller tuning is approached by a parametric optimization process, using design of experiments and response surface methodology techniques, in a multiple regression. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the operational performance of the tracking system. PMID:24327803

  18. A novel open-loop tracking strategy for photovoltaic systems.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Cătălin

    2013-01-01

    This paper approaches a dual-axis equatorial tracking system that is used to increase the photovoltaic efficiency by maximizing the degree of use of the solar radiation. The innovative aspect in the solar tracker design consists in considering the tracking mechanism as a perturbation for the DC motors. The goal is to control the DC motors, which are perturbed with the motor torques whose computation is based on the dynamic model of the mechanical structure on which external forces act. The daily and elevation angles of the PV module represent the input parameters in the mechanical device, while the outputs transmitted to the controller are the motor torques. The controller tuning is approached by a parametric optimization process, using design of experiments and response surface methodology techniques, in a multiple regression. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the operational performance of the tracking system.

  19. An open-loop ground-water heat pump system: transient numerical modeling and site experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Russo, S.; Taddia, G.; Gnavi, L.

    2012-04-01

    KEY WORDS: Open-loop ground water heat pump; Feflow; Low-enthalpy; Thermal Affected Zone; Turin; Italy The increasing diffusion of low-enthalpy geothermal open-loop Groundwater Heat Pumps (GWHP) providing buildings air conditioning requires a careful assessment of the overall effects on groundwater system, especially in the urban areas where several plants can be close together and interfere. One of the fundamental aspects in the realization of an open loop low-enthalpy geothermal system is therefore the capacity to forecast the effects of thermal alteration produced in the ground, induced by the geothermal system itself. The impact on the groundwater temperature in the surrounding area of the re-injection well (Thermal Affected Zone - TAZ) is directly linked to the aquifer properties. The transient dynamic of groundwater discharge and temperature variations should be also considered to assess the subsurface environmental effects of the plant. The experimental groundwater heat pump system used in this study is installed at the "Politecnico di Torino" (NW Italy, Piedmont Region). This plant provides summer cooling needs for the university buildings. This system is composed by a pumping well, a downgradient injection well and a control piezometer. The system is constantly monitored by multiparameter probes measuring the dynamic of groundwater temperature. A finite element subsurface flow and transport simulator (FEFLOW) was used to investigate the thermal aquifer alteration. Simulations were continuously performed during May-October 2010 (cooling period). The numerical simulation of the heat transport in the aquifer was solved with transient conditions. The simulation was performed by considering only the heat transfer within the saturated aquifer, without any heat dispersion above or below the saturated zone due to the lack of detailed information regarding the unsaturated zone. Model results were compared with experimental temperature data derived from groundwater

  20. Hardware platforms for MEMS gyroscope tuning based on evolutionary computation using open-loop and closed -loop frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Ferguson, Michael I.; Fink, Wolfgang; Oks, Boris; Peay, Chris; Terrile, Richard; Cheng, Yen; Kim, Dennis; MacDonald, Eric; Foor, David

    2005-01-01

    We propose a tuning method for MEMS gyroscopes based on evolutionary computation to efficiently increase the sensitivity of MEMS gyroscopes through tuning. The tuning method was tested for the second generation JPL/Boeing Post-resonator MEMS gyroscope using the measurement of the frequency response of the MEMS device in open-loop operation. We also report on the development of a hardware platform for integrated tuning and closed loop operation of MEMS gyroscopes. The control of this device is implemented through a digital design on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The hardware platform easily transitions to an embedded solution that allows for the miniaturization of the system to a single chip.

  1. Coupling between feedback loops in autoregulatory networks affects bistability range, open-loop gain and switching times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Abhinav; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2012-10-01

    Biochemical regulatory networks governing diverse cellular processes such as stress-response, differentiation and cell cycle often contain coupled feedback loops. We aim at understanding how features of feedback architecture, such as the number of loops, the sign of the loops and the type of their coupling, affect network dynamical performance. Specifically, we investigate how bistability range, maximum open-loop gain and switching times of a network with transcriptional positive feedback are affected by additive or multiplicative coupling with another positive- or negative-feedback loop. We show that a network's bistability range is positively correlated with its maximum open-loop gain and that both quantities depend on the sign of the feedback loops and the type of feedback coupling. Moreover, we find that the addition of positive feedback could decrease the bistability range if we control the basal level in the signal-response curves of the two systems. Furthermore, the addition of negative feedback has the capacity to increase the bistability range if its dissociation constant is much lower than that of the positive feedback. We also find that the addition of a positive feedback to a bistable network increases the robustness of its bistability range, whereas the addition of a negative feedback decreases it. Finally, we show that the switching time for a transition from a high to a low steady state increases with the effective fold change in gene regulation. In summary, we show that the effect of coupled feedback loops on the bistability range and switching times depends on the underlying mechanistic details.

  2. High-resolution retinal imaging through open-loop adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Xia, Mingliang; Li, Dayu; Mu, Quanquan; Xuan, Li

    2010-07-01

    Using the liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) as the wavefront corrector, an open-loop adaptive optics (AO) system for fundus imaging in vivo is constructed. Compared with the LC-SLM closed-loop AO system, the light energy efficiency is increased by a factor of 2, which is helpful for the safety of fundus illumination in vivo. In our experiment, the subjective accommodation method is used to precorrect the defocus aberration, and three subjects with different myopia 0, -3, and -5 D are tested. Although the residual wavefront error after correction cannot to detected, the fundus images adequately demonstrate that the imaging system reaches the resolution of a single photoreceptor cell through the open-loop correction. Without dilating and cyclopleging the eye, the continuous imaging for 8 s is recorded for one of the subjects.

  3. Developing Open Loop Radio Science Facility for YH-1 Martian Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinsong; Jian, Nianchuan; Shi, Xian; Yan, Jianguo; Wang, Mingyuan; Zhang, Sujun; Shang, Kun; Huang, Qian; Wang, Guangli; Qiu, Shi

    The first Chinese martian orbiter, Yinghuo-1, is planned to be launched together with the Rassian Phobos-Grunt sampling return mission next year. Open loop radio tracking technique will be applied for s/c tracking and radio science study. A team from Shanghai Astronomical Observatory of CAS has been involved to develop the open loop radio science techniques. They simulated the OD by considering the VLBI and One-way tracking technique; they are developing the DOR/DOD and one-way tracking system; also, they are developing the s/c to ground occultation facilities to study the Martian atmosphere. Using the data released by PDS (http://pds.jpl.nasa.gov) and other resources, they are learning the experiences of deep space tracking and exploration, step by step.

  4. Tuning of MEMS Devices using Evolutionary Computation and Open-loop Frequency Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Fink, Wolfgang; Ferguson, Michael I.; Peay, Chris; Oks, Boris; Terrile, Richard; Yee, Karl

    2005-01-01

    We propose a tuning method for MEMS gyroscopes based on evolutionary computation that has the capacity to efficiently increase the sensitivity of MEMS gyroscopes through tuning and, furthermore, to find the optimally tuned configuration for this state of increased sensitivity. The tuning method was tested for the second generation JPL/Boeing Post-resonator MEMS gyroscope using the measurement of the frequency response of the MEMS device in open-loop operation.

  5. Brief Introduction of YINGHUO-1 Mars Orbiter and Open-Loop Tracking Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jin-Song; Shang, Kun; Jian, Nian-Chuan; Wang, Ming-Yuan; Zhang, Su-Jun; Shi, Xian; Han, Ting-Ting; Sun, Jing; Wang, Guang-Li; Li, Jin-Ling; Fung, Leewo

    2010-04-01

    China and Russia are planning to launch a joint Mars mission in 2011. In the joint mission, the 1st Chinese Mars Probe, Yinghuo-1 will explore the space weather of the Mars, and will test the deep space navigation techniques. Different from the close-loop tracking methods in common deep space mission, the open-loop methods like DOR/DOD and 1-way Doppler, are developed and applied to determine the sic orbit and position.

  6. Thermal performance of an open loop closed end pulsating heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Manabendra; Feroz, C. M.; Ahmed, F.; Mujib, T.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of an open loop pulsating heat pipe (OLPHP) of 0.9 mm inner diameter. The performance characterization has been done using four working fluids at vertical and horizontal orientations. Water, Methanol, 2-Propanol and Acetone has been employed as the working fluid with 50% fill ratio. The experimental results indicate a strong influence of gravity and thermo physical properties of the working fluids on the performance of OLPHP. Considering all the working fluids used, Water has shown better thermal performance in vertical orientation while Methanol has shown better performance in horizontal orientation. All the working fluids perform better at horizontal orientation.

  7. The JWST MIRI FM wheel mechanisms characterisation for open loop drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detre, Örs Hunor; Grözinger, Ulrich; Krause, Oliver; Müller, Friedrich; Scheithauer, Silvia

    2012-09-01

    The high reliability of the mechanisms of any space instrument is one of the most critical and challenging requirements. This is even more pronounced in the case of cryogenic instruments, such as the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) to be flown on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - which will be cooled down to below 7 K. MIRI hosts three wheel mechanisms for filter, grating and dichroic selection. All of them have an open loop torque drive and thus the precise characterisation of the mechanisms and their motors is fundamental to achieve minimum heat load and maximum reliability of the mechanism movements over the lifetime. In this paper we present the overview of the characterisation and verification of the MIRI wheel mechanisms. Our method is based on measuring back EMF voltages generated by the two phase cold redundant motors of the wheel mechanisms after they had been fully integrated into the MIRI optical module. We present the analysis of the data and the resulting performance increase. We discuss the optimisation of the open loop drive, as well as the verification of the measurement results and the physical model of the motors and mechanisms.

  8. Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach for Vehicle Positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System in Urban Areas.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Hang; Li, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Long, Teng

    2015-08-28

    For vehicle positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in urban areas, open-loop tracking shows better performance because of its high sensitivity and superior robustness against multipath. However, no previous study has focused on the effects of the code search grid size on the code phase measurement accuracy of open-loop tracking. Traditional open-loop tracking methods are performed by the batch correlators with fixed correlation space. The code search grid size, which is the correlation space, is a constant empirical value and the code phase measuring accuracy will be largely degraded due to the improper grid size, especially when the signal carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N₀) varies. In this study, the Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach (ACSA-OLTA) is proposed to improve the code phase measurement dependent pseudo range accuracy. In ACSA-OLTA, the correlation space is adjusted according to the signal C/N₀. The novel Equivalent Weighted Pseudo Range Error (EWPRE) is raised to obtain the optimal code search grid sizes for different C/N₀. The code phase measuring errors of different measurement calculation methods are analyzed for the first time. The measurement calculation strategy of ACSA-OLTA is derived from the analysis to further improve the accuracy but reduce the correlator consumption. Performance simulation and real tests confirm that the pseudo range and positioning accuracy of ASCA-OLTA are better than the traditional open-loop tracking methods in the usual scenarios of urban area.

  9. Characterization of Site for Installing Open Loop Ground Source Heat Pump System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S. W.; Park, Y.; Lee, J. Y.; Yi, M. J.; Cha, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to understand hydrogeological properties of site where open loop ground source heat pump system will be installed and operated. Groundwater level and water temperature were hourly measured at the well developed for usage of open loop ground source heat pump system from 11 October 2013 to 8 January 2014. Groundwater was sampled in January and August 2013 and its chemical and isotopic compositions were analyzed. The bedrock of study area is the Jurassic granodiorite that mainly consists of quartz (27.9 to 46.8%), plagioclase (26.0 to 45.5%), and alkali feldspar (9.5 to 18.7%). The groundwater level ranged from 68.30 to 68.94 m (above mean sea level). Recharge rate was estimated using modified watertable fluctuation method and the recharge ratios was 9.1%. The water temperature ranged from 14.8 to 15.0oC. The vertical Increase rates of water temperature were 1.91 to 1.94/100 m. The water temperature showed the significant seasonal variation above 50 m depth, but had constant value below 50 m depth. Therefore, heat energy of the groundwater can be used securely in open loop ground source heat pump system. Electrical conductivity ranged from 120 to 320 µS/cm in dry season and from 133 to 310 µS/cm in wet season. The electrical conductivity gradually decreased with depth. In particular, electrical conductivity in approximately 30 m depth decreased dramatically (287 to 249 µS/cm) in wet season. The groundwater was Ca-HCO3 type. The concentrations of dissolved components did not show the vertically significant variations from 0 to 250 m depth. The δ18O and δD ranged from -9.5 to -9.4‰ and from -69 to -68‰. This work is supported by the New and Renewable Energy of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No.20123040110010).

  10. Low Pressure Seeder Development for PIV in Large Scale Open Loop Wind Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Ryan

    2010-11-01

    A low pressure seeding techniques have been developed for Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in large scale wind tunnel facilities was performed at the Subsonic Aerodynamic Research Laboratory (SARL) facility at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The SARL facility is an open loop tunnel with a 7 by 10 foot octagonal test section that has 56% optical access and the Mach number varies from 0.2 to 0.5. A low pressure seeder sprayer was designed and tested in the inlet of the wind tunnel. The seeder sprayer was designed to produce an even and uniform distribution of seed while reducing the seeders influence in the test section. ViCount Compact 5000 using Smoke Oil 180 was using as the seeding material. The results show that this low pressure seeder does produce streaky seeding but excellent PIV images are produced.

  11. An investigation of the open-loop amplification of Reynolds number dependent processes by wave distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdy, K. R.; Ventrice, M. B.; Fang, J.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were initiated to determine if the response of a constant temperature hot wire anemometer to acoustic oscillations could serve as an analog to the response of the drop vaporization burning rate process to acoustic oscillations, and, perhaps, also as an analog to any Reynolds number dependent process. The motivation behind this study was a recent analytical study which showed that distorted acoustic oscillations could amplify the open-loop response of vaporization limited combustion. This type of amplification may be the cause of unstable combustion in liquid propellant rocket engines. The analytical results obtained for the constant temperature anemometer are similar in nature to those previously obtained for vaporization limited combustion and indicate that the response is dependent on the amount and type of distortion as well as other factors, such as sound pressure level, Mach number and hot wire temperature. Preliminary results indicate qualitative agreement between theory and experiment.

  12. Open loop tracking of radio occultation signals from an airborne platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lulich, Tyler Delfield

    Radio occultation is a remote sensing technique that uses signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) to determine electron density in the ionosphere, and temperature and water vapor content in the neutral atmosphere. In the lowest part of the atmosphere where there are strong refractivity gradients due to boundary layer structure, the signal may experience rapid phase accelerations, extending beyond the operational range of traditional receiver tracking loops. Open loop (OL) tracking is a method for tracking GPS signals in this situation by replacing a traditional feedback loop with a method that tracks the signal by estimating the deviations from a model-based reference Doppler frequency time history. The open loop (OL) tracking method was originally designed to work using measurements from a stationary receiver, and has been modified to operate using data recorded by a receiver in motion. Occultation data were gathered by the GNSS Instrumentation System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) aboard the High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) during flights over the Gulf of Mexico and Southeastern United States in February 2008. Occultations from setting satellites were recorded during five flight days. The OL tracking method was demonstrated on GPS radio occultations recorded during this campaign and was shown to successfully track signals to lower elevations than a high-quality commercial receiver. OL tracking was able to extract continuous phase information down to approximately -3.9, -4.2, and -4.5 degrees elevation relative to the local horizon on three setting occultations observed on 22 February 2008. Finally, the accuracy of OL measurements, averaged over a Fresnel zone, is shown to be on the order of 3 mm/s, which is well within the limit for extracting useful scientific measurements.

  13. All-digital signal-processing open-loop fiber-optic gyroscope with enlarged dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Yang, Chuanchuan; Wang, Xinyue; Wang, Ziyu

    2013-12-15

    We propose and realize a new open-loop fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) with an all-digital signal-processing (DSP) system where an all-digital phase-locked loop is employed for digital demodulation to eliminate the variation of the source intensity and suppress the bias drift. A Sagnac phase-shift tracking method is proposed to enlarge the dynamic range, and, with its aid, a new open-loop FOG, which can achieve a large dynamic range and high sensitivity at the same time, is realized. The experimental results show that compared with the conventional open-loop FOG with the same fiber coil and optical devices, the proposed FOG reduces the bias instability from 0.259 to 0.018 deg/h, and the angle random walk from 0.031 to 0.006 deg/h(1/2), moreover, enlarges the dynamic range to ±360 deg/s, exceeding the maximum dynamic range ±63 deg/s of the conventional open-loop FOG.

  14. Optimum bleeding rate of open loop ground source heat pump systems determined by hydrogeological modeling in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, W. H.; Kim, N.; Lee, J. Y.

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the influence of open loop ground source heat pump systems operation on hydrological conditions of aquifer. Test bed is located in Chuncheon, Korea. The step drawdown test was conducted in five stages for 300 minutes. The variation of groundwater levels by open loop ground source heat pump systems operation was estimated using Visual MODFLOW. Transmissivity ranged from 2.02×10-4 to 9.36×10-4, and storage coefficient ranged from 0.00067 to 0.021. The amount of optimum bleeding was calculated to be 240 m3/day. When bleeding will be 50, 90, 240 and 450 m3/day for 5 years, groundwater levels may decrease 1.84, 3.31, 8.89 and 17.0 m, respectively. If the amount of bleeding is 50 m3/day, the influence of bleeding will not reach the boundary regions of the Soyang River after 5 years. Regarding the open loop ground source heat pump system installed at the test bed, the amount of optimum bleeding in accordance with the stand are proposed by the government is 90 m3/day, which is 20% of the 450 m3/day circulation quantity of the system. However, if continuous bleeding of more than 90 m3/day occurs, then the radius of influence is expected to reach the boundary regions of the Soyang River after 5 years. These results indicate that amount of optimum bleeding differ in each open loop ground soured heat pump system. Therefore, the debate for the amount of optimum bleeding in open loop ground source heat pump systems is demanded. This work is supported by the Energy Efficiency and Resources of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No.20123040110010).

  15. Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach for Vehicle Positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System in Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Hang; Li, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Long, Teng

    2015-01-01

    For vehicle positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in urban areas, open-loop tracking shows better performance because of its high sensitivity and superior robustness against multipath. However, no previous study has focused on the effects of the code search grid size on the code phase measurement accuracy of open-loop tracking. Traditional open-loop tracking methods are performed by the batch correlators with fixed correlation space. The code search grid size, which is the correlation space, is a constant empirical value and the code phase measuring accuracy will be largely degraded due to the improper grid size, especially when the signal carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N0) varies. In this study, the Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach (ACSA-OLTA) is proposed to improve the code phase measurement dependent pseudo range accuracy. In ACSA-OLTA, the correlation space is adjusted according to the signal C/N0. The novel Equivalent Weighted Pseudo Range Error (EWPRE) is raised to obtain the optimal code search grid sizes for different C/N0. The code phase measuring errors of different measurement calculation methods are analyzed for the first time. The measurement calculation strategy of ACSA-OLTA is derived from the analysis to further improve the accuracy but reduce the correlator consumption. Performance simulation and real tests confirm that the pseudo range and positioning accuracy of ASCA-OLTA are better than the traditional open-loop tracking methods in the usual scenarios of urban area. PMID:26343683

  16. Open-loop signal tracking of AltBOC-Modulated GNSS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creekmore, Paul F.

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) such as the United States' GPS and Europe's upcoming Galileo system provide unique signals-of-opportunity for atmospheric sounding. When a planetary atmosphere occults a radio-frequency (RF) signal, its physical properties cause measurable changes in the signal. Therefore, at any time we can track a GNSS signal that is propagating along a path that intersects the atmosphere, we can measure various properties of the atmosphere along that path. Researchers have successfully demonstrated this radio occultation (RO) technique with GPS signals, and the National Research Council has recommended widespread deployment of RO receivers on future Earth-observing satellites. In the coming years, Europe's new Galileo navigation system's deployment will double the number of GNSS satellites in orbit. An RO receiver that can track both GPS and Galileo signals will be able to observe roughly twice as many RO events, doubling its measurement density in space and time for minimal additional cost. Additionally, open-loop (OL) signal tracking has proven to be an effective method for tracking occulted signals through low altitudes where strong refractivity gradients often overwhelm traditional closed-loop (CL) trackers. The OL method predicts the character of the signal ahead of time and measures the prediction error upon arrival of the actual signal. In contrast, the CL method relies on error feedback to fully characterize the signal in real time. This thesis provides an overview of the Galileo GNSS and its AltBOC-modulated E5 signal, introduces and compares several AltBOC tracking discriminators and develops two prototype RO receivers for E5 employing an open-loop signal tracking approach to decrease the minimum altitude at which we can observe RO events. The Galileo constellation does not yet exist, so it is not possible to test a fully representative RO receiver. To provide initial validation of the E5 OL tracking algorithms, these

  17. A Numerical Study for Groundwater Flow, Heat and Solute Transport Associated with Operation of Open-loop Geothermal System in Alluvial Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Lee, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    The open-loop geothermal system directly uses a relatively stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as an eco-friendly, energy-saving, and cost-efficient technique. The facility for this system was installed at a site located near Paldang-dam in Han-river, Korea. Because of the well-developed alluvium, the site might be appropriate to application of this system requiring extraction and injection of a large amount of groundwater. A simple numerical experiment assuming various hydrogeologic conditions demonstrated that regional groundwater flow direction was the most important factor for efficient operation of facility in this site having a highly permeable layer. However, a comparison of river stage data and groundwater level measurements showed that the daily and seasonal controls of water level at Paldang-dam have had a critical influence on the regional groundwater flow in the site. Moreover, nitrate concentrations measured in the monitoring wells gave indication of the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality. The facility operation, such as extraction and injection of groundwater, will obviously affect transport of the agricultural contaminant and, maybe, it will even cause serious problems in the normal operation. Particularly, the high-permeable layer in this aquifer must be a preferential path for quick spreadings of thermal and contaminant plumes. The objective of this study was to find an efficient, safe and stable operation plan of the open-loop geothermal system installed in this site having the complicated conditions of highly permeable layer, variable regional groundwater flow, and agricultural contamination. Numerical simulations for groundwater flow, heat and solute transport were carried out to analyze all the changes in groundwater level and flow, temperature, and quality according to the operation, respectively. Results showed that an operation plan for

  18. Open-loop correction for an eddy current dominated beam-switching magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Koseki, K. Nakayama, H.; Tawada, M.

    2014-04-15

    A beam-switching magnet and the pulsed power supply it requires have been developed for the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. To switch bunched proton beams, the dipole magnetic field must reach its maximum value within 40 ms. In addition, the field flatness should be less than 5 × 10{sup −4} to guide each bunched beam to the designed orbit. From a magnetic field measurement by using a long search coil, it was found that an eddy current in the thick endplates and laminated core disturbs the rise of the magnetic field. The eddy current also deteriorates the field flatness over the required flat-top period. The measured field flatness was 5 × 10{sup −3}. By using a double-exponential equation to approximate the measured magnetic field, a compensation pattern for the eddy current was calculated. The integrated magnetic field was measured while using the newly developed open-loop compensation system. A field flatness of less than 5 × 10{sup −4}, which is an acceptable value, was achieved.

  19. Open-loop correction for an eddy current dominated beam-switching magnet.

    PubMed

    Koseki, K; Nakayama, H; Tawada, M

    2014-04-01

    A beam-switching magnet and the pulsed power supply it requires have been developed for the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. To switch bunched proton beams, the dipole magnetic field must reach its maximum value within 40 ms. In addition, the field flatness should be less than 5 × 10(-4) to guide each bunched beam to the designed orbit. From a magnetic field measurement by using a long search coil, it was found that an eddy current in the thick endplates and laminated core disturbs the rise of the magnetic field. The eddy current also deteriorates the field flatness over the required flat-top period. The measured field flatness was 5 × 10(-3). By using a double-exponential equation to approximate the measured magnetic field, a compensation pattern for the eddy current was calculated. The integrated magnetic field was measured while using the newly developed open-loop compensation system. A field flatness of less than 5 × 10(-4), which is an acceptable value, was achieved.

  20. Open-loop correction for an eddy current dominated beam-switching magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, K.; Nakayama, H.; Tawada, M.

    2014-04-01

    A beam-switching magnet and the pulsed power supply it requires have been developed for the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. To switch bunched proton beams, the dipole magnetic field must reach its maximum value within 40 ms. In addition, the field flatness should be less than 5 × 10-4 to guide each bunched beam to the designed orbit. From a magnetic field measurement by using a long search coil, it was found that an eddy current in the thick endplates and laminated core disturbs the rise of the magnetic field. The eddy current also deteriorates the field flatness over the required flat-top period. The measured field flatness was 5 × 10-3. By using a double-exponential equation to approximate the measured magnetic field, a compensation pattern for the eddy current was calculated. The integrated magnetic field was measured while using the newly developed open-loop compensation system. A field flatness of less than 5 × 10-4, which is an acceptable value, was achieved.

  1. Albumin dialysis in artificial liver support systems: open-loop or closed-loop dialysis mode?

    PubMed

    Pei, Yingying; Sun, Yize; Sun, Sijie; Gao, Dayong; Ding, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    In artificial liver support systems, the open-loop albumin dialysis mode (OLM) is usually used to remove protein-bound toxins from the blood of patients with liver failure. However, there is still interest in the closed-loop albumin dialysis mode (CLM) because this mode may enable not only the regeneration and reuse of albumin but also the miniaturization of artificial liver systems. In this article, we compared the two modes under a fixed amount of albumin in dialysate experimentally and theoretically. The results show that according to the detoxification efficiency in the 3 hour dialysis for removing albumin-bound bilirubin, CLM is better than OLM. The usage efficiency of albumin in CLM is also higher. Moreover, the advantage of CLM is more significant when the concentration of bilirubin in blood is lower. Under a given amount of albumin in dialysate, if the concentration of bilirubin in blood is high, one may further increase the performance of CLM by means of increasing the flow rate of the albumin dialysate or using the highly concentrated albumin dialysate.

  2. An open-loop RFOG based on harmonic division technique to suppress LD's intensity modulation noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Diqing; Wang, Zeyu; Mao, Jianmin; Jin, Zhonghe

    2016-11-01

    A harmonic division technique is proposed for an open-loop resonator fiber optic gyro (RFOG) to suppress semiconductor laser diode's (LD's) intensity modulation noise. The theoretical study indicates the RFOG with this technique is immune to the intensity noise. The simulation and experimental results show this technique would lead to a diminished linear region, which still could be acceptable for an RFOG applied to low rotation rate detection. The tests for the gyro output signal are carried out with/without noise suppressing methods, including the harmonic division technique and previously proposed signal compensation technique. With the harmonic division technique at the rotation rate of 10 deg/s, the stability of gyro output signal is improved from 1.07 deg/s to 0.0361 deg/s, whose noise suppressing ratio is more than 3 times as that of the signal compensation technique. And especially, a 3.12 deg/s signal jump is significantly removed with the harmonic division technique; in contrast, a residual 0.36 deg/s signal jump still exists with the signal compensation technique. It is concluded the harmonic division technique does work in intensity noise suppressing under dynamic condition, and it is superior to the signal compensation technique.

  3. Visualizing Nanoscale Distribution of Corrosion Cells by Open-Loop Electric Potential Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Honbo, Kyoko; Ogata, Shoichiro; Kitagawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Sugimoto, Itto; Shima, Shohei; Fukunaga, Akira; Takatoh, Chikako; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-02-23

    Corrosion is a traditional problem but still one of the most serious problems in industry. To reduce the huge economic loss caused by corrosion, tremendous effort has been made to understand, predict and prevent it. Corrosion phenomena are generally explained by the formation of corrosion cells at a metal-electrolyte interface. However, experimental verification of their nanoscale distribution has been a major challenge owing to the lack of a method able to visualize the local potential distribution in an electrolytic solution. In this study, we have investigated the nanoscale corrosion behavior of Cu fine wires and a duplex stainless steel by in situ imaging of local corrosion cells by open-loop electric potential microscopy (OL-EPM). For both materials, potential images obtained by OL-EPM show nanoscale contrasts, where areas of higher and lower potential correspond to anodic areas (i.e., corrosion sites) and cathodic areas, respectively. This imaging capability allows us to investigate the real-time transition of local corrosion sites even when surface structures show little change. This is particularly useful for investigating reactions under surface oxide layers or highly corrosion-resistant materials as demonstrated here. The proposed technique should be applicable to the study of other redox reactions on a battery electrode or a catalytic material. The results presented here open up such future applications of OL-EPM in nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:26811989

  4. Open Loop Heat Pipe Radiator Having a Free-Piston for Wiping Condensed Working Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An open loop heat pipe radiator comprises a radiator tube and a free-piston. The radiator tube has a first end, a second end, and a tube wall, and the tube wall has an inner surface and an outer surface. The free-piston is enclosed within the radiator tube and is capable of movement within the radiator tube between the first and second ends. The free-piston defines a first space between the free-piston, the first end, and the tube wall, and further defines a second space between the free-piston, the second end, and the tube wall. A gaseous-state working fluid, which was evaporated to remove waste heat, alternately enters the first and second spaces, and the free-piston wipes condensed working fluid from the inner surface of the tube wall as the free-piston alternately moves between the first and second ends. The condensed working fluid is then pumped back to the heat source.

  5. Open-loop frequency acquisition for suppressed-carrier biphase signals using one-pole arm filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, B.; Holmes, J. K.

    1991-02-01

    Open loop frequency acquisition performance is discussed for suppressed carrier binary phase shift keyed signals in terms of the probability of detecting the carrier frequency offset when the arms of the Costas loop detector have one pole filters. The approach, which does not require symbol timing, uses fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) to detect the carrier frequency offset. The detection probability, which depends on both the 3 dB arm filter bandwidth and the received symbol signal to noise ratio, is derived and is shown to be independent of symbol timing. It is shown that the performance of this technique is slightly better that other open loop acquisition techniques which use integrators in the arms and whose detection performance varies with symbol timing.

  6. Open-loop frequency acquisition for suppressed-carrier biphase signals using one-pole arm filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, B.; Holmes, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    Open loop frequency acquisition performance is discussed for suppressed carrier binary phase shift keyed signals in terms of the probability of detecting the carrier frequency offset when the arms of the Costas loop detector have one pole filters. The approach, which does not require symbol timing, uses fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) to detect the carrier frequency offset. The detection probability, which depends on both the 3 dB arm filter bandwidth and the received symbol signal to noise ratio, is derived and is shown to be independent of symbol timing. It is shown that the performance of this technique is slightly better that other open loop acquisition techniques which use integrators in the arms and whose detection performance varies with symbol timing.

  7. RIP Input Tables From WAPDEG for LA Design Selection: Continuous Post-Closure Ventilation Design- Open Loop

    SciTech Connect

    K.G> Mon; P.K. Mast; R. Howard; J.H. Lee

    1999-07-21

    The purpose of this calculation is to document (1) the Waste Package Degradation (WAPDEG) version 3.09 (CRWMS M&O 1998b). Software Routine Report for WAPDEG (Version 3.09) simulations used to analyze waste package degradation and failure under the repository exposure conditions characterized by the open loop option of the post-closure ventilation design and, (2) post-processing of these results into tables of waste package degradation time histories suitable for use as input into the Integrated Probabilistic Simulator for Environmental Systems version 5.19.0 1 (RIP) computer program (Golder Associates 1998). Specifically, the WAPDEG simulations discussed in this calculation correspond to waste package emplacement conditions (repository environment and design) defined in the Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (TSPA-VA), with the exception that the open loop option of the post-closure ventilation License Application Design Selection (LADS) Design Alternative (Design Alternative 3b) was analyzed. The open loop post-closure ventilation design alternative, under which airways to the surface remain open after repository closure, could result in substantial cooling and drying of the potential repository. In open loop post-closure ventilation, expanded air heated by waste decay would move up an exhaust shaft, pulling denser, cooler air into the repository through intake shafts. The exchange of air with the atmosphere could remove more heat and moisture. As a result of the enhanced ventilation relative to the TSPA-VA base-case design, different temperature and relative humidity time histories at the waste package surface are calculated (input to the WAPDEG simulations), and consequently different waste package failure histories (as calculated by WAPDEG) result.

  8. Seizure Suppression Efficacy of Closed-Loop Versus Open-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation in a Rodent Model of Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Salam, M Tariqus; Perez Velazquez, Jose Luis; Genov, Roman

    2016-06-01

    We assess and compare the effects of both closed-loop and open-loop neurostimulation of the rat hippocampus by means of a custom low-power programmable therapeutic neurostimulation device on the suppression of spontaneous seizures in a rodent model of epilepsy. Chronic seizures were induced by intraperitoneal kainic acid injection. Two bipolar electrodes were implanted into the CA1 regions of both hippocampi. The electrodes were connected to the custom-built programmable therapeutic neurostimulation device that can trigger an electrical stimulation either in a periodic manner or upon detection of the intracerebral electroencephalographic (icEEE) seizure onset. This device includes a microchip consisting of a 256-channel icEEG recording system and a 64-channel stimulator, and a programmable seizure detector implemented in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The neurostimulator was used to evaluate seizure suppression efficacy in ten epileptic rats for a total of 240 subject-days (5760 subject-hours). For this purpose, all rats were randomly divided into two groups: the no-stimulation group and the stimulation group. The no-stimulation group did not receive stimulation. The stimulation group received, first, closed-loop stimulation and, next, open-loop stimulation. The no-stimulation and stimulation groups had a similar seizure frequency baseline, averaging five seizures per day. Closed-loop stimulation reduced seizure frequency by 90% and open-loop stimulation reduced seizure frequency by 17%, both in the stimulation group as compared to the no-stimulation group. PMID:26571534

  9. Compact and robust open-loop fiber-optic gyroscope for applications in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehi, Behzad M.; Yahalom, Ram; Faridian, Ferey; Black, Richard J.; Taylor, Edward W.; Ooi, Teng; Corder, Aaron

    2010-09-01

    Next generation navigation systems demand performance enhancements to support new applications with longer range capabilities, provide robust operation in severe thermal and vibration environments while simultaneously reducing weight, size and power dissipation. Compact, inexpensive, advanced guidance components are essential for such applications. In particular, Inertial Reference Units (IRUs) that can provide high-resolution stabilization and accurate inertial pointing knowledge are needed. For space applications, an added requirement is radiation hardening up to 300 krad over 5 to 15 years. Manufacturing specifications for the radiation-induced losses are not readily available and empirical test data is required for all components in order to optimize the system performance. Interferometric Fiber-Optic Gyroscopes (IFOGs) have proven to be a leading technology for tactical and navigational systems. The sensors have no moving parts. This ensures high reliability and a long life compared to the mechanical gyroscopes and dithered ring laser gyroscopes. However, the available architectures limit the potential size and cost of the IFOG. The work reported here describes an innovative approach for the design, fabrication, and testing of the IFOG and enables the production of a small, robust and low cost gyro with excellent noise and bandwidth characteristics with high radiation tolerance. The development is aimed at achieving a sensor volume < 5 cubic inches. The new IFOS gyro uses an open loop configuration, utilizes extremely small diameter radiation-hard fiber with customized all-digital signal processing. The optics is packaged using a combination of highly-integrated optical component assemblies with an allfiber approach that leads to a more flexible yet lower cost optical design. The IFOS gyro prototypes are implemented using a distributed architecture, where the light source, electronics and receiver are integrated in an external package, while the sensor head is

  10. An investigation of the open-loop amplification of a Reynolds number dependent process by wave distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventrice, M. B.; Purdy, K. R.

    1974-01-01

    The response of a constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer to sinusoidal and distorted sinusoidal acoustic oscillations is examined. The output of the anemometer is dependent upon the Reynolds number of the flow over the wire. The response is a measure of the interaction between the anemometer output and the acoustic pressure in the neighborhood of the wire. It is an open-loop prediction of the characteristics of actual closed-loop operation of a system. If the open-loop response is large enough, unstable closed-loop operation is predicted. The study was motivated by a need to investigate the stability limits of liquid-propellant rockets when perturbed by pressure oscillations. The sinusoidal and distorted sinusoidal acoustic oscillations used for this study are the same as those characteristic of unstable rocket combustion. Qualitatively, the results are similar--the response of the system to pure sinusoidal acoustic vibration of the fluid surrounding the wire is small, even when the magnitude of the acoustic pressure is quite large; but the response can be increased by as much as an order of magnitude with respect to the sinusoidal case by the addition of distortion. The amplitude and phase of the distortion component, relative to the fundamental component, are the dominant factors in the increase in the response.

  11. A simplified fracture network model for studying the efficiency of a single well semi open loop heat exchanger in fractured crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Bour, Olivier; Thierion, Charlotte; Ausseur, Jean-Yves; Lesuer, Hervé; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable energy source particularly attractive due to associated low greenhouse gas emission rates. Crystalline rocks are in general considered of poor interest for geothermal applications at shallow depths (< 100m), because of the low permeability of the medium. In some cases, fractures may enhance permeability, but thermal energy storage at these shallow depths is still remaining very challenging because of the complexity of fractured media. The purpose of this study is to test the possibility of efficient thermal energy storage in shallow fractured rocks with a single well semi open loop heat exchanger (standing column well). For doing so, a simplified numerical model of fractured media is considered with few fractures. Here we present the different steps for building the model and for achieving the sensitivity analysis. First, an analytical and dimensional study on the equations has been achieved to highlight the main parameters that control the optimization of the system. In a second step, multiphysics software COMSOL was used to achieve numerical simulations in a very simplified model of fractured media. The objective was to test the efficiency of such a system to store and recover thermal energy depending on i) the few parameters controlling fracture network geometry (size and number of fractures) and ii) the frequency of cycles used to store and recover thermal energy. The results have then been compared to reference shallow geothermal systems already set up for porous media. Through this study, relationships between structure, heat exchanges and storage may be highlighted.

  12. Downlink Training Techniques for FDD Massive MIMO Systems: Open-Loop and Closed-Loop Training With Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Junil; Love, David J.; Bidigare, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The concept of deploying a large number of antennas at the base station, often called massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO), has drawn considerable interest because of its potential ability to revolutionize current wireless communication systems. Most literature on massive MIMO systems assumes time division duplexing (TDD), although frequency division duplexing (FDD) dominates current cellular systems. Due to the large number of transmit antennas at the base station, currently standardized approaches would require a large percentage of the precious downlink and uplink resources in FDD massive MIMO be used for training signal transmissions and channel state information (CSI) feedback. To reduce the overhead of the downlink training phase, we propose practical open-loop and closed-loop training frameworks in this paper. We assume the base station and the user share a common set of training signals in advance. In open-loop training, the base station transmits training signals in a round-robin manner, and the user successively estimates the current channel using long-term channel statistics such as temporal and spatial correlations and previous channel estimates. In closed-loop training, the user feeds back the best training signal to be sent in the future based on channel prediction and the previously received training signals. With a small amount of feedback from the user to the base station, closed-loop training offers better performance in the data communication phase, especially when the signal-to-noise ratio is low, the number of transmit antennas is large, or prior channel estimates are not accurate at the beginning of the communication setup, all of which would be mostly beneficial for massive MIMO systems.

  13. Shallow open-loop geothermal systems: simulation of heat transfer in groundwater and experimental tests for improving parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossoul, F.; Orban, P.; Dassargues, A.; Hydrogeology; Environmental Geology

    2011-12-01

    Innovative and efficient strategies for energy use become a priority, especially in civil engineering. Geothermal open-loop systems (geothermal wells) are not so developed in Belgium contrary to close-loop systems. This is generally due to the lack of relevant dimensioning and impact study that must be foreseen during the planning phases of the building. However, as shallow groundwater is widely available, geothermal wells potential is significant. Using both experimental and numerical tools, our aim is to develop a rigorous methodology to design heating and cooling shallow geothermal wells (pumping/reinjection), with a detailed hydrogeological characterization coupled to feasibility, environmental impact assessment, dimensioning, and system sustainability. Concerning numerical modeling, Groundwater flow and heat transfer is computed using different codes (HydroGeoSphere, MT3DMS and SHEMAT) for a comparative sensitivity analysis on a typical case. Coupling and temperature non linearities of hydro-thermal parameters values are checked accurately. As shown previously, small temperature variations (temperatures ranging from 12 to 25 °C) allow to use conventional solute transport codes for modeling heat transfer in groundwater taking benefits of the similarities between solute transport and heat transfer equations. When numerical codes are used as dimensioning tools for long-term simulations, reliable values for hydro-thermal properties of the aquifer are essential. As very few experimental values are available in the literature, field experiments are needed to determine more accurately the local values in different geological/hydrogeological conditions. Apart from thermal response tests (TRT) usually performed for designing a close-loop system within a borehole considered in static groundwater conditions, there is no standard procedure for geothermal wells systems. In an open-loop system, groundwater movement induced by the pumping is responsible for a major heat

  14. Prism adaptation aftereffects in stroke patients with spatial neglect: Pathological effects on subjective straight ahead but not visual open-loop pointing

    PubMed Central

    Sarri, Margarita; Greenwood, Richard; Kalra, Lalit; Papps, Ben; Husain, Masud; Driver, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Prism adaptation to rightward optical shifts during visually guided pointing is considered a promising intervention in right-hemisphere stroke patients with left spatial neglect. Conventionally, prism adaptation is assessed via aftereffects, on subjective straight ahead (SSA) pointing with eyes closed; or by visual open-loop pointing (VOL), i.e. pointing to a visual target without seeing the hand. Previous data suggest indirectly that prism aftereffects in neglect patients may be larger (pathologically so) when assessed by SSA than by VOL. But these measures have never been directly compared within the same patients after identical prism exposure. Accordingly we implemented both measures here within the same group of 13 neglect patients and 13 controls. Prism aftereffects were much larger for SSA than VOL in neglect patients, falling outside the normative range only for SSA. This may arise because the SSA task can itself involve aspects of neglect that may be ameliorated by the prism intervention, hence showing abnormal changes after prisms. The extent of SSA change after prisms varied between patients, and correlated with improvements on a standard cancellation measure for neglect. The lesions of patients who did versus did not show neglect improvement immediately after prisms provide an initial indication that lack of improvement may potentially relate to cortical damage in right intraparietal sulcus and white matter damage in inferior parietal lobe and middle frontal gyrus. Future studies of possible rehabilitative impact from prisms upon neglect may need to consider carefully how to measure prism adaptation per se, separately from any impact of such adaptation upon manifestations of neglect. PMID:18083203

  15. New numerical methods for open-loop and feedback solutions to dynamic optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pradipto

    The topic of the first part of this research is trajectory optimization of dynamical systems via computational swarm intelligence. Particle swarm optimization is a nature-inspired heuristic search method that relies on a group of potential solutions to explore the fitness landscape. Conceptually, each particle in the swarm uses its own memory as well as the knowledge accumulated by the entire swarm to iteratively converge on an optimal or near-optimal solution. It is relatively straightforward to implement and unlike gradient-based solvers, does not require an initial guess or continuity in the problem definition. Although particle swarm optimization has been successfully employed in solving static optimization problems, its application in dynamic optimization, as posed in optimal control theory, is still relatively new. In the first half of this thesis particle swarm optimization is used to generate near-optimal solutions to several nontrivial trajectory optimization problems including thrust programming for minimum fuel, multi-burn spacecraft orbit transfer, and computing minimum-time rest-to-rest trajectories for a robotic manipulator. A distinct feature of the particle swarm optimization implementation in this work is the runtime selection of the optimal solution structure. Optimal trajectories are generated by solving instances of constrained nonlinear mixed-integer programming problems with the swarming technique. For each solved optimal programming problem, the particle swarm optimization result is compared with a nearly exact solution found via a direct method using nonlinear programming. Numerical experiments indicate that swarm search can locate solutions to very great accuracy. The second half of this research develops a new extremal-field approach for synthesizing nearly optimal feedback controllers for optimal control and two-player pursuit-evasion games described by general nonlinear differential equations. A notable revelation from this development

  16. A component-level failure detection and identification algorithm based on open-loop and closed-loop state estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Seung-Han; Cho, Young Man; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2013-04-01

    This study presents a component-level failure detection and identification (FDI) algorithm for a cascade mechanical system subsuming a plant driven by an actuator unit. The novelty of the FDI algorithm presented in this study is that it is able to discriminate failure occurring in the actuator unit, the sensor measuring the output of the actuator unit, and the plant driven by the actuator unit. The proposed FDI algorithm exploits the measurement of the actuator unit output together with its estimates generated by open-loop (OL) and closed-loop (CL) estimators to enable FDI at the component's level. In this study, the OL estimator is designed based on the system identification of the actuator unit. The CL estimator, which is guaranteed to be stable against variations in the plant, is synthesized based on the dynamics of the entire cascade system. The viability of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using a hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS), which shows that it can detect and identify target failures reliably in the presence of plant uncertainties.

  17. A miniaturized compact open-loop RFOG with demodulation signal compensation technique to suppress intensity modulation noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Diqing; Mao, Jianmin; Li, Qiang; Jin, Zhonghe

    2016-01-01

    A miniaturized compact open-loop resonator fiber optic gyro (RFOG) prototype with main body size of about 10.4 cm×10.4 cm×5.2 cm is reported, and a demodulation signal compensation technique is proposed, aiming to suppress the drift arising from accompanying intensity modulation induced by semiconductor laser diode (LD). The scheme of how to establish this miniaturized RFOG prototype is specifically stated. The linear relationship between the first-harmonic and second-harmonic demodulated signals respectively for the two counter propagating beams in the resonator is verified by theory and experiment, and based on this relationship, the demodulation signal compensation technique by monitoring the second-harmonic demodulated signal is described in detail. With this compensation technique, the gyro output stability under 1°/s rotation rate is effectively improved from 0.12°/s to 0.03°/s, and especially, an about 0.36°/s peak-to-peak fluctuation due to tuning current reset is significantly suppressed. A long term bias stability of about 4.5°/h in 1 h for such a small-sized RFOG prototype is demonstrated, which is of the same magnitude as that of currently reported large-sized RFOG systems utilizing LD as the laser source as well.

  18. A microfluidic device for open loop stripping of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Benjamin Z; Dittrich, Petra S

    2013-03-01

    The detection of volatile organic compounds is of great importance for assessing the quality of water. In this contribution, we describe a miniaturized stripping device that allows fast online detection of organic solvents in water. The core component is a glass microfluidic chip that facilitates the creation of an annular-flowing stream of water and nitrogen gas. Volatile compounds are transferred efficiently from the water into the gas phase along the microfluidic pathway at room temperature within less than 5 s. Before exiting the microchip, the liquid phase is separated from the enriched gas phase by incorporating side capillaries through which the hydrophilic water phase is withdrawn. The gas phase is conveniently collected at the outlet reservoir by tubing. Finally, a semiconductor gas sensor analyzes the concentration of (volatile) organic compounds in the nitrogen gas. The operation and use of the stripping device is demonstrated for the organic solvents THF, 1-propanol, toluene, ethylbenzene, benzaldehyde, and methanol. The mobile, inexpensive, and continuously operating system with liquid flow rates in the low range of microliters per minute can be connected to other detectors or implemented in chemical production line for process control.

  19. Can shallow open-loop hydrothermal well-doublets help remediate seawater intrusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keuleneer, François; Renard, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Recharge through injection wells is a well-established technique to remediate and protect coastal aquifers from saltwater intrusion. In this study, it is shown that hydrothermal doublet installations can also be used to protect coastal aquifers while producing heat or cold for air conditioning. Such a method could be extremely valuable for situations where there is both a need for freshwater and energy production in coastal regions. The efficiency of the proposed approach is tested using Strack's analytical solution on a wide range of scenarios where the number of injection and pumping wells vary as well as the distance between these wells and the coast. The efficiency is evaluated through four control parameters: the relative freshwater volume, the maximum penetration distance of the saltwater toe, the thermal breakthrough time, and the percentage of injected water recycled. The analysis of these parameters computed for 343 scenarios confirms the efficiency of the method. Those results are extremely encouraging even if they still need to be confirmed through field experiments.

  20. Advanced Hybrid Spacesuit Concept Featuring Integrated Open Loop and Closed Loop Ventilation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, Brian A.; Fitzpatrick, Garret R.; Gohmert, Dustin M.; Ybarra, Rick M.; Dub, Mark O.

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses the design and prototype of an advanced spacesuit concept that integrates the capability to function seamlessly with multiple ventilation system approaches. Traditionally, spacesuits are designed to operate both dependently and independently of a host vehicle environment control and life support system (ECLSS). Spacesuits that operate independent of vehicle-provided ECLSS services must do so with equipment selfcontained within or on the spacesuit. Suits that are dependent on vehicle-provided consumables must remain physically connected to and integrated with the vehicle to operate properly. This innovation is the design and prototype of a hybrid spacesuit approach that configures the spacesuit to seamlessly interface and integrate with either type of vehicular systems, while still maintaining the ability to function completely independent of the vehicle. An existing Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) was utilized as the platform from which to develop the innovation. The ACES was retrofitted with selected components and one-off items to achieve the objective. The ventilation system concept was developed and prototyped/retrofitted to an existing ACES. Components were selected to provide suit connectors, hoses/umbilicals, internal breathing system ducting/ conduits, etc. The concept utilizes a lowpressure- drop, high-flow ventilation system that serves as a conduit from the vehicle supply into the suit, up through a neck seal, into the breathing helmet cavity, back down through the neck seal, out of the suit, and returned to the vehicle. The concept also utilizes a modified demand-based breathing system configured to function seamlessly with the low-pressure-drop closed-loop ventilation system.

  1. Advantages of dynamic "closed loop" stable isotope flux phenotyping over static "open loop" clamps in detecting silent genetic and dietary phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Chueh, Fu-Yu; Xu, Jun; Trujillo, Chuck; Saad, M F; Lee, W N P; McGuinness, Owen P; Kurland, Irwin J

    2010-06-01

    In vivo insulin sensitivity can be assessed using "open loop" clamp or "closed loop" methods. Open loop clamp methods are static, and fix plasma glucose independently from plasma insulin. Closed loop methods are dynamic, and assess glucose disposal in response to a stable isotope labeled glucose tolerance test. Using PPARalpha(-/-) mice, open and closed loop assessments of insulin sensitivity/glucose disposal were compared. Indirect calorimetry done for the assessment of diurnal substrate utilization/metabolic flexibility showed that chow fed PPARalpha(-/-) mice had increased glucose utilization during the light (starved) cycle. Euglycemic clamps showed no differences in insulin stimulated glucose disposal, whether for chow or high fat diets, but did show differences in basal glucose clearance for chow fed PPARalpha(-/-) versus SV129J-wt mice. In contrast, the dynamic stable isotope labeled glucose tolerance tests reveal enhanced glucose disposal for PPARalpha(-/-) versus SV129J-wt, for chow and high fat diets. Area under the curve for plasma labeled and unlabeled glucose for PPARalpha(-/-) was approximately 1.7-fold lower, P < 0.01 during the stable isotope labeled glucose tolerance test for both diets. Area under the curve for plasma insulin was 5-fold less for the chow fed SV129J-wt (P < 0.01) but showed no difference on a high fat diet (0.30 +/- 0.1 for SV129J-wt vs. 0.13 +/- 0.10 for PPARalpha(-/-), P = 0.28). This study demonstrates that dynamic stable isotope labeled glucose tolerance test can assess "silent" metabolic phenotypes, not detectable by the static, "open loop", euglycemic or hyperglycemic clamps. Both open loop and closed loop methods may describe different aspects of metabolic inflexibility and insulin sensitivity. PMID:20445758

  2. Open-loop wavefront sensing scheme for specimen aberrations correction in two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andilla, Jordi; Porcar-Guezenec, Rafael; Levecq, Xavier; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2011-07-01

    The recent linkage between adaptive optics, a technique borrowed from astronomy and various imaging devices, has enabled to push forward their imaging capabilities by improving its contrast and resolution. A specific case is nonlinear microscopy (NLM) that, although it brings several inherent advantages (compared to linear fluorescence techniques) due to its nonlinear dependence on the excitation beam, its enhanced capabilities can be limited by the sample inhomogeneous structure. In this work, we demonstrate how these imaging capabilities can be enhanced by, employing adaptive optics in a two step correction process. Firstly, a closed-loop methodology aided by Shack-Hartman Wavefront sensing scheme is implemented for compensating the aberrations produced by the laser and the optical elements before the high numerical aperture microscope objective, resulting in a one-time calibration process. Then the residual aberrations are produced by the microscope objective and the sample. These are measured in a similar way as it is done in astronomy (employing a laser guide-star), using the two-photon excited fluorescence. The properties of this incoherent emission produced inside a test sample are compared to a genetically modified Caenorhabditis. elegans nematode expressing GFP showing that the emission of this protein (at 810nm) can be sensed efficiently with our WFS by modifying the exposure time. Therefore the recorded wavefront will capture the sample aberrations which are used to shape a deformable mirror in an open-loop configuration. This correction principle is demonstrated in a test sample by correcting aberrations in a "single-shot" resulting in a reduced sample exposure.

  3. A New Open-Loop Fiber Optic Gyro Error Compensation Method Based on Angular Velocity Error Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanshun; Guo, Yajing; Li, Chunyu; Wang, Yixin; Wang, Zhanqing

    2015-01-01

    With the open-loop fiber optic gyro (OFOG) model, output voltage and angular velocity can effectively compensate OFOG errors. However, the model cannot reflect the characteristics of OFOG errors well when it comes to pretty large dynamic angular velocities. This paper puts forward a modeling scheme with OFOG output voltage u and temperature T as the input variables and angular velocity error Δω as the output variable. Firstly, the angular velocity error Δω is extracted from OFOG output signals, and then the output voltage u, temperature T and angular velocity error Δω are used as the learning samples to train a Radial-Basis-Function (RBF) neural network model. Then the nonlinear mapping model over T, u and Δω is established and thus Δω can be calculated automatically to compensate OFOG errors according to T and u. The results of the experiments show that the established model can be used to compensate the nonlinear OFOG errors. The maximum, the minimum and the mean square error of OFOG angular velocity are decreased by 97.0%, 97.1% and 96.5% relative to their initial values, respectively. Compared with the direct modeling of gyro angular velocity, which we researched before, the experimental results of the compensating method proposed in this paper are further reduced by 1.6%, 1.4% and 1.2%, respectively, so the performance of this method is better than that of the direct modeling for gyro angular velocity. PMID:25734642

  4. Origin and control of instability in SCR/triac three-phase motor controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearth, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The energy savings and reactive power reduction functions initiated by the power factor controller (PFC) are discussed. A three-phase PFC with soft start is examined analytically and experimentally to determine how well it controls the open loop instability and other possible modes of instability. The detailed mechanism of the open loop instability is determined and shown to impose design constraints on the closed loop system. The design is shown to meet those constraints.

  5. An optimal open/closed-loop control method with application to a pre-stressed thin duralumin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimpalli, Sruthi Raju

    The excessive vibrations of a pre-stressed duralumin plate, suppressed by a combination of open-loop and closed-loop controls, also known as open/closed-loop control, is studied in this thesis. The two primary steps involved in this process are: Step (I) with an assumption that the closed-loop control law is proportional, obtain the optimal open-loop control by direct minimization of the performance measure consisting of energy at terminal time and a penalty on open-loop control force via calculus of variations. If the performance measure also involves a penalty on closed-loop control effort then a Fourier based method is utilized. Step (II) the energy at terminal time is minimized numerically to obtain optimal values of feedback gains. The optimal closed-loop control gains obtained are used to describe the displacement and the velocity of open-loop, closed-loop and open/closed-loop controlled duralumin plate.

  6. Mid-tropospheric Moisture Variations During the Development of Hurricane Karl as Resolved by Airborne GPS Radio Occultation with Open Loop Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, J. S.; Murphy, B.; Wang, K. N.; Garrison, J. L.; Adhikari, L.; Xie, F.

    2015-12-01

    The development of hurricane Karl in 2010 was investigated with dropsonde and airborne radio occultation (ARO) measurements from the stage of tropical disturbance within an easterly wave through to genesis of the tropical storm. Infrared imagery showed deep convection with extensive cold cloud tops on 11 September however the storm failed to develop until 3 days later. One possible explanation is the horizontal offset of the mid and lower level circulation centers. We illustrate with airborne radio occultation measurements additional information on the moisture distribution during this stage of development that indicates that average mid-level moisture was lower the following day and then increased again over the next two days prior to development. High sample rate RF data recorded by the GNSS instrument system for multistatic and occultation sensing (GISMOS) was analyzed with a version of the Purdue Software Receiver that has open-loop tracking implemented. Open loop tracking eliminates the feedback loop of conventional receivers that fails in the complex signal propagation environment typical of atmosphere with sharp moisture gradients. The open-loop excess phase profiles routinely sample below 4 km, with half of the profiles extending below 2 km. We retrieve slanted vertical profiles of atmospheric refractivity that can be considered a proxy for moisture in this tropical environment. We illustrate that in the mid to upper troposphere, ARO refractivity profiles sampling different areas within the tropical wave showed characteristics that were consistent with (~150 to 200 km scale) horizontal moisture gradients present in the NWP model representation of the developing tropical storm. Variation in refractivity preceding the development of the pre-Karl system is consistent with increasing moisture near the storm center. The ARO observations almost double the amount of thermodynamic data over that provided by the dropsondes. They provide interesting complementary

  7. Integration of an On-Axis General Sun-Tracking Formula in the Algorithm of an Open-Loop Sun-Tracking System

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Kok-Keong; Wong, Chee-Woon; Siaw, Fei-Lu; Yew, Tiong-Keat; Ng, See-Seng; Liang, Meng-Suan; Lim, Yun-Seng; Lau, Sing-Liong

    2009-01-01

    A novel on-axis general sun-tracking formula has been integrated in the algorithm of an open-loop sun-tracking system in order to track the sun accurately and cost effectively. Sun-tracking errors due to installation defects of the 25 m2 prototype solar concentrator have been analyzed from recorded solar images with the use of a CCD camera. With the recorded data, misaligned angles from ideal azimuth-elevation axes have been determined and corrected by a straightforward changing of the parameters' values in the general formula of the tracking algorithm to improve the tracking accuracy to 2.99 mrad, which falls below the encoder resolution limit of 4.13 mrad. PMID:22408483

  8. Integration of an on-axis general sun-tracking formula in the algorithm of an open-loop sun-tracking system.

    PubMed

    Chong, Kok-Keong; Wong, Chee-Woon; Siaw, Fei-Lu; Yew, Tiong-Keat; Ng, See-Seng; Liang, Meng-Suan; Lim, Yun-Seng; Lau, Sing-Liong

    2009-01-01

    A novel on-axis general sun-tracking formula has been integrated in the algorithm of an open-loop sun-tracking system in order to track the sun accurately and cost effectively. Sun-tracking errors due to installation defects of the 25 m(2) prototype solar concentrator have been analyzed from recorded solar images with the use of a CCD camera. With the recorded data, misaligned angles from ideal azimuth-elevation axes have been determined and corrected by a straightforward changing of the parameters' values in the general formula of the tracking algorithm to improve the tracking accuracy to 2.99 mrad, which falls below the encoder resolution limit of 4.13 mrad.

  9. Measurement and numerical simulation of the changes in the open-loop transfer function in hearing aid as a function telephone handset proximity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Gilles A.; Stinson, Michael R.

    2002-11-01

    The presence of a nearby object (telephone handset, cupped hand, etc.) can cause acoustical feedback to occur in a hearing aid. The object reflects or scatters additional sound energy to the microphone position causing the open-loop transfer function (OLTF) to increase. Feedback can occur when the OLTF>0 dB. To investigate this problem, measurements of the OLTF were made for three hearing aids (BTE, ITC, ITE) mounted on a KEMAR manikin. A telephone handset, positioned initially in a typical user position, was translated to positions between 0 and 100 mm away from the pinna, repeatibly, using a linear translation system. Changes of up to 15 dB or more were observed as the handset moved, particularly for positions within 20 mm of the pinna. In parallel, numerical simulations were made using a boundary element method. Computed changes in OLTF were consistent with the measured changes.

  10. Effect of using acetone and distilled water on the performance of open loop pulsating heat pipe (OLPHP) with different filling ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Lutfor; Afrose, Tonima; Tahmina, Halima Khatun; Rinky, Rumana Parvin; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Pulsating heat pipe (PHP) is a new innovation in the modern era of miniaturizes thermal management system for its higher heating and cooling capacity. The objective of this experiment is to observe the performance of open loop pulsating heat pipe using two fluids at different filling ratios. This OLPHP is a copper capillary tube of 2.5mm outer diameter and 2mm inner diameter. It consists of 8 loops where the evaporative section is 50mm, adiabatic section is 120mm and condensation section is 80mm. The experiment is conducted with distilled water and acetone at 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70% filling ratios where 0° (vertical) is considered as definite angle of inclination. Distilled water and acetone are selected as working fluids considering their different latent heat of vaporization and surface tension. It is found that acetone shows lower thermal resistance than water at all heat inputs. Best performance of acetone is attained at 70% filling ratio. Water displays better heat transfer capability at 50% filling ratio.

  11. Iterative LQG Controller Design Through Closed-Loop Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang; Cox, David E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller design approach for a linear stochastic system with an uncertain open-loop model and unknown noise statistics. This approach consists of closed-loop identification and controller redesign cycles. In each cycle, the closed-loop identification method is used to identify an open-loop model and a steady-state Kalman filter gain from closed-loop input/output test data obtained by using a feedback LQG controller designed from the previous cycle. Then the identified open-loop model is used to redesign the state feedback. The state feedback and the identified Kalman filter gain are used to form an updated LQC controller for the next cycle. This iterative process continues until the updated controller converges. The proposed controller design is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experiments on a highly unstable large-gap magnetic suspension system.

  12. Evaluation of Analytical and Numerical Techniques for Defining the Radius of Influence for an Open-Loop Ground Source Heat Pump System

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Mackley, Rob D.; Waichler, Scott R.; Horner, Jacob A.

    2013-09-26

    In an open-loop groundwater heat pump (GHP) system, groundwater is extracted, run through a heat exchanger, and injected back into the ground, resulting in no mass balance changes to the flow system. Although the groundwater use is non-consumptive, the withdrawal and injection of groundwater may cause negative hydraulic and thermal impacts to the flow system. Because GHP is a relatively new technology and regulatory guidelines for determining environmental impacts for GHPs may not exist, consumptive use metrics may need to be used for permit applications. For consumptive use permits, a radius of influence is often used, which is defined as the radius beyond which hydraulic impacts to the system are considered negligible. In this paper, the hydraulic radius of influence concept was examined using analytical and numerical methods for a non-consumptive GHP system in southeastern Washington State. At this location, the primary hydraulic concerns were impacts to nearby contaminant plumes and a water supply well field. The results of this study showed that the analytical techniques with idealized radial flow were generally unsuited because they over predicted the influence of the well system. The numerical techniques yielded more reasonable results because they could account for aquifer heterogeneities and flow boundaries. In particular, the use of a capture zone analysis was identified as the best method for determining potential changes in current contaminant plume trajectories. The capture zone analysis is a more quantitative and reliable tool for determining the radius of influence with a greater accuracy and better insight for a non-consumptive GHP assessment.

  13. Feedback control of waiting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions.

  14. Adaptation of a modern medium helicopter (Sikorsky S-76) to higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleary, J. J.; Kottapalli, S. B. R.; Davis, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Sikorsky Aircraft has performed analytical studies, design analyses, and risk reduction tests have been performed for Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) on the S-76. The S-76 is an 8 to 10,000 lb helicopter which cruises at 145 kts. Flight test hardware has been assembled, main servo frequency response tested and upgraded, aircraft control system shake tested and verified, open loop controllers designed and fabricated, closed loop controllers defined and evaluated, and rotors turning ground and flight tests planned for the near future. Open loop analysis shows that about 2 deg of higher harmonic feathering at the blade 75% radius will be required to eliminate 4P vibration in the cockpit.

  15. INTEGRATED ROBOT-HUMAN CONTROL IN MINING OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    George Danko

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the results of the 2nd year of a research project on the implementation of a novel human-robot control system for hydraulic machinery. Sensor and valve re-calibration experiments were conducted to improve open loop machine control. A Cartesian control example was tested both in simulation and on the machine; the results are discussed in detail. The machine tests included open-loop as well as closed-loop motion control. Both methods worked reasonably well, due to the high-quality electro-hydraulic valves used on the experimental machine. Experiments on 3-D analysis of the bucket trajectory using marker tracking software are also presented with the results obtained. Open-loop control is robustly stable and free of short-term dynamic problems, but it allows for drifting away from the desired motion kinematics of the machine. A novel, closed-loop control adjustment provides a remedy, while retaining much of the advantages of the open-loop control based on kinematics transformation. Additional analysis of previously recorded, three-dimensional working trajectories of the bucket of large mine shovels was completed. The motion patterns, when transformed into a family of curves, serve as the basis for software-controlled machine kinematics transformation in the new human-robot control system.

  16. Multivariable PID control by decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Juan; Vázquez, Francisco; Morilla, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new methodology to design multivariable proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers based on decoupling control. The method is presented for general n × n processes. In the design procedure, an ideal decoupling control with integral action is designed to minimise interactions. It depends on the desired open-loop processes that are specified according to realisability conditions and desired closed-loop performance specifications. These realisability conditions are stated and three common cases to define the open-loop processes are studied and proposed. Then, controller elements are approximated to PID structure. From a practical point of view, the wind-up problem is also considered and a new anti-wind-up scheme for multivariable PID controller is proposed. Comparisons with other works demonstrate the effectiveness of the methodology through the use of several simulation examples and an experimental lab process.

  17. PID Controller Settings Based on a Transient Response Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Carlos M.; Lito, Patricia F.; Neves, Patricia S.; Da Silva, Francisco A.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental work on controller tuning for chemical engineering undergraduate students is proposed using a small heat exchange unit. Based upon process reaction curves in open-loop configuration, system gain and time constant are determined for first order model with time delay with excellent accuracy. Afterwards students calculate PID…

  18. Simulation Exercises for an Undergraduate Digital Process Control Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Deborah E.; Schork, F. Joseph

    1988-01-01

    Presents six problems from an alternative approach to homework traditionally given to follow-up lectures. Stresses the advantage of longer term exercises which allow for creativity and independence on the part of the student. Problems include: "System Model,""Open-Loop Simulation,""PID Control,""Dahlin Algorithm,""Analytical Predictor," and…

  19. Two-Step Design Method of Engine Control System Based on Generalized Predictive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Seiji; Okuda, Hiroyuki; Okada, Yasushi; Adachi, Shuichi; Niwa, Shinji; Kajitani, Mitsunobu

    Conservation of the environment has become critical to the automotive industry. Recently, requirements for on-board diagnostic and engine control systems have been strictly enforced. In the present paper, in order to meet the requirements for a low-emissions vehicle, a novel construction method of the air-fuel ratio (A/F) control system is proposed. The construction method of the system is divided into two steps. The first step is to design the A/F control system for the engine based on an open loop design. The second step is to design the A/F control system for the catalyst system. The design method is based on the generalized predictive control in order to satisfy the robustness to open loop control as well as model uncertainty. The effectiveness of the proposed A/F control system is verified through experiments using full-scale products.

  20. Long-term pumping test to study the impact of an open-loop geothermal system on seawater intrusion in a coastal aquifer: the case study of Bari (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementina Caputo, Maria; Masciale, Rita; Masciopinto, Costantino; De Carlo, Lorenzo

    2016-04-01

    The high cost and scarcity of fossil fuels have promoted the increased use of natural heat for a number of direct applications. Just as for fossil fuels, the exploitation of geothermal energy should consider its environmental impact and sustainability. Particular attention deserves the so-called open loop geothermal groundwater heat pump (GWHP) system, which uses groundwater as geothermal fluid. From an economic point of view, the implementation of this kind of geothermal system is particularly attractive in coastal areas, which have generally shallow aquifers. Anyway the potential problem of seawater intrusion has led to laws that restrict the use of groundwater. The scarcity of freshwater could be a major impediment for the utilization of geothermal resources. In this study a new methodology has been proposed. It was based on an experimental approach to characterize a coastal area in order to exploit the low-enthalpy geothermal resource. The coastal karst and fractured aquifer near Bari, in Southern Italy, was selected for this purpose. For the purpose of investigating the influence of an open-loop GWHP system on the seawater intrusion, a long-term pumping test was performed. The test simulated the effects of a prolonged withdrawal on the chemical-physical groundwater characteristics of the studied aquifer portion. The duration of the test was programmed in 16 days, and it was performed with a constant pumping flowrate of 50 m3/h. The extracted water was outflowed into an adjacent artificial channel, by means of a piping system. Water depth, temperature and electrical conductivity of the pumped water were monitored for 37 days, including also some days before and after the pumping duration. The monitored parameters, collected in the pumping and in five observation wells placed 160 m down-gradient with respect to the groundwater flow direction, have been used to estimate different scenarios of the impact of the GWHP system on the seawater intrusion by mean of a

  1. Flexible body stability analysis of Space Shuttle ascent flight control system by using lambda matrix solution techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bown, R. L.; Christofferson, A.; Lardas, M.; Flanders, H.

    1980-01-01

    A lambda matrix solution technique is being developed to perform an open loop frequency analysis of a high order dynamic system. The procedure evaluates the right and left latent vectors corresponding to the respective latent roots. The latent vectors are used to evaluate the partial fraction expansion formulation required to compute the flexible body open loop feedback gains for the Space Shuttle Digital Ascent Flight Control System. The algorithm is in the final stages of development and will be used to insure that the feedback gains meet the design specification.

  2. Gust alleviation - Criteria and control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rynaski, E. G.

    1979-01-01

    The relationships between criteria specified for aircraft gust alleviation and the form of the control laws that result from the criteria are considered. Open-loop gust alleviation based on the linearized, small perturbation equations of aircraft motion is discussed, and an approximate solution of the open-loop control law is presented for the case in which the number of degrees of freedom of the aircraft exceeds the rank of the control effectiveness matrix. Excessive actuator lag is compensated for by taking into account actuator dynamics in the equations of motion, resulting in the specification of a general load network. Criteria for gust alleviation when output motions are gust alleviated and the closed-loop control law derived from them are examined and linear optimal control law is derived. Comparisons of the control laws reveal that the effectiveness of an open-loop control law is greatest at low aircraft frequencies but deteriorates as the natural frequency of the actuators is approached, while closed-loop methods are found to be more effective at higher frequencies.

  3. Action Control: Independent Effects of Memory and Monocular Viewing on Reaching Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, D.A.; Robertson, C.; Heath, M.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence suggests that perceptual networks in the ventral visual pathway are necessary for action control when targets are viewed with only one eye, or when the target must be stored in memory. We tested whether memory-linked (i.e., open-loop versus memory-guided actions) and monocular-linked effects (i.e., binocular versus monocular actions) on…

  4. Results of aircraft open-loop tests of an experimental magnetic leader cable system for guidance during roll-out and turnoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundick, W. Thomas; Middleton, David B.; Poole, William L.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental magnetic leader cable (MLC) system designed to measure aircraft lateral displacement from centerline and heading relative to centerline during rollout, turnoff, and taxi was tested at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility using NASA's Transport System Research Vehicle (TSRV), a modified B-737. The MLC system consisted of ground equipment that produced a magnetic field about a wire along runway centerline and airborne equipment that detected the strength and direction of this field and computed displacement and heading. Results of these tests indicate that estimates of aircraft displacement from centerline produced by the magnetic leader cable system using either of the two algorithms appear to be adequate for use by an automatic control system during rollout, turnoff, and taxi. Estimates of heading, however, are not sufficiently accurate for use, probably because of distortion of the magnetic field by the metal aircraft.

  5. Stability and variability: indicators for passive stability and active control in a rhythmic task.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kunlin; Dijkstra, Tjeerd M H; Sternad, Dagmar

    2008-06-01

    Using a rhythmic task where human subjects bounced a ball with a handheld racket, fine-grained analyses of stability and variability extricated contributions from open-loop control, noise strength, and active error compensation. Based on stability analyses of a stochastic-deterministic model of the task--a surface contacting the ball by periodic movements--open-loop or dynamic stability was assessed by the acceleration of the racket at contact. Autocovariance analyses of model and data were further used to gauge the contributions of open-loop stability and noise strength. Variability and regression analyses estimated active error compensation. Empirical results demonstrated that experienced actors exploited open-loop stability more than novices, had lower noise strength, and applied more active error compensations. By manipulating the model parameter coefficient of restitution, task stability was varied and showed that actors graded these three components as a function of task stability. It is concluded that actors tune into task stability when stability is high but use more active compensation when stability is reduced. Implications for the neural underpinnings for passive stability and active control are discussed. Further, results showed that stability and variability are not simply the inverse of each other but contain more quantitative information when combined with model analyses.

  6. Open-loop digital frequency multiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Monostable multivibrator is implemented by using digital integrated circuits where multiplier constant is too large for conventional phase-locked-loop integrated circuit. A 400 Hz clock is generated by divide-by-N counter from 1 Hz timing reference.

  7. Generalized Momentum Control of the Spin-Stabilized Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benegalrao, Suyog; Queen, Steven; Shah, Neerav; Blackman, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Angular momentum control maneuvers required to keep spin-axis in science box. Traditional approach uses de-coupled modes for pointing, spin, nutation Impractical for MMS Frequency and Number of maneuvers (Orbit Control, Pointing, Nutation, Spin, four observatories, every 2-4 weeks). Difficult to implement de-coupled open-loop control with flexible wire booms. Desire a unified angular momentum controller. Comprehensively control pointing, spin, and nutation.

  8. Multi-mode ultrasonic welding control and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jason C.H.; Cai, Wayne W

    2013-05-28

    A system and method for providing multi-mode control of an ultrasonic welding system. In one embodiment, the control modes include the energy of the weld, the time of the welding process and the compression displacement of the parts being welded during the welding process. The method includes providing thresholds for each of the modes, and terminating the welding process after the threshold for each mode has been reached, the threshold for more than one mode has been reached or the threshold for one of the modes has been reached. The welding control can be either open-loop or closed-loop, where the open-loop process provides the mode thresholds and once one or more of those thresholds is reached the welding process is terminated. The closed-loop control provides feedback of the weld energy and/or the compression displacement so that the weld power and/or weld pressure can be increased or decreased accordingly.

  9. Cycle time control of an onboard oxygen generation system.

    PubMed

    Beaman, J J; Wang, S Y; Masada, G Y

    1987-12-01

    The outlet oxygen concentration of an onboard oxygen generation system (OBOGS) is controlled in this study by varying the cycle time of a pressure swing adsorption process. The control of the oxygen concentration is highly desirable since both high and low concentrations of oxygen can cause physiological problems. This cycle time control method can be easily implemented using a DC motor and a simple electronic controller. The physiological requirements recommended for high-performance tactical aircraft can be met by this method with either an open-loop or closed-loop configuration. The open-loop configuration requires the measurement of crew breathing flowrate and cabin pressure. The closed-loop configuration requires an additional measurement of oxygen concentration, but it has the advantage of being more adaptive to system variability during setup and operation. The method in either configuration requires very little adjustment and setup time in order to meet the specifications.

  10. Attitude-Control Algorithm for Minimizing Maneuver Execution Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet

    2008-01-01

    A G-RAC attitude-control algorithm is used to minimize maneuver execution error in a spacecraft with a flexible appendage when said spacecraft must induce translational momentum by firing (in open loop) large thrusters along a desired direction for a given period of time. The controller is dynamic with two integrators and requires measurement of only the angular position and velocity of the spacecraft. The global stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed without having access to the states describing the dynamics of the appendage and with severe saturation in the available torque. Spacecraft apply open-loop thruster firings to induce a desired translational momentum with an extended appendage. This control algorithm will assist this maneuver by stabilizing the attitude dynamics around a desired orientation, and consequently minimize the maneuver execution errors.

  11. Combating dephasing decoherence by periodically performing tracking control and projective measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ming; Dai Hongyi; Xi Zairong; Xie Hongwei; Hu Dewen

    2007-10-15

    We propose a scheme to overcome phase damping decoherence by periodically performing open loop tracking control and projective measurement. Although it is impossible to stabilize a qubit subject to Markovian dynamics only by open loop coherent control, one can attain a 'softened' control goal with the help of periodical projective measurement. The 'softened' control objective in our scheme is to keep the state of the controlled qubit to stay near a reference pure state with a high probability for a sufficiently long time. Two suboptimal control problems are given in the sense of trace distance and fidelity, respectively, and they are eventually reduced to the design of a period T. In our scheme, one can choose the period T as long as possible if the 'softened' control goal is attained. This is in contrast to the observation that quantum Zeno effect takes place only if measurements are performed in a very frequent manner, i.e., the period T must be extremely small.

  12. Intermittent control models of human standing: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Gawthrop, Peter; Loram, Ian; Gollee, Henrik; Lakie, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Two architectures of intermittent control are compared and contrasted in the context of the single inverted pendulum model often used for describing standing in humans. The architectures are similar insofar as they use periods of open-loop control punctuated by switching events when crossing a switching surface to keep the system state trajectories close to trajectories leading to equilibrium. The architectures differ in two significant ways. Firstly, in one case, the open-loop control trajectory is generated by a system-matched hold, and in the other case, the open-loop control signal is zero. Secondly, prediction is used in one case but not the other. The former difference is examined in this paper. The zero control alternative leads to periodic oscillations associated with limit cycles; whereas the system-matched control alternative gives trajectories (including homoclinic orbits) which contain the equilibrium point and do not have oscillatory behaviour. Despite this difference in behaviour, it is further shown that behaviour can appear similar when either the system is perturbed by additive noise or the system-matched trajectory generation is perturbed. The purpose of the research is to come to a common approach for understanding the theoretical properties of the two alternatives with the twin aims of choosing which provides the best explanation of current experimental data (which may not, by itself, distinguish between the two alternatives) and suggesting future experiments to distinguish between the two alternatives.

  13. Computational alternatives to obtain time optimal jet engine control. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, R. J.; Leake, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Two computational methods to determine an open loop time optimal control sequence for a simple single spool turbojet engine are described by a set of nonlinear differential equations. Both methods are modifications of widely accepted algorithms which can solve fixed time unconstrained optimal control problems with a free right end. Constrained problems to be considered have fixed right ends and free time. Dynamic programming is defined on a standard problem and it yields a successive approximation solution to the time optimal problem of interest. A feedback control law is obtained and it is then used to determine the corresponding open loop control sequence. The Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient method has been selected for adaptation to solve a nonlinear optimal control problem with state variable and control constraints.

  14. Attitude control of spacecraft using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadali, Srinivas R.; Krishnan, S.; Singh, T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of radial basis function neural networks for adaptive attitude control and momentum management of spacecraft. In the first part of the paper, neural networks are trained to learn from a family of open-loop optimal controls parameterized by the initial states and times-to-go. The trained is then used for closed-loop control. In the second part of the paper, neural networks are used for direct adaptive control in the presence of unmodeled effects and parameter uncertainty. The control and learning laws are derived using the method of Lyapunov.

  15. An optimal PID controller via LQR for standard second order plus time delay systems.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Misra, Anuraag; Thakur, S K; Pandit, V S

    2016-01-01

    An improved tuning methodology of PID controller for standard second order plus time delay systems (SOPTD) is developed using the approach of Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and pole placement technique to obtain the desired performance measures. The pole placement method together with LQR is ingeniously used for SOPTD systems where the time delay part is handled in the controller output equation instead of characteristic equation. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology has been demonstrated via simulation of stable open loop oscillatory, over damped, critical damped and unstable open loop systems. Results show improved closed loop time response over the existing LQR based PI/PID tuning methods with less control effort. The effect of non-dominant pole on the stability and robustness of the controller has also been discussed.

  16. A hierarchical approach to large space structure control

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.D.

    1990-01-15

    Controlled Component Synthesis (CCS) is a CSI approach to decentralized control of large structures which was developed by the author in 1987. In the CCS process, instead of following the conventional control system design path which begins with a model of the open loop plant, the controlled plant is assembled from controlled components for which the modeling phase and the control design phase are integrated at the component level. In this paper, a hierarchical approach to large space structure control which utilizes the CCS process repeatedly in a multi-level setting is presented. 17 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Lessons Learned and Flight Results from the F15 Intelligent Flight Control System Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the lessons learned and flight results from the F15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) project is shown. The topics include: 1) F-15 IFCS Project Goals; 2) Motivation; 3) IFCS Approach; 4) NASA F-15 #837 Aircraft Description; 5) Flight Envelope; 6) Limited Authority System; 7) NN Floating Limiter; 8) Flight Experiment; 9) Adaptation Goals; 10) Handling Qualities Performance Metric; 11) Project Phases; 12) Indirect Adaptive Control Architecture; 13) Indirect Adaptive Experience and Lessons Learned; 14) Gen II Direct Adaptive Control Architecture; 15) Current Status; 16) Effect of Canard Multiplier; 17) Simulated Canard Failure Stab Open Loop; 18) Canard Multiplier Effect Closed Loop Freq. Resp.; 19) Simulated Canard Failure Stab Open Loop with Adaptation; 20) Canard Multiplier Effect Closed Loop with Adaptation; 21) Gen 2 NN Wts from Simulation; 22) Direct Adaptive Experience and Lessons Learned; and 23) Conclusions

  18. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures, 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Diarra, C. M.; Ananthakrishnan, S.

    1985-01-01

    A development of the in plane open loop rotational equations of motion for the proposed Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) in orbit configuration is presented based on an Eulerian formulation. The mast is considered to be a flexible beam connected to the (rigid) shuttle and the reflector. Frequencies and mode shapes are obtained for the mast vibrational appendage modes (assumed to be decoupled) for different boundary conditions based on continuum approaches and also preliminary results are obtained using a finite element representation of the mast reflector system. The linearized rotational in plane equation is characterized by periodic coefficients and open loop system stability can be examined with an application of the Floquet theorem. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the potential instability associated with actuator time delays even for delays which represent only a small fraction of the natural period of oscillation of the modes contained in the open loop model of the system. When plant and measurement noise effects are added to the previously designed deterministic model of the hoop column system, it is seen that both the system transient and steady state performance are degraded. Mission requirements can be satisfied by appropriate assignment of cost function weighting elements and changes in the ratio of plant noise to measurement noise.

  19. Modal Filtering for Control of Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2013-01-01

    Modal regulators and deformation trackers are designed for an open-loop fluttering wing model. The regulators are designed with modal coordinate and accelerometer inputs respectively. The modal coordinates are estimated with simulated fiber optics. The robust stability of the closed-loop systems is compared in a structured singular-value vector analysis. Performance is evaluated and compared in a gust alleviation and flutter suppression simulation. For the same wing and flight condition two wing-shape-tracking control architectures are presented, which achieve deformation control at any point on the wing.

  20. A platform for dynamic simulation and control of movement based on OpenSim and MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Misagh; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A

    2012-05-11

    Numerical simulations play an important role in solving complex engineering problems and have the potential to revolutionize medical decision making and treatment strategies. In this paper, we combine the rapid model-based design, control systems and powerful numerical method strengths of MATLAB/Simulink with the simulation and human movement dynamics strengths of OpenSim by developing a new interface between the two software tools. OpenSim is integrated with Simulink using the MATLAB S-function mechanism, and the interface is demonstrated using both open-loop and closed-loop control systems. While the open-loop system uses MATLAB/Simulink to separately reproduce the OpenSim Forward Dynamics Tool, the closed-loop system adds the unique feature of feedback control to OpenSim, which is necessary for most human movement simulations. An arm model example was successfully used in both open-loop and closed-loop cases. For the open-loop case, the simulation reproduced results from the OpenSim Forward Dynamics Tool with root mean square (RMS) differences of 0.03° for the shoulder elevation angle and 0.06° for the elbow flexion angle. MATLAB's variable step-size integrator reduced the time required to generate the forward dynamic simulation from 7.1s (OpenSim) to 2.9s (MATLAB). For the closed-loop case, a proportional-integral-derivative controller was used to successfully balance a pole on model's hand despite random force disturbances on the pole. The new interface presented here not only integrates the OpenSim and MATLAB/Simulink software tools, but also will allow neuroscientists, physiologists, biomechanists, and physical therapists to adapt and generate new solutions as treatments for musculoskeletal conditions.

  1. Spatiotemporal control and synchronization of flute modes and drift waves in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, F.; Bonhomme, G.; Gravier, E.; Oldenbuerger, S.; Philipp, M.

    2006-05-15

    An open-loop spatiotemporal synchronization method is applied to flute modes in a cylindrical magnetized plasma. It is demonstrated that synchronization can be achieved only if the exciter signal rotates in the same direction as the propagating mode. Moreover, the efficiency of the synchronization is shown to depend on the radial properties of the instability under consideration. It is also demonstrated that the control disposition can alternatively be used to produce strongly developed turbulence of drift waves or flute instabilities.

  2. Modelling and Control of an Annular Momentum Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James R.; Johnson, Bruce G.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a modelling and control study for an advanced momentum storage device supported on magnetic bearings are documented. The control challenge posed by this device lies in its dynamics being such a strong function of flywheel rotational speed. At high rotational speed, this can lead to open loop instabilities, resulting in requirements for minimum and maximum control bandwidths and gains for the stabilizing controllers. Using recently developed analysis tools for systems described by complex coefficient differential equations, the closed properties of the controllers were analyzed and stability properties established. Various feedback controllers are investigated and discussed. Both translational and angular dynamics compensators are developed, and measures of system stability and robustness to plant and operational speed variations are presented.

  3. Optimization of an Aeroservoelastic Wing with Distributed Multiple Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the aeroelastic optimization of a subsonic transport wingbox under a variety of static and dynamic aeroelastic constraints. Three types of design variables are utilized: structural variables (skin thickness, stiffener details), the quasi-steady deflection scheduling of a series of control surfaces distributed along the trailing edge for maneuver load alleviation and trim attainment, and the design details of an LQR controller, which commands oscillatory hinge moments into those same control surfaces. Optimization problems are solved where a closed loop flutter constraint is forced to satisfy the required flight margin, and mass reduction benefits are realized by relaxing the open loop flutter requirements.

  4. On-sky demonstration of optimal control for adaptive optics at Palomar Observatory.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Jonathan; Truong, Tuan; Burruss, Rick; Gibson, Steve

    2015-04-01

    High-order adaptive optics systems often suffer from significant computational latency, which ultimately limits the temporal error rejection bandwidth when classical controllers are employed. This Letter presents results from an on-sky, real-time implementation of an optimal controller on the PALM-3000 adaptive optics system at Palomar Observatory. The optimal controller is computed directly from open-loop wavefront measurements using a multichannel subspace system identification algorithm, and mitigates latency by explicitly predicting incident turbulence. Experimental results show a significant reduction in the residual wavefront error over the controlled spatial modes, illustrating the superior performance of the optimal control approach versus the nominal integral control architecture.

  5. Load limiting parachute inflation control

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Hinnerichs, T.; Parker, G.

    1994-01-01

    Excessive deceleration forces experienced during high speed deployment of parachute systems can cause damage to the payload and the canopy fabric. Conventional reefing lines offer limited relief by temporarily restricting canopy inflation and limiting the peak deceleration load. However, the open-loop control provided by existing reefing devices restrict their use to a specific set of deployment conditions. In this paper, the sensing, processing, and actuation that are characteristic of adaptive structures form the basis of three concepts for active control of parachute inflation. These active control concepts are incorporated into a computer simulation of parachute inflation. Initial investigations indicate that these concepts promise enhanced performance as compared to conventional techniques for a nominal release. Furthermore, the ability of each controller to adapt to off-nominal release conditions is examined.

  6. Proof of quasi-adaptivity for the m-measurement feedback class of stochastic control policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    1987-01-01

    Bounds on expected performance are established which show that the m-measurement feedback (mM) policy for nonlinear stochastic control performs as well or better than the open-loop optimal control policy, and thus is quasi-adaptive in the sense of Witenhausen (1966). The chain of performance inequalities indicate a tendency for the mM policy performance to improve with increasing m. It is suggested that the present analytical method, based on the construction of artificial control sequences denoted as utility controls, can be used to establish performance bounds on other well-known policies, avoiding the extensive Monte Carlo simulations necessary in comparing stochastic control policies.

  7. Transform methods for precision continuum and control models of flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupi, Victor D.; Turner, James D.; Chun, Hon M.

    1991-01-01

    An open loop optimal control algorithm is developed for general flexible structures, based on Laplace transform methods. A distributed parameter model of the structure is first presented, followed by a derivation of the optimal control algorithm. The control inputs are expressed in terms of their Fourier series expansions, so that a numerical solution can be easily obtained. The algorithm deals directly with the transcendental transfer functions from control inputs to outputs of interest, and structural deformation penalties, as well as penalties on control effort, are included in the formulation. The algorithm is applied to several structures of increasing complexity to show its generality.

  8. Game Theoretic Approach to Post-Docked Satellite Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Fitz-Coy, Norman G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the interaction between two satellites after docking. In order to maintain the docked state with uncertainty in the motion of the target vehicle, a game theoretic controller with Stackelberg strategy to minimize the interaction between the satellites is considered. The small perturbation approximation leads to LQ differential game scheme, which is validated to address the docking interactions between a service vehicle and a target vehicle. The open-loop solution are compared with Nash strategy, and it is shown that less control efforts are obtained with Stackelberg strategy.

  9. Precision positioning system based on intelligent Fuzzy-PID control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Liqiong; Li, Yan

    2010-08-01

    To break through the limitations of static and dynamic characteristics of conventional step motor driven open-loop positioning devices, a two-dimensional precision positioning system with a travel range of 100mm×100mm has been developed. This paper presents its structure, control principle and performance experiments. This system, equipped with cross roller guides working as linear guiding elements, is driven by step motors through ball screw transmission. A threeaxis dual-frequency laser interferometric measurement system is established for real-time measurement and feedback of system's movements in three degrees of freedom (DOF) and an intelligent Fuzzy-PID controller is implemented for this system's motion control. In the controller, the PID module calculates the output from motor drivers and its initial parameters are tuned through expansion of critical proportioning method; the Fuzzy module optimizes PID parameters to fulfill specific requirements of different movement stages. A dead zone control mechanism is developed in this controller to minimize the oscillations around target position. Experimental results indicate that system with Fuzzy-PID controller shows faster response than that with ordinary PID controller. Moreover, with this controller implemented, the developed precision positioning system achieves better repeatability (+/-2μm) and accuracy (+/-2.5μm) within the full range than open-loop system using step motor.

  10. Control of Disruptive Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, S. A.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In tokamak devices, at critical values of discharge parameters (n_ e, q(a), beta) the plasma can suddenly be terminated. The process is called a disruption. It is a major limitation in the operation of tokamaks, not only because of the limitation it imposes on the operation parameter space, but also due to the severe thermal and electromechanical loadings on the vessel. These difficulties and implications for fusion reactors have attracted increasing attention and a variety of approaches in the attempt to avoid, reduce or overcome the problem have been investigated. The growth of a magnetic perturbation is believed to be responsible for the disruptive process, and previous experiments have examined the effect on this perturbation of magnetic feedback. In DITE experiments have been done to extend this work by using a more sophisticated feedback loop. The detector-coils and feedback saddle-coils (configured to treat the m = 21, n = 1 structure which is dominant in disruption precursors) were mounted inside the vacuum vessel and fast programmable loop-gain and loop-phase controllers were used. Open-loop experiments contained studies of mode locking and plasma response to applied (2,1) fields. The feedback work explored the effect on disruption precursors over a large area in parameter space and was the first to address in detail the effect of feedback on disruptions. Both open-loop and feedback experiments were conducted on Ohmic discharges and discharges with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD). The experiments have demonstrated disruption precursor control in both types of discharge. Disruptions were studied in Ohmic plasmas. They were postponed and the density limit was extended.

  11. Speed and pressure control system design and simulation for a compression press

    SciTech Connect

    Floersch, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    A new system design using closed loop control on the hydraulic system on compression transfer presses used to make filled elastomer parts will improve accuracy and repeatability of speed and pressure control during critical pre-cure forming stages. The present open loop system does not provide the control necessary to mold repeatably the filled elastomer products. These products form with great difficulty because of high loading levels of filler materials. The new system will mean improved wall thickness control of loaded elastomer parts, thus reducing the amount of scrap caused by wall thickness variations.

  12. Automated generation of discrete event controllers for dynamic reconfiguration of autonomous sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, Sarah; Griffin, Christopher; Phoha, Shashi

    2003-12-01

    Autonomous Sensor Networks have the potential for broad applicability to national security, intelligent transportation, industrial production and environmental and hazardous process control. Distributed sensors may be used for detecting bio-terrorist attacks, for contraband interdiction, border patrol, monitoring building safety and security, battlefield surveillance, or may be embedded in complex dynamic systems for enabling fault tolerant operations. In this paper we present algorithms and automation tools for constructing discrete event controllers for complex networked systems that restrict the dynamic behavior of the system according to given specifications. In our previous work we have modeled dynamic system as a discrete event automation whose open loop behavior is represented as a language L of strings generated with the alphabet 'Elipson' of all possible atomic events that cause state transitions in the network. The controlled behavior is represented by a sublanguage K, contained in L, that restricts the behavior of the system according to the specifications of the controller. We have developed the algebraic structure of controllable sublanguages as perfect right partial ideals that satisfy a precontrollability condition. In this paper we develop an iterative algorithm to take an ad hoc specification described using a natural language, and to formulate a complete specification that results in a controllable sublanguage. A supervisory controller modeled as an automaton that runs synchronously with the open loop system in the sense of Ramadge and Wonham is automatically generated to restrict the behavior of the open loop system to the controllable sublanguage. A battlefield surveillance scenario illustrates the iterative evolution of ad hoc specifications for controlling an autonomous sensor network and the generation of a controller that reconfigures the sensor network to dynamically adapt to environmental perturbations.

  13. Feed forward and feedback control for over-ground locomotion in anaesthetized cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, K. A.; Holinski, B. J.; Everaert, D. G.; Stein, R. B.; Etienne-Cummings, R.; Mushahwar, V. K.

    2012-04-01

    The biological central pattern generator (CPG) integrates open and closed loop control to produce over-ground walking. The goal of this study was to develop a physiologically based algorithm capable of mimicking the biological system to control multiple joints in the lower extremities for producing over-ground walking. The algorithm used state-based models of the step cycle each of which produced different stimulation patterns. Two configurations were implemented to restore over-ground walking in five adult anaesthetized cats using intramuscular stimulation (IMS) of the main hip, knee and ankle flexor and extensor muscles in the hind limbs. An open loop controller relied only on intrinsic timing while a hybrid-CPG controller added sensory feedback from force plates (representing limb loading), and accelerometers and gyroscopes (representing limb position). Stimulation applied to hind limb muscles caused extension or flexion in the hips, knees and ankles. A total of 113 walking trials were obtained across all experiments. Of these, 74 were successful in which the cats traversed 75% of the 3.5 m over-ground walkway. In these trials, the average peak step length decreased from 24.9 ± 8.4 to 21.8 ± 7.5 (normalized units) and the median number of steps per trial increased from 7 (Q1 = 6, Q3 = 9) to 9 (8, 11) with the hybrid-CPG controller. Moreover, within these trials, the hybrid-CPG controller produced more successful steps (step length ≤ 20 cm ground reaction force ≥ 12.5% body weight) than the open loop controller: 372 of 544 steps (68%) versus 65 of 134 steps (49%), respectively. This supports our previous preliminary findings, and affirms that physiologically based hybrid-CPG approaches produce more successful stepping than open loop controllers. The algorithm provides the foundation for a neural prosthetic controller and a framework to implement more detailed control of locomotion in the future.

  14. Feed forward and feedback control for over-ground locomotion in anaesthetized cats

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, K A; Holinski, B J; Everaert, D G; Stein, R B; Etienne-Cummings, R; Mushahwar, V K

    2012-01-01

    The biological central pattern generator (CPG) integrates open and closed loop control to produce over-ground walking. The goal of this study was to develop a physiologically based algorithm capable of mimicking the biological system to control multiple joints in the lower extremities for producing over-ground walking. The algorithm used state-based models of the step cycle each of which produced different stimulation patterns. Two configurations were implemented to restore over-ground walking in five adult anaesthetized cats using intramuscular stimulation (IMS) of the main hip, knee and ankle flexor and extensor muscles in the hind limbs. An open loop controller relied only on intrinsic timing while a hybrid-CPG controller added sensory feedback from force plates (representing limb loading), and accelerometers and gyroscopes (representing limb position). Stimulation applied to hind limb muscles caused extension or flexion in the hips, knees and ankles. A total of 113 walking trials were obtained across all experiments. Of these, 74 were successful in which the cats traversed 75% of the 3.5 m over-ground walkway. In these trials, the average peak step length decreased from 24.9 ± 8.4 to 21.8 ± 7.5 (normalized units) and the median number of steps per trial increased from 7 (Q1=6, Q3 = 9) to 9 (8, 11) with the hybrid-CPG controller. Moreover, these trials, the hybrid-CPG controller produced more successful steps (step length ≤ 20 cm; ground reaction force ≥ 12.5% body weight) than the open loop controller: 372 of 544 steps (68%) versus 65 of 134 steps (49%), respectively. This supports our previous preliminary findings, and affirms that physiologically based hybrid-CPG approaches produce more successful stepping than open loop controllers. The algorithm provides the foundation for a neural prosthetic controller and a framework to implement more detailed control of locomotion in the future. PMID:22328615

  15. Feedback control of chlorine inductively coupled plasma etch processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chaung; Leou, K.-C.; Shiao, K.-M.

    2005-03-01

    Feedback control has been applied to poly-Si etch processing using a chlorine inductively coupled plasma. Since the positive ion flux and ion energy incident upon the wafer surface are the key factors that influence the etch rate, the ion current and the root mean square (rms) rf voltage on the wafer stage, which are measured using an impedance meter connected to the wafer stage, are adopted as the controlled variables to enhance etch rate. The actuators are two 13.56 MHz rf power generators, which adjust ion density and ion energy, respectively. The results of closed-loop control show that the advantages of feedback control can be achieved. For example, with feedback control, etch rate variation under the transient chamber wall condition is reduced roughly by a factor of 2 as compared to the open-loop case. In addition, the capability of the disturbance rejection was also investigated. For a gas pressure variation of 20%, the largest etch rate variation is about 2.4% with closed-loop control as compared with as large as about 6% variation using open-loop control. Also the effect of ion current and rms rf voltage on etch rate was studied using 2{sup 2} factorial design whose results were used to derive a model equation. The obtained formula was used to adjust the set point of ion current and rf voltage so that the desired etch rate was obtained.

  16. Spacecraft attitude control using neuro-fuzzy approximation of the optimal controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Woo; Park, Sang-Young; Park, Chandeok

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a neuro-fuzzy controller (NFC) was developed for spacecraft attitude control to mitigate large computational load of the state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE) controller. The NFC was developed by training a neuro-fuzzy network to approximate the SDRE controller. The stability of the NFC was numerically verified using a Lyapunov-based method, and the performance of the controller was analyzed in terms of approximation ability, steady-state error, cost, and execution time. The simulations and test results indicate that the developed NFC efficiently approximates the SDRE controller, with asymptotic stability in a bounded region of angular velocity encompassing the operational range of rapid-attitude maneuvers. In addition, it was shown that an approximated optimal feedback controller can be designed successfully through neuro-fuzzy approximation of the optimal open-loop controller.

  17. Information-theoretic limits of control

    PubMed

    Touchette; Lloyd

    2000-02-01

    Fundamental limits on the controllability of physical systems are discussed in the light of information theory. It is shown that the second law of thermodynamics, when generalized to include information, sets absolute limits to the minimum amount of dissipation required by open-loop control. In addition, an information-theoretic analysis of control systems shows feedback control to be a zero sum game: each bit of information gathered from a dynamical system by a control device can serve to decrease the entropy of that system by at most one bit additional to the reduction of entropy attainable without such information. Consequences for the control of discrete state systems and chaotic maps are discussed. PMID:11017467

  18. Intermittent control: a computational theory of human control.

    PubMed

    Gawthrop, Peter; Loram, Ian; Lakie, Martin; Gollee, Henrik

    2011-02-01

    The paradigm of continuous control using internal models has advanced understanding of human motor control. However, this paradigm ignores some aspects of human control, including intermittent feedback, serial ballistic control, triggered responses and refractory periods. It is shown that event-driven intermittent control provides a framework to explain the behaviour of the human operator under a wider range of conditions than continuous control. Continuous control is included as a special case, but sampling, system matched hold, an intermittent predictor and an event trigger allow serial open-loop trajectories using intermittent feedback. The implementation here may be described as "continuous observation, intermittent action". Beyond explaining unimodal regulation distributions in common with continuous control, these features naturally explain refractoriness and bimodal stabilisation distributions observed in double stimulus tracking experiments and quiet standing, respectively. Moreover, given that human control systems contain significant time delays, a biological-cybernetic rationale favours intermittent over continuous control: intermittent predictive control is computationally less demanding than continuous predictive control. A standard continuous-time predictive control model of the human operator is used as the underlying design method for an event-driven intermittent controller. It is shown that when event thresholds are small and sampling is regular, the intermittent controller can masquerade as the underlying continuous-time controller and thus, under these conditions, the continuous-time and intermittent controller cannot be distinguished. This explains why the intermittent control hypothesis is consistent with the continuous control hypothesis for certain experimental conditions.

  19. Flutter suppression digital control law design and testing for the AFW wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1992-01-01

    Design of a control law for simultaneously suppressing the symmetric and antisymmetric flutter modes of a string mounted fixed-in-roll aeroelastic wind tunnel model is described. The flutter suppression control law was designed using linear quadratic Gaussian theory and involved control law order reduction, a gain root-locus study, and the use of previous experimental results. A 23 percent increase in open-loop flutter dynamic pressure was demonstrated during the wind tunnel test. Rapid roll maneuvers at 11 percent above the symmetric flutter boundary were also performed when the model was in a free-to-roll configuration.

  20. Flutter suppression digital control law design and testing for the AFW wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1994-01-01

    The design of a control law for simultaneously suppressing the symmetric and antisymmetric flutter modes of a sting mounted fixed-in-roll aeroelastic wind-tunnel model is described. The flutter suppression control law was designed using linear quadratic Gaussian theory, and it also involved control law order reduction, a gain root-locus study, and use of previous experimental results. A 23 percent increase in the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure was demonstrated during the wind-tunnel test. Rapid roll maneuvers at 11 percent above the symmetric flutter boundary were also performed when the model was in a free-to-roll configuration.

  1. Lyapunov Stabilizability of Controlled Diffusions via a Superoptimality Principle for Viscosity Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cesaroni, Annalisa

    2006-01-15

    We prove optimality principles for semicontinuous bounded viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations. In particular, we provide a representation formula for viscosity supersolutions as value functions of suitable obstacle control problems. This result is applied to extend the Lyapunov direct method for stability to controlled Ito stochastic differential equations. We define the appropriate concept of the Lyapunov function to study stochastic open loop stabilizability in probability and local and global asymptotic stabilizability (or asymptotic controllability). Finally, we illustrate the theory with some examples.

  2. Users manual for flight control design programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalbandian, J. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Computer programs for the design of analog and digital flight control systems are documented. The program DIGADAPT uses linear-quadratic-gaussian synthesis algorithms in the design of command response controllers and state estimators, and it applies covariance propagation analysis to the selection of sampling intervals for digital systems. Program SCHED executes correlation and regression analyses for the development of gain and trim schedules to be used in open-loop explicit-adaptive control laws. A linear-time-varying simulation of aircraft motions is provided by the program TVHIS, which includes guidance and control logic, as well as models for control actuator dynamics. The programs are coded in FORTRAN and are compiled and executed on both IBM and CDC computers.

  3. Automatic control of bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Stanke, Marc; Hitzmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, different approaches for open-loop and closed-loop control applied in bioprocess automation are discussed. Although in recent years many contributions dealing with closed-loop control have been published, only a minority were actually applied in real bioprocesses, the majority being simulations. As a result of the diversity of bioprocess requirements, a single control algorithm cannot be applied in all cases; rather, different approaches are necessary. Most publications combine different closed-loop control techniques to construct hybrid systems. These systems are supposed to combine the advantages of each approach into a well-performing control strategy. The majority of applications are soft sensors in combination with a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. The fact that soft sensors have become this importance for control purposes demonstrates the lack of direct measurements or their large additional expense for robust and reliable online measurement systems. The importance of model predictive control is increasing; however, reliable and robust process models are required, as well as very powerful computers to address the computational needs. The lack of theoretical bioprocess models is compensated by hybrid systems combining theoretical models, fuzzy logic, and/or artificial neural network methodology. Although many authors suggest a possible transfer of their presented control application to other bioprocesses, the algorithms are mostly specialized to certain organisms or certain cultivation conditions as well as to a specific measurement system. PMID:23307293

  4. Control and structural optimization for maneuvering large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, H. M.; Turner, J. D.; Yu, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Presented here are the results of an advanced control design as well as a discussion of the requirements for automating both the structures and control design efforts for maneuvering a large spacecraft. The advanced control application addresses a general three dimensional slewing problem, and is applied to a large geostationary platform. The platform consists of two flexible antennas attached to the ends of a flexible truss. The control strategy involves an open-loop rigid body control profile which is derived from a nonlinear optimal control problem and provides the main control effort. A perturbation feedback control reduces the response due to the flexibility of the structure. Results are shown which demonstrate the usefulness of the approach. Software issues are considered for developing an integrated structures and control design environment.

  5. Load-limiting parachute inflation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, James M.; Hinnerichs, Terry D.; Parker, Gordon G.

    1994-05-01

    Excessive deceleration forces experienced during high speed deployment of parachute systems can cause damage to the payload and the canopy fabric. Conventional reefing lines offer limited relief by temporarily restricting canopy inflation and limiting the peak deceleration load. However, the open-loop control provided by existing reefing devices restrict their use to a specific set of deployment conditions. In this paper, the sensing, processing, and actuation that are characteristic of adaptive structures form the basis of three concepts for active control of parachute inflation. These active control concepts are incorporated into a computer simulation of parachute inflation. Initial investigations indicate that these concepts promise enhanced performance as compared to conventional techniques for a nominal release. Furthermore, the ability of each controller to adapt to off-nominal release conditions is examined.

  6. Structural Damage Detection Using Virtual Passive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents novel approaches for structural damage detection which uses the virtual passive controllers attached to structures, where passive controllers are energy dissipative devices and thus guarantee the closed-loop stability. The use of the identified parameters of various closed-loop systems can solve the problem that reliable identified parameters, such as natural frequencies of the open-loop system may not provide enough information for damage detection. Only a small number of sensors are required for the proposed approaches. The identified natural frequencies, which are generally much less sensitive to noise and more reliable than the identified natural frequencies, are used for damage detection. Two damage detection techniques are presented. One technique is based on the structures with direct output feedback controllers while the other technique uses the second-order dynamic feedback controllers. A least-squares technique, which is based on the sensitivity of natural frequencies to damage variables, is used for accurately identifying the damage variables.

  7. Improvements on adaptive optics control approaches: experimental tests of wavefront correction forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Stangalini, Marco; Giovannelli, Luca; Berrilli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The FORS (closed loop forecasting system) control algorithm has been already successfully applied to improve the efficiency of a simulated adaptive optics (AO) system. To test its performance in real conditions, we implemented this algorithm in a hardware AO demonstrator, introducing controlled aberrations into the system. We present here the results of introducing into the system both a simple periodic defocus aberration and a real open loop defocus time sequence acquired at the vacuum tower telescope solar telescope. In both cases, FORS yields a significant performance increase, improving the stability of the system in closed-loop conditions and decreasing the amplitude of the residual uncorrected wavefront aberrations.

  8. Optimal actuator location of minimum norm controls for heat equation with general controlled domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bao-Zhu; Xu, Yashan; Yang, Dong-Hui

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study optimal actuator location of the minimum norm controls for a multi-dimensional heat equation with control defined in the space L2 (Ω × (0 , T)). The actuator domain is time-varying in the sense that it is only required to have a prescribed Lebesgue measure for any moment. We select an optimal actuator location so that the optimal control takes its minimal norm over all possible actuator domains. We build a framework of finding the Nash equilibrium so that we can develop a sufficient and necessary condition to characterize the optimal relaxed solutions for both actuator location and corresponding optimal control of the open-loop system. The existence and uniqueness of the optimal classical solutions are therefore concluded. As a result, we synthesize both optimal actuator location and corresponding optimal control into a time-varying feedbacks.

  9. Tracking-refinement modeling for solar-collector control

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, F.

    1980-01-01

    A closed-loop sun-tracking control used in conjunction with an open-loop system can utilize the unique features of both methods to obtain an improved sun-tracking capability. The open-loop part of the system uses a computer with clock and ephemeris input to acquire the sun at startup, to provide alignment during cloud passage, and to give an approximate sun-tracking capability throughout the day. The closed-loop portion of the system refines this alignment in order to maximize the collected solar power. For a parabolic trough that utilizes a tube along its focal line to collect energy in a fluid, a resistance wire attached to the tube can provide the sensor for the closed-loop part of the control. This kind of tracking refinement helps to compensate for such time-dependent effects as sag of the absorber tube and deformation of the concentrator surface from gravity or wind loading, temperature gradients, and manufacturing tolerances. A model is developed to explain the behavior of a resistance wire which is wrapped around the absorber tube of a parabolic-trough concentrator and used as a sensor in a tracking-refinement control.

  10. System/observer/controller identification toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.; Phan, Minh

    1992-01-01

    System Identification is the process of constructing a mathematical model from input and output data for a system under testing, and characterizing the system uncertainties and measurement noises. The mathematical model structure can take various forms depending upon the intended use. The SYSTEM/OBSERVER/CONTROLLER IDENTIFICATION TOOLBOX (SOCIT) is a collection of functions, written in MATLAB language and expressed in M-files, that implements a variety of modern system identification techniques. For an open loop system, the central features of the SOCIT are functions for identification of a system model and its corresponding forward and backward observers directly from input and output data. The system and observers are represented by a discrete model. The identified model and observers may be used for controller design of linear systems as well as identification of modal parameters such as dampings, frequencies, and mode shapes. For a closed-loop system, an observer and its corresponding controller gain directly from input and output data.

  11. Maneuvering and control of flexible space robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, Leonard; Lim, Seungchul

    1994-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a flexible space robot capable of maneuvering payloads. The robot is assumed to consist of two hinge-connected flexible arms and a rigid end-effector holding a payload; the robot is mounted on a rigid platform floating in space. The equations of motion are nonlinear and of high order. Based on the assumption that the maneuvering motions are one order of magnitude larger than the elastic vibrations, a perturbation approach permits design of controls for the two types of motion separately. The rigid-body maneuvering is carried out open loop, but the elastic motions are controlled closed loop, by means of discrete-time linear quadratic regulator theory with prescribed degree of stability. A numerical example demonstrates the approach. In the example, the controls derived by the perturbation approach are applied to the original nonlinear system and errors are found to be relatively small.

  12. Adaptive Control Using Residual Mode Filters Applied to Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Many dynamic systems containing a large number of modes can benefit from adaptive control techniques, which are well suited to applications that have unknown parameters and poorly known operating conditions. In this paper, we focus on a model reference direct adaptive control approach that has been extended to handle adaptive rejection of persistent disturbances. We extend this adaptive control theory to accommodate problematic modal subsystems of a plant that inhibit the adaptive controller by causing the open-loop plant to be non-minimum phase. We will augment the adaptive controller using a Residual Mode Filter (RMF) to compensate for problematic modal subsystems, thereby allowing the system to satisfy the requirements for the adaptive controller to have guaranteed convergence and bounded gains. We apply these theoretical results to design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility-scale, variable-speed wind turbine that has minimum phase zeros.

  13. Motion and force control for multiple cooperative manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    The motion and force control of multiple robot arms manipulating a commonly held object is addressed. A general control paradigm that decouples the motion and force control problems is introduced. For motion control, there are three natural choices: (1) joint torques, (2) arm-tip force vectors, and (3) the acceleration of a generalized coordinate. Choice (1) allows a class of relatively model-independent control laws by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the open-loop system; (2) and (3) require the full model information but produce simpler problems. To resolve the nonuniqueness of the joint torques, two methods are introduced. If the arm and object models are available, the allocation of the desired end-effector control force to the joint actuators can be optimized; otherwise the internal force can be controlled about some set point. It is shown that effective force regulation can be achieved even if little model information is available.

  14. Robust control of flexible space vehicles with minimum structural excitation: On-off pulse control of flexible space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Liu, Qiang

    1992-01-01

    Both feedback and feedforward control approaches for uncertain dynamical systems (in particular, with uncertainty in structural mode frequency) are investigated. The control objective is to achieve a fast settling time (high performance) and robustness (insensitivity) to plant uncertainty. Preshaping of an ideal, time optimal control input using a tapped-delay filter is shown to provide a fast settling time with robust performance. A robust, non-minimum-phase feedback controller is synthesized with particular emphasis on its proper implementation for a non-zero set-point control problem. It is shown that a properly designed, feedback controller performs well, as compared with a time optimal open loop controller with special preshaping for performance robustness. Also included are two separate papers by the same authors on this subject.

  15. Constant-current control method of multi-function electromagnetic transmitter.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kaichang; Zhou, Fengdao; Wang, Shuang; Lin, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Based on the requirements of controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric, DC resistivity, and induced polarization, a constant-current control method is proposed. Using the required current waveforms in prospecting as a standard, the causes of current waveform distortion and current waveform distortion's effects on prospecting are analyzed. A cascaded topology is adopted to achieve 40 kW constant-current transmitter. The responsive speed and precision are analyzed. According to the power circuit of the transmitting system, the circuit structure of the pulse width modulation (PWM) constant-current controller is designed. After establishing the power circuit model of the transmitting system and the PWM constant-current controller model, analyzing the influence of ripple current, and designing an open-loop transfer function according to the amplitude-frequency characteristic curves, the parameters of the PWM constant-current controller are determined. The open-loop transfer function indicates that the loop gain is no less than 28 dB below 160 Hz, which assures the responsive speed of the transmitting system; the phase margin is 45°, which assures the stabilization of the transmitting system. Experimental results verify that the proposed constant-current control method can keep the control error below 4% and can effectively suppress load change caused by the capacitance of earth load. PMID:25725863

  16. Optimizing Structural Active Control Force Using the Exterior Penalty Function Method

    SciTech Connect

    Tavassoli, Mohammad Reza; Amini, Fereidoun

    2008-07-08

    A new method for optimizing the control force in a closed-open loop control system has been developed. In this method which applies the complete feedback, structural responses including displacement, velocity, acceleration and also the excitation forces are used to determine the required control forces. In a closed-open loop control system, applying control force is equivalent to making changes in the mass, damping and stiffness matrices of the structure and the external force vector. Assuming these changes are linear and proportional to their initial values, the minimization of control force depends on the optimal values of the proportion coefficients. This idea leads to a constrained optimization problem of n-variable, which has been solved by using the exterior penalty function method and the Powell's search algorithm. The peak control force is the objective function of this optimization problem and the proportion coefficients are the design variables. The supposed limitation of the structural responses comprises the constraints of the problem. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by some numerical examples.

  17. Optimizing Structural Active Control Force Using the Exterior Penalty Function Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, Mohammad Reza; Amini, Fereidoun

    2008-07-01

    A new method for optimizing the control force in a closed-open loop control system has been developed. In this method which applies the complete feedback, structural responses including displacement, velocity, acceleration and also the excitation forces are used to determine the required control forces. In a closed-open loop control system, applying control force is equivalent to making changes in the mass, damping and stiffness matrices of the structure and the external force vector. Assuming these changes are linear and proportional to their initial values, the minimization of control force depends on the optimal values of the proportion coefficients. This idea leads to a constrained optimization problem of n-variable, which has been solved by using the exterior penalty function method and the Powell's search algorithm. The peak control force is the objective function of this optimization problem and the proportion coefficients are the design variables. The supposed limitation of the structural responses comprises the constraints of the problem. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by some numerical examples.

  18. Behavioural system identification of visual flight speed control in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rohrseitz, Nicola; Fry, Steven N

    2011-02-01

    Behavioural control in many animals involves complex mechanisms with intricate sensory-motor feedback loops. Modelling allows functional aspects to be captured without relying on a description of the underlying complex, and often unknown, mechanisms. A wide range of engineering techniques are available for modelling, but their ability to describe time-continuous processes is rarely exploited to describe sensory-motor control mechanisms in biological systems. We performed a system identification of visual flight speed control in the fruitfly Drosophila, based on an extensive dataset of open-loop responses previously measured under free flight conditions. We identified a second-order under-damped control model with just six free parameters that well describes both the transient and steady-state characteristics of the open-loop data. We then used the identified control model to predict flight speed responses after a visual perturbation under closed-loop conditions and validated the model with behavioural measurements performed in free-flying flies under the same closed-loop conditions. Our system identification of the fruitfly's flight speed response uncovers the high-level control strategy of a fundamental flight control reflex without depending on assumptions about the underlying physiological mechanisms. The results are relevant for future investigations of the underlying neuromotor processing mechanisms, as well as for the design of biomimetic robots, such as micro-air vehicles.

  19. Constant-current control method of multi-function electromagnetic transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kaichang; Zhou, Fengdao; Wang, Shuang; Lin, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Based on the requirements of controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric, DC resistivity, and induced polarization, a constant-current control method is proposed. Using the required current waveforms in prospecting as a standard, the causes of current waveform distortion and current waveform distortion's effects on prospecting are analyzed. A cascaded topology is adopted to achieve 40 kW constant-current transmitter. The responsive speed and precision are analyzed. According to the power circuit of the transmitting system, the circuit structure of the pulse width modulation (PWM) constant-current controller is designed. After establishing the power circuit model of the transmitting system and the PWM constant-current controller model, analyzing the influence of ripple current, and designing an open-loop transfer function according to the amplitude-frequency characteristic curves, the parameters of the PWM constant-current controller are determined. The open-loop transfer function indicates that the loop gain is no less than 28 dB below 160 Hz, which assures the responsive speed of the transmitting system; the phase margin is 45°, which assures the stabilization of the transmitting system. Experimental results verify that the proposed constant-current control method can keep the control error below 4% and can effectively suppress load change caused by the capacitance of earth load.

  20. Constant-current control method of multi-function electromagnetic transmitter.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kaichang; Zhou, Fengdao; Wang, Shuang; Lin, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Based on the requirements of controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric, DC resistivity, and induced polarization, a constant-current control method is proposed. Using the required current waveforms in prospecting as a standard, the causes of current waveform distortion and current waveform distortion's effects on prospecting are analyzed. A cascaded topology is adopted to achieve 40 kW constant-current transmitter. The responsive speed and precision are analyzed. According to the power circuit of the transmitting system, the circuit structure of the pulse width modulation (PWM) constant-current controller is designed. After establishing the power circuit model of the transmitting system and the PWM constant-current controller model, analyzing the influence of ripple current, and designing an open-loop transfer function according to the amplitude-frequency characteristic curves, the parameters of the PWM constant-current controller are determined. The open-loop transfer function indicates that the loop gain is no less than 28 dB below 160 Hz, which assures the responsive speed of the transmitting system; the phase margin is 45°, which assures the stabilization of the transmitting system. Experimental results verify that the proposed constant-current control method can keep the control error below 4% and can effectively suppress load change caused by the capacitance of earth load.

  1. Behavioural system identification of visual flight speed control in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rohrseitz, Nicola; Fry, Steven N.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural control in many animals involves complex mechanisms with intricate sensory-motor feedback loops. Modelling allows functional aspects to be captured without relying on a description of the underlying complex, and often unknown, mechanisms. A wide range of engineering techniques are available for modelling, but their ability to describe time-continuous processes is rarely exploited to describe sensory-motor control mechanisms in biological systems. We performed a system identification of visual flight speed control in the fruitfly Drosophila, based on an extensive dataset of open-loop responses previously measured under free flight conditions. We identified a second-order under-damped control model with just six free parameters that well describes both the transient and steady-state characteristics of the open-loop data. We then used the identified control model to predict flight speed responses after a visual perturbation under closed-loop conditions and validated the model with behavioural measurements performed in free-flying flies under the same closed-loop conditions. Our system identification of the fruitfly's flight speed response uncovers the high-level control strategy of a fundamental flight control reflex without depending on assumptions about the underlying physiological mechanisms. The results are relevant for future investigations of the underlying neuromotor processing mechanisms, as well as for the design of biomimetic robots, such as micro-air vehicles. PMID:20525744

  2. On-Orbit Model Refinement for Controller Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.; Calise, Anthony J.

    1998-01-01

    High performance control design for a flexible space structure is challenging since high fidelity plant models are difficult to obtain a priori. Uncertainty in the control design models typically require a very robust, low performance control design which must be tuned on-orbit to achieve the required performance. A new procedure for refining a multivariable open loop plant model based on closed-loop response data is presented. Using a minimal representation of the state space dynamics, a least squares prediction error method is employed to estimate the plant parameters. This control-relevant system identification procedure stresses the joint nature of the system identification and control design problem by seeking to obtain a model that minimizes the difference between the predicted and actual closed-loop performance. This paper presents an algorithm for iterative closed-loop system identification and controller redesign along with illustrative examples.

  3. A New Systematic Procedure to Design an Automatic Generation Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodabakhshian, A.

    A new method to tune the controller parameters is presented in study for Automatic Generation Control (AGC) of hydro turbine power systems. The controller parameters are adjusted such that the maximum phase is located on the right-most point of the ellipse, corresponding the maximum peak resonance on the Nichols chart. For this system making the open-loop frequency response curve tangent to a specified ellipse is an efficient method for controlling the overshoot, the stability and the dynamics of the system. The robustness of the feedback PID controller has been investigated on a multimachine power system model and the results are shown to be consistent with the expected performance. The results are also compared with a conventional PI controller and shown to be superior; especially since the transient droop compensator of the speed governor is removed a much faster response is obtained. The region of acceptable performance for the LFC covers a wide range of operating and system conditions.

  4. On-off closed-loop control of vagus nerve stimulation for the adaptation of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Ugalde, Hector Romero; Le Rolle, Virginie; Bel, Alain; Bonnet, Jean-Luc; Andreu, David; Mabo, Philippe; Carrault, Guy; Hernández, Alfredo I

    2014-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a potential therapeutic approach in a number of clinical applications. Although VNS is commonly delivered in an open-loop approach, it is now recognized that closed-loop approaches may be necessary to optimize the therapy and minimize side effects of neuro-stimulation devices. In this paper, we describe a prototype system for real-time control of the instantaneous heart rate, working synchronously with the heart period. As a first step, an on-off control method has been integrated. The system is evaluated on one sheep with induced heart failure, showing the interest of the proposed approach.

  5. A novel control strategy for efficient biological phosphorus removal with carbon-limited wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Javier; Guisasola, Albert; Baeza, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    This work shows the development and the in silico evaluation of a novel control strategy aiming at successful biological phosphorus removal in a wastewater treatment plant operating in an A(2)/O configuration with carbon-limited influent. The principle of this novel approach is that the phosphorus in the effluent can be controlled with the nitrate setpoint in the anoxic reactor as manipulated variable. The theoretical background behind this control strategy is that reducing nitrate entrance to the anoxic reactor would result in more organic matter available for biological phosphorus removal. Thus, phosphorus removal would be enhanced at the expense of increasing nitrate in the effluent (but always below legal limits). The work shows the control development, tuning and performance in comparison to open-loop conditions and to two other conventional control strategies for phosphorus removal based on organic matter and metal addition. It is shown that the novel proposed strategy achieves positive nutrient removal results with similar operational costs to the other control strategies and open-loop operation.

  6. A novel control strategy for efficient biological phosphorus removal with carbon-limited wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Javier; Guisasola, Albert; Baeza, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    This work shows the development and the in silico evaluation of a novel control strategy aiming at successful biological phosphorus removal in a wastewater treatment plant operating in an A(2)/O configuration with carbon-limited influent. The principle of this novel approach is that the phosphorus in the effluent can be controlled with the nitrate setpoint in the anoxic reactor as manipulated variable. The theoretical background behind this control strategy is that reducing nitrate entrance to the anoxic reactor would result in more organic matter available for biological phosphorus removal. Thus, phosphorus removal would be enhanced at the expense of increasing nitrate in the effluent (but always below legal limits). The work shows the control development, tuning and performance in comparison to open-loop conditions and to two other conventional control strategies for phosphorus removal based on organic matter and metal addition. It is shown that the novel proposed strategy achieves positive nutrient removal results with similar operational costs to the other control strategies and open-loop operation. PMID:25116500

  7. Sensorless Control of Permanent Magnet Machine for NASA Flywheel Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Kascak, Peter E.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the position sensorless algorithms presently used in the motor control for the NASA "in-house" development work of the flywheel energy storage system. At zero and low speeds a signal injection technique, the self-sensing method, is used to determine rotor position. At higher speeds, an open loop estimate of the back EMF of the machine is made to determine the rotor position. At start up, the rotor is set to a known position by commanding dc into one of the phase windings. Experimental results up to 52,000 rpm are presented.

  8. Feedback Control of the Wake of a Three-Dimensional Blunt Bluff Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinois, Thibault; Morgans, Aimee

    2013-11-01

    When cars or trucks drive on motorways, more than two thirds of their fuel consumption is due to aerodynamic drag, a significant part of which is caused by the large scale separation that takes place near their trailing edge. We tackle this problem using Large Eddy Simulations and use feedback control of synthetic jets to reduce the losses associated with large-scale structures in the wake. The geometry is a long surface mounted block, whose leading edge is not modelled for computational efficiency and the structure of the unforced flow field around this body is similar to the flow over a surface mounted block or hump. Considering this flow field as a control system, the base pressure force was used as the system output and the input is a slot jet actuator located near the trailing edge. Using open-loop forcing, a form drag reduction of about 7.5% was obtained. Open-loop system identification also allowed a transfer function that models the system's response to actuation to be found. Finally, a set of feedback controllers were applied to the plant and their performance was analysed. These controllers successfully reduce the fluctuations in the near wake, with only a small control effort. However, more significant mean drag reductions are expected at higher Reynolds numbers. PhD Student, Imperial College London.

  9. Active load control during rolling maneuvers. [performed in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.

    1994-01-01

    A rolling maneuver load alleviation (RMLA) system has been demonstrated on the active flexible wing (AFW) wind tunnel model in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The objective was to develop a systematic approach for designing active control laws to alleviate wing loads during rolling maneuvers. Two RMLA control laws were developed that utilized outboard control-surface pairs (leading and trailing edge) to counteract the loads and that used inboard trailing-edge control-surface pairs to maintain roll performance. Rolling maneuver load tests were performed in the TDT at several dynamic pressures that included two below and one 11 percent above open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. The RMLA system was operated simultaneously with an active flutter suppression system above open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. At all dynamic pressures for which baseline results were obtained, torsion-moment loads were reduced for both RMLA control laws. Results for bending-moment load reductions were mixed; however, design equations developed in this study provided conservative estimates of load reduction in all cases.

  10. Dynamics of a reaction-diffusion system with Brusselator kinetics under feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karafyllis, Iasson; Christofides, Panagiotis D.; Daoutidis, Prodromos

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of the reaction-diffusion Brusselator model with Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, under linear and nonlinear modal feedback control. The bifurcation parameters are for the Neumann problem the concentration of one of the reactants and for the Dirichlet problem the diffusion coefficient of one of the reactants. The study of the dynamics of the system is based on methods of bifurcation theory and the application of Poincaré maps. A direct comparison of the dynamics of the open-loop and closed-loop systems establishes that the use of feedback control significantly suppresses the rich open-loop dynamics. In addition, the superiority of the nonlinear controller over a linear controller, in attenuating the effect of bifurcations on the output of the closed-loop system, and the ability of the nonlinear controller to stabilize the system states at the spatially uniform solution provided the number of manipulated inputs is sufficiently large are shown for both the Neumann and Dirichlet problems.

  11. Metrics of Balance Control for Use in Screening Tests of Vestibular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, Matthew; Cohen, Helen; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Peters, Brian; Miller, Chris; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Decrements in balance control have been documented in astronauts after space flight. Reliable measures of balance control are needed for use in postflight field tests at remote landing sites. Diffusion analysis (DA) is a statistical mechanical tool that shows the average difference of the dependent variable on varying time scales. These techniques have been shown to measure differences in open-loop and closed-loop postural control in astronauts and elderly subjects. The goal of this study was to investigate the reliability of these measures of balance control. Eleven subjects were tested using the Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance: the subject stood with feet together and arms crossed on a stable or compliant surface, with eyes open or closed and with or without head movements in the pitch or yaw plane. Subjects were instrumented with inertial motion sensors attached to their trunk segment. The DA curves for linear acceleration measures were characterized by linear fits measuring open- (Ds) and closed-loop (Dl) control, and their intersection point (X-int, Y-int). Ds and Y-int showed significant differences between the test conditions. Additionally, Ds was correlated with the root mean square (RMS) of the signal, indicating that RMS was dominated by open-loop events (< 0.5 seconds). The Y-int was found to be correlated with the average linear velocity of trunk movements. Thus DA measures could be applied to derive reliable metrics of balance stability during field tests.

  12. Circadian Phase Resetting via Single and Multiple Control Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Neda; Stelling, Jörg; Doyle, Francis J.

    2008-01-01

    Circadian entrainment is necessary for rhythmic physiological functions to be appropriately timed over the 24-hour day. Disruption of circadian rhythms has been associated with sleep and neuro-behavioral impairments as well as cancer. To date, light is widely accepted to be the most powerful circadian synchronizer, motivating its use as a key control input for phase resetting. Through sensitivity analysis, we identify additional control targets whose individual and simultaneous manipulation (via a model predictive control algorithm) out-perform the open-loop light-based phase recovery dynamics by nearly 3-fold. We further demonstrate the robustness of phase resetting by synchronizing short- and long-period mutant phenotypes to the 24-hour environment; the control algorithm is robust in the presence of model mismatch. These studies prove the efficacy and immediate application of model predictive control in experimental studies and medicine. In particular, maintaining proper circadian regulation may significantly decrease the chance of acquiring chronic illness. PMID:18795146

  13. REAL-TIME MODEL-BASED ELECTRICAL POWERED WHEELCHAIR CONTROL

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwu; Salatin, Benjamin; Grindle, Garrett G.; Ding, Dan; Cooper, Rory A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different control methods on driving speed variation and wheel-slip of an electric-powered wheelchair (EPW). A kinematic model as well as 3-D dynamic model was developed to control the velocity and traction of the wheelchair. A smart wheelchair platform was designed and built with a computerized controller and encoders to record wheel speeds and to detect the slip. A model based, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and an open-loop controller were applied with the EPW driving on four different surfaces at three specified speeds. The speed errors, variation, rise time, settling time and slip coefficient were calculated and compared for a speed step-response input. Experimental results showed that model based control performed best on all surfaces across the speeds. PMID:19733494

  14. Method and System for Active Noise Control of Tiltrotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betzina, Mark D. (Inventor); Nguyen, Khanh Q. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Methods and systems for reducing noise generated by rotating blades of a tiltrotor aircraft. A rotor-blade pitch angle associated with the tiltrotor aircraft can be controlled utilizing a swashplate connected to rotating blades of the tiltrotor aircraft. One or more Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) signals can be transmitted and input to a swashplate control actuator associated with the swashplate. A particular blade pitch oscillation (e.g., four cycles per revolution) is there-after produced in a rotating frame of reference associated with the rotating blades in response to input of an HHC signal to the swashplate control actuator associated with the swashplate to thereby reduce noise associated with the rotating blades of the tiltrotor aircraft. The HHC signal can be transmitted and input to the swashplate control actuator to reduce noise of the tiltrotor aircraft in response to a user input utilizing an open-loop configuration.

  15. Precision Intelligent Control of Electrorheological Fluids with Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, C. J.; Lloyd, J. R.

    1997-03-01

    Electrorheological (ER) fluids have electrically controllable stiffness, heat transfer and viscosity properties. Since their recognition in the last century, ER fluids have been proposed for wide application to the electrical control of systems such as hydraulic valves, clutches, heat exchangers and suspension systems. Previous approaches to application of ER fluids have been hampered by the slow, strongly time-dependent, non-linear behavior of these fluid systems. The effects of electric field activation history, temperature and humidity also contribute to wide variation in "open-loop" speed and strength of response. Successfull application of ER fluids to engineering systems requires fast, precise control of the internal fluid state which yields the controllable properties to be exploited. This work presents an intelligent feedback control approach of ER fluid state which uses laser sensing to allow higher initial field strengths to speed ER response while lowering the level of applied electric field to exactly that level required to maintain a specified level of ER fluid viscosity, stiffness, thermal conductivity or transmissibility. An analytical model for both the ER fluid and control system are developed which predicts system response as controlled field drive is varied. Laser sensing and feedback allows the use of these fluids in a wide variety of applications where the lack of fast, precise control limited their past use. The ability to quickly and precisely control ER fluid response may make possible the applications of ER fluids promised since their invention 5 decades ago. When compared against conventional "open-loop" fluid control methods, laboratory tests of "closed-loop feedback control demonstrate ER fluid response 30 times faster with 30 times more precision than previously possible

  16. Real-time Adaptive Control Using Neural Generalized Predictive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, Pam; Soloway, Don; Gold, Brian

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of a Nonlinear Generalized Predictive Control algorithm by showing real-time adaptive control on a plant with relatively fast time-constants. Generalized Predictive Control has classically been used in process control where linear control laws were formulated for plants with relatively slow time-constants. The plant of interest for this paper is a magnetic levitation device that is nonlinear and open-loop unstable. In this application, the reference model of the plant is a neural network that has an embedded nominal linear model in the network weights. The control based on the linear model provides initial stability at the beginning of network training. In using a neural network the control laws are nonlinear and online adaptation of the model is possible to capture unmodeled or time-varying dynamics. Newton-Raphson is the minimization algorithm. Newton-Raphson requires the calculation of the Hessian, but even with this computational expense the low iteration rate make this a viable algorithm for real-time control.

  17. Low-level finite state control of knee joint in paraplegic standing.

    PubMed

    Mulder, A J; Veltink, P H; Boom, H B; Zilvold, G

    1992-01-01

    Low-level finite state (locked-unlocked) control is compared with open-loop stimulation of the knee extensor muscles in functional electrical stimulation (FES) induced paraplegic standing. The parameters were: duration of standing, relative torque loss in knee extensor muscles, knee angle stability, average stimulus output and average arm effort during standing. To investigate the impact of external mechanical conditions on controller performance, experiments were performed both under the condition of a freely moving ankle joint and of a mechanically stabilized ankle joint. Finite state control resulted in a 2.5 to 12 times increase of standing duration or in a 1.5 to 5 times decrease of relative torque loss in comparison with open-loop stimulation. Finite state control induced a limit cycle oscillation in the knee joint. Average maximum knee flexion was 6.2 degrees without ankle bracing, and half that value with ankle bracing. Average arm support was 13.9 and 7.5% of the body weight without and with ankle bracing respectively.

  18. Periodic-disturbance accommodating control of the space station for asymptotic momentum management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne; Wie, Bong; Geller, David

    1989-01-01

    Periodic-disturbance accommodating control is investigated for asymptotic momentum management of control moment gyros used as primary actuating devices for the Space Station. The proposed controller utilizes the concepts of quaternion feedback control and periodic-disturbance accommodation to achieve oscillations about the constant torque equilibrium attitude, while minimizing the control effort required. Three-axis coupled equations of motion, written in terms of quaternions, are derived for roll/yaw controller design and stability analysis. The quaternion feedback controller designed using the linear-quadratic regulator synthesis technique is shown to be robust for a wide range of pitch angles. It is also shown that the proposed controller tunes the open-loop unstable vehicle to a stable oscillatory motion which minimizes the control effort needed for steady-state operations.

  19. Periodic-disturbance accommodating control of the space station for asymptotic momentum management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne; Wie, Bong

    1989-01-01

    Periodic maneuvering control is developed for asymptotic momentum management of control gyros used as primary actuating devices for the Space Station. The proposed controller utilizes the concepts of quaternion feedback control and periodic-disturbance accommodation to achieve oscillations about the constant torque equilibrium attitude, while minimizing the control effort required. Three-axis coupled equations of motion, written in terms of quaternions, are derived for roll/yaw controller design and stability analysis. It is shown that the quaternion feedback controller is very robust for a wide range of pitch angles. It is also shown that the proposed controller tunes the open-loop unstable vehicle to a stable oscillatory motion which minimizes the control effort needed for steady-state operations.

  20. Periodic-disturbance accommodating control of the Space Station for asymptotic momentum management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne; Wie, Bong; Geller, David

    1989-01-01

    Periodic-disturbance accommodating control is investigated for asymptotic momentum management of control moment gyros used as primary actuating devices for the Space Station. The proposed controller utilizes the concepts of quaternion feedback control and periodic-disturbance accommodation to achieve oscillations about the constant torque equilibrium attitude, while minimizing the control effort required. Three-axis coupled equations of motion, written in terms of quaternions, are derived for roll/yaw controller design and stability analysis. The quaternion feedback controller designed using the linear-quadratic regulator synthesis technique is shown to be robust for a wide range of pitch angles. It is also shown that the proposed controller tunes the open-loop unstable vehicle to a stable oscillatory motion which minimizes the control effort needed for steady-state operations.

  1. Control of Separated Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shao-Ching; Kim, John

    2003-11-01

    The control of separated boundary layers are numerically investigated. Two types of flow geometry are considered. The first case is flow separation on a flat plate caused by an imposed adverse pressure gradient. The second case is flow separation downstream of a curved leading edge. These cases represent laminar separation with turbulent reattachment with and without curvature effects. Open-loop control, with distributed surface blowing and suction as control input, is first applied to establish base-line cases. We then use a system identification approach to construct approximate system models for design of closed-loop control. The models are based on the input-output relationship obtained from numerical simulations. The linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control synthesis is applied to the models to produce feedback control laws. The distributed sensors and actuators are confined to the walls. The efficacy of the controllers are quantified by pressure distribution, separation bubble size and Reynolds stresses. Visualization of the controlled and uncontrolled flow fields will also be presented.

  2. Controller strategy for a 6 DOF piezoelectric translation stage

    SciTech Connect

    Buice, E S; Yang, H; Smith, S T; Hocken, R J; Trumper, D L; Otten, D; Seugling, R M

    2006-03-22

    A controller for the third generation, 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) piezoelectric translation stage shown in Figure 1 is presented. This was tested by monitoring all six coordinate motions using an orthogonal array of six, high-resolution capacitance gages. The full 6 DOF matrix transformations and controller block diagrams for this system have been measured and the system operated under closed loop control. Results of early experiments to determine the 21 open loop response functions as well as preliminary results showing the closed loop response for the 3 linear translations are presented in this abstract. The ultimate goal of this project is to incorporate this 6 DOF stage within a long range X-Y scanning system for nanometer pick-and-place capability over an area of 50 x 50 mm. The control strategy and early results from this system will be presented.

  3. Magnetic suspension system for an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A technique to control a rim suspended in a magnetic field was developed. A complete system was developed, incorporating a support structure, magnetic actuators, a rim drive mechanism, an emergency fail-safe system, servo control system, and control electronics. Open loop and closed loop response of the system at zero speed and at 500 revolutions per minute (r/min) of the rim was obtained and analyzed. The rim was then dynamically balanced and a rim speed of 725 r/min was achieved. An analog simulation of the hardware was developed and tested with the actual control electronics connected to the analog computer. The system under development is stable at rim speeds below 700 r/min. Test results indicate that the rim under test is not rigid. The rim has a warp and a number of binding modes which prevented achievement of higher speeds. Further development efforts are required to achieve higher rim speeds.

  4. Analysis and control of cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourta, A.; Vitale, E.

    2008-07-01

    A flow above a cavity leads to an unsteady separated flow. This configuration exhibits an intense aeroacoustic coupling, where very intense aerodynamic noise can be emitted. Moreover, a majority of tangential flow above a cavity has an oscillatory character, resulting from a strong coupling between the acoustic and the flow dynamics. In the present work, we are interested in characterizing the dynamics and the frequency distribution of a cavity flow. First, the dynamics of the cavity are analyzed and the frequency distribution is established, which is followed by a study of nonlinear interaction. An open loop control using a synthetic jet is then applied in order to reduce noise generation. Finally, by choosing suitable jet parameters a significant noise reduction is obtained.

  5. F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) parameter identification flight test maneuvers for optimal input design validation and lateral control effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1995-01-01

    Flight test maneuvers are specified for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The maneuvers were designed for open loop parameter identification purposes, specifically for optimal input design validation at 5 degrees angle of attack, identification of individual strake effectiveness at 40 and 50 degrees angle of attack, and study of lateral dynamics and lateral control effectiveness at 40 and 50 degrees angle of attack. Each maneuver is to be realized by applying square wave inputs to specific control effectors using the On-Board Excitation System (OBES). Maneuver descriptions and complete specifications of the time/amplitude points define each input are included, along with plots of the input time histories.

  6. Comparison of decentralized velocity feedback control for thin homogeneous and stiff sandwich panels using electrodynamic proof-mass actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohlfing, J.; Gardonio, P.; Thompson, D. J.

    2011-02-01

    Theoretical and experimental work is presented to compare the effect of decentralised velocity feedback control on thin homogeneous and sandwich panels. The decentralised control system consists of five control units, which are composed of a proof-mass electrodynamic actuator with an accelerometer underneath its footprint and an analogue controller. The stability of the feedback loops is analysed by considering the sensor-actuator open-loop frequency response function of each control unit and the eigenvalues of the fully populated matrix of open-loop frequency response functions between the five sensors and five actuators. The control performance is then analysed in terms of the time-averaged total kinetic energy and total sound power radiated by the two panels. The results show that for a stiff sandwich panel higher stable feedback gains can be implemented than on a thin homogeneous panel of comparable weight per unit area. Moreover the implementation of decentralised velocity feedback can offset some of the undesirable sound transmission properties of lightweight sandwich structures by efficiently reducing structural vibration and sound power radiation in the mid audio frequency range.

  7. A Piloted Evaluation of Damage Accommodating Flight Control Using a Remotely Piloted Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Kevin; Cox, David E.; Murri, Daniel G.; Riddick, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01

    Toward the goal of reducing the fatal accident rate of large transport airplanes due to loss of control, the NASA Aviation Safety Program has conducted research into flight control technologies that can provide resilient control of airplanes under adverse flight conditions, including damage and failure. As part of the safety program s Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control Project, the NASA Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system was designed to address the challenges associated with the safe and efficient subscale flight testing of research control laws under adverse flight conditions. This paper presents the results of a series of pilot evaluations of several flight control algorithms used during an offset-to-landing task conducted at altitude. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the ability of various flight control technologies to prevent loss of control as stability and control characteristics were degraded. During the course of 8 research flights, data were recorded while one task was repeatedly executed by a single evaluation pilot. Two generic failures, which degraded stability and control characteristics, were simulated inflight for each of the 9 different flight control laws that were tested. The flight control laws included three different adaptive control methodologies, several linear multivariable designs, a linear robust design, a linear stability augmentation system, and a direct open-loop control mode. Based on pilot Cooper-Harper Ratings obtained for this test, the adaptive flight control laws provided the greatest overall benefit for the stability and control degradation scenarios that were considered. Also, all controllers tested provided a significant improvement in handling qualities over the direct open-loop control mode.

  8. Postural control model interpretation of stabilogram diffusion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Collins and De Luca [Collins JJ. De Luca CJ (1993) Exp Brain Res 95: 308-318] introduced a new method known as stabilogram diffusion analysis that provides a quantitative statistical measure of the apparently random variations of center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories recorded during quiet upright stance in humans. This analysis generates a stabilogram diffusion function (SDF) that summarizes the mean square COP displacement as a function of the time interval between COP comparisons. SDFs have a characteristic two-part form that suggests the presence of two different control regimes: a short-term open-loop control behavior and a longer-term closed-loop behavior. This paper demonstrates that a very simple closed-loop control model of upright stance can generate realistic SDFs. The model consists of an inverted pendulum body with torque applied at the ankle joint. This torque includes a random disturbance torque and a control torque. The control torque is a function of the deviation (error signal) between the desired upright body position and the actual body position, and is generated in proportion to the error signal, the derivative of the error signal, and the integral of the error signal [i.e. a proportional, integral and derivative (PID) neural controller]. The control torque is applied with a time delay representing conduction, processing, and muscle activation delays. Variations in the PID parameters and the time delay generate variations in SDFs that mimic real experimental SDFs. This model analysis allows one to interpret experimentally observed changes in SDFs in terms of variations in neural controller and time delay parameters rather than in terms of open-loop versus closed-loop behavior.

  9. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla-qubit correlation

  10. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla-qubit correlation

  11. Design of feedback control systems for unstable plants with saturating actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapasouris, Petros; Athans, Michael; Stein, Gunter

    1988-01-01

    A new control design methodology is introduced for multi-input/multi-output systems with unstable open loop plants and saturating actuators. A control system is designed using well known linear control theory techniques and then a reference prefilter is introduced so that when the references are sufficiently small, the control system operates linearly as designated. For signals large enough to cause saturations, the control law is modified in such a way to ensure stability and to preserve, to the extent possible, the behavior of the linear control design. Key benefits of this methodology are: the modified feedback system never produces saturating control signals, integrators and/or slow dynamics in the compensator never windup, the directionaL properties of the controls are maintained, and the closed loop system has certain guaranteed stability properties. The advantages of the new design methodology are illustrated in the simulation of an approximation of the AFTI-16 (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration) aircraft multivariable longitudinal dynamics.

  12. Visual control of flight speed in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fry, Steven N; Rohrseitz, Nicola; Straw, Andrew D; Dickinson, Michael H

    2009-04-01

    Flight control in insects depends on self-induced image motion (optic flow), which the visual system must process to generate appropriate corrective steering maneuvers. Classic experiments in tethered insects applied rigorous system identification techniques for the analysis of turning reactions in the presence of rotating pattern stimuli delivered in open-loop. However, the functional relevance of these measurements for visual free-flight control remains equivocal due to the largely unknown effects of the highly constrained experimental conditions. To perform a systems analysis of the visual flight speed response under free-flight conditions, we implemented a 'one-parameter open-loop' paradigm using 'TrackFly' in a wind tunnel equipped with real-time tracking and virtual reality display technology. Upwind flying flies were stimulated with sine gratings of varying temporal and spatial frequencies, and the resulting speed responses were measured from the resulting flight speed reactions. To control flight speed, the visual system of the fruit fly extracts linear pattern velocity robustly over a broad range of spatio-temporal frequencies. The speed signal is used for a proportional control of flight speed within locomotor limits. The extraction of pattern velocity over a broad spatio-temporal frequency range may require more sophisticated motion processing mechanisms than those identified in flies so far. In Drosophila, the neuromotor pathways underlying flight speed control may be suitably explored by applying advanced genetic techniques, for which our data can serve as a baseline. Finally, the high-level control principles identified in the fly can be meaningfully transferred into a robotic context, such as for the robust and efficient control of autonomous flying micro air vehicles.

  13. Visual control of flight speed in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fry, Steven N; Rohrseitz, Nicola; Straw, Andrew D; Dickinson, Michael H

    2009-04-01

    Flight control in insects depends on self-induced image motion (optic flow), which the visual system must process to generate appropriate corrective steering maneuvers. Classic experiments in tethered insects applied rigorous system identification techniques for the analysis of turning reactions in the presence of rotating pattern stimuli delivered in open-loop. However, the functional relevance of these measurements for visual free-flight control remains equivocal due to the largely unknown effects of the highly constrained experimental conditions. To perform a systems analysis of the visual flight speed response under free-flight conditions, we implemented a 'one-parameter open-loop' paradigm using 'TrackFly' in a wind tunnel equipped with real-time tracking and virtual reality display technology. Upwind flying flies were stimulated with sine gratings of varying temporal and spatial frequencies, and the resulting speed responses were measured from the resulting flight speed reactions. To control flight speed, the visual system of the fruit fly extracts linear pattern velocity robustly over a broad range of spatio-temporal frequencies. The speed signal is used for a proportional control of flight speed within locomotor limits. The extraction of pattern velocity over a broad spatio-temporal frequency range may require more sophisticated motion processing mechanisms than those identified in flies so far. In Drosophila, the neuromotor pathways underlying flight speed control may be suitably explored by applying advanced genetic techniques, for which our data can serve as a baseline. Finally, the high-level control principles identified in the fly can be meaningfully transferred into a robotic context, such as for the robust and efficient control of autonomous flying micro air vehicles. PMID:19329746

  14. Active control of aerothermoelastic effects for a conceptual hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Gilbert, Michael G.; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1990-01-01

    Procedures for and results of aeroservothermoelastic studies are described. The objectives of these studies were to develop the necessary procedures for performing an aeroelastic analysis of an aerodynamically heated vehicle and to analyze a configuration in the classical cold state and in a hot state. Major tasks include the development of the structural and aerodynamic models, open loop analyses, design of active control laws for improving dynamic responses and analyses of the closed loop vehicles. The analyses performed focused on flutter speed calculations, short period eigenvalue trends and statistical analyses of the vehicle response to controls and turbulence. Improving the ride quality of the vehicle and raising the flutter boundary of the aerodynamically-heated vehicle up to that of the cold vehicle were the objectives of the control law design investigations.

  15. Human performance evaluation of isometric and elastic rate controllers in a six-degree-of-freedom tracking task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Shumin; Milgram, Paul

    1993-12-01

    The control feel of the master controller in a telemanipulation system has a critical effect on human-machine system performance. Many theoretical and practical human factors issues on hand controller design and selection remain to be explored. In this paper, two types of hand controllers, elastic versus isometric rate controllers, were studied in a 6 degree-of-freedom pursuit tracking experiment. Twenty-six subjects participated in the experiment. The results showed that the elastic rate controller facilitated significantly lower tracking error than the isometric rate controller, presumably due to richer proprioceptive feedback afforded by the elastic device. It was also found that, although the elastic controller was superior to the isometric controller in general, the magnitude of performance differences between the two controller decreased as subjects gained more experience, supporting the theory that human manipulation shifts from more closed-loop behavior towards open loop skills.

  16. Bioreactor control improves bioprocess performance.

    PubMed

    Simutis, Rimvydas; Lübbert, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The performance of bioreactors is not only determined by productivity but also by process quality, which is mainly determined by variances in the process variables. As fluctuations in these quantities directly affect the variability in the product properties, combatting distortions is the main task of practical quality assurance. The straightforward way of reducing this variability is keeping the product formation process tightly under control. Purpose of this keynote is to show that there is enough evidence in literature showing that the performance of the fermentation processes can significantly be improved by feedback control. Most of the currently used open loop control procedures can be replaced by relatively simple feedback techniques. It is shown by practical examples that such a retrofitting does not require significant changes in the well-established equipment. Feedback techniques are best in assuring high reproducibility of the industrial cultivation processes and thus in assuring the quality of their products. Many developments in supervising and controlling industrial fermentations can directly be taken over in manufacturing processes. Even simple feedback controllers can efficiently improve the product quality. It's the time now that manufacturers follow the developments in most other industries and improve process quality by automatic feedback control. PMID:26228573

  17. Bioreactor control improves bioprocess performance.

    PubMed

    Simutis, Rimvydas; Lübbert, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The performance of bioreactors is not only determined by productivity but also by process quality, which is mainly determined by variances in the process variables. As fluctuations in these quantities directly affect the variability in the product properties, combatting distortions is the main task of practical quality assurance. The straightforward way of reducing this variability is keeping the product formation process tightly under control. Purpose of this keynote is to show that there is enough evidence in literature showing that the performance of the fermentation processes can significantly be improved by feedback control. Most of the currently used open loop control procedures can be replaced by relatively simple feedback techniques. It is shown by practical examples that such a retrofitting does not require significant changes in the well-established equipment. Feedback techniques are best in assuring high reproducibility of the industrial cultivation processes and thus in assuring the quality of their products. Many developments in supervising and controlling industrial fermentations can directly be taken over in manufacturing processes. Even simple feedback controllers can efficiently improve the product quality. It's the time now that manufacturers follow the developments in most other industries and improve process quality by automatic feedback control.

  18. A distributed finite-element modeling and control approach for large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, K. D.

    1989-01-01

    An unconventional framework is described for the design of decentralized controllers for large flexible structures. In contrast to conventional control system design practice which begins with a model of the open loop plant, the controlled plant is assembled from controlled components in which the modeling phase and the control design phase are integrated at the component level. The developed framework is called controlled component synthesis (CCS) to reflect that it is motivated by the well developed Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) methods which were demonstrated to be effective for solving large complex structural analysis problems for almost three decades. The design philosophy behind CCS is also closely related to that of the subsystem decomposition approach in decentralized control.

  19. Control system estimation and design for aerospace vehicles with time delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgaier, G. R.; Williams, T. L.

    1972-01-01

    The problems of estimation and control of discrete, linear, time-varying systems are considered. Previous solutions to these problems involved either approximate techniques, open-loop control solutions, or results which required excessive computation. The estimation problem is solved by two different methods, both of which yield the identical algorithm for determining the optimal filter. The partitioned results achieve a substantial reduction in computation time and storage requirements over the expanded solution, however. The results reduce to the Kalman filter when no delays are present in the system. The control problem is also solved by two different methods, both of which yield identical algorithms for determining the optimal control gains. The stochastic control is shown to be identical to the deterministic control, thus extending the separation principle to time delay systems. The results obtained reduce to the familiar optimal control solution when no time delays are present in the system.

  20. A Nonlinear Physics-Based Optimal Control Method for Magnetostrictive Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses the development of a nonlinear optimal control methodology for magnetostrictive actuators. At moderate to high drive levels, the output from these actuators is highly nonlinear and contains significant magnetic and magnetomechanical hysteresis. These dynamics must be accommodated by models and control laws to utilize the full capabilities of the actuators. A characterization based upon ferromagnetic mean field theory provides a model which accurately quantifies both transient and steady state actuator dynamics under a variety of operating conditions. The control method consists of a linear perturbation feedback law used in combination with an optimal open loop nonlinear control. The nonlinear control incorporates the hysteresis and nonlinearities inherent to the transducer and can be computed offline. The feedback control is constructed through linearization of the perturbed system about the optimal system and is efficient for online implementation. As demonstrated through numerical examples, the combined hybrid control is robust and can be readily implemented in linear PDE-based structural models.

  1. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources using Model Predictive Control

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Butler-Purry, Karen

    2012-07-22

    In an isolated power system (rural microgrid), Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response can be used to complement fossil fueled generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with the goals of minimizing fuel costs and changes in power output of diesel generators, minimizing costs associated with low battery life of energy storage and maintaining system frequency at the nominal operating value. Two control modes are considered for controlling the energy storage to compensate either net load variability or wind variability. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve the aforementioned problem and the performance is compared to an open-loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies using high and low wind profiles, as well as, different MPC prediction horizons demonstrate the efficacy of the closed-loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties in wind and demand.

  2. Dynamic control of modeled tonic-clonic seizure states with closed-loop stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Beverlin II, Bryce; Netoff, Theoden I.

    2013-01-01

    Seizure control using deep brain stimulation (DBS) provides an alternative therapy to patients with intractable and drug resistant epilepsy. This paper presents novel DBS stimulus protocols to disrupt seizures. Two protocols are presented: open-loop stimulation and a closed-loop feedback system utilizing measured firing rates to adjust stimulus frequency. Stimulation suppression is demonstrated in a computational model using 3000 excitatory Morris–Lecar (M–L) model neurons connected with depressing synapses. Cells are connected using second order network topology (SONET) to simulate network topologies measured in cortical networks. The network spontaneously switches from tonic to clonic as synaptic strengths and tonic input to the neurons decreases. To this model we add periodic stimulation pulses to simulate DBS. Periodic forcing can synchronize or desynchronize an oscillating population of neurons, depending on the stimulus frequency and amplitude. Therefore, it is possible to either extend or truncate the tonic or clonic phases of the seizure. Stimuli applied at the firing rate of the neuron generally synchronize the population while stimuli slightly slower than the firing rate prevent synchronization. We present an adaptive stimulation algorithm that measures the firing rate of a neuron and adjusts the stimulus to maintain a relative stimulus frequency to firing frequency and demonstrate it in a computational model of a tonic-clonic seizure. This adaptive algorithm can affect the duration of the tonic phase using much smaller stimulus amplitudes than the open-loop control. PMID:23390413

  3. Effects of flow control over a 3D turret -- Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Ryan; Andino, Marlyn; Schmit, Ryan; Camphouse, Chris; Myatt, James; Glauser, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Building upon the 3D turret work done at Syracuse University an extended study was conducted in the Air Force Research Laboratory's Subsonic Aerodynamic Research Laboratory (SARL) wind tunnel at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The SARL experiments were performed at higher Reynolds and Mach numbers and therefore present a more complex, more challenging flow. Synthetic jets mounted upstream of the aperture were used to generate multiple actuation cases in order to provide a rich ensemble for plant model development based on the split POD method of Camphouse (2007). PIV velocity data was acquired along with simultaneous surface pressure data at various planes across the turret with and without open-loop control. In addition, a simple proportional closed-loop control was performed using the bandpass filtered first POD mode coefficient of the surface pressure as the feedback signal. The amplitude of the feedback signal was calibrated using the open-loop results which were the most effective in reducing the separation zone of the turret.

  4. Modeling and Simulation of Resistive Wall Mode Control In DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. L.; Humphreys, D. A.; Jensen, T. H.; Leuer, J. A.; Nerem, A.; Strait, E. J.; Garofalo, A. M.

    2001-10-01

    Detailed dynamic response models have been developed for all relevant subsystems comprising the DIII-D resistive wall mode (RWM) closed loop control system. These include the switching power amplifiers (SPA), digital plasma control system (PCS), acquisition and control circuitry, and a fully toroidal model of plasma/vessel dynamics based on specification of the marginal wall position from stability codes such as GATO and DCON. These models have been validated with experimental data, including open-loop excitation of the SPA, PCS, and vacuum vessel dynamic responses, and measurement of the growth rate and mode structure of the unstable plasma. These models are incorporated into a closed-loop control simulation to investigate the control limitations which are due to realistic power supply responses. Consequences of and approaches to the intrinsically multivariable RWM control problem are also investigated.

  5. Automatic control systems for submerged membrane bioreactors: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Giuliana; Rodríguez-Roda, Ignasi; Comas, Joaquim

    2012-07-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology has become relatively widespread as an advanced treatment for both industrial and municipal wastewater, especially in areas prone to water scarcity. Although operational cost is a key issue in MBRs, currently only a few crucial papers and inventions aimed to optimise and enhance MBR efficiency have been published. The present review summarises the available solutions in the area of automatic control systems and widely explores the advances in automation and control for MBRs. In this review of state of the art, different control systems are evaluated comparatively, distinguishing between control systems used for the filtration process and those used for the biological process of MBRs and describing the challenge faced by integrated control systems. The existing knowledge is classified according to the manipulated variables, the operational mode (open-loop or closed-loop) and the controlled variables used.

  6. Small Body GN&C Research Report: A Guidance and Control Technique for Small-Body Proximity Operations with Guaranteed Guidance Resolvability and Required Thruster Silent Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Ackmese, A. Behcet

    2005-01-01

    The guidance and control (G&C) algorithms for enabling small-body proximity operations are developed by using a model predictive control approach along with a convexification of the governing dynamics, control constraints, and trajectory/state constraints. The open-loop guidance is solved ahead of time or in a resolvable, real-time manner through the use of PWG (Pseudo Way-point Generation), a technique developed in this research. The PWG scheme ensures required thruster silent times during trajectory maneuvers. The feedback control is implemented to track the PWG trajectories in a manner that guarantees the resolvability for the open-loop problem, enabling the ability to update the G&C in a model-predictive manner. The schemes incorporate gravity models and thruster ring times into discrete dynamics that are solved as a optimal control problem to minimize fuel consumption or thruster energy expenditure. The optimal control problem is cast as an LMI (Linear Matrix Inequality) and then solved through Semi-Definite Programming techniques in a computationally efficient manner that provides convergence and constraint guarantees.

  7. Control of turbulent flow over an articulating turret for reduction of adverse aero-optic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent flows such as wakes and shear layers are highly detrimental to the intensity of any collimated light beams that pass through these regions. The work presented in this thesis utilized suction flow control to help mitigate the adverse affects of the wake and shear layer over a flat aperture on the hemisphere of a three dimensional turret. The hemisphere of the turret was capable of dynamically articulating in two degrees of freedom: pitch and azimuthal rotation. The experiments were performed in the Syracuse University wind tunnel at a Mach number of 0.1, giving a Reynolds number of 500,000. Steady suction at various amounts were initially implemented for both static and dynamic pitching cases. Abatement of the wake above the aperture of the turret was seen for open loop suction actuation in both cases, demonstrating that for our conditions the suction system has enough control authority to reduce the turbulence levels. Building upon this success, a simple proportional closed loop controller was constructed to improve the efficiency of the actuation system by reducing the amount of suction required to achieve the same level of turbulence abatement as with the open loop control. The overall objective of the controller was to drive the velocity fluctuations over the aperture of the turret to zero. The next set of experiments fixed the pitch angle and dynamically rotated the hemisphere in the azimuthal direction. Like the pitch tests, steady suction actuation applied over the top of the turret was able to diminish the size of the wake. A multiple-input-multiple output closed loop controller was then employed with the objective of reducing the velocity fluctuations over the aperture of the turret. By dividing the actuation into two separate zones, the MIMO controller was able to more efficiently decrease the turbulent levels over the aperture when compared to the open loop case. Additional suction control tests were performed over a stationary turret in the Air

  8. Active Noise Control of Radiated Noise from Jets Originating NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Turner, Travis L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of jet noise using a closed-loop active noise control system with highbandwidth active chevrons was investigated. The high frequency energy introduced by piezoelectrically-driven chevrons was demonstrated to achieve a broadband reduction of jet noise, presumably due to the suppression of large-scale turbulence. For a nozzle with one active chevron, benefits of up to 0.8 dB overall sound pressure level (OASPL) were observed compared to a static chevron nozzle near the maximum noise emission angle, and benefits of up to 1.9 dB OASPL were observed compared to a baseline nozzle with no chevrons. The closed-loop actuation system was able to effectively reduce noise at select frequencies by 1-3 dB. However, integrated OASPL did not indicate further reduction beyond the open-loop benefits, most likely due to the preliminary controller design, which was focused on narrowband performance.

  9. Block-decoupling vibration control using eigenstructure assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Mottershead, John E.

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical study is presented on the feasibility of applying active control for the purpose of vibration isolation in lightweight structures by block diagonalisation of the system matrices and at the same time assigning eigenvalues (natural frequencies and damping) to the chosen substructures separately. The methodology, based on eigenstructure assignment using the method of receptances, is found to work successfully when the eigenvalues of the open-loop system are controllable and the open- and closed-loop eigenvalues are distinct. In the first part of the paper results are obtained under the restriction that the mass matrix is diagonal (lumped). This is certainly applicable in the case of numerous engineering systems consisting of discrete masses with flexible interconnections of negligible mass. Later in the paper this restriction is lifted to allow bandedness of the mass matrix. Several numerical examples are used to illustrate the working of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Floating-point system quantization errors in digital control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of research into the effects on system operation of signal quantization in a digital control system. The investigation considered digital controllers (filters) operating in floating-point arithmetic in either open-loop or closed-loop systems. An error analysis technique is developed, and is implemented by a digital computer program that is based on a digital simulation of the system. As an output the program gives the programing form required for minimum system quantization errors (either maximum of rms errors), and the maximum and rms errors that appear in the system output for a given bit configuration. The program can be integrated into existing digital simulations of a system.

  11. A control theoretic model of driver steering behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donges, E.

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative description of driver steering behavior such as a mathematical model is presented. The steering task is divided into two levels: (1) the guidance level involving the perception of the instantaneous and future course of the forcing function provided by the forward view of the road, and the response to it in an anticipatory open-loop control mode; (2) the stabilization level whereby any occuring deviations from the forcing function are compensated for in a closed-loop control mode. This concept of the duality of the driver's steering activity led to a newly developed two-level model of driver steering behavior. Its parameters are identified on the basis of data measured in driving simulator experiments. The parameter estimates of both levels of the model show significant dependence on the experimental situation which can be characterized by variables such as vehicle speed and desired path curvature.

  12. Active vibration control based on piezoelectric smart composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Le; Lu, Qingqing; Fei, Fan; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-12-01

    An aircraft’s vertical fin may experience dramatic buffet loads in high angle of attack flight conditions, and these buffet loads would cause huge vibration and dynamic stress on the vertical fin structure. To reduce the dynamic vibration of the vertical fin structure, macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators were used in this paper. The drive moment equations and sensing voltage equations of the MFC actuators were developed. Finite element analysis models based on three kinds of models of simplified vertical fin structures with surface-bonded MFC actuators were established in ABAQUS. The equivalent damping ratio of the structure was employed in finite element analysis, in order to measure the effectiveness of vibration control. Further, an open-loop test for the active vibration control system of the vertical fin with MFC actuators was designed and developed. The experimental results validated the effectiveness of the MFC actuators as well as the developed methodology.

  13. On reliable control system designs. Ph.D. Thesis; [actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birdwell, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A mathematical model for use in the design of reliable multivariable control systems is discussed with special emphasis on actuator failures and necessary actuator redundancy levels. The model consists of a linear time invariant discrete time dynamical system. Configuration changes in the system dynamics are governed by a Markov chain that includes transition probabilities from one configuration state to another. The performance index is a standard quadratic cost functional, over an infinite time interval. The actual system configuration can be deduced with a one step delay. The calculation of the optimal control law requires the solution of a set of highly coupled Riccati-like matrix difference equations. Results can be used for off-line studies relating the open loop dynamics, required performance, actuator mean time to failure, and functional or identical actuator redundancy, with and without feedback gain reconfiguration strategies.

  14. A comparison of motor submodels in the optimal control model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancraft, R. E.; Kleinman, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Properties of several structural variations in the neuromotor interface portion of the optimal control model (OCM) are investigated. For example, it is known that commanding control-rate introduces an open-loop pole at S=O and will generate low frequency phase and magnitude characteristics similar to experimental data. However, this gives rise to unusually high sensitivities with respect to motor and sensor noise-ratios, thereby reducing the models' predictive capabilities. Relationships for different motor submodels are discussed to show sources of these sensitivities. The models investigated include both pseudo motor-noise and actual (system driving) motor-noise characterizations. The effects of explicit proprioceptive feedback in the OCM is also examined. To show graphically the effects of each submodel on system outputs, sensitivity studies are included, and compared to data obtained from other tests.

  15. Learning the Optimal Control of Coordinated Eye and Head Movements

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Sohrab; Weber, Cornelius; Triesch, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Various optimality principles have been proposed to explain the characteristics of coordinated eye and head movements during visual orienting behavior. At the same time, researchers have suggested several neural models to underly the generation of saccades, but these do not include online learning as a mechanism of optimization. Here, we suggest an open-loop neural controller with a local adaptation mechanism that minimizes a proposed cost function. Simulations show that the characteristics of coordinated eye and head movements generated by this model match the experimental data in many aspects, including the relationship between amplitude, duration and peak velocity in head-restrained and the relative contribution of eye and head to the total gaze shift in head-free conditions. Our model is a first step towards bringing together an optimality principle and an incremental local learning mechanism into a unified control scheme for coordinated eye and head movements. PMID:22072953

  16. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Test act system validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective of the Test Active Control Technology (ACT) System laboratory tests was to verify and validate the system concept, hardware, and software. The initial lab tests were open loop hardware tests of the Test ACT System as designed and built. During the course of the testing, minor problems were uncovered and corrected. Major software tests were run. The initial software testing was also open loop. These tests examined pitch control laws, wing load alleviation, signal selection/fault detection (SSFD), and output management. The Test ACT System was modified to interface with the direct drive valve (DDV) modules. The initial testing identified problem areas with DDV nonlinearities, valve friction induced limit cycling, DDV control loop instability, and channel command mismatch. The other DDV issue investigated was the ability to detect and isolate failures. Some simple schemes for failure detection were tested but were not completely satisfactory. The Test ACT System architecture continues to appear promising for ACT/FBW applications in systems that must be immune to worst case generic digital faults, and be able to tolerate two sequential nongeneric faults with no reduction in performance. The challenge in such an implementation would be to keep the analog element sufficiently simple to achieve the necessary reliability.

  17. Mu-Synthesis robust control of 3D bar structure vibration using piezo-stack actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mystkowski, Arkadiusz; Koszewnik, Andrzej Piotr

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an idea for the Mu-Synthesis robust control of 3D bar structure vibration with using a piezo-stack actuators. A model of the 3D bar structure with uncertain parameters is presented as multi-input multi-output (MIMO) dynamics. Nominal stability and nominal performances of the open-loop 3D bar structure dynamic model is developed. The uncertain model-based robust controller is derived due to voltage control signal saturation and selected parameter perturbations. The robust control performances and robustness of the system due to uncertainties influence is evaluated by using singular values and a small gain theorem. Finally, simulation investigations and experimental results shown that system response of the 3D bar structure dynamic model with taken into account perturbed parameters met desired robust stability and system limits. The proposed robust controller ensures a good dynamics of the closed-loop system, robustness, and vibration attenuation.

  18. Multiple steady state and instability in distillation. Implications for operation and control

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, E.W.; Skogestad, S.

    1995-12-01

    The fact that distillation columns, even in the ideal binary case, may display multiple steady states and unstable operating points has only recently been recognized. This article addresses some implications of these phenomena for the operation and control of distillation columns. Under manual operation, the multiplicity and instability will result in ability to reach separations corresponding to unstable operating points and may furthermore cause abrupt changes and hysteresis in operating conditions. It is shown that an unstable operating point may be stabilized by feedback control of a single product composition or tray temperature (one-point control). The steady-state multiplicity does, in this case, not represent any severe limitation in operation, but if the control is not sufficient tight, the column may settle in sustained oscillations (stable limit cycle). Finally, the impact of open-loop instability on the achievable closed-loop performance with both product compositions under feedback control is discussed.

  19. Effects of displacement and rate saturation on the control of statically unstable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, G. D.; Stengel, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    Methodologies are presented for the analysis and design of stability augmentation control laws for aircraft in which 'hard' displacement and rate limiting are significant. Candidate control laws are derived using the linear-quadratic (LQ) regulator. Analytical and computational estimates of the stability limits imposed by control saturation are presented using state trajectories with control limiting, as well as describing functions and eigenvalue computation. Analysis also includes an investigation of the interaction of the state-space saturation and stability boundaries for various choices of LQ weighting matrices. For minimum-energy control, the saturation and stability boundaries are shown to be parallel. In this case, there is a direct relation between the solution to the matrix Riccati equation and the aircraft's open-loop dynamics.

  20. A Review of Control Strategies in Closed-Loop Neuroprosthetic Systems.

    PubMed

    Wright, James; Macefield, Vaughan G; van Schaik, André; Tapson, Jonathan C

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that closed-loop neuroprosthetic systems achieve more favorable outcomes for users then equivalent open-loop devices. Improved performance of tasks, better usability, and greater embodiment have all been reported in systems utilizing some form of feedback. However, the interdisciplinary work on neuroprosthetic systems can lead to miscommunication due to similarities in well-established nomenclature in different fields. Here we present a review of control strategies in existing experimental, investigational and clinical neuroprosthetic systems in order to establish a baseline and promote a common understanding of different feedback modes and closed-loop controllers. The first section provides a brief discussion of feedback control and control theory. The second section reviews the control strategies of recent Brain Machine Interfaces, neuromodulatory implants, neuroprosthetic systems, and assistive neurorobotic devices. The final section examines the different approaches to feedback in current neuroprosthetic and neurorobotic systems. PMID:27462202

  1. Centralized PI control for high dimensional multivariable systems based on equivalent transfer function.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xiaoli; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Fei

    2014-09-01

    This article presents a new scheme to design full matrix controller for high dimensional multivariable processes based on equivalent transfer function (ETF). Differing from existing ETF method, the proposed ETF is derived directly by exploiting the relationship between the equivalent closed-loop transfer function and the inverse of open-loop transfer function. Based on the obtained ETF, the full matrix controller is designed utilizing the existing PI tuning rules. The new proposed ETF model can more accurately represent the original processes. Furthermore, the full matrix centralized controller design method proposed in this paper is applicable to high dimensional multivariable systems with satisfactory performance. Comparison with other multivariable controllers shows that the designed ETF based controller is superior with respect to design-complexity and obtained performance.

  2. Control approaches for intelligent material systems -- What can we learn from nature?

    SciTech Connect

    Robertshaw, H.H.

    1994-12-31

    Three natural systems (human thermoregulation, enzyme-catalyzed biochemical reactions, and rivers) are examined with the intent of finding commonalties in control among these systems which may offer inspiration or guidance to the task of controlling the behavior of Intelligent Material Systems. It is observed that these natural systems act in ways not seen in technological control systems. The observations of a lack of (feedback) control, the predominance of regulation, the extremely local nature of the apparent goals, the storage of information in form (in structure), and non-numerical processing, produce a strong impression of coupled open-loop processes amidst seeming chaos almost passively producing what the author calls natural system control.

  3. A Review of Control Strategies in Closed-Loop Neuroprosthetic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James; Macefield, Vaughan G.; van Schaik, André; Tapson, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that closed-loop neuroprosthetic systems achieve more favorable outcomes for users then equivalent open-loop devices. Improved performance of tasks, better usability, and greater embodiment have all been reported in systems utilizing some form of feedback. However, the interdisciplinary work on neuroprosthetic systems can lead to miscommunication due to similarities in well-established nomenclature in different fields. Here we present a review of control strategies in existing experimental, investigational and clinical neuroprosthetic systems in order to establish a baseline and promote a common understanding of different feedback modes and closed-loop controllers. The first section provides a brief discussion of feedback control and control theory. The second section reviews the control strategies of recent Brain Machine Interfaces, neuromodulatory implants, neuroprosthetic systems, and assistive neurorobotic devices. The final section examines the different approaches to feedback in current neuroprosthetic and neurorobotic systems. PMID:27462202

  4. A Signal Transmission Technique for Stability Analysis of Multivariable Non-Linear Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Mark; Zimpfer, Doug; Adams, Neil; Lindsey, K. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the difficulties associated with multivariable, non-linear control systems is the problem of assessing closed-loop stability. Of particular interest is the class of non-linear systems controlled with on/off actuators, such as spacecraft thrusters or electrical relays. With such systems, standard describing function techniques are typically too conservative, and time-domain simulation analysis is prohibitively extensive, This paper presents an open-loop analysis technique for this class of non-linear systems. The technique is centered around an innovative use of multivariable signal transmission theory to quantify the plant response to worst case control commands. The technique has been applied to assess stability of thruster controlled flexible space structures. Examples are provided for Space Shuttle attitude control with attached flexible payloads.

  5. Active vibration control for nonlinear vehicle suspension with actuator delay via I/O feedback linearization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jing; Jiang, Zuo; Li, Ya-Li; Li, Wu-Xin

    2014-10-01

    The problem of nonlinear vibration control for active vehicle suspension systems with actuator delay is considered. Through feedback linearization, the open-loop nonlinearity is eliminated by the feedback nonlinear term. Based on the finite spectrum assignment, the quarter-car suspension system with actuator delay is converted into an equivalent delay-free one. The nonlinear control includes a linear feedback term, a feedforward compensator, and a control memory term, which can be derived from a Riccati equation and a Sylvester equation, so that the effects produced by the road disturbances and the actuator delay are compensated, respectively. A predictor is designed to implement the predictive state in the designed control. Moreover, a reduced-order observer is constructed to solve its physical unrealisability problem. The stability proofs for the zero dynamics and the closed-loop system are provided. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness and the simplicity of the designed control.

  6. Application of modern control design methodology to oblique wing research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, James H.

    1991-01-01

    A Linear Quadratic Regulator synthesis technique was used to design an explicit model following control system for the Oblique Wing Research Aircraft (OWRA). The forward path model (Maneuver Command Generator) was designed to incorporate the desired flying qualities and response decoupling. The LQR synthesis was based on the use of generalized controls, and it was structured to provide a proportional/integral error regulator with feedforward compensation. An unexpected consequence of this design approach was the ability to decouple the control synthesis into separate longitudinal and lateral directional designs. Longitudinal and lateral directional control laws were generated for each of the nine design flight conditions, and gain scheduling requirements were addressed. A fully coupled 6 degree of freedom open loop model of the OWRA along with the longitudinal and lateral directional control laws was used to assess the closed loop performance of the design. Evaluations were performed for each of the nine design flight conditions.

  7. Comparison of Five System Identification Algorithms for Rotorcraft Higher Harmonic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents an analysis and performance comparison of five system identification algorithms. The methods are presented in the context of identifying a frequency-domain transfer matrix for the higher harmonic control (HHC) of helicopter vibration. The five system identification algorithms include three previously proposed methods: (1) the weighted-least- squares-error approach (in moving-block format), (2) the Kalman filter method, and (3) the least-mean-squares (LMS) filter method. In addition there are two new ones: (4) a generalized Kalman filter method and (5) a generalized LMS filter method. The generalized Kalman filter method and the generalized LMS filter method were derived as extensions of the classic methods to permit identification by using more than one measurement per identification cycle. Simulation results are presented for conditions ranging from the ideal case of a stationary transfer matrix and no measurement noise to the more complex cases involving both measurement noise and transfer-matrix variation. Both open-loop identification and closed- loop identification were simulated. Closed-loop mode identification was more challenging than open-loop identification because of the decreasing signal-to-noise ratio as the vibration became reduced. The closed-loop simulation considered both local-model identification, with measured vibration feedback and global-model identification with feedback of the identified uncontrolled vibration. The algorithms were evaluated in terms of their accuracy, stability, convergence properties, computation speeds, and relative ease of implementation.

  8. A kinematic CAD tool for the design and control of a robot manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.-H.

    The correct relationship between two connective joint coordinates of a robot manipulator is defined by four link parameters; one being the joint variable and the other three the geometric values. The basis for all open-loop manipulator control is the relationship between the Cartesian coordinates of the end-effector and the joint coordinates; therefore, the fidelity of the Cartesian position and orientation of the end-effector to the real world depend on the accuracy of the four link parameters of each joint. In this paper, a linear analytic error model describes the six possible Cartesian errors and the four independent kinematic errors from which the Cartesian error envelopes due to any combination of four kinds of kinematic errors can be uniquely determined. From a design standpoint, this error model can be used as a guide to minimize the open-loop kinematic errors of the robot manipulator. Finally, a new calibration technique based on this model has also been developed that can be used to correct the kinematic errors of the robot manipulator.

  9. Randomized controlled trial of anterior-chamber intraocular lenses in Nepal: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. R.; Henning, A.; Pradhan, D.; Foster, A.; Lagnado, R.; Poulson, A.; Johnson, G. J.; Wormald, R. P.

    2000-01-01

    Most of the estimated 20 million people who are blind with cataracts live in rural areas of developing countries, where expert surgical resources are scarce. We have studied the use of multiflex open-loop anterior-chamber intraocular lenses (ACIOL) in high-volume low-cost surgery. Between 1992 and 1995, a total of 2000 people attending Lahan Eye Hospital, Nepal, with bilateral cataracts reducing vision to < or = 6/36 were randomly allocated to receive intracapsular extraction (ICCE) with aphakic spectacles, or ICCE with an ACIOL. We re-examined the cohort (1305/2000, 65%) between November 1996 and April 1997 and report the findings in this article. There were 13 new cases of poor visual outcome (best corrected vision < 6/60) arising after one year: 9 in the ACIOL group and 4 in the control group; odds ratio 2.1 (95% confidence interval, 0.59-9.55). The causes of poor outcome were as follows: ACIOL group--retinal detachment (4 cases), cystoid macular oedema (2), epiretinal membrane (1), age-related macular degeneration (1), and late endophthalmitis (1); control group--retinal detachment (2 cases), late endophthalmitis (1), and primary open-angle glaucoma with age-related macular degeneration (1). In rural areas of developing countries, well-manufactured multiflex open-loop ACIOLs can be implanted safely by experienced ophthalmologists after routine ICCE, avoiding the disadvantages of aphakic spectacle correction. PMID:10812737

  10. The development of the DAST I remotely piloted research vehicle for flight testing an active flutter suppression control system. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grose, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The development of the DAST I (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing) remotely piloted research vehicle is described. The DAST I is a highly modified BQM-34E/F Firebee II Supersonic Aerial Target incorporating a swept supercritical wing designed to flutter within the vehicle's flight envelope. The predicted flutter and rigid body characteristics are presented. A description of the analysis and design of an active flutter suppression control system (FSS) designed to increase the flutter boundary of the DAST wing (ARW-1) by a factor of 20% is given. The design and development of the digital remotely augmented primary flight control system and on-board analog backup control system is presented. An evaluation of the near real-time flight flutter testing methods is made by comparing results of five flutter testing techniques on simulated DAST I flutter data. The development of the DAST ARW-1 state variable model used to generate time histories of simulated accelerometer responses is presented. This model uses control surface commands and a Dryden model gust as inputs. The feasibility of the concept of extracting open loop flutter characteristics from closed loop FSS responses was examined. It was shown that open loop characteristics can be determined very well from closed loop subcritical responses.

  11. Feasibility of Outpatient Fully Integrated Closed-Loop Control

    PubMed Central

    Kovatchev, Boris P.; Renard, Eric; Cobelli, Claudio; Zisser, Howard C.; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Anderson, Stacey M.; Brown, Sue A.; Chernavvsky, Daniel R.; Breton, Marc D.; Farret, Anne; Pelletier, Marie-Josée; Place, Jérôme; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Del Favero, Simone; Visentin, Roberto; Filippi, Alessio; Scotton, Rachele; Avogaro, Angelo; Doyle, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the feasibility of a wearable artificial pancreas system, the Diabetes Assistant (DiAs), which uses a smart phone as a closed-loop control platform. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty patients with type 1 diabetes were enrolled at the Universities of Padova, Montpellier, and Virginia and at Sansum Diabetes Research Institute. Each trial continued for 42 h. The United States studies were conducted entirely in outpatient setting (e.g., hotel or guest house); studies in Italy and France were hybrid hospital–hotel admissions. A continuous glucose monitoring/pump system (Dexcom Seven Plus/Omnipod) was placed on the subject and was connected to DiAs. The patient operated the system via the DiAs user interface in open-loop mode (first 14 h of study), switching to closed-loop for the remaining 28 h. Study personnel monitored remotely via 3G or WiFi connection to DiAs and were available on site for assistance. RESULTS The total duration of proper system communication functioning was 807.5 h (274 h in open-loop and 533.5 h in closed-loop), which represented 97.7% of the total possible time from admission to discharge. This exceeded the predetermined primary end point of 80% system functionality. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated that a contemporary smart phone is capable of running outpatient closed-loop control and introduced a prototype system (DiAs) for further investigation. Following this proof of concept, future steps should include equipping insulin pumps and sensors with wireless capabilities, as well as studies focusing on control efficacy and patient-oriented clinical outcomes. PMID:23801798

  12. Human control of an inverted pendulum: is continuous control necessary? Is intermittent control effective? Is intermittent control physiological?

    PubMed

    Loram, Ian D; Gollee, Henrik; Lakie, Martin; Gawthrop, Peter J

    2011-01-15

    Human motor control is often explained in terms of engineering 'servo' theory. Recently, continuous, optimal control using internal models has emerged as a leading paradigm for voluntary movement. However, these engineering paradigms are designed for high band-width, inflexible, consistent systems whereas human control is low bandwidth and flexible using noisy sensors and actuators. By contrast, engineering intermittent control was designed for bandwidth-limited applications. Our general interest is whether intermittent rather than continuous control is generic to human motor control. Currently, it would be assumed that continuous control is the superior and physiologically natural choice for controlling unstable loads, for example as required for maintaining human balance. Using visuo-manual tracking of an unstable load, we show that control using gentle, intermittent taps is entirely natural and effective. The gentle tapping method resulted in slightly superior position control and velocity minimisation, a reduced feedback time delay, greater robustness to changing actuator gain and equal or greater linearity with respect to the external disturbance. Control was possible with a median contact rate of 0.8±0.3 s(-1). However, when optimising position or velocity regulation, a modal contact rate of 2 s(-1) was observed. This modal rate was consistent with insignificant disturbance-joystick coherence beyond 1-2 Hz in both tapping and continuous contact methods. For this load, these results demonstrate a motor control process of serial ballistic trajectories limited to an optimum rate of 2 s(-1). Consistent with theoretical reasoning, our results suggest that intermittent open loop action is a natural consequence of human physiology.

  13. Lp-stability (1 less than or equal to p less than or equal to infinity) of multivariable nonlinear time-varying feedback systems that are open-loop unstable. [noting unstable convolution subsystem forward control and time varying nonlinear feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callier, F. M.; Desoer, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    A class of multivariable, nonlinear time-varying feedback systems with an unstable convolution subsystem as feedforward and a time-varying nonlinear gain as feedback was considered. The impulse response of the convolution subsystem is the sum of a finite number of increasing exponentials multiplied by nonnegative powers of the time t, a term that is absolutely integrable and an infinite series of delayed impulses. The main result is a theorem. It essentially states that if the unstable convolution subsystem can be stabilized by a constant feedback gain F and if incremental gain of the difference between the nonlinear gain function and F is sufficiently small, then the nonlinear system is L(p)-stable for any p between one and infinity. Furthermore, the solutions of the nonlinear system depend continuously on the inputs in any L(p)-norm. The fixed point theorem is crucial in deriving the above theorem.

  14. Entrainment and Control of Bacterial Populations: An in Silico Study over a Spatially Extended Agent Based Model.

    PubMed

    Mina, Petros; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Bernardo, Mario di

    2016-07-15

    We extend a spatially explicit agent based model (ABM) developed previously to investigate entrainment and control of the emergent behavior of a population of synchronized oscillating cells in a microfluidic chamber. Unlike most of the work in models of control of cellular systems which focus on temporal changes, we model individual cells with spatial dependencies which may contribute to certain behavioral responses. We use the model to investigate the response of both open loop and closed loop strategies, such as proportional control (P-control), proportional-integral control (PI-control) and proportional-integral-derivative control (PID-control), to heterogeinities and growth in the cell population, variations of the control parameters and spatial effects such as diffusion in the spatially explicit setting of a microfluidic chamber setup. We show that, as expected from the theory of phase locking in dynamical systems, open loop control can only entrain the cell population in a subset of forcing periods, with a wide variety of dynamical behaviors obtained outside these regions of entrainment. Closed-loop control is shown instead to guarantee entrainment in a much wider region of control parameter space although presenting limitations when the population size increases over a certain threshold. In silico tracking experiments are also performed to validate the ability of classical control approaches to achieve other reference behaviors such as a desired constant output or a linearly varying one. All simulations are carried out in BSim, an advanced agent-based simulator of microbial population which is here extended ad hoc to include the effects of control strategies acting onto the population. PMID:27110835

  15. Rapid torque-limited line-of-sight pointing of SCOLE (Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment) configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    The design concept of a control for rapid torque-limited slewing of a rigid-mast version of the NASA SCOLE configuration is presented and demonstrated by means of numerical simulation. The time-optimal control problem for the system is decomposed into separate single-axis problems, expanding analytically the implicit nonlinear transcendental expression for the SCOLE line-of-sight error, and the final Euler attitude angles and slew angles are determined. The simulation results are presented in tables and graphs, and it is found that bang-bang or bang-pause-bang slew maneuvers with control moment applied to the Shuttle and control force applied to the reflector, and with a 5-deg/s slew-rate limit, produce the best pointing accuracy and the shortest slew times, although the specified line-of-sight error of 0.02 deg cannot be achieved using such open-loop single-axis maneuvers.

  16. Active vibration control using a modal-domain fiber optic sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, David E.

    1992-01-01

    A closed-loop control experiment is described in which vibrations of a cantilevered beam are suppressed using measurements from a modal-domain fiber optic sensor. Modal-domain sensors are interference between the modes of a few-mode optical waveguide to detect strain. The fiber is bonded along the length of the beam and provides a measurement related to the strain distribution on the surface of the beam. A model for the fiber optic sensor is derived, and this model is integrated with the dynamic model of the beam. A piezoelectric actuator is also bonded to the beam and used to provide control forces. Control forces are obtained through dynamic compensation of the signal from the fiber optic sensor. The compensator is implemented with a real-time digital controller. Analytical models are verified by comparing simulations to experimental results for both open-loop and closed-loop configurations.

  17. Neuro-estimator based GMC control of a batch reactive distillation.

    PubMed

    Prakash, K J Jithin; Patle, Dipesh S; Jana, Amiya K

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based nonlinear control algorithm is proposed for a simulated batch reactive distillation (RD) column. In the homogeneously catalyzed reactive process, an esterification reaction takes place for the production of ethyl acetate. The fundamental model has been derived incorporating the reaction term in the model structure of the nonreactive distillation process. The process operation is simulated at the startup phase under total reflux conditions. The open-loop process dynamics is also addressed running the batch process at the production phase under partial reflux conditions. In this study, a neuro-estimator based generic model controller (GMC), which consists of an ANN-based state predictor and the GMC law, has been synthesized. Finally, this proposed control law has been tested on the representative batch reactive distillation comparing with a gain-scheduled proportional integral (GSPI) controller and with its ideal performance (ideal GMC).

  18. Stability boundaries for aircraft with unstable lateral-directional dynamics and control saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrivastava, Prakash C.; Stengel, Robert F.

    1989-01-01

    Aircraft that do not possess inherent (aerodynamic) stability must rely on closed-loop control systems for stable operation. Because there are limits on the deflections of an aircraft's control surfaces, the region of stable operation also is bounded. These boundaries are investigated for a lateral-directional example in which vertical fin size is inadequate to provide directional stability and where aileron and rudder deflections are subject to saturation. Fourth-order models are used in this study, with flight control logic based on minimum-control-energy linear-quadratic-regulatory theory. It is found that the stability boundaries can be described by unstable limit cycles surrounding stable equilibrium points. Variations in regions of stability with gain levels and command inputs are illustrated. Current results suggest guidelines for permissible limits on the open-loop instability of an aircraft's lateral-directional modes.

  19. Application handbook for a Standardized Control Module (SCM) for DC-DC converters, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Mahmoud, M. F.; Yu, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The standardized control module (SCM) was developed for application in the buck, boost and buck/boost DC-DC converters. The SCM used multiple feedback loops to provide improved input line and output load regulation, stable feedback control system, good dynamic transient response and adaptive compensation of the control loop for changes in open loop gain and output filter time constraints. The necessary modeling and analysis tools to aid the design engineer in the application of the SCM to DC-DC Converters were developed. The SCM functional block diagram and the different analysis techniques were examined. The average time domain analysis technique was chosen as the basic analytical tool. The power stage transfer functions were developed for the buck, boost and buck/boost converters. The analog signal and digital signal processor transfer functions were developed for the three DC-DC Converter types using the constant on time, constant off time and constant frequency control laws.

  20. Aerodynamic flow control of a high lift system with dual synthetic jet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alstrom, Robert Bruce

    Implementing flow control systems will mitigate the vibration and aeroacoustic issues associated with weapons bays; enhance the performance of the latest generation aircraft by reducing their fuel consumption and improving their high angle-of-attack handling qualities; facilitate steep climb out profiles for military transport aircraft. Experimental research is performed on a NACA 0015 airfoil with a simple flap at angle of attack of 16o in both clean and high lift configurations. The results of the active control phase of the project will be discussed. Three different experiments were conducted; they are Amplitude Modulated Dual Location Open Loop Control, Adaptive Control with Amplitude Modulation using Direct Sensor Feedback and Adaptive Control with Amplitude Modulation using Extremum Seeking Control. All the closed loop experiments are dual location. The analysis presented uses the spatial variation of the root mean square pressure fluctuations, power spectral density estimates, Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs), and time frequency analysis which consists of the application of the Morlet and Mexican Hat wavelets. Additionally, during the course of high speed testing in the wind tunnel, some aeroacoustic phenomena were uncovered; those results will also be presented. A cross section of the results shows that the shape of the RMS pressure distributions is sensitive to forcing frequency. The application of broadband excitation in the case adaptive control causes the flow to select a frequency to lock in to. Additionally, open loop control results in global synchronization via switching between two stable states and closed loop control inhibits the switching phenomena, but rather synchronizes the flow about multiple stable shedding frequencies.

  1. Design study for LANDSAT-D attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwens, R. P.; Bernier, G. E.; Hofstadter, R. F.; Mayo, R. A.; Nakano, H.

    1977-01-01

    The gimballed Ku-band antenna system for communication with TDRS was studied. By means of an error analysis it was demonstrated that the antenna cannot be open loop pointed to TDRS by an onboard programmer, but that an autotrack system was required. After some tradeoffs, a two-axis, azimuth-elevation type gimbal configuration was recommended for the antenna. It is shown that gimbal lock only occurs when LANDSAT-D is over water where a temporary loss of the communication link to TDRS is of no consequence. A preliminary gimbal control system design is also presented. A digital computer program was written that computes antenna gimbal angle profiles, assesses percent antenna beam interference with the solar array, and determines whether the spacecraft is over land or water, a lighted earth or a dark earth, and whether the spacecraft is in eclipse.

  2. Toward rational design of electrical stimulation strategies for epilepsy control

    PubMed Central

    Sunderam, Sridhar; Gluckman, Bruce; Reato, Davide; Bikson, Marom

    2009-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is emerging as a viable alternative for epilepsy patients whose seizures are not alleviated by drugs or surgery. Its attractions are temporal and spatial specificity of action, flexibility of waveform parameters and timing, and the perception that its effects are reversible unlike resective surgery. However, despite significant advances in our understanding of mechanisms of neural electrical stimulation, clinical electrotherapy for seizures relies heavily on empirical tuning of parameters and protocols. We highlight concurrent treatment goals with potentially conflicting design constraints that must be resolved when formulating rational strategies for epilepsy electrotherapy: namely seizure reduction versus cognitive impairment, stimulation efficacy versus tissue safety, and mechanistic insight versus clinical pragmatism. First, treatment markers, objectives, and metrics relevant to electrical stimulation for epilepsy are discussed from a clinical perspective. Then the experimental perspective is presented, with the biophysical mechanisms and modalities of open-loop electrical stimulation, and the potential benefits of closed-loop control for epilepsy. PMID:19926525

  3. Interactive Medical Image Segmentation using PDE Control of Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Karasev, Peter; Kolesov, Ivan; Fritscher, Karl; Vela, Patricio; Mitchell, Phillip; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of injured or unusual anatomic structures in medical imagery is a problem that has continued to elude fully automated solutions. In this paper, the goal of easy-to-use and consistent interactive segmentation is transformed into a control synthesis problem. A nominal level set PDE is assumed to be given; this open-loop system achieves correct segmentation under ideal conditions, but does not agree with a human expert's ideal boundary for real image data. Perturbing the state and dynamics of a level set PDE via the accumulated user input and an observer-like system leads to desirable closed-loop behavior. The input structure is designed such that a user can stabilize the boundary in some desired state without needing to understand any mathematical parameters. Effectiveness of the technique is illustrated with applications to the challenging segmentations of a patellar tendon in MR and a shattered femur in CT. PMID:23893712

  4. Operator in-the-loop control of rotary cranes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Robinett, R.D.; Driessen, B.J.; Dohrmann, C.R.

    1996-03-01

    An open-loop control method is presented for reducing the oscillatory motion of rotary crane payloads during operator commanded maneuvers. A typical rotary crane consists of a multiple degree-of-freedom platform for positioning a spherical pendulum with an attached payload. The crane operator positions the Payload by issuing a combination of translational and rotational commands to the platform as well as load-line length changes. Frequently, these pendulum modes are time-varying and exhibit low natural frequencies. Maneuvers are therefore performed at rates sufficiently slow so as not to excite oscillation. The strategy presented here generates crane commands which suppress vibration of the payload without a priori knowledge of the desired maneuver. Results are presented for operator in-the-loop positioning using a real-time dynamics simulation of a three-axis rotary crane where the residual sway magnitude is reduced in excess of 4OdB.

  5. A Robust Design Methodology for Optimal Microscale Secondary Flow Control in Compact Inlet Diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Keller, Dennis J.

    2001-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to develop an economical Robust design methodology for microscale secondary flow control in compact inlet diffusers. To illustrate the potential of economical Robust Design methodology, two different mission strategies were considered for the subject inlet, namely Maximum Performance and Maximum HCF Life Expectancy. The Maximum Performance mission maximized total pressure recovery while the Maximum HCF Life Expectancy mission minimized the mean of the first five Fourier harmonic amplitudes, i.e., 'collectively' reduced all the harmonic 1/2 amplitudes of engine face distortion. Each of the mission strategies was subject to a low engine face distortion constraint, i.e., DC60<0.10, which is a level acceptable for commercial engines. For each of these missions strategies, an 'Optimal Robust' (open loop control) and an 'Optimal Adaptive' (closed loop control) installation was designed over a twenty degree angle-of-incidence range. The Optimal Robust installation used economical Robust Design methodology to arrive at a single design which operated over the entire angle-of-incident range (open loop control). The Optimal Adaptive installation optimized all the design parameters at each angle-of-incidence. Thus, the Optimal Adaptive installation would require a closed loop control system to sense a proper signal for each effector and modify that effector device, whether mechanical or fluidic, for optimal inlet performance. In general, the performance differences between the Optimal Adaptive and Optimal Robust installation designs were found to be marginal. This suggests, however, that Optimal Robust open loop installation designs can be very competitive with Optimal Adaptive close loop designs. Secondary flow control in inlets is inherently robust, provided it is optimally designed. Therefore, the new methodology presented in this paper, combined array 'Lower Order' approach to Robust DOE, offers the aerodynamicist a very viable and

  6. Type-2 fuzzy model based controller design for neutralization processes.

    PubMed

    Kumbasar, Tufan; Eksin, Ibrahim; Guzelkaya, Mujde; Yesil, Engin

    2012-03-01

    In this study, an inverse controller based on a type-2 fuzzy model control design strategy is introduced and this main controller is embedded within an internal model control structure. Then, the overall proposed control structure is implemented in a pH neutralization experimental setup. The inverse fuzzy control signal generation is handled as an optimization problem and solved at each sampling time in an online manner. Although, inverse fuzzy model controllers may produce perfect control in perfect model match case and/or non-existence of disturbances, this open loop control would not be sufficient in the case of modeling mismatches or disturbances. Therefore, an internal model control structure is proposed to compensate these errors in order to overcome this deficiency where the basic controller is an inverse type-2 fuzzy model. This feature improves the closed-loop performance to disturbance rejection as shown through the real-time control of the pH neutralization process. Experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the inverse type-2 fuzzy model controller structure compared to the inverse type-1 fuzzy model controller and conventional control structures. PMID:22036014

  7. Modular control of fusion power heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, D. R.

    2012-08-24

    This work is motivated by the growing demand for auxiliary heating on small and large machines worldwide. Numerous present and planned RF experiments (EBW, Lower Hybrid, ICRF, and ECH) are increasingly complex systems. The operational challenges are indicative of a need for components of real-time control that can be implemented with a moderate amount of effort in a time- and cost-effective fashion. Such a system will improve experimental efficiency, enhance experimental quality, and expedite technological advancements. The modular architecture of this control-suite serves multiple purposes. It facilitates construction on various scales from single to multiple controller systems. It enables expandability of control from basic to complex via the addition of modules with varying functionalities. It simplifies the control implementation process by reducing layers of software and electronic development. While conceived with fusion applications in mind, this suite has the potential to serve a broad range of scientific and industrial applications. During the Phase-I research effort we established the overall feasibility of this modular control-suite concept. We developed the fundamental modules needed to implement open-loop active-control and demonstrated their use on a microwave power deposition experiment.

  8. Multi-objective LQR with optimum weight selection to design FOPID controllers for delayed fractional order processes.

    PubMed

    Das, Saptarshi; Pan, Indranil; Das, Shantanu

    2015-09-01

    An optimal trade-off design for fractional order (FO)-PID controller is proposed with a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) based technique using two conflicting time domain objectives. A class of delayed FO systems with single non-integer order element, exhibiting both sluggish and oscillatory open loop responses, have been controlled here. The FO time delay processes are handled within a multi-objective optimization (MOO) formalism of LQR based FOPID design. A comparison is made between two contemporary approaches of stabilizing time-delay systems withinLQR. The MOO control design methodology yields the Pareto optimal trade-off solutions between the tracking performance and total variation (TV) of the control signal. Tuning rules are formed for the optimal LQR-FOPID controller parameters, using median of the non-dominated Pareto solutions to handle delayed FO processes.

  9. Closed-loop control of a 2-D mems micromirror with sidewall electrodes for a laser scanning microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Chen, Albert; Jie Sun, Wei; Sun, Zhen Dong; Yeow, John TW

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and implementation of a robust nonlinear control scheme for a 2-D micromirror-based laser scanning microscope system. The presented control scheme, built around sliding mode control approach and augmented an adaptive algorithm, is proposed to improve the tracking accuracy in presence of cross-axis effect. The closed-loop controlled imaging system is developed through integrating a 2-D micromirror with sidewall electrodes (SW), a laser source, NI field-programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware, the optics, position sensing detector (PSD) and photo detector (PD). The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed scheme is able to achieve accurate tracking of a reference triangular signal. Compared with open-loop control, the scanning performance is significantly improved, and a better 2-D image is obtained using the micromirror with the proposed scheme.

  10. Soft sensor based composition estimation and controller design for an ideal reactive distillation column.

    PubMed

    Vijaya Raghavan, S R; Radhakrishnan, T K; Srinivasan, K

    2011-01-01

    In this research work, the authors have presented the design and implementation of a recurrent neural network (RNN) based inferential state estimation scheme for an ideal reactive distillation column. Decentralized PI controllers are designed and implemented. The reactive distillation process is controlled by controlling the composition which has been estimated from the available temperature measurements using a type of RNN called Time Delayed Neural Network (TDNN). The performance of the RNN based state estimation scheme under both open loop and closed loop have been compared with a standard Extended Kalman filter (EKF) and a Feed forward Neural Network (FNN). The online training/correction has been done for both RNN and FNN schemes for every ten minutes whenever new un-trained measurements are available from a conventional composition analyzer. The performance of RNN shows better state estimation capability as compared to other state estimation schemes in terms of qualitative and quantitative performance indices. PMID:20887987

  11. Precision Pointing Control System (PPCS) system design and analysis. [for gimbaled experiment platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frew, A. M.; Eisenhut, D. F.; Farrenkopf, R. L.; Gates, R. F.; Iwens, R. P.; Kirby, D. K.; Mann, R. J.; Spencer, D. J.; Tsou, H. S.; Zaremba, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    The precision pointing control system (PPCS) is an integrated system for precision attitude determination and orientation of gimbaled experiment platforms. The PPCS concept configures the system to perform orientation of up to six independent gimbaled experiment platforms to design goal accuracy of 0.001 degrees, and to operate in conjunction with a three-axis stabilized earth-oriented spacecraft in orbits ranging from low altitude (200-2500 n.m., sun synchronous) to 24 hour geosynchronous, with a design goal life of 3 to 5 years. The system comprises two complementary functions: (1) attitude determination where the attitude of a defined set of body-fixed reference axes is determined relative to a known set of reference axes fixed in inertial space; and (2) pointing control where gimbal orientation is controlled, open-loop (without use of payload error/feedback) with respect to a defined set of body-fixed reference axes to produce pointing to a desired target.

  12. Soft sensor based composition estimation and controller design for an ideal reactive distillation column.

    PubMed

    Vijaya Raghavan, S R; Radhakrishnan, T K; Srinivasan, K

    2011-01-01

    In this research work, the authors have presented the design and implementation of a recurrent neural network (RNN) based inferential state estimation scheme for an ideal reactive distillation column. Decentralized PI controllers are designed and implemented. The reactive distillation process is controlled by controlling the composition which has been estimated from the available temperature measurements using a type of RNN called Time Delayed Neural Network (TDNN). The performance of the RNN based state estimation scheme under both open loop and closed loop have been compared with a standard Extended Kalman filter (EKF) and a Feed forward Neural Network (FNN). The online training/correction has been done for both RNN and FNN schemes for every ten minutes whenever new un-trained measurements are available from a conventional composition analyzer. The performance of RNN shows better state estimation capability as compared to other state estimation schemes in terms of qualitative and quantitative performance indices.

  13. Dynamic Characteristic Analysis of Spinal Motor Control Between 11- and 15-Year-Old Children.

    PubMed

    Chow, Daniel H; Lau, Newman M

    2016-07-01

    Spinal motor control can provide substantial insight for the causes of spinal musculoskeletal disorders. Its dynamic characteristics however, have not been fully investigated. The objective of this study is to explore the dynamic characteristics of spinal motor control via the fractional Brownian motion mathematical technique. Spinal curvatures and repositioning errors of different spinal regions in 64 children age 11- or 15-years old during upright stance were measured and compared for the effects of age and gender. With the application of the fractional Brownian motion analytical technique to the changes of spinal curvatures, distinct persistent movement behaviors could be determined, which could be interpreted physiologically as open-loop behaviors. Moreover, it was found that the spinal motor control of 15-year-old children was better than that of 11-year-old children with smaller repositioning error and less curvature variability as well as shorter response time and smaller curvature deformation.

  14. Recovery of Dynamics and Function in Spiking Neural Networks with Closed-Loop Control

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Ioannis; Deniz, Taşkin; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in developing novel brain stimulation methods to control disease-related aberrant neural activity and to address basic neuroscience questions. Conventional methods for manipulating brain activity rely on open-loop approaches that usually lead to excessive stimulation and, crucially, do not restore the original computations performed by the network. Thus, they are often accompanied by undesired side-effects. Here, we introduce delayed feedback control (DFC), a conceptually simple but effective method, to control pathological oscillations in spiking neural networks (SNNs). Using mathematical analysis and numerical simulations we show that DFC can restore a wide range of aberrant network dynamics either by suppressing or enhancing synchronous irregular activity. Importantly, DFC, besides steering the system back to a healthy state, also recovers the computations performed by the underlying network. Finally, using our theory we identify the role of single neuron and synapse properties in determining the stability of the closed-loop system. PMID:26829673

  15. Model Predictive Control-based Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Lian, Jianming; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-04-03

    Distributed energy resources, such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response, can be used to complement conventional generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging, especially in isolated systems. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation performance. The goals of the optimization problem are to minimize fuel costs and maximize the utilization of wind while considering equipment life of generators and energy storage. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve a look-ahead dispatch optimization problem and the performance is compared to an open loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the closed loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties and variability caused in the system.

  16. Model Predictive Control-based Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Lian, Jianming; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-01-07

    Distributed energy resources, such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response, can be used to complement conventional generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging, especially in isolated systems. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation performance. The goals of the optimization problem are to minimize fuel costs and maximize the utilization of wind while considering equipment life of generators and energy storage. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve a look-ahead dispatch optimization problem and the performance is compared to an open loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the closed loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties and variability caused in the system.

  17. Discrete sliding mode control for robust tracking of higher order delay time systems with experimental application.

    PubMed

    Khandekar, A A; Malwatkar, G M; Patre, B M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a discrete time sliding mode controller (DSMC) is proposed for higher order plus delay time (HOPDT) processes. A sliding mode surface is selected as a function of system states and error and the tuning parameters of sliding mode controller are determined using dominant pole placement strategy. The condition for the existence of stable sliding mode is obtained by using Lyapunov function. The proposed method is applicable to HOPDT processes with oscillatory and integrating behavior, open loop instability or non-minimum phase characteristics and works satisfactory under the effect of parametric uncertainty. The method does not require reduced order model and provides simple way to design the controllers. The simulation and experimentation results show that the proposed method ensures desired tracking dynamics.

  18. EMG spike time difference based feedback control.

    PubMed

    Butala, Jaydrath; Arkles, Anthony; Gray, John R

    2007-01-01

    Flight control in insects has been studied extensively; however the underlying neural mechanisms are not fully understood. Output from the central nervous system (CNS) must drive wing phase shifts and flight muscle depressor asymmetries associated with adaptive flight maneuvers. These maneuvers will, in turn, influence the insect's sensory environment, thus closing the feedback loop. We present a novel method that utilizes asymmetrical timing of bilateral depressor muscles, the forewing first basalars (m97), of the locust to close a visual feedback loop in a computer-generated flight simulator. The method converts the time difference between left and right m97s to analog voltage values. These voltage values can be obtained using open-loop experiments (visual motion controlled by the experimenter), or can be used to control closed-loop experiments (muscle activity controls the visual stimuli) experiments. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were obtained from right and left m97 muscles; spike time difference between them was calculated and converted to voltage values. Testing this circuit with real animals, we were able to detect the spike time difference and convert that to voltage that controlled the presentation of a stimulus in a closed-loop environment. This method may be used in conjunction with the flight simulator to understand the manner in which sensory information is integrated with the activity of the flight circuitry to study the neural control of this complex behaviour. PMID:18003414

  19. Sliding mode control for Lorentz-augmented spacecraft hovering around elliptic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Yan, Ye; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Hua

    2014-10-01

    A Lorentz spacecraft is an electrostatically charged space vehicle that could actively modulate its surface charge to generate Lorentz force as it moves through the planetary magnetic field. The induced Lorentz force provides propellantless electromagnetic propulsion for orbital maneuvering, such as spacecraft hovering that the chaser thrusts continuously to create an equilibrium state at the desired position relative to the target. Due to the fact that the direction of Lorentz force is determined by the local magnetic field and the velocity of the spacecraft with respect to the local magnetic field, which does not necessarily coincide with that of the required control acceleration for hovering, thus, in most cases, the Lorentz force works as a means of auxiliary propulsion to reduce the expenditure of fuel onboard. And that is why it is called Lorentz-augmented hovering. A dynamical model for Lorentz-augmented hovering around elliptic orbits is developed based upon the assumption that the Earth's magnetic field could be modeled as a tilted dipole that corotates with Earth. Fuel-optimal open-loop control laws are then derived based on the proposed dynamical model, presenting the optimal trajectories of the required specific charge of Lorentz spacecraft and the thruster-generated control acceleration. Considering the external disturbances that may drift the desired hovering position, a closed-loop integral sliding mode controller is also designed to guarantee the tracking of optimal control trajectories, ensuring the robustness of the system against perturbations. Numerical simulations are presented to analyze the characteristics of Lorentz-augmented hovering around eccentric orbits and the results substantiate the validity of the proposed open-loop and closed-loop control methods.

  20. A minimum attention control law for ball catching.

    PubMed

    Jang, Cheongjae; Lee, Jee-eun; Lee, Sohee; Park, F C

    2015-10-06

    Digital implementations of control laws typically involve discretization with respect to both time and space, and a control law that can achieve a task at coarser levels of discretization can be said to require less control attention, and also reduced implementation costs. One means of quantitatively capturing the attention of a control law is to measure the rate of change of the control with respect to changes in state and time. In this paper we present an attention-minimizing control law for ball catching and other target tracking tasks based on Brockett's attention criterion. We first highlight the connections between this attention criterion and some well-known principles from human motor control. Under the assumption that the optimal control law is the sum of a linear time-varying feedback term and a time-varying feedforward term, we derive an LQR-based minimum attention tracking control law that is stable, and obtained efficiently via a finite-dimensional optimization over the symmetric positive-definite matrices. Taking ball catching as our primary task, we perform numerical experiments comparing the performance of the various control strategies examined in the paper. Consistent with prevailing theories about human ball catching, our results exhibit several familiar features, e.g., the transition from open-loop to closed-loop control during the catching movement, and improved robustness to spatiotemporal discretization. The presented control laws are applicable to more general tracking problems that are subject to limited communication resources.

  1. A minimum attention control law for ball catching.

    PubMed

    Jang, Cheongjae; Lee, Jee-eun; Lee, Sohee; Park, F C

    2015-10-01

    Digital implementations of control laws typically involve discretization with respect to both time and space, and a control law that can achieve a task at coarser levels of discretization can be said to require less control attention, and also reduced implementation costs. One means of quantitatively capturing the attention of a control law is to measure the rate of change of the control with respect to changes in state and time. In this paper we present an attention-minimizing control law for ball catching and other target tracking tasks based on Brockett's attention criterion. We first highlight the connections between this attention criterion and some well-known principles from human motor control. Under the assumption that the optimal control law is the sum of a linear time-varying feedback term and a time-varying feedforward term, we derive an LQR-based minimum attention tracking control law that is stable, and obtained efficiently via a finite-dimensional optimization over the symmetric positive-definite matrices. Taking ball catching as our primary task, we perform numerical experiments comparing the performance of the various control strategies examined in the paper. Consistent with prevailing theories about human ball catching, our results exhibit several familiar features, e.g., the transition from open-loop to closed-loop control during the catching movement, and improved robustness to spatiotemporal discretization. The presented control laws are applicable to more general tracking problems that are subject to limited communication resources. PMID:26440578

  2. Motion and force control of multiple robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the motion and force control problem of multiple robot arms manipulating a cooperatively held object. A general control paradigm is introduced which decouples the motion and force control problems. For motion control, different control strategies are constructed based on the variables used as the control input in the controller design. There are three natural choices; acceleration of a generalized coordinate, arm tip force vectors, and the joint torques. The first two choices require full model information but produce simple models for the control design problem. The last choice results in a class of relatively model independent control laws by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the open loop system. The motion control only determines the joint torque to within a manifold, due to the multiple-arm kinematic constraint. To resolve the nonuniqueness of the joint torques, two methods are introduced. If the arm and object models are available, an optimization can be performed to best allocate the desired and effector control force to the joint actuators. The other possibility is to control the internal force about some set point. It is shown that effective force regulation can be achieved even if little model information is available.

  3. Optimal performance of constrained control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, P. Scott, Jr.; Gavin, Henri P.; Scruggs, Jeffrey T.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a method to compute optimal open-loop trajectories for systems subject to state and control inequality constraints in which the cost function is quadratic and the state dynamics are linear. For the case in which inequality constraints are decentralized with respect to the controls, optimal Lagrange multipliers enforcing the inequality constraints may be found at any time through Pontryagin’s minimum principle. In so doing, the set of differential algebraic Euler-Lagrange equations is transformed into a nonlinear two-point boundary-value problem for states and costates whose solution meets the necessary conditions for optimality. The optimal performance of inequality constrained control systems is calculable, allowing for comparison to previous, sub-optimal solutions. The method is applied to the control of damping forces in a vibration isolation system subjected to constraints imposed by the physical implementation of a particular controllable damper. An outcome of this study is the best performance achievable given a particular objective, isolation system, and semi-active damper constraints.

  4. O the Use of Modern Control Theory for Active Structural Acoustic Control.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, William Richard

    A modern control theory formulation of Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) of simple structures radiating acoustic energy into light or heavy fluid mediums is discussed in this dissertation. ASAC of a baffled, simply-supported plate subject to mechanical disturbances is investigated. For the case of light fluid loading, a finite element modelling approach is used to extend previous ASAC design methods. Vibration and acoustic controllers are designed for the plate. Comparison of the controller performance shows distinct advantages of the ASAC method for minimizing radiated acoustic power. A novel approach to the modelling of the heavy fluid-loaded plate is developed here. Augmenting structural and acoustic dynamics using state vector formalism allows the design of both vibration and ASAC controllers for the fluid-loaded plate. This modern control approach to active structural acoustic control is unique in its ability to suppress both persistent and transient disturbances on a plate in a heavy fluid. Numerical simulations of the open-loop and closed-loop plate response are provided to support the theoretical developments.

  5. Improved PID controller design for unstable time delay processes based on direct synthesis method and maximum sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanavil, B.; Krishna Chaitanya, K.; Seshagiri Rao, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a proportional-integral-derivative controller in series with a lead-lag filter is designed for control of the open-loop unstable processes with time delay based on direct synthesis method. Study of the performance of the designed controllers has been carried out on various unstable processes. Set-point weighting is considered to reduce the undesirable overshoot. The proposed scheme consists of only one tuning parameter, and systematic guidelines are provided for selection of the tuning parameter based on the peak value of the sensitivity function (Ms). Robustness analysis has been carried out based on sensitivity and complementary sensitivity functions. Nominal and robust control performances are achieved with the proposed method and improved closed-loop performances are obtained when compared to the recently reported methods in the literature.

  6. Towards autonomous neuroprosthetic control using Hebbian reinforcement learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Babak; Pohlmeyer, Eric A.; Prins, Noeline W.; Geng, Shijia; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Our goal was to design an adaptive neuroprosthetic controller that could learn the mapping from neural states to prosthetic actions and automatically adjust adaptation using only a binary evaluative feedback as a measure of desirability/undesirability of performance. Approach. Hebbian reinforcement learning (HRL) in a connectionist network was used for the design of the adaptive controller. The method combines the efficiency of supervised learning with the generality of reinforcement learning. The convergence properties of this approach were studied using both closed-loop control simulations and open-loop simulations that used primate neural data from robot-assisted reaching tasks. Main results. The HRL controller was able to perform classification and regression tasks using its episodic and sequential learning modes, respectively. In our experiments, the HRL controller quickly achieved convergence to an effective control policy, followed by robust performance. The controller also automatically stopped adapting the parameters after converging to a satisfactory control policy. Additionally, when the input neural vector was reorganized, the controller resumed adaptation to maintain performance. Significance. By estimating an evaluative feedback directly from the user, the HRL control algorithm may provide an efficient method for autonomous adaptation of neuroprosthetic systems. This method may enable the user to teach the controller the desired behavior using only a simple feedback signal.

  7. The Design of the Plasma Control System in KTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Xiao, Bingjia; Yuan, Qiping; Zhang, Ruirui; Yang, Fei; Li, Shi; Li, Hong; Liu, Ahdi; Liu, Wandong

    2015-04-01

    KTX (Keda Torus for eXperiment) is a new reversed field pinch device. The KTX plasma control system (PCS) can provide real-time, stable, flexible plasma control which is designed by ASIPP (Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences), based on the Linux cluster system and EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) framework, and developed from DIII-D (Doublet III-D) PCS. The control of the equilibrium field in KTX uses a PID (Proportional-Integral-Derivative) feedback controller. The control of the gas injection is an open loop control. The plasma control simulation system is one part of the plasma control system, which is used to test the plasma control algorithm if it is revised and updated. The KTX PCS has been successfully tested using HT-7 (Hefei Torus 7) experiment data in simulation mode. In the next phase, an error field feedback control and KTX simulator will be added to the KTX PCS, and the KTX PCS will be applied in experiments in the future. supported by the External Cooperation Program of BIC, Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. GJHZ201303), the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research Program of China (Nos. 2014GB10300, 2012GB105000 and 2011GB10600), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11205200), the Anhui Provincial Science Foundation for Outstanding Young Talent of China (No. 2012SQRL265)

  8. On the Origins and Control of Community Types in the Human Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Travis E; Bashan, Amir; Cao, Hong-Tai; Weiss, Scott T; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-02-01

    Microbiome-based stratification of healthy individuals into compositional categories, referred to as "enterotypes" or "community types", holds promise for drastically improving personalized medicine. Despite this potential, the existence of community types and the degree of their distinctness have been highly debated. Here we adopted a dynamic systems approach and found that heterogeneity in the interspecific interactions or the presence of strongly interacting species is sufficient to explain community types, independent of the topology of the underlying ecological network. By controlling the presence or absence of these strongly interacting species we can steer the microbial ecosystem to any desired community type. This open-loop control strategy still holds even when the community types are not distinct but appear as dense regions within a continuous gradient. This finding can be used to develop viable therapeutic strategies for shifting the microbial composition to a healthy configuration.

  9. On the Origins and Control of Community Types in the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hong-Tai; Weiss, Scott T.; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Microbiome-based stratification of healthy individuals into compositional categories, referred to as “enterotypes” or “community types”, holds promise for drastically improving personalized medicine. Despite this potential, the existence of community types and the degree of their distinctness have been highly debated. Here we adopted a dynamic systems approach and found that heterogeneity in the interspecific interactions or the presence of strongly interacting species is sufficient to explain community types, independent of the topology of the underlying ecological network. By controlling the presence or absence of these strongly interacting species we can steer the microbial ecosystem to any desired community type. This open-loop control strategy still holds even when the community types are not distinct but appear as dense regions within a continuous gradient. This finding can be used to develop viable therapeutic strategies for shifting the microbial composition to a healthy configuration. PMID:26866806

  10. Low frequency inertial control strategy for seismic attenuation with passive monolithic mechanical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; De Rosa, R.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present experimental results about preliminary activity related to the control of seismic attenuators and inertial platforms using monolithic accelerometer sensors based on folded pendulum mechanical scheme. Apart the compactness and robustness of monolithic implementations of folded pendulums, the main advantages of this kind of sensors are the tune-ability of their resonance frequency and their high sensitivity over a large measurement band. In this preliminary test we show that the main resonant frequencies of the inertial platform, located in the frequency band 0.01 +/- 10Hz, can be controlled using open loop monolithic folded pendulums as inertial sensors. The results are presented and discussed in this paper together with the planned further developments and improvements.

  11. Real-Time Feedback Control of Flow-Induced Cavity Tones. Part 2; Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, M. A.; Cabell, R. H.; Cattafesta, L. N., III

    2006-01-01

    An adaptive generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm was formulated and applied to the cavity flow-tone problem. The algorithm employs gradient descent to update the GPC coefficients at each time step. Past input-output data and an estimate of the open-loop pulse response sequence are all that is needed to implement the algorithm for application at fixed Mach numbers. Transient measurements made during controller adaptation revealed that the controller coefficients converged to a steady state in the mean, and this implies that adaptation can be turned off at some point with no degradation in control performance. When converged, the control algorithm demonstrated multiple Rossiter mode suppression at fixed Mach numbers ranging from 0.275 to 0.38. However, as in the case of fixed-gain GPC, the adaptive GPC performance was limited by spillover in sidebands around the suppressed Rossiter modes. The algorithm was also able to maintain suppression of multiple cavity tones as the freestream Mach number was varied over a modest range (0.275 to 0.29). Beyond this range, stable operation of the control algorithm was not possible due to the fixed plant model in the algorithm.

  12. An Integrated Multivariable Artificial Pancreas Control System

    PubMed Central

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Quinn, Lauretta T.; Littlejohn, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to develop a closed-loop (CL) artificial pancreas (AP) control system that uses continuous measurements of glucose concentration and physiological variables, integrated with a hypoglycemia early alarm module to regulate glucose concentration and prevent hypoglycemia. Eleven open-loop (OL) and 9 CL experiments were performed. A multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (MAAP) system was used for the first 6 CL experiments. An integrated multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (IMAAP) system consisting of MAAP augmented with a hypoglycemia early alarm system was used during the last 3 CL experiments. Glucose values and physical activity information were measured and transferred to the controller every 10 minutes and insulin suggestions were entered to the pump manually. All experiments were designed to be close to real-life conditions. Severe hypoglycemic episodes were seen several times during the OL experiments. With the MAAP system, the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia was decreased significantly (P < .01). No hypoglycemia was seen with the IMAAP system. There was also a significant difference (P < .01) between OL and CL experiments with regard to percentage of glucose concentration (54% vs 58%) that remained within target range (70-180 mg/dl). Integration of an adaptive control and hypoglycemia early alarm system was able to keep glucose concentration values in target range in patients with type 1 diabetes. Postprandial hypoglycemia and exercise-induced hypoglycemia did not occur when this system was used. Physical activity information improved estimation of the blood glucose concentration and effectiveness of the control system. PMID:24876613

  13. An integrated multivariable artificial pancreas control system.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Quinn, Lauretta T; Littlejohn, Elizabeth; Cinar, Ali

    2014-05-01

    The objective was to develop a closed-loop (CL) artificial pancreas (AP) control system that uses continuous measurements of glucose concentration and physiological variables, integrated with a hypoglycemia early alarm module to regulate glucose concentration and prevent hypoglycemia. Eleven open-loop (OL) and 9 CL experiments were performed. A multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (MAAP) system was used for the first 6 CL experiments. An integrated multivariable adaptive artificial pancreas (IMAAP) system consisting of MAAP augmented with a hypoglycemia early alarm system was used during the last 3 CL experiments. Glucose values and physical activity information were measured and transferred to the controller every 10 minutes and insulin suggestions were entered to the pump manually. All experiments were designed to be close to real-life conditions. Severe hypoglycemic episodes were seen several times during the OL experiments. With the MAAP system, the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia was decreased significantly (P < .01). No hypoglycemia was seen with the IMAAP system. There was also a significant difference (P < .01) between OL and CL experiments with regard to percentage of glucose concentration (54% vs 58%) that remained within target range (70-180 mg/dl). Integration of an adaptive control and hypoglycemia early alarm system was able to keep glucose concentration values in target range in patients with type 1 diabetes. Postprandial hypoglycemia and exercise-induced hypoglycemia did not occur when this system was used. Physical activity information improved estimation of the blood glucose concentration and effectiveness of the control system.

  14. Bio-Inspired Controller on an FPGA Applied to Closed-Loop Diaphragmatic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zbrzeski, Adeline; Bornat, Yannick; Hillen, Brian; Siu, Ricardo; Abbas, James; Jung, Ranu; Renaud, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury can disrupt connections between the brain respiratory network and the respiratory muscles which can lead to partial or complete loss of ventilatory control and require ventilatory assistance. Unlike current open-loop technology, a closed-loop diaphragmatic pacing system could overcome the drawbacks of manual titration as well as respond to changing ventilation requirements. We present an original bio-inspired assistive technology for real-time ventilation assistance, implemented in a digital configurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The bio-inspired controller, which is a spiking neural network (SNN) inspired by the medullary respiratory network, is as robust as a classic controller while having a flexible, low-power and low-cost hardware design. The system was simulated in MATLAB with FPGA-specific constraints and tested with a computational model of rat breathing; the model reproduced experimentally collected respiratory data in eupneic animals. The open-loop version of the bio-inspired controller was implemented on the FPGA. Electrical test bench characterizations confirmed the system functionality. Open and closed-loop paradigm simulations were simulated to test the FPGA system real-time behavior using the rat computational model. The closed-loop system monitors breathing and changes in respiratory demands to drive diaphragmatic stimulation. The simulated results inform future acute animal experiments and constitute the first step toward the development of a neuromorphic, adaptive, compact, low-power, implantable device. The bio-inspired hardware design optimizes the FPGA resource and time costs while harnessing the computational power of spike-based neuromorphic hardware. Its real-time feature makes it suitable for in vivo applications.

  15. Bio-Inspired Controller on an FPGA Applied to Closed-Loop Diaphragmatic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zbrzeski, Adeline; Bornat, Yannick; Hillen, Brian; Siu, Ricardo; Abbas, James; Jung, Ranu; Renaud, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury can disrupt connections between the brain respiratory network and the respiratory muscles which can lead to partial or complete loss of ventilatory control and require ventilatory assistance. Unlike current open-loop technology, a closed-loop diaphragmatic pacing system could overcome the drawbacks of manual titration as well as respond to changing ventilation requirements. We present an original bio-inspired assistive technology for real-time ventilation assistance, implemented in a digital configurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The bio-inspired controller, which is a spiking neural network (SNN) inspired by the medullary respiratory network, is as robust as a classic controller while having a flexible, low-power and low-cost hardware design. The system was simulated in MATLAB with FPGA-specific constraints and tested with a computational model of rat breathing; the model reproduced experimentally collected respiratory data in eupneic animals. The open-loop version of the bio-inspired controller was implemented on the FPGA. Electrical test bench characterizations confirmed the system functionality. Open and closed-loop paradigm simulations were simulated to test the FPGA system real-time behavior using the rat computational model. The closed-loop system monitors breathing and changes in respiratory demands to drive diaphragmatic stimulation. The simulated results inform future acute animal experiments and constitute the first step toward the development of a neuromorphic, adaptive, compact, low-power, implantable device. The bio-inspired hardware design optimizes the FPGA resource and time costs while harnessing the computational power of spike-based neuromorphic hardware. Its real-time feature makes it suitable for in vivo applications. PMID:27378844

  16. Bio-Inspired Controller on an FPGA Applied to Closed-Loop Diaphragmatic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zbrzeski, Adeline; Bornat, Yannick; Hillen, Brian; Siu, Ricardo; Abbas, James; Jung, Ranu; Renaud, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury can disrupt connections between the brain respiratory network and the respiratory muscles which can lead to partial or complete loss of ventilatory control and require ventilatory assistance. Unlike current open-loop technology, a closed-loop diaphragmatic pacing system could overcome the drawbacks of manual titration as well as respond to changing ventilation requirements. We present an original bio-inspired assistive technology for real-time ventilation assistance, implemented in a digital configurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The bio-inspired controller, which is a spiking neural network (SNN) inspired by the medullary respiratory network, is as robust as a classic controller while having a flexible, low-power and low-cost hardware design. The system was simulated in MATLAB with FPGA-specific constraints and tested with a computational model of rat breathing; the model reproduced experimentally collected respiratory data in eupneic animals. The open-loop version of the bio-inspired controller was implemented on the FPGA. Electrical test bench characterizations confirmed the system functionality. Open and closed-loop paradigm simulations were simulated to test the FPGA system real-time behavior using the rat computational model. The closed-loop system monitors breathing and changes in respiratory demands to drive diaphragmatic stimulation. The simulated results inform future acute animal experiments and constitute the first step toward the development of a neuromorphic, adaptive, compact, low-power, implantable device. The bio-inspired hardware design optimizes the FPGA resource and time costs while harnessing the computational power of spike-based neuromorphic hardware. Its real-time feature makes it suitable for in vivo applications. PMID:27378844

  17. Research on measurement and control of helicopter rotor response using blade-mounted accelerometers 1991-92

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Norman D.; Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary wind tunnel tests of the hill-size Model 412/IBC rotor at the Ames Research Center, NASA, are described. Blade flapping motion was excited by swash plate oscillation, and the flapping response was measured using blade-mounted accelerometers and compared with flapping motion inferred form blade strain measurements. The recorded open-loop accelerometer signals were used as input to the flapping-IBC system in the laboratory. The resulting controller cyclic pitch outputs are compared with the original cyclic pitch excitation inputs, and the potential effectiveness of the controller in suppressing the original excitation is evaluated. Control of blade flapping excites blade lagging, and vice versa; the paper describes a theoretical investigation of these coupling effects.

  18. Dual scheduling and quantised control for networked control systems with communication constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hui; Zhou, Chuan

    2016-07-01

    A novel integrated design scheme of average dwell time scheduling strategy, dynamic bandwidth allocation policy and quantised control for a collection of networked control systems (NCSs) with time delay and communication constraints is proposed in this paper. A scheduling policy is presented to accommodate the limitation of communication capacity which depends on the convergence rate of closed-loop system and divergence rate of open-loop plant. Linear programming technique is adopted to dynamically allocate bit rate for each node and the strategy is used to make trade-offs between the network utilisation and the control performance which provides an effective way of optimising the quality of control (QoC) and the quality of service (QoS) for NCSs. Mid-tread uniform quantisers update the quantisation rules according to the assignment of the bit rate and convert the quantised state into a kind of input saturation with bounded disturbances. Taking into account the effect of dual scheduling strategy and quantisation, the NCSs are modelled as discrete-time switched systems with bounded disturbances. Furthermore, a scheduling and quantised feedback control co-design procedure is proposed for the simultaneous stabilisation of the collection of networked subsystems. Finally, a simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Robust on-off pulse control of flexible space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Sinha, Ravi

    1993-01-01

    The on-off reaction jet control system is often used for attitude and orbital maneuvering of various spacecraft. Future space vehicles such as the orbital transfer vehicles, orbital maneuvering vehicles, and space station will extensively use reaction jets for orbital maneuvering and attitude stabilization. The proposed robust fuel- and time-optimal control algorithm is used for a three-mass spacing model of flexible spacecraft. A fuel-efficient on-off control logic is developed for robust rest-to-rest maneuver of a flexible vehicle with minimum excitation of structural modes. The first part of this report is concerned with the problem of selecting a proper pair of jets for practical trade-offs among the maneuvering time, fuel consumption, structural mode excitation, and performance robustness. A time-optimal control problem subject to parameter robustness constraints is formulated and solved. The second part of this report deals with obtaining parameter insensitive fuel- and time- optimal control inputs by solving a constrained optimization problem subject to robustness constraints. It is shown that sensitivity to modeling errors can be significantly reduced by the proposed, robustified open-loop control approach. The final part of this report deals with sliding mode control design for uncertain flexible structures. The benchmark problem of a flexible structure is used as an example for the feedback sliding mode controller design with bounded control inputs and robustness to parameter variations is investigated.

  20. Multichannel electrotactile feedback for simultaneous and proportional myoelectric control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Gauravkumar K.; Dosen, Strahinja; Castellini, Claudio; Farina, Dario

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Closing the loop in myoelectric prostheses by providing artificial somatosensory feedback to the user is an important need for prosthetic users. Previous studies investigated feedback strategies in combination with the control of one degree of freedom of simple grippers. Modern hands, however, are sophisticated multifunction systems. In this study, we assessed multichannel electrotactile feedback integrated with an advanced method for the simultaneous and proportional control of individual fingers of a dexterous hand. Approach. The feedback used spatial and frequency coding to provide information on the finger positions (normalized flexion angles). A comprehensive set of conditions have been investigated in 28 able-bodied subjects, including feedback modalities (visual, electrotactile and no feedback), control tasks (fingers and grasps), systems (virtual and real hand), control methods (ideal and realistic) and range of motion (low and high). The task for the subjects was to operate the hand using closed-loop myoelectric control and generate the desired movement (e.g., selected finger or grasp at a specific level of closure). Main results. The subjects could perceive the multichannel and multivariable electrotactile feedback and effectively exploit it to improve the control performance with respect to open-loop grasping. The improvement however depended on the reliability of the feedforward control, with less consistent control exhibiting performance trends that were more complex across the conditions. Significance. The results are promising for the potential application of advanced feedback to close the control loop in sophisticated prosthetic systems.

  1. Humidity control tool for neonatal incubator.

    PubMed

    Abdiche, M; Farges, G; Delanaud, S; Bach, V; Villon, P; Libert, J P

    1998-03-01

    In the first days of life, the daily evaporative loss from premature neonates can reach up to 20% of body mass. Such loss can be reduced by increasing the air humidity inside the incubator. Neither passive humidification nor open loop systems allow high humidity rates to be maintained or easily controlled: at 34 degrees C, the maximum levels vary with the system from 40% to 77% of relative humidity. The skin evaporative exchanges between the neonate and the environment are directly proportional to the water vapour partial pressure difference between the neonate's skin and the air. An active closed loop system has been designed, which permits reliable and accurate control of humidity according to the water vapour partial pressure set, between 1 and 6 kPa, in an air temperature range of 28-39 degrees C. It is characterised by variations of about 0.05 kPa around the set value and a maximum humidification speed of 0.25 kPa min-1. The algorithm is based on optimal control and the dynamic programming principles. Test results place this active system above usual systems for its power, precision and adaptability. It is an exploitable tool in fundamental and clinical research, to precisely study the humidity effects on neonatal comfort and thermo-regulation evolution.

  2. Closed-loop response properties of a visual interneuron involved in fly optomotor control

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Naveed; Krapp, Holger G.; Tanaka, Reiko J.

    2013-01-01

    Due to methodological limitations neural function is mostly studied under open-loop conditions. Normally, however, nervous systems operate in closed-loop where sensory input is processed to generate behavioral outputs, which again change the sensory input. Here, we investigate the closed-loop responses of an identified visual interneuron, the blowfly H1-cell, that is part of a neural circuit involved in optomotor flight and gaze control. Those behaviors may be triggered by attitude changes during flight in turbulent air. The fly analyses the resulting retinal image shifts and performs compensatory body and head rotations to regain its default attitude. We developed a fly robot interface to study H1-cell responses in a 1 degree-of-freedom image stabilization task. Image shifts, induced by externally forced rotations, modulate the cell’s spike rate that controls counter rotations of a mobile robot to minimize relative motion between the robot and its visual surroundings. A feedback controller closed the loop between neural activity and the rotation of the robot. Under these conditions we found the following H1-cell response properties: (i) the peak spike rate decreases when the mean image velocity is increased, (ii) the relationship between spike rate and image velocity depends on the standard deviation of the image velocities suggesting adaptive scaling of the cell’s signaling range, and (iii) the cell’s gain decreases linearly with increasing image accelerations. Our results reveal a remarkable qualitative similarity between the response dynamics of the H1-cell under closed-loop conditions with those obtained in previous open-loop experiments. Finally, we show that the adaptive scaling of the H1-cell’s responses, while maximizing information on image velocity, decreases the cell’s sensitivity to image accelerations. Understanding such trade-offs in biological vision systems may advance the design of smart vision sensors for autonomous robots. PMID

  3. Closed-loop response properties of a visual interneuron involved in fly optomotor control.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, Naveed; Krapp, Holger G; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2013-01-01

    Due to methodological limitations neural function is mostly studied under open-loop conditions. Normally, however, nervous systems operate in closed-loop where sensory input is processed to generate behavioral outputs, which again change the sensory input. Here, we investigate the closed-loop responses of an identified visual interneuron, the blowfly H1-cell, that is part of a neural circuit involved in optomotor flight and gaze control. Those behaviors may be triggered by attitude changes during flight in turbulent air. The fly analyses the resulting retinal image shifts and performs compensatory body and head rotations to regain its default attitude. We developed a fly robot interface to study H1-cell responses in a 1 degree-of-freedom image stabilization task. Image shifts, induced by externally forced rotations, modulate the cell's spike rate that controls counter rotations of a mobile robot to minimize relative motion between the robot and its visual surroundings. A feedback controller closed the loop between neural activity and the rotation of the robot. Under these conditions we found the following H1-cell response properties: (i) the peak spike rate decreases when the mean image velocity is increased, (ii) the relationship between spike rate and image velocity depends on the standard deviation of the image velocities suggesting adaptive scaling of the cell's signaling range, and (iii) the cell's gain decreases linearly with increasing image accelerations. Our results reveal a remarkable qualitative similarity between the response dynamics of the H1-cell under closed-loop conditions with those obtained in previous open-loop experiments. Finally, we show that the adaptive scaling of the H1-cell's responses, while maximizing information on image velocity, decreases the cell's sensitivity to image accelerations. Understanding such trade-offs in biological vision systems may advance the design of smart vision sensors for autonomous robots. PMID:23543872

  4. Closed-loop response properties of a visual interneuron involved in fly optomotor control.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, Naveed; Krapp, Holger G; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2013-01-01

    Due to methodological limitations neural function is mostly studied under open-loop conditions. Normally, however, nervous systems operate in closed-loop where sensory input is processed to generate behavioral outputs, which again change the sensory input. Here, we investigate the closed-loop responses of an identified visual interneuron, the blowfly H1-cell, that is part of a neural circuit involved in optomotor flight and gaze control. Those behaviors may be triggered by attitude changes during flight in turbulent air. The fly analyses the resulting retinal image shifts and performs compensatory body and head rotations to regain its default attitude. We developed a fly robot interface to study H1-cell responses in a 1 degree-of-freedom image stabilization task. Image shifts, induced by externally forced rotations, modulate the cell's spike rate that controls counter rotations of a mobile robot to minimize relative motion between the robot and its visual surroundings. A feedback controller closed the loop between neural activity and the rotation of the robot. Under these conditions we found the following H1-cell response properties: (i) the peak spike rate decreases when the mean image velocity is increased, (ii) the relationship between spike rate and image velocity depends on the standard deviation of the image velocities suggesting adaptive scaling of the cell's signaling range, and (iii) the cell's gain decreases linearly with increasing image accelerations. Our results reveal a remarkable qualitative similarity between the response dynamics of the H1-cell under closed-loop conditions with those obtained in previous open-loop experiments. Finally, we show that the adaptive scaling of the H1-cell's responses, while maximizing information on image velocity, decreases the cell's sensitivity to image accelerations. Understanding such trade-offs in biological vision systems may advance the design of smart vision sensors for autonomous robots.

  5. An Investigation of Nonlinear Controller for Propulsion Controlled Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft control systems are usually very reliable because of redundancy and multiple control surfaces. However, there are rare occasions when potentially disastrous flight control system failures do occur. At such times, the use of appropriate modulation of engine thrust to stabilize the aircraft may be the only chance of survival for the people aboard. In several cases where complete loss of control systems has occurred in multi-engine aircraft, pilots used the propulsion system to regain limited control of the aircraft with various degrees of success. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using only engine thrust modulation for emergency backup flight control, the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has been conducting a series of analytical studies and flight tests on several different types of aircraft in a propulsion controlled aircraft (PCA) program. Simulation studies have included B-720, B-727, MD-11, C-402, C-17, F-18, and F-15, and flight tests have included B-747, B-777, MD-11, T-39, Lear 24, F-18, F-15, T-38, and PA-30. One objective was to determine the degree of control available with manual manipulation (open-loop) of the engine throttles. Flight tests and simulations soon showed that a closed loop controller could improve the chances of making a safe runway landing. The major work to date has concentrated on three aircraft (F-15, F-18, and the MD-11). Successful landings using PCA controllers were performed on the F-15 and MD-11 without the use of control surfaces. During the course of the research, some unique challenges have been identified. Compared to the conventional flight control surfaces, the engines are slow and have limited control effectiveness. Hence the ability of the system to promptly respond to aerodynamic changes is limited. Consequently, many nonlinear effects, which are easily accommodated by a conventional flight control system, become significant issues in the design of an effective controller when the engines are used as the

  6. Study of a Simulation Tool to Determine Achievable Control Dynamics and Control Power Requirements with Perfect Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper contains a study of two methods for use in a generic nonlinear simulation tool that could be used to determine achievable control dynamics and control power requirements while performing perfect tracking maneuvers over the entire flight envelope. The two methods are NDI (nonlinear dynamic inversion) and the SOFFT(Stochastic Optimal Feedforward and Feedback Technology) feedforward control structure. Equivalent discrete and continuous SOFFT feedforward controllers have been developed. These equivalent forms clearly show that the closed-loop plant model loop is a plant inversion and is the same as the NDI formulation. The main difference is that the NDI formulation has a closed-loop controller structure whereas SOFFT uses an open-loop command model. Continuous, discrete, and hybrid controller structures have been developed and integrated into the formulation. Linear simulation results show that seven different configurations all give essentially the same response, with the NDI hybrid being slightly different. The SOFFT controller gave better tracking performance compared to the NDI controller when a nonlinear saturation element was added. Future plans include evaluation using a nonlinear simulation.

  7. Optimization of microalgal photobioreactor system using model predictive control with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sung Jin; Jeong, Dong Hwi; Kim, Jung Hun; Lee, Jong Min

    2016-08-01

    To maximize biomass and lipid concentrations, various optimization methods were investigated in microalgal photobioreactor systems under mixotrophic conditions. Lipid concentration was estimated using unscented Kalman filter (UKF) with other measurable sources and subsequently used as lipid data for performing model predictive control (MPC). In addition, the maximized biomass and lipid trajectory obtained by open-loop optimization were used as target trajectory for tracking by MPC. Simulation studies and experimental validation were performed and significant improvements in biomass and lipid productivity were achieved in the case where MPC was applied. However, occurence of a lag phase was observed while manipulating the feed flow rates, which is induced by large amount of inputs. This is an important phenomenon that can lead to model-plant mismatch and requires further study for the optimization of microalgal photobioreactors. PMID:27094678

  8. Multiple-Probe Excitation and Control of Low-Frequency Fluctuations in a Laboratory Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battey, Alexander; Abler, Melissa C.; Mauel, Michael; Collisionless Terella Experiment Team

    2015-11-01

    Plasma confined by a magnetic dipole have both astrophysical and laboratory applications and exhibit complex flute-like low-frequency turbulence. In this poster, we present new experiments, conducted with the Collisionless Terella Experiment (CTX), where both single and dual electrodes are used to inject currents and drive electrostatic potentials. These probes are driven either open-loop, to excite waves, or closed-loop, to implement multiple-point feedback control of the plasma's interchange turbulence. Our measurements of interchange turbulence show that two probes with a 90 degree spatial separation are able to manipulate the interchange modes differently than a system using only one probe. Supported by NSF-DOE Partnership for Plasma Science Grants DOE-DE-FG02-00ER54585 and NSF-PHY-1201896.

  9. Attenuation of wall disturbances in an electron cyclotron resonance oxygen–argon plasma using real time control

    SciTech Connect

    Keville, Bernard Gaman, Cezar; Turner, Miles M.; Zhang, Yang; Daniels, Stephen; Holohan, Anthony M.

    2014-07-01

    Present practice in plasma-assisted semiconductor manufacturing specifies recipes in terms of inputs such as gas flow rates, power and pressure. However, ostensibly identical chambers running identical recipes may produce very different results. Extensive chamber matching, i.e., initial iterative, empirical tuning of the process recipe, which entails time-consuming, ex situ statistical analysis of process metrics such as etch depth, uniformity, anisotropy and selectivity, is required to ensure acceptable results. Once matched, chambers are run open loop and are thus sensitive to disturbances such as actuator drift, wall seasoning and substrate loading, which may impact negatively on process reproducibility. An alternative approach, which may obviate the need for chamber matching and reduce the sensitivity of process metrics to exogenous disturbances, would be to specify a recipe in terms of quantities such as active species densities, and to regulate these in real time by adjusting the inputs with a suitable control algorithm. In this work, real time control of an electron cyclotron resonance O{sub 2}/Ar plasma used for photoresist ashing has been implemented. The design of elementary, model-based algorithms for the control of the argon 750 and oxygen 844 line intensities measured by optical emission spectroscopy is described. Fluorination of the chamber walls by means of an SF{sub 6} plasma prior to ashing inhibits wall recombination of oxygen radicals resulting in an approximately 20% increase in ash rate in the open loop case. However, closed loop control almost completely attenuates the effect of fluorination, thus demonstrating the efficacy of the control algorithms in ensuring a reproducible ash rate in the face of a wall disturbance.

  10. Optimal Micro-Scale Secondary Flow Control for the Management of High Cycle Fatigue and Distortion in Compact Inlet Diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Keller, Dennis J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study on micro-scale secondary flow control (MSFC) is to study the aerodynamic behavior of micro-vane effectors through their factor (i.e., the design variable) interactions and to demonstrate how these statistical interactions, when brought together in an optimal manner, determine design robustness. The term micro-scale indicates the vane effectors are small in comparison to the local boundary layer height. Robustness in this situation means that it is possible to design fixed MSFC robust installation (i.e.. open loop) which operates well over the range of mission variables and is only marginally different from adaptive (i.e., closed loop) installation design, which would require a control system. The inherent robustness of MSFC micro-vane effector installation designs comes about because of their natural aerodynamic characteristics and the manner in which these characteristics are brought together in an optimal manner through a structured Response Surface Methodology design process.

  11. Quantum demolition filtering and optimal control of unstable systems.

    PubMed

    Belavkin, V P

    2012-11-28

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for optimal control of quantum unstable systems is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme, we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects as in the usual case of quantum stable systems with non-demolition observation. This allows us to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation generalized to demolition observations and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. An unstable controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one. PMID:23091216

  12. Towards Quantum Cybernetics:. Optimal Feedback Control in Quantum Bio Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavkin, V. P.

    2009-02-01

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for the purpose of optimal control in quantum cybernetics with convex constraints and cońcave cost and bequest functions of the quantum state is given. Consideration is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme with continuous observations we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects for quantum stochastic micro-dynamics of the total system. This allows to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to only Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. A controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one.

  13. Optimal Control of Airfoil Flow Separation using Fluidic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabi, Arireza F.

    as well as F+ were evaluated and discussed. The computational model predictions showed good agreement with the experimental data. It was observed that different angles of attack and flap angles have different requirements for the minimum value of the momentum coefficient, Cμ, in order for the SJA to be effective for control of separation. It was also found that the variation of F + noticeably affects the lift and drag forces acting on the airfoil. The optimum values of parameters during open loop control simulations have been applied in order to introduce the optimal open loop control outcome. An innovative approach has been implemented to formulate optimal frequencies and momentum ratios of vortex shedding which depends on angle of attack and static pressure of the separation zone in the upper chord. Optimal open loop results have been compared with the optimal closed loop results. Cumulative case studies in the matter of angle of attacks, flap angles, Re, Cμ and F+ provide a convincing collection of evidence to the following conclusion. An improvement of a direct closed loop control was demonstrated, and an analytical formula describing the properties of a separated flow and vortex shedding was proposed. Best AFC solutions are offered by providing optimal frequencies and momentum ratios at a variety of flow conditions.

  14. Closed-loop feedback control and bifurcation analysis of epileptiform activity via optogenetic stimulation in a mathematical model of human cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj, Prashanth; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides a method of neuron stimulation that has high spatial, temporal, and cell-type specificity. Here we present a model of optogenetic feedback control that targets the inhibitory population, which expresses light-sensitive channelrhodopsin-2 channels, in a mean-field model of undifferentiated cortex that is driven to seizures. The inhibitory population is illuminated with an intensity that is a function of electrode measurements obtained via the cortical model. We test the efficacy of this control method on seizurelike activity observed in two parameter spaces of the cortical model that most closely correspond to seizures observed in patients. We also compare the effect of closed-loop and open-loop control on seizurelike activity using a less-complicated ordinary differential equation model of the undifferentiated cortex in parameter space. Seizurelike activity is successfully suppressed in both parameter planes using optimal illumination intensities less likely to have adverse effects on cortical tissue.

  15. The Benchmark Active Controls Technology Model Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Durham, Michael H.

    1997-01-01

    The Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) model is a part of the Benchmark Models Program (BMP). The BMP is a NASA Langley Research Center program that includes a series of models which were used to study different aeroelastic phenomena and to validate computational fluid dynamics codes. The primary objective of BACT testing was to obtain steady and unsteady loads, accelerations, and aerodynamic pressures due to control surface activity in order to calibrate unsteady CFD codes and active control design tools. Three wind-tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) have been completed. The first and parts of the second and third tests focused on collecting open-loop data to define the model's aeroservoelastic characteristics, including the flutter boundary across the Mach range. It is this data that is being presented in this paper. An extensive database of over 3000 data sets was obtained. This database includes steady and unsteady control surface effectiveness data, including pressure distributions, control surface hinge moments, and overall model loads due to deflections of a trailing edge control surface and upper and lower surface

  16. Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

    2012-07-22

    Abstract— Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms— Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

  17. A Method for Precision Closed-Loop Irrigation Using a Modified PID Control Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, Martin; Kühn, Karl; Jenkins, Malcolm; Burek, Kazimierz; Dutton, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The benefits of closed-loop irrigation control have been demonstrated in grower trials which show the potential for improved crop yields and resource usage. Managing water use by controlling irrigation in response to soil moisture changes to meet crop water demands is a popular approach but requires knowledge of closed-loop control practice. In theory, to obtain precise closed-loop control of a system it is necessary to characterise every component in the control loop to derive the appropriate controller parameters, i.e. proportional, integral & derivative (PID) parameters in a classic PID controller. In practice this is often difficult to achieve. Empirical methods are employed to estimate the PID parameters by observing how the system performs under open-loop conditions. In this paper we present a modified PID controller, with a constrained integral function, that delivers excellent regulation of soil moisture by supplying the appropriate amount of water to meet the needs of the plant during the diurnal cycle. Furthermore, the modified PID controller responds quickly to changes in environmental conditions, including rainfall events which can result in: controller windup, under-watering and plant stress conditions. The experimental work successfully demonstrates the functionality of a constrained integral PID controller that delivers robust and precise irrigation control. Coir substrate strawberry growing trial data is also presented illustrating soil moisture control and the ability to match water deliver to solar radiation.

  18. CALL FOR PAPERS: Quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Stefano; Wiseman, Howard M.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.

    2004-10-01

    Over the last few decades, the achievements of highly precise technologies for manipulating systems at quantum scales have paved the way for the development of quantum control. Moreover, the proliferation of results in quantum information suggest that control theory might profitably be re-examined from this perspective. Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics will publish a topical issue devoted to quantum control. The Guest Editors invite contributions from researchers working in any area related to quantum control. Topics to be covered include: • Quantum Hamiltonian dynamics and programming control • Quantum decoherence controlOpen loop control • Closed loop (feedback) control • Quantum measurement theory • Quantum noise and filtering • Estimation and decision theory • Quantum error correction • Group representation in quantum control • Coherent control in quantum optics and lasers • Coherent control in cavity QED and atom optics • Coherent control in molecular dynamics The topical issue is scheduled for publication in November 2005 and the DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 28 February 2005. All contributions will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Submissions should preferably be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Enquiries regarding this topical issue may be addressed to the Publisher, Dr Claire Bedrock (claire.bedrock@iop.org). There are no page charges for publication. The corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should preferably be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions

  19. Closed-loop Separation Control Using Oscillatory Flow Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Raney, David L.; Seifert, Avi; Pack, latunia G.; Brown, Donald E.

    2000-01-01

    Design and implementation of a digital feedback controller for a flow control experiment was performed. The experiment was conducted in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel on a generic separated configuration at a chord Reynolds number of 16 million and a Mach number of 0.25. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick airfoil at zero angle-of-attack. A moderate favorable pressure gradient, up to 55% of the chord, is followed by a severe adverse pressure gradient which is relaxed towards the trailing edge. The turbulent separation bubble, behind the adverse pressure gradient, is then reduced by introducing oscillatory flow excitation just upstream of the point of flow separation. The degree of reduction in the separation region can be controlled by the amplitude of the oscillatory excitation. A feedback controller was designed to track a given trajectory for the desired degree of flow reattachment and to improve the transient behavior of the flow system. Closed-loop experiments demonstrated that the feedback controller was able to track step input commands and improve the transient behavior of the open-loop response.

  20. Fuzzy control structure for an anaerobic fluidised bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Salvador Carlos; Sanchez, Edgar N.; Béteau, Jean-François

    2012-12-01

    This article deals with the design of a fuzzy control strategy for a fluidised bed reactor, which is used for anaerobic wastewater treatment. This strategy is composed of a supervisor system and two PI L/A controllers. In addition, a biomass observer, designed on the basis of the Takagi-Sugeno approach considering a principal component analysis, is used with supervision proposals. The supervisor is also designed following the Takagi-Sugeno methodology; it detects the process state, selects and applies the most adequate control action in order to avoid the washout region. On the other side, two control actions are designed for bicarbonate regulation using the PI/LA technique: adding a base and dilution rate. These control actions, as well as the open loop operation, are selected by the supervisor in order to reject disturbances on the substrate influent allowing at the same time a high methane production. The applicability of the proposed structure in a fluidised bed reactor is illustrated via simulations.

  1. Test Cases for the Benchmark Active Controls: Spoiler and Control Surface Oscillations and Flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Scott, Robert C.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2000-01-01

    As a portion of the Benchmark Models Program at NASA Langley, a simple generic model was developed for active controls research and was called BACT for Benchmark Active Controls Technology model. This model was based on the previously-tested Benchmark Models rectangular wing with the NACA 0012 airfoil section that was mounted on the Pitch and Plunge Apparatus (PAPA) for flutter testing. The BACT model had an upper surface spoiler, a lower surface spoiler, and a trailing edge control surface for use in flutter suppression and dynamic response excitation. Previous experience with flutter suppression indicated a need for measured control surface aerodynamics for accurate control law design. Three different types of flutter instability boundaries had also been determined for the NACA 0012/PAPA model, a classical flutter boundary, a transonic stall flutter boundary at angle of attack, and a plunge instability near M = 0.9. Therefore an extensive set of steady and control surface oscillation data was generated spanning the range of the three types of instabilities. This information was subsequently used to design control laws to suppress each flutter instability. There have been three tests of the BACT model. The objective of the first test, TDT Test 485, was to generate a data set of steady and unsteady control surface effectiveness data, and to determine the open loop dynamic characteristics of the control systems including the actuators. Unsteady pressures, loads, and transfer functions were measured. The other two tests, TDT Test 502 and TDT Test 5 18, were primarily oriented towards active controls research, but some data supplementary to the first test were obtained. Dynamic response of the flexible system to control surface excitation and open loop flutter characteristics were determined during Test 502. Loads were not measured during the last two tests. During these tests, a database of over 3000 data sets was obtained. A reasonably extensive subset of the data

  2. Pilot modeling, modal analysis, and control of large flexible aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    The issues to be addressed are threefold. The first deals with the question of whether dynamic aeroelastic effects can significantly impact piloted flight dynamics. For example, if one were to explore this problem experimentally, what mathematical model would be appropriate to use in the simulation? What modes, for example, should be included in the simulation, or what linear model should be used in the control synthesis? The second question deals with the appropriate design criteria or design objectives. In the case of active control, for example, what would be the design objectives for the control synthesis if aeroelastic effects are a problem? The outline of the topics includes a description of a model analysis methodology aimed at answering the question of the significance of higher order dynamics. Secondly, a pilot vehicle analysis of some experimental data addresses the question of ""What's important in the task?'' The experimental data will be presented briefly, followed by the results of an open-loop modal analysis of the generic vehicle configurations in question. Finally, one of the vehicles will be augmented via active control and the results presented.

  3. Nonlinear closed-loop control system for intracranial pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Coté, G L; Durai, R; Zoghi, B

    1995-01-01

    A nonlinear closed-loop control system with flat pressure-versus-flow characteristics that is aimed at regulating intracranial pressure (ICP) by adjusting the volume of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) was designed, built, and tested. The control system design allows both the pressure setpoint and hysteresis to be adjusted to overcome the difficulties inherent in differential pressure-activated, fixed resistance, open-loop shunts. A dynamic six-compartment bench-top fluid system, which mimics the cerebral spinal fluid system, was designed, built, and tested. A computer simulation was developed which included the nonlinear on-off controller with hysteresis and a sixth-order, linear, multicompartmental model of the CSF system. The computer model and in vitro system results showed the ability of the system to track and compensate for pressure variations above and below normal as well as for spurious outputs that mimic such in vivo problems as blood pressure changes, sneezing, or coughing. There was one discrepancy between the simulated and in vitro results. The in vitro system had a higher rate of increase in pressure due to the more rigid compliance of the materials used, whereas the computer model compliance, based on the basal in vivo compliance of the CSF system, was less rigid. Based on these findings, the controller was modified to account for short-duration, extremely elevated pressures. PMID:8572426

  4. Precision Attitude Control for the BETTII Balloon-Borne Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Rinehart. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is an 8-meter baseline far-infrared interferometer to fly on a high altitude balloon. Operating at wavelengths of 30-90 microns, BETTII will obtain spatial and spectral information on science targets at angular resolutions down to less than half an arcsecond, a capability unmatched by other far-infrared facilities. This requires attitude control at a level ofless than a tenth of an arcsecond, a great challenge for a lightweight balloon-borne system. We have designed a precision attitude determination system to provide gondola attitude knowledge at a level of 2 milliarcseconds at rates up to 100Hz, with accurate absolute attitude determination at the half arcsecond level at rates of up to 10Hz. A mUlti-stage control system involving rigid body motion and tip-tilt-piston correction provides precision pointing stability to the level required for the far-infrared instrument to perform its spatial/spectral interferometry in an open-loop control. We present key aspects of the design of the attitude determination and control and its development status.

  5. Sensor and Sensorless Fault Tolerant Control for Induction Motors Using a Wavelet Index

    PubMed Central

    Gaeid, Khalaf Salloum; Ping, Hew Wooi; Khalid, Mustafa; Masaoud, Ammar

    2012-01-01

    Fault Tolerant Control (FTC) systems are crucial in industry to ensure safe and reliable operation, especially of motor drives. This paper proposes the use of multiple controllers for a FTC system of an induction motor drive, selected based on a switching mechanism. The system switches between sensor vector control, sensorless vector control, closed-loop voltage by frequency (V/f) control and open loop V/f control. Vector control offers high performance, while V/f is a simple, low cost strategy with high speed and satisfactory performance. The faults dealt with are speed sensor failures, stator winding open circuits, shorts and minimum voltage faults. In the event of compound faults, a protection unit halts motor operation. The faults are detected using a wavelet index. For the sensorless vector control, a novel Boosted Model Reference Adaptive System (BMRAS) to estimate the motor speed is presented, which reduces tuning time. Both simulation results and experimental results with an induction motor drive show the scheme to be a fast and effective one for fault detection, while the control methods transition smoothly and ensure the effectiveness of the FTC system. The system is also shown to be flexible, reverting rapidly back to the dominant controller if the motor returns to a healthy state. PMID:22666016

  6. Modern control strategies for vacuum arc remelting of segregation sensitive alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, R.L.; Schlienger, M.E.; Hysinger, C.L.; Beaman, J.J.

    1997-06-01

    There are several process variables which are crucial to the control of vacuum arc remelting of segregation sensitive alloys. These are: electrode gap, melt rate, cooling rate, furnace annulus, furnace atmosphere and electrode quality (i.e. cleanliness and integrity). Of these variables, active, closed loop control is usually applied only to electrode gap. Other variables are controlled by controlling furnace operational parameters to preset schedules (e.g. melting current is ramped or held constant to control melt rate in an open loop fashion), through proper maintenance and calibration of equipment (e.g. to ensure proper cooling water and gas flow rates, or to accomplish an acceptable vacuum leak rate), through proper practice of procedures, and by maintaining electrode quality control. Electrode gap control is accomplished by controlling an electrode gap indicator such as drip-short frequency (or period) to a specified set-point. This type of control, though often adequate, ignores information available from other electrode gap indicators and is susceptible to upsets. A multiple input electrode gap controller is described which uses optimal estimation techniques to address this problem.

  7. Modified Smith predictor based cascade control of unstable time delay processes.

    PubMed

    Padhan, Dola Gobinda; Majhi, Somanath

    2012-01-01

    An improved cascade control structure with a modified Smith predictor is proposed for controlling open-loop unstable time delay processes. The proposed structure has three controllers of which one is meant for servo response and the other two are for regulatory responses. An analytical design method is derived for the two disturbance rejection controllers by proposing the desired closed-loop complementary sensitivity functions. These two closed-loop controllers are considered in the form of proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller cascaded with a second order lead/lag filter. The direct synthesis method is used to design the setpoint tracking controller. By virtue of the enhanced structure, the proposed control scheme decouples the servo response from the regulatory response in case of nominal systems i.e., the setpoint tracking controller and the disturbance rejection controller can be tuned independently. Internal stability of the proposed cascade structure is analyzed. Kharitonov's theorem is used for the robustness analysis. The disturbance rejection capability of the proposed scheme is superior as compared to existing methods. Examples are also included to illustrate the simplicity and usefulness of the proposed method.

  8. Invariant Control of the Technological Plants to Compensate an Impact of Main Disturbances Preemptively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sniders, A.; Laizans, A.; Komass, T.

    2016-06-01

    The paper considers a survey of the research procedures and results due to invariant control method application perspective for operation quality advancement in several technological plants (wastewater biological treatment tanks and water steam production boilers), which operate under influence of organised and random disturbances. A specified subject of research is the simulation model of the multi-link invariant control system for steam pressure stabilisation in a steam boiler by preemptive compensation of steam load and feed water flow impact on output parameter (steam pressure), developed in MATLAB/SIMULINK. Simulation block-diagram of the steam boiler invariant control system, containing closed loop PID control circuit and open loop DPC circuit, has been composed on the basis of the designed mathematical model of the system components, disturbance compensation algorithms, and operational equation of the invariant control system. Comparative response of the steam boiler, operating under influence of fluctuating disturbances, with conventional PID control and using PID-DPC control with disturbance compensation controller DPC, has been investigated. Simulation results of invariant PID - DPC control system show that output parameter of the steam boiler - pressure remains practically constant under fluctuating disturbances due to a high-speed response of DPC controller.

  9. Benchmarking of control strategies for ATAD technology: a first approach to the automatic control of sludge treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, J A; Gil-Martinez, M; Garcia-Sanz, M; Irizar, I

    2009-01-01

    Autothermal Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion (ATAD technology) is a promising alternative to conventional digestion systems. Aeration is a key factor in the performance of these kinds of reactors, in relation to effluent quality and operating costs. At present, the realisation of automatic control in ATADs is in its infancy. Additionally, the lack of robust sensors also makes the control of these processes difficult: only redox potential and temperature sensors are reliable for operation in full-scale plants. Based as it is on the existing simulation protocols for benchmarking of control strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), this paper presents the definition and implementation of a similar protocol but specifically adapted to the needs of ATAD technology. The implemented simulation protocol has been used to validate two different control strategies for aeration (ST1 and ST2). In comparison to an open-loop operation for the ATAD, simulation results showed that the ST1 strategy was able to save aeration costs of around 2-4%. Unlike ST1, ST2 achieved maximum sludge stabilisation but at the expense of higher aeration costs. PMID:19633383

  10. Force control for robotic manipulators with structurally flexible links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latornell, Douglas John

    1992-01-01

    This thesis reports on the development of strategies for the control of contact forces exerted by a structurally flexible robotic manipulator on surfaces in its working environment. The controller is based on a multivariable, explicitly adaptive, long range predictive control algorithm. A static equilibrium bias term which is particularly applicable to the contact force control problem has been incorporated into the control algorithm cost function. A general formulation for the discrete time domain characteristic polynomial of the closed loop system has been derived and shown useful in tuning the controller. Kinematic and dynamic models of a robotic manipulator with structurally flexible links interacting with its working environment are derived. These models include inertia and damping effects in the contact dynamics in addition to the contact stiffness employed in most previous work. Linear analyses of the dynamic models for a variety of manipulator configurations reveal that the controlled variable, the contact force, is dominated by different open loop modes of the system depending on the effective stiffness of the contacting surfaces. This result has important implications for the selection of the controller parameters. The performance of the controller has been evaluated using computer simulation. A special purpose simulation program, TWOFLEX, which includes the dynamics models of the manipulator and the environment as well as the control algorithm was developed during the research. The configurations investigated using the simulation include a single flexible manipulator link, two link manipulators with both rigid and flexible links, and a two link prototype model of the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) manipulator for the proposed Space Station Freedom. The results show that the controller can be tuned to provide fast contact force step responses with minimal overshoot and zero steady-state error. The problem of maintaining control through the discontinuous

  11. An adaptive human response mechanism controlling the V/STOL aircraft. Appendix 3: The adaptive control model of a pilot in V/STOL aircraft control loops. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucuk, Senol

    1988-01-01

    Importance of the role of human operator in control systems has led to the particular area of manual control theory. Human describing functions were developed to model human behavior for manual control studies to take advantage of the successful and safe human operations. A single variable approach is presented that can be extended for multi-variable tasks where a low order human response model is used together with its rules, to adapt the model on-line, being capable of responding to the changes in the controlled element dynamics. Basic control theory concepts are used to combine the model, constrained with the physical observations, particularly, for the case of aircraft control. Pilot experience is represented as the initial model parameters. An adaptive root-locus method is presented as the adaptation law of the model where the closed loop bandwidth of the system is to be preserved in a stable manner with the adjustments of the pilot handling qualities which relate the latter to the closed loop bandwidth and damping of the closed loop pilot aircraft combination. A Kalman filter parameter estimator is presented as the controlled element identifier of the adaptive model where any discrepancies of the open loop dynamics from the presented one, are sensed to be compensated.

  12. Subtractive, divisive and non-monotonic gain control in feedforward nets linearized by noise and delays.

    PubMed

    Mejias, Jorge F; Payeur, Alexandre; Selin, Erik; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André

    2014-01-01

    The control of input-to-output mappings, or gain control, is one of the main strategies used by neural networks for the processing and gating of information. Using a spiking neural network model, we studied the gain control induced by a form of inhibitory feedforward circuitry-also known as "open-loop feedback"-, which has been experimentally observed in a cerebellum-like structure in weakly electric fish. We found, both analytically and numerically, that this network displays three different regimes of gain control: subtractive, divisive, and non-monotonic. Subtractive gain control was obtained when noise is very low in the network. Also, it was possible to change from divisive to non-monotonic gain control by simply modulating the strength of the feedforward inhibition, which may be achieved via long-term synaptic plasticity. The particular case of divisive gain control has been previously observed in vivo in weakly electric fish. These gain control regimes were robust to the presence of temporal delays in the inhibitory feedforward pathway, which were found to linearize the input-to-output mappings (or f-I curves) via a novel variability-increasing mechanism. Our findings highlight the feedforward-induced gain control analyzed here as a highly versatile mechanism of information gating in the brain.

  13. An Actor-Critic based controller for glucose regulation in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Daskalaki, Elena; Diem, Peter; Mougiakakou, Stavroula G

    2013-02-01

    A novel adaptive approach for glucose control in individuals with type 1 diabetes under sensor-augmented pump therapy is proposed. The controller, is based on Actor-Critic (AC) learning and is inspired by the principles of reinforcement learning and optimal control theory. The main characteristics of the proposed controller are (i) simultaneous adjustment of both the insulin basal rate and the bolus dose, (ii) initialization based on clinical procedures, and (iii) real-time personalization. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in terms of glycemic control has been investigated in silico in adults, adolescents and children under open-loop and closed-loop approaches, using announced meals with uncertainties in the order of ±25% in the estimation of carbohydrates. The results show that glucose regulation is efficient in all three groups of patients, even with uncertainties in the level of carbohydrates in the meal. The percentages in the A+B zones of the Control Variability Grid Analysis (CVGA) were 100% for adults, and 93% for both adolescents and children. The AC based controller seems to be a promising approach for the automatic adjustment of insulin infusion in order to improve glycemic control. After optimization of the algorithm, the controller will be tested in a clinical trial. PMID:22502983

  14. An Actor-Critic based controller for glucose regulation in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Daskalaki, Elena; Diem, Peter; Mougiakakou, Stavroula G

    2013-02-01

    A novel adaptive approach for glucose control in individuals with type 1 diabetes under sensor-augmented pump therapy is proposed. The controller, is based on Actor-Critic (AC) learning and is inspired by the principles of reinforcement learning and optimal control theory. The main characteristics of the proposed controller are (i) simultaneous adjustment of both the insulin basal rate and the bolus dose, (ii) initialization based on clinical procedures, and (iii) real-time personalization. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in terms of glycemic control has been investigated in silico in adults, adolescents and children under open-loop and closed-loop approaches, using announced meals with uncertainties in the order of ±25% in the estimation of carbohydrates. The results show that glucose regulation is efficient in all three groups of patients, even with uncertainties in the level of carbohydrates in the meal. The percentages in the A+B zones of the Control Variability Grid Analysis (CVGA) were 100% for adults, and 93% for both adolescents and children. The AC based controller seems to be a promising approach for the automatic adjustment of insulin infusion in order to improve glycemic control. After optimization of the algorithm, the controller will be tested in a clinical trial.

  15. Active disturbance rejection based trajectory linearization control for hypersonic reentry vehicle with bounded uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xingling; Wang, Honglun

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a novel compound control scheme combined with the advantages of trajectory linearization control (TLC) and alternative active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) for hypersonic reentry vehicle (HRV) attitude tracking system with bounded uncertainties. Firstly, in order to overcome actuator saturation problem, nonlinear tracking differentiator (TD) is applied in the attitude loop to achieve fewer control consumption. Then, linear extended state observers (LESO) are constructed to estimate the uncertainties acting on the LTV system in the attitude and angular rate loop. In addition, feedback linearization (FL) based controllers are designed using estimates of uncertainties generated by LESO in each loop, which enable the tracking error for closed-loop system in the presence of large uncertainties to converge to the residual set of the origin asymptotically. Finally, the compound controllers are derived by integrating with the nominal controller for open-loop nonlinear system and FL based controller. Also, comparisons and simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategy.

  16. Subtractive, divisive and non-monotonic gain control in feedforward nets linearized by noise and delays

    PubMed Central

    Mejias, Jorge F.; Payeur, Alexandre; Selin, Erik; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André

    2014-01-01

    The control of input-to-output mappings, or gain control, is one of the main strategies used by neural networks for the processing and gating of information. Using a spiking neural network model, we studied the gain control induced by a form of inhibitory feedforward circuitry—also known as “open-loop feedback”—, which has been experimentally observed in a cerebellum-like structure in weakly electric fish. We found, both analytically and numerically, that this network displays three different regimes of gain control: subtractive, divisive, and non-monotonic. Subtractive gain control was obtained when noise is very low in the network. Also, it was possible to change from divisive to non-monotonic gain control by simply modulating the strength of the feedforward inhibition, which may be achieved via long-term synaptic plasticity. The particular case of divisive gain control has been previously observed in vivo in weakly electric fish. These gain control regimes were robust to the presence of temporal delays in the inhibitory feedforward pathway, which were found to linearize the input-to-output mappings (or f-I curves) via a novel variability-increasing mechanism. Our findings highlight the feedforward-induced gain control analyzed here as a highly versatile mechanism of information gating in the brain. PMID:24616694

  17. Real time MHD mode control using ECCD in KSTAR: Plan and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, M.; Woo, M. H.; Jeong, J. H.; Hahn, S. H.; Yun, S. W.; Lee, W. R.; Bae, Y. S.; Oh, Y. K.; Kwak, J. G.; Yang, H. L.; Namkung, W.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, K. J.; Na, Y. S.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.

    2014-02-12

    For a high-performance, advanced tokamak mode in KSTAR, we have been developing a real-time control system of MHD modes such as sawtooth and Neo-classical Tearing Mode (NTM) by ECH/ECCD. The active feedback control loop will be also added to the mirror position and the real-time detection of the mode position. In this year, for the stabilization of NTM that is crucial to plasma performance we have implemented open-loop ECH antenna control system in KSTAR Plasma Control System (PCS) for ECH mirror movement during a single plasma discharge. KSTAR 170 GHz ECH launcher which was designed and fabricated by collaboration with PPPL and POSTECH has a final mirror of a poloidally and toroidally steerable mirror. The poloidal steering motion is only controlled in the real-time NTM control system and its maximum steering speed is 10 degree/sec by DC motor. However, the latency of the mirror control system and the return period of ECH antenna mirror angle are not fast because the existing launcher mirror control system is based on PLC which is connected to the KSTAR machine network through serial to LAN converter. In this paper, we present the design of real time NTM control system, ECH requirements, and the upgrade plan.

  18. Selected Flight Test Results for Online Learning Neural Network-Based Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Hayes, Peggy S.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System project team developed a series of flight control concepts designed to demonstrate neural network-based adaptive controller benefits, with the objective to develop and flight-test control systems using neural network technology to optimize aircraft performance under nominal conditions and stabilize the aircraft under failure conditions. This report presents flight-test results for an adaptive controller using stability and control derivative values from an online learning neural network. A dynamic cell structure neural network is used in conjunction with a real-time parameter identification algorithm to estimate aerodynamic stability and control derivative increments to baseline aerodynamic derivatives in flight. This open-loop flight test set was performed in preparation for a future phase in which the learning neural network and parameter identification algorithm output would provide the flight controller with aerodynamic stability and control derivative updates in near real time. Two flight maneuvers are analyzed - pitch frequency sweep and automated flight-test maneuver designed to optimally excite the parameter identification algorithm in all axes. Frequency responses generated from flight data are compared to those obtained from nonlinear simulation runs. Flight data examination shows that addition of flight-identified aerodynamic derivative increments into the simulation improved aircraft pitch handling qualities.

  19. Real time MHD mode control using ECCD in KSTAR: Plan and requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, M.; Woo, M. H.; Jeong, J. H.; Hahn, S. H.; Yun, S. W.; Lee, W. R.; Bae, Y. S.; Oh, Y. K.; Kwak, J. G.; Yang, H. L.; Namkung, W.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, K. J.; Na, Y. S.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.

    2014-02-01

    For a high-performance, advanced tokamak mode in KSTAR, we have been developing a real-time control system of MHD modes such as sawtooth and Neo-classical Tearing Mode (NTM) by ECH/ECCD. The active feedback control loop will be also added to the mirror position and the real-time detection of the mode position. In this year, for the stabilization of NTM that is crucial to plasma performance we have implemented open-loop ECH antenna control system in KSTAR Plasma Control System (PCS) for ECH mirror movement during a single plasma discharge. KSTAR 170 GHz ECH launcher which was designed and fabricated by collaboration with PPPL and POSTECH has a final mirror of a poloidally and toroidally steerable mirror. The poloidal steering motion is only controlled in the real-time NTM control system and its maximum steering speed is 10 degree/sec by DC motor. However, the latency of the mirror control system and the return period of ECH antenna mirror angle are not fast because the existing launcher mirror control system is based on PLC which is connected to the KSTAR machine network through serial to LAN converter. In this paper, we present the design of real time NTM control system, ECH requirements, and the upgrade plan.

  20. Aeroelastic control of flutter using trailing edge control surfaces powered by piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardelean, Emil Valentin

    University. Operating in closed-loop, flutter was suppressed at the speed at which the flutter occurred open-loop; the flutter speed was increased by approximately 30%.

  1. Enhanced robust fractional order proportional-plus-integral controller based on neural network for velocity control of permanent magnet synchronous motor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bitao; Pi, YouGuo

    2013-07-01

    The traditional integer order proportional-integral-differential (IO-PID) controller is sensitive to the parameter variation or/and external load disturbance of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM). And the fractional order proportional-integral-differential (FO-PID) control scheme based on robustness tuning method is proposed to enhance the robustness. But the robustness focuses on the open-loop gain variation of controlled plant. In this paper, an enhanced robust fractional order proportional-plus-integral (ERFOPI) controller based on neural network is proposed. The control law of the ERFOPI controller is acted on a fractional order implement function (FOIF) of tracking error but not tracking error directly, which, according to theory analysis, can enhance the robust performance of system. Tuning rules and approaches, based on phase margin, crossover frequency specification and robustness rejecting gain variation, are introduced to obtain the parameters of ERFOPI controller. And the neural network algorithm is used to adjust the parameter of FOIF. Simulation and experimental results show that the method proposed in this paper not only achieve favorable tracking performance, but also is robust with regard to external load disturbance and parameter variation.

  2. Comparison of advanced distillation control methods. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, J.B.

    1996-11-01

    Detailed dynamic simulations of two industrial distillation columns (a propylene/propane splitter and a xylene/toluene column) have been used to study the issue of configuration selection for diagonal PI dual composition controls. Auto Tune Variation (ATV) identification with on-line detuning was used for tuning the diagonal proportional integral (PI) composition controls. Each configuration was evaluated with respect to steady-state relative gain array (RGA) values, sensitivity to feed composition changes, and open loop dynamic performance. Each configuration was tuned using setpoint changes over a wider range of operation for robustness and tested for feed composition upsets. Overall, configuration selection was shown to have a dominant effect upon control performance. Configuration analysis tools (e.g., RGA, condition number, disturbance sensitivity) were found to reject configuration choices that are obviously poor choices, but were unable to critically differentiate between the remaining viable choices. Configuration selection guidelines are given although it is demonstrated that the most reliable configuration selection approach is based upon testing the viable configurations using dynamic column simulators.

  3. Comparison of advanced distillation control methods. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Detailed dynamic simulations of three industrial distillation columns (a propylene/propane splitter, a xylene/toluene column, and a depropanizer) have been used to study the issue of configuration selection for diagonal PI dual composition controls. ATV identification with on-line detuning was used for tuning the diagonal PI composition controllers. Each configuration was evaluated with respect to steady-state RGA values, sensitivity to feed composition changes, and open loop dynamic performance. Each configuration was tuned using setpoint changes over a wider range of operation for robustness and tested for feed composition upsets. Overall, configuration selection was shown to have a dominant effect upon control performance. Configuration analysis tools (e.g., RGA, condition number, disturbance sensitivity), were found to reject configuration choices that are obviously poor choices, but were unable to critically differentiate between the remaining viable choices. Configuration selection guidelines are given although it is demonstrated that the most reliable configuration selection approach is based upon testing the viable configurations using dynamic column simulators.

  4. Robust time and frequency domain estimation methods in adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamaire, Richard Orville

    1987-01-01

    A robust identification method was developed for use in an adaptive control system. The type of estimator is called the robust estimator, since it is robust to the effects of both unmodeled dynamics and an unmeasurable disturbance. The development of the robust estimator was motivated by a need to provide guarantees in the identification part of an adaptive controller. To enable the design of a robust control system, a nominal model as well as a frequency-domain bounding function on the modeling uncertainty associated with this nominal model must be provided. Two estimation methods are presented for finding parameter estimates, and, hence, a nominal model. One of these methods is based on the well developed field of time-domain parameter estimation. In a second method of finding parameter estimates, a type of weighted least-squares fitting to a frequency-domain estimated model is used. The frequency-domain estimator is shown to perform better, in general, than the time-domain parameter estimator. In addition, a methodology for finding a frequency-domain bounding function on the disturbance is used to compute a frequency-domain bounding function on the additive modeling error due to the effects of the disturbance and the use of finite-length data. The performance of the robust estimator in both open-loop and closed-loop situations is examined through the use of simulations.

  5. A open loop guidance architecture for navigationally robust on-orbit docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Hung-Sheng

    1995-01-01

    The development of an open-hop guidance architecture is outlined for autonomous rendezvous and docking (AR&D) missions to determine whether the Global Positioning System (GPS) can be used in place of optical sensors for relative initial position determination of the chase vehicle. Feasible command trajectories for one, two, and three impulse AR&D maneuvers are determined using constrained trajectory optimization. Early AR&D command trajectory results suggest that docking accuracies are most sensitive to vertical position errors at the initial conduction of the chase vehicle. Thus, a feasible command trajectory is based on maximizing the size of the locus of initial vertical positions for which a fixed sequence of impulses will translate the chase vehicle into the target while satisfying docking accuracy requirements. Documented accuracies are used to determine whether relative GPS can achieve the vertical position error requirements of the impulsive command trajectories. Preliminary development of a thruster management system for the Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) based on optimal throttle settings is presented to complete the guidance architecture. Results show that a guidance architecture based on a two impulse maneuvers generated the best performance in terms of initial position error and total velocity change for the chase vehicle.

  6. Investigation of open-loop beam motion at low frequencies at the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Decker, G.; Doose, C.; Mangra, D.; Merl, R.

    1997-08-01

    Sources of transverse beam motion in the APS storage ring have been investigated for ground-motion- and water-system-induced vibrations of the magnet and vacuum systems, and for power supply ripple. The displacement of magnets in a bandwidth of 4-30 Hz have been reduced significantly by inserting viscoelastic damping pads between the girder supports and pedestals, and by welding the magnet cooling headers to the ceiling of the storage ring tunnel. Current ripple on magnet power supplies was identified as a source of horizontal beam motion. Beam motion was measured without the closed-orbit feedback system activated. At {beta}{sub x} = 15.4 m and {beta}{sub y} = 10.4 m the rms beam motion in the 0.02-30 Hz band was 22.7 {mu}m and 6.3 {mu}m in the horizontal and verticle planes, respectively. A few narrow-band structures of the horizontal beam motion spectrum in the 1-4 Hz band have to be investigated further to identify the sources.

  7. CANARY phase B: on-sky open-loop tomographic LGS AO results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Tim; Gendron, Eric; Basden, Alastair; Martin, Olivier; Osborn, James; Henry, David; Hubert, Zoltan; Sivo, Gaetano; Gratadour, Damien; Chemla, Fanny; Sevin, Arnaud; Cohen, Matthieu; Younger, Eddy; Vidal, Fabrice; Wilson, Richard; Butterley, Tim; Bitenc, Urban; Reeves, Andrew; Bharmal, Nazim; Raynaud, Henri-François; Kulcsar, Caroline; Conan, Jean-Marc; Huet, Jean-Michel; Perret, Denis; Dickson, Colin; Atkinson, David; Bailie, Tom; Longmore, Andy; Todd, Stephen; Talbot, Gordon; Morris, Simon; Rousset, Gérard; Myers, Richard

    2014-07-01

    CANARY is an on-sky Laser Guide Star (LGS) tomographic AO demonstrator that has been in operation at the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma since 2010. In 2013, CANARY was upgraded from its initial configuration that used three off-axis Natural Guide Stars (NGS) through the inclusion of four off-axis Rayleigh LGS and associated wavefront sensing system. Here we present the system and analysis of the on-sky results obtained at the WHT between May and September 2014. Finally we present results from the final `Phase C' CANARY system that aims to recreate the tomographic configuration to emulate the expected tomographic AO configuration of both the AOF at the VLT and E-ELT.

  8. Open loop compensation for the eddy current effect in the APS storage ring vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.; Bridges, J.; Emery, L.; Decker, G.

    1991-01-01

    In the third generation synchrotron light sources, closed orbit stabilization against external vibrations is critical to ensure low emittance and high brightness. The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will use a large number (678) of correction magnets to create local bumps and to achieve global orbit stabilization. In this paper, we will present the result of the effort to counter the effect due to the finite inductance of the magnet and the eddy current in the 1/2 in.-thick aluminum storage ring vacuum chamber. The amplitude attenuation and the phase shift of the correction magnet field inside the APS storage ring vacuum chamber were measured. A circuit to compensate for this effect was then inserted between the signal source and the magnet power supply. The amplitude was restored with an error of less than 20% of the source signal amplitude and the phase shift was reduced from 80{degrees} to 12{degrees} at 10 Hz. Incorporation of this circuit in the closed loop feedback scheme and the resulting beneficial effect in the closed orbit stabilization will be discussed. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Modeling of a horizontal circulation open loop in two-phase helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Baudouy; Anne, Bessette; Aurélien, Four

    2013-01-01

    In the process of the cryogenic cooling system design of the superconducting magnet of the R3B spectrometer, heat and mass transfer in a two-phase He I natural circulation loop with a horizontal heated section has been investigated experimentally. The experiments were conducted on a 2 m high experimental loop with a copper tube of 10 mm inner diameter uniformly heated over a length of 4 m. All data were obtained near atmospheric pressure. Evolution of the mass flow rates as a function of heat flux in steady state condition are presented and compared to a numerical model that have been developed to assist the design of such a cooling scheme. The model is based on a one-dimensional equations system, which includes mass, momentum and energy balances. It is based on the homogeneous model with a specific friction coefficient for the horizontal heated section. The model reproduces with an acceptable accuracy the experimental results and now serves as a tool for the design.

  10. Completing the forward kinematic calibration of open loop manipulators when single point position sensors are used

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Louis J.

    1989-01-01

    Single-point sensors can measure the position of one point fixed to a manipulator's end effector. When single-point sensors have been used for calibration, it has not been possible to calibrate the orientation of the tool. Furthermore, it can be difficult to calibrate the sensor system. Results in the literature seldom provide a complete kinematic calibration of the manipulator. Presented here is a technique that enables single-point sensors to gather sufficient information to complete kinematic calibration. In addition, the method can reduce the burden of calibrating the sensor system.

  11. Open-loop tomography with artificial neural networks on CANARY: on-sky results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, J.; Guzman, D.; de Cos Juez, F. J.; Basden, A. G.; Morris, T. J.; Gendron, E.; Butterley, T.; Myers, R. M.; Guesalaga, A.; Sanchez Lasheras, F.; Gomez Victoria, M.; Sánchez Rodríguez, M. L.; Gratadour, D.; Rousset, G.

    2014-07-01

    We present recent results from the initial testing of an artificial neural network (ANN)-based tomographic reconstructor Complex Atmospheric Reconstructor based on Machine lEarNing (CARMEN) on CANARY, an adaptive optics demonstrator operated on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope, La Palma. The reconstructor was compared with contemporaneous data using the Learn and Apply (L&A) tomographic reconstructor. We find that the fully optimized L&A tomographic reconstructor outperforms CARMEN by approximately 5 per cent in Strehl ratio or 15 nm rms in wavefront error. We also present results for CANARY in Ground Layer Adaptive Optics mode to show that the reconstructors are tomographic. The results are comparable and this small deficit is attributed to limitations in the training data used to build the ANN. Laboratory bench tests show that the ANN can outperform L&A under certain conditions, e.g. if the higher layer of a model two layer atmosphere was to change in altitude by ˜300 m (equivalent to a shift of approximately one tenth of a subaperture).

  12. Velocity control with disturbance observer for pedal-assisted electric bikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shyue-Bin; Chen, Pang-Chia; Chuang, Hung-Shiang; Hsiao, Chih-Ching

    2012-11-01

    This paper proposes a velocity control approach for light electric bicycles with human power assistance. A disturbance observer mechanism is used to estimate the sum of the human torque and resistance torques. The resulting vehicle velocity control provides better battery energy efficiency by knowledge of the instantaneous human torque assistance and better speed control by knowledge of the instantaneous resistive torque. The disturbance observer is tuned in terms of the DC gain of a low-passed Q-filter for both open-loop and closed-loop schemes. Assuming that the slow varying nature of the disturbance has been properly estimated and compensated, the torque control law is designed via an optimal control approach to achieve multi-objective performances regarding the external disturbance input, control signal magnitude, and velocity tracking error. The three main parameters of the electric bike, including the moment of inertia, the radius of tyre and the vehicle weight are allowed to be variational. Specifically, the deviation of the inertia moment and deviation of the tyre radius are addressed during the controller design in terms of linear matrix inequalities. On the other hand, the effect of vehicle weight deviation on the system behaviour is evaluated when the vehicle is implemented with the constructed control law. Based on the parameters and specifications of the EL-168 electric bike produced by KENTFA Advanced Technology, Taiwan, the design results are verified through time-response simulations.

  13. Modeling and path-following control of a vector-driven stratospheric satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zewei; Chen, Tian; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The stratospheric satellite driven by steady prevailing winds in the stratosphere must be controlled in its longitudinal excursion to keep a latitudinal orbital flight. In a reliable and high-precision control system, an available system model must come first. In this paper, we study the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) modeling and path-following problem of a novel stratospheric satellite which consists of a high-altitude helium balloon, a truss and two vector-motor-driven propellers. To keep a latitudinal flight orbit, an algorithm for accurate latitudinal path following is proposed based on the theories of vector field and sliding mode control. Moreover, a forward velocity controller is added to the control algorithm to maintain a constant velocity. Finally, a series of open-loop control simulations are completed to verify the effectiveness of the model in the performance of the stratospheric satellite dynamics, and path-following control simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm.

  14. Modification of the logic and control system for the 80-ounce injection molding machine

    SciTech Connect

    Domer, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The modification of the hydraulic logic and control system for the 80-ounce injection molding machine in the Molding and Machining, Plastics, department was required to allow production of near net size thick-walled parts and machining stock from high-shrinkage materials while retaining the original logic for standard product. The control system that was developed allows the new capability of open clamp injection. This capability will replace the present method of purchasing machining stock from an outside source. The control system was implemented with a Giddings Lewis Programmable Industrial Computer 409 (G L PiC 409). Hydraulic modifications included adding Vickers servo valves, an Inductosyn position transducer, and MOOG pressure transducers to perform force and position control. The control system provides two capabilities, NORMAL and SERVO. The NORMAL mode is defined as operating the machine according to original design specifications. The SERVO mode is defined as operating the machine according to a recipe in open loop position control then in closed loop force control. The G L PiC 409 controls the tasks of both modes. A selector switch determines the mode of operation (NORMAL or SERVO). The NORMAL mode uses the original hydraulic circuits, and the SERVO mode diverts fluid into the modified hydraulic circuits. 11 figs.

  15. Biomechanically Induced and Controller Coupled Oscillations Experienced on the F-16XL Aircraft During Rolling Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John W.; Montgomery, Terry

    1996-01-01

    During rapid rolling maneuvers, the F-16 XL aircraft exhibits a 2.5 Hz lightly damped roll oscillation, perceived and described as 'roll ratcheting.' This phenomenon is common with fly-by-wire control systems, particularly when primary control is derived through a pedestal-mounted side-arm controller. Analytical studies have been conducted to model the nature of the integrated control characteristics. The analytical results complement the flight observations. A three-degree-of-freedom linearized set of aerodynamic matrices was assembled to simulate the aircraft plant. The lateral-directional control system was modeled as a linear system. A combination of two second-order transfer functions was derived to couple the lateral acceleration feed through effect of the operator's arm and controller to the roll stick force input. From the combined systems, open-loop frequency responses and a time history were derived, describing and predicting an analogous in-flight situation. This report describes the primary control, aircraft angular rate, and position time responses of the F-16 XL-2 aircraft during subsonic and high-dynamic-pressure rolling maneuvers. The analytical description of the pilot's arm and controller can be applied to other aircraft or simulations to assess roll ratcheting susceptibility.

  16. Anti-jackknife reverse tracking control of articulated vehicles in the presence of actuator saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H.; Zhu, H.

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that backward motion control of an articulated vehicle is difficult because it is an open loop unstable system and such motion is also dangerous due to 'jackknifing'. In this paper, an anti-jackknife reverse tracking control strategy for autonomous articulated vehicles is proposed based on the combined longitudinal and lateral control scheme. In the proposed lateral-longitudinal control scheme, the major task is to control the reverse heading of the trailer by automatic steering strategies that observe both the anti-jackknife condition and input limitations. The main contribution of this paper is the development of globally asymptotic anti-jackknife stabilising and tracking controls of heading angles with both state and input constraints considered a priori. The proposed control inherently has an anti-windup mechanism that prevents the hitch angle from going beyond any specified critical value to avoid jackknifing, during which time, the steering angle remains at its limit. Stability of the controller is theoretically proven via the Lyapunov argument. Effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated by CarSim and Simulink joint simulations.

  17. Proportional and Integral Thermal Control System for Large Scale Heating Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) Flight Loads Laboratory is a unique national laboratory that supports thermal, mechanical, thermal/mechanical, and structural dynamics research and testing. A Proportional Integral thermal control system was designed and implemented to support thermal tests. A thermal control algorithm supporting a quartz lamp heater was developed based on the Proportional Integral control concept and a linearized heating process. The thermal control equations were derived and expressed in terms of power levels, integral gain, proportional gain, and differences between thermal setpoints and skin temperatures. Besides the derived equations, user's predefined thermal test information generated in the form of thermal maps was used to implement the thermal control system capabilities. Graphite heater closed-loop thermal control and graphite heater open-loop power level were added later to fulfill the demand for higher temperature tests. Verification and validation tests were performed to ensure that the thermal control system requirements were achieved. This thermal control system has successfully supported many milestone thermal and thermal/mechanical tests for almost a decade with temperatures ranging from 50 F to 3000 F and temperature rise rates from -10 F/s to 70 F/s for a variety of test articles having unique thermal profiles and test setups.

  18. Comparative Study of SSVEP- and P300-Based Models for the Telepresence Control of Humanoid Robots.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Wei; Li, Mengfan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the control performance of SSVEP (steady-state visual evoked potential)- and P300-based models using Cerebot-a mind-controlled humanoid robot platform. Seven subjects with diverse experience participated in experiments concerning the open-loop and closed-loop control of a humanoid robot via brain signals. The visual stimuli of both the SSVEP- and P300- based models were implemented on a LCD computer monitor with a refresh frequency of 60 Hz. Considering the operation safety, we set the classification accuracy of a model over 90.0% as the most important mandatory for the telepresence control of the humanoid robot. The open-loop experiments demonstrated that the SSVEP model with at most four stimulus targets achieved the average accurate rate about 90%, whereas the P300 model with the six or more stimulus targets under five repetitions per trial was able to achieve the accurate rates over 90.0%. Therefore, the four SSVEP stimuli were used to control four types of robot behavior; while the six P300 stimuli were chosen to control six types of robot behavior. Both of the 4-class SSVEP and 6-class P300 models achieved the average success rates of 90.3% and 91.3%, the average response times of 3.65 s and 6.6 s, and the average information transfer rates (ITR) of 24.7 bits/min 18.8 bits/min, respectively. The closed-loop experiments addressed the telepresence control of the robot; the objective was to cause the robot to walk along a white lane marked in an office environment using live video feedback. Comparative studies reveal that the SSVEP model yielded faster response to the subject's mental activity with less reliance on channel selection, whereas the P300 model was found to be suitable for more classifiable targets and required less training. To conclude, we discuss the existing SSVEP and P300 models for the control of humanoid robots, including the models proposed in this paper.

  19. Comparative Study of SSVEP- and P300-Based Models for the Telepresence Control of Humanoid Robots

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengfan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the control performance of SSVEP (steady-state visual evoked potential)- and P300-based models using Cerebot—a mind-controlled humanoid robot platform. Seven subjects with diverse experience participated in experiments concerning the open-loop and closed-loop control of a humanoid robot via brain signals. The visual stimuli of both the SSVEP- and P300- based models were implemented on a LCD computer monitor with a refresh frequency of 60 Hz. Considering the operation safety, we set the classification accuracy of a model over 90.0% as the most important mandatory for the telepresence control of the humanoid robot. The open-loop experiments demonstrated that the SSVEP model with at most four stimulus targets achieved the average accurate rate about 90%, whereas the P300 model with the six or more stimulus targets under five repetitions per trial was able to achieve the accurate rates over 90.0%. Therefore, the four SSVEP stimuli were used to control four types of robot behavior; while the six P300 stimuli were chosen to control six types of robot behavior. Both of the 4-class SSVEP and 6-class P300 models achieved the average success rates of 90.3% and 91.3%, the average response times of 3.65 s and 6.6 s, and the average information transfer rates (ITR) of 24.7 bits/min 18.8 bits/min, respectively. The closed-loop experiments addressed the telepresence control of the robot; the objective was to cause the robot to walk along a white lane marked in an office environment using live video feedback. Comparative studies reveal that the SSVEP model yielded faster response to the subject’s mental activity with less reliance on channel selection, whereas the P300 model was found to be suitable for more classifiable targets and required less training. To conclude, we discuss the existing SSVEP and P300 models for the control of humanoid robots, including the models proposed in this paper. PMID:26562524

  20. Neural control of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaessel, Holger; Kloeppel, Valentin; Rudolph, Stephan

    2001-06-01

    Significant reduction of helicopter blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is currently one of the most advanced research topics in the helicopter industry. This is due to the complex flow, the close aerodynamic and structural coupling, and the interaction of the blades with the trailing edge vortices. Analytical and numerical modeling techniques are therefore currently still far from a sufficient degree of accuracy to obtain satisfactory results using classical model based control concepts. Neural networks with a proven potential to learn nonlinear relationships implicitly encoded in a training data set are therefore an appropriate and complementary technique for the alternative design of a nonlinear controller for BVI noise reduction. For nonlinear and adaptive control different neural control strategies have been proposed. Two possible approaches, a direct and an indirect neural controller are described. In indirect neural control, the plant has to be identified first by training a network with measured data. The plant network is then used to train the controller network. On the other hand the direct control approach does not rely on an explicit plant model, instead a specific training algorithm (like reinforcement learning) uses the information gathered from interactions with the environment. In the investigation of the BVI noise phenomena, helicopter developers have undertaken substantial efforts in full scale flight tests and wind tunnel experiments. Data obtained in these experiments have been adequately preprocessed using wavelet analysis and filtering techniques and are then used in the design of a neural controller. Neural open-loop control and neural closed-loop control concepts for the BVI noise reduction problem are conceived, simulated and compared against each other in this work in the above mentioned framework.

  1. Feedback control for counterflow thrust vectoring with a turbine engine: Experiment design and robust control design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dores, Delfim Zambujo Das

    2005-11-01

    Engineering research over the last few years has successfully demonstrated the potential of thrust vector control using counterflow at conditions up to Mach 2. Flow configurations that include the pitch vectoring of rectangular jets and multi-axis vector control in diamond and axisymmetric nozzle geometries have been studied. Although bistable (on-off) fluid-based control has been around for some time, the present counterflow thrust vector control is unique because proportional and continuous jet response can be achieved in the absence of moving parts, while avoiding jet attachment, which renders most fluidic approaches unacceptable for aircraft and missile control applications. However, before this study, research had been limited to open-loop studies of counterflow thrust vectoring. For practical implementation it was vital that the counterflow scheme be used in conjunction with feedback control. Hence, the focus of this research was to develop and experimentally demonstrate a feedback control design methodology for counterflow thrust vectoring. This research focused on 2-D (pitch) thrust vectoring and addresses four key modeling issues. The first issue is to determine the measured variable to be commanded since the thrust vector angle is not measurable in real time. The second related issue is to determine the static mapping from the thrust vector angle to this measured variable. The third issue is to determine the dynamic relationship between the measured variable and the thrust vector angle. The fourth issue is to develop dynamic models with uncertainty characterizations. The final and main goal was the design and implementation of robust controllers that yield closed-loop systems with fast response times, and avoid overshoot in order to aid in the avoidance of attachment. These controllers should be simple and easy to implement in real applications. Hence, PID design has been chosen. Robust control design is accomplished by using ℓ1 control theory in

  2. Integrated Robot-Human Control in Mining Operations

    SciTech Connect

    George Danko

    2007-09-30

    This report contains a detailed description of the work conducted for the project on Integrated Robot-Human Control in Mining Operations at University of Nevada, Reno. This project combines human operator control with robotic control concepts to create a hybrid control architecture, in which the strengths of each control method are combined to increase machine efficiency and reduce operator fatigue. The kinematics reconfiguration type differential control of the excavator implemented with a variety of 'software machine kinematics' is the key feature of the project. This software re-configured excavator is more desirable to execute a given digging task. The human operator retains the master control of the main motion parameters, while the computer coordinates the repetitive movement patterns of the machine links. These repetitive movements may be selected from a pre-defined family of trajectories with different transformations. The operator can make adjustments to this pattern in real time, as needed, to accommodate rapidly-changing environmental conditions. A working prototype has been developed using a Bobcat 435 excavator. The machine is operational with or without the computer control system depending on whether the computer interface is on or off. In preparation for emulated mining tasks tests, typical, repetitive tool trajectories during surface mining operations were recorded at the Newmont Mining Corporation's 'Lone Tree' mine in Nevada. Analysis of these working trajectories has been completed. The motion patterns, when transformed into a family of curves, may serve as the basis for software-controlled machine kinematics transformation in the new human-robot control system. A Cartesian control example has been developed and tested both in simulation and on the experimental excavator. Open-loop control is robustly stable and free of short-term dynamic problems, but it allows for drifting away from the desired motion kinematics of the machine. A novel, closed

  3. Feedback Control for Steering Needles Through 3D Deformable Tissue Using Helical Paths

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Kris; Alterovitz, Ron; Chentanez, Nuttapong; Okamura, Allison; Goldberg, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Bevel-tip steerable needles are a promising new technology for improving accuracy and accessibility in minimally invasive medical procedures. As yet, 3D needle steering has not been demonstrated in the presence of tissue deformation and uncertainty, despite the application of progressively more sophisticated planning algorithms. This paper presents a feedback controller that steers a needle along 3D helical paths, and varies the helix radius to correct for perturbations. It achieves high accuracy for targets sufficiently far from the needle insertion point; this is counterintuitive because the system is highly under-actuated and not locally controllable. The controller uses a model predictive control framework that chooses a needle twist rate such that the predicted helical trajectory minimizes the distance to the target. Fast branch and bound techniques enable execution at kilohertz rates on a 2GHz PC. We evaluate the controller under a variety of simulated perturbations, including imaging noise, needle deflections, and curvature estimation errors. We also test the controller in a 3D finite element simulator that incorporates deformation in the tissue as well as the needle. In deformable tissue examples, the controller reduced targeting error by up to 88% compared to open-loop execution. PMID:21179401

  4. Feedback shape control for deployable mesh reflectors using gain scheduling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangmin; Shi, Hang; Alleyne, Andrew; Yang, Bingen

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the dynamic shape control problem of deployable mesh reflectors (DMRs) via feedback approaches. The reflector structure is simplified from a nonlinear model to be quasi-static with respect to temperature variations but dynamic with respect to mechanical vibrations. The orbital cycle is segmented into multiple temperature zones, and an H∞ robust state feedback controller is designed for each zone to guarantee the local stability of the system under the model uncertainty caused by thermal effects and to reject external force disturbances. At the same time, gain scheduling control method is adopted to compensate thermal distortions and to ensure smooth transition response when switching among the local robust controllers. A DMR model is considered in the case study to show the effectiveness of the control approach. The structural vibrations caused by external force disturbances can be sufficiently suppressed in a much shorter time. The closed loop response of the DMR structure shows that much higher surface accuracy is obtained during the orbiting mission compared to the open-loop configuration, and transient focal length and transient de-focus of the reflector are well controlled within the satisfactory bounds, demonstrating the numerical feasibility of the proposed method to solve the dynamic shape control problem of DMRs.

  5. Design of feedback control systems for stable plants with saturating actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapasouris, Petros; Athans, Michael; Stein, Gunter

    1988-01-01

    A systematic control design methodology is introduced for multi-input/multi-output stable open loop plants with multiple saturations. This new methodology is a substantial improvement over previous heuristic single-input/single-output approaches. The idea is to introduce a supervisor loop so that when the references and/or disturbances are sufficiently small, the control system operates linearly as designed. For signals large enough to cause saturations, the control law is modified in such a way as to ensure stability and to preserve, to the extent possible, the behavior of the linear control design. Key benefits of the methodology are: the modified compensator never produces saturating control signals, integrators and/or slow dynamics in the compensator never windup, the directional properties of the controls are maintained, and the closed loop system has certain guaranteed stability properties. The advantages of the new design methodology are illustrated in the simulation of an academic example and the simulation of the multivariable longitudinal control of a modified model of the F-8 aircraft.

  6. Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) Control of Secreted Factors for Blood Stem Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Julia; Wang, Weijia; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical use of umbilical cord blood has typically been limited by the need to expand hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) ex vivo. This expansion is challenging due to the accumulation of secreted signaling factors in the culture that have a negative regulatory effect on HSPC output. Strategies for global regulation of these factors through dilution have been developed, but do not accommodate the dynamic nature or inherent variability of hematopoietic cell culture. We have developed a mathematical model to simulate the impact of feedback control on in vitro hematopoiesis, and used it to design a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control algorithm. This algorithm was implemented with a fed-batch bioreactor to regulate the concentrations of secreted factors. Controlling the concentration of a key target factor, TGF-β1, through dilution limited the negative effect it had on HSPCs, and allowed global control of other similarly-produced inhibitory endogenous factors. The PID control algorithm effectively maintained the target soluble factor at the target concentration. We show that feedback controlled dilution is predicted to be a more cost effective dilution strategy compared to other open-loop strategies, and can enhance HSPC expansion in short term culture. This study demonstrates the utility of secreted factor process control strategies to optimize stem cell culture systems, and motivates the development of multi-analyte protein sensors to automate the manufacturing of cell therapies. PMID:26348930

  7. Using Fast-Steering Mirror Control to Reduce Instrument Pointing Errors Caused by Spacecraft Jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffery; Holtz, Ted M.; Cuda, Vince; Johnson, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    The scope of this study was to investigate the benefit of using feedback control of a Fast Steering Mirror (FSM) to reduce instrument pointing errors. Initially, the study identified FSM control technologies and categorized them according to their use, range of applicability, and physical requirements. Candidate payloads were then evaluated according to their relevance in use of fast steering minor control technologies. This leads to the mission and instrument selection which served as the candidate mission for numerical modeling. A standard SmallSat was designed in order to accommodate the payload requirements (weight, size, power, etc.). This included sizing the SmallSat bus, sizing the solar array, choosing appropriate antennas, and identifying an attitude control system (ACS). A feedback control system for the FSM compensation was then designed, and the instrument pointing error and SmallSat jitter environment for open-loop and closed-loop FSM control were evaluated for typical SmallSat disturbances. The results were then compared to determine the effectiveness of the FSM feedback control system.

  8. Control of a free-flying robot manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, H.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of the research is to develop and test control strategies for a self-contained, free flying space robot. Such a robot would perform operations in space similar to those currently handled by astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA). The focus of the work is to develop and carry out a program of research with a series of physical Satellite Robot Simulator Vehicles (SRSV's), two-dimensionally freely mobile laboratory models of autonomous free-flying space robots such as might perform extravehicular functions associated with operation of a space station or repair of orbiting satellites. The development of the SRSV and of some of the controller subsystems are discribed. The two-link arm was fitted to the SRSV base, and researchers explored the open-loop characteristics of the arm and thruster actuators. Work began on building the software foundation necessary for use of the on-board computer, as well as hardware and software for a local vision system for target identification and tracking.

  9. Status of the Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1993-05-01

    This report presents a discussion of the progress made in the NASA/NAVY Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. This program will culminate in open-loop flight tests of passive optical sensors and associated electro-optics on an F-18 aircraft. Currently, the program is in the final stages of hardware fabrication and environmental testing of the passive optical sensors and electro-optics. This program is a foundation for future Fly-by-Light (FBL) programs. The term Fly-by-Light is used to describe the utilization of passive optical sensors and fiber optic data links for monitoring and control of aircraft in which sensor and actuation signals are transmitted optically. The benefits of this technology for advanced aircraft include the following: improved reliability and reduced certification cost due to greater immunity to EME (electromagnetic effects); reduced harness volume and weight; elimination of short circuits and sparking in wiring due to insulation deterioration; lower maintenance costs (fewer components); greater flexibility in data bus protocol and architecture; absence of ground loops; and higher operating temperatures for electrically passive optical sensors.

  10. Status of the Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a discussion of the progress made in the NASA/NAVY Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. This program will culminate in open-loop flight tests of passive optical sensors and associated electro-optics on an F-18 aircraft. Currently, the program is in the final stages of hardware fabrication and environmental testing of the passive optical sensors and electro-optics. This program is a foundation for future Fly-by-Light (FBL) programs. The term Fly-by-Light is used to describe the utilization of passive optical sensors and fiber optic data links for monitoring and control of aircraft in which sensor and actuation signals are transmitted optically. The benefits of this technology for advanced aircraft include the following: improved reliability and reduced certification cost due to greater immunity to EME (electromagnetic effects); reduced harness volume and weight; elimination of short circuits and sparking in wiring due to insulation deterioration; lower maintenance costs (fewer components); greater flexibility in data bus protocol and architecture; absence of ground loops; and higher operating temperatures for electrically passive optical sensors.

  11. Distributed optimization and flight control using collectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniawski, Stefan Richard

    flight control system. These controllers increased the flight vehicle stability by 85% and alleviated gust loads by 78%, when compared with open loop. This work demonstrates the use of collectives for the range of optimization problems of interest in aerospace systems, provides the mathematical foundations and implementation details, and focuses on applications to nonlinear, robust, distributed control. The two successful experiments validate both the collectives approach and the use of MiTEs for the control of flight vehicles.

  12. Power and Performance Management in Nonlinear Virtualized Computing Systems via Predictive Control

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chengjian; Mu, Yifen

    2015-01-01

    The problem of power and performance management captures growing research interest in both academic and industrial field. Virtulization, as an advanced technology to conserve energy, has become basic architecture for most data centers. Accordingly, more sophisticated and finer control are desired in virtualized computing systems, where multiple types of control actions exist as well as time delay effect, which make it complicated to formulate and solve the problem. Furthermore, because of improvement on chips and reduction of idle power, power consumption in modern machines shows significant nonlinearity, making linear power models(which is commonly adopted in previous work) no longer suitable. To deal with this, we build a discrete system state model, in which all control actions and time delay effect are included by state transition and performance and power can be defined on each state. Then, we design the predictive controller, via which the quadratic cost function integrating performance and power can be dynamically optimized. Experiment results show the effectiveness of the controller. By choosing a moderate weight, a good balance can be achieved between performance and power: 99.76% requirements can be dealt with and power consumption can be saved by 33% comparing to the case with open loop controller. PMID:26225769

  13. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    Renewed interest in space nuclear applications has motivated the study of a specialized reactor kinetics model. Consideration of a kinetics model favorable for study of the feasibility of automatic control of these devices is warranted. The need to bridge this gap between reactor kinetics and automatic control in conjunction with the control drum design characteristic of next generation paper space reactors inspired the development of a new Reflected Kinetics (RK) model. An extension of the conventional point-kinetics (PK) model was done in order to explicitly correlate reactivity and the reflector/absorber control drums characteristic of space nuclear reactor designs. Open-loop computations and numerical comparison to analytic PK equations indicated that the RK model is a functional alternative to equivalent bare point kinetics in the analysis of moderate transients. Variations in the RK reflector-to-core transfer probabilities and coolant flow rate do indeed drive the transient differently than the lumped insertion of equivalent reactivity amounts in the core. These computations illustrated the potential importance of the utilization of variable coolant flow rate to aid control in space reactor systems limited by minimal drum reactivity worth. Additionally the Doppler reactivity shutdown mechanism was concluded to be the primarily reliable means of safety shutdown in such systems. The structure of the RK equations proved to be advantageous for integration of automatic control.

  14. Space Weather Influence on Relative Motion Control using the Touchless Electrostatic Tractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Erik A.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2016-09-01

    With recent interest in the use of electrostatic forces for contactless tugging and attitude control of noncooperative objects for orbital servicing and active debris mitigation, the need for a method of remote charge control arises. In this paper, the use of a directed electron beam for remote charge control is considered in conjunction with the relative motion control. A tug vehicle emits an electron beam onto a deputy object, charging it negatively. At the same time, the tug is charged positively due to beam emission, resulting in an attractive electrostatic force. The relative position feedback control between the tug and the passive debris object is studied subject to the charging being created through an electron beam. Employing the nominal variations of the GEO space weather conditions across longitude slots, two electrostatic tugging strategies are considered. First, the electron beam current is adjusted throughout the orbit in order to maximize this resulting electrostatic force. This open-loop control strategy compensates for changes in the nominally expected local space weather environment in the GEO region to adjust for fluctuations in the local plasma return currents. Second, the performance impact of using a fixed electron beam current on the electrostatic tractor is studied if the same natural space weather variations are assumed. The fixed electron beam current shows a minor performance penalty (<5 %) while providing a much simpler implementation that does not require any knowledge of local space weather conditions.

  15. Antenna Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) Controllers: Properties, Limits of Performance, and Tuning Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W.

    2004-01-01

    Wind gusts are the main disturbances that depreciate tracking precision of microwave antennas and radiotelescopes. The linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) controllers - as compared with the proportional-and-integral (PI) controllers significantly improve the tracking precision in wind disturbances. However, their properties have not been satisfactorily understood; consequently, their tuning is a trial-and-error process. A control engineer has two tools to tune an LQG controller: the choice of coordinate system of the controller model and the selection of weights of the LQG performance index. This article analyzes properties of an open- and closed-loop antenna. It shows that the proper choice of coordinates of the open-loop model simplifies the shaping of the closed-loop performance. The closed-loop properties are influenced by the LQG weights. The article shows the impact of the weights on the antenna closed-loop bandwidth, disturbance rejection properties, and antenna acceleration. The bandwidth and the disturbance rejection characterize the antenna performance, while the acceleration represents the performance limit set by the antenna hardware (motors). The article presents the controller tuning procedure, based on the coordinate selection and the weight properties. The procedure rationally shapes the closed-loop performance, as an alternative to the trial-and-error approach.

  16. Dynamic fast terminal sliding mode control of a shape memory alloy actuated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, Meeshawn S.; Srinivasan, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we address the chattering phenomenon which is a common drawback associated with the normal Sliding Mode Control (SMC) law for a basic shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated system. A new method has been proposed to counter this effect by combining the concepts of Fast Terminal SMC and Dynamic controller. A phenomenological model is developed for the SMA which incorporates a piecewise linear hysteresis behavior. This model is used for both open loop as well as closed loop simulations for a linear motion control system. Based on this model, a dynamic terminal sliding mode control law is derived and applied to the system. A normal SMC law with saturation function which is known to reduce chattering is compared with the proposed control law for its effectiveness to curb the issue of chattering versus its ability to faithfully track a desired trajectory. Numerical Simulations indicate that the proposed law is able to reduce the chattering effect sufficiently and at par with the control technique involving saturation function.

  17. Dynamics and control of flexible multibody structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemple, Timothy John

    The goal of this study is to present a method for deriving equations of motion capable of modeling the controlled motion of an open loop multibody structure comprised of an arbitrary number of rigid bodies and slender beams. The procedure presented here for deriving equations of motion for flexible multibody systems is carried out by means of the Principle of Virtual Work (often referred to in the dynamics literature as d'Alembert's Principle). We first consider the motion of a general flexible body relative to the inertial space, and then derive specific formulas for both rigid bodies and slender beams. Next, we make a small motions assumption, with the end result being equations for a Rayleigh beam, which include terms which account for the axial motion, due to bending, of points on the beam central axis. This process includes a novel application of the exponential form of an orthogonal matrix, which is ideally suited for truncation. Then, the generalized coordinates and quasi-velocities used in the mathematical model, including those needed in the spatial discretization process of the beam equations are discussed. Furthermore, we develop a new set of recursive relations used to compute the inertial motion of a body in terms of the generalized coordinates and quasi-velocities. This research was motivated by the desire to model the controlled motion of a flexible space robot, and consequently, we use the multibody dynamics equations to simulate the motion of such a structure, providing a demonstration of the computer program. For this particular example we make use of a new sequence of shape functions, first used by Meirovitch and Stemple to model a two dimensional building frame subjected to earthquake excitations.

  18. The GBT precision telescope control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestage, Richard M.; Constantikes, Kim T.; Balser, Dana S.; Condon, James J.

    2004-10-01

    The NRAO Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is a 100m diameter advanced single dish radio telescope designed for a wide range of astronomical projects with special emphasis on precision imaging. Open-loop adjustments of the active surface, and real-time corrections to pointing and focus on the basis of structural temperatures already allow observations at frequencies up to 50GHz. Our ultimate goal is to extend the observing frequency limit up to 115GHz; this will require a two dimensional tracking error better than 1.3", and an rms surface accuracy better than 210μm. The Precision Telescope Control System project has two main components. One aspect is the continued deployment of appropriate metrology systems, including temperature sensors, inclinometers, laser rangefinders and other devices. An improved control system architecture will harness this measurement capability with the existing servo systems, to deliver the precision operation required. The second aspect is the execution of a series of experiments to identify, understand and correct the residual pointing and surface accuracy errors. These can have multiple causes, many of which depend on variable environmental conditions. A particularly novel approach is to solve simultaneously for gravitational, thermal and wind effects in the development of the telescope pointing and focus tracking models. Our precision temperature sensor system has already allowed us to compensate for thermal gradients in the antenna, which were previously responsible for the largest "non-repeatable" pointing and focus tracking errors. We are currently targetting the effects of wind as the next, currently uncompensated, source of error.

  19. Integration of Online Parameter Identification and Neural Network for In-Flight Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hageman, Jacob J.; Smith, Mark S.; Stachowiak, Susan

    2003-01-01

    An indirect adaptive system has been constructed for robust control of an aircraft with uncertain aerodynamic characteristics. This system consists of a multilayer perceptron pre-trained neural network, online stability and control derivative identification, a dynamic cell structure online learning neural network, and a model following control system based on the stochastic optimal feedforward and feedback technique. The pre-trained neural network and model following control system have been flight-tested, but the online parameter identification and online learning neural network are new additions used for in-flight adaptation of the control system model. A description of the modification and integration of these two stand-alone software packages into the complete system in preparation for initial flight tests is presented. Open-loop results using both simulation and flight data, as well as closed-loop performance of the complete system in a nonlinear, six-degree-of-freedom, flight validated simulation, are analyzed. Results show that this online learning system, in contrast to the nonlearning system, has the ability to adapt to changes in aerodynamic characteristics in a real-time, closed-loop, piloted simulation, resulting in improved flying qualities.

  20. In Silico Magnetic Nanocontainers Navigation in Blood Vessels: A Feedback Control Approach.

    PubMed

    Do, Ton Duc; Noh, Yeongil; Kim, Myeong Ok; Yoon, Jungwon

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are recently used in a drug delivery system to pass the blood brain barrier. However, because the magnetic force acting on particles is proportional to their volumes, as the size of particles is small, the large magnetic field is required to produce enough magnetic force for overcoming the hydrodynamic drag force as well as other forces in blood vessels. Other difficulties for controlling MNPs are the complicated behavior of hydrodynamic drag force and uncertain factors in their dynamics. Therefore, open-loop control methods cannot guarantee guiding every MNP to the correct location. Considering these challenges, this paper introduces a feedback control approach for magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in blood vessels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time feedback controller that is designed for MNPs without aggregation. Simulation studies in MATLAB and real-time verifications on a physical model in COMSOL-MATLAB interface are performed to prove the feasibility of the proposed approach. It is shown that the proposed control scheme can accurately and effectively navigate the MNP to the correct path with feasible hardware supports. PMID:27427720

  1. Real-time closed-loop control for micro mirrors with quasistatic comb drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroedter, Richard; Sandner, Thilo; Janschek, Klaus; Roth, Matthias; Hruschka, Clemens

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the application of a real-time closed-loop control for the quasistatic axis of electrostatic micro scanning mirrors. In comparison to resonantly driven mirrors, the quasistatic comb drive allows arbitrary motion profiles with frequencies up to its eigenfrequency. A current mirror setup at Fraunhofer IPMS is manufactured with a staggered vertical comb (SVC) drive and equipped with an integrated piezo-resistive deflection sensor, which can potentially be used as position feedback sensor. The control design is accomplished based on a nonlinear mechatronic system model and the preliminary parameter characterization. In previous papers [1, 2] we have shown that jerk-limited trajectories, calculated offline, provide a suitable method for parametric trajectory design, taking into account physical limitations given by the electrostatic comb and thus decreasing the dynamic requirements. The open-loop control shows in general unfavorable residual eigenfrequency oscillations leading to considerable tracking errors for desired triangle trajectories [3]. With real-time closed-loop control, implemented on a dSPACE system using an optical feedback, we can significantly reduce these errors and stabilize the mirror motion against external disturbances. In this paper we compare linear and different nonlinear closed-loop control strategies as well as two observer variants for state estimation. Finally, we evaluate the simulation and experimental results in terms of steady state accuracy and the concept feasibility for a low-cost realization.

  2. Multi-loop Control System Design for Biodiesel Process using Waste Cooking Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patle, Dipesh S.; Z, Ahmad; Rangaiah, G. P.

    2015-06-01

    Biodiesel is one of the promising liquid fuels for future due to its advantages such as renewability and eco-friendliness. This manuscript describes the development of a multi-loop control system design for a comprehensive biodiesel process using waste cooking oil. Method for controlled variable-manipulated variable (CV-MV) pairings are vital for the stable, effective and economical operation of the process. Liquid recycles, product quality requirements and effective inventory control pose tough challenges to the safe operation of the biodiesel process. A simple and easy to apply effective RGA method [Xiong Q, Cai W J and He M J 2005 A practical loop pairing criterion for multivariable processes Journal of Process Control vol. 15 pp 741-747.] is applied to determine CV-MV pairings i.e. control configuration design for the bioprocess. This method uses steady state gain as well as bandwidth information of the process open loop transfer function to determine input-output pairings.

  3. Flexible strategies for flight control: an active role for the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Dyhr, Jonathan P; Morgansen, Kristi A; Daniel, Thomas L; Cowan, Noah J

    2013-05-01

    Moving animals orchestrate myriad motor systems in response to multimodal sensory inputs. Coordinating movement is particularly challenging in flight control, where animals deal with potential instability and multiple degrees of freedom of movement. Prior studies have focused on wings as the primary flight control structures, for which changes in angle of attack or shape are used to modulate lift and drag forces. However, other actuators that may impact flight performance are reflexively activated during flight. We investigated the visual-abdominal reflex displayed by the hawkmoth Manduca sexta to determine its role in flight control. We measured the open-loop stimulus-response characteristics (measured as a transfer function) between the visual stimulus and abdominal response in tethered moths. The transfer function reveals a 41 ms delay and a high-pass filter behavior with a pass band starting at ~0.5 Hz. We also developed a simplified mathematical model of hovering flight wherein articulation of the thoracic-abdominal joint redirects an average lift force provided by the wings. We show that control of the joint, subject to a high-pass filter, is sufficient to maintain stable hovering, but with a slim stability margin. Our experiments and models suggest a novel mechanism by which articulation of the body or 'airframe' of an animal can be used to redirect lift forces for effective flight control. Furthermore, the small stability margin may increase flight agility by easing the transition from stable flight to a more maneuverable, unstable regime.

  4. Cooperative control of two active spacecraft during proximity operations. M.S. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polutchko, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A cooperative autopilot is developed for the control of the relative attitude, relative position and absolute attitude of two maneuvering spacecraft during on orbit proximity operations. The autopilot consists of an open-loop trajectory solver which computes a nine dimensional linearized nominal state trajectory at the beginning of each maneuver and a phase space regulator which maintains the two spacecraft on the nominal trajectory during coast phases of the maneuver. A linear programming algorithm is used to perform jet selection. Simulation tests using a system of two space shuttle vehicles are performed to verify the performance of the cooperative controller and comparisons are made to a traditional passive target/active pursuit vehicle approach to proximity operations. The cooperative autopilot is shown to be able to control the two vehicle system when both the would be pursuit vehicle and the target vehicle are not completely controllable in six degrees of freedom. The cooperative controller is also shown to use as much as 37 percent less fuel and 57 percent fewer jet firings than a single pursuit vehicle during a simple docking approach maneuver.

  5. Closed-loop separation control over a sharp edge ramp using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debien, Antoine; von Krbek, Kai A. F. F.; Mazellier, Nicolas; Duriez, Thomas; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd R.; Abel, Markus W.; Kourta, Azeddine

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally perform open and closed-loop control of a separating turbulent boundary layer downstream from a sharp edge ramp. The turbulent boundary layer just above the separation point has a Reynolds number Re_{θ }≈ 3500 based on momentum thickness. The goal of the control is to mitigate separation and early re-attachment. The forcing employs a spanwise array of active vortex generators. The flow state is monitored with skin-friction sensors downstream of the actuators. The feedback control law is obtained using model-free genetic programming control (GPC) (Gautier et al. in J Fluid Mech 770:442-457, 2015). The resulting flow is assessed using the momentum coefficient, pressure distribution and skin friction over the ramp and stereo PIV. The PIV yields vector field statistics, e.g. shear layer growth, the back-flow area and vortex region. GPC is benchmarked against the best periodic forcing. While open-loop control achieves separation reduction by locking-on the shedding mode, GPC gives rise to similar benefits by accelerating the shear layer growth. Moreover, GPC uses less actuation energy.

  6. Improvements to the measurement of electrically controlled hydraulic pumps' flow/pressure characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jian-Feng; Liu, Cheng-Liang; Gu, Jian-Jiang; Shen, Liang-Chong

    2011-12-01

    To increase the measurement accuracy, and also to automate the measurement operation, we modify the electrically controlled hydraulic pumps' (ECHPs') flow/pressure performance characteristic description and improve the test method in existent standards. According to ECHPs' working principle, we divide ECHPs' operation into two models: constant flow operating mode (CFOM) and constant pressure operating mode (CPOM). A direct drive servo-proportional control valve (DDV) is used to load the test pump. In the CFOM, we change the pressure load at a constant rate by driving the DDV's displacement with nonlinear feedback and a proportional-integral (PI) controller. In the CPOM, we take advantage of the DDV's inherent linearity between its input signal and output flow, and change the flow load at a constant rate by using open-loop spool displacement control. A mathematic model is built for the derivation of a stable condition and the analysis of steady-state pressure tracking error. The theoretical analysis shows that the feedback linearization and PI controller with negative proportional and integral gains are able to track a slope pressure load command with a desired rate. The test results also show that the mathematical model is valid and the proposed method can improve the measurement accuracy remarkably.

  7. In Silico Magnetic Nanocontainers Navigation in Blood Vessels: A Feedback Control Approach.

    PubMed

    Do, Ton Duc; Noh, Yeongil; Kim, Myeong Ok; Yoon, Jungwon

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are recently used in a drug delivery system to pass the blood brain barrier. However, because the magnetic force acting on particles is proportional to their volumes, as the size of particles is small, the large magnetic field is required to produce enough magnetic force for overcoming the hydrodynamic drag force as well as other forces in blood vessels. Other difficulties for controlling MNPs are the complicated behavior of hydrodynamic drag force and uncertain factors in their dynamics. Therefore, open-loop control methods cannot guarantee guiding every MNP to the correct location. Considering these challenges, this paper introduces a feedback control approach for magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in blood vessels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time feedback controller that is designed for MNPs without aggregation. Simulation studies in MATLAB and real-time verifications on a physical model in COMSOL-MATLAB interface are performed to prove the feasibility of the proposed approach. It is shown that the proposed control scheme can accurately and effectively navigate the MNP to the correct path with feasible hardware supports.

  8. MHD control experiments in the Extrap T2R Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrelli, L.; Bolzonella, T.; Brunsell, P.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J.; Franz, P.; Gregoratto, D.; Manduchi, G.; Martin, P.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Piovesan, P.; Spizzo, G.; Yadikin, D.; Zanca, P.

    2004-11-01

    We report here on MHD active control experiments performed in the Extrap T2R device, which has been recently equipped with a set of 32 feedback controlled saddle coils couples. Experiments aiming at selectively exciting a resonant resistive instability in order to actively induce Quasi Single Helicity states will be presented. Open loop experiments have in fact shown that a spectrum with one dominant mode can be excited in a high aspect ratio device like T2R. In addition, evidences of controlled braking of tearing modes, which spontaneously rotate in T2R, have been gathered, allowing the determination of a threshold for mode wall locking. Different feedback control schemes have been implemented. In particular, mode suppression schemes proved successful in delaying resistive wall modes growth and in increasing the discharge duration: this suggests a hybrid mode control scenario, in which RWM are suppressed and QSH is induced. Radiation imaging and internal magnetic field reconstructions performed with the ORBIT code will be presented.

  9. Self-optimising control for a class of continuous bioreactor via variable-structure feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Cisneros, Gerardo; Alvarez-Ramírez, José; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    A self-optimising controller is designed for stabilisation of a class of bioreactor exploiting sliding-mode techniques. The stability analysis for the class of bioreactor, in open-loop configuration, suggests that the optimal behaviour, respect to maximal biomass production, occurs in an unstable region (structurally unstable). In this contribution, a variable-structure controller is designed, exploiting the inhibitory effect of substrate concentration under the biomass growth rate, such that the closed-loop system reaches the optimal manifold where the effect induced by the growth rate gradient is compensated (favouring the maximum growth rate). The self-optimising comprises an uncertainty estimator which computes the unknown terms for increasing the robustness issues of the sliding-mode scheme. Numerical experiments illustrate the performance and execution of the control strategy considering different parameter values for biomass growth rate. The robustness and fragility of the proposed controller are also discussed with respect to the modelling uncertainty and small changes in the controller gains, respectively.

  10. Finite State Control of a Variable Impedance Hybrid Neuroprosthesis for Locomotion after Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Bulea, Thomas C.; Kobetic, R.; Audu, M.L.; Schnellenberger, J.; Triolo, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported on a novel variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM). The VIKM was designed as a component of a hybrid neuroprosthesis to regulate knee flexion. The hybrid neuroprosthesis is a device that uses a controllable brace to support the body against collapse while stimulation provides power for movement. The hybrid neuroprosthesis requires a control system to coordinate the actions of the VIKM with the stimulation system; the development and evaluation of such a controller is presented. Brace mounted sensors and a baseline open loop stimulation pattern are utilized as control signals to activate the VIKM during stance phase while simultaneously modulating muscle stimulation in an on-off fashion. The objective is twofold: reduce the amount of stimulation necessary for walking while simultaneously restoring more biologically correct knee motion during stance using the VIKM. Custom designed hardware and software components were developed for controller implementation. The VIKM hybrid neuroprosthesis (VIKM-HNP) was evaluated during walking in one participant with thoracic level spinal cord injury. In comparison to walking with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) alone, the VIKM-HNP restored near normal stance phase knee flexion during loading response and pre-swing phases while decreasing knee extensor stimulation by up to 40%. PMID:23193320

  11. Control design for the SISO system with the unknown order and the unknown relative degree.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunzhe; Li, Donghai

    2014-07-01

    For the uncertain system whose order, relative degree and parameters are unknown in the control design, new research is still in need on the parameter tuning and close-loop stability. During the last 10 years, much progress is made in the application and theory research of the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) for the uncertain system. In this study, the necessary and sufficient conditions are established for building the ADRC for the minimum-phase system and the open-loop stable system when the plant parameters, orders and relative degrees are unknown, the corresponding ideal dynamics are analyzed, and the theoretical results are verified by the simulations. Considering the wide application and the long history of the PID/PI controller, a method is given to design ADRC quickly based on the existing (generalized or conventional) PID/PI controller. A plenty of simulations are made to illustrate this PID/PI-based design method and the corresponding close-loop performances. The simulation examples include the minimum/nonminimum-phase plants, the stable/integrating plants, the high/low-order plant, and the plants with time delays. Such plants are from a wider scope than the theoretical result, and representative of many kinds of the industrial processes. That leads to a new way to simplify the ADRC design via absorbing the engineering experience in designing the PID/PI controller.

  12. ORACLS: A system for linear-quadratic-Gaussian control law design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    A modern control theory design package (ORACLS) for constructing controllers and optimal filters for systems modeled by linear time-invariant differential or difference equations is described. Numerical linear-algebra procedures are used to implement the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) methodology of modern control theory. Algorithms are included for computing eigensystems of real matrices, the relative stability of a matrix, factored forms for nonnegative definite matrices, the solutions and least squares approximations to the solutions of certain linear matrix algebraic equations, the controllability properties of a linear time-invariant system, and the steady state covariance matrix of an open-loop stable system forced by white noise. Subroutines are provided for solving both the continuous and discrete optimal linear regulator problems with noise free measurements and the sampled-data optimal linear regulator problem. For measurement noise, duality theory and the optimal regulator algorithms are used to solve the continuous and discrete Kalman-Bucy filter problems. Subroutines are also included which give control laws causing the output of a system to track the output of a prescribed model.

  13. Design of Robust Adaptive Unbalance Response Controllers for Rotors with Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knospe, Carl R.; Tamer, Samir M.; Fedigan, Stephen J.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental results have recently demonstrated that an adaptive open loop control strategy can be highly effective in the suppression of unbalance induced vibration on rotors supported in active magnetic bearings. This algorithm, however, relies upon a predetermined gain matrix. Typically, this matrix is determined by an optimal control formulation resulting in the choice of the pseudo-inverse of the nominal influence coefficient matrix as the gain matrix. This solution may result in problems with stability and performance robustness since the estimated influence coefficient matrix is not equal to the actual influence coefficient matrix. Recently, analysis tools have been developed to examine the robustness of this control algorithm with respect to structured uncertainty. Herein, these tools are extended to produce a design procedure for determining the adaptive law's gain matrix. The resulting control algorithm has a guaranteed convergence rate and steady state performance in spite of the uncertainty in the rotor system. Several examples are presented which demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach and its advantages over the standard optimal control formulation.

  14. Active Control of 2/1 Magnetic Islands in the HBT-EP Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, G.A.; Cates, C.; Mauel, M.E.; Maurer, D.; Nadle, D.; Taylor, E.; Xiao, Q.; Wurden, G.A.; Reass, W.A.

    1997-11-18

    Closed and open loop control techniques were applied to growing m/n=2/1 rotating islands in wall stabilized plasmas in the HBT-EP tokamak. The approach taken by HBT-EP combines an adjustable segmented conducting wall (which slows the growth or stabilizes ideal external kinks) with a number of small (6{degree} wide) saddle coils located between the gaps of the conducting wall. In this paper we report demonstration of 2-phase island rotation control from 5 kHz to 15 kHz and observation of the phase instability which are well modeled by the single-helicity, predictions of nonlinear Rutherford island dynamics for 2/1 tearing modes including important effects of ion inertia and FLR which appears as a damping term in the model equations. The closed loop response of active feedback control of the 2/1 mode at moderate gain was observed to be in good agreement with the theory. We have also demonstrated suppression of the 2/1 island growth using an asynchronous frequency modulation drive which maintains the flow damping of the island by application of rotating control fields with frequencies alternating above and below the natural mode frequency. This frequency modulation control technique was also able to prevent disruptions normally observed to follow giant sawtooth crashes in the plasma core.

  15. Low-order design and high-order simulation of active closed-loop control for aerospace structures under construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    Partially constructed/assembled structures in space are complicated enough but their dynamics will also be operating in closed-loop with feedback controllers. The dynamics of such structures are modeled by large-scale finite element models. The model dimension L is extremely large (approximately 10,000) while the numbers of actuators (M) and sensors (P) are small. The model parameters M(sub m) mass matrix, D(sub o) damping matrix, and K(sub o) stiffness matrix, are all symmetric and sparse (banded). Thus simulation of open-loop structure models of very large dimension can be accomplished by special integration techniques for sparse matrices. The problem of simulation of closed-loop control of such structures is complicated by the addition of controllers. Simulation of closed-loop controlled structures is an essential part of the controller design and evaluation process. Current research in the following areas is presented: high-order simulation of actively controlled aerospace structures; low-order controller design and SCI compensation for unmodeled dynamics; prediction of closed-loop stability using asymptotic eigenvalue series; and flexible robot manipulator control experiment.

  16. The multiple-function multi-input/multi-output digital controller system for the AFW wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Mcgraw, Sandra M.

    1992-01-01

    A real time multiple-function digital controller system was developed for the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) Program. The digital controller system (DCS) allowed simultaneous execution of two control laws: flutter suppression and either roll trim or a rolling maneuver load control. The DCS operated within, but independently of, a slower host operating system environment, at regulated speeds up to 200 Hz. It also coordinated the acquisition, storage, and transfer of data for near real time controller performance evaluation and both open- and closed-loop plant estimation. It synchronized the operation of four different processing units, allowing flexibility in the number, form, functionality, and order of control laws, and variability in the selection of the sensors and actuators employed. Most importantly, the DCS allowed for the successful demonstration of active flutter suppression to conditions approximately 26 percent (in dynamic pressure) above the open-loop boundary in cases when the model was fixed in roll and up to 23 percent when it was free to roll. Aggressive roll maneuvers with load control were achieved above the flutter boundary. The purpose here is to present the development, validation, and wind tunnel testing of this multiple-function digital controller system.

  17. Controlled locomotion of robots driven by a vibrating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbanhowar, Paul; Lynch, Kevin M.

    Robots typically derive their powers of movement from onboard actuators and power sources, but other scenarios are possible where the external environment provides part or all of the necessary forcing and control. I will discuss details of a system where the ``robots'' are just planar solid objects and the requisite driving forces originate from frictional sliding-interactions with a periodically oscillated and nominally horizontal surface. For the robots to move, the temporal symmetry of the frictional forces must be broken, which is achieved here by modulating the normal force using vertical acceleration of the surface. Independent of the initial conditions and vibration waveform, a sliding locomotor reaches a unique velocity limit cycle at a given position. Its resulting motion can be described in terms of velocity fields which specify the robot's cycle-averaged velocity as a function of position. Velocity fields with non-zero spatial divergence can be generated by combining translational and rotational surface motions; this allows the simultaneous and open-loop collection, dispersal, and transport of multiple robots. Fields and field sequences can simultaneously move multiple robots between arbitrary positions and, potentially, along arbitrary trajectories. Supported by NSF CMMI #0700537.

  18. Adaptive Control of Non-Minimum Phase Modal Systems Using Residual Mode Filters2. Parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.; Frost, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Many dynamic systems containing a large number of modes can benefit from adaptive control techniques, which are well suited to applications that have unknown parameters and poorly known operating conditions. In this paper, we focus on a direct adaptive control approach that has been extended to handle adaptive rejection of persistent disturbances. We extend this adaptive control theory to accommodate problematic modal subsystems of a plant that inhibit the adaptive controller by causing the open-loop plant to be non-minimum phase. We will modify the adaptive controller with a Residual Mode Filter (RMF) to compensate for problematic modal subsystems, thereby allowing the system to satisfy the requirements for the adaptive controller to have guaranteed convergence and bounded gains. This paper will be divided into two parts. Here in Part I we will review the basic adaptive control approach and introduce the primary ideas. In Part II, we will present the RMF methodology and complete the proofs of all our results. Also, we will apply the above theoretical results to a simple flexible structure example to illustrate the behavior with and without the residual mode filter.

  19. On-orbit application of H-infinity to the middeck active controls experiment: Overview of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Horta, Lucas G.

    1996-01-01

    The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) was successfully completed during the flight of STS-67 in March 1995. MACE provided an on-orbit validation of modem robust control theory and system identification techniques through the testing of a flexible, multi-instrument, science platform in the micro-gravity environment of the Space Shuttle's Middeck. As part of this experiment, H-infinity control design was validated in zero gravity (0-G) environment. The control objective was to isolate a payload sensor from a 5O Hz bandwidth disturbance occurring on the test article. Controllers were designed with the use of finite element models developed using 1 -G measurements and a measurement model obtained by applying system identification techniques to open loop data obtained on orbit. Over 50 single-input, single-output and multi-input, multi-output, single and multi-axis H-infinity control designs were evaluated on-orbit. Up to 19 dB reduction in vibration levels and 25 Hz bandwidth of control were achieved.

  20. Linear quadratic game and non-cooperative predictive methods for potential application to modelling driver-AFS interactive steering control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Xiaoxiang; Cole, David J.

    2013-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the modelling of strategic interactions between the human driver and the vehicle active front steering (AFS) controller in a path-following task where the two controllers hold different target paths. The work is aimed at extending the use of mathematical models in representing driver steering behaviour in complicated driving situations. Two game theoretic approaches, namely linear quadratic game and non-cooperative model predictive control (non-cooperative MPC), are used for developing the driver-AFS interactive steering control model. For each approach, the open-loop Nash steering control solution is derived; the influences of the path-following weights, preview and control horizons, driver time delay and arm neuromuscular system (NMS) dynamics are investigated, and the CPU time consumed is recorded. It is found that the two approaches give identical time histories as well as control gains, while the non-cooperative MPC method uses much less CPU time. Specifically, it is observed that the introduction of weight on the integral of vehicle lateral displacement error helps to eliminate the steady-state path-following error; the increase in preview horizon and NMS natural frequency and the decline in time delay and NMS damping ratio improve the path-following accuracy.

  1. Exploratory Studies in Generalized Predictive Control for Active Gust Load Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Eure, Kenneth W.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2006-01-01

    The results of numerical simulations aimed at assessing the efficacy of Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) for active gust load alleviation using trailing- and leading-edge control surfaces are presented. The equations underlying the method are presented and discussed, including system identification, calculation of control law matrices, and calculation of commands applied to the control effectors. Both embedded and explicit feedforward paths for inclusion of disturbance effects are addressed. Results from two types of simulations are shown. The first used a 3-DOF math model of a mass-spring-dashpot system subject to user-defined external disturbances. The second used open-loop data from a wind-tunnel test in which a wing model was excited by sinusoidal vertical gusts; closed-loop behavior was simulated in post-test calculations. Results obtained from these simulations have been decidedly positive. In particular, results of closed-loop simulations for the wing model showed reductions in root moments by factors as high as 1000, depending on whether the excitation is from a constant- or variable-frequency gust and on the direction of the response.

  2. Reduction of Helicopter BVI Noise, Vibration, and Power Consumption Through Individual Blade Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Blaas, Achim; Teves, Dietrich; Kube, Roland; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted with a full-scale BO 105 helicopter rotor to evaluate the potential of open-loop individual blade control (IBC) to improve rotor performance, to reduce blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise, and to alleviate helicopter vibrations. The wind tunnel test was an international collaborative effort between NASA/U.S. Army AFDD, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, Eurocopter Deutschland, and the German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR) and was conducted under the auspices of the U.S./German MOU on Rotorcraft Aeromechanics. In this test the normal blade pitch links of the rotor were replaced by servo-actuators so that the pitch of each blade could be controlled independently of the other blades. The specially designed servoactuators and IBC control system were designed and manufactured by ZF Luftfahrttechnik, GmbH. The wind tunnel test was conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. An extensive amount of measurement information was acquired for each IBC data point. These data include rotor performance, static and dynamic hub forces and moments, rotor loads, control loads, inboard and outboard blade pitch motion, and BVI noise data. The data indicated very significant (80 percent) simultaneous reductions in both BVI noise and hub vibrations could be obtained using multi-harmonic input at the critical descent (terminal approach) condition. The data also showed that performance improvements of up to 7 percent could be obtained using 2P input at high-speed forward flight conditions.

  3. Adaptive deep brain stimulation (aDBS) controlled by local field potential oscillations.

    PubMed

    Priori, Alberto; Foffani, Guglielmo; Rossi, Lorenzo; Marceglia, Sara

    2013-07-01

    Despite their proven efficacy in treating neurological disorders, especially Parkinson's disease, deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems could be further optimized to maximize treatment benefits. In particular, because current open-loop DBS strategies based on fixed stimulation settings leave the typical parkinsonian motor fluctuations and rapid symptom variations partly uncontrolled, research has for several years focused on developing novel "closed-loop" or "adaptive" DBS (aDBS) systems. aDBS consists of a simple closed-loop model designed to measure and analyze a control variable reflecting the patient's clinical condition to elaborate new stimulation settings and send them to an "intelligent" implanted stimulator. The major problem in developing an aDBS system is choosing the ideal control variable for feedback. Here we review current evidence on the advantages of neurosignal-controlled aDBS that uses local field potentials (LFPs) as a control variable, and describe the technology already available to create new aDBS systems, and the potential benefits of aDBS for patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:23022916

  4. Active Control of High Frequency Combustion Instability in Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Bob (Technical Monitor); DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    Active control of high-frequency (greater than 500 Hz) combustion instability has been demonstrated in the NASA single-nozzle combustor rig at United Technologies Research Center. The combustor rig emulates an actual engine instability and has many of the complexities of a real engine combustor (i.e. actual fuel nozzle and swirler, dilution cooling, etc.) In order to demonstrate control, a high-frequency fuel valve capable of modulating the fuel flow at up to 1kHz was developed. Characterization of the fuel delivery system was accomplished in a custom dynamic flow rig developed for that purpose. Two instability control methods, one model-based and one based on adaptive phase-shifting, were developed and evaluated against reduced order models and a Sectored-1-dimensional model of the combustor rig. Open-loop fuel modulation testing in the rig demonstrated sufficient fuel modulation authority to proceed with closed-loop testing. During closed-loop testing, both control methods were able to identify the instability from the background noise and were shown to reduce the pressure oscillations at the instability frequency by 30%. This is the first known successful demonstration of high-frequency combustion instability suppression in a realistic aero-engine environment. Future plans are to carry these technologies forward to demonstration on an advanced low-emission combustor.

  5. Height estimation and control of a rotorcraft in ground effect using multiple pressure probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooi, Chin Gian

    This thesis describes a dynamic height estimator and controller for rotorcraft landing and hovering in ground effect based on flowfield sensing and modeling. The rotor downwash in ground effect is represented using a ring-source potential flow model selected for real-time use. Experimental verification of the flow model and an augmented flow model for tilt are presented. A nonlinear dynamic model of a compound pendulum heave test stand that reduces to the dynamics of a rotorcraft in ground effect is presented with open-loop analysis and closed-loop control simulation. Equations of motion and stability characterization of of a heaving rotor IGE are derived for external perturbations and it is shown that a uniform sideward wind does not cause instability and uniform axial wind from the top can cause instability. Flowfield velocity measurements are assimilated into a grid-based recursive Bayesian filter to estimate height above ground in both simulation and experiment. Height tracking in ground effect and landing using the estimated height are implemented with a dynamic linear controller in both simulation and experiment. Mean estimation and motion errors are found to be no greater than 5% and 9% respectively, demonstrating that height estimation and control is possible with only flow sensing and modeling.

  6. Dynamics, stability, and control analyses of flapping wing micro-air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowski, Christopher T.; Girard, Anouck R.

    2012-05-01

    The paper presents an overview of the various analyses of flight dynamics, stability, and control of flapping wing micro-air vehicles available in the literature. The potential benefits of flapping wing micro-air vehicles for civil, military, and search and rescue operations are numerous. The majority of the flight dynamics research involves the standard aircraft (6DOF) equations of motion, although a growth is evident in examining the multibody flight dynamics models of flapping wing micro-air vehicles. The stability of flapping wing micro-air vehicles is largely studied in the vicinity of hover and forward flight. The majority of stability studies focus on linear, time-invariant stability in the vicinity of reference flight conditions, such as hover or forward flight. The consistent result is that flapping wing micro-air vehicles are unstable in an open loop setting. The unstable result is based on linear and nonlinear stability analyses. Control has been demonstrated for hovering and forward flight through various methods, both linear and nonlinear in nature. The entirety of reported research into the stability and control of flapping wing micro-air vehicles has neglected the mass effects of the wings on the position and orientation of the central body. Successful control of a flapping wing micro-air vehicle, with the wings' mass effects included, is still an open research area.

  7. Stability and control of a high-speed cavity running vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, Martin; Arndt, Roger E. A.; Ryan, Tyler; Balas, Gary

    2004-11-01

    A vehicle traveling underwater inside a supercavity has only small regions at the nose (cavitator) and on the afterbody in contact with water. It experiences significantly reduced drag compared to the fully wetted case and can reach very high speeds (currently ˜100m/s). Such a vehicle can be controlled with deflection of front (cavitator) or aft control surfaces (fins), thrust vectoring, or a combination thereof. Here an experiment with a semi-axisymmetric, ventilated cavity and a single cavity-piercing fin was carried out in the high-speed water tunnel at SAFL. Initially, different cavitator shapes were tested (two cones, a fore-shortened cone and a sharp-edged disk) and found to have significant effect on cavity size as well as cavity interface instabilities. With a wedge-shaped, swept, cavity-piercing fin the interaction of control surface and supercavity was studied. Hystereses in cavity shape (cavitation number) versus ventilation rate were observed for both the main supercavity and the supercavitating fin. At constant ventilation rate, re-entrant jets were found to penetrate further upstream for increasing fin angles of attack. Currently, fin forces for different cavitation numbers and angles of attack are being measured, and a simple open-loop control experiment with fin response to an upstream/cavity disturbance is being carried out.

  8. Simulation of the fast steering mirror control system based on gyro velocity feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Jiagming; Tang, Tao; Fu, Chengyu; Ding, Ke; Yu, Wei

    2009-11-01

    The fast steering mirror is a significant element of the photoelectric precision tracking system and is mainly used for attenuating the tracking error of the main axis and rejecting the line-of-sight jitter caused by various disturbances. A control loop model is constructed and object parameters have been identified according to this model in this paper. Low sampling frequency introduce great delay into the imaging tracking system, which may restrict greatly the closed-loop bandwidth, reduce tracking precision of the system and even make the system unsteady. Various elements which limit tracking loop bandwidth are presented and analyzed. Three tracking systems with different sampling frequency are simulated and analyzed. From the simulation result the conclusion can be drawn that it is difficult to increase the closedloop bandwidth in the presence of great delay by means of the general control method. Accordingly feedback control or feed forward control may be tried to improve the error attenuation of the system. The micro-mechanical gyro can be used for measuring the angular velocity of fast steering mirror, so output of velocity gyro as velocity loop feedback may improve the system performance. Furthermore, the velocity loop feedback can enhance the rigidity and the output stability of the tracking system. Finally, the velocity feedback can increase the type of the open loop system; consequently it will improve the error attenuation of the system. The simulation result shows that the tracking precision of the system with velocity feedback is 10 times better than the system without velocity feedback.

  9. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures-V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Diarra, C. M.; Kumar, V. K.

    1982-01-01

    A general survey of the progress made in the areas of mathematical modelling of the system dynamics, structural analysis, development of control algorithms, and simulation of environmental disturbances is presented. The use of graph theory techniques is employed to examine the effects of inherent damping associated with LSST systems on the number and locations of the required control actuators. A mathematical model of the forces and moments induced on a flexible orbiting beam due to solar radiation pressure is developed and typical steady state open loop responses obtained for the case when rotations and vibrations are limited to occur within the orbit plane. A preliminary controls analysis based on a truncated (13 mode) finite element model of the 122m. Hoop/Column antenna indicates that a minimum of six appropriately placed actuators is required for controllability. An algorithm to evaluate the coefficients which describe coupling between the rigid rotational and flexible modes and also intramodal coupling was developed and numerical evaluation based on the finite element model of Hoop/Column system is currently in progress.

  10. Combined magnetic and kinetic control of advanced tokamak steady state scenarios based on semi-empirical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, D.; Artaud, J. F.; Ferron, J. R.; Holcomb, C. T.; Humphreys, D. A.; Liu, F.; Luce, T. C.; Park, J. M.; Prater, R.; Turco, F.; Walker, M. L.

    2015-06-01

    This paper shows that semi-empirical data-driven models based on a two-time-scale approximation for the magnetic and kinetic control of advanced tokamak (AT) scenarios can be advantageously identified from simulated rather than real data, and used for control design. The method is applied to the combined control of the safety factor profile, q(x), and normalized pressure parameter, βN, using DIII-D parameters and actuators (on-axis co-current neutral beam injection (NBI) power, off-axis co-current NBI power, electron cyclotron current drive power, and ohmic coil). The approximate plasma response model was identified from simulated open-loop data obtained using a rapidly converging plasma transport code, METIS, which includes an MHD equilibrium and current diffusion solver, and combines plasma transport nonlinearity with 0D scaling laws and 1.5D ordinary differential equations. The paper discusses the results of closed-loop METIS simulations, using the near-optimal ARTAEMIS control algorithm (Moreau D et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 063020) for steady state AT operation. With feedforward plus feedback control, the steady state target q-profile and βN are satisfactorily tracked with a time scale of about 10 s, despite large disturbances applied to the feedforward powers and plasma parameters. The robustness of the control algorithm with respect to disturbances of the H&CD actuators and of plasma parameters such as the H-factor, plasma density and effective charge, is also shown.

  11. Closed-loop control of zebrafish response using a bioinspired robotic-fish in a preference test

    PubMed Central

    Kopman, Vladislav; Laut, Jeffrey; Polverino, Giovanni; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the response of zebrafish to a robotic-fish whose morphology and colour pattern are inspired by zebrafish. Experiments are conducted in a three-chambered instrumented water tank where a robotic-fish is juxtaposed with an empty compartment, and the preference of live subjects is scored as the mean time spent in the vicinity of the tank's two lateral sides. The tail-beating of the robotic-fish is controlled in real-time based on feedback from fish motion to explore a spectrum of closed-loop systems, including proportional and integral controllers. Closed-loop control systems are complemented by open-loop strategies, wherein the tail-beat of the robotic-fish is independent of the fish motion. The preference space and the locomotory patterns of fish for each experimental condition are analysed and compared to understand the influence of real-time closed-loop control on zebrafish response. The results of this study show that zebrafish respond differently to the pattern of tail-beating motion executed by the robotic-fish. Specifically, the preference and behaviour of zebrafish depend on whether the robotic-fish tail-beating frequency is controlled as a function of fish motion and how such closed-loop control is implemented. PMID:23152102

  12. Real-time control of hind limb functional electrical stimulation using feedback from dorsal root ganglia recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Tim M.; Wagenaar, Joost B.; Bauman, Matthew J.; Gaunt, Robert A.; Weber, Douglas J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) approaches often utilize an open-loop controller to drive state transitions. The addition of sensory feedback may allow for closed-loop control that can respond effectively to perturbations and muscle fatigue. Approach. We evaluated the use of natural sensory nerve signals obtained with penetrating microelectrode arrays in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) as real-time feedback for closed-loop control of FES-generated hind limb stepping in anesthetized cats. Main results. Leg position feedback was obtained in near real-time at 50 ms intervals by decoding the firing rates of more than 120 DRG neurons recorded simultaneously. Over 5 m of effective linear distance was traversed during closed-loop stepping trials in each of two cats. The controller compensated effectively for perturbations in the stepping path when DRG sensory feedback was provided. The presence of stimulation artifacts and the quality of DRG unit sorting did not significantly affect the accuracy of leg position feedback obtained from the linear decoding model as long as at least 20 DRG units were included in the model. Significance. This work demonstrates the feasibility and utility of closed-loop FES control based on natural neural sensors. Further work is needed to improve the controller and electrode technologies and to evaluate long-term viability.

  13. Real-time control of hind limb functional electrical stimulation using feedback from dorsal root ganglia recordings

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Tim M; Wagenaar, Joost B; Bauman, Matthew J; Gaunt, Robert A; Weber, Douglas J

    2013-01-01

    Objective Functional electrical stimulation (FES) approaches often utilize an open-loop controller to drive state transitions. The addition of sensory feedback may allow for closed-loop control that can respond effectively to perturbations and muscle fatigue. Approach We evaluated the use of natural sensory nerve signals obtained with penetrating microelectrode arrays in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) as real-time feedback for closed-loop control of FES-generated hind limb stepping in anesthetized cats. Main results Leg position feedback was obtained in near real-time at 50 ms intervals by decoding the firing rates of more than 120 DRG neurons recorded simultaneously. Over 5 m of effective linear distance was traversed during closed-loop stepping trials in each of two cats. The controller compensated effectively for perturbations in the stepping path when DRG sensory feedback was provided. The presence of stimulation artifacts and the quality of DRG unit sorting did not significantly affect the accuracy of leg position feedback obtained from the linear decoding model as long as at least 20 DRG units were included in the model. Significance This work demonstrates the feasibility and utility of closed-loop FES control based on natural neural sensors. Further work is needed to improve the controller and electrode technologies and to evaluate long-term viability. PMID:23503062

  14. On controllability and system constraints of the linear models of proton exchange membrane and solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radisavljevic, Verica

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we first show that the linear models of proton exchange membrane (polymer electrolyte membrane, PEM) and solid oxide (SO) fuel cells, commonly used in power and energy literature, are not controllable. The source of uncontrollability is the equation for pressure of the water vapor that is only affected by the fuel cell current, which in fact is a disturbance in this system and cannot be controlled by the given model inputs: inlet molar flow rates of hydrogen and oxygen. Being uncontrollable these models are not good candidates for studying control of dynamic processes in PEM and SO fuel cells. However, due to their simplicity, they can be used in hybrid configurations with other energy producing devices such as photovoltaic (solar) cells, wind turbine, micro gas turbine, battery (ultra capacitor) to demonstrate some other phenomena, but not for control purposes unless the hybrid models formed in such hybrid configurations are controllable. Testing controllability of such hybrid models is mandatory. Secondly, we introduce some algebraic constraints that follow from the model dynamics and the Nernst open-loop fuel cell voltage formula. These constraints must be satisfied in simulation of considered fuel cell modes, for example, via MATLAB/Simulink or any other computer software package.

  15. Experimental demonstration of using divergence cost-function in SPGD algorithm for coherent beam combining with tip/tilt control.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chao; Luo, Wen; Tan, Yi; Liu, Hongmei; Mu, Jinbo; Li, Xinyang

    2013-10-21

    A novel approach of tip/tilt control by using divergence cost function in stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm for coherent beam combining (CBC) is proposed and demonstrated experimentally in a seven-channel 2-W fiber amplifier array with both phase-locking and tip/tilt control, for the first time to our best knowledge. Compared with the conventional power-in-the-bucket (PIB) cost function for SPGD optimization, the tip/tilt control using divergence cost function ensures wider correction range, automatic switching control of program, and freedom of camera's intensity-saturation. Homemade piezoelectric-ring phase-modulator (PZT PM) and adaptive fiber-optics collimator (AFOC) are developed to correct piston- and tip/tilt-type aberrations, respectively. The PIB cost function is employed for phase-locking via maximization of SPGD optimization, while the divergence cost function is used for tip/tilt control via minimization. An average of 432-μrad of divergence metrics in open loop has decreased to 89-μrad when tip/tilt control implemented. In CBC, the power in the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the main lobe increases by 32 times, and the phase residual error is less than λ/15. PMID:24150347

  16. Control system performance in a modern daylighted office building

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, C.; Fountain, M., Selkowitz, S.; Jewell, J.

    1990-10-01

    Lockheed Building 157 is one of the United States' largest experiments in contemporary daylighting. Built in 1983, the five story structure houses 3,000 employees and uses daylight for ambient illumination throughout its 56,000-m{sup 2} office interior. A continuously dimmable fluorescent lighting system supplements interior daylight under the control of open-loop ceiling-mounted photosensors. In 1985 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) began a year-long program to measure lighting system performance in the building. Data from this study indicated that architectural features of the building performed admirably, admitting significant daylight to large areas of the open plan interior. Operational savings, however, were limited by inappropriate performance of the control system in many of the building's lighting circuits. LBL recently completed a follow-up investigation of the lighting systems in Building 157 addressing the interaction between daylight and the lighting control system with the goal of improving control system performance. We modified a 1,700-m{sup 2} test zone by relocating the photosensors, attenuating the photosensor control signal, changing the response pattern of the photosensors, and implementing a LBL-developed calibration procedure, Following these modifications, we installed four data-acquisition systems and collected detailed data describing illuminance and lighting power demand during two week periods in the summer, equinox, and winter seasons. This paper presents a comparison of lighting system performance before and after the LBL modifications. Analysis of the data indicates our modifications were successful in maintaining interior illuminance at the target of 350 lux with minimal electric energy consumption. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Compliance and control characteristics of an additive manufactured-flexure stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a compliance and positioning control characteristics of additive manufactured-nanopositioning system consisted of the flexure mechanism and voice coil motor (VCM). The double compound notch type flexure stage was designed to utilize the elastic deformation of two symmetrical four-bar mechanisms to provide a millimeter-level working range. Additive manufacturing (AM) process, stereolithography, was used to fabricate the flexure stage. The AM stage was inspected by using 3D X-ray computerized tomography scanner: air-voids and shape irregularity. The compliance, open-loop resonance peak, and damping ratio of the AM stage were measured 0.317 mm/N, 80 Hz, and 0.19, respectively. The AM stage was proportional-integral-derivative positioning feedback-controlled and the capacitive type sensor was used to measure the displacement. As a result, the AM flexure mechanism was successfully 25 nm positioning controlled within 500 μm range. The resonance peak was found approximately at 280 Hz in closed-loop. This research showed that the AM flexure mechanism and the VCM can provide millimeter range with high precision and can be a good alternative to an expensive metal-based flexure mechanism and piezoelectric transducer.

  18. Compliance and control characteristics of an additive manufactured-flexure stage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a compliance and positioning control characteristics of additive manufactured-nanopositioning system consisted of the flexure mechanism and voice coil motor (VCM). The double compound notch type flexure stage was designed to utilize the elastic deformation of two symmetrical four-bar mechanisms to provide a millimeter-level working range. Additive manufacturing (AM) process, stereolithography, was used to fabricate the flexure stage. The AM stage was inspected by using 3D X-ray computerized tomography scanner: air-voids and shape irregularity. The compliance, open-loop resonance peak, and damping ratio of the AM stage were measured 0.317 mm/N, 80 Hz, and 0.19, respectively. The AM stage was proportional-integral-derivative positioning feedback-controlled and the capacitive type sensor was used to measure the displacement. As a result, the AM flexure mechanism was successfully 25 nm positioning controlled within 500 μm range. The resonance peak was found approximately at 280 Hz in closed-loop. This research showed that the AM flexure mechanism and the VCM can provide millimeter range with high precision and can be a good alternative to an expensive metal-based flexure mechanism and piezoelectric transducer.

  19. Comparison of frequency-domain and time-domain rotorcraft vibration control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Active control of rotor-induced vibration in rotorcraft has received significant attention recently. Two classes of techniques have been proposed. The more developed approach works with harmonic analysis of measured time histories and is called the frequency-domain approach. The more recent approach computes the control input directly using the measured time history data and is called the time-domain approach. The report summarizes the results of a theoretical investigation to compare the two approaches. Five specific areas were addressed: (1) techniques to derive models needed for control design (system identification methods), (2) robustness with respect to errors, (3) transient response, (4) susceptibility to noise, and (5) implementation difficulties. The system identification methods are more difficult for the time-domain models. The time-domain approach is more robust (e.g., has higher gain and phase margins) than the frequency-domain approach. It might thus be possible to avoid doing real-time system identification in the time-domain approach by storing models at a number of flight conditions. The most significant error source is the variation in open-loop vibrations caused by pilot inputs, maneuvers or gusts. The implementation requirements are similar except that the time-domain approach can be much simpler to implement if real-time system identification were not necessary.

  20. On the benefits of hysteresis effects for closed-loop separation control using plasma actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, N.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Moreau, E.; Griffin, J.; Bonnet, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    Flow separation control by a non-thermal plasma actuator is considered for a NACA 0015 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of 1.9 × 105. Static hysteresis in the lift coefficient is demonstrated for increasing and then decreasing sinusoidal voltage amplitude supplying a typical single dielectric barrier discharge actuator at the leading edge of the model. In addition to these open-loop experiments, unsteady surface pressure signals are examined for transient processes involving forced reattachment and natural separation. The results show that strong pressure oscillations in the relatively slow separation process, compared to reattachment, precede the ultimate massive flow separation. To enhance the contrast between the parts of the signal related to the attached flow and those related to the incipient separation, RMS estimate of filtered values of Cp is used to define a flow separation predictor that is implemented in feedback control. Two simple controllers are proposed, one based on a predefined threshold of the unsteady Cp and another that utilizes the flow separation predictor to identify incipient separation. The latter effectively leverages the hysteresis in the post-stall regime to reduce the electrical power consumed by the actuator while maintaining continuously attached flow.

  1. OPTICON: Pro-Matlab software for large order controlled structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Lee D.

    1989-01-01

    A software package for large order controlled structure design is described and demonstrated. The primary program, called OPTICAN, uses both Pro-Matlab M-file routines and selected compiled FORTRAN routines linked into the Pro-Matlab structure. The program accepts structural model information in the form of state-space matrices and performs three basic design functions on the model: (1) open loop analyses; (2) closed loop reduced order controller synthesis; and (3) closed loop stability and performance assessment. The current controller synthesis methods which were implemented in this software are based on the Generalized Linear Quadratic Gaussian theory of Bernstein. In particular, a reduced order Optimal Projection synthesis algorithm based on a homotopy solution method was successfully applied to an experimental truss structure using a 58-state dynamic model. These results are presented and discussed. Current plans to expand the practical size of the design model to several hundred states and the intention to interface Pro-Matlab to a supercomputing environment are discussed.

  2. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Program review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport Project, established as one element of the NASA/Boeing Energy Efficient Transport Technology Program. The performance assessment showed that incorporating ACT into an airplane designed to fly approximately 200 passengers approximately 2,000 nmi could yield block fuel savings from 6 to 10 percent at the design range. The principal risks associated with incorporating these active control functions into a commercial airplane are those involved with the ACT system implementation. The Test and Evaluation phase of the IAAC Project focused on the design, fabrication, and test of a system that implemented pitch axis fly-by-wire, pitch axis augmentation, and wing load alleviation. The system was built to be flight worthy, and was planned to be experimentally flown on the 757. The system was installed in the Boeing Digital Avionics Flight Controls Laboratory (DAFCL), where open loop hardware and software tests, and a brief examination of a direct drive valve (DDV) actuation concept were accomplished. The IAAC Project has shown that ACT can be beneficially incorporated into a commercial transport airplane. Based on the results achieved during the testing phase, there appears to be no fundamental reason(s) that would preclude the commercial application of ACT, assuming an appropriate development effort is included.

  3. On the decentralized control of large-scale systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, C.

    1973-01-01

    The decentralized control of stochastic large scale systems was considered. Particular emphasis was given to control strategies which utilize decentralized information and can be computed in a decentralized manner. The deterministic constrained optimization problem is generalized to the stochastic case when each decision variable depends on different information and the constraint is only required to be satisfied on the average. For problems with a particular structure, a hierarchical decomposition is obtained. For the stochastic control of dynamic systems with different information sets, a new kind of optimality is proposed which exploits the coupled nature of the dynamic system. The subsystems are assumed to be uncoupled and then certain constraints are required to be satisfied, either in a off-line or on-line fashion. For off-line coordination, a hierarchical approach of solving the problem is obtained. The lower level problems are all uncoupled. For on-line coordination, distinction is made between open loop feedback optimal coordination and closed loop optimal coordination.

  4. Simulink-Based Simulation Architecture for Evaluating Controls for Aerospace Vehicles (SAREC-ASV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David m.; Bacon, Barton J.

    2006-01-01

    The Simulation Architecture for Evaluating Controls for Aerospace Vehicles (SAREC-ASV) is a Simulink-based approach to providing an engineering quality desktop simulation capability for finding trim solutions, extracting linear models for vehicle analysis and control law development, and generating open-loop and closed-loop time history responses for control system evaluation. It represents a useful level of maturity rather than a finished product. The layout is hierarchical and supports concurrent component development and validation, with support from the Concurrent Versions System (CVS) software management tool. Real Time Workshop (RTW) is used to generate pre-compiled code for substantial component modules, and templates permit switching seamlessly between original Simulink and code compiled for various platforms. Two previous limitations are addressed. Turn around time for incorporating tabular model components was improved through auto-generation of required Simulink diagrams based on data received in XML format. The layout was modified to exploit a Simulink "compile once, evaluate multiple times" capability for zero elapsed time for use in trimming and linearizing. Trim is achieved through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) with a narrow, script definable interface to the vehicle model which facilitates incorporating new models.

  5. Compliance and control characteristics of an additive manufactured-flexure stage.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a compliance and positioning control characteristics of additive manufactured-nanopositioning system consisted of the flexure mechanism and voice coil motor (VCM). The double compound notch type flexure stage was designed to utilize the elastic deformation of two symmetrical four-bar mechanisms to provide a millimeter-level working range. Additive manufacturing (AM) process, stereolithography, was used to fabricate the flexure stage. The AM stage was inspected by using 3D X-ray computerized tomography scanner: air-voids and shape irregularity. The compliance, open-loop resonance peak, and damping ratio of the AM stage were measured 0.317 mm/N, 80 Hz, and 0.19, respectively. The AM stage was proportional-integral-derivative positioning feedback-controlled and the capacitive type sensor was used to measure the displacement. As a result, the AM flexure mechanism was successfully 25 nm positioning controlled within 500 μm range. The resonance peak was found approximately at 280 Hz in closed-loop. This research showed that the AM flexure mechanism and the VCM can provide millimeter range with high precision and can be a good alternative to an expensive metal-based flexure mechanism and piezoelectric transducer. PMID:25933897

  6. All-electronic droplet generation on-chip with real-time feedback control for EWOD digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jian; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2008-06-01

    Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) actuation enables digital (or droplet) microfluidics where small packets of liquids are manipulated on a two-dimensional surface. Due to its mechanical simplicity and low energy consumption, EWOD holds particular promise for portable systems. To improve volume precision of the droplets, which is desired for quantitative applications such as biochemical assays, existing practices would require near-perfect device fabrication and operation conditions unless the droplets are generated under feedback control by an extra pump setup off of the chip. In this paper, we develop an all-electronic (i.e., no ancillary pumping) real-time feedback control of on-chip droplet generation. A fast voltage modulation, capacitance sensing, and discrete-time PID feedback controller are integrated on the operating electronic board. A significant improvement is obtained in the droplet volume uniformity, compared with an open loop control as well as the previous feedback control employing an external pump. Furthermore, this new capability empowers users to prescribe the droplet volume even below the previously considered minimum, allowing, for example, 1 : x (x < 1) mixing, in comparison to the previously considered n : m mixing (i.e., n and m unit droplets).

  7. ALL-ELECTRONIC DROPLET GENERATION ON-CHIP WITH REAL-TIME FEEDBACK CONTROL FOR EWOD DIGITIAL MICROFLUIDICS

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jian; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”

    2009-01-01

    Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) actuation enables digital (or droplet) microfluidics where small packets of liquids are manipulated on a two-dimensional surface. Due to its mechanical simplicity and low energy consumption, EWOD holds particular promise for portable systems. To improve volume precision of the droplets, which is desired for quantitative applications such as biochemical assays, existing practices would require near-perfect device fabricaion and operation conditions unless the droplets are generated under feedback control by an extra pump setup off of the chip. In this paper, we develop an all-electronic (i.e., no ancillary pumping) real-time feedback control of on-chip droplet generation. A fast voltage modulation, capacitance sensing, and discrete-time PID feedback controller are integrated on the operating electronic board. A significant improvement is obtained in the droplet volume uniformity, compared with an open loop control as well as the previous feedback control employing an external pump. Furthermore, this new capability empowers users to prescribe the droplet volume even below the previously considered minimum, allowing, for example, 1:x (x < 1) mixing, in comparison to the previously considered n:m mixing (i.e., n and m unit droplets). PMID:18497909

  8. Adsorption Processes in Spacecraft Environmental Control and Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Liese Dall; Finn, John E.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The environmental control and life support system on a spacecraft must maintain a safe and comfortable environment in which the crew can live and work. The system's functions include supplying the crew with oxygen and water as well as removing carbon dioxide, water vapor, and trace contaminants from cabin air. Although open-loop systems have been used in the past, logistics and safety factors of current and future missions in space make near-complete recycling of the cabin's air and water imperative. The recycling process may include separation and reduction of carbon dioxide, removal of trace gas-phase contaminants, recovery and purification of humidity condensate, purification and polishing of wastewater streams, and other processes. Several of these operations can be performed totally or in part by adsorption processes. These processes are frequently good candidates to perform separations and purifications in space due to their gravity independence, high reliability, relatively high energy efficiency, design flexibility, technological maturity, and regenerability. For these reasons, adsorption has historically played a key role in life support on U.S. and Russian piloted spacecraft. This article focuses on three current spacecraft life support applications that often use adsorption technology: gas-phase trace contaminant control, carbon dioxide removal from cabin air, and potable water recovery from waste streams. In each application, adsorption technology has been selected for use on the International Space Station. The requirements, science, and hardware for each of these applications are discussed. Eventually, human space exploration may lead to construction of planetary habitats. These habitats may provide additional opportunities for use of adsorption processes, such as control of greenhouse gas composition, and may have different requirements and resources available to them, such as gases present in the planetary atmosphere. Adsorption separation and

  9. Simulation and experiment research on the proportional pressure control of water-assisted injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Chen, Yinglong; Zhang, Zengmeng; Yang, Huayong

    2012-05-01

    Water-assisted injection molding (WAIM), a newly developed fluid-assisted injection molding technology has drawn more and more attentions for the energy saving, short cooling circle time and high quality of products. Existing research for the process of WAIM has shown that the pressure control of the injecting water is mostly important for the WAIM. However, the proportional pressure control for the WAIM system is quite complex due to the existence of nonlinearities in the water hydraulic system. In order to achieve better pressure control performance of the injecting water to meet the requirements of the WAIM, the proportional pressure control of the WAIM system is investigated both numerically and experimentally. A newly designed water hydraulic system for WAIM is first modeled in AMEsim environment, the load characteristics and the nonlinearities of water hydraulic system are both considered, then the main factors affecting the injecting pressure and load flow rate are extensively studied. Meanwhile, an open-loop model-based compensation control strategy is employed to regulate the water injection pressure and a feedback proportional integrator controller is further adopted to achieve better control performance. In order to verify the AMEsim simulation results WAIM experiment for particular Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) parts is implemented and the measured experimental data including injecting pressure and flow rate results are compared with the simulation. The good coincidence between experiment and simulation shows that the AMEsim model is accurate, and the tracking performance of the load pressure indicates that the proposed control strategy is effective for the proportional pressure control of the nonlinear WAIM system. The proposed proportional pressure control strategy and the conclusions drawn from simulation and experiment contribute to the application of water hydraulic proportional control and WAIM technology.

  10. Model-based rational feedback controller design for closed-loop deep brain stimulation of Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorzelic, P.; Schiff, S. J.; Sinha, A.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. To explore the use of classical feedback control methods to achieve an improved deep brain stimulation (DBS) algorithm for application to Parkinson's disease (PD). Approach. A computational model of PD dynamics was employed to develop model-based rational feedback controller design. The restoration of thalamocortical relay capabilities to patients suffering from PD is formulated as a feedback control problem with the DBS waveform serving as the control input. Two high-level control strategies are tested: one that is driven by an online estimate of thalamic reliability, and another that acts to eliminate substantial decreases in the inhibition from the globus pallidus interna (GPi) to the thalamus. Control laws inspired by traditional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) methodology are prescribed for each strategy and simulated on this computational model of the basal ganglia network. Main Results. For control based upon thalamic reliability, a strategy of frequency proportional control with proportional bias delivered the optimal control achieved for a given energy expenditure. In comparison, control based upon synaptic inhibitory output from the GPi performed very well in comparison with those of reliability-based control, with considerable further reduction in energy expenditure relative to that of open-loop DBS. The best controller performance was amplitude proportional with derivative control and integral bias, which is full PID control. We demonstrated how optimizing the three components of PID control is feasible in this setting, although the complexity of these optimization functions argues for adaptive methods in implementation. Significance. Our findings point to the potential value of model-based rational design of feedback controllers for Parkinson's disease.

  11. Design, optimization, and control of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko

    The contributions of this dissertation may be divided into four categories. The first category involves developing a systematic form-finding method for general and symmetric tensegrity structures. As an extension of the available results, different shape constraints are incorporated in the problem. Methods for treatment of these constraints are considered and proposed. A systematic formulation of the form-finding problem for symmetric tensegrity structures is introduced, and it uses the symmetry to reduce both the number of equations and the number of variables in the problem. The equilibrium analysis of modular tensegrities exploits their peculiar symmetry. The tensegrity similarity transformation completes the contributions in the area of enabling tools for tensegrity form-finding. The second group of contributions develops the methods for optimal mass-to-stiffness-ratio design of tensegrity structures. This technique represents the state-of-the-art for the static design of tensegrity structures. It is an extension of the results available for the topology optimization of truss structures. Besides guaranteeing that the final design satisfies the tensegrity paradigm, the problem constrains the structure from different modes of failure, which makes it very general. The open-loop control of the shape of modular tensegrities is the third contribution of the dissertation. This analytical result offers a closed form solution for the control of the reconfiguration of modular structures. Applications range from the deployment and stowing of large-scale space structures to the locomotion-inducing control for biologically inspired structures. The control algorithm is applicable regardless of the size of the structures, and it represents a very general result for a large class of tensegrities. Controlled deployments of large-scale tensegrity plates and tensegrity towers are shown as examples that demonstrate the full potential of this reconfiguration strategy. The last

  12. Feedback control of combustion instabilities from within limit cycle oscillations using H∞ loop-shaping and the ν-gap metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingxuan; Morgans, Aimee S.

    2016-07-01

    Combustion instabilities arise owing to a two-way coupling between acoustic waves and unsteady heat release. Oscillation amplitudes successively grow, until nonlinear effects cause saturation into limit cycle oscillations. Feedback control, in which an actuator modifies some combustor input in response to a sensor measurement, can suppress combustion instabilities. Linear feedback controllers are typically designed, using linear combustor models. However, when activated from within limit cycle, the linear model is invalid, and such controllers are not guaranteed to stabilize. This work develops a feedback control strategy guaranteed to stabilize from within limit cycle oscillations. A low-order model of a simple combustor, exhibiting the essential features of more complex systems, is presented. Linear plane acoustic wave modelling is combined with a weakly nonlinear describing function for the flame. The latter is determined numerically using a level set approach. Its implication is that the open-loop transfer function (OLTF) needed for controller design varies with oscillation level. The difference between the mean and the rest of the OLTFs is characterized using the ν-gap metric, providing the minimum required `robustness margin' for an H∞ loop-shaping controller. Such controllers are designed and achieve stability both for linear fluctuations and from within limit cycle oscillations.

  13. Feedback control of combustion instabilities from within limit cycle oscillations using H∞ loop-shaping and the ν-gap metric

    PubMed Central

    Morgans, Aimee S.

    2016-01-01

    Combustion instabilities arise owing to a two-way coupling between acoustic waves and unsteady heat release. Oscillation amplitudes successively grow, until nonlinear effects cause saturation into limit cycle oscillations. Feedback control, in which an actuator modifies some combustor input in response to a sensor measurement, can suppress combustion instabilities. Linear feedback controllers are typically designed, using linear combustor models. However, when activated from within limit cycle, the linear model is invalid, and such controllers are not guaranteed to stabilize. This work develops a feedback control strategy guaranteed to stabilize from within limit cycle oscillations. A low-order model of a simple combustor, exhibiting the essential features of more complex systems, is presented. Linear plane acoustic wave modelling is combined with a weakly nonlinear describing function for the flame. The latter is determined numerically using a level set approach. Its implication is that the open-loop transfer function (OLTF) needed for controller design varies with oscillation level. The difference between the mean and the rest of the OLTFs is characterized using the ν-gap metric, providing the minimum required ‘robustness margin’ for an H∞ loop-shaping controller. Such controllers are designed and achieve stability both for linear fluctuations and from within limit cycle oscillations. PMID:27493558

  14. Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre amplifiers with active phase control

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X L; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Y X; Ma, H T; Xu, X J; Liu, Z J; Zhao, Y J

    2011-12-31

    Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre lasers is a promising method for power scaling while simultaneously maintaining good beam quality. We propose and demonstrate a scalable architecture for coherent beam combining of all-fibre pulsed amplifiers with active phase control using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. A low-pass filter is introduced to eliminate the fluctuation of the metric function caused by pulsed lasers and to extract the exact phase noise signal. Active control is thereby based on the SPGD algorithm, resulting in stable coherent beam combining at the receiving plane even in a turbulent environment. Experimental results show that the fringe visibility of the long exposure pattern increases from 0 to 0.4, and the power encircled in the main-lobe increases by 1.6 times when the system evolves from the open-loop phase-locking scheme to the closed-loop scheme. This architecture can be easily scaled up to a higher power by increasing the number of amplifying channels and the power of a single amplifier.

  15. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: I. Rhythm generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2011-10-01

    Locomotion in mammals is controlled by a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) coupled to a biomechanical limb system, with afferent feedback to the spinal circuits and CPG closing the control loop. We have considered a simplified model of this system, in which the CPG establishes a rhythm when a supra-spinal activating drive is present and afferent signals from a single-joint limb feed back to affect CPG operation. Using dynamical system methods, in a series of two papers we analyze the mechanisms by which this model produces oscillations, and the characteristics of these oscillations, in the closed- and open-loop regimes. In this first paper, we analyze the phase transition mechanisms operating within the CPG and use the results to explain how afferent feedback allows oscillations to occur at a wider range of drive values to the CPG than the range over which oscillations occur in the CPG without feedback, and then to comment on why stronger feedback leads to faster oscillations. Linking these transitions to structures in the phase plane associated with the limb segment clarifies how increased weights of afferent feedback to the CPG can restore locomotion after removal of supra-spinal drive to simulate spinal cord injury.

  16. Distributed Smart Device for Monitoring, Control and Management of Electric Loads in Domotic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Ricardo; Badesa, Francisco J.; García-Aracil, Nicolas; Perez-Vidal, Carlos; Sabater, Jose María

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a microdevice for monitoring, control and management of electric loads at home. The key idea is to compact the electronic design as much as possible in order to install it inside a Schuko socket. Moreover, the electronic Schuko socket (electronic microdevice + Schuko socket) has the feature of communicating with a central unit and with other microdevices over the existing powerlines. Using the existing power lines, the proposed device can be installed in new buildings or in old ones. The main use of this device is to monitor, control and manage electric loads to save energy and prevent accidents produced by different kind of devices (e.g., iron) used in domestic tasks. The developed smart device is based on a single phase multifunction energy meter manufactured by Analog Devices (ADE7753) to measure the consumption of electrical energy and then to transmit it using a serial interface. To provide current measurement information to the ADE7753, an ultra flat SMD open loop integrated circuit current transducer based on the Hall effect principle manufactured by Lem (FHS-40P/SP600) has been used. Moreover, each smart device has a PL-3120 smart transceiver manufactured by LonWorks to execute the user's program, to communicate with the ADE7753 via serial interface and to transmit information to the central unit via powerline communication. Experimental results show the exactitude of the measurements made using the developed smart device. PMID:22778581

  17. Distributed smart device for monitoring, control and management of electric loads in domotic environments.

    PubMed

    Morales, Ricardo; Badesa, Francisco J; García-Aracil, Nicolas; Perez-Vidal, Carlos; Sabater, Jose María

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a microdevice for monitoring, control and management of electric loads at home. The key idea is to compact the electronic design as much as possible in order to install it inside a Schuko socket. Moreover, the electronic Schuko socket (electronic microdevice + Schuko socket) has the feature of communicating with a central unit and with other microdevices over the existing powerlines. Using the existing power lines, the proposed device can be installed in new buildings or in old ones. The main use of this device is to monitor, control and manage electric loads to save energy and prevent accidents produced by different kind of devices (e.g., iron) used in domestic tasks. The developed smart device is based on a single phase multifunction energy meter manufactured by Analog Devices (ADE7753) to measure the consumption of electrical energy and then to transmit it using a serial interface. To provide current measurement information to the ADE7753, an ultra flat SMD open loop integrated circuit current transducer based on the Hall effect principle manufactured by Lem (FHS-40P/SP600) has been used. Moreover, each smart device has a PL-3120 smart transceiver manufactured by LonWorks to execute the user's program, to communicate with the ADE7753 via serial interface and to transmit information to the central unit via powerline communication. Experimental results show the exactitude of the measurements made using the developed smart device.

  18. Coupled rotor-fuselage vibration reduction with multiple frequency blade pitch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear coupled rotor/flexible fuselage analysis has been developed and used to study the effects of higher harmonic blade pitch control on the vibratory hub loads and fuselage acceleration levels. Previous results, obtained with this model have shown that conventional higher harmonic control (HHC) inputs aimed at hub shear reduction cause an increase in the fuselage accelerations and vice-versa. It was also found that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselage accelerations, a pitch input representing a combination of two higher harmonic components of different frequencies was needed. Subsequently, it was found that this input could not be implemented through a conventional swashplate. This paper corrects a mistake originally made in the representation of the multiple frequency pitch input and shows that such a pitch input can be only implemented in the rotating reference frame. A rigorous mathematical solution is found, for the pitch input in the rotating reference frame, which produces simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselage acceleration. New insight on vibration reduction in coupled rotor/fuselage systems is obtained from the sensitivity of hub shears to the frequency and amplitude of the open loop HHC signal in the rotating reference frame. Finally the role of fuselage flexibility in this class of problems is determined.

  19. Frequency-induced changes in interlimb interactions: increasing manifestations of closed-loop control.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Betteco J; Peper, C Lieke E; Beek, Peter J

    2011-06-20

    In bimanual coordination, interactions between the limbs result in attraction to in-phase and antiphase coordination. Increasing movement frequency leads to decreasing stability of antiphase coordination, often resulting in a transition to the more stable in-phase pattern. It is unknown, however, how this frequency-induced loss of stability is engendered in terms of the interlimb interactions underwriting bimanual coordination. The present study was conducted to help resolve this issue. Using an established method (based on comparison of various unimanual and bimanual tasks involving both passive and active movements), three sources of interlimb interaction were dissociated: (1) integrated timing of feedforward signals, (2) afference-based correction of relative phase errors, and (3) phase entrainment by contralateral afference. Results indicated that phase entrainment strength remained unaffected by frequency and that the stabilizing effects of error correction and integrated timing decreased with increasing frequency. Their contributions, however, reflected an interesting interplay as frequency increased. For moderate frequencies coordinative stability was predominantly secured by integrated timing processes. However, at high frequencies, the stabilization of the antiphase pattern required combined contributions of both integrated timing and error correction. In sum, increasing frequency was found to induce a shift from predominantly open-loop control to more closed-loop control. The results may be accounted for by means of an internal forward model for sensorimotor integration in which the sensory signals are compared to values predicted on the basis of efference copies.

  20. Design of a linear-motion dual-stage actuation system for precision control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Tang, J.; El Deeb, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Actuators with high linear-motion speed, high positioning resolution and a long motion stroke are needed in many precision machining systems. In some current systems, voice coil motors (VCMs) are implemented for servo control. While the voice coil motors may provide the long motion stroke needed in many applications, the main obstacle that hinders the improvement of the machining accuracy and efficiency is their limited bandwidth. To fundamentally solve this issue, we propose to develop a dual-stage actuation system that consists of a voice coil motor that covers the coarse motion, and a piezoelectric stack actuator that induces the fine motion, thus enhancing the positioning accuracy. The focus of this present research is the mechatronics design and synthesis of the new actuation system. In particular, a flexure hinge based mechanism is developed to provide a motion guide and preload to the piezoelectric stack actuator that is serially connected to the voice coil motor. This mechanism is built upon parallel plane flexure hinges. A series of numerical and experimental studies are carried out to facilitate the system design and the model identification. The effectiveness of the proposed system is demonstrated through open-loop studies and preliminary closed-loop control practice. While the primary goal of this particular design is aimed at enhancing optical lens machining, the concept and approach outlined are generic and can be extended to a variety of applications.

  1. Interferometric adaptive optics testbed for laser pointing, wave-front control and phasing.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Homoelle, D; Utternback, E; Stappaerts, E A; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2009-09-14

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing, intra-beam phasing and overall wave-front quality. In this article experimental results are presented which were taken on an interferometric adaptive optics testbed that was designed and built to test the capabilities of such a system to control phasing, pointing and higher order beam aberrations. These measurements included quantification of the reduction in Strehl ratio incurred when using the MEMS device to correct for pointing errors in the system. The interferometric adaptive optics system achieved a Strehl ratio of 0.83 when correcting for a piston, tip/tilt error between two adjacent rectangular apertures, the geometry expected for the National ignition Facility. The interferometric adaptive optics system also achieved a Strehl ratio of 0.66 when used to correct for a phase plate aberration of similar magnitude as expected from simulations of the ARC beam line. All of these corrections included measuring both the upstream and downstream aberrations in the testbed and applying the sum of these two measurements in open-loop to the MEMS deformable mirror.

  2. Interferometric adaptive optics testbed for laser pointing, wave-front control and phasing.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Homoelle, D; Utternback, E; Stappaerts, E A; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2009-09-14

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing, intra-beam phasing and overall wave-front quality. In this article experimental results are presented which were taken on an interferometric adaptive optics testbed that was designed and built to test the capabilities of such a system to control phasing, pointing and higher order beam aberrations. These measurements included quantification of the reduction in Strehl ratio incurred when using the MEMS device to correct for pointing errors in the system. The interferometric adaptive optics system achieved a Strehl ratio of 0.83 when correcting for a piston, tip/tilt error between two adjacent rectangular apertures, the geometry expected for the National ignition Facility. The interferometric adaptive optics system also achieved a Strehl ratio of 0.66 when used to correct for a phase plate aberration of similar magnitude as expected from simulations of the ARC beam line. All of these corrections included measuring both the upstream and downstream aberrations in the testbed and applying the sum of these two measurements in open-loop to the MEMS deformable mirror. PMID:19770884

  3. Selected Flight Test Results for Online Learning Neural Network-Based Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peggy S.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System project team has developed a series of flight control concepts designed to demonstrate the benefits of a neural network-based adaptive controller. The objective of the team is to develop and flight-test control systems that use neural network technology to optimize the performance of the aircraft under nominal conditions as well as stabilize the aircraft under failure conditions. Failure conditions include locked or failed control surfaces as well as unforeseen damage that might occur to the aircraft in flight. This report presents flight-test results for an adaptive controller using stability and control derivative values from an online learning neural network. A dynamic cell structure neural network is used in conjunction with a real-time parameter identification algorithm to estimate aerodynamic stability and control derivative increments to the baseline aerodynamic derivatives in flight. This set of open-loop flight tests was performed in preparation for a future phase of flights in which the learning neural network and parameter identification algorithm output would provide the flight controller with aerodynamic stability and control derivative updates in near real time. Two flight maneuvers are analyzed a pitch frequency sweep and an automated flight-test maneuver designed to optimally excite the parameter identification algorithm in all axes. Frequency responses generated from flight data are compared to those obtained from nonlinear simulation runs. An examination of flight data shows that addition of the flight-identified aerodynamic derivative increments into the simulation improved the pitch handling qualities of the aircraft.

  4. PI controller design of a wind turbine: evaluation of the pole-placement method and tuning using constrained optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Mahmood; Tibaldi, Carlo; Hansen, Morten H.

    2016-09-01

    PI/PID controllers are the most common wind turbine controllers. Normally a first tuning is obtained using methods such as pole-placement or Ziegler-Nichols and then extensive aeroelastic simulations are used to obtain the best tuning in terms of regulation of the outputs and reduction of the loads. In the traditional tuning approaches, the properties of different open loop and closed loop transfer functions of the system are not normally considered. In this paper, an assessment of the pole-placement tuning method is presented based on robustness measures. Then a constrained optimization setup is suggested to automatically tune the wind turbine controller subject to robustness constraints. The properties of the system such as the maximum sensitivity and complementary sensitivity functions (Ms and Mt ), along with some of the responses of the system, are used to investigate the controller performance and formulate the optimization problem. The cost function is the integral absolute error (IAE) of the rotational speed from a disturbance modeled as a step in wind speed. Linearized model of the DTU 10-MW reference wind turbine is obtained using HAWCStab2. Thereafter, the model is reduced with model order reduction. The trade-off curves are given to assess the tunings of the poles- placement method and a constrained optimization problem is solved to find the best tuning.

  5. Alleviation of whirl-flutter on a joined-wing tilt-rotor aircraft configuration using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanaken, Johannes M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using active controls to delay the onset of whirl-flutter on a joined-wing tilt rotor aircraft was investigated. The CAMRAD/JA code was used to obtain a set of linear differential equations which describe the motion of the joined-wing tilt-rotor aircraft. The hub motions due to wing/body motion is a standard input to CAMRAD/JA and were obtained from a structural dynamics model of a representative joined-wing tilt-rotor aircraft. The CAMRAD/JA output, consisting of the open-loop system matrices, and the airframe free vibration motion were input to a separate program which performed the closed-loop, active control calculations. An eigenvalue analysis was performed to determine the flutter stability of both open- and closed-loop systems. Sensor models, based upon the feedback of pure state variables and based upon hub-mounted sensors, providing physically measurable accelerations, were evaluated. It was shown that the onset of tilt-rotor whirl-flutter could be delayed from 240 to above 270 knots by feeding back vertical and span-wise accelerations, measured at the rotor hub, to the longitudinal cyclic pitch. Time response calculations at a 270-knot cruise condition showed an active cyclic pitch control level of 0.009 deg, which equates to a very acceptable 9 pound active-control force applied at the rotor hub.

  6. Interaction between beam control and rf feedback loops for high Q cavities an heavy beam loading. Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    Mestha, L.K.; Kwan, C.M.; Yeung, K.S.

    1994-04-01

    An open-loop state space model of all the major low-level rf feedback control loops is derived. The model has control and state variables for fast-cycling machines to apply modern multivariable feedback techniques. A condition is derived to know when exactly we can cross the boundaries between time-varying and time-invariant approaches for a fast-cycling machine like the Low Energy Booster (LEB). The conditions are dependent on the Q of the cavity and the rate at which the frequency changes with time. Apart from capturing the time-variant characteristics, the errors in the magnetic field are accounted in the model to study the effects on synchronization with the Medium Energy Booster (MEB). The control model is useful to study the effects on beam control due to heavy beam loading at high intensities, voltage transients just after injection especially due to time-varying voltages, instability thresholds created by the cavity tuning feedback system, cross coupling between feedback loops with and without direct rf feedback etc. As a special case we have shown that the model agrees with the well known Pedersen model derived for the CERN PS booster. As an application of the model we undertook a detailed study of the cross coupling between the loops by considering all of them at once for varying time, Q and beam intensities. A discussion of the method to identify the coupling is shown. At the end a summary of the identified loop interactions is presented.

  7. Adsorption processes in spacecraft environmental control and life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DallBauman, L. A.; Finn, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    The environmental control and life support system on a spacecraft maintains a safe and comfortable environment in which the crew can live and work by supplying oxygen and water and by removing carbon dioxide, water vapor, and trace contaminants from cabin air. Although open-loop systems have been used successfully in the past for short-duration missions, the economics of current and future long-duration missions in space will make nearly complete recycling of air and water imperative. A variety of operations will be necessary to achieve the goal of nearly complete recycling. These include separation and reduction of carbon dioxide, removal of trace gas-phase contaminants, recovery and purification of humidity condensate, purification and polishing of wastewater streams, and others. Several of these can be performed totally or in part by adsorption processes. These processes are good candidates to perform separations and purifications in space due to their gravity independence, high reliability, relative high energy efficiency, design flexibility, technological maturity, and regenerative nature. For these reasons, adsorption has historically played a key role in life support on U.S. and Russian piloted spacecraft. Among the life support applications that can be achieved through use of adsorption technology are removal of trace contaminants and carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovery of potable water from waste streams. In each of these cases adsorption technology has been selected for use onboard the International Space Station. The requirements, science, and hardware for these applications are discussed. Human space exploration may eventually lead to construction of planetary habitats. These habitats may provide additional opportunities for use of adsorption processes, such as control of greenhouse gas composition, and may have different resources available to them, such as gases present in the planetary atmosphere. Separation and purification processes based on

  8. New experimental approaches to the biology of flight control systems.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Bacic, Marko; Bomphrey, Richard J; Carruthers, Anna C; Gillies, James; Walker, Simon M; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2008-01-01

    Here we consider how new experimental approaches in biomechanics can be used to attain a systems-level understanding of the dynamics of animal flight control. Our aim in this paper is not to provide detailed results and analysis, but rather to tackle several conceptual and methodological issues that have stood in the way of experimentalists in achieving this goal, and to offer tools for overcoming these. We begin by discussing the interplay between analytical and empirical methods, emphasizing that the structure of the models we use to analyse flight control dictates the empirical measurements we must make in order to parameterize them. We then provide a conceptual overview of tethered-flight paradigms, comparing classical ;open-loop' and ;closed-loop' setups, and describe a flight simulator that we have recently developed for making flight dynamics measurements on tethered insects. Next, we provide a conceptual overview of free-flight paradigms, focusing on the need to use system identification techniques in order to analyse the data they provide, and describe two new techniques that we have developed for making flight dynamics measurements on freely flying birds. First, we describe a technique for obtaining inertial measurements of the orientation, angular velocity and acceleration of a steppe eagle Aquila nipalensis in wide-ranging free flight, together with synchronized measurements of wing and tail kinematics using onboard instrumentation and video cameras. Second, we describe a photogrammetric method to measure the 3D wing kinematics of the eagle during take-off and landing. In each case, we provide demonstration data to illustrate the kinds of information available from each method. We conclude by discussing the prospects for systems-level analyses of flight control using these techniques and others like them.

  9. Adsorption processes in spacecraft environmental control and life support systems.

    PubMed

    DallBauman, L A; Finn, J E

    1999-01-01

    The environmental control and life support system on a spacecraft maintains a safe and comfortable environment in which the crew can live and work by supplying oxygen and water and by removing carbon dioxide, water vapor, and trace contaminants from cabin air. Although open-loop systems have been used successfully in the past for short-duration missions, the economics of current and future long-duration missions in space will make nearly complete recycling of air and water imperative. A variety of operations will be necessary to achieve the goal of nearly complete recycling. These include separation and reduction of carbon dioxide, removal of trace gas-phase contaminants, recovery and purification of humidity condensate, purification and polishing of wastewater streams, and others. Several of these can be performed totally or in part by adsorption processes. These processes are good candidates to perform separations and purifications in space due to their gravity independence, high reliability, relative high energy efficiency, design flexibility, technological maturity, and regenerative nature. For these reasons, adsorption has historically played a key role in life support on U.S. and Russian piloted spacecraft. Among the life support applications that can be achieved through use of adsorption technology are removal of trace contaminants and carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovery of potable water from waste streams. In each of these cases adsorption technology has been selected for use onboard the International Space Station. The requirements, science, and hardware for these applications are discussed. Human space exploration may eventually lead to construction of planetary habitats. These habitats may provide additional opportunities for use of adsorption processes, such as control of greenhouse gas composition, and may have different resources available to them, such as gases present in the planetary atmosphere. Separation and purification processes based on

  10. Feedback control of HfO{sub 2} etch processing in inductively coupled Cl{sub 2}/N{sub 2}/Ar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chaung; Leou, K.-C.; Li, T.-C.; Lee, L.-S.; Tzeng, P.-J.

    2008-09-15

    The etch rate of HfO{sub 2} etch processing has been feedback controlled in inductively coupled Cl{sub 2}/N{sub 2}/Ar plasmas. The ion current and the root mean square rf voltage on the wafer stage, which are measured using a commercial impedance meter connected to the wafer stage, are chosen as controlled variables because the positive-ion flux and ion energy incident upon the wafer surface are the key factors that determine the etch rate. Two 13.56 MHz rf generators are used to adjust the inductively coupled plasma power and bias power which control ion density and ion energy, respectively. The adopted HfO{sub 2} etch processing used rather low rf voltage. The ion-current value obtained by the power/voltage method is underestimated, so the neural-network model was developed to assist estimating the correct ion-current value. The experimental results show that the etch-rate variation of the closed-loop control is smaller than that of the open-loop control. However, the first wafer effect cannot be eliminated using closed-loop control and thus to achieve a constant etch rate, the chamber-conditioning procedure is required in this etch processing.

  11. Development of microheaters for gas sensor with an AT-Mega 8535 temperature controller using a PWM (pulse width modulation) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megayanti, Meti; Panatarani, Camellia; Joni, I. Made

    2016-03-01

    Microheater is the main component in gas sensor characterized by their sensitivity, selectivity, and time response of gas sensor which is depend on the microheater temperature stability. A Cu microheater was developed and utilized AT-Mega 8535 controller using a PWM (pulse width modulation) method. This control system is interfaced to the PC to observe the real time temperature response of the microheater. Three initial resistance (R0) variations of microheater were developed in an open loop control system. The power characteristic of designed microheater depends on the specified microheater initial resistance. The smaller R0, the less power required to reach a temperature setting value. The developed microheater was designed to reach a temperature setting value of 250°C having resistance 0.531 Ω for 1.979 Watt and 0.265 Ω for 1.072 Watt respectively. The results of the investigation on the control performances shows microheater-control system achieved operating temperature up to 250°C. The response of the temperature control shows smallest R0 resulted in a high stability with short settling time, short delay time and small ripple for temperature setting values higher than 150°C. The obtained error of microheater temperature with R0 = 0.265 is 8.596 %. It is concluded that the developed microheater can be utilized as a component of a gas sensor.

  12. Model control of image processing for telerobotics and biomedical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, An Huu

    1993-06-01

    This thesis has model control of image processing (MCIP) as its major theme. By this it is meant that there is a top-down model approach which already knows the structure of the image to be processed. This top-down image processing under model control is used further as visual feedback to control robots and as feedforward information for biomedical instrumentation. The software engineering of the bioengineering instrumentation image processing is defined in terms of the task and the tools available. Early bottom-up image processing such as thresholding occurs only within the top-down control regions of interest (ROI's) or operating windows. Moment computation is an important bottom-up procedure as well as pyramiding to attain rapid computation, among other considerations in attaining programming efficiencies. A distinction is made between initialization procedures and stripped down run time operations. Even more detailed engineering design considerations are considered with respect to the ellipsoidal modeling of objects. Here the major axis orientation is an important additional piece of information, beyond the centroid moments. Careful analysis of various sources of errors and considerable benchmarking characterized the detailed considerations of the software engineering of the image processing procedures. Image processing for robotic control involves a great deal of 3D calibration of the robot working environment (RWE). Of special interest is the idea of adapting the machine scanpath to the current task. It was important to pay careful attention to the hardware aspects of the control of the toy robots that were used to demonstrate the general methodology. It was necessary to precalibrate the open loop gains for all motors so that after initialization the visual feedback, which depends on MCIP, would be able to supply enough information quickly enough to the control algorithms to govern the robots under a variety of control configurations and task operations

  13. Temporal sequence learning, prediction, and control: a review of different models and their relation to biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wörgötter, Florentin; Porr, Bernd

    2005-02-01

    In this review, we compare methods for temporal sequence learning (TSL) across the disciplines machine-control, classical conditioning, neuronal models for TSL as well as spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). This review introduces the most influential models and focuses on two questions: To what degree are reward-based (e.g., TD learning) and correlation-based (Hebbian) learning related? and How do the different models correspond to possibly underlying biological mechanisms of synaptic plasticity? We first compare the different models in an open-loop condition, where behavioral feedback does not alter the learning. Here we observe that reward-based and correlation-based learning are indeed very similar. Machine control is then used to introduce the problem of closed-loop control (e.g., actor-critic architectures). Here the problem of evaluative (rewards) versus nonevaluative (correlations) feedback from the environment will be discussed, showing that both learning approaches are fundamentally different in the closed-loop condition. In trying to answer the second question, we compare neuronal versions of the different learning architectures to the anatomy of the involved brain structures (basal-ganglia, thalamus, and cortex) and the molecular biophysics of glutamatergic and dopaminergic synapses. Finally, we discuss the different algorithms used to model STDP and compare them to reward-based learning rules. Certain similarities are found in spite of the strongly different timescales. Here we focus on the biophysics of the different calcium-release mechanisms known to be involved in STDP. PMID:15720770

  14. Optimal locations of piezoelectric patches for supersonic flutter control of honeycomb sandwich panels, using the NSGA-II method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezami, M.; Gholami, B.

    2016-03-01

    The active flutter control of supersonic sandwich panels with regular honeycomb interlayers under impact load excitation is studied using piezoelectric patches. A non-dominated sorting-based multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) is suggested to find the optimal locations for different numbers of piezoelectric actuator/sensor pairs. Quasi-steady first order supersonic piston theory is employed to define aerodynamic loading and the p-method is applied to find the flutter bounds. Hamilton’s principle in conjunction with the generalized Fourier expansions and Galerkin method are used to develop the dynamical model of the structural systems in the state-space domain. The classical Runge-Kutta time integration algorithm is then used to calculate the open-loop aeroelastic response of the system. The maximum flutter velocity and minimum voltage applied to actuators are calculated according to the optimal locations of piezoelectric patches obtained using the NSGA-II and then the proportional feedback is used to actively suppress the closed loop system response. Finally the control effects, using the two different controllers, are compared.

  15. Design and experimental research of a high-precision wavelength controller for tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Hai-bing; Wei, Shu-hua; Wei, Chen

    2013-03-01

    A high-precision wavelength controller is presented in this paper. It is necessary to find out the difference between the central wavelength of a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) filter and that of the input laser, while the wavelength controller operates at the states of wavelength-scanning and wavelength-locking modes. Firstly, a dynamic simulation model of tunable FFP filter is established, and the dynamic characteristic of tunable FFP filter modulated by an alternating current (AC) signal is simulated. Then the measuring time at wavelength-scanning mode compared with the theory time is discussed, and this time difference shows the difference between the central wavelength of a tunable FFP filter and that of the input laser. At last, the effects on wavelength-locking precision of time delays, including the time delay of opened-loop circuit, the time constant of the closed-loop circuit and the intrinsic hysteresis of piezoelectric (PZT) element, are analyzed. A wavelength controller of tunable FFP filter is designed and prepared. The experimental results at wavelength-locking mode show that a high locking precision is obtained.

  16. Experimental investigation of fuel cell dynamic response and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Keith A.; Keith, Warren T.; Marcel, Michael J.; Haskew, Timothy A.; Shepard, W. Steve; Todd, Beth A.

    An experimental study of the dynamic response of a commercial fuel cell system is presented in this work. The primary goal of the research is an examination of the feasibility for using fuel cells in a load-following mode for vehicular applications, where load-following implies that the fuel cell system provides the power necessary for transient responses without the use of additional energy storage elements, such as batteries or super-capacitors. The dynamic response of fuel cell systems used in the load-following mode may have implications for safe and efficient operation of vehicles. To that end, a DC-DC converter was used to port the power output of the fuel cell to a resistive load using a pulse-width-modulating circuit. Frequency responses of the system were evaluated at a variety of DC offsets and AC amplitudes of the PWM duty cycle from 1 out to 400 Hz. Open-loop transient responses are then evaluated using transitions from 10% to 90% duty cycle levels, followed by dwells at the 90% level and then transitions back to the 10% level. A classical proportional-integral controller was then developed and used to close the loop around the system, with the result that the fuel cell system was driven to track the same transient. The controller was then used to drive the fuel cell system according to a reference power signal, which was a scaled-down copy of the simulated power output from an internal combustion engine powering a conventional automobile through the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS). The results showed that the fuel cell system is capable of tracking transient signals with sufficient fidelity such that it should be applicable for use in a load-following mode for vehicular applications. The results also highlight important issues that must be addressed in considering vehicular applications of fuel cells, such as the power conditioning circuit efficiency and the effect of stack heating on the system response.

  17. Rotor blade-vortex interaction noise reduction and vibration using higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The use of higher harmonic control (HHC) of blade pitch to reduce blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is examined by means of a rotor acoustic test. A dynamically scaled, four-bladed, articulated rotor model was tested in a heavy gas (Freon-12) medium. Acoustic and vibration measurements were made for a large range of matched flight conditions where prescribed (open loop) HHC pitch schedules were superimposed on the normal (baseline) collective and cyclic trim pitch. A novel sound power measurement technique was developed to take advantage of the reverberance in the hard walled tunnel. Quantitative sound power results are presented for a 4/rev (4P) collective pitch HHC. By comparing the results using 4P HHC to corresponding baseline (no HHC) conditions, significant midfrequency noise reductions of 5-6 dB are found for low-speed descent conditions where BVI is most intense. For other flight conditions, noise is found to increase with the use of HHC. LF loading noise, as well as fixed and rotating frame vibration levels, show increased levels.

  18. Ship Compliance in Emission Control Areas: Technology Costs and Policy Instruments.

    PubMed

    Carr, Edward W; Corbett, James J

    2015-08-18

    This paper explores whether a Panama Canal Authority pollution tax could be an effective economic instrument to achieve Emission Control Area (ECA)-like reductions in emissions from ships transiting the Panama Canal. This tariff-based policy action, whereby vessels in compliance with International Maritime Organisation (IMO) ECA standards pay a lower transit tariff than noncompliant vessels, could be a feasible alternative to petitioning for a Panamanian ECA through the IMO. A $4.06/container fuel tax could incentivize ECA-compliant emissions reductions for nearly two-thirds of Panama Canal container vessels, mainly through fuel switching; if the vessel(s) also operate in IMO-defined ECAs, exhaust-gas treatment technologies may be cost-effective. The RATES model presented here compares current abatement technologies based on hours of operation within an ECA, computing costs for a container vessel to comply with ECA standards in addition to computing the Canal tax that would reduce emissions in Panama. Retrofitted open-loop scrubbers are cost-effective only for vessels operating within an ECA for more than 4500 h annually. Fuel switching is the least-cost option to industry for vessels that operate mostly outside of ECA regions, whereas vessels operating entirely within an ECA region could reduce compliance cost with exhaust-gas treatment technology (scrubbers).

  19. Ship Compliance in Emission Control Areas: Technology Costs and Policy Instruments.

    PubMed

    Carr, Edward W; Corbett, James J

    2015-08-18

    This paper explores whether a Panama Canal Authority pollution tax could be an effective economic instrument to achieve Emission Control Area (ECA)-like reductions in emissions from ships transiting the Panama Canal. This tariff-based policy action, whereby vessels in compliance with International Maritime Organisation (IMO) ECA standards pay a lower transit tariff than noncompliant vessels, could be a feasible alternative to petitioning for a Panamanian ECA through the IMO. A $4.06/container fuel tax could incentivize ECA-compliant emissions reductions for nearly two-thirds of Panama Canal container vessels, mainly through fuel switching; if the vessel(s) also operate in IMO-defined ECAs, exhaust-gas treatment technologies may be cost-effective. The RATES model presented here compares current abatement technologies based on hours of operation within an ECA, computing costs for a container vessel to comply with ECA standards in addition to computing the Canal tax that would reduce emissions in Panama. Retrofitted open-loop scrubbers are cost-effective only for vessels operating within an ECA for more than 4500 h annually. Fuel switching is the least-cost option to industry for vessels that operate mostly outside of ECA regions, whereas vessels operating entirely within an ECA region could reduce compliance cost with exhaust-gas treatment technology (scrubbers). PMID:26258438

  20. Investigation of Combustion Control in a Dump Combustor Using the Feedback Free Fluidic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Eric J.; Casiano, Matthew J.; Anderson, William E.; Heister, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    A feedback free fluidic oscillator was designed and integrated into a single element rocket combustor with the goal of suppressing longitudinal combustion instabilities. The fluidic oscillator uses internal fluid dynamics to create an unsteady outlet jet at a specific frequency. An array of nine fluidic oscillators was tested to mimic modulated secondary oxidizer injection into the combustor dump plane. The combustor has a coaxial injector that uses gaseous methane and decomposed hydrogen peroxide with an overall O/F ratio of 11.7. A sonic choke plate on an actuator arm allows for continuous adjustment of the oxidizer post acoustics enabling the study of a variety of instability magnitudes. The fluidic oscillator unsteady outlet jet performance is compared against equivalent steady jet injection and a baseline design with no secondary oxidizer injection. At the most unstable operating conditions, the unsteady outlet jet saw a 67% reduction in the instability pressure oscillation magnitude when compared to the steady jet and baseline data. Additionally, computational fluid dynamics analysis of the combustor gives insight into the flow field interaction of the fluidic oscillators. The results indicate that open loop high frequency propellant modulation for combustion control can be achieved through fluidic devices that require no moving parts or electrical power to operate.

  1. FES control of isometric forces in the rat hindlimb using many muscles.

    PubMed

    Jarc, Anthony M; Berniker, Max; Tresch, Matthew C

    2013-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) attempts to restore motor behaviors to paralyzed limbs by electrically stimulating nerves and/or muscles. This restoration of behavior requires specifying commands to a large number of muscles, each making an independent contribution to the ongoing behavior. Efforts to develop FES systems in humans have generally been limited to preprogrammed, fixed muscle activation patterns. The development and evaluation of more sophisticated FES control strategies is difficult to accomplish in humans, mainly because of the limited access of patients for FES experiments. Here, we developed an in vivo FES test platform using a rat model that is capable of using many muscles for control and that can therefore be used to evaluate potential strategies for developing flexible FES control strategies. We first validated this FES test platform by showing consistent force responses to repeated stimulation, monotonically increasing muscle recruitment with constant force directions, and linear summation of costimulated muscles. These results demonstrate that we are able to differentially control the activation of many muscles, despite the small size of the rat hindlimb. We then demonstrate the utility of this platform to test potential FES control strategies, using it to test our ability to effectively produce open-loop control of isometric forces. We show that we are able to use this preparation to produce a range of endpoint forces flexibly and with good accuracy. We suggest that this platform will aid in FES controller design, development, and evaluation, thus accelerating the development of effective FES applications for the restoration of movement in paralyzed patients.

  2. Control Relevant Modeling and Design of Scramjet-Powered Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickeson, Jeffrey James

    This report provides an overview of scramjet-powered hypersonic vehicle modeling and control challenges. Such vehicles are characterized by unstable non-minimum phase dynamics with significant coupling and low thrust margins. Recent trends in hypersonic vehicle research are summarized. To illustrate control relevant design issues and tradeoffs, a generic nonlinear 3DOF longitudinal dynamics model capturing aero-elastic-propulsive interactions for wedge-shaped vehicle is used. Limitations of the model are discussed and numerous modifications have been made to address control relevant needs. Two different baseline configurations are examined over a two-stage to orbit ascent trajectory. The report highlights how vehicle level-flight static (trim) and dynamic properties change over the trajectory. Thermal choking constraints are imposed on control system design as a direct consequence of having a finite FER margin. The implication of this state-dependent nonlinear FER margin constraint, the right half plane (RHP) zero, and lightly damped flexible modes, on control system bandwidth (BW) and FPA tracking has been discussed. A control methodology has been proposed that addresses the above dynamics while providing some robustness to modeling uncertainty. Vehicle closure (the ability to fly a trajectory segment subject to constraints) is provided through a proposed vehicle design methodology. The design method attempts to use open loop metrics whenever possible to design the vehicle. The design method is applied to a vehicle/control law closed loop nonlinear simulation for validation. The 3DOF longitudinal modeling results are validated against a newly released NASA 6DOF code.

  3. Effect of contrast on the active control of a moving line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li; Sweet, Barbara T.; Stone, Leland S.

    2005-01-01

    In many passive visual tasks, human perceptual judgments are contrast dependent. To explore whether these contrast dependencies of visual perception also affect closed-loop manual control tasks, we examined visuomotor performance as humans actively controlled a moving luminance-defined line over a range of contrasts. Four subjects were asked to use a joystick to keep a horizontal line centered on a display as its vertical position was perturbed by a sum of sinusoids under two control regimes. The total root mean square (RMS) position error decreased quasi-linearly with increasing log contrast across the tested range (mean slope across subjects: -8.0 and -7.7% per log2 contrast, for the two control regimes, respectively). Frequency-response (Bode) plots showed a systematic increase in open-loop gain (mean slope: 1.44 and 1.30 dB per log2 contrast, respectively), and decrease in phase lag with increasing contrast, which can be accounted for by a decrease in response time delay (mean slope: 32 and 40 ms per log2 contrast, respectively). The performance data are well fit by a Crossover Model proposed by McRuer and Krendel, which allowed us to identify both visual position and motion cues driving performance. This analysis revealed that the position and motion cues used to support manual control under both control regimes appear equally sensitive to changes in stimulus contrast. In conclusion, our data show that active control of a moving visual stimulus is as dependent on contrast as passive perception and suggest that this effect is attributed to a shared contrast sensitivity early in the visual pathway, before any specialization for motion processing.

  4. Analysis and performance of the control systems of the NASA 70-meter antennas.

    PubMed

    Gawronski, Wodek; Ahlstrom, Harlow G; Bernardo, Abner M

    2004-10-01

    The control systems of the NASA 70-m antennas include the antenna control system, the Master Equatorial (ME) control system, and their combinations (called modes). The Master Equatorial is a small telescope mounted on the top of a tower located inside the antenna structure. In the Antenna Encoder mode antenna encoders are used to close the feedback loop. In the Autocollimator mode the Master Equatorial is a master that follows a target, and the antenna is a slave that follows the Master Equatorial. In the Master Equatorial Encoder mode the "master-slave" relationship is reversed. In the paper the analysis begins with the description of the open-loop models of the antenna and of the Master Equatorial. We obtained the models by using field test data and system identification techniques. Next, we analyzed and evaluated the performance of the three modes of the antenna control system. The analysis showed that the Autocollimator and Master Equatorial Encoder tracking modes are feasible for high-rate tracking, and that the latter mode has the smallest tracking error. Finally, we analyzed the switching between antenna modes, necessary while tracking near the keyhold. We showed that switching causes jerks of magnitudes within the acceptable threshold. The contribution of this paper includes the development of the antenna model using field data and system identification procedures, the development of the LQG control algorithm for the 70-meter antenna, the development of two control cooperating systems (antenna and ME), identifying the more appropriate, and analyzing of switching between the two control systems.

  5. Integrated active and passive control design methodology for the LaRC CSI evolutionary model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voth, Christopher T.; Richards, Kenneth E., Jr.; Schmitz, Eric; Gehling, Russel N.; Morgenthaler, Daniel R.

    1994-01-01

    A general design methodology to integrate active control with passive damping was demonstrated on the NASA LaRC CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM), a ground testbed for future large, flexible spacecraft. Vibration suppression controllers designed for Line-of Sight (LOS) minimization were successfully implemented on the CEM. A frequency-shaped H2 methodology was developed, allowing the designer to specify the roll-off of the MIMO compensator. A closed loop bandwidth of 4 Hz, including the six rigid body modes and the first three dominant elastic modes of the CEM was achieved. Good agreement was demonstrated between experimental data and analytical predictions for the closed loop frequency response and random tests. Using the Modal Strain Energy (MSE) method, a passive damping treatment consisting of 60 viscoelastically damped struts was designed, fabricated and implemented on the CEM. Damping levels for the targeted modes were more than an order of magnitude larger than for the undamped structure. Using measured loss and stiffness data for the individual damped struts, analytical predictions of the damping levels were very close to the experimental values in the (1-10) Hz frequency range where the open loop model matched the experimental data. An integrated active/passive controller was successfully implemented on the CEM and was evaluated against an active-only controller. A two-fold increase in the effective control bandwidth and further reductions of 30 percent to 50 percent in the LOS RMS outputs were achieved compared to an active-only controller. Superior performance was also obtained compared to a High-Authority/Low-Authority (HAC/LAC) controller.

  6. FES control of isometric forces in the rat hindlimb using many muscles.

    PubMed

    Jarc, Anthony M; Berniker, Max; Tresch, Matthew C

    2013-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) attempts to restore motor behaviors to paralyzed limbs by electrically stimulating nerves and/or muscles. This restoration of behavior requires specifying commands to a large number of muscles, each making an independent contribution to the ongoing behavior. Efforts to develop FES systems in humans have generally been limited to preprogrammed, fixed muscle activation patterns. The development and evaluation of more sophisticated FES control strategies is difficult to accomplish in humans, mainly because of the limited access of patients for FES experiments. Here, we developed an in vivo FES test platform using a rat model that is capable of using many muscles for control and that can therefore be used to evaluate potential strategies for developing flexible FES control strategies. We first validated this FES test platform by showing consistent force responses to repeated stimulation, monotonically increasing muscle recruitment with constant force directions, and linear summation of costimulated muscles. These results demonstrate that we are able to differentially control the activation of many muscles, despite the small size of the rat hindlimb. We then demonstrate the utility of this platform to test potential FES control strategies, using it to test our ability to effectively produce open-loop control of isometric forces. We show that we are able to use this preparation to produce a range of endpoint forces flexibly and with good accuracy. We suggest that this platform will aid in FES controller design, development, and evaluation, thus accelerating the development of effective FES applications for the restoration of movement in paralyzed patients. PMID:23303688

  7. Real-time operating system timing jitter and its impact on motor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Frederick M.; Shackleford, William P.

    2001-12-01

    General-purpose microprocessors are increasingly being used for control applications due to their widespread availability and software support for non-control functions like networking and operator interfaces. Two classes of real-time operating systems (RTOS) exist for these systems. The traditional RTOS serves as the sole operating system, and provides all OS services. Examples include ETS, LynxOS, QNX, Windows CE and VxWorks. RTOS extensions add real-time scheduling capabilities to non-real-time OSes, and provide minimal services needed for the time-critical portions of an application. Examples include RTAI and RTL for Linux, and HyperKernel, OnTime and RTX for Windows NT. Timing jitter is an issue in these systems, due to hardware effects such as bus locking, caches and pipelines, and software effects from mutual exclusion resource locks, non-preemtible critical sections, disabled interrupts, and multiple code paths in the scheduler. Jitter is typically on the order of a microsecond to a few tens of microseconds for hard real-time operating systems, and ranges from milliseconds to seconds in the worst case for soft real-time operating systems. The question of its significance on the performance of a controller arises. Naturally, the smaller the scheduling period required for a control task, the more significant is the impact of timing jitter. Aside from this intuitive relationship is the greater significance of timing on open-loop control, such as for stepper motors, than for closed-loop control, such as for servo motors. Techniques for measuring timing jitter are discussed, and comparisons between various platforms are presented. Techniques to reduce jitter or mitigate its effects are presented. The impact of jitter on stepper motor control is analyzed.

  8. Linear parameter-varying control of an F-16 aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bei

    To improve the aircraft capability at high angle of attack and expand the flight envelope, advanced linear parameter-varying (LPV) control methodologies are studied in this thesis with particular applications of actuator saturation control and switching control. A standard two-step LPV antiwindup control scheme and a systematic switching LPV control approach are derived, and the advantages of LPV control techniques are demonstrated through nonlinear simulations of an F-16 longitudinal autopilot control system. The aerodynamic surface saturation is one of the major issues of flight control in the high angle of attack region. The incorporated unconventional actuators such as thrust vectoring can provide additional control power, but may have a potentially significant pay-off. The proposed LPV antiwindup control scheme is advantageous from the implementation standpoint because it can be thought of as an augmented control algorithm to the existing control system. Moreover, the synthesis condition for an antiwindup compensator is formulated as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem and can be solved efficiently. By treating the input saturation as a sector bounded nonlinearity with a tight sector bound, the synthesized antiwindup compensator can stabilize the open-loop exponentially unstable systems. The LPV antiwindup control scheme is applied to the nonlinear F-16 longitudinal model, and compared with the thrust vectoring control approach. The simulation results show that the LPV antiwindup compensator improves the flight quality, and offers advantages over thrust vectoring in a high angle of attack region. For a thrust vectoring augmented aircraft, the actuator sets may be different at low and high angles of attack. Also due to different control objectives, a single controller may not exist over a wide angle of attack region. The proposed switching LPV control approach based on multiple parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions provides a flexible design

  9. Heterogeneous Nuclear Reactor Models for Optimal Xenon Control.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, Ishtiaq Ahmad

    Nuclear reactors are generally modeled as homogeneous mixtures of fuel, control, and other materials while in reality they are heterogeneous-homogeneous configurations comprised of fuel and control rods along with other materials. Similarly, for space-time studies of a nuclear reactor, homogeneous, usually one-group diffusion theory, models are used, and the system equations are solved by either nodal or modal expansion approximations. Study of xenon-induced problems has also been carried out using similar models and with the help of dynamic programming or classical calculus of variations or the minimum principle. In this study a thermal nuclear reactor is modeled as a two-dimensional lattice of fuel and control rods placed in an infinite-moderator in plane geometry. The two-group diffusion theory approximation is used for neutron transport. Space -time neutron balance equations are written for two groups and reduced to one space-time algebraic equation by using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. This equation is written at all fuel and control rod locations. Iodine -xenon and promethium-samarium dynamic equations are also written at fuel rod locations only. These equations are then linearized about an equilibrium point which is determined from the steady-state form of the original nonlinear system equations. After studying poisonless criticality, with and without control, and the stability of the open-loop system and after checking its controllability, a performance criterion is defined for the xenon-induced spatial flux oscillation problem in the form of a functional to be minimized. Linear -quadratic optimal control theory is then applied to solve the problem. To perform a variety of different additional useful studies, this formulation has potential for various extensions and variations; for example, different geometry of the problem, with possible extension to three dimensions, heterogeneous -homogeneous formulation to include, for example, homogeneously

  10. Development of Aeroservoelastic Analytical Models and Gust Load Alleviation Control Laws of a SensorCraft Wind-Tunnel Model Using Measured Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Shimko, Anthony; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Eure, Kenneth W.; Scott, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    Aeroservoelastic (ASE) analytical models of a SensorCraft wind-tunnel model are generated using measured data. The data was acquired during the ASE wind-tunnel test of the HiLDA (High Lift-to-Drag Active) Wing model, tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) in late 2004. Two time-domain system identification techniques are applied to the development of the ASE analytical models: impulse response (IR) method and the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) method. Using measured control surface inputs (frequency sweeps) and associated sensor responses, the IR method is used to extract corresponding input/output impulse response pairs. These impulse responses are then transformed into state-space models for use in ASE analyses. Similarly, the GPC method transforms measured random control surface inputs and associated sensor responses into an AutoRegressive with eXogenous input (ARX) model. The ARX model is then used to develop the gust load alleviation (GLA) control law. For the IR method, comparison of measured with simulated responses are presented to investigate the accuracy of the ASE analytical models developed. For the GPC method, comparison of simulated open-loop and closed-loop (GLA) time histories are presented.

  11. Development of Aeroservoelastic Analytical Models and Gust Load Alleviation Control Laws of a SensorCraft Wind-Tunnel Model Using Measured Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vartio, Eric; Shimko, Anthony; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Eure, Kenneth W.; Scott,Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Aeroservoelastic (ASE) analytical models of a SensorCraft wind-tunnel model are generated using measured data. The data was acquired during the ASE wind-tunnel test of the HiLDA (High Lift-to-Drag Active) Wing model, tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) in late 2004. Two time-domain system identification techniques are applied to the development of the ASE analytical models: impulse response (IR) method and the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) method. Using measured control surface inputs (frequency sweeps) and associated sensor responses, the IR method is used to extract corresponding input/output impulse response pairs. These impulse responses are then transformed into state-space models for use in ASE analyses. Similarly, the GPC method transforms measured random control surface inputs and associated sensor responses into an AutoRegressive with eXogenous input (ARX) model. The ARX model is then used to develop the gust load alleviation (GLA) control law. For the IR method, comparison of measured with simulated responses are presented to investigate the accuracy of the ASE analytical models developed. For the GPC method, comparison of simulated open-loop and closed-loop (GLA) time histories are presented.

  12. Characteristics of Control Laws Tested on the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Moulin, Boris; Ritz, Erich; Chen, P. C.; Roughen, Kevin M.; Perry, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Span Supersonic Transport (S4T) is an aeroelastically scaled wind-tunnel model built to test active controls concepts for large flexible supersonic aircraft in the transonic flight regime. It is one of several models constructed in the 1990's as part of the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. Control laws were developed for the S4T by M4 Engineering, Inc. and by Zona Technologies, Inc. under NASA Research Announcement (NRA) contracts. The model was tested in the NASA-Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) four times from 2007 to 2010. The first two tests were primarily for plant identification. The third entry was used for testing control laws for Ride Quality Enhancement, Gust Load Alleviation, and Flutter Suppression. Whereas the third entry only tested FS subcritically, the fourth test demonstrated closed-loop operation above the open-loop flutter boundary. The results of the third entry are reported elsewhere. This paper reports on flutter suppression results from the fourth wind-tunnel test. Flutter suppression is seen as a way to provide stability margins while flying at transonic flight conditions without penalizing the primary supersonic cruise design condition. An account is given for how Controller Performance Evaluation (CPE) singular value plots were interpreted with regard to progressing open- or closed-loop to higher dynamic pressures during testing.

  13. Thermodynamic Vent System for an On-Orbit Cryogenic Reaction Control Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; Romig, Kris A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Flores, Sam

    2012-01-01

    A report discusses a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) that integrates a Joule-Thompson (JT) device (expansion valve) and thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with a cryogenic distribution system to allow fine control of the propellant quality (subcooled liquid) during operation of the device. It enables zero-venting when coupled with an RCS engine. The proper attachment locations and sizing of the orifice are required with the propellant distribution line to facilitate line conditioning. During operations, system instrumentation was strategically installed along the distribution/TVS line assembly, and temperature control bands were identified. A sub-scale run tank, full-scale distribution line, open-loop TVS, and a combination of procured and custom-fabricated cryogenic components were used in the cryogenic RCS build-up. Simulated on-orbit activation and thruster firing profiles were performed to quantify system heat gain and evaluate the TVS s capability to maintain the required propellant conditions at the inlet to the engine valves. Test data determined that a small control valve, such as a piezoelectric, is optimal to provide continuously the required thermal control. The data obtained from testing has also assisted with the development of fluid and thermal models of an RCS to refine integrated cryogenic propulsion system designs. This system allows a liquid oxygenbased main propulsion and reaction control system for a spacecraft, which improves performance, safety, and cost over conventional hypergolic systems due to higher performance, use of nontoxic propellants, potential for integration with life support and power subsystems, and compatibility with in-situ produced propellants.

  14. FPGA-based real time controller for high order correction in EDIFISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ramos, L. F.; Chulani, H.; Martín, Y.; Dorta, T.; Alonso, A.; Fuensalida, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    EDIFISE is a technology demonstrator instrument developed at the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC), intended to explore the feasibility of combining Adaptive Optics with attenuated optical fibers in order to obtain high spatial resolution spectra at the surroundings of a star, as an alternative to coronagraphy. A simplified version with only tip tilt correction has been tested at the OGS telescope in Observatorio del Teide (Canary islands, Spain) and a complete version is intended to be tested at the OGS and at the WHT telescope in Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, (Canary Islands, Spain). This paper describes the FPGA-based real time control of the High Order unit, responsible of the computation of the actuation values of a 97-actuactor deformable mirror (11x11) with the information provided by a configurable wavefront sensor of up to 16x16 subpupils at 500 Hz (128x128 pixels). The reconfigurable logic hardware will allow both zonal and modal control approaches, will full access to select which mode loops should be closed and with a number of utilities for influence matrix and open loop response measurements. The system has been designed in a modular way to allow for easy upgrade to faster frame rates (1500 Hz) and bigger wavefront sensors (240x240 pixels), accepting also several interfaces from the WFS and towards the mirror driver. The FPGA-based (Field Programmable Gate Array) real time controller provides bias and flat-fielding corrections, subpupil slopes to modal matrix computation for up to 97 modes, independent servo loop controllers for each mode with user control for independent loop opening or closing, mode to actuator matrix computation and non-common path aberration correction capability. It also provides full housekeeping control via UPD/IP for matrix reloading and full system data logging.

  15. An adaptive identification and control scheme for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. V.

    1988-01-01

    A unified identification and control scheme capable of achieving space at form performance objectives under nominal or failure conditions is described. Preliminary results are also presented, showing that the methodology offers much promise for effective robust control of large space structures. The control method is a multivariable, adaptive, output predictive controller called Model Predictive Control (MPC). MPC uses a state space model and input reference trajectories of set or tracking points to adaptively generate optimum commands. For a fixed model, MPC processes commands with great efficiency, and is also highly robust. A key feature of MPC is its ability to control either nonminimum phase or open loop unstable systems. As an output controller, MPC does not explicitly require full state feedback, as do most multivariable (e.g., Linear Quadratic) methods. Its features are very useful in LSS operations, as they allow non-collocated actuators and sensors. The identification scheme is based on canonical variate analysis (CVA) of input and output data. The CVA technique is particularly suited for the measurement and identification of structural dynamic processes - that is, unsteady transient or dynamically interacting processes such as between aerodynamics and structural deformation - from short, noisy data. CVA is structured so that the identification can be done in real or near real time, using computationally stable algorithms. Modeling LSS dynamics in 1-g laboratories has always been a major impediment not only to understanding their behavior in orbit, but also to controlling it. In cases where the theoretical model is not confirmed, current methods provide few clues concerning additional dynamical relationships that are not included in the theoretical models. CVA needs no a priori model data, or structure; all statistically significant dynamical states are determined using natural, entropy-based methods. Heretofore, a major limitation in applying adaptive

  16. Controllers for systems with bounded actuators: Scheduling and antiwindup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjadi Kia, Solmaz

    The focus of this dissertation is one of the oldest, though in many ways unresolved, problems in control: actuator saturation. We start with an investigation of the effects of deferring the activation of anti-windup by allowing actuators to remain in the saturated regime longer, without any assistance. The basic idea is to apply anti-windup when the performance of the saturated system faces substantial degradation. For this, we present a modified anti-windup scheme along with the appropriate LMIs to obtain the gains in both cases of static and dynamic anti-windup. Benefits of the proposed design method over the immediate activation of the anti-windup are demonstrated through examples. Next, results are presented for developing a scheduling scheme for anti-windup compensators. The main idea is to devise a family of controllers that, when saturation is countered, can be used to override the nominal controller. At each instant, the active overriding controller is the most aggressive unsaturated member of the family. The emphasis is on providing performance guarantees, even for open loop unstable plants. The results include state feedback controllers and dynamic output feedback controllers with an order less than or equal to that of the plant. The benefits are demonstrated through some examples. Some of the design techniques proposed here are primarily multi-objective in nature, in which a controller is obtained that addresses more than one objective concurrently. Often, these problems lead to conservative results due to reliance on a common Lyapunov variable. To mitigate this conservatism, we develop a new variation of dilated matrix inequalities that are usually encountered in saturation problems. In these new dilated forms, the system matrices are separated from Lyapunov variable to allow the use of different Lyapunov matrices in multi-objective and robust problems. The results are applicable to both full state and full order dynamic output feedback synthesis

  17. INCA- INTERACTIVE CONTROLS ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F. H.

    1994-01-01

    plane to W plane and back. These capabilities allow the INCA user to perform block diagram algebraic manipulations quickly for functions in the S, Z, and W domains. Additionally, a versatile digital control capability has been included in INCA. Special plane transformations allow the user to easily convert functions from one domain to another. Other digital control capabilities include: 1) totally independent open loop frequency response analyses on a continuous plant, discrete control system with a delay, 2) advanced Z-transform capability for systems with delays, and 3) multirate sampling analyses. The current version of INCA includes Dynamic Functions (which change when a parameter changes), standard filter generation, PD and PID controller generation, incorporation of the QZ-algorithm (function addition, inverse Laplace), and describing functions that allow the user to calculate the gain and phase characteristics of a nonlinear device. The INCA graphic modes provide the user with a convenient means to document and study frequency response, time response, and root locus analyses. General graphics features include: 1) zooming and dezooming, 2) plot documentation, 3) a table of analytic computation results, 4) multiple curves on the same plot, and 5) displaying frequency and gain information for a specific point on a curve. Additional capabilities in the frequency response mode include: 1) a full complement of graphical methods Bode magnitude, Bode phase, Bode combined magnitude and phase, Bode strip plots, root contour plots, Nyquist, Nichols, and Popov plots; 2) user selected plot scaling; and 3) gain and phase margin calculation and display. In the time response mode, additional capabilities include: 1) support for inverse Laplace and inverse Z transforms, 2) support for various input functions, 3) closed loop response evaluation, 4) loop gain sensitivity analyses, 5) intersample time response for discrete systems using the advanced Z transform, and 6) closed loop

  18. EDITORIAL: Quantum control theory for coherence and information dynamics Quantum control theory for coherence and information dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Lorenza; Tannor, David

    2011-08-01

    , quantum control of chemical reactions or high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy); on the other hand, an unprecedented demand for close coupling between theory and experiment, with theoretical developments becoming more and more attuned to and driven by experimental advances as different quantum technologies continue to evolve at an impressive pace in the laboratory. Altogether, these two trends account for several of the recurrent themes in this volume, as well as in the current quantum control literature as a whole: namely, the quest for control strategies that can attain the highest degree of precision and robustness possible, while striving for efficiency and, ultimately, optimality in achieving the intended control task under realistic operational constraints. From a theory standpoint, this makes it imperative to take into account increasingly more realistic control settings; to assess the quantitative impact of limited control resources and/or system knowledge; and to provide a rigorous and general foundation for existing experimental approaches in order to further enhance applicability and performance. From an experimental standpoint, renewed emphasis is in turn placed on validating theoretical predictions and benchmarking performance, so that the limiting constraints can be singled out for additional theoretical analysis and guidance. This ongoing cross-talk is clearly reflected in this collection, which brings together theoreticians and experimentalists, with a significant fraction of the papers reporting on combined quantum control theory-experiment efforts. While a precise categorization would neither be possible nor desirable, contributions to this volume have been loosely grouped into five broad sections. This grouping has been made in the hope that connections between different problems and/or technical approaches will become more transparent, facilitating the transfer of concepts and methods. The special issue opens with a section devoted to open-loop

  19. Development of a blended-control, predictor-corrector guidance algorithm for a crewed Mars aerocapture vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jits, Roman Yuryevich

    A robust blended-control guidance system for a crewed Mars aerocapture vehicle is developed. The key features of its guidance algorithm are the use of the both bank-angle and angle-of-attack modulation to control the aerobraking vehicle, and the use of multiple controls (sequenced pairs of bank-angles and angles-of-attack) within its numeric predictor-corrector targeting routine. The guidance algorithm macrologic is based on extensive open loop trajectory analyses, described in the present research, which led to the selection of a blended-control scheme. A heuristic approach to recover from situations where no converged guidance solution could be found by the numeric predictor-corrector is implemented in the guidance algorithm, and has been successfully demonstrated in a large number of test runs. In this research both the outer and inner loop of the guidance and control system employ the POST (Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories) computer code as the basic simulation module. At each guidance update, the inner loop solves the rigorous three-dimensional equations of motion and computes the control (bank-angle and angle-of-attack) sequence that is required to meet the required atmospheric exit conditions. Throughout the aerocapture trajectory, the guidance algorithm modifies this control sequence computed by the inner loop, and generates commanded controls for the vehicle, which, when implemented by the outer loop, meet an imposed g-load constraint of 5 Earth g's and compensate for unexpected off-nominal conditions. This blended-control, predictor-corrector guidance algorithm has been successfully developed, implemented and tested and has been shown to be capable of meeting the prescribed g-load constraint and guiding the vehicle to the desired exit conditions for a range of off-nominal factors much wider than those which could be accommodated by prior algorithms and bank-angle-only guidance.

  20. The role of feed-forward and feedback processes for closed-loop prosthesis control

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is widely believed that both feed-forward and feed-back mechanisms are required for successful object manipulation. Open-loop upper-limb prosthesis wearers receive no tactile feedback, which may be the cause of their limited dexterity and compromised grip force control. In this paper we ask whether observed prosthesis control impairments are due to lack of feedback or due to inadequate feed-forward control. Methods Healthy subjects were fitted with a closed-loop robotic hand and instructed to grasp and lift objects of different weights as we recorded trajectories and force profiles. We conducted three experiments under different feed-forward and feed-back configurations to elucidate the role of tactile feedback (i) in ideal conditions, (ii) under sensory deprivation, and (iii) under feed-forward uncertainty. Results (i) We found that subjects formed economical grasps in ideal conditions. (ii) To our surprise, this ability was preserved even when visual and tactile feedback were removed. (iii) When we introduced uncertainty into the hand controller performance degraded significantly in the absence of either visual or tactile feedback. Greatest performance was achieved when both sources of feedback were present. Conclusions We have introduced a novel method to understand the cognitive processes underlying grasping and lifting. We have shown quantitatively that tactile feedback can significantly improve performance in the presence of feed-forward uncertainty. However, our results indicate that feed-forward and feed-back mechanisms serve complementary roles, suggesting that to improve on the state-of-the-art in prosthetic hands we must develop prostheses that empower users to correct for the inevitable uncertainty in their feed-forward control. PMID:22032545

  1. Effects of Different Heave Motion Components on Pilot Pitch Control Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaal, Petrus M. T.; Zavala, Melinda A.

    2016-01-01

    The study described in this paper had two objectives. The first objective was to investigate if a different weighting of heave motion components decomposed at the center of gravity, allowing for a higher fidelity of individual components, would result in pilot manual pitch control behavior and performance closer to that observed with full aircraft motion. The second objective was to investigate if decomposing the heave components at the aircraft's instantaneous center of rotation rather than at the center of gravity could result in additional improvements in heave motion fidelity. Twenty-one general aviation pilots performed a pitch attitude control task in an experiment conducted on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames under different hexapod motion conditions. The large motion capability of the Vertical Motion Simulator also allowed for a full aircraft motion condition, which served as a baseline. The controlled dynamics were of a transport category aircraft trimmed close to the stall point. When the ratio of center of gravity pitch heave to center of gravity heave increased in the hexapod motion conditions, pilot manual control behavior and performance became increasingly more similar to what is observed with full aircraft motion. Pilot visual and motion gains significantly increased, while the visual lead time constant decreased. The pilot visual and motion time delays remained approximately constant and decreased, respectively. The neuromuscular damping and frequency both decreased, with their values more similar to what is observed with real aircraft motion when there was an equal weighting of the heave of the center of gravity and heave due to rotations about the center of gravity. In terms of open- loop performance, the disturbance and target crossover frequency increased and decreased, respectively, and their corresponding phase margins remained constant and increased, respectively. The decomposition point of the heave components only had limited

  2. An Experimental Study on Active Flow Control Using Synthetic Jet Actuators over S809 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, M.; Uzol, O.; Akmandor, I. S.

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of periodic excitation from individually controlled synthetic jet actuators on the dynamics of the flow within the separation and re-attachment regions of the boundary layer over the suction surface of a 2D model wing that has S809 airfoil profile. Experiments are performed in METUWIND's C3 open-loop suction type wind tunnel that has a 1 m × 1 m cross-section test section. The synthetic jet array on the wing consists of three individually controlled actuators driven by piezoelectric diaphragms located at 28% chord location near the mid-span of the wing. In the first part of the study, surface pressure, Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are performed over the suction surface of the airfoil to determine the size and characteristics of the separated shear layer and the re-attachment region, i.e. the laminar separation bubble, at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack and with no flow control as a baseline case. For the controlled case, CTA measurements are carried out under the same inlet conditions at various streamwise locations along the suction surface of the airfoil to investigate the effect of the synthetic jet on the boundary layer properties. During the controlled case experiments, the synthetic jet actuators are driven with a sinusoidal frequency of 1.45 kHz and 300Vp-p. Results of this study show that periodic excitation from the synthetic jet actuators eliminates the laminar separation bubble formed over the suction surface of the airfoil at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack.

  3. Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Digital Control Systems for the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieseman, Carol D.; Christhilf, David; Perry, Boyd, III

    2012-01-01

    An important objective of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) wind tunnel model program was the demonstration of Flutter Suppression (FS), Gust Load Alleviation (GLA), and Ride Quality Enhancement (RQE). It was critical to evaluate the stability and robustness of these control laws analytically before testing them and experimentally while testing them to ensure safety of the model and the wind tunnel. MATLAB based software was applied to evaluate the performance of closed-loop systems in terms of stability and robustness. Existing software tools were extended to use analytical representations of the S4T and the control laws to analyze and evaluate the control laws prior to testing. Lessons were learned about the complex windtunnel model and experimental testing. The open-loop flutter boundary was determined from the closed-loop systems. A MATLAB/Simulink Simulation developed under the program is available for future work to improve the CPE process. This paper is one of a series of that comprise a special session, which summarizes the S4T wind-tunnel program.

  4. Passivity-based Robust Control of Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul G.; Joshi, Suresh M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report provides a brief summary of the research work performed over the duration of the cooperative research agreement between NASA Langley Research Center and Kansas State University. The cooperative agreement which was originally for the duration the three years was extended by another year through no-cost extension in order to accomplish the goals of the project. The main objective of the research was to develop passivity-based robust control methodology for passive and non-passive aerospace systems. The focus of the first-year's research was limited to the investigation of passivity-based methods for the robust control of Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) single-input single-output (SISO), open-loop stable, minimum-phase non-passive systems. The second year's focus was mainly on extending the passivity-based methodology to a larger class of non-passive LTI systems which includes unstable and nonminimum phase SISO systems. For LTI non-passive systems, five different passification. methods were developed. The primary effort during the years three and four was on the development of passification methodology for MIMO systems, development of methods for checking robustness of passification, and developing synthesis techniques for passifying compensators. For passive LTI systems optimal synthesis procedure was also developed for the design of constant-gain positive real controllers. For nonlinear passive systems, numerical optimization-based technique was developed for the synthesis of constant as well as time-varying gain positive-real controllers. The passivity-based control design methodology developed during the duration of this project was demonstrated by its application to various benchmark examples. These example systems included longitudinal model of an F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) for pitch axis control, NASA's supersonic transport wind tunnel model, ACC benchmark model, 1-D acoustic duct model, piezo-actuated flexible link model, and NASA

  5. A single blinded randomised controlled pilot trial of prism adaptation for improving self-care in stroke patients with neglect.

    PubMed

    Turton, Ailie J; O'Leary, Kelly; Gabb, Judith; Woodward, Rebecca; Gilchrist, Iain D

    2010-04-01

    Prism adaptation has been shown to alleviate the symptoms of unilateral spatial neglect following stroke in single case and small group studies. The purposes of this single blinded pilot randomised controlled trial were to determine the feasibility of delivering prism adaptation treatment in a clinically valid sample and to assess its impact on self-care. Thirty seven right hemisphere stroke patients with unilateral spatial neglect were randomised into either prism adaptation (using 10 dioptre, 6 degree prisms) or sham treatment (using plain glasses) groups. Treatment was delivered each weekday for two weeks. Pointing accuracy, without vision of the finger, was recorded each day before treatment. Outcome was measured, by blinded assessors, four days and eight weeks after the end of treatment using the Catherine Bergego Scale (CBS) and the conventional neuropsychological tests from the Behavioural Inattention Test (BIT). Thirty four patients received treatment: 16 with prisms, 18 sham. Mean compliance was 99% and 97%, respectively. Over the treatment days only the prism treated group showed increased leftward bias in open loop pointing to targets on a touch screen. However, despite the group level changes in pointing behaviour no overall effect of the treatment on self-care or BIT were found.

  6. An autonomous drug release system based on chemo-mechanical energy conversion "Organic Engine" for feedback control of blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ryodai; Munkhjargal, Munkhbayar; Takahashi, Daishi; Arakawa, Takahiro; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2010-12-15

    A novel autonomous drug release system was fabricated and tested. The system consists of two integrated units: decompression unit and drug release unit. The decompression unit was fabricated by separating a cylindrical cell into a top cell (gas phase) and a bottom cell (liquid phase) by glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme immobilized membrane. The enzyme membrane recognizes glucose and converts chemical energy found in glucose to mechanical energy. The linear correlation between glucose concentration and de-pressure slope of the top cell was revealed as applying glucose solution to the bottom cell. Afterward, the drug release unit which utilizes the energy of the decompression unit as a power source was fabricated and evaluated by recording its release actions. The drug release unit was made to release at a constant quantity of drug in the liquid phase. The system was then fabricated by combining the decompression unit and the drug release unit. And it was evaluated in an open loop and in a closed loop by applying a mixture of glucose solution (100 mmol/l) and NADH(+) using glucose dehydrogenase enzyme (GDH) as a glucose reducer. Glucose concentration decreased gradually in the closed loop and, as a consequence, interval time of the GDH release became longer. In other words, an inverse correlation between actuation interval of the system and glucose concentration was shown. As a result, the possibility of feedback control of glucose concentration by the drug release system without external energy was confirmed.

  7. Robustness analysis of an air heating plant and control law by using polynomial chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Diego; Ferreira, Murillo A. S.; Balthazar, José M.; Bueno, Átila M.; de S. R. F. Rosa, Suélia

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a robustness analysis of an air heating plant with a multivariable closed-loop control law by using the polynomial chaos methodology (MPC). The plant consists of a PVC tube with a fan in the air input (that forces the air through the tube) and a mass flux sensor in the output. A heating resistance warms the air as it flows inside the tube, and a thermo-couple sensor measures the air temperature. The plant has thus two inputs (the fan's rotation intensity and heat generated by the resistance, both measured in percent of the maximum value) and two outputs (air temperature and air mass flux, also in percent of the maximal value). The mathematical model is obtained by System Identification techniques. The mass flux sensor, which is nonlinear, is linearized and the delays in the transfer functions are properly approximated by non-minimum phase transfer functions. The resulting model is transformed to a state-space model, which is used for control design purposes. The multivariable robust control design techniques used is the LQG/LTR, and the controllers are validated in simulation software and in the real plant. Finally, the MPC is applied by considering some of the system's parameters as random variables (one at a time, and the system's stochastic differential equations are solved by expanding the solution (a stochastic process) in an orthogonal basis of polynomial functions of the basic random variables. This method transforms the stochastic equations in a set of deterministic differential equations, which can be solved by traditional numerical methods (That is the MPC). Statistical data for the system (like expected values and variances) are then calculated. The effects of randomness in the parameters are evaluated in the open-loop and closed-loop pole's positions.

  8. Robustness analysis of an air heating plant and control law by using polynomial chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Colón, Diego; Ferreira, Murillo A. S.; Bueno, Átila M.; Balthazar, José M.; Rosa, Suélia S. R. F. de

    2014-12-10

    This paper presents a robustness analysis of an air heating plant with a multivariable closed-loop control law by using the polynomial chaos methodology (MPC). The plant consists of a PVC tube with a fan in the air input (that forces the air through the tube) and a mass flux sensor in the output. A heating resistance warms the air as it flows inside the tube, and a thermo-couple sensor measures the air temperature. The plant has thus two inputs (the fan's rotation intensity and heat generated by the resistance, both measured in percent of the maximum value) and two outputs (air temperature and air mass flux, also in percent of the maximal value). The mathematical model is obtained by System Identification techniques. The mass flux sensor, which is nonlinear, is linearized and the delays in the transfer functions are properly approximated by non-minimum phase transfer functions. The resulting model is transformed to a state-space model, which is used for control design purposes. The multivariable robust control design techniques used is the LQG/LTR, and the controllers are validated in simulation software and in the real plant. Finally, the MPC is applied by considering some of the system's parameters as random variables (one at a time, and the system's stochastic differential equations are solved by expanding the solution (a stochastic process) in an orthogonal basis of polynomial functions of the basic random variables. This method transforms the stochastic equations in a set of deterministic differential equations, which can be solved by traditional numerical methods (That is the MPC). Statistical data for the system (like expected values and variances) are then calculated. The effects of randomness in the parameters are evaluated in the open-loop and closed-loop pole's positions.

  9. Design and control of a decoupled two degree of freedom translational parallel micro-positioning stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Lei-Jie; Gu, Guo-Ying; Zhu, Li-Min

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a novel decoupled two degrees of freedom (2-DOF) translational parallel micro-positioning stage. The stage consists of a monolithic compliant mechanism driven by two piezoelectric actuators. The end-effector of the stage is connected to the base by four independent kinematic limbs. Two types of compound flexure module are serially connected to provide 2-DOF for each limb. The compound flexure modules and mirror symmetric distribution of the four limbs significantly reduce the input and output cross couplings and the parasitic motions. Based on the stiffness matrix method, static and dynamic models are constructed and optimal design is performed under certain constraints. The finite element analysis results are then given to validate the design model and a prototype of the XY stage is fabricated for performance tests. Open-loop tests show that maximum static and dynamic cross couplings between the two linear motions are below 0.5% and -45 dB, which are low enough to utilize the single-input-single-out control strategies. Finally, according to the identified dynamic model, an inversion-based feedforward controller in conjunction with a proportional-integral-derivative controller is applied to compensate for the nonlinearities and uncertainties. The experimental results show that good positioning and tracking performances are achieved, which verifies the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism and controller design. The resonant frequencies of the loaded stage at 2 kg and 5 kg are 105 Hz and 68 Hz, respectively. Therefore, the performance of the stage is reasonably good in term of a 200 N load capacity.

  10. Adsorption and Processes in Spacecraft Environmental Control and Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dall-Bauman, Liese; Finn, John E.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The environmental control and life support system on a spacecraft must maintain a safe and comfortable environment in which the crew can live and work. The system's functions include supplying the crew with oxygen and water, as well as removing carbon dioxide, water vapor, and trace contaminants from cabin air. Although open-loop systems have been used in the past, logistics and safety factors of current and future missions in space make near-complete recycling of the cabin's air and water desirable. The recycling process may include separation and reduction of carbon dioxide, removal of trace gas-phase contaminants, recovery and purification of humidity condensate, purification and polishing of wastewater streams, and other processes. Several of these operations can be performed totally or in part by adsorption processes. Adsorption processes are frequently good candidates for separation and purification in space by virtue of such characteristics as gravity independence, high reliability, relatively high energy efficiency, design flexibility, technological maturity, and regenerability. For these reasons, adsorption has historically played a key role in life support on U.S. and Russian piloted spacecraft. This article focuses on three current spacecraft life support applications that often use adsorption technology: carbon dioxide separation from cabin air, gas-phase trace contaminant control, and potable water recovery from waste streams. In each application, adsorption technology has been selected for use on the International Space Station. The requirements, science, and hardware for each application are discussed. Eventually, human space exploration may lead to construction of planetary habitats. These habitats may have additional applications, such as control of greenhouse gas composition and purification of hydroponic solutions, and may have different requirements and resources available to them, such as gases present in the planetary atmosphere. Adsorption

  11. Development and verification of real-time controllers for the F/A-18 vertical fin buffet load alleviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Viresh, Wickramasinghe; Zimcik, David

    2006-03-01

    Twin-tail fighter aircraft such as the F/A-18 may experience intense buffet loads at high angles of attack flight conditions and the broadband buffet loads primarily excite the first bending and torsional modes of the vertical fin that results in severe vibration and dynamic stresses on the vertical fin structures. To reduce the premature fatigue failure of the structure and to increase mission availability, a novel hybrid actuation system was developed to actively alleviate the buffet response of a full-scale F/A-18 vertical fin. A hydraulic rudder actuator was used to control the bending mode of the fin by engaging the rudder inertial force. Multiple Macro Fiber Composites actuators were surface mounted to provide induced strain actuation authority to control the torsional mode. Experimental system identification approach was selected to obtain a state-space model of the system using open-loop test data. An LQG controller was developed to minimize the dynamic response of the vertical fin at critical locations. Extensive simulations were conducted to evaluate the control authority of the actuators and the performance of the controller under various buffet load cases and levels. Closed-loop tests were performed on a full-scale F/A-18 empennage and the results validated the effectiveness of the real-time controller as well as the development methodology. In addition, the ground vibration test demonstrated that the hybrid actuation system is a feasible solution to alleviate the vertical tail buffet loads in high performance fighter aircraft.

  12. Analysis and control of computer cooling fan noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kam

    features the leading mode drag noise. Further reduction of this noise is left to the active noise control. The feasibility of the active noise control technique is demonstrated for the cancellation of both thrust and drag noise radiated at their leading modes. An open loop, feed-forward system is used to maximize the simplicity of the rig in order to deliver an appropriate technology for a small ventilation fan. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  13. Precise Heater Controller with rf-Biased Josephson Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Colin J.; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; Duncan, R. V.

    2003-01-01

    Paramagnetic susceptibility thermometers used in fundamental physics experiments are capable of measuring temperature changes with a precision of a part in 2 x 10(exp 10). However, heater controllers are only able to control open-loop power dissipation to about a part in 10(exp 5). We used an array of rf-biased Josephson junctions to precisely control the electrical power dissipation in a heater resistor mounted on a thermally isolated cryogenic platform. Theoretically, this method is capable of controlling the electrical power dissipation to better than a part in 10(exp 12). However, this level has not yet been demonstrated experimentally. The experiment consists of a liquid helium cell that also functions as a high-resolution PdMn thermometer, with a heater resistor mounted on it. The cell is thermally connected to a temperature-controlled cooling stage via a weak thermal link. The heater resistor is electrically connected to the array of Josephson junctions using superconducting wire. An rf-biased array of capacitively shunted Josephson junctions drives the voltage across the heater. The quantized voltage across the resistor is Vn = nf(h/2e), where h is Planck's constant, f is the array biasing frequency, e is the charge of an electron, and n is the integer quantum state of the Josephson array. This results in an electrical power dissipation on the cell of Pn = (Vn)(sup 2/R), where R is the heater resistance. The change of the quantum state of the array changes the power dissipated in the heater, which in turn, results in the change of the cell temperature. This temperature change is compared to the expected values based on the known thermal standoff resistance of the cell from the cooling stage. We will present our initial experimental results and discuss future improvements. This work has been funded by the Fundamental Physics Discipline of the Microgravity Science Office of NASA, and supported by a no-cost equipment loan from Sandia National Laboratories.

  14. High-contrast imager for Complex Aperture Telescopes (HiCAT). 4. Status and wavefront control development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboulleux, Lucie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Riggs, A. J. E.; Egron, Sylvain; Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Elodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Kasdin, Jeremy; Sauvage, Jean-François; Fusco, Thierry; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-07-01

    Segmented telescopes are a possible approach to enable large-aperture space telescopes for the direct imaging and spectroscopy of habitable worlds. However, the increased complexity of their aperture geometry, due to their central obstruction, support structures and segment gaps, makes high-contrast imaging very challenging. The High-contrast imager for Complex Aperture Telescopes (HiCAT) was designed to study and develop solutions for such telescope pupils using wavefront control and starlight suppression. The testbed design has the flexibility to enable studies with increasing complexity for telescope aperture geometries starting with off-axis telescopes, then on-axis telescopes with central obstruction and support structures (e.g. the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST]), up to on-axis segmented telescopes e.g. including various concepts for a Large UV, Optical, IR telescope (LUVOIR), such as the High Definition Space Telescope (HDST). We completed optical alignment in the