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Sample records for operational magnitudes implantation

  1. Low-magnitude high-frequency loading, by whole-body vibration, accelerates early implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YONG-QIANG; QI, MENG-CHUN; XU, JIANG; XU, JUAN; LIU, HUA-WEI; DONG, WEI; LI, JIN-YUAN; HU, MIN

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis deteriorates jaw bone quality and may compromise early implant osseointegration and early implant loading. The influence of low-magnitude, high-frequency (LMHF) vibration on peri-implant bone healing and implant integration in osteoporotic bones remains poorly understood. LMHF loading via whole-body vibration (WBV) for 8 weeks has previously been demonstrated to significantly enhance bone-to-implant contact, peri-implant bone fraction and implant mechanical properties in osteoporotic rats. In the present study, LMHF loading by WBV was performed in osteoporotic rats, with a loading duration of 4 weeks during the early stages of bone healing. The results indicated that 4-week LMHF loading by WBV partly reversed the negative effects of osteoporosis and accelerated early peri-implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats. PMID:25270245

  2. A touch probe method of operating an implantable RFID tag for orthopedic implant identification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Berger, J Lee; Ogirala, Ajay; Mickle, Marlin H

    2013-06-01

    The major problem in operating an implantable radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag embedded on an orthopedic implant is low efficiency because of metallic interference. To improve the efficiency, this paper proposes a method of operating an implantable passive RFID tag using a touch probe at 13.56 MHz. This technology relies on the electric field interaction between two pairs of electrodes, one being a part of the touch probe placed on the surface of tissue and the other being a part of the tag installed under the tissue. Compared with using a conventional RFID antenna such as a loop antenna, this method has a better performance in the near field operation range to reduce interference with the orthopedic implant. Properly matching the touch probe and the tag to the tissue and the implant reduces signal attenuation and increases the overall system efficiency. The experiments have shown that this method has a great performance in the near field transcutaneous operation and can be used for orthopedic implant identification.

  3. The Modulation of Operant Variation by the Probability, Magnitude, and Delay of Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Stahlman, W. David; Blaisdell, Aaron P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the expectation of reward delivery has an inverse relationship with operant behavioral variation (e.g., Stahlman, Roberts, & Blaisdell, 2010). Research thus far has largely focused on one aspect of reinforcement – the likelihood of food delivery. In two experiments with pigeons, we examined the effect of two other aspects of reinforcement: the magnitude of the reward and the temporal delay between the operant response and outcome delivery. In the first experiment, we found that a large reward magnitude resulted in reduced spatiotemporal variation in pigeons’ pecking behavior. In the second experiment, we found that a 4-s delay between response-dependent trial termination and reward delivery increased variation in behavior. These results indicate that multiple dimensions of the reinforcer modulate operant response variation. PMID:21731111

  4. Pre- and post-operative management of dental implant placement. Part 1: management of post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Bryce, G; Bomfim, D I; Bassi, G S

    2014-08-01

    Although dental implant placements have high success rates and a low incidence of morbidity, post-operative pain and complications with the healing process have been reported. There is little guidance available regarding optimal pre- and post-operative management of dental implant placement. This first paper discusses the mechanisms of pain associated with dental implant placement and offers guidance to clinicians on optimal pre- and post-operative pain management regimes. The second paper aims to discuss pre- and post-operative means of reducing the risk of early healing complications. PMID:25104691

  5. The Modulation of Operant Variation by the Probability, Magnitude, and Delay of Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahlman, W. David; Blaisdell, Aaron P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the expectation of reward delivery has an inverse relationship with operant behavioral variation (e.g., Stahlman, Roberts, & Blaisdell, 2010). Research thus far has largely focused on one aspect of reinforcement--the likelihood of food delivery. In two experiments with pigeons, we examined the effect of two…

  6. Optimal operating frequency in wireless power transmission for implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Poon, Ada S Y; O'Driscoll, Stephen; Meng, Teresa H

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines short-range wireless powering for implantable devices and shows that existing analysis techniques are not adequate to conclude the characteristics of power transfer efficiency over a wide frequency range. It shows, theoretically and experimentally, that the optimal frequency for power transmission in biological media can be in the GHz-range while existing solutions exclusively focus on the MHz-range. This implies that the size of the receive coil can be reduced by 10(4) times which enables the realization of fully integrated implantable devices. PMID:18003300

  7. Operative considerations in implantation of the Perma-Flow graft.

    PubMed

    Emery, R W; Joyce, L D; Arom, K V; King, R M; Nicoloff, D M

    1994-12-01

    The Perma-Flow coronary bypass graft (Possis Medical, Inc, Minneapolis, MN) currently is undergoing expanded clinical trial. From November 1992 through June 1994 we have used this artificial conduit in 8 patients without autologous alternatives. These cases allowed the establishment of a technical basis for successful implantation of this graft. All studied coronary anastomoses are patent.

  8. Order of magnitude enhancement in neutron emission with deuterium-krypton admixture operation in miniature plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Rishi; Lee, P.; Lee, S.; Springham, S. V.; Tan, T. L.; Rawat, R. S.; Krishnan, M.

    2008-09-08

    The effect of varied concentrations of deuterium-krypton (D{sub 2}-Kr) admixture on the neutron emission of a fast miniature plasma focus device was investigated. It was found that a judicious concentration of Kr in D{sub 2} can significantly enhance the neutron yield. The maximum average neutron yield of (1{+-}0.27)x10{sup 4} n/shot for pure D{sub 2} filling at 3 mbars was enhanced to (3.14{+-}0.4)x10{sup 5} n/shot with D{sub 2}+2% Kr admixture operation, which represents a >30-fold increase. More than an order of magnitude enhancement in the average neutron yield was observed over the broader operating range of 1-4 mbars for D{sub 2}+2% Kr and D{sub 2}+5% Kr admixtures.

  9. Design and operation of a fully implantable SMA actuated implant for correcting short bowel syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brent; Luntz, Jonathan; Brei, Diann; Teitelbaum, Daniel; Okawada, Manabu; Miyasaka, Eiichi

    2009-03-01

    Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) is medical condition characterized by insufficient small intestine length, leading to improper nutrient absorption and significant mortality rates. The complications of current treatment methods have encouraged the development of a novel treatment method based on mechanotransduction, the process through which mechanical tensile loading induces longitudinal growth of intestine. Animal based studies with simple extension devices have demonstrated the potential of the treatment to grow healthy bowel, but an implantable device suitable for clinical use remains undeveloped. This paper presents the development of an instrumented fully implantable bowel extender based upon a shape memory alloy driven linear ratchet that can be controlled and monitored remotely. The overall bowel extender system is described with respect to specifications for pig experimental tests. The functionality of the mechanical and electrical subsystems of the device are detailed and experimentally validated on the bench top, in segments of living bowel tissue removed from a pig, and in cadaveric pigs. Mechanical loading characteristics and safe load limits on bowel tissue are identified. Results from these experiments establish the readiness of the device to be tested in living pigs, enabling studies to move one step closer to clinical studies.

  10. Operations manual for the plasma source ion implantation economics program

    SciTech Connect

    Bibeault, M.L.; Thayer, G.R.

    1995-10-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a surface modification technique for metal. PSIICOSTMODEL95 is an EXCEL-based program that estimates the cost for implementing a PSII system in a manufacturing setting where the number of parts to be processed is over 5,000 parts per day and the shape of each part does not change from day to day. Overall, the manufacturing process must be very well defined and should not change. This document is a self-contained manual for PSIICOSTMODEL95. It assumes the reader has some general knowledge of the technical requirements for PSII. Configuration of the PSII process versus design is used as the methodology in PSIICOSTMODEL95. The reason behind this is twofold. First, the design process cannot be programmed into a computer when the relationships between design variables are not understood. Second, the configuration methodology reduces the number of assumptions that must be programmed into our software. Misuse of results are less likely to occur if the user has fewer assumptions to understand.

  11. A rabbit osteomyelitis model for the longitudinal assessment of early post-operative implant infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Implant infection is one of the most severe complications within the field of orthopaedic surgery, associated with an enormous burden for the healthcare system. During the last decades, attempts have been made to lower the incidence of implant-related infections. In the case of cemented prostheses, the use of antibiotic-containing bone cement can be effective. However, in the case of non-cemented prostheses, osteosynthesis and spinal surgery, local antibacterial prophylaxis is not a standard procedure. For the development of implant coatings with antibacterial properties, there is a need for a reliable animal model to evaluate the preventive capacity of such coatings during a specific period of time. Existing animal models generally present a limited follow-up, with a limited number of outcome parameters and relatively large animal numbers in multiple groups. Methods To represent an early post-operative implant infection, we established an acute tibial intramedullary nail infection model in rabbits by contamination of the tibial nail with 3.8 × 105 colony forming units of Staphylococcus aureus. Clinical, haematological and radiological parameters for infection were weekly assessed during a 6-week follow-up with post-mortem bacteriological and histological analyses. Results S. aureus implant infection was confirmed by the above parameters. A saline control group did not develop osteomyelitis. By combining the clinical, haematological, radiological, bacteriological and histological data collected during the experimental follow-up, we were able to differentiate between the control and the infected condition and assess the severity of the infection at sequential timepoints in a parameter-dependent fashion. Conclusion We herein present an acute early post-operative rabbit implant infection model which, in contrast to previously published models, combines improved in-time insight into the development of an implant osteomyelitis with a relatively low

  12. Influence of implant properties and local delivery systems on the outcome in operative fracture care.

    PubMed

    Metsemakers, W-J; Moriarty, T F; Nijs, S; Pape, H C; Richards, R G

    2016-03-01

    Fracture fixation devices are implanted into a growing number of patients each year. This may be attributed to an increase in the popularity of operative fracture care and the development of ever more sophisticated implants, which may be used in even the most difficult clinical cases. Furthermore, as the general population ages, fragility fractures become more frequent. With the increase in number of surgical interventions, the absolute number of complications of these surgical treatments will inevitably rise. Implant-related infection and compromised fracture healing remain the most challenging and prevalent complications in operative fracture care. Any strategy that can help to reduce these complications will not only lead to a faster and more complete resumption of activities, but will also help to reduce the socio-economic impact. In this review we describe the influence of implant design and material choice on complication rates in trauma patients. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of local delivery systems, such as implant coatings and bone cement, and how these systems may have an impact on the prevalence, prevention and treatment outcome of these complications. PMID:26847958

  13. Active implantable medical device EMI assessment for wireless power transfer operating in LF and HF bands.

    PubMed

    Hikage, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio; Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-06-21

    The electromagnetic interference (EMI) imposed on active implantable medical devices by wireless power transfer systems (WPTSs) is discussed based upon results of in vitro experiments. The purpose of this study is to present comprehensive EMI test results gathered from implantable-cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators exposed to the electromagnetic field generated by several WPTSs operating in low-frequency (70 kHz-460 kHz) and high-frequency (6.78 MHz) bands. The constructed in vitro experimental test system based upon an Irnich's flat torso phantom was applied. EMI test experiments are conducted on 14 types of WPTSs including Qi-compliant system and EV-charging WPT system mounted on current production EVs. In addition, a numerical simulation model for active implantable medical device (AIMD) EMI estimation based on the experimental test system is newly proposed. The experimental results demonstrate the risk of WPTSs emitting intermittent signal to affect the correct behavior of AIMDs when operating at very short distances. The proposed numerical simulation model is applicable to obtain basically the EMI characteristics of various types of WPTSs. PMID:27224201

  14. Active implantable medical device EMI assessment for wireless power transfer operating in LF and HF bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikage, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio; Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    The electromagnetic interference (EMI) imposed on active implantable medical devices by wireless power transfer systems (WPTSs) is discussed based upon results of in vitro experiments. The purpose of this study is to present comprehensive EMI test results gathered from implantable-cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators exposed to the electromagnetic field generated by several WPTSs operating in low-frequency (70 kHz-460 kHz) and high-frequency (6.78 MHz) bands. The constructed in vitro experimental test system based upon an Irnich’s flat torso phantom was applied. EMI test experiments are conducted on 14 types of WPTSs including Qi-compliant system and EV-charging WPT system mounted on current production EVs. In addition, a numerical simulation model for active implantable medical device (AIMD) EMI estimation based on the experimental test system is newly proposed. The experimental results demonstrate the risk of WPTSs emitting intermittent signal to affect the correct behavior of AIMDs when operating at very short distances. The proposed numerical simulation model is applicable to obtain basically the EMI characteristics of various types of WPTSs.

  15. Minimally Invasive Catheter Procedures to Assist Complicated Pacemaker Lead Extraction and Implantation in the Operating Room

    SciTech Connect

    Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S. Miese, Falk R.; Blondin, Dirk; Winter, Joachim; Scherer, Axel; Fuerst, Guenter

    2011-04-15

    We report on percutaneous catheter procedures in the operating room (OR) to assist complicated manual extraction or insertion of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. We retrospectively reviewed complicated PM revisions and implantations performed between 2004 and 2009 that required percutaneous catheter procedures performed in the OR. The type of interventional procedure, catheter and retrieval system used, venous access, success rates, and procedural complications were analyzed. In 41 (12 female and 29 male [mean age 62 {+-} 17 years]) of 3021 (1.4%) patients, standard manual retrieval of old leads or insertion of new leads was not achievable and thus required percutaneous catheter intervention for retrieval of misplaced leads and/or recanalisation of occluded central veins. Thirteen of 18 (72.2%) catheter-guided retrieval procedures for misplaced (right atrium [RA] or ventricle [RV; n = 3], superior vena cava [n = 2], brachiocephalic vein [n = 5], and subclavian vein [n = 3]) lead fragments in 16 patients were successful. Percutaneous catheter retrieval failed in five patients because there were extremely fixed or adhered lead fragments. Percutaneous transluminal angiography (PTA) of central veins for occlusion or high-grade stenosis was performed in 25 patients. In 22 of 25 patients (88%), recanalization of central veins was successful, thus enabling subsequent lead replacement. Major periprocedural complications were not observed. In the case of complicated manual PM lead implantation or revision, percutaneous catheter-guided extraction of misplaced lead fragments or recanalisation of central veins can be performed safely in the OR, thus enabling subsequent implantation or revision of PM systems in the majority of patients.

  16. Formulation and evaluation of controlled release antibiotic biodegradable implants for post operative site delivery.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Vijay; Mudnaik, Rajesh; Barde, Laxmikant; Roy, Arghya; Shivhare, Umesh; Bhusari, Kishore

    2010-03-01

    Biodegradable implants of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride for post operative site delivery were prepared using glyceryl monostearate and different concentrations of polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000), glycerol and Tween 80 as erosion enhancers by compression and molding technique. Formulations were subjected to in vitro drug release by the USP dissolution method, while promising formulations were subjected to in vitro drug release by the agar gel method and also to stability studies. It was observed that glyceryl monostearate formed hydrophobic matrix and delayed the drug delivery. Antibiotic release profile was controlled by using different combinations of erosion enhancers. The formulation prepared by the compression method showed more delayed release compared to formulations prepared by the molding method.

  17. Scaling up delivery of contraceptive implants in sub-Saharan Africa: operational experiences of Marie Stopes International.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Susan; Thurston, Sarah; Weinberger, Michelle; Nuccio, Olivia; Fuchs-Montgomery, Nomi

    2014-02-01

    Contraceptive implants offer promising opportunities for addressing the high and growing unmet need for modern contraceptives in sub-Saharan Africa. Marie Stopes International (MSI) offers implants as one of many family planning options. Between 2008 and 2012, MSI scaled up voluntary access to implants in 15 sub-Saharan African countries, from 80,041 implants in 2008 to 754,329 implants in 2012. This 9-fold increase amounted to more than 1.7 million implants delivered cumulatively over the 5-year period. High levels of client satisfaction were attained alongside service provision scale up by using existing MSI service delivery channels-mobile outreach, social franchising, and clinics-to implement strategies that broadened access for underserved clients and maintained service quality. Use of adaptive and context-specific service delivery models and attention to key operational components, including sufficient numbers of trained providers, strong supply chains, diverse financing mechanisms, and implant removal services, underpinned our service delivery efforts. Accounting for 70% of the implants delivered by MSI in 2012, mobile outreach services through dedicated MSI provider teams played a central role in scale-up efforts, fueled in part by the provision of free or heavily subsidized services. Social franchising also demonstrated promise for future program growth, along with MSI clinics. Continued high growth in implant provision between 2011 and 2012 in all sub-Saharan African countries indicates the region's capacity for further service delivery expansion. Meeting the expected rising demand for implants and ensuring long-term sustainable access to the method, as part of a comprehensive method mix, will require continued use of appropriate service delivery models, effective operations, and ongoing collaboration between the private, public, and nongovernmental sectors. MSI's experience can be instructive for future efforts to ensure contraceptive access and choice

  18. Scaling up delivery of contraceptive implants in sub-Saharan Africa: operational experiences of Marie Stopes International

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, Susan; Thurston, Sarah; Weinberger, Michelle; Nuccio, Olivia; Fuchs-Montgomery, Nomi

    2014-01-01

    Contraceptive implants offer promising opportunities for addressing the high and growing unmet need for modern contraceptives in sub-Saharan Africa. Marie Stopes International (MSI) offers implants as one of many family planning options. Between 2008 and 2012, MSI scaled up voluntary access to implants in 15 sub-Saharan African countries, from 80,041 implants in 2008 to 754,329 implants in 2012. This 9-fold increase amounted to more than 1.7 million implants delivered cumulatively over the 5-year period. High levels of client satisfaction were attained alongside service provision scale up by using existing MSI service delivery channels—mobile outreach, social franchising, and clinics—to implement strategies that broadened access for underserved clients and maintained service quality. Use of adaptive and context-specific service delivery models and attention to key operational components, including sufficient numbers of trained providers, strong supply chains, diverse financing mechanisms, and implant removal services, underpinned our service delivery efforts. Accounting for 70% of the implants delivered by MSI in 2012, mobile outreach services through dedicated MSI provider teams played a central role in scale-up efforts, fueled in part by the provision of free or heavily subsidized services. Social franchising also demonstrated promise for future program growth, along with MSI clinics. Continued high growth in implant provision between 2011 and 2012 in all sub-Saharan African countries indicates the region's capacity for further service delivery expansion. Meeting the expected rising demand for implants and ensuring long-term sustainable access to the method, as part of a comprehensive method mix, will require continued use of appropriate service delivery models, effective operations, and ongoing collaboration between the private, public, and nongovernmental sectors. MSI's experience can be instructive for future efforts to ensure contraceptive access and

  19. Scaling up delivery of contraceptive implants in sub-Saharan Africa: operational experiences of Marie Stopes International.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Susan; Thurston, Sarah; Weinberger, Michelle; Nuccio, Olivia; Fuchs-Montgomery, Nomi

    2014-02-01

    Contraceptive implants offer promising opportunities for addressing the high and growing unmet need for modern contraceptives in sub-Saharan Africa. Marie Stopes International (MSI) offers implants as one of many family planning options. Between 2008 and 2012, MSI scaled up voluntary access to implants in 15 sub-Saharan African countries, from 80,041 implants in 2008 to 754,329 implants in 2012. This 9-fold increase amounted to more than 1.7 million implants delivered cumulatively over the 5-year period. High levels of client satisfaction were attained alongside service provision scale up by using existing MSI service delivery channels-mobile outreach, social franchising, and clinics-to implement strategies that broadened access for underserved clients and maintained service quality. Use of adaptive and context-specific service delivery models and attention to key operational components, including sufficient numbers of trained providers, strong supply chains, diverse financing mechanisms, and implant removal services, underpinned our service delivery efforts. Accounting for 70% of the implants delivered by MSI in 2012, mobile outreach services through dedicated MSI provider teams played a central role in scale-up efforts, fueled in part by the provision of free or heavily subsidized services. Social franchising also demonstrated promise for future program growth, along with MSI clinics. Continued high growth in implant provision between 2011 and 2012 in all sub-Saharan African countries indicates the region's capacity for further service delivery expansion. Meeting the expected rising demand for implants and ensuring long-term sustainable access to the method, as part of a comprehensive method mix, will require continued use of appropriate service delivery models, effective operations, and ongoing collaboration between the private, public, and nongovernmental sectors. MSI's experience can be instructive for future efforts to ensure contraceptive access and choice

  20. Eddy current inspection tool which is selectively operable in a discontinuity detection mode and a discontinuity magnitude mode

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, R.R.; Van Lue, D.F.

    1983-10-25

    A miniaturized inspection tool, for testing and inspection of metal objects in locations with difficult accessibility, which comprises eddy current sensing equipment with a probe coil, and associated coaxial coil cable, coil energizing means, and circuit means responsive to impedance changes in the coil as effected by induced eddy currents in a test object to produce a data output signal proportional to such changes. The coil and cable are slideably received in the utility channel of the flexible insertion tube of fiberoptic scope. The scope is provided with light transmitting and receiving fiberoptics for viewing through the flexible tube, and articulation means for articulating the distal end of the tube and permitting close control of coil placement relative to a test object. The eddy current sensing equipment includes a tone generator 30 for generating audibly signals responsive to the data output signal. In one selected mode of operation, the tone generator responsive to the output signal above a selected level generates a constant single frequency tone for signaling detection of a discontinuity and, in a second selected mode, generates a tone whose frequency is proportional to the difference between the output signal and a predetermined selected threshold level. 5 figs.

  1. Eddy current inspection tool which is selectively operable in a discontinuity detection mode and a discontinuity magnitude mode

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, Richard R.; Van Lue, Dorin F.

    1983-01-01

    A miniaturized inspection tool, for testing and inspection of metal objects in locations with difficult accessibility, which comprises eddy current sensing equipment (12) with a probe coil (11), and associated coaxial coil cable (13), coil energizing means (21), and circuit means (21, 12) responsive to impedance changes in the coil as effected by induced eddy currents in a test object to produce a data output signal proportional to such changes. The coil and cable are slideably received in the utility channel of the flexible insertion tube 17 of fiberoptic scope 10. The scope 10 is provided with light transmitting and receiving fiberoptics for viewing through the flexible tube, and articulation means (19, 20) for articulating the distal end of the tube and permitting close control of coil placement relative to a test object. The eddy current sensing equipment includes a tone generator 30 for generating audibly signals responsive to the data output signal. In one selected mode of operation, the tone generator responsive to the output signal above a selected level generates a constant single frequency tone for signalling detection of a discontinuity and, in a second selected mode, generates a tone whose frequency is proportional to the difference between the output signal and a predetermined selected threshold level.

  2. Poly Implant Prothèse™ (PIP) experience in the United Kingdom: A prospective cohort study into the accuracy of diagnostic imaging findings in comparison to operative findings of 1029 implants.

    PubMed

    Leckenby, Jonathan; Chana, Jagdeep; Harrison, Douglas; Grobbelaar, Adriaan

    2016-04-01

    The Poly Implant Prosthèse™ (PIP) implants were withdrawn from market use in the United Kingdom on 31st March 2010 following Government issued advice. In June 2012 a final Government report was issued and during this period the majority of patients elected to have their prostheses removed. This study presents the operative findings of three surgeons. 517 patients were identified retrospectively from the implant database as having received PIP implants with a total of 1029 implants. 62 patients (124 implants) declined explantation after consultation and imaging. The data was recorded prospectively for all patients and included the clinical, imaging and operative findings. A total of 905 implants were removed of which 129 were ruptured at the time of explantation (14.25%). 27 implants were intact but the presence of liquid surrounding the prosthesis was noted. 93 implants were reported as being ruptured after diagnostic imaging but were intact operatively resulting in a test sensitivity of 0.82 and a specificity of 0.92 yielding a positive predictive value of 0.59 and a negative predictive value of 0.97 overall. Capsule formation was noted in 27 breasts (3%). Our study showed that the prevalence of PIP ruptures is comparable to other manufacturers. The prevalence of implant rupture predictably increased over time and the prevalence of abnormal capsule formation was similar to other manufacturers. PMID:26936318

  3. Operative technique for insertion of a totally implantable system for venous access.

    PubMed

    Sterchi, J M; Fulks, D; Cruz, J; Paschold, E

    1986-10-01

    A totally implantable venous access device is described and a step by step technique for implanting the device is given. Among 203 patients in whom the technique has been used, thrombosis of the subclavian or jugular vein has occurred in only three. There have been no pulmonary complications, and only three devices have been removed because of infection.

  4. A standard operating procedure for the surgical implantation of transmitters in juvenile salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, T.L.; Beeman, J.W.; Gee, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Biotelemetry is a useful tool to monitor the movements of animals and is widely applied in fisheries research. Radio or acoustic technology can be used, depending on the study design and the environmental conditions in the study area. A broad definition of telemetry also includes the use of Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags, either separately or with a radio or acoustic transmitter. To use telemetry, fish must be equipped with a transmitter. Although there are several attachment procedures available, surgical implantation of transmitters in the abdominal cavity is recognized as the best technique for long-term telemetry studies in general (Stasko and Pincock, 1977; Winter, 1996; Jepsen, 2003), and specifically for juvenile salmonids, Oncorhynchus spp. (Adams and others, 1998a, 1998b; Martinelli and others, 1998; Hall and others, 2009). Studies that use telemetry assume that the processes by which the animals are captured, handled, and tagged, as well as the act of carrying the transmitter, will have minimal effect on their behavior and performance. This assumption, commonly stated as a lack of transmitter effects, must be valid if telemetry studies are to describe accurately the movements and behavior of an entire population of interest, rather than the subset of that population that carries transmitters. This document describes a standard operating procedure (SOP) for surgical implantation of radio or acoustic transmitters in juvenile salmonids. The procedures were developed from a broad base of published information, laboratory experiments, and practical experience in tagging thousands of fish for numerous studies of juvenile salmon movements near Columbia River and Snake River hydroelectric dams. Staff from the Western Fisheries Research Center's Columbia River Research Laboratory (CRRL) frequently have used telemetry studies to evaluate new structures or operations at hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin, and these evaluations typically

  5. A wireless power interface for rechargeable battery operated neural recording implants.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Principe, Jose C; Bashirullah, Rizwan

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated analog front-end for wireless powering and recharging of miniature Li-ion batteries used in implantable neural recording microsystems. DC signal extraction from a wireless carrier is accomplished using Schottky barrier contact diodes with lower forward voltage drop for improved efficiency. The battery charger employs a new control loop that relaxes comparator resolution requirements, provides simultaneous operation of constant-current and constant-voltage loops, and eliminates the external current sense resistor from the charging path. The accuracy of the end-of-charge detection is primarily determined by the voltage drop across matched resistors and current-sources and the offset voltage of the sense comparator. Experimental results in 0.6 mum bulk CMOS technology indicate that +/- 1.3% (or +/-20 microA) end-of-charge accuracy can be obtained under worst-case conditions for a comparator offset voltage of +/-5mV. The circuits occupy 1.735 mm(2) with a power dissipation of 8.4 mW when delivering a load current of 1.5 mA at 4.1 V (or 6.15 mW) for an efficiency of 73%

  6. Harms and responsibilities associated with battery-operated implants (BOI): who controls postmortem explantation?

    PubMed

    Bramstedt, Katrina A

    2013-01-01

    The postmortem issues raised by battery-operated implants (BOI) are complex and issues of consent, setting (clinical vs research), and environmental risks have received little attention in bioethics literature. Analyzing the issues, the following are argued: (1) Patients receiving BOIs should sign a consent form that includes a requirement for postmortem explant of the device; (2) BOI consent forms should require the explanted devices be returned to their manufacturers for Returned Product Analysis; (3) Failure to explant and analyze devices from the research setting fails the research goal of generation of knowledge for the benefit of future patients; (4) Failure to explant and analyze devices from the clinical setting allows product defects to be potentially hidden from patients, families, clinicians, manufacturers, and regulatory agencies; (5) Bodies buried with BOIs potentially harm the environment; (6) Religious or philosophical objections to autopsy should not supersede the duty to explant and analyze BOIs; (7) The concepts herein for BOIs could potentially extend to non-BOI if the device has failure modes that can lead to a potentially life-threatening event or can cause permanent debilitating health issues, and the burial or cremation of the device poses environmental harm. In these situations, neither the patient (premortem) nor family (postmortem) should have the right to refuse explant. PMID:23121647

  7. Radiation exposure to operator and patients during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Cho, J. H.; Park, S. J.; Kim, J. S.; On, Y. K.; Huh, J.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the radiation exposure to operator and patient during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures and to calculate the allowable number of cases per year. We carried out 9 electrophysiology studies, 40 radiofrequency catheter ablation and 11 cardiac device implantation procedures. To measure occupational radiation dose and dose-area product (DAP), 13 photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes (inside and outside lead glass), thyroids (inside and outside thyroid collar), chest (inside and outside lead apron), wrists, genital of the operator (inside lead apron), and 6 of photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes, thyroids, chest and genital of the patient. Exposure time and DAP values were 11.7 ± 11.8 min and 23.2 ± 26.2 Gy cm2 for electrophysiology study; 36.5 ± 42.1 min and 822.4 ± 125.5 Gy cm2 for radiofrequency catheter ablation; 16.2 ± 9.3 min and 27.8 ± 16.5 Gy cm2 for cardiac device implantation procedure, prospectively. 4591 electrophysiology studies can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv), and 658-electrophysiology studies with radiofrequency catheter ablation can be carried out within the occupational exposure limit for the hands (500 mSv). 1654 cardiac device implantation procedure can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv). The amounts of the operator and patient's radiation exposure were comparatively small. So, electrophysiology study, radio frequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures are safe when performed with modern equipment and optimized protective radiation protect equipment.

  8. Initial operation of a large-scale Plasma Source Ion Implantation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Henins, I.; Gribble, R.J.; Reass, W.A.; Faehl, R.J.; Nastasi, M.A.; Rej, D.J.

    1993-10-01

    In Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII), a workpiece to be implanted is immersed in a weakly ionized plasma and pulsed to a high negative voltage. Plasma ions are accelerated toward the workpiece and implanted in its surface. Experimental PSII results reported in the literature have been for small workpieces. A large scale PSII experiment has recently been assembled at Los Alamos, in which stainless steel and aluminum workpieces with surface areas over 4 m{sup 2} have been implanted in a 1.5 m-diameter, 4.6 m-length cylindrical vacuum chamber. Initial implants have been performed at 50 kV with 20 {mu}s pulses of 53 A peak current, repeated at 500 Hz, although the pulse modulator will eventually supply 120 kV pulses of 60 A peak current at 2 kHz. A 1,000 W, 13.56 MHz capacitively-coupled source produces nitrogen plasma densities in the 10{sup 15} m{sup {minus}3} range at neutral pressures as low as 0.02 mtorr. A variety of antenna configurations have been tried, with and without axial magnetic fields of up to 60 gauss. Measurements of sheath expansion, modulator voltage and current, and plasma density fill-in following a pulse are presented. The authors consider secondary electron emission, x-ray production, workpiece arcing, implant conformality, and workpiece and chamber heating.

  9. Post-operative hemimaxillectomy rehabilitation using prostheses supported by zygoma implants and remaining natural teeth

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xing Zhou; Wang, Ming Yi; Ong, Hui Shan; Zhang, Chen Ping

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the stability of prostheses supported by zygoma implants and remaining teeth for subjects who had undergone hemi-maxillectomy. METHODS: Ten patients were included in the study. Oral rehabilitation was performed using a temporary prosthesis that was supported by remaining teeth for the first three months. Then, a zygoma implant was placed to provide support for a final prosthesis in addition to the remaining teeth. Each prosthesis was tailor-made according to biomechanical three-dimensional finite element analysis results. The patients were assessed using the prosthesis functioning scale of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. In addition, retention and bite force were recorded for both the temporary prosthesis and the final prosthesis. RESULTS: The mean bite force of the prosthetic first molar was increased to 69.2 N. The mean retentive force increased to 13.5 N after zygoma implant insertion. The bite force on the prosthetic first molar was improved to 229.3 N. CONCLUSION: Bite force increased significantly with the support of a zygoma implant. The use of zygoma implants in the restoration of maxillary defects improved functional outcome and patient satisfaction. PMID:27759845

  10. Task Shifting Provision of Contraceptive Implants to Community Health Extension Workers: Results of Operations Research in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oguntunde, Olugbenga; Orobaton, Nosa; Otolorin, Emmanuel; Inuwa, Fatima; Alalade, Olubisi; Abegunde, Dele; Danladi, Saba’atu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Contraceptive use remains low in Nigeria, with only 11% of women reporting use of any modern method. Access to long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) is constrained by a severe shortage of human resources. To assess feasibility of task shifting provision of implants, we trained community health extension workers (CHEWs) to insert and remove contraceptive implants in rural communities of Bauchi and Sokoto states in northern Nigeria. Methods: We conducted 2- to 3-week training sessions for 166 selected CHEWs from 82 facilities in Sokoto state (September 2013) and 84 health facilities in Bauchi state (December 2013). To assess feasibility of the task shifting approach, we conducted operations research using a pretest–posttest design using multiple sources of information, including surveys with 151 trained CHEWs (9% were lost to follow-up) and with 150 family planning clients; facility observations using supply checklists (N = 149); direct observation of counseling provided by CHEWs (N = 144) and of their clinical (N = 113) skills; as well as a review of service statistics (N = 151 health facilities). The endline assessment was conducted 6 months after the training in each state. Results: CHEWs inserted a total of 3,588 implants in 151 health facilities over a period of 6 months, generating 10,088 couple-years of protection (CYP). After practicing on anatomic arm models, most CHEWs achieved competency in implant insertions after insertions with 4–5 actual clients. Clinical observations revealed that CHEWs performed implant insertion tasks correctly 90% of the time or more for nearly all checklist items. The amount of information that CHEWs provided clients increased between baseline and endline, and over 95% of surveyed clients reported being satisfied with CHEWs’ services in both surveys. The study found that supervisors not only observed and corrected insertion skills, as needed, during supervisory visits but also encouraged

  11. Reliable experimental setup to test the pressure modulation of Baerveldt Implant tubes for reducing post-operative hypotony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Ajay

    Glaucoma encompasses a group of conditions that result in damage to the optic nerve and can cause loss of vision and blindness. The nerve is damaged due to an increase in the eye's internal (intraocular) pressure (IOP) above the nominal range of 15 -- 20 mm Hg. There are many treatments available for this group of diseases depending on the complexity and stage of nerve degradation. In extreme cases where drugs or laser surgery do not create better conditions for the patient, ophthalmologists use glaucoma drainage devices to help alleviate the IOP. Many drainage implants have been developed over the years and are in use; but two popular implants are the Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant and the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implant. Baerveldt Implants are non-valved and provide low initial resistance to outflow of fluid, resulting in post-operative complications such as hypotony, where the IOP drops below 5 mm of Hg. Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implants are valved implants which initially restrict the amount of fluid flowing out of the eye. The long term success rates of Baerveldt Implants surpass those of Ahmed Valve Implants because of post-surgical issues; but Baerveldt Implants' initial effectiveness is poor without proper flow restriction. This drives the need to develop new ways to improve the initial effectiveness of Baerveldt Implants. A possible solution proposed by our research team is to place an insert in the Baerveldt Implant tube of inner diameter 305 microns. The insert must be designed to provide flow resistance for the early time frame [e.g., first 30 -- 60 post-operative days] until sufficient scar tissue has formed on the implant. After that initial stage with the insert, the scar tissue will provide the necessary flow resistance to maintain the IOP above 5 mm Hg. The main objective of this project was to develop and validate an experimental apparatus to measure pressure drop across a Baerveldt Implant tube, with and without inserts. This setup will be used in the

  12. Automaticity of Conceptual Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Gliksman, Yarden; Itamar, Shai; Leibovich, Tali; Melman, Yonatan; Henik, Avishai

    2016-01-01

    What is bigger, an elephant or a mouse? This question can be answered without seeing the two animals, since these objects elicit conceptual magnitude. How is an object’s conceptual magnitude processed? It was suggested that conceptual magnitude is automatically processed; namely, irrelevant conceptual magnitude can affect performance when comparing physical magnitudes. The current study further examined this question and aimed to expand the understanding of automaticity of conceptual magnitude. Two different objects were presented and participants were asked to decide which object was larger on the screen (physical magnitude) or in the real world (conceptual magnitude), in separate blocks. By creating congruent (the conceptually larger object was physically larger) and incongruent (the conceptually larger object was physically smaller) pairs of stimuli it was possible to examine the automatic processing of each magnitude. A significant congruity effect was found for both magnitudes. Furthermore, quartile analysis revealed that the congruity was affected similarly by processing time for both magnitudes. These results suggest that the processing of conceptual and physical magnitudes is automatic to the same extent. The results support recent theories suggested that different types of magnitude processing and representation share the same core system. PMID:26879153

  13. System design and operation of a 100 kilovolt, 2 kilohertz pulse modulator for plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W.A.

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes the electrical design and operation of a high power modulator system implemented for the Los Alamos Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) facility. To test the viability of the PSII process for various automotive components, the modulator must accept wide variations of load impedance. Components have varying area and composition which must be processed with different plasmas. Additionally, the load impedance may change by large factors during the typical 20 uS pulse, due to plasma displacement currents and sheath growth. As a preliminary design to test the system viability for automotive component implantation, suitable for a manufacturing environment, circuit topology must be able to directly scale to high power versions, for increased component through-put. We have chosen an evolutionary design approach with component families of characterized performance, which should Ion result in a reliable modulator system with component lifetimes. The modulator utilizes a pair of Litton L-3408 hollow beam amplifier tubes as switching elements in a ``hot-deck`` configuration. Internal to the main of planar triode hot deck, an additional pair decks, configured in a totem pole circuit, provide input drive to the L-3408 mod-anodes. The modulator can output over 2 amps average current (at 100 kV) with 1 kW of modanode drive. Diagnostic electronics monitor the load and stops pulses for 100 mS when a load arcs occur. This paper, in addition to providing detailed engineering design information, will provide operational characteristics and reliability data that direct the design to the higher power, mass production line capable modulators.

  14. System design and operation of a 100 kilovolt, 2 kilohertz pulse modulator for plasma source ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reass, W. A.

    This paper describes the electrical design and operation of a high power modulator system implemented for the Los Alamos Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) facility. To test the viability of the PSII process for various automotive components, the modulator must accept wide variations of load impedance. Components have varying area and composition which must be processed with different plasmas. Additionally, the load impedance may change by large factors during the typical 20 uS pulse, due to plasma displacement currents and sheath growth. As a preliminary design to test the system viability for automotive component implantation, suitable for a manufacturing environment, circuit topology must be able to directly scale to high power versions, for increased component through-put. We have chosen an evolutionary design approach with component families of characterized performance, which should result in a reliable modulator system with component lifetimes. The modulator utilizes a pair of Litton L-3408 hollow beam amplifier tubes as switching elements in a 'hot-deck' configuration. Internal to the main of planar triode hot deck, an additional pair decks, configured in a totem pole circuit, provide input drive to the L-3408 mod-anodes. The modulator can output over 2 amps average current (at 100 kV) with 1 kW of modanode drive. Diagnostic electronics monitor the load and stops pulses for 100 mS when a load arcs occur. This paper, in addition to providing detailed engineering design information, will provide operational characteristics and reliability data that direct the design to the higher power, mass production line capable modulators.

  15. New operational techniques of implantation of biomaterials and titanium implants in the jaw with the atrophy of the bone and soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikityuk, D. B.; Urakov, A. L.; Reshetnikov, A. P.; Kopylov, M. V.; Baimurzin, D. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The research into dynamics of quality of clinical use in 2003 - 2012 of autologous and xenogeneic biomaterials at dental transplantation and implantation among 1,100 of adult patients was made. The analysis results show that at autologous bone transplantation implant survival is observed only in 72% of cases, and the "necessary" result of bone repair occurred only in 6 - 9 months. Transplantation of biomaterials of OsteoBiol® (materials "mp3", "Genos" and "Evolution") provided engraftment and bone regeneration in 100 % of cases and allowed the use of dental implantation immediately after transplantation even in case of reduction in the patient's alveolar crest down to 2.0 mm. Replace Select implants of Nobel Biocare® were used at plantation. In order to exclude Schneiderian membrane's perforation lighting of Highmore's sinus with the cold blue-violet light from inside at sinus elevation is recommended as well as deepening of dental instruments into the bone only until the blue-violet light appears under them. To exclude deficiency of soft tissue under the cervical part of the ceramic crown application of special anti-fissure technology involving biomaterial flap dissection and its laying around the implant is suggested.

  16. A pre-operative planning for endoprosthetic human tracheal implantation: a decision support system based on robust design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, O; Villalobos, J L López; Ginel, A; Cortes, E Barrot; Doblaré, M

    2014-05-01

    Swallowing depends on physiological variables that have a decisive influence on the swallowing capacity and on the tracheal stress distribution. Prosthetic implantation modifies these values and the overall performance of the trachea. The objective of this work was to develop a decision support system based on experimental, numerical and statistical approaches, with clinical verification, to help the thoracic surgeon in deciding the position and appropriate dimensions of a Dumon prosthesis for a specific patient in an optimal time and with sufficient robustness. A code for mesh adaptation to any tracheal geometry was implemented and used to develop a robust experimental design, based on the Taguchi's method and the analysis of variance. This design was able to establish the main swallowing influencing factors. The equations to fit the stress and the vertical displacement distributions were obtained. The resulting fitted values were compared to those calculated directly by the finite element method (FEM). Finally, a checking and clinical validation of the statistical study were made, by studying two cases of real patients. The vertical displacements and principal stress distribution obtained for the specific tracheal model were in agreement with those calculated by FE simulations with a maximum absolute error of 1.2 mm and 0.17 MPa, respectively. It was concluded that the resulting decision support tool provides a fast, accurate and simple tool for the thoracic surgeon to predict the stress state of the trachea and the reduction in the ability to swallow after implantation. Thus, it will help them in taking decisions during pre-operative planning of tracheal interventions. PMID:23046526

  17. Mechanical Behaviour of Umbrella-Shaped, Ni-Ti Memory Alloy Femoral Head Support Device during Implant Operation: A Finite Element Analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Wei; Tian, Qing; Dai, Zhipeng; Liu, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    A new instrument used for treating femoral head osteonecrosis was recently proposed: the umbrella-shaped, Ni-Ti memory femoral head support device. The device has an efficacy rate of 82.35%. Traditional radiographic study provides limited information about the mechanical behaviour of the support device during an implant operation. Thus, this study proposes a finite element analysis method, which includes a 3-step formal head model construction scheme and a unique material assignment strategy for evaluating mechanical behaviour during an implant operation. Four different scenarios with different constraints, initial positions and bone qualities are analyzed using the simulation method. The max radium of the implanted device was consistent with observation data, which confirms the accuracy of the proposed method. To ensure that the device does not unexpectedly open and puncture the femoral head, the constraint on the impact device should be strong. The initial position of sleeve should be in the middle to reduce the damage to the decompression channel. The operation may fail because of poor bone quality caused by severe osteoporosis. The proposed finite element analysis method has proven to be an accurate tool for studying the mechanical behaviour of umbrella-shaped, Ni-Ti memory alloy femoral head support device during an implant operation. The 3-step construct scheme can be implemented with any kind of bone structure meshed with multiple element types. PMID:24960038

  18. The Early Years of Practice: An Assessment of Operative Efficiency and Cost of Free Flap and Implant Breast Reconstruction at an Academic Institution.

    PubMed

    Sando, Ian C; Momoh, Adeyiza O; Chung, Kevin C; Kozlow, Jeffrey H

    2016-07-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term costs, and financial implications of improvements in operative efficiency of free flap and implant-based breast reconstruction within an academic practice. Methods The billing records of 162 patients who underwent postmastectomy implant-based or free flap breast reconstruction by two newly hired microsurgeons at an academic institution during the 2011, 2012, and 2013 fiscal years were reviewed. Actual data on professional revenue, relative value units (RVUs), and facility costs for the first stage of reconstruction as well as costs of postoperative complications were assessed. Results Free flaps consistently generated more revenue and RVUs than implants (p < 0.001). Rates of major complications and associated costs were greater for free flaps during the first 2 years of practice; however, by the 3rd year rates were similar between free flaps and implants (14.3 vs. 18.2%, p = 0.72). There was a 26% reduction in free flap operative time in 2013 as compared with 2011. Operative efficiency (hourly RVU) of first stage procedures increased each year for both modalities. At the completion of reconstruction, flaps and implants had comparable hourly reimbursement ($1,053 vs. $947, p = 0.72) and hourly RVU (22 vs. 29, p = 0.06). Conclusions Contrary to perceptions that free flap breast reconstructions are financially inefficient for the surgeon, we have found that these complex reconstructive procedures are profitable. Even in the early years of practice, hourly reimbursements from completed flap reconstructions are similar to reimbursements received from similar staged implant reconstructions. PMID:26872025

  19. Are Earthquake Magnitudes Clustered?

    SciTech Connect

    Davidsen, Joern; Green, Adam

    2011-03-11

    The question of earthquake predictability is a long-standing and important challenge. Recent results [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 098501 (2007); ibid.100, 038501 (2008)] have suggested that earthquake magnitudes are clustered, thus indicating that they are not independent in contrast to what is typically assumed. Here, we present evidence that the observed magnitude correlations are to a large extent, if not entirely, an artifact due to the incompleteness of earthquake catalogs and the well-known modified Omori law. The latter leads to variations in the frequency-magnitude distribution if the distribution is constrained to those earthquakes that are close in space and time to the directly following event.

  20. Misconceptions about astronomical magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Eric; Cox, Caroline V.

    1997-10-01

    The present system of astronomical magnitudes was created as an inverse scale by Claudius Ptolemy in about 140 A.D. and was defined to be logarithmic in 1856 by Norman Pogson, who believed that human eyes respond logarithmically to the intensity of light. Although scientists have known for some time that the response is instead a power law, astronomers continue to use the Pogson magnitude scale. The peculiarities of this system make it easy for students to develop numerous misconceptions about how and why to use magnitudes. We present a useful exercise in the use of magnitudes to derive a cosmologically interesting quantity (the mass-to-light ratio for spiral galaxies), with potential pitfalls pointed out and explained.

  1. The effect of cochlear implantation and post-operative rehabilitation on acoustic voice analysis in post-lingual hearing impaired adults.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sabah M; Malki, Khalid H; Mesallam, Tamer A; Farahat, Mohamad; Bukhari, Manal; Murry, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    Post-lingual deaf adults can develop some vocal abnormalities similar to those developed in pre-lingual deaf individuals. The aim of this work was to study the effect of cochlear implantation followed by post-operative rehabilitation on voice acoustics in post-lingual hearing impaired adults with different durations of hearing loss. The study included 35 post-lingual hearing impaired adults who underwent cochlear implantation. Patients were divided into two groups according to the duration of their hearing loss. Each group was further divided into two subgroups according to whether they received auditory rehabilitation or not. Using the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP) parameters, comparisons were made between each subgroup of patients and the normal MDVP Saudi database, and between subgroups of patients. Most of the patients in the two groups reported significant improvement in their MDVP results post-implantation. Further, significantly deviant MDVP parameters were reported in the group of patients with longer duration of hearing loss. Patients who received rehabilitation significantly improved more than those who did not. In conclusion, it appears that cochlear implantation improves the auditory control of voice production in post-lingual deaf adults. Also, it is obvious that cochlear implantation at an early stage of hearing loss gives better results on voice control, especially if augmented with auditory rehabilitation. PMID:21331786

  2. Telescopic limiting magnitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1990-01-01

    The prediction of the magnitude of the faintest star visible through a telescope by a visual observer is a difficult problem in physiology. Many prediction formulas have been advanced over the years, but most do not even consider the magnification used. Here, the prediction algorithm problem is attacked with two complimentary approaches: (1) First, a theoretical algorithm was developed based on physiological data for the sensitivity of the eye. This algorithm also accounts for the transmission of the atmosphere and the telescope, the brightness of the sky, the color of the star, the age of the observer, the aperture, and the magnification. (2) Second, 314 observed values for the limiting magnitude were collected as a test of the formula. It is found that the formula does accurately predict the average observed limiting magnitudes under all conditions.

  3. Should Astronomy Abolish Magnitudes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    2001-12-01

    Astronomy is riddled with a number of anachronistic and counterintuitive practices. Among these are: plotting increasing stellar temperature from right to left in the H-R diagram; giving the distances to remote astronomical objects in parsecs; and reporting the brightness of astronomical objects in magnitudes. Historical accident and observational technique, respectively, are the bases for the first two practices, and they will undoubtedly persist in the future. However, the use of magnitudes is especially egregious when essentially linear optical detectors like CCDs are used for measuring brightness, which are then reported in a logarithmic (base 2.512 deg!) scale. The use of magnitudes has its origin in three historical artifacts: Ptolemy's method of reporting the brightness of stars in the "Almagest"; the 19th century need for a photographic photometry scale; and the 19th century studies by psychophysicists E. H. Weber and G. T. Fechner on the response of the human eye to light. The latter work sought to uncover the relationship between the subjective response of the human eye and brain to the objective brightness of external optical stimuli. The resulting Fechner-Weber law states that this response is logarithmic: that is, that the eye essentially takes the logarithm of the incoming optical signal. However, after more than a century of perceptual studies, most intensively by S. S. Stevens, it is now well established that this relation is not logarithmic. For naked eye detection of stars from the first to sixth magnitudes, it can be reasonably well fit by a power law with index of about 0.3. Therefore, the modern experimental studies undermine the physiological basis for the use of magnitudes in astronomy. Should the historical origins of magnitudes alone be reason enough for their continued use? Probably not, since astronomical magnitudes are based on outdated studies of human perception; make little sense in an era of linear optical detection; and provide a

  4. Regression problems for magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellaro, S.; Mulargia, F.; Kagan, Y. Y.

    2006-06-01

    Least-squares linear regression is so popular that it is sometimes applied without checking whether its basic requirements are satisfied. In particular, in studying earthquake phenomena, the conditions (a) that the uncertainty on the independent variable is at least one order of magnitude smaller than the one on the dependent variable, (b) that both data and uncertainties are normally distributed and (c) that residuals are constant are at times disregarded. This may easily lead to wrong results. As an alternative to least squares, when the ratio between errors on the independent and the dependent variable can be estimated, orthogonal regression can be applied. We test the performance of orthogonal regression in its general form against Gaussian and non-Gaussian data and error distributions and compare it with standard least-square regression. General orthogonal regression is found to be superior or equal to the standard least squares in all the cases investigated and its use is recommended. We also compare the performance of orthogonal regression versus standard regression when, as often happens in the literature, the ratio between errors on the independent and the dependent variables cannot be estimated and is arbitrarily set to 1. We apply these results to magnitude scale conversion, which is a common problem in seismology, with important implications in seismic hazard evaluation, and analyse it through specific tests. Our analysis concludes that the commonly used standard regression may induce systematic errors in magnitude conversion as high as 0.3-0.4, and, even more importantly, this can introduce apparent catalogue incompleteness, as well as a heavy bias in estimates of the slope of the frequency-magnitude distributions. All this can be avoided by using the general orthogonal regression in magnitude conversions.

  5. A pacemaker powered by an implantable biofuel cell operating under conditions mimicking the human blood circulatory system--battery not included.

    PubMed

    Southcott, Mark; MacVittie, Kevin; Halámek, Jan; Halámková, Lenka; Jemison, William D; Lobel, Robert; Katz, Evgeny

    2013-05-01

    Biocatalytic electrodes made of buckypaper were modified with PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase on the anode and with laccase on the cathode and were assembled in a flow biofuel cell filled with serum solution mimicking the human blood circulatory system. The biofuel cell generated an open circuitry voltage, Voc, of ca. 470 mV and a short circuitry current, Isc, of ca. 5 mA (a current density of 0.83 mA cm(-2)). The power generated by the implantable biofuel cell was used to activate a pacemaker connected to the cell via a charge pump and a DC-DC converter interface circuit to adjust the voltage produced by the biofuel cell to the value required by the pacemaker. The voltage-current dependencies were analyzed for the biofuel cell connected to an Ohmic load and to the electronic loads composed of the interface circuit, or the power converter, and the pacemaker to study their operation. The correct pacemaker operation was confirmed using a medical device - an implantable loop recorder. Sustainable operation of the pacemaker was achieved with the system closely mimicking human physiological conditions using a single biofuel cell. This first demonstration of the pacemaker activated by the physiologically produced electrical energy shows promise for future electronic implantable medical devices powered by electricity harvested from the human body.

  6. The discovery and comparison of symbolic magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawn; Lu, Hongjing; Holyoak, Keith J

    2014-06-01

    Humans and other primates are able to make relative magnitude comparisons, both with perceptual stimuli and with symbolic inputs that convey magnitude information. Although numerous models of magnitude comparison have been proposed, the basic question of how symbolic magnitudes (e.g., size or intelligence of animals) are derived and represented in memory has received little attention. We argue that symbolic magnitudes often will not correspond directly to elementary features of individual concepts. Rather, magnitudes may be formed in working memory based on computations over more basic features stored in long-term memory. We present a model of how magnitudes can be acquired and compared based on BARTlet, a representationally simpler version of Bayesian Analogy with Relational Transformations (BART; Lu, Chen, & Holyoak, 2012). BARTlet operates on distributions of magnitude variables created by applying dimension-specific weights (learned with the aid of empirical priors derived from pre-categorical comparisons) to more primitive features of objects. The resulting magnitude distributions, formed and maintained in working memory, are sensitive to contextual influences such as the range of stimuli and polarity of the question. By incorporating psychological reference points that control the precision of magnitudes in working memory and applying the tools of signal detection theory, BARTlet is able to account for a wide range of empirical phenomena involving magnitude comparisons, including the symbolic distance effect and the semantic congruity effect. We discuss the role of reference points in cognitive and social decision-making, and implications for the evolution of relational representations.

  7. Landslide seismic magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. H.; Jan, J. C.; Pu, H. C.; Tu, Y.; Chen, C. C.; Wu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    Landslides have become one of the most deadly natural disasters on earth, not only due to a significant increase in extreme climate change caused by global warming, but also rapid economic development in topographic relief areas. How to detect landslides using a real-time system has become an important question for reducing possible landslide impacts on human society. However, traditional detection of landslides, either through direct surveys in the field or remote sensing images obtained via aircraft or satellites, is highly time consuming. Here we analyze very long period seismic signals (20-50 s) generated by large landslides such as Typhoon Morakot, which passed though Taiwan in August 2009. In addition to successfully locating 109 large landslides, we define landslide seismic magnitude based on an empirical formula: Lm = log ⁡ (A) + 0.55 log ⁡ (Δ) + 2.44, where A is the maximum displacement (μm) recorded at one seismic station and Δ is its distance (km) from the landslide. We conclude that both the location and seismic magnitude of large landslides can be rapidly estimated from broadband seismic networks for both academic and applied purposes, similar to earthquake monitoring. We suggest a real-time algorithm be set up for routine monitoring of landslides in places where they pose a frequent threat.

  8. Magnitude correlations in global seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarlis, N. V.

    2011-08-15

    By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

  9. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  10. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain Fixed Bridges Porcelain Veneers Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth- ...

  11. Implantable electrical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fully implantable and self contained device is disclosed composed of a flexible electrode array for surrounding damaged nerves and a signal generator for driving the electrode array with periodic electrical impulses of nanoampere magnitude to induce regeneration of the damaged nerves.

  12. Are all metal-on-metal hip revision operations contributing to the National Joint Registry implant survival curves?

    PubMed Central

    Sabah, S. A.; Henckel, J.; Koutsouris, S.; Rajani, R.; Hothi, H.; Skinner, J. A.; Hart, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NJR) has extended its scope to report on hospital, surgeon and implant performance. Data linkage of the NJR to the London Implant Retrieval Centre (LIRC) has previously evaluated data quality for hip primary procedures, but did not assess revision records. Methods We analysed metal-on-metal hip revision procedures performed between 2003 and 2013. A total of 69 929 revision procedures from the NJR and 929 revised pairs of components from the LIRC were included. Results We were able to link 716 (77.1%) revision procedures on the NJR to the LIRC. This meant that 213 (22.9%) revision procedures at the LIRC could not be identified on the NJR. We found that 349 (37.6%) explants at the LIRC completed the full linkage process to both NJR primary and revision databases. Data completion was excellent (> 99.9%) for revision procedures reported to the NJR. Discussion This study has shown that only approximately one third of retrieved components at the LIRC, contributed to survival curves on the NJR. We recommend prospective registry-retrieval linkage as a tool to feedback missing and erroneous data to the NJR and improve data quality. Take home message: Prospective Registry – retrieval linkage is a simple tool to evaluate and improve data quality on the NJR. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:33–9. PMID:26733513

  13. Implantable apparatus for localized heating of tissue

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.

    1985-05-20

    With the object of repetitively treating deep-seated, inoperable tumors by hyperthermia as well as locally heating other internal tissue masses repetitively, a receiving antenna, transmission line and electrode arrangement are implanted completely within the patient's body, with the receiving antenna just under the surface of the skin and with the electrode arrangement being located so as to most effectively heat the tissue to be treated. An external, transmitting antenna, driven by an external radio-frequency energy source, is closely coupled to the implanted receiving antenna so that the energy coupled across the air-skin interface provides electromagnetic energy suitable for heating the tissue in the vicinity of the implanted electrodes. The resulting increase in tissue temperature may be estimated by an indirect measurement of the decrease in tissue resistivity in the heat region. This change in resistivity appears as a change in the loading of the receiving antenna which can be measured by either determining the change in the phase relationship between the voltage and the current appearing on the transmitting antenna or by measuring the change in the magnitude of the impedance thereof. Optionally, multiple electrode arrays may be activated or inactivated by the application of magnetic fields to operate implanted magnetic reed swtiches. 5 figs.

  14. Implantable apparatus for localized heating of tissue

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.

    1987-01-01

    With the object of repetitively treating deep-seated, inoperable tumors by hyperthermia as well as locally heating other internal tissue masses repetitively, a receiving antenna, transmission line, and electrode arrangment are implanted completely within the patient's body, with the receiving antenna just under the surface of the skin and with the electrode arrangement being located so as to most effectively heat the tissue to be treated. An external, transmitting antenna, driven by an external radio-frequency energy source, is closely coupled to the implanted receiving antenna so that the energy coupled across the air-skin interface provides electromagnetic energy suitable for heating the tissue in the vicinity of the implanted electrodes. The resulting increase in tissue temperature may be estimated by an indirect measurement of the decrease in tissue resistivity in the heated region. This change in resistivity appears as a change in the loading of the receiving antenna which can be measured by either determining the change in the phase relationship between the voltage and the current appearing on the transmitting antenna or by measuring the change in the magnitude of the impedance thereof. Optionally, multiple electrode arrays may be activated or inactivated by the application of magnetic fields to operate implanted magnetic reed switches.

  15. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  16. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  17. Dental-Implantate und ihre Werkstoffe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newesely, Heinrich

    1983-07-01

    Some new trends in materials for dental implants, which also effect in the operative techniques and implant design, are described. Advantages and shortcomings of the different material types are exemplified and correlated with their bioinert resp. bioactive functions. The practical interest in metallic implants focussed in titanium resp. oxide ceramics in the ceramic field, whereas the special goal of implant research follows from the improvement of the bioactive principle with loaded calcium phosphate implants.

  18. Comparison of TV magnitudes and visual magnitudes of meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigeno, Yoshihiko; Toda, Masayuki

    2008-08-01

    The generally accepted belief is that a meteor, with a large amount of infrared rays, can be captured brighter than it actually is by infrared-sensitive image intensifiers (I.I.) or CCD. We conducted observations of meteors using three methodologies: 1) I.I. with an attached filter that has the same spectral response as the human eye at night vision, 2) I.I. without the filter and 3) visually to determine meteor magnitudes. A total of 31 members of the astronomical club at Meiji University observed 50 Perseid meteors, 19 Geminid meteors as well as 44 sporadic meteors and the results were tabulated. The results helped us understand that on average I.I. can record meteors as brighter than visual observation by the magnitude equivalent of 0.5 for Perseids, 1.0 for Geminids and 0.5 for sporadic meteors. For I.I. with a filter that has the same spectral response the human eye at night vision, it turned out that we could obtain almost the same magnitude with observation by the human eye. We learned that a bright meteor with negative magnitude can be observed by I.I. brighter than the human eye. From several examples, we found I.I. could record a meteor with about -1 visual magnitude as brighter by about three magnitudes. We could probably do so because a bright meteor with negative magnitude may contain more infrared rays and the brightness could be amplified.

  19. Integrated Circuit Stellar Magnitude Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, James A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an electronic circuit which can be used to demonstrate the stellar magnitude scale. Six rectangular light-emitting diodes with independently adjustable duty cycles represent stars of magnitudes 1 through 6. Experimentally verifies the logarithmic response of the eye. (Author/GA)

  20. [Hearing implants].

    PubMed

    Stokroos, Robert J; George, Erwin L J

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands, more than 1.5 million people suffer from sensorineural hearing loss or deafness. However, fitting conventional hearing aids does not provide a solution for everyone. In recent decades, developments in medical technology have produced implantable and other devices that restore both sensorineural and conductive hearing losses. These hearing devices can be categorized into bone conductive devices, implantable middle ear prostheses, cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Furthermore, new implants aimed at treating tinnitus and loss of vestibular function have recently been developed.

  1. Multi-catheter interstitial brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation: an audit of implant quality based on dosimetric evaluation comparing intra-operative versus post-operative placement

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, Lavanya; Joshi, Kishor; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji; Sarin, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The use of multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (MIB) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in early breast cancer (EBC) patients outside the trial setting has increased. Hence, there is a need to critically evaluate implant quality. Moreover, there is a scarcity of reports using an open cavity technique. We report the dosimetric indices of open and closed cavity MIB techniques. Material and methods The dosimetric parameters of 60 EBC patients treated with MIB (open and closed cavity) who underwent three dimensional, computerized tomography (CT) based planning for APBI from November 2011 to July 2015 were evaluated. Coverage Index (CI), Dose Homogeneity Index (DHI), Conformity Index (COIN), Plan Quality Index (PQI), and Dose Non-uniformity Index (DNR) were assessed. Results Forty-one patients underwent open cavity and 19 patients underwent closed cavity placement of brachytherapy catheters. The median number of planes was 4 and median number of needles was 20. Median dose was 34 Gy with dose per fraction of 3.4 Gy, given twice a day, 6 hours apart. The D90 of the cavity and clinical target volume (CTV) were 105% and 89%, respectively. The median doses to the surgical clips were greater than 100%. The median CI of the cavity and CTV was 0.96 and 0.82, respectively. The DHI and COIN index of the CTV was 0.73 and 0.67. There were no significant differences in the dosimetric parameters based on whether the technique was done open or closed. Conclusions Critical evaluation of the dosimetric parameters of MIB-APBI is important for optimal results. While the open and closed techniques have similar dosimetry, our institutional preference is for an open technique which eases the procedure due to direct visualization of the tumor cavity. PMID:27257415

  2. Amplitude-dependent station magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzyner, Yael; Ben Horin, Yochai; Steinberg, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Magnitude, a concept first presented by Gutenberg and Richter, adjusts measurements of ground motion for epicentral distance and source depth. Following this principle, the IDC defines the j'th station body wave magnitude for event i as mb(stai,j) = log 10(Aj,i/Tj,i) + V C(Δj,i,hi) , where VC is the Veith-Clawson (VC) correction to compensate for the epicentral distance of the station and the depth of the source. The network magnitude is calculated as the average of station magnitudes. The IDC magnitude estimation is used for event characterization and discrimination and it should be as accurate as possible. Ideally, the network magnitude should be close in value to the station magnitudes. In reality, it is observed that the residuals range between -1 and 1 mu or ±25% of a given mb(neti) value. We show that the residual, mb(neti) -mb(staj,i), depends linearly on log 10(Aj,i/Tj,i), and we correct for this dependence using the following procedure: Calculate a "jackknifed" network magnitude, mbj,n(neti), i.e. an average over all participating stations except station n. Using all measurements at station n, calculate the parameters an, bn of the linear fit of the residual mbj,n(neti) - mb(stan,i to log 10(An,i/Tn,i). For each event i at station n calculate the new station magnitude mbnew(stan,i) = (an + 1)log(An,i/Tn,i) + V C(Δn,i,hi) + bn Calculate the new network magnitude: mbnew(neti) = 1N- ∑ n=1nmbnew(stan,i) The procedure was used on more than two million station-event pairs. Correcting for the station-specific dependence on log amplitude reduces the residuals by roughly a third. We have calculated the spread of the distributions, and compared the original values and those for the corrected magnitudes. The spread is the ratio between the variance of the network magnitudes, and the variance of the residual. Calculations show an increase in the ratio of the variance, meaning that the correction process presented in this document did not lead to loss of variance

  3. A pre-operative CT and non-contrast-enhanced C-arm CT registration framework for trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongning; Sun, Ying; Liao, Rui; Ong, Sim Heng

    2014-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced C-arm CT is routinely used for intra-operative guidance during the trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI); however, the requirement for contrast agent injection is not preferable, especially for patients with renal insufficiencies. To address this problem, we present a novel framework for fully automatic registration of pre-operative CT and non-contrast-enhanced C-arm CT. The proposed framework provides an improved workflow and minimizes the usage of contrast agent in the TAVI procedure. Our framework consists of three steps: coarse rigid-body alignment, anatomical knowledge-based prior deformation field generation, and fine deformable registration. We validated the proposed framework on 20 real patient data sets. Based on the 20 data sets, the mesh-to-mesh errors at the aortic root from different methods are measured. Our proposed method significantly outperforms the other state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, we achieve the registration accuracy at 1.76±0.43 mm which is clinically plausible. Quantitative evaluation on real non-contrast enhanced C-arm CT data sets confirms the applicability in the clinical usage. The proposed heart registration method is generic and hence can be easily applied to other cardiac applications.

  4. A pre-operative CT and non-contrast-enhanced C-arm CT registration framework for trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongning; Sun, Ying; Liao, Rui; Ong, Sim Heng

    2014-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced C-arm CT is routinely used for intra-operative guidance during the trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI); however, the requirement for contrast agent injection is not preferable, especially for patients with renal insufficiencies. To address this problem, we present a novel framework for fully automatic registration of pre-operative CT and non-contrast-enhanced C-arm CT. The proposed framework provides an improved workflow and minimizes the usage of contrast agent in the TAVI procedure. Our framework consists of three steps: coarse rigid-body alignment, anatomical knowledge-based prior deformation field generation, and fine deformable registration. We validated the proposed framework on 20 real patient data sets. Based on the 20 data sets, the mesh-to-mesh errors at the aortic root from different methods are measured. Our proposed method significantly outperforms the other state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, we achieve the registration accuracy at 1.76±0.43 mm which is clinically plausible. Quantitative evaluation on real non-contrast enhanced C-arm CT data sets confirms the applicability in the clinical usage. The proposed heart registration method is generic and hence can be easily applied to other cardiac applications. PMID:25158997

  5. Bidirectional Modulation of Numerical Magnitude.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Qadeer; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Nigmatullin, Ramil; Asavarut, Paladd; Goga, Usman; Khan, Sarah; Sander, Kaija; Siddiqui, Shuaib; Roberts, R E; Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Malhotra, Paresh A

    2016-05-01

    Numerical cognition is critical for modern life; however, the precise neural mechanisms underpinning numerical magnitude allocation in humans remain obscure. Based upon previous reports demonstrating the close behavioral and neuro-anatomical relationship between number allocation and spatial attention, we hypothesized that these systems would be subject to similar control mechanisms, namely dynamic interhemispheric competition. We employed a physiological paradigm, combining visual and vestibular stimulation, to induce interhemispheric conflict and subsequent unihemispheric inhibition, as confirmed by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). This allowed us to demonstrate the first systematic bidirectional modulation of numerical magnitude toward either higher or lower numbers, independently of either eye movements or spatial attention mediated biases. We incorporated both our findings and those from the most widely accepted theoretical framework for numerical cognition to present a novel unifying computational model that describes how numerical magnitude allocation is subject to dynamic interhemispheric competition. That is, numerical allocation is continually updated in a contextual manner based upon relative magnitude, with the right hemisphere responsible for smaller magnitudes and the left hemisphere for larger magnitudes.

  6. Bidirectional Modulation of Numerical Magnitude.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Qadeer; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Nigmatullin, Ramil; Asavarut, Paladd; Goga, Usman; Khan, Sarah; Sander, Kaija; Siddiqui, Shuaib; Roberts, R E; Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Malhotra, Paresh A

    2016-05-01

    Numerical cognition is critical for modern life; however, the precise neural mechanisms underpinning numerical magnitude allocation in humans remain obscure. Based upon previous reports demonstrating the close behavioral and neuro-anatomical relationship between number allocation and spatial attention, we hypothesized that these systems would be subject to similar control mechanisms, namely dynamic interhemispheric competition. We employed a physiological paradigm, combining visual and vestibular stimulation, to induce interhemispheric conflict and subsequent unihemispheric inhibition, as confirmed by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). This allowed us to demonstrate the first systematic bidirectional modulation of numerical magnitude toward either higher or lower numbers, independently of either eye movements or spatial attention mediated biases. We incorporated both our findings and those from the most widely accepted theoretical framework for numerical cognition to present a novel unifying computational model that describes how numerical magnitude allocation is subject to dynamic interhemispheric competition. That is, numerical allocation is continually updated in a contextual manner based upon relative magnitude, with the right hemisphere responsible for smaller magnitudes and the left hemisphere for larger magnitudes. PMID:26879093

  7. Bidirectional Modulation of Numerical Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Qadeer; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Nigmatullin, Ramil; Asavarut, Paladd; Goga, Usman; Khan, Sarah; Sander, Kaija; Siddiqui, Shuaib; Roberts, R. E.; Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Bronstein, Adolfo M.; Malhotra, Paresh A.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical cognition is critical for modern life; however, the precise neural mechanisms underpinning numerical magnitude allocation in humans remain obscure. Based upon previous reports demonstrating the close behavioral and neuro-anatomical relationship between number allocation and spatial attention, we hypothesized that these systems would be subject to similar control mechanisms, namely dynamic interhemispheric competition. We employed a physiological paradigm, combining visual and vestibular stimulation, to induce interhemispheric conflict and subsequent unihemispheric inhibition, as confirmed by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). This allowed us to demonstrate the first systematic bidirectional modulation of numerical magnitude toward either higher or lower numbers, independently of either eye movements or spatial attention mediated biases. We incorporated both our findings and those from the most widely accepted theoretical framework for numerical cognition to present a novel unifying computational model that describes how numerical magnitude allocation is subject to dynamic interhemispheric competition. That is, numerical allocation is continually updated in a contextual manner based upon relative magnitude, with the right hemisphere responsible for smaller magnitudes and the left hemisphere for larger magnitudes. PMID:26879093

  8. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  9. Calibration de la magnitude absolue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, A. E.; Mennessier, M. O.

    Les parallaxes mesurées par Hipparcos permettront d'obtenir des magnitudes absolues individuelles meilleures que ±0m4 pour les étoiles placées dans un volume de rayon inférieur à 150 pc environ autour du soleil. Les algorithmes développés dans le cadre de l'exploitation des données d'Hipparcos, basés sur la méthode de maximum de vraisemblance, permettent non seulement de faire une estimation de la magnitude absolue moyenne d'un groupe physiquement homogène d'étoiles, de son comportement cinématique et de sa distribution spatiale mais aussi d'estimer une magnitude absolue individuelle pour chaque étoile de l'échantillon considéré.

  10. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to histrelin implant. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about histrelin implant.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  11. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; Bartlett, Erica L; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-11-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  12. The Testability of Maximum Magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, R.; Schorlemmer, D.; Gonzalez, A.; Zoeller, G.; Schneider, M.

    2012-12-01

    Recent disasters caused by earthquakes of unexpectedly large magnitude (such as Tohoku) illustrate the need for reliable assessments of the seismic hazard. Estimates of the maximum possible magnitude M at a given fault or in a particular zone are essential parameters in probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA), but their accuracy remains untested. In this study, we discuss the testability of long-term and short-term M estimates and the limitations that arise from testing such rare events. Of considerable importance is whether or not those limitations imply a lack of testability of a useful maximum magnitude estimate, and whether this should have any influence on current PSHA methodology. We use a simple extreme value theory approach to derive a probability distribution for the expected maximum magnitude in a future time interval, and we perform a sensitivity analysis on this distribution to determine if there is a reasonable avenue available for testing M estimates as they are commonly reported today: devoid of an appropriate probability distribution of their own and estimated only for infinite time (or relatively large untestable periods). Our results imply that any attempt at testing such estimates is futile, and that the distribution is highly sensitive to M estimates only under certain optimal conditions that are rarely observed in practice. In the future we suggest that PSHA modelers be brutally honest about the uncertainty of M estimates, or must find a way to decrease its influence on the estimated hazard.

  13. Understanding Magnitudes to Understand Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are known to be difficult to learn and difficult to teach, yet they are vital for students to have access to further mathematical concepts. This article uses evidence to support teachers employing teaching methods that focus on the conceptual understanding of the magnitude of fractions.

  14. Maximum magnitude earthquakes induced by fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarr, A.

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of numerous case histories of earthquake sequences induced by fluid injection at depth reveals that the maximum magnitude appears to be limited according to the total volume of fluid injected. Similarly, the maximum seismic moment seems to have an upper bound proportional to the total volume of injected fluid. Activities involving fluid injection include (1) hydraulic fracturing of shale formations or coal seams to extract gas and oil, (2) disposal of wastewater from these gas and oil activities by injection into deep aquifers, and (3) the development of enhanced geothermal systems by injecting water into hot, low-permeability rock. Of these three operations, wastewater disposal is observed to be associated with the largest earthquakes, with maximum magnitudes sometimes exceeding 5. To estimate the maximum earthquake that could be induced by a given fluid injection project, the rock mass is assumed to be fully saturated, brittle, to respond to injection with a sequence of earthquakes localized to the region weakened by the pore pressure increase of the injection operation and to have a Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution with a b value of 1. If these assumptions correctly describe the circumstances of the largest earthquake, then the maximum seismic moment is limited to the volume of injected liquid times the modulus of rigidity. Observations from the available case histories of earthquakes induced by fluid injection are consistent with this bound on seismic moment. In view of the uncertainties in this analysis, however, this should not be regarded as an absolute physical limit.

  15. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  16. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  17. Implants for draining neovascular glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Molteno, A C; Van Rooyen, M M; Bartholomew, R S

    1977-01-01

    The implant design, surgical technique, and pharmacological methods of controlling bleb fibrosis, used to treat neovascular glaucoma, are described, together with the results of 14 operations performed on 12 eyes. Images PMID:843508

  18. The hydroxyapatite orbital implant: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, J L; Rhatigan, M; Sampath, R; Brammar, R; Sunderland, S; Leatherbarrow, B

    1996-01-01

    The hydroxyapatite orbital implant was first released for use as an orbital implant in humans in August 1989. It has been shown to be well tolerated, providing good motility of the artificial eye with a low complication rate when used as a primary implant. This prospective study evaluated the hydroxyapatite orbital implant used as both a primary and a secondary implant. Sixty patients were implanted between October 1992 and November 1994, 28 being implanted as a primary procedure at the time of enucleation or evisceration, and 32 as a secondary procedure. Seven patients underwent second-stage drilling and pegging of the implant. The mean follow-up time was 13 months (range 2-26 months). A standardised operative and post-operative protocol was followed. The patients were evaluated post-operatively for the amount of enophthalmos, degree of upper lid sulcus deformity, motility of the prosthesis, location of the implant in the socket, socket status and the presence or absence of discharge, position of the drill hole and coverage of the implant. Complications and their management were documented. Both patient and surgeon made a subjective assessment of cosmesis and the patient's satisfaction with the overall result was noted. The results of this study show the hydroxyapatite orbital implant to provide excellent motility of the artificial eye and good cosmesis with a low rate of complications when used both as a primary and as a secondary implant.

  19. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant. These specialists may include: Audiologists Speech therapists Ear, nose, and throat doctors (otolaryngologists) This is a very important part of the process. You will need to work closely with your team of specialists to get ...

  20. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  1. Orientation and Magnitude of Mars' Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image shows the orientation and magnitude of the magnetic field measured by the MGS magnetometer as it sped over the surface of Mars during an early aerobraking pass (Day of the year, 264; 'P6' periapsis pass). At each point along the spacecraft trajectory we've drawn vectors in the direction of the magnetic field measured at that instant; the length of the line is scaled to show the relative magnitude of the field. Imagine traveling along with the MGS spacecraft, holding a string with a magnetized needle on one end: this essentially a compass with a needle that is free to spin in all directions. As you pass over the surface the needle would swing rapidly, first pointing towards the planet and then rotating quickly towards 'up' and back down again. All in a relatively short span of time, say a minute or two, during which time the spacecraft has traveled a couple of hundred miles. You've just passed over one of many 'magnetic anomalies' thus far detected near the surface of Mars. A second major anomaly appears a little later along the spacecraft track, about 1/4 the magnitude of the first - can you find it? The short scale length of the magnetic field signature locates the source near the surface of Mars, perhaps in the crust, a 10 to 75 kilometer thick outer shell of the planet (radius 3397 km).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  2. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  3. The 'baseball' orbital implant: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Leatherbarrow, B; Kwartz, J; Sunderland, S; Brammar, R; Nichol, E

    1994-01-01

    The 'baseball' orbital implant was described by Frueh and Felker in 1976. Although this implant was originally described for use as a secondary implant, it has also been widely used as a primary implant at the time of enucleation. This prospective study evaluated the effectiveness of this implant used both primarily and secondarily. Forty-four patients were implanted between April 1990 and May 1991, 19 of the implants being primary and 25 secondary. A standardised operative and post-operative protocol was followed. The mean follow-up time was 31 months (range 24-36 months). The patients were evaluated for the degree of volume replacement, implant and associated prosthesis motility, secondary eyelid and socket problems, patient satisfaction, the need for further surgery and post-operative complications. The overall results achieved by primary implantation were superior to those of secondary implantation. Our results suggest that this implant provides a satisfactory functional and cosmetic rehabilitation of the anophthalmic patient with few complications.

  4. Solar Variability Magnitudes and Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Greg

    2015-08-01

    The Sun’s net radiative output varies on timescales of minutes to many millennia. The former are directly observed as part of the on-going 37-year long total solar irradiance climate data record, while the latter are inferred from solar proxy and stellar evolution models. Since the Sun provides nearly all the energy driving the Earth’s climate system, changes in the sunlight reaching our planet can have - and have had - significant impacts on life and civilizations.Total solar irradiance has been measured from space since 1978 by a series of overlapping instruments. These have shown changes in the spatially- and spectrally-integrated radiant energy at the top of the Earth’s atmosphere from timescales as short as minutes to as long as a solar cycle. The Sun’s ~0.01% variations over a few minutes are caused by the superposition of convection and oscillations, and even occasionally by a large flare. Over days to weeks, changing surface activity affects solar brightness at the ~0.1% level. The 11-year solar cycle has comparable irradiance variations with peaks near solar maxima.Secular variations are harder to discern, being limited by instrument stability and the relatively short duration of the space-borne record. Proxy models of the Sun based on cosmogenic isotope records and inferred from Earth climate signatures indicate solar brightness changes over decades to millennia, although the magnitude of these variations depends on many assumptions. Stellar evolution affects yet longer timescales and is responsible for the greatest solar variabilities.In this talk I will summarize the Sun’s variability magnitudes over different temporal ranges, showing examples relevant for climate studies as well as detections of exo-solar planets transiting Sun-like stars.

  5. Early tissue reaction to textured breast implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brohim, R M; Foresman, P A; Hildebrandt, P K; Rodeheaver, G T

    1992-04-01

    Capsular contracture around breast implants with smooth surfaces continues to be an unpredictable complication. Some surgeons believe that silicone implants covered with porous polyurethane foam have a lowered potential to contract. These textured implants are not as biocompatible as silicone. Recently, silicone implants with textured surfaces have been introduced with the hope that the incidence of unacceptable implant contracture will be reduced. Using a rat implant model, the tissue reaction to textured implant surfaces was assessed. The implant surfaces evaluated were Silastic II, Siltex, MISTI, Biocell, Silastic MSI, and Même. Disks of each implant material were implanted under the dorsal skin of rats for a period of 28 days. Each implant with its surrounding tissue was excised, processed for histological analysis, and assessed for the tissue's response to the implant with particular emphasis on the formation of a continuous collagen capsule. The results indicated that the magnitude of surface texturing influenced the development of a complete capsule. Implant surfaces with a texture of less than 150 microns in height or depth (Silastic II, Siltex, and MISTI) resulted in the formation of complete capsules. An implant (Biocell) with irregular texturing (200-350 microns) produced an organized capsule over most of its surface with localized interruptions of the capsule at the sites of its deepest cavities. Implant surfaces with texturing that exceeded 350 microns in height or depth (Silastic MSI and Même) resulted in inhibition of the formation of a continuous capsule during this 28-day study.

  6. PRE-OPERATIVE PLANNING AND SURGICAL TECHNIQUE OF THE OPEN WEDGE SUPRACONDYLAR OSTEOTOMY FOR CORRECTION OF VALGUS KNEE AND FIXATION WITH A FIXED-ANGLE IMPLANT

    PubMed Central

    Paccola, Cleber Antonio Jansen

    2015-01-01

    The step-by-step preoperative planning for supracondylar opening wedge osteotomy of the femur for precise correction of the load axis of the lower limb using a fixed-angle implant (95° AO blade plate) is presented. The surgical technique and the use of a bone graft from the same site for filling in the defect are also presented. PMID:27026976

  7. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  8. Facial implants.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, M R; Rubenstein, J T

    1998-01-01

    The application of endosseous dental implants for the retention and stabilization of extraoral prostheses and hearing aids has been shown to be effective functionally and aesthetically. Implants have reduced the need for adhesive use, simplifying cleaning procedures and thus extending the life of the prosthesis. Implant-retained prostheses have provided patients the opportunity to participate in routine activities such as work, shopping, swimming, and jogging with less fear of losing their prosthesis. The implants' impact on patients has resulted in their ability to function in society with confidence that their defects will be less noticeable and their ability to respond to the environment enhanced. The culmination of these effects have without doubt improved the overall quality of life for patients. As with any new technology, its application will encounter unanticipated problems and some limitations in use. As the art and science of this technique evolve, however, it is anticipated that it will result in the ability to provide improved health care for patients.

  9. Elementary Implantable Force Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wachs, Rebecca A.; Ellstein, David; Drazan, John; Healey, Colleen P.; Uhl, Richard L.; Connor, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing implantable sensors which are robust enough to maintain long term functionality inside the body remains a significant challenge. The ideal implantable sensing system is one which is simple and robust; free from batteries, telemetry, and complex electronics. We have developed an elementary implantable sensor for orthopaedic smart implants. The sensor requires no telemetry and no batteries to communicate wirelessly. It has no on-board signal conditioning electronics. The sensor itself has no electrical connections and thus does not require a hermetic package. The sensor is an elementary L-C resonator which can function as a simple force transducer by using a solid dielectric material of known stiffness between two parallel Archimedean coils. The operating characteristics of the sensors are predicted using a simplified, lumped circuit model. We have demonstrated sensor functionality both in air and in saline. Our preliminary data indicate that the sensor can be reasonably well modeled as a lumped circuit to predict its response to loading. PMID:24883335

  10. An unusual case of a ruptured Poly Implant Prothèse breast implant associated with xanthoma.

    PubMed

    Dinets, Andrii; Unukovych, Dmytro; Khrapach, Vasyl; Zakhartseva, Olga; Sulik, Volodymyr; Kaminskyi, Edgar; Khrapach, Olexandr; Meloyan, Ani; Zakhartseva, Lubov; Mishalov, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    A suspicious breast mass was intra-operatively found in a female patient previously operated for breast augmentation with the Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) implants. The neoplasm was verified as xanthoma and an asymptomatic microrupture of PIP was also detected. This report discusses possible association of breast xanthoma with PIP implant rupture. PMID:27583262

  11. An unusual case of a ruptured Poly Implant Prothèse breast implant associated with xanthoma

    PubMed Central

    Dinets, Andrii; Unukovych, Dmytro; Khrapach, Vasyl; Zakhartseva, Olga; Sulik, Volodymyr; Kaminskyi, Edgar; Khrapach, Olexandr; Meloyan, Ani; Zakhartseva, Lubov; Mishalov, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A suspicious breast mass was intra-operatively found in a female patient previously operated for breast augmentation with the Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) implants. The neoplasm was verified as xanthoma and an asymptomatic microrupture of PIP was also detected. This report discusses possible association of breast xanthoma with PIP implant rupture. PMID:27583262

  12. A scheme to set preferred magnitudes in the ISC Bulletin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Domenico; Storchak, Dmitry A.

    2016-04-01

    One of the main purposes of the International Seismological Centre (ISC) is to collect, integrate and reprocess seismic bulletins provided by agencies around the world in order to produce the ISC Bulletin. This is regarded as the most comprehensive bulletin of the Earth's seismicity, and its production is based on a unique cooperation in the seismological community that allows the ISC to complement the work of seismological agencies operating at global and/or local-regional scale. In addition, by using the seismic wave measurements provided by reporting agencies, the ISC computes, where possible, its own event locations and magnitudes such as short-period body wave m b and surface wave M S . Therefore, the ISC Bulletin contains the results of the reporting agencies as well as the ISC own solutions. Among the most used seismic event parameters listed in seismological bulletins, the event magnitude is of particular importance for characterizing a seismic event. The selection of a magnitude value (or multiple ones) for various research purposes or practical applications is not always a straightforward task for users of the ISC Bulletin and related products since a multitude of magnitude types is currently computed by seismological agencies (sometimes using different standards for the same magnitude type). Here, we describe a scheme that we intend to implement in routine ISC operations to mark the preferred magnitudes in order to help ISC users in the selection of events with magnitudes of their interest.

  13. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  14. Cochlear Implantation in Unique Pediatric Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Anna X.; Kim, Grace G.; Zdanski, Carlton J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Over the last decade, the selection criteria for cochlear implantation have expanded to include children with special auditory, otologic, and medical problems. Included within this expanded group of candidates are those children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, cochleovestibular malformations, cochlear nerve deficiency, associated syndromes, as well as multiple medical and developmental disorders. Definitive indications for cochlear implantation in these unique pediatric populations are in evolution. This review will provide an overview of managing and habilitating hearing loss within these populations with specific focus on cochlear implantation as a treatment option. Recent findings Cochlear implants have been successfully implanted in children within unique populations with variable results. Evaluation for cochlear implant candidacy includes the core components of a full medical, audiologic, and speech and language evaluations. When considering candidacy in these children, additional aspects to consider include disorder specific surgical considerations and child/care-giver counseling regarding reasonable post-implantation outcome expectations. Summary Cochlear implantations are accepted as the standard of care for improving hearing and speech development in children with severe to profound hearing loss. However, children with sensorineural hearing loss who meet established audiologic criteria for cochlear implantation may have unique audiologic, medical, and anatomic characteristics that necessitate special consideration regarding cochlear implantation candidacy and outcome. Individualized pre-operative candidacy and counseling, surgical evaluation, and reasonable post-operative outcome expectations should be taken into account in the management of these children. PMID:23128686

  15. Reinforcer Magnitude Attenuates Apomorphine's Effects on Operant Pecking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Lamb, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    When given to pigeons, the direct-acting dopamine agonist apomorphine elicits pecking. The response has been likened to foraging pecking because it bears remarkable similarity to foraging behavior, and it is enhanced by food deprivation. On the other hand, other data suggest the response is not related to foraging behavior and may even interfere…

  16. Magnitude correlations and dynamical scaling for seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Godano, Cataldo; Lippiello, Eugenio; De Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2007-12-06

    We analyze the experimental seismic catalog of Southern California and we show the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We propose a dynamical scaling hypothesis relating time and magnitude as the physical mechanism responsible of the observed magnitude correlations. We show that experimental distributions in size and time naturally originate solely from this scaling hypothesis. Furthermore we generate a synthetic catalog reproducing the organization in time and magnitude of experimental data.

  17. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  18. Sterilisation of implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Matthews, I P; Gibson, C; Samuel, A H

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis and rates of infection associated with the use of a wide variety of implantable devices are described. The multi-factorial nature of post-operative periprosthetic infection is outlined and the role of sterilisation of devices is explained. The resistance of bacterial spores is highlighted as a problem and a full description is given of the processes of sterilisation by heat, steam, ethylene oxide, low temperature steam and formaldehyde, ionising radiation and liquid glutaraldehyde. Sterility assurance and validation are discussed in the context of biological indicators and physical/chemical indicators. Adverse effects upon the material composition of devices and problems of process control are listed. Finally, possible optimisations of the ethylene oxide process and their potential significance to the field of sterilisation of implants is explored. PMID:10172076

  19. Magnitude and sign correlations in heartbeat fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenazy, Y.; Ivanov, P. C.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    We propose an approach for analyzing signals with long-range correlations by decomposing the signal increment series into magnitude and sign series and analyzing their scaling properties. We show that signals with identical long-range correlations can exhibit different time organization for the magnitude and sign. We find that the magnitude series relates to the nonlinear properties of the original time series, while the sign series relates to the linear properties. We apply our approach to the heartbeat interval series and find that the magnitude series is long-range correlated, while the sign series is anticorrelated and that both magnitude and sign series may have clinical applications.

  20. Magnitude systems in old star catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Tomoko; Yamaoka, Hitoshi

    2005-06-01

    The current system of stellar magnitudes originally introduced by Hipparchus was strictly defined by Norman Pogson in 1856. He based his system on Ptolemy's star catalogue, the Almagest, recorded in about AD137, and defined the magnitude-intensity relationship on a logarithmic scale. Stellar magnitudes observed with the naked eye recorded in seven old star catalogues were analyzed in order to examine the visual magnitude systems. Although psychophysicists have proposed that human visual sensitivity follows a power-law scale, it is shown here that the degree of agreement is far better for a logarithmic scale than for a power-law scale. It is also found that light ratios in each star catalogue are nearly equal to 2.512, if the brightest (1st magnitude) and the faintest (6th magnitude and dimmer) stars are excluded from the study. This means that the visual magnitudes in the old star catalogues agree fully with Pogson's logarithmic scale.

  1. A Novel Operative Procedure for Pelvic Organ Prolapse Utilizing a MRI-Visible Mesh Implant: Safety and Outcome of Modified Laparoscopic Bilateral Sacropexy

    PubMed Central

    Meyberg-Solomayer, Gabriele; Radosa, Julia; Bader, Werner; Schneider, Guenther; Solomayer, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sacropexy is a generally applied treatment of prolapse, yet there are known possible complications of it. An essential need exists for better alloplastic materials. Methods. Between April 2013 and June 2014, we performed a modified laparoscopic bilateral sacropexy (MLBS) in 10 patients using a MRI-visible PVDF mesh implant. Selected patients had prolapse POP-Q stages II-III and concomitant OAB. We studied surgery-related morbidity, anatomical and functional outcome, and mesh-visibility in MRI. Mean follow-up was 7.4 months. Results. Concomitant colporrhaphy was conducted in 1/10 patients. Anatomical success was defined as POP-Q stage 0-I. Apical success rate was 100% and remained stable. A recurrent cystocele was seen in 1/10 patients during follow-up without need for intervention. Out of 6 (6/10) patients with preoperative SUI, 5/6 were healed and 1/6 persisted. De-novo SUI was seen in 1/10 patients. Complications requiring a relaparoscopy were seen in 2/10 patients. 8/10 patients with OAB were relieved postoperatively. The first in-human magnetic resonance visualization of a prolapse mesh implant was performed and showed good quality of visualization. Conclusion. MLBS is a feasible and safe procedure with favorable anatomical and functional outcome and good concomitant healing rates of SUI and OAB. Prospective data and larger samples are required. PMID:25961042

  2. Reinforcement magnitude and responding during treatment with differential reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, Dorothea C; Kelley, Michael E; Vorndran, Christina M; Kuhn, Stephanie A C; LaRue, Robert H

    2002-01-01

    Basic findings indicate that the amount or magnitude of reinforcement can influence free-operant responding prior to and during extinction. In this study, the relation between reinforcement magnitude and adaptive behavior was evaluated with 3 children as part of treatment with differential reinforcement. In the first experiment, a communicative response was shaped and maintained by the same reinforcer that was found to maintain problem behavior. Two reinforcement magnitudes (20-s or 60-s access to toys or escape from demands) were compared and found to be associated with similar levels of resistance to extinction. The relation between reinforcement magnitude and response maintenance was further evaluated in the second experiment by exposing the communicative response to 20-s or 300-s access to toys or escape. Results for 2 participants suggested that this factor may alter the duration of postreinforcement pauses. PMID:11936544

  3. Reinforcement magnitude and responding during treatment with differential reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Dorothea C; Kelley, Michael E; Vorndran, Christina M; Kuhn, Stephanie A C; LaRue, Robert H

    2002-01-01

    Basic findings indicate that the amount or magnitude of reinforcement can influence free-operant responding prior to and during extinction. In this study, the relation between reinforcement magnitude and adaptive behavior was evaluated with 3 children as part of treatment with differential reinforcement. In the first experiment, a communicative response was shaped and maintained by the same reinforcer that was found to maintain problem behavior. Two reinforcement magnitudes (20-s or 60-s access to toys or escape from demands) were compared and found to be associated with similar levels of resistance to extinction. The relation between reinforcement magnitude and response maintenance was further evaluated in the second experiment by exposing the communicative response to 20-s or 300-s access to toys or escape. Results for 2 participants suggested that this factor may alter the duration of postreinforcement pauses.

  4. Wireless power transfer to a cardiac implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanghoek; Ho, John S.; Chen, Lisa Y.; Poon, Ada S. Y.

    2012-08-01

    We analyze wireless power transfer between a source and a weakly coupled implant on the heart. Numerical studies show that mid-field wireless powering achieves much higher power transfer efficiency than traditional inductively coupled systems. With proper system design, power sufficient to operate typical cardiac implants can be received by millimeter-sized coils.

  5. Optimization of the ion implantation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maczka, D.; Latuszynski, A.; Kuduk, R.; Partyka, J.

    This work is devoted to the optimization of the ion implantation process in the implanter Unimas of the Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin. The results obtained during several years of operation allow us to determine the optimal work parameters of the device [1-3].

  6. The case for a generic implant processor.

    PubMed

    Strydis, Christos; Gaydadjiev, Georgi N

    2008-01-01

    A more structured and streamlined design of implants is nowadays possible. In this paper we focus on implant processors located in the heart of implantable systems. We present a real and representative biomedical-application scenario where such a new processor can be employed. Based on a suitably selected processor simulator, various operational aspects of the application are being monitored. Findings on performance, cache behavior, branch prediction, power consumption, energy expenditure and instruction mixes are presented and analyzed. The suitability of such an implant processor and directions for future work are given.

  7. A novel closed-loop electromechanical stimulator to enhance osseointegration with immediate loading of dental implant restorations.

    PubMed

    Meswania, I M; Bousdras, V A; Ahir, S P; Cunningham, J L; Blunn, G W; Goodship, A E

    2010-10-01

    The degree of osseomechanical integration of dental implants is acutely sensitive to their mechanical environment. Bone, both as a tissue and structure, adapts its mass and architecture in response to loading conditions. Therefore, application of predefined controlled loads may be considered as a treatment option to promote early maturation of bone/implant interface prior to or in conjunction with crown/prosthesis attachment. Although many studies have established that the magnitude, rate of the applied strain, and frequency have significant effects on the osteogenic response, the actual specific relationships between strain parameters and frequency have not yet been fully defined. The purpose of this study was to develop a stimulator to apply defined mechanical stimuli to individual dental implants in vivo immediately after implantation, exploring the hypothesis that immediate controlled loading could enhance implant integration. An electromechanical device was developed, based on load values obtained using a two-dimensional finite element analysis of the bone/implant interface generating 1000 to 4000 pe and operated at 30 and 3 Hz respectively. The device was then tested in a cadaveric pig mandible, and periosteal bone surface strains were recorded for potential future comparison with a three-dimensional finite element model to determine loading regimens to optimize interface strains and iterate the device for clinical use.

  8. The effect of bruxism on treatment planning for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Misch, Carl E

    2002-09-01

    Bruxism is a potential risk factor for implant failure. Excessive force is the primary cause of late implant complications. An appreciation of the etiology of crestal bone loss, failure of implants, failure to retain implant restorations, and fracture of components will lead the practitioner to develop a treatment plan that reduces force on implants and their restorations. The forces are considered in terms of magnitude, duration, direction, type, and magnification. Once the dentist has identified the source(s) of additional force on the implant system, the treatment plan is altered to contend with and reduce the negative sequelae on the bone, implant, and final restoration. One viable approach is to increase the implant-bone surface area. Additional implants can be placed to decrease stress on any one implant, and implants in molar regions should have an increased width. Use of more and wider implants decreases the strain on the prosthesis and also dissipates stress to the bone, especially at the crest. The additional implants should be positioned with intent to eliminate cantilevers when possible. Greater surface area implant designs made of titanium alloy and with an external hex design can also prove advantageous. Anterior guidance in mandibular excursions further decreases force and eliminates or reduces lateral posterior force. Metal occlusal surfaces decrease the risk of porcelain fracture and do not require as much abutment reduction, which in turn enhances prosthesis retention. The retention of the final prosthesis or super-structure is also improved with additional implant abutments. Night guards designed with specific features also are a benefit to initially diagnose the influence of occlusal factors for the patient, and as importantly, to reduce the influence of extraneous stress on implants and implant-retained restorations. PMID:12271847

  9. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  10. Active tendon implants in flexor tendon reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J M; Singer, D I; Jaeger, S H; Mackin, E J

    1988-11-01

    Forty-five active flexor tendon implants were evaluated after placement in scarred tendon beds of digits II through V. The implant is constructed of silicone rubber with a Dacron core, terminating in a loop proximally and a metal plate distally. Modification of the implant during the period of study has improved its reliability and longevity. The improvement in total active motion (TAM) averaged 72 degrees during implant functioning (stage I) in a group of digits that before operation were classified as 78% Boyes grade 5 (salvage). Complication rate during stage I was 11% (5 out of 45). Of the 27 digits evaluated after implant replacement by tendon autograft (stage II), there was an overall improvement in 62 degrees total active motion with 70% of digits being Boyes grade 5. Many of the complications were believed to be avoidable with experience. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an active tendon implant and the possibility of a permanent prosthesis. PMID:2976074

  11. Absolute magnitudes of trans-neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Alvarez-candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Thirouin, A.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate measurements of diameters of trans- Neptunian objects are extremely complicated to obtain. Radiomatric techniques applied to thermal measurements can provide good results, but precise absolute magnitudes are needed to constrain diameters and albedos. Our objective is to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for a sample of trans- Neptunian objects, many of which have been observed, and modelled, by the "TNOs are cool" team, one of Herschel Space Observatory key projects grantes with ~ 400 hours of observing time. We observed 56 objects in filters V and R, if possible. These data, along with data available in the literature, was used to obtain phase curves and to measure absolute magnitudes by assuming a linear trend of the phase curves and considering magnitude variability due to rotational light-curve. In total we obtained 234 new magnitudes for the 56 objects, 6 of them with no reported previous measurements. Including the data from the literature we report a total of 109 absolute magnitudes.

  12. Cochlear Implantation in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank R.; Chien, Wade W.; Li, Lingsheng; Niparko, John K.; Francis, Howard W.

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implants allow individuals with severe-to-profound hearing loss access to sound and spoken language. The number of older adults in the United States who are potential candidates for cochlear implantation is approximately 150,000 and will continue to increase with the aging of the population. Should cochlear implantation (CI) be routinely recommended for these older adults, and do these individuals benefit from CI? We reviewed our 12 year experience with cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years (n = 445) at Johns Hopkins to investigate the impact of CI on speech understanding and to identify factors associated with speech performance. Complete data on speech outcomes at baseline and 1 year post-CI were available for 83 individuals. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years consistently improved speech understanding scores with a mean increase of 60. 0% (S. D. 24. 1) on HINT sentences in quiet . The magnitude of the gain in speech scores was negatively associated with age at implantation such that for every increasing year of age at CI the gain in speech scores was 1. 3 percentage points less (95% CI: 0. 6 – 1. 9) after adjusting for age at hearing loss onset. Conversely, individuals with higher pre-CI speech scores (HINT scores between 40–60%) had significantly greater post-CI speech scores by a mean of 10. 0 percentage points (95% CI: 0. 4 – 19. 6) than those with lower pre-CI speech scores (HINT <40%) after adjusting for age at CI and age at hearing loss onset. These results suggest that older adult CI candidates who are younger at implantation and with higher preoperative speech scores obtain the highest speech understanding scores after cochlear implantation with possible implications for current Medicare policy. Finally, we provide an extended discussion of the epidemiology and impact of hearing loss in older adults. Future research of CI in older adults should expand beyond simple speech outcomes to take into

  13. Estimating magnitude and duration of incident delays

    SciTech Connect

    Garib, A.; Radwan, A.E.; Al-Deek, H.

    1997-11-01

    Traffic congestion is a major operational problem on urban freeways. In the case of recurring congestion, travelers can plan their trips according to the expected occurrence and severity of recurring congestion. However, nonrecurring congestion cannot be managed without real-time prediction. Evaluating the efficiency of intelligent transportation systems (ITS) technologies in reducing incident effects requires developing models that can accurately predict incident duration along with the magnitude of nonrecurring congestion. This paper provides two statistical models for estimating incident delay and a model for predicting incident duration. The incident delay models showed that up to 85% of variation in incident delay can be explained by incident duration, number of lanes affected, number of vehicles involved, and traffic demand before the incident. The incident duration prediction model showed that 81% of variation in incident duration can be predicted by number of lanes affected, number of vehicles involved, truck involvement, time of day, police response time, and weather condition. These findings have implications for on-line applications within the context of advanced traveler information systems (ATIS).

  14. Local magnitude calibration of the Hellenic Unified Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scordilis, E. M.; Kementzetzidou, D.; Papazachos, B. C.

    2016-01-01

    A new relation is proposed for accurate determination of local magnitudes in Greece. This relation is based on a large number of synthetic Wood-Anderson (SWA) seismograms corresponding to 782 regional shallow earthquakes which occurred during the period 2007-2013 and recorded by 98 digital broad-band stations. These stations are installed and operated by the following: (a) the National Observatory of Athens (HL), (b) the Department of Geophysics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (HT), (c) the Seismological Laboratory of the University of Athens (HA), and (d) the Seismological Laboratory of the Patras University (HP). The seismological networks of the above institutions constitute the recently (2004) established Hellenic Unified Seismic Network (HUSN). These records are used to calculate a refined geometrical spreading factor and an anelastic attenuation coefficient, representative for Greece and surrounding areas, proper for accurate calculation of local magnitudes in this region. Individual station corrections depending on the crustal structure variations in their vicinity and possible inconsistencies in instruments responses are also considered in order to further ameliorate magnitude estimation accuracy. Comparison of such calculated local magnitudes with corresponding original moment magnitudes, based on an independent dataset, revealed that these magnitude scales are equivalent for a wide range of values.

  15. Form-stable silicone gel breast implants.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the question of what is the optimal shape for a breast implant. It is oriented toward processes, system engineering, and operational excellence versus being a treatise on the author's personal technique. PMID:19055963

  16. Reward Magnitude Effects on Temporal Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtress, Tiffany; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Changes in reward magnitude or value have been reported to produce effects on timing behavior, which have been attributed to changes in the speed of an internal pacemaker in some instances and to attentional factors in other cases. The present experiments therefore aimed to clarify the effects of reward magnitude on timing processes. In Experiment…

  17. Representations of the Magnitudes of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Michael; Siegler, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether adults can use integrated, analog, magnitude representations to compare the values of fractions. The only previous study on this question concluded that even college students cannot form such representations and instead compare fraction magnitudes by representing numerators and denominators as separate whole numbers. However,…

  18. Local magnitudes of small contained explosions.

    SciTech Connect

    Chael, Eric Paul

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between explosive yield and seismic magnitude has been extensively studied for underground nuclear tests larger than about 1 kt. For monitoring smaller tests over local ranges (within 200 km), we need to know whether the available formulas can be extrapolated to much lower yields. Here, we review published information on amplitude decay with distance, and on the seismic magnitudes of industrial blasts and refraction explosions in the western U. S. Next we measure the magnitudes of some similar shots in the northeast. We find that local magnitudes ML of small, contained explosions are reasonably consistent with the magnitude-yield formulas developed for nuclear tests. These results are useful for estimating the detection performance of proposed local seismic networks.

  19. [Needle implantations--clinical report].

    PubMed

    Esswein, W

    1977-04-01

    In the last four years 27 patients with edentulous lower jaw were treated with implantation of rows of tantalum needles; 25 of them were followed up clinically and radiologically. After an average of two years and seven months where the success rate was found to be 72%. Reasons for failure were thought to be mistakes in operative technique, insufficient oral hygiene of the patients and less than optimal aftercare. These needle implants have proved their value also in cases with marked atrophy of the lower jaw where other prosthetic-surgical methods aimed at improving the prosthesis site have failed.

  20. A Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Vest, Adriana N.; Chmait, Ramen H.; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Pruetz, Jay; Silka, Michael; Zheng, Kaihui; Peck, Ray; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized, self-contained pacemaker that could be implanted with a minimally invasive technique would dramatically improve the survival rate for fetuses that develop hydrops fetalis as a result of congenital heart block. We are currently validating a device that we developed to address this bradyarrhythmia. Preclinical studies in a fetal sheep model are underway to demonstrate that the device can be implanted via a minimally invasive approach, can mechanically withstand the harsh bodily environment, can induce effective contractions of the heart muscle with an adequate safety factor, and can successfully operate for the required device lifetime of three months using the previously-developed closed loop transcutaneous recharging system. PMID:25570982

  1. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  2. Multiscale Analyses of the Bone-implant Interface

    PubMed Central

    Cha, J.Y.; Pereira, M.D.; Smith, A.A.; Houschyar, K.S.; Yin, X.; Mouraret, S.; Brunski, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Implants placed with high insertion torque (IT) typically exhibit primary stability, which enables early loading. Whether high IT has a negative impact on peri-implant bone health, however, remains to be determined. The purpose of this study was to ascertain how peri-implant bone responds to strains and stresses created when implants are placed with low and high IT. Titanium micro-implants were inserted into murine femurs with low and high IT using torque values that were scaled to approximate those used to place clinically sized implants. Torque created in peri-implant tissues a distribution and magnitude of strains, which were calculated through finite element modeling. Stiffness tests quantified primary and secondary implant stability. At multiple time points, molecular, cellular, and histomorphometric analyses were performed to quantitatively determine the effect of high and low strains on apoptosis, mineralization, resorption, and collagen matrix deposition in peri-implant bone. Preparation of an osteotomy results in a narrow zone of dead and dying osteocytes in peri-implant bone that is not significantly enlarged in response to implants placed with low IT. Placing implants with high IT more than doubles this zone of dead and dying osteocytes. As a result, peri-implant bone develops micro-fractures, bone resorption is increased, and bone formation is decreased. Using high IT to place an implant creates high interfacial stress and strain that are associated with damage to peri-implant bone and therefore should be avoided to best preserve the viability of this tissue. PMID:25628271

  3. Measuring radon source magnitude in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Boegel, M.L.; Nero, A.V.

    1981-08-01

    A description is given of procedures used in residences for rapid grab-sample and time-dependent measurements of the air-exchange rate and radon concentration. The radon source magnitude is calculated from the results of simultaneous measurements of these parameters. Grab-sample measurements in three survey groups comprising 101 US houses showed the radon source magnitude to vary approximately log-normally with a geometric mean of 0.37 and a range of 0.01 to 6.0 pCi 1/sup -1/ h/sup -1/. Successive measurements in six houses in the northeastern United States showed considerable variability in source magnitude within a given house. In two of these houses the source magnitude showed a strong correlation with the air-exchange rate, suggesting that soil gas influx can be an important transport process for indoor radon.

  4. Determination of the Meteor Limiting Magnitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingery, A.; Blaauw, R.; Cooke, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    The limiting meteor magnitude of a meteor camera system will depend on the camera hardware and software, sky conditions, and the location of the meteor radiant. Some of these factors are constants for a given meteor camera system, but many change between meteor shower or sporadic source and on both long and short timescales. Since the limiting meteor magnitude ultimately gets used to calculate the limiting meteor mass for a given data set, it is important to have an understanding of these factors and to monitor how they change throughout the night, as a 0.5 magnitude uncertainty in limiting magnitude translates to a uncertainty in limiting mass by a factor of two.

  5. Nano hydroxyapatite-coated implants improve bone nanomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, R; Coelho, P G; Bryington, M; Baldassarri, M; Tovar, N; Currie, F; Hayashi, M; Janal, M N; Andersson, M; Ono, D; Vandeweghe, S; Wennerberg, A

    2012-12-01

    Nanostructure modification of dental implants has long been sought as a means to improve osseointegration through enhanced biomimicry of host structures. Several methods have been proposed and demonstrated for creating nanotopographic features; here we describe a nanoscale hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated implant surface and hypothesize that it will hasten osseointegration and improve its quality relative to that of non-coated implants. Twenty threaded titanium alloy implants, half prepared with a stable HA nanoparticle surface and half grit-blasted, acid-etched, and heat-treated (HT), were inserted into rabbit femurs. Pre-operatively, the implants were morphologically and topographically characterized. After 3 weeks of healing, the samples were retrieved for histomorphometry. The nanomechanical properties of the surrounding bone were evaluated by nanoindentation. While both implants revealed similar bone-to-implant contact, the nanoindentation demonstrated that the tissue quality was significantly enhanced around the HA-coated implants, validating the postulated hypothesis.

  6. Implant success!!!.....simplified.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Kaushal K

    2009-01-01

    The endeavor towards life-like restoration has helped nurture new vistas in the art and science of implant dentistry. The protocol of "restoration-driven implant placement" ensures that the implant is an apical extension of the ideal future restoration and not the opposite. Meticulous pre-implant evaluation of soft and hard tissues, diagnostic cast and use of aesthetic wax-up and radiographic template combined with surgical template can simplify the intricate roadmap for appropriate implant treatment.By applying the harmony of artistic skill, scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, we can simply master the outstanding implant success in requisites of aesthetics, phonetics and function.

  7. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  8. Standardized Loads Acting in Hip Implants.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Dymke, Jörn; Duda, Georg; Damm, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing success of hip joint replacements, the average age of patients has decreased, patients have become more active and their expectations of the implant durability have risen. Thus, pre-clinical endurance tests on hip implants require defining realistic in vivo loads from younger and more active patients. These loads require simplifications to be applicable for simulator tests and numerical analyses. Here, the contact forces in the joint were measured with instrumented hip implants in ten subjects during nine of the most physically demanding and frequent activities of daily living. Typical levels and directions of average and high joint loads were extracted from the intra- and inter-individually widely varying individual data. These data can also be used to analyse bone remodelling at the implant-bone interface, evaluate tissue straining in finite element studies or validate analytical loading predictions, among other uses. The current ISO standards for endurance tests of implant stems and necks are based on historic analytical data from the 1970s. Comparisons of these test forces with in vivo loads unveiled that their unidirectional orientations deviate from the time-dependent in vivo directions during walking and most other activities. The ISO force for testing the stem is substantially too low while the ISO force for the neck better matches typical in vivo magnitudes. Because the magnitudes and orientations of peak forces substantially vary among the activities, load scenarios that reflect a collection of time-dependent high forces should be applied rather than using unidirectional forces. Based on data from ten patients, proposals for the most demanding activities, the time courses of the contact forces and the required cycle numbers for testing are given here. Friction moments in the joint were measured in addition to the contact forces. The moment data were also standardized and can be applied to wear tests of the implant. It was shown that

  9. Standardized Loads Acting in Hip Implants.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Dymke, Jörn; Duda, Georg; Damm, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing success of hip joint replacements, the average age of patients has decreased, patients have become more active and their expectations of the implant durability have risen. Thus, pre-clinical endurance tests on hip implants require defining realistic in vivo loads from younger and more active patients. These loads require simplifications to be applicable for simulator tests and numerical analyses. Here, the contact forces in the joint were measured with instrumented hip implants in ten subjects during nine of the most physically demanding and frequent activities of daily living. Typical levels and directions of average and high joint loads were extracted from the intra- and inter-individually widely varying individual data. These data can also be used to analyse bone remodelling at the implant-bone interface, evaluate tissue straining in finite element studies or validate analytical loading predictions, among other uses. The current ISO standards for endurance tests of implant stems and necks are based on historic analytical data from the 1970s. Comparisons of these test forces with in vivo loads unveiled that their unidirectional orientations deviate from the time-dependent in vivo directions during walking and most other activities. The ISO force for testing the stem is substantially too low while the ISO force for the neck better matches typical in vivo magnitudes. Because the magnitudes and orientations of peak forces substantially vary among the activities, load scenarios that reflect a collection of time-dependent high forces should be applied rather than using unidirectional forces. Based on data from ten patients, proposals for the most demanding activities, the time courses of the contact forces and the required cycle numbers for testing are given here. Friction moments in the joint were measured in addition to the contact forces. The moment data were also standardized and can be applied to wear tests of the implant. It was shown that

  10. Standardized Loads Acting in Hip Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Dymke, Jörn; Duda, Georg; Damm, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing success of hip joint replacements, the average age of patients has decreased, patients have become more active and their expectations of the implant durability have risen. Thus, pre-clinical endurance tests on hip implants require defining realistic in vivo loads from younger and more active patients. These loads require simplifications to be applicable for simulator tests and numerical analyses. Here, the contact forces in the joint were measured with instrumented hip implants in ten subjects during nine of the most physically demanding and frequent activities of daily living. Typical levels and directions of average and high joint loads were extracted from the intra- and inter-individually widely varying individual data. These data can also be used to analyse bone remodelling at the implant-bone interface, evaluate tissue straining in finite element studies or validate analytical loading predictions, among other uses. The current ISO standards for endurance tests of implant stems and necks are based on historic analytical data from the 1970s. Comparisons of these test forces with in vivo loads unveiled that their unidirectional orientations deviate from the time-dependent in vivo directions during walking and most other activities. The ISO force for testing the stem is substantially too low while the ISO force for the neck better matches typical in vivo magnitudes. Because the magnitudes and orientations of peak forces substantially vary among the activities, load scenarios that reflect a collection of time-dependent high forces should be applied rather than using unidirectional forces. Based on data from ten patients, proposals for the most demanding activities, the time courses of the contact forces and the required cycle numbers for testing are given here. Friction moments in the joint were measured in addition to the contact forces. The moment data were also standardized and can be applied to wear tests of the implant. It was shown that

  11. Titania nanotube arrays: Interfaces for implantable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Barbara Symie

    For the 8--10% of Americans (20--25 million people) that have implanted biomedical devices, biomaterial failure and the need for revision surgery are critical concerns. The major causes for failure in implantable biomedical devices promoting a need for re-implantation and revision surgery include thrombosis, post-operative infection, immune driven fibrosis and biomechanical failure. The successful integration of long-term implantable devices is highly dependent on the early events of tissue/biomaterial interaction, promoting either implant rejection or a wound healing response (extracellular matrix production and vasculature). Favorable interactions between the implant surface and the respective tissue are critical for the long-term success of any implantable device. Recent studies have shown that material surfaces which mimic the natural physiological hierarchy of in vivo tissue may provide a possible solution for enhancing biomaterial integration, thus preventing infection and biomaterial rejection. Titania nanotube arrays, fabricated using a simple anodization technique, provide a template capable of promoting altered cellular functionality at a hierarchy similar to that of natural tissue. This work focuses on the fabrication of immobilized, vertically oriented and highly uniform titania nanotube arrays to determine how this specific nano-architecture affects skin cell functionality, hemocompatibility, thrombogenicity and the immune response. The results in this work identify enhanced dermal matrix production, altered hemocompatibility, reduced thrombogenicity and a deterred immune response on titania nanotube arrays. This evidences promising implications with respect to the use of titania nanotube arrays as beneficial interfaces for the successful implantation of biomedical devices.

  12. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... visits, your surgeon injects a small amount of saline (salt water) through the valve into the expander. ... breast implants. Implants may be filled with either saline or a silicone gel. You may have another ...

  13. Magnitude and frequency of floods in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olin, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Methods are presented to estimate flood magnitude for selected recurrence intervals for urban and rural streams with drainage areas from 1 to 22,000 square miles. Seven hydrologic areas were delineated and regression equations were developed for six areas. Hydrologic data could not be regionalized for the seventh area. Drainage area was the only independent variable used in the equations for five hydrologic areas. Drainage area and a storage factor were used in the equations for the other area. One hydrologic area, located in the central part of the State, has flood runoffs two to four times greater than the other areas. It is recommended that the rural equations be used for estimates of flood magnitudes for both urban and rural streams in the hydrologic area. Rivers with drainage areas greater than 1,500 square miles could not be regionalized. Estimating methods for these rivers are shown graphically. Maximum flood magnitudes versus drainage area also are presented. (USGS)

  14. [Pathology of implants].

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, C; Eblenkamp, M; Richter, H A; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, G; Bhardwaj, R S; Klosterhalfen, B

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the surgery of implants and biomaterials can be accomplished by: 1. Painstakingly analysing and registering of defaulting implants after explantation within a "National Registry of Implant Pathology". 2. Development of a DNA-microarray named "Implantat/Chronic Wound" in order to discover the differential transcriptional activities of cells brought into contact with different foreign surfaces. 3. Predictive cell-engineering combined with custom-made implant surfaces with the aim of optimal patient care.

  15. Is the use of computer navigation in total knee arthroplasty improving implant positioning and function? A comparative study of 198 knees operated at a Norwegian district hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are few Scandinavian studies on the effect of computer assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), compared to conventional technique (CON), and there is little information on effects in pain and function scores. This retrospective study has evaluated the effects of CAOS on radiological parameters and pain, function and quality of life after primary TKA. Methods 198 primary TKAs were operated by one surgeon in two district hospitals; 103 CAOS and 95 CON. The groups were evaluated based on 3 months post-operative radiographs and a questionnaire containing the knee osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS), the EQ-5D index score and a visual analogue scale (VAS) two years after surgery. Multiple linear regression method was used to investigate possible impact from exposure (CON or CAOS). Results On hip-knee-ankle radiographs, 20% of measurements were > ±3° of neutral in the CAOS group and 25% in the CON group (p = 0.37). For the femoral component, the number was 5% for CAOS and 18% for CON (p < 0.01). For the tibial component, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.58). In the sagittal plane, the surgeon tended to apply more femoral flexion and more posterior tibial slope with CAOS. We observed no statistically or clinically significant difference in KOOS score, VAS or ∆EQ-5D (all p values >0.05), but there was a trend towards better scores for CAOS. Operation time was 3 minutes longer for CON (p = 0.37). Conclusions CAOS can improve radiological measurements in primary TKA, and makes it possible to adjust component placement to the patient’s anatomy. Over-all, the two methods are equal in pain, function and quality-of-life scores. PMID:24228727

  16. Characterization of wear in composite material orthopaedic implants. Part II: The implant/bone interface.

    PubMed

    Albert, K; Schledjewski, R; Harbaugh, M; Bleser, S; Jamison, R; Friedrich, K

    1994-01-01

    Carbon fiber/PEEK polymer (C/PEEK) composite materials are being developed for use as orthopaedic implant materials. Wear is an issue of increasing importance in orthopaedic implants; particulate debris generated by the wearing of biomaterials may be a causal factor leading to osteolysis and implant loosening. Therefore, numerical and experimental studies were completed to characterize the wear of C/PEEK composite materials in comparison to current orthopaedic implant materials. Finite element analyses (FEA) of a composite material hip stem implanted in a femur and loaded at 890 N determined that peak contact stresses will occur at the proximal-medial and distal regions of the implant. These contact stresses were found to be below 1.0 MPa over most of the implant surface; however the peak stress in the proximal-medial region was 1.8 MPa and higher still at the distal portion of the stem. In vivo forces result in contact stress values up to 9.0 MPa. The composite implant exhibited 10-40% lower contact stresses in the distal region compared to a titanium-alloy implant of identical design. Composite material wear samples were slid against porous hydroxylapatite (HA) to simulate the stem/bone interface. An identical series of experiments was run for comparison to a current orthopaedic implant material--Ti6A14V titanium alloy. Two domains of motion were studied; a composite ring-on-HA disc large amplitude sliding wear test; and a composite pin-on-HA disc small amplitude fretting regimen. Nominal contact pressures during testing were 1.4 MPa and 7.6 MPa for sliding and fretting tests, respectively. Fretting and sliding abrasive wear tests resulted in the composite material exhibiting a lower wear rate than the titanium-alloy. The magnitude of the difference was greatly dependent on the contact pressures, sliding amplitudes, and counterface material properties.

  17. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  18. Implantable Myoelectric Sensors (IMESs) for Intramuscular Electromyogram Recording

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Richard F. ff.; Troyk, Phil R.; DeMichele, Glen A.; Kerns, Douglas A.; Schorsch, Jack F.; Maas, Huub

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a multichannel electrogmyography sensor system capable of receiving and processing signals from up to 32 implanted myoelectric sensors (IMES). The appeal of implanted sensors for myoelectric control is that electromyography (EMG) signals can be measured at their source providing relatively cross-talk-free signals that can be treated as independent control sites. An external telemetry controller receives telemetry sent over a transcutaneous magnetic link by the implanted electrodes. The same link provides power and commands to the implanted electrodes. Wireless telemetry of EMG signals from sensors implanted in the residual musculature eliminates the problems associated with percutaneous wires, such as infection, breakage, and marsupialization. Each implantable sensor consists of a custom-designed application-specified integrated circuit that is packaged into a bio-compatible RF BION capsule from the Alfred E. Mann Foundation. Implants are designed for permanent long-term implantation with no servicing requirements. We have a fully operational system. The system has been tested in animals. Implants have been chronically implanted in the legs of three cats and are still completely operational four months after implantation. PMID:19224729

  19. Delta Scorpii unusual brightening to first magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    The Be star delta Scorpii with a range of variability between 2.35 and 1.65 in visible light is having an unusual brightening to magnitude mV=0.8, as measured on 31 Jan 2016 at 3:56 UT and 5:36 UT from Lanciano, Italy.

  20. K Giant Magnitude Calibration from Parallaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, A.; Flynn, C.

    1992-02-01

    We test the Janes (1975, 1979) calibration of K giant magnitudes from DDO colours against a sample of 40 local parallax stars. These stars are taken from the sample analyzed by Egret, Keenan, and Heck (1982), but are further selected for Janes magnitude (0m.80 &le MJV ≤ 2m.2), colour (1.0 ≤ B-V ≤ 1.5), and metallicity (-0.5 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0.0). We find these stars to be on average very slightly brighter (δMJV = -0m.07±0m.10) than the Janes values. Our result is in agreement with a recent redetermination of the Janes magnitude offset by Flynn and Mermilliod (1991) (δMJV = 0m.07 ± 0m.09) on the basis of open-cluster stars. However, we disagree with the calibration of Egret, Keenan, and Heck by a full magnitude. Half of this difference is due to changes in the parallax catalog values and to slightly different selection criteria. We cannot account for the remaining half.

  1. Is there a magnitude effect in tipping?

    PubMed

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel; Schneider, Rachel

    2003-06-01

    The present study examined nearly 1,000 tips recorded for two taxicabs, two hair salons, and two restaurants. In each of the six cases, amount of tip increased linearly as a function of the amount of the bill. Contrary to standard microeconomic theory, there was a magnitude effect in that as the amount of the bill increased, the percent tip tended to decrease. The present results extend the findings of Chapman and Winquist (1998), obtained using hypothetical scenarios, to real-world tipping behavior. Chapman and Winquist argued that a magnitude effect in tipping reflects the shape of the utility function for money. We suggest, however, that the magnitude effect may be the mathematical consequence of replotting the fundamental relationship between tip and bill amounts in terms of percent tip, given that the observed linear relation between tip and bill amounts has a positive intercept. We suggest further that the positive intercept arises because a tip represents a judgment as to what constitutes a fair or equitable wage, and part of what constitutes a fair wage is independent of the amount of the bill, reflecting compensation for simply being there when needed. The present account implies that different explanations may be needed for magnitude effects observed in different domains.

  2. Color and magnitude dependence of galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Volker

    2016-10-01

    A quantitative study of the clustering properties of galaxies in the cosmic web as a function of absolute magnitude and colour is presented using the SDSS Data Release 7 galaxy redshift survey. We compare our results with mock galaxy samples obtained with four different semi-analytical models of galaxy formation imposed on the merger trees of the Millenium simulation.

  3. Fast Regional Magnitude Determination at INGV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, A.; Lomax, A.; Bono, A.; Amato, A.

    2006-12-01

    The recent, very large earthquakes in the Indian Ocean and Indonesia have shown the importance of rapid magnitude determination for tsunami warning. In the Mediterranean region, destructive tsunamis have occurred repeatedly in the past; however, because of the proximity of the tsunami sources to populated coasts, very rapid analysis is necessary for effective warning. Reliable estimates of the earthquake location and size should be available within tens of seconds after the first arriving P-waves are recorded at local and regional distances. Currently in Europe there is no centralized agency such as the PTWC for the Pacific Ocean dedicated to issue tsunami warnings, though, recent initiatives, such as the NEAMTWS (North-East Atlantic and Mediterranean Tsunami Warning System), aim toward the establishment of such an agency. Thus established seismic monitoring centers, such as INGV, Rome, are currently relied upon for rapid earthquake analysis and information dissemination. In this study, we describe the recent, experimental implementation at the INGV seismic center of a procedure for rapid magnitude determination at regional distances based on the Mwp methodology (Tsuboi et al., 1995), which exploits information in the P-wave train. For our Mwp determinations, we have implemented an automatic procedure that windows the relevant part of the seismograms and picks the amplitudes of the first two largest peaks, providing within seconds after each P arrival an estimate of earthquake size. Manual revision is completed using interactive software that presents an analysis with the seismograms, amplitude picks and magnitude estimates. We have compared our Mwp magnitudes for recent earthquakes within the Mediterranean region with Mw determined through the Harvard CMT procedure. For the majority of the events, the Mwp and Mw magnitudes agree closely, indicating that the rapid Mwp estimates forms a useful tool for effective tsunami warning on a regional scale.

  4. Implantation in IVF.

    PubMed

    Busso, Cristiano E; Melo, Marco A B; Fernandez, Manuel; Pellicer, Antonio; Simon, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The recent advances in assisted reproduction have made it possible to study and interfere in almost every step of the human reproductive process except for implantation. The most complex and important step remains in great part unknown. Implantation in human has proven to be less efficient compared with other species. However, in in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients, it has been evaluated to be even poorer. This paper highlights the factors related to infertile patients and IVF treatments that can affect implantation and implantation's clinical aspects related to these treatments: implantation failure and early pregnancy loss.

  5. Evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of the implant-abutment complex of a reduced-diameter morse-taper implant. A nonlinear finite element stress analysis.

    PubMed

    Akça, Kivanç; Cehreli, Murat Cavit; Iplikçioğlu, Haldun

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical characteristics of the implant-abutment connection of a reduced-diameter ITI dental implant. A finite element model of a slashed circle 3.3 mm x 10 mm ITI solid-screw implant and a 6 degrees solid abutment 4 mm in height was constructed, and the implant-abutment complex was embedded vertically in the center of a slashed circle 1.5 cm x 1.5 cm acrylic cylinder. Static vertical and oblique loads of 300 N were applied in separate load cases. The contact area was defined between the implant-abutment connection and nonlinear finite element stress analysis was performed. The magnitude and distribution of Von Mises stresses and displacement characteristics were evaluated. In vertical loading, Von Mises stresses concentrated around the implant-abutment connection at the stem of the screw and around the implant collar. Oblique loading resulted in a 2-fold increase in stresses at the implant collar, which was close to the yield strength of titanium. Displacement values under both loading conditions were negligible. We conclude that, in a reduced-diameter ITI dental implant, vertical and oblique loads are resisted mainly by the implant-abutment joint at the screw level and by the implant collar. The neck of this implant is a potential zone for fracture when subjected to high bending forces. The reduced-diameter ITI dental implant might benefit from reinforcement of this region.

  6. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  7. Breast implants. A review.

    PubMed

    Van Zele, D; Heymans, O

    2004-04-01

    Breast implants have been used for about four decades for both reconstructive and aesthetic purposes. In 1963, the quality of the artificial implants was revolutionized by the introduction of the silicone gel-filled implant. Since, this modern prosthesis has gone through an evolution of change and improvement with several types of devices with many variations and styles within each class. Actually, for the last three decades, approximately one million women have received silicone breast implants in the USA. But, in 1992, the American FDA banned silicone from the market, leaving saline implants as the only product generally available as an alternative until now. Other filler materials were introduced, but have never progressed beyond the experimental stage in the USA (in contrast with Europe). The evolution of the different implants through time, with their advantages and disadvantages will be discussed, but also the controversy on silicone implants in the USA and their suspected association with systemic diseases. PMID:15154572

  8. Major Intrahepatic Veno-Venous Fistula after Fontan Operation Treated by Transcatheter Implantation of Amplatzer Septal Occluder through Internal Jugular Vein

    PubMed Central

    Guzeltas, Alper; Tanidir, Ibrahim Cansaran; Saygi, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Six months after undergoing a Fontan operation, a 7-year-old boy with right atrial isomerism and a single functional ventricle was admitted to our emergency department with cyanosis. Emergency cardiac catheterization revealed a large veno-venous fistula that began in a left hepatic vein, connected to the left accessory hepatic veins, and drained into the common atrium, resulting in desaturation. The fistula was occluded proximally with an Amplatzer septal occluder, with satisfying results; the patient's systemic arterial saturation decreased during his hospital stay. Three weeks after the first intervention, a second procedure was performed to retrieve the first device and to close the fistula distally. Multiple attempts with different types of gooseneck snares and a bioptome catheter failed to retrieve the first device, so a telescopic method was used to re-screw it. Using a Mullins long sheath and delivery sheath, the delivery cable was manipulated to fit into the slot of the end screw, and the cable was rotated gently in a clockwise direction to re-screw the device. Then, another Amplatzer septal occluder was placed at the distal end of the fistula. In conclusion, distal transcatheter occlusion of intrahepatic veno-venous fistulas might lead to better clinical outcomes in selected patients. Amplatzer septal occluder device can be retrieve without any complication within three weeks. PMID:27556319

  9. Major Intrahepatic Veno-Venous Fistula after Fontan Operation Treated by Transcatheter Implantation of Amplatzer Septal Occluder through Internal Jugular Vein.

    PubMed

    Guzeltas, Alper; Tanidir, Ibrahim Cansaran; Saygi, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Six months after undergoing a Fontan operation, a 7-year-old boy with right atrial isomerism and a single functional ventricle was admitted to our emergency department with cyanosis. Emergency cardiac catheterization revealed a large veno-venous fistula that began in a left hepatic vein, connected to the left accessory hepatic veins, and drained into the common atrium, resulting in desaturation. The fistula was occluded proximally with an Amplatzer septal occluder, with satisfying results; the patient's systemic arterial saturation decreased during his hospital stay. Three weeks after the first intervention, a second procedure was performed to retrieve the first device and to close the fistula distally. Multiple attempts with different types of gooseneck snares and a bioptome catheter failed to retrieve the first device, so a telescopic method was used to re-screw it. Using a Mullins long sheath and delivery sheath, the delivery cable was manipulated to fit into the slot of the end screw, and the cable was rotated gently in a clockwise direction to re-screw the device. Then, another Amplatzer septal occluder was placed at the distal end of the fistula. In conclusion, distal transcatheter occlusion of intrahepatic veno-venous fistulas might lead to better clinical outcomes in selected patients. Amplatzer septal occluder device can be retrieve without any complication within three weeks. PMID:27556319

  10. Subitizing, Magnitude Representation, and Magnitude Retrieval in Deaf and Hearing Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Rebecca; Blatto-Vallee, Gary; Fabich, Megan

    2006-01-01

    This study examines basic number processing (subitizing, automaticity, and magnitude representation) as the possible underpinning of mathematical difficulties often evidenced in deaf adults. Hearing and deaf participants completed tasks to assess the automaticity with which magnitude information was activated and retrieved from long-term memory…

  11. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  12. Absolute-magnitude distributions of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John; Jenkins III, Robert L.; Maddox, Larry

    2014-05-01

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.

  13. Absolute magnitudes and kinematics of barium stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A. E.; Luri, X.; Grenier, S.; Prevot, L.; Mennessier, M. O.; Figueras, F.; Torra, J.

    1997-03-01

    The absolute magnitude of barium stars has been obtained from kinematical data using a new algorithm based on the maximum-likelihood principle. The method allows to separate a sample into groups characterized by different mean absolute magnitudes, kinematics and z-scale heights. It also takes into account, simultaneously, the censorship in the sample and the errors on the observables. The method has been applied to a sample of 318 barium stars. Four groups have been detected. Three of them show a kinematical behaviour corresponding to disk population stars. The fourth group contains stars with halo kinematics. The luminosities of the disk population groups spread a large range. The intrinsically brightest one (M_v_=-1.5mag, σ_M_=0.5mag) seems to be an inhomogeneous group containing barium binaries as well as AGB single stars. The most numerous group (about 150 stars) has a mean absolute magnitude corresponding to stars in the red giant branch (M_v_=0.9mag, σ_M_=0.8mag). The third group contains barium dwarfs, the obtained mean absolute magnitude is characteristic of stars on the main sequence or on the subgiant branch (M_v_=3.3mag, σ_M_=0.5mag). The obtained mean luminosities as well as the kinematical results are compatible with an evolutionary link between barium dwarfs and classical barium giants. The highly luminous group is not linked with these last two groups. More high-resolution spectroscopic data will be necessary in order to better discriminate between barium and non-barium stars.

  14. Effects of implantation temperature and thermal annealing on the Ga+ ion beam induced optical contrast formation in a-SiC:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkova, T.; Wright, C. D.; Kitova, S.; Bischoff, L.; Zuk, J.

    2013-07-01

    The effects of implantation temperature and post-implantation thermal annealing on the Ga+ ion beam induced optical contrast formation in hydrogenated silicon-carbon alloy films have been studied. As a result of the implantation a well-expressed "darkening" effect (i.e. absorption edge shift to the longer-wavelength/lower-photon-energy region) has been registered. It is accompanied by a remarkable increase of the absorption coefficient up to 2 orders of magnitude in the measured photon energy range (1.5-3.1 eV). The optical contrast thus obtained (between implanted and unimplanted regions of the film material) has been made use of in the form of optical pattern formation by computer-operated Ga+-focused ion beam. Possible applications of this effect in the area of submicron lithography and high-density optical data storage have been suggested with regard to the most widely spread focused micro-beam systems based on Ga+ liquid metal ion sources. The fact that Ga has a very low melting point (Tm = 29.8 °C) and an unusual feature of volume contraction on melting are factors which favour Ga incorporation upon ion-implantation as dispersed clusters, or small nanoparticles. It has been previously noted that Ga precipitation into nanoparticles can vary dramatically (in terms of particle size) with Ga concentration and small changes in surface implant temperature, thus affecting the optical properties of the target. The precise role of implantation temperature effects, i.e. the target temperature during Ga+ ion irradiation, on the optical contrast obtainable, has been therefore a key part of this study. Appropriate post-implantation annealing treatments were also studied, since these are expected to offer further benefits in reducing the required ion dose and enhancing contrast, thus increasing the cost-effectiveness of the bit-writing method.

  15. Magnitude and frequency of floods in Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cummans, J.E.; Collings, Michael R.; Nasser, Edmund George

    1975-01-01

    Relations are provided to estimate the magnitude and frequency of floods on Washington streams. Annual-peak-flow data from stream gaging stations on unregulated streams having 1 years or more of record were used to determine a log-Pearson Type III frequency curve for each station. Flood magnitudes having recurrence intervals of 2, 5, i0, 25, 50, and 10years were then related to physical and climatic indices of the drainage basins by multiple-regression analysis using the Biomedical Computer Program BMDO2R. These regression relations are useful for estimating flood magnitudes of the specified recurrence intervals at ungaged or short-record sites. Separate sets of regression equations were defined for western and eastern parts of the State, and the State was further subdivided into 12 regions in which the annual floods exhibit similar flood characteristics. Peak flows are related most significantly in western Washington to drainage-area size and mean annual precipitation. In eastern Washington-they are related most significantly to drainage-area size, mean annual precipitation, and percentage of forest cover. Standard errors of estimate of the estimating relations range from 25 to 129 percent, and the smallest errors are generally associated with the more humid regions.

  16. Local magnitude scale for earthquakes in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıç, T.; Ottemöller, L.; Havskov, J.; Yanık, K.; Kılıçarslan, Ö.; Alver, F.; Özyazıcıoğlu, M.

    2016-06-01

    Based on the earthquake event data accumulated by the Turkish National Seismic Network between 2007 and 2013, the local magnitude (Richter, Ml) scale is calibrated for Turkey and the close neighborhood. A total of 137 earthquakes (Mw > 3.5) are used for the Ml inversion for the whole country. Three Ml scales, whole country, East, and West Turkey, are developed, and the scales also include the station correction terms. Since the scales for the two parts of the country are very similar, it is concluded that a single Ml scale is suitable for the whole country. Available data indicate the new scale to suffer from saturation beyond magnitude 6.5. For this data set, the horizontal amplitudes are on average larger than vertical amplitudes by a factor of 1.8. The recommendation made is to measure Ml amplitudes on the vertical channels and then add the logarithm scale factor to have a measure of maximum amplitude on the horizontal. The new Ml is compared to Mw from EMSC, and there is almost a 1:1 relationship, indicating that the new scale gives reliable magnitudes for Turkey.

  17. Computer methods for automating preoperative dental implant planning: implant positioning and size assignment.

    PubMed

    Galanis, Christos C; Sfantsikopoulos, Michael M; Koidis, Petros T; Kafantaris, Nikolaos M; Mpikos, Pavlos G

    2007-04-01

    The paper presents computer-aided methods that allocate a dental implant and suggest its size, during the pre-operative planning stage, in conformance with introduced optimization criteria and established clinical requirements. Based on computed tomography data of the jaw and prosthesis anatomy, single tooth cases are planned for the best-suited implant insertion at a user-defined region. An optimum implantation axis line is produced and cylindrical implants of various candidate sizes are then automatically positioned, while their occlusal end is leveled to bone ridge, and evaluated. Radial safety margins are used for the assessment of the implant safety distance from neighboring anatomical structures and bone quantity and quality are estimated and taken into consideration. A case study demonstrates the concept and allows for its discussion.

  18. Evolution and magnitudes of candidate Planet Nine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Esther F.; Mordasini, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Context. The recently renewed interest in a possible additional major body in the outer solar system prompted us to study the thermodynamic evolution of such an object. We assumed that it is a smaller version of Uranus and Neptune. Aims: We modeled the temporal evolution of the radius, temperature, intrinsic luminosity, and the blackbody spectrum of distant ice giant planets. The aim is also to provide estimates of the magnitudes in different bands to assess whether the object might be detectable. Methods: Simulations of the cooling and contraction were conducted for ice giants with masses of 5, 10, 20, and 50 M⊕ that are located at 280, 700, and 1120 AU from the Sun. The core composition, the fraction of H/He, the efficiency of energy transport, and the initial luminosity were varied. The atmospheric opacity was set to 1, 50, and 100 times solar metallicity. Results: We find for a nominal 10 M⊕ planet at 700 AU at the current age of the solar system an effective temperature of 47 K, much higher than the equilibrium temperature of about 10 K, a radius of 3.7 R⊕, and an intrinsic luminosity of 0.006 L♃. It has estimated apparent magnitudes of Johnson V, R, I, L, N, Q of 21.7, 21.4, 21.0, 20.1, 19.9, and 10.7, and WISE W1-W4 magnitudes of 20.1, 20.1, 18.6, and 10.2. The Q and W4 band and other observations longward of about 13 μm pick up the intrinsic flux. Conclusions: If candidate Planet 9 has a significant H/He layer and an efficient energy transport in the interior, then its luminosity is dominated by the intrinsic contribution, making it a self-luminous planet. At a likely position on its orbit near aphelion, we estimate for a mass of 5, 10, 20, and 50 M⊕ a V magnitude from the reflected light of 24.3, 23.7, 23.3, and 22.6 and a Q magnitude from the intrinsic radiation of 14.6, 11.7, 9.2, and 5.8. The latter would probably have been detected by past surveys.

  19. Nanotechnology and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate.

  20. Nanotechnology and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate. PMID:21253543

  1. In-vivo orthopedic implant diagnostic device for sensing load, wear, and infection

    DOEpatents

    Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen; Thundat, Thomas G.; Komistek, Richard D.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Mahfouz, Mohamed

    2006-08-29

    A device for providing in vivo diagnostics of loads, wear, and infection in orthopedic implants having at least one load sensor associated with the implant, at least one temperature sensor associated with the implant, at least one vibration sensor associated with the implant, and at least one signal processing device operatively coupled with the sensors. The signal processing device is operable to receive the output signal from the sensors and transmit a signal corresponding with the output signal.

  2. Numerical assessment of bone remodeling around conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants.

    PubMed

    Akça, Kıvanç; Eser, Atılım; Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Çehreli, Murat Cavit

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants by three-dimensional finite element stress analysis. Three-dimensional model of a dental implant was created and a thread area was established as a region of interest in trabecular bone to study a localized part of the global model with a refined mesh. The peri-implant tissues around conventionally loaded (model 1) and early loaded (model 2) implants were implemented and were used to explore principal stresses, displacement values, and equivalent strains in the peri-implant region of titanium and titanium-zirconium implants under static load of 300 N with or without 30° inclination applied on top of the abutment surface. Under axial loading, principal stresses in both models were comparable for both implants and models. Under oblique loading, principal stresses around titanium-zirconium implants were slightly higher in both models. Comparable stress magnitudes were observed in both models. The displacement values and equivalent strain amplitudes around both implants and models were similar. Peri-implant bone around titanium and titanium-zirconium implants experiences similar stress magnitudes coupled with intraosseous implant displacement values under conventional loading and early loading simulations. Titanium-zirconium implants have biomechanical outcome comparable to conventional titanium implants under conventional loading and early loading.

  3. Orthodontic mechanics using mini-implant measured by FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trannin, Pamela G.; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Walmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-07-01

    The magnitude of the force generated during orthodontic mechanics anchored in mini-implant in a maxilla model was analyzed. Data was collected during the insertion of the mini-implant and at the moment of applying forces to the structure of the maxilla and dentition. To obtain quantitative results, the Fibre Bragg Gratings (FBG) were inserted in an elastomeric material reproducing a maxilla model. It was observed levels of forces of approximately 3,78N next to the root of first premolar by the insertion of the mini-implant and different levels of the force to different orthodontic mechanics applied on the dental system.

  4. Tritium implantation in the accelerator production of tritium device

    SciTech Connect

    Kidman, R.B.

    1997-11-01

    We briefly describe the methods we have developed to compute the magnitude and spatial distribution of born and implanted tritons and protons in the Accelerator Production of Tritium (AFT) device. The methods are verified against experimental measurements and then used to predict that 16% of the tritium is implanted in the walls of the APT distribution tubes. The methods are also used to estimate the spatial distribution of implanted tritium, which will be required for determining the possible diffusion of tritium out of the walls and back into the gas stream.

  5. Composite implants coated with biodegradable polymers prevent stimulating tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litviakov, N. V.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Perelmuter, V. M.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Tsyganov, M. M.; Zheravin, A. A.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this experiment we studied oncologic safety of model implants created using the solution blow spinning method with the use of the PURASORB PL-38 polylactic acid polymer and organic mineral filler which was obtained via laser ablation of a solid target made of dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate. For this purpose the implant was introduced into the area of Wistar rats' iliums, and on day 17 after the surgery the Walker sarcoma was transplanted into the area of the implant. We evaluated the implant's influence on the primary tumor growth, hematogenous and lymphogenous metastasis of the Walker sarcoma. In comparison with sham operated animals the implant group demonstrated significant inhibition of hematogenous metastasis on day 34 after the surgery. The metastasis inhibition index (MII) equaled 94% and the metastases growth inhibition index (MGII) equaled 83%. The metastasis frequency of the Walker sarcoma in para aortic lymph nodes in the implant group was not statistically different from the control frequency; there was also no influence of the implant on the primary tumor growth noted. In case of the Walker sarcoma transplantation into the calf and the palmar pad of the ipsilateral limb to the one with the implant in the ilium, we could not note any attraction of tumor cells to the implant area, i.e. stimulation of the Walker sarcoma relapse by the implant. Thus, the research concluded that the studied implant meets the requirements of oncologic safety.

  6. An implantable blood pressure and flow transmitter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, R. D.; Meehan, J. P.; Henriksen, J. K. C.

    1973-01-01

    A miniature totally implantable FM/FM telemetry system has been developed to simultaneously measure blood pressure and blood flow, thus providing an appreciation of the hemodynamics of the circulation to the entire body or to a particular organ. Developed for work with animal subjects, the telemetry system's transmission time is controlled by an RF signal that permits an operating life of several months. Pressure is detected by a miniature intravascular transducer and flow is detected by an extravascular interferometric ultrasonic technique. Both pressure and flow are calibrated prior to implanting. The pressure calibration can be checked after the implanting by cannulation; flow calibration can be verified only at the end of the experiment by determining the voltage output from the implanted sensing system as a function of several measured flow rates. The utility of this device has been established by its use in investigating canine renal circulation during exercise, emotional encounters, administration of drugs, and application of accelerative forces.

  7. Cochlear implant in an ambulatory surgery center.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Aimee M; Lassen, L Frederick

    2013-02-01

    Presbycusis, or sensorineural hearing loss in the elderly population, affects approximately 40% to 50% of people over the age of 75. A variety of devices are available to those with hearing loss. Cochlear implants, for example, are especially useful for those with severe-to-profound hearing loss. The population is aging, so the demand for cochlear implantation in ambulatory surgery centers will likely increase. Ambulatory surgery centers (ASC) can provide a more convenient and less expensive location for cochlear implant surgery than hospital-based operating facilities. Patient selection using standard ASC criteria, coupled with an understanding of the unique surgical and anesthetic needs of cochlear implant patients, are key to bringing this once exotic inpatient procedure into the ASC.

  8. Apparent magnitude of earthshine: a simple calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Dulli Chandra

    2016-05-01

    The Sun illuminates both the Moon and the Earth with practically the same luminous fluxes which are in turn reflected by them. The Moon provides a dim light to the Earth whereas the Earth illuminates the Moon with somewhat brighter light which can be seen from the Earth and is called earthshine. As the amount of light reflected from the Earth depends on part of the Earth and the cloud cover, the strength of earthshine varies throughout the year. The measure of the earthshine light is luminance, which is defined in photometry as the total luminous flux of light hitting or passing through a surface. The expression for the earthshine light in terms of the apparent magnitude has been derived for the first time and evaluated for two extreme cases; firstly, when the Sun’s rays are reflected by the water of the oceans and secondly when the reflector is either thick clouds or snow. The corresponding values are -1.30 and -3.69, respectively. The earthshine value -3.22 reported by Jackson lies within these apparent magnitudes. This paper will motivate the students and teachers of physics to look for the illuminated Moon by earthlight during the waning or waxing crescent phase of the Moon and to reproduce the expressions derived here by making use of the inverse-square law of radiation, Planck’s expression for the power in electromagnetic radiation, photopic spectral luminous efficiency function and expression for the apparent magnitude of a body in terms of luminous fluxes.

  9. Precise Relative Earthquake Magnitudes from Cross Correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Cleveland, K. Michael; Ammon, Charles J.

    2015-04-21

    We present a method to estimate precise relative magnitudes using cross correlation of seismic waveforms. Our method incorporates the intercorrelation of all events in a group of earthquakes, as opposed to individual event pairings relative to a reference event. This method works well when a reliable reference event does not exist. We illustrate the method using vertical strike-slip earthquakes located in the northeast Pacific and Panama fracture zone regions. Our results are generally consistent with the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog, which we use to establish a baseline for the relative event sizes.

  10. The intensities and magnitudes of volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigurdsson, H.

    1991-01-01

    Ever since 1935, when C.F Richter devised the earthquake magnitude scale that bears his name, seismologists have been able to view energy release from earthquakes in a systematic and quantitative manner. The benefits have been obvious in terms of assessing seismic gaps and the spatial and temporal trends of earthquake energy release. A similar quantitative treatment of volcanic activity is of course equally desirable, both for gaining a further understanding of the physical principles of volcanic eruptions and for volcanic-hazard assessment. A systematic volcanologic data base would be of great value in evaluating such features as volcanic gaps, and regional and temporal trends in energy release.  

  11. Implants in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rohit A.; Mitra, Dipika K.; Rodrigues, Silvia V.; Pathare, Pragalbha N.; Podar, Rajesh S.; Vijayakar, Harshad N.

    2013-01-01

    Implants have gained tremendous popularity as a treatment modality for replacement of missing teeth in adults. There is extensive research present on the use of implants in adults, but there is a dearth of data available on the same in adolescents. The treatment planning and execution of implant placement in adolescents is still in its infancy. This review article is an attempt to bring together available literature. PMID:24174743

  12. Surface modification of Natural Rubber by ion implantation: Evidence for implant doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predeep, P.; Najidha, S.; Sreeja, R.; Saxena, N. S.

    2005-12-01

    Ion implantation is one of the most powerful and well-known technique for surface modification in polymers. Thin films of Natural Rubber were modified by the implantation of 60 keV N + ions to the fluences of 10 11-10 15 cm -2. The electrical conductivity measurements of irradiated sample show 10 orders of magnitude compared to pristine state. Along with conductivity change there was a noticeable change in color to a dense shiny black for the most highly conducting films. The analysis of temperature dependence of dc electrical conductivity data reveals a three-dimensional variable range hopping mechanism. The microstructural evolution of the virgin and ion-beam modified samples was investigated by spectroscopic analysis such as UV/Vis & FTIR. These spectral studies gave evidence for the production of conjugate double bonds, which is a clear cut indication of implant doping. This is an important result since ion implantation usually does not produce doping in polymeric materials and only a few reports about the possibility of implant doping in polymers are available. The significant aspect of this study is that this confirms, the Natural Rubber's potential to be used as a microelectronic device material. Also an attempt has been made to compare the conductivity enhancement in Natural Rubber by chemical and implant doping.

  13. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Baddour LM, Epstein AE, Erickson CC, et al. Update on cardiovascular implantable electronic device infections and their management: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation . ...

  14. Morphology and Absolute Magnitudes of the SDSS DR7 QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, B.; Andrei, A. H.; Antón, S.

    2014-10-01

    The ESA mission Gaia will furnish a complete census of the Milky Way, delivering astrometrics, dynamics, and astrophysics information for 1 billion stars. Operating in all-sky repeated survey mode, Gaia will also provide measurements of extra-galactic objects. Among the later there will be at least 500,000 QSOs that will be used to build the reference frame upon which the several independent observations will be combined and interpreted. Not all the QSOs are equally suited to fulfill this role of fundamental, fiducial grid-points. Brightness, morphology, and variability define the astrometric error budget for each object. We made use of 3 morphological parameters based on the PSF sharpness, circularity and gaussianity, which enable us to distinguish the "real point-like" QSOs. These parameters are being explored on the spectroscopically certified QSOs of the SDSS DR7, to compare the performance against other morphology classification schemes, as well as to derive properties of the host galaxy. We present a new method, based on the Gaia quasar database, to derive absolute magnitudes, on the SDSS filters domain. The method can be extrapolated all over the optical window, including the Gaia filters. We discuss colors derived from SDSS apparent magnitudes and colors based on absolute magnitudes that we obtained tanking into account corrections for dust extinction, either intergalactic or from the QSO host, and for the Lyman α forest. In the future we want to further discuss properties of the host galaxies, comparing for e.g. the obtained morphological classification with the color, the apparent and absolute magnitudes, and the redshift distributions.

  15. CO2 lasers and temperature changes of titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Oyster, D K; Parker, W B; Gher, M E

    1995-12-01

    Lasers may be useful in uncovering submerged implants or in removing contaminants from "ailing" implants. The purposes of this study were to record temperature changes at the bone-titanium implant interface when using a CO2 laser to: 1) uncover the implant at second stage surgery; and 2) "decontaminate" exposed implant threads. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize surface changes of lased implants, both uncontaminated or contaminated with blood or saliva. In part one, 28 titanium implants, measuring 3.75 mm by 7 to 20 mm, were placed into room temperature, fresh, resected pig mandibles and covered with a flap of gingiva. The overlying tissue was removed with a CO2 laser at different power levels. Bone-implant interface temperatures were measured with a thermocouple near the top of the implant, and 5 to 7 mm apical to the osseous crest. The effects of implant size, power level, tissue thickness, and operation time were evaluated. In part two, 5 mm by 4 mm bony dehiscences were created on 3 implants in one mandible and the exposed fixture threads lased at varying times and power levels. The results from part one showed temperature increases at the top thermocouple ranged from 4.2 to 16.8 degrees C and increases at the bottom thermocouple ranged from 2.0 to 11.5 degrees C. The results from part two showed temperature increases at the top thermocouple ranged from 1.2 to 11.7 degrees C and increases at the bottom thermocouple from 0.0 to 5.0 degrees C. If baseline ambient temperatures are 37 degrees C, then the temperature at the bone-implant interface might exceed 50 degrees C. SEM revealed no gross surface changes in lased uncontaminated implants, but laser treatment alone of contaminated implants failed to completely remove saliva or blood. Further study is needed regarding temperature increases and surface changes induced by lasers that may adversely affect osseointegration.

  16. Plasma-based ion implantation: a valuable technology for the elaboration of innovative materials and nanostructured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vempaire, D.; Pelletier, J.; Lacoste, A.; Béchu, S.; Sirou, J.; Miraglia, S.; Fruchart, D.

    2005-05-01

    Plasma-based ion implantation (PBII), invented in 1987, can now be considered as a mature technology for thin film modification. After a brief recapitulation of the principle and physics of PBII, its advantages and disadvantages, as compared to conventional ion beam implantation, are listed and discussed. The elaboration of thin films and the modification of their functional properties by PBII have already been achieved in many fields, such as microelectronics (plasma doping/PLAD), biomaterials (surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible materials), plastics (grafting, surface adhesion) and metallurgy (hard coatings, tribology), to name a few. The major advantages of PBII processing lie, on the one hand, in its flexibility in terms of ion implantation energy (from 0 to 100 keV) and operating conditions (plasma density, collisional or non-collisional ion sheath), and, on the other hand, in the easy transferrability of processes from the laboratory to industry. The possibility of modifying the composition and physical nature of the films, or of drastically changing their physical properties over several orders of magnitude makes this technology very attractive for the elaboration of innovative materials, including metastable materials, and the realization of micro- or nanostructures. A review of the state of the art in these domains is presented and illustrated through a few selected examples. The perspectives opened up by PBII processing, as well as its limitations, are discussed.

  17. EVALUATION REINFORCER MAGNITUDE AND RATE DEPENDENCY OF RESISTANCE TO CHANGE MECHANIMS

    PubMed Central

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Ginsburg, Brett C.; Lamb, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    In many circumstances, reinforcer magnitude appears to modulate the rate-dependent effects of drugs, such that when schedules arrange for relatively larger reinforcer magnitude, rate dependency is attenuated compared to behavior maintained by smaller magnitudes. The current literature on resistance to change suggests that increased reinforcer density strengthens operant behavior, and such strengthening effects appear to extend to the temporal control of behavior. As rate dependency may be understood as a loss of temporal control, the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency may be due to increased resistance to disruption of temporally controlled behavior. In the present experiments, pigeons earned different magnitudes of grain during signaled components of a multiple fixed-interval schedule. Three drugs, clonidine, haloperidol, and morphine, were examined: all three decreased overall rates of key pecking; however, only the effects of clonidine were attenuated as reinforcer magnitude increased. An analysis of within-interval performance found rate-dependent effects for clonidine and morphine, but those effects were not modulated by reinforcer magnitude. Additionally, we included prefeeding and extinction conditions, standard tests used to measure resistance to change. In general, rate-decreasing effects of prefeeding and extinction were attenuated by increasing reinforcer magnitudes. Rate-dependent analyses of prefeeding showed rate-dependency following those tests, but in no case were these effects modulated by reinforcer magnitude. The results suggest a resistance-to-change interpretation of the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency is not viable. PMID:25115595

  18. Violence against women: global scope and magnitude.

    PubMed

    Watts, Charlotte; Zimmerman, Cathy

    2002-04-01

    An increasing amount of research is beginning to offer a global overview of the extent of violence against women. In this paper we discuss the magnitude of some of the most common and most severe forms of violence against women: intimate partner violence; sexual abuse by non-intimate partners; trafficking, forced prostitution, exploitation of labour, and debt bondage of women and girls; physical and sexual violence against prostitutes; sex selective abortion, female infanticide, and the deliberate neglect of girls; and rape in war. There are many potential perpetrators, including spouses and partners, parents, other family members, neighbours, and men in positions of power or influence. Most forms of violence are not unique incidents but are ongoing, and can even continue for decades. Because of the sensitivity of the subject, violence is almost universally under-reported. Nevertheless, the prevalence of such violence suggests that globally, millions of women are experiencing violence or living with its consequences. PMID:11955557

  19. Object file continuity predicts attentional blink magnitude.

    PubMed

    Kellie, Frances J; Shapiro, Kimron L

    2004-05-01

    When asked to identify targets embedded within a rapid consecutive stream of visual stimuli, observers are less able to identify the second target (T2) when it is presented within half a second of the first (T1); this deficit has been termed the attentional blink (AB). Rapid serial visual presentation methodology was used to investigate the relationship between the AB and object files (episodic representations implicated in object identification and perceptual constancy). An inverse linear relationship was found between the degree of object file continuity and AB magnitude. An important locus of object file continuity was the intervening stream items between T1 and T2. The results are discussed in terms of the heuristic of the object file to preserve limited attentional capacity.

  20. Definition, epidemiology and magnitude of alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Basra, Sarpreet; Anand, Bhupinderjit S

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major cause of alcohol-related morbidity and mortality. Its presentation ranges from fatty liver to alcoholic hepatitis (AH), cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the amount and pattern of alcohol consumption is a well recognized predisposing factor for the development of serious liver pathology, environmental factors and the host’s genetic make-up may also play significant roles that have not yet been entirely explored. Continuing alcohol consumption is a major factor that influences the survival of patients with AH. The presence of cirrhosis at presentation or its development on follow up is a major factor determining the outcome in the long run. This chapter deals with the epidemiology and magnitude of ALD in general and AH in particular. PMID:21731902

  1. Theoretical model of a piezoelectric composite spinal fusion interbody implant.

    PubMed

    Tobaben, Nicholas E; Domann, John P; Arnold, Paul M; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    Failure rates of spinal fusion are high in smokers and diabetics. The authors are investigating the development of a piezoelectric composite biomaterial and interbody device design that could generate clinically relevant levels of electrical stimulation to help improve the rate of fusion for these patients. A lumped parameter model of the piezoelectric composite implant was developed based on a model that has been utilized to successfully predict power generation for piezoceramics. Seven variables (fiber material, matrix material, fiber volume fraction, fiber aspect ratio, implant cross-sectional area, implant thickness, and electrical load resistance) were parametrically analyzed to determine their effects on power generation within reasonable implant constraints. Influences of implant geometry and fiber aspect ratio were independent of material parameters. For a cyclic force of constant magnitude, implant thickness was directly and cross-sectional area inversely proportional to power generation potential. Fiber aspect ratios above 30 yielded maximum power generation potential while volume fractions above 15% showed superior performance. This investigation demonstrates the feasibility of using composite piezoelectric biomaterials in medical implants to generate therapeutic levels of direct current electrical stimulation. The piezoelectric spinal fusion interbody implant shows promise for helping increase success rates of spinal fusion.

  2. Evidence Accumulation in the Magnitude System

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Anna; Walsh, Vincent; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual interferences in the estimation of quantities (time, space and numbers) have been interpreted as evidence for a common magnitude system. However, if duration estimation has appears sensitive to spatial and numerical interferences, space and number estimation tend to be resilient to temporal manipulations. These observations question the relative contribution of each quantity in the elaboration of a representation in a common mental metric. Here, we elaborated a task in which perceptual evidence accumulated over time for all tested quantities (space, time and number) in order to match the natural requirement for building a duration percept. For this, we used a bisection task. Experimental trials consisted of dynamic dots of different sizes appearing progressively on the screen. Participants were asked to judge the duration, the cumulative surface or the number of dots in the display while the two non-target dimensions varied independently. In a prospective experiment, participants were informed before the trial which dimension was the target; in a retrospective experiment, participants had to attend to all dimensions and were informed only after a given trial which dimension was the target. Surprisingly, we found that duration was resilient to spatial and numerical interferences whereas space and number estimation were affected by time. Specifically, and counter-intuitively, results revealed that longer durations lead to smaller number and space estimates whether participants knew before (prospectively) or after (retrospectively) a given trial which quantity they had to estimate. Altogether, our results support a magnitude system in which perceptual evidence for time, space and numbers integrate following Bayesian cue-combination rules. PMID:24339998

  3. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  4. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  5. Electrochemical Evaluation of Nanocrystalline Diamond Thin Films on Ti-6Al-4V Implant Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Marc; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Vohra, Yogesh

    2002-03-01

    Some 186,000 hip replacement surgeries are peformed every year in the United States alone. About 10surgeries are revision operations to replace an implant that has most likely failed through mechanical-electrochemical interactions resulting in implant wear. The ability to enhance the resistance to such mechanical-electrochemical interaction and thereby reduce wear could result in significantly increased device lifespan. Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films were deposited on Ti-6Al-4V disk samples (processed per ASTM F86 standard for medical implant surface conditions) using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). As a first step, these samples (n=3/test per group) were subjected to electrochemical evaluation in inorganic neutral salt solution at 37 C. The electrochemical evaluation involved both impedence spectroscopy (per ASTM G106) and polarization testing (per ASTM G5). The impedence spectroscopy data indicated a significantly higher charge transfer resistance at the interface due to the protective NCD as compared to the bare or uncoated substrate. The polarization test data confirmed that this increased charge transfer resistance resulted in a decreased current density measurement. This decreased current density measurement resulted in an order of magnitude lower calculated static corrosion rate from the NCD coated samples as opposed to the uncoated controls. Future studies will focus on investigations that will facilitate transfer of these static electrochemical resistance results to a more relevant mechanical-electrochemical interaction milieu.

  6. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  7. [Carbon fiber reinforced polysulfone--a new implant material].

    PubMed

    Claes, L

    1989-12-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced polysulfone is a composite material which contains two materials of well known biocompatibility. In comparison to metals this composite material has some advantages which makes it favourable particularly for implants in tumor surgery. The custom made arrangement of fibres in the composite allows the development of implants with special mechanical properties. The radiolucency of the material avoids problems caused by the reflection of x-rays, using metal implants. This special property allows the exact calculation of postoperative radiation doses of tumor patients. Simultaneously the structures behind the implants are not hidden. All implants can be machined during the operation to adapt them to the individual anatomical situation. Animal experimental and clinical applications of plates, screws and spinal segmental replacement implants made of this composite material have shown good results so far.

  8. [MR implant labelling and its use in clinical MRI practice].

    PubMed

    Mühlenweg, M; Schaefers, G

    2015-08-01

    Before a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination, implants in patients must be cleared for MR safety in order to exclude the risk of possible severe injuries and implant malfunction in an MR environment. The general contraindication for measurements of patients with implants still applies; however, in the recent past a way has been found to legally circumvent this contraindication. For this purpose special conditions are required: explicit implant identification and the original manufacturer's labelling are necessary, the required conditions for conditionally MR safe implants must be assured and a risk-benefit analysis with appropriate explanation to the patient has to be performed. This process can be very complex as the implants are often poorly documented and detailed information on the implant MR labelling is also often outdated or not easy to interpret. This article provides information about legal and normative principles of MR measurement of patients with implants. The possible physical interactions with implants will be briefly dealt with as well as possible strategies for better identification and investigation of implants and MR labelling. General approaches for minimizing the risk will be discussed using some examples. The second part deals with the content of MR implant labelling and the current test standards. Furthermore, the additional information from the operating instructions of the MR scanner that are necessary for the interpretation of the MR implant labelling, will be explained. The article concludes with an explanation of the current pattern for MR labelling of implants from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and an exemplary application. PMID:26296804

  9. Extended arrays for nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2016-01-01

    This study implements nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) with multifrequency intermodulation and phase encoding. An imaging grid was constructed of cylindrical wells of 3.5-mm diameter and 4.2-mm height on a hexagonal two-dimensional 61-voxel pattern with 5-mm spacing. Patterns of sample wells were filled with 40-μl volumes of Fe3O4 starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm and a concentration of 25 mg/ml. The imaging hardware was configured with three excitation coils and three detection coils in anticipation that a larger imaging system will have arrays of excitation and detection coils. Hexagonal and bar patterns of mNP were successfully imaged (R2 > 0.9) at several orientations. This SMI demonstration extends our prior work to feature a larger coil array, enlarged field-of-view, effective phase encoding scheme, reduced mNP sample size, and more complex imaging patterns to test the feasibility of extending the method beyond the pilot scale. The results presented in this study show that nonlinear SMI holds promise for further development into a practical imaging system for medical applications. PMID:26124044

  10. The magnitude distribution of dynamically triggered earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Stephen

    Large dynamic strains carried by seismic waves are known to trigger seismicity far from their source region. It is unknown, however, whether surface waves trigger only small earthquakes, or whether they can also trigger large, societally significant earthquakes. To address this question, we use a mixing model approach in which total seismicity is decomposed into 2 broad subclasses: "triggered" events initiated or advanced by far-field dynamic strains, and "untriggered" spontaneous events consisting of everything else. The b-value of a mixed data set, b MIX, is decomposed into a weighted sum of b-values of its constituent components, bT and bU. For populations of earthquakes subjected to dynamic strain, the fraction of earthquakes that are likely triggered, f T, is estimated via inter-event time ratios and used to invert for bT. The confidence bounds on b T are estimated by multiple inversions of bootstrap resamplings of bMIX and fT. For Californian seismicity, data are consistent with a single-parameter Gutenberg-Richter hypothesis governing the magnitudes of both triggered and untriggered earthquakes. Triggered earthquakes therefore seem just as likely to be societally significant as any other population of earthquakes.

  11. Extended arrays for nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging.

    PubMed

    Ficko, Bradley W; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G

    2015-10-01

    This study implements nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) with multifrequency intermodulation and phase encoding. An imaging grid was constructed of cylindrical wells of 3.5-mm diameter and 4.2-mm height on a hexagonal two-dimensional 61-voxel pattern with 5-mm spacing. Patterns of sample wells were filled with 40-μl volumes of Fe3O4 starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm and a concentration of 25 mg/ml. The imaging hardware was configured with three excitation coils and three detection coils in anticipation that a larger imaging system will have arrays of excitation and detection coils. Hexagonal and bar patterns of mNP were successfully imaged (R2>0.9) at several orientations. This SMI demonstration extends our prior work to feature a larger coil array, enlarged field-of-view, effective phase encoding scheme, reduced mNP sample size, and more complex imaging patterns to test the feasibility of extending the method beyond the pilot scale. The results presented in this study show that nonlinear SMI holds promise for further development into a practical imaging system for medical applications. PMID:26124044

  12. Analysis of earthquake body wave spectra for potency and magnitude values: implications for magnitude scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Zachary E.; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; White, Malcolm C.; Vernon, Frank L.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a simple methodology for reliable automated estimation of the low-frequency asymptote in seismic body wave spectra of small to moderate local earthquakes. The procedure corrects individual P- and S-wave spectra for propagation and site effects and estimates the seismic potency from a stacked spectrum. The method is applied to >11 000 earthquakes with local magnitudes 0 < ML < 4 that occurred in the Southern California plate-boundary region around the San Jacinto fault zone during 2013. Moment magnitude Mw values, derived from the spectra and the scaling relation of Hanks & Kanamori, follow a Gutenberg-Richter distribution with a larger b-value (1.22) from that associated with the ML values (0.93) for the same earthquakes. The completeness magnitude for the Mw values is 1.6 while for ML it is 1.0. The quantity (Mw - ML) linearly increases in the analysed magnitude range as ML decreases. An average earthquake with ML = 0 in the study area has an Mw of about 0.9. The developed methodology and results have important implications for earthquake source studies and statistical seismology.

  13. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  14. Mobility implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Danz, W

    1990-01-01

    We present a brief review of mobility implants, their contribution, and the experiences derived after almost 40 years since the new concepts of full mobility implants were introduced. In early 1940, experiments with a new material for the making of plastic artificial eyes was also being considered for the making of orbital implants. Methyl-methacrylate (MMA) had proven inert and satisfactory for dental products. The Surgeon Generals office of the Armed Services encouraged further research and experimental work in the development of plastic eyes. The success of the new material sponsored the beginning of great expansion with new concepts for orbital implants. Through a period of more than a decade, the design and types of implants went through three stages. First, the buried implant was introduced, then the exposed integrated followed, and the buried integrated subsequently followed. The path of progress was not smooth. Theoretically correct designs and surgical procedures met unexpected practical difficulties for the ophthalmic surgeon, the patient, and the eye maker. Surgical and technical efforts were carefully reviewed to eliminate the problems encountered, only to have further unforeseen complications arise. Infections, extrusions, and migration of the implant were not uncommon. The exposed integrated implant was eventually abandoned. However, there were some extraordinary successes of mobility. A new era introduced fully buried mobility implants that were more successful. However, this procedure also produced some problems, causing infection (or allergy), extrusion, and migration. Tantalum mesh and gauze gave great promise with the inception of their use. Orbital tissue grew into the material in an astonishing way, making it possible to secure the extraocular muscles and tenons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  16. Reflections on Rodent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon M; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process involving endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine modulators that span cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The quality of implantation is predictive for pregnancy success. Earlier observational studies formed the basis for genetic and molecular approaches that ensued with emerging technological advances. However, the precise sequence and details of the molecular interactions involved have yet to be defined. This review reflects briefly on aspects of our current understanding of rodent implantation as a tribute to Roger Short's lifelong contributions to the field of reproductive physiology. PMID:26450495

  17. Spectroscopy of implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.

    1994-01-01

    The spectral criteria of selection of soft intraocular lens (IOL) implants of long service in an organism have been defined for ophthalmology. The analysis of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra provides the required and sufficient level of material polymerization for manufacturing non-toxic lenses for the eye. The spectral limits for determining the biocompatibility of samples can be related to the intensity ratio of two bands only in the FTIR spectra of siloxane. Siloxane-poly(urethane) block copolymers and other materials for implants have been studied. Passivated surfaces of implants have been obtained and registered by methods of Fourier Transform Spectroscopy.

  18. Nonlinear Susceptibility Magnitude Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R2 = 0.99, CNR = 84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R2 > 0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI. PMID:25505816

  19. Nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-03-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R2=0.99, CNR=84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R2>0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI.

  20. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J.

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  1. Electrochemical Disinfection of Dental Implants – a Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, Dirk; Zehnder, Matthias; Stark, Wendelin J.; Imfeld, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background Peri-implantitis has gained significant clinical attention in recent years. This disease is an inflammatory reaction to microorganisms around dental implants. Due to the limited accessibility, non-invasive antimicrobial strategies are of high interest. An unexpected approach to implant disinfection may evolve from electrolysis. Given the electrical conductivity of titanium implants, alkalinity or active oxidants can be generated in body fluids. We investigated the use of dental titanium implants as electrodes for the local generation of disinfectants. Our hypothesis was that electrolysis can reduce viable counts of adhering bacteria, and that this reduction should be greater if active oxidative species are generated. Methodology/Principal Findings As model systems, dental implants, covered with a mono-species biofilm of Escherichia coli C43, were placed in photographic gelatin prepared with physiological saline. Implants were treated by a continuous current of 0 - 10 mA for 15 minutes. The reduction of viable counts was investigated on cathodes and anodes. In separate experiments, the local change in pH was visualized using color indicators embedded in the gelatin. Oxidative species were qualitatively detected by potassium iodide-starch paper. The in situ generated alkaline environment around cathodic implants caused a reduction of up to 2 orders of magnitude in viable E. coli counts. On anodic implants, in contrast to cathodic counterparts, oxidative species were detected. Here, a current of merely 7.5 mA caused complete kill of the bacteria. Conclusions/Significance This laboratory study shows that electrochemical treatment may provide access to a new way to decontaminate dental implants in situ. PMID:21264247

  2. The evolution of embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    McGowen, Michael R; Erez, Offer; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation varies widely in placental mammals. We review this variation in mammals with a special focus on two features: the depth of implantation and embryonic diapause. We discuss the two major types of implantation depth, superficial and interstitial, and map this character on a well-resolved molecular phylogenetic tree of placental mammals. We infer that relatively deep interstitial implantation has independently evolved at least eight times within placental mammals. Moreover, the superficial type of implantation represents the ancestral state for placental mammals. In addition, we review the genes involved in various phases of implantation, and suggest a future direction in investigating the molecular evolution of implantation-related genes. PMID:25023681

  3. Piezoelectric load measurement model in knee implants.

    PubMed

    Romero, Edwar; Rincon, Amilcar

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the feasibility of a new sensing platform for knee implant diagnostics. The proposed unit measures force and transmits the reading information wirelessly to an external receiving unit. This device is to be located in the tibial tray of the knee implant. The system measures force through the use of piezoelectric elements housed in the insert. At the same time, the piezoelectric material can generate enough energy to transmit the measurements without requiring batteries. Only the modeling of the piezoelectric voltage output is discussed at present. The force measurement can provide useful information about ligament balance while helping in the post-operative physical therapy.

  4. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and flossing and regular check-ups from a dental professional. Other risks factors for developing peri-implant disease include previous periodontal disease diagnosis, poor plaque control, smoking , and diabetes . It is essential to routinely ...

  5. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  6. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... larger and longer than these conducted so far. Breastfeeding Some women who undergo breast augmentation can successfully ... breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during breastfeeding. Although there are currently no established methods for ...

  7. The influence of implant articular thickness and glenohumeral conformity on stability of an all-metal glenoid component.

    PubMed

    Bicknell, Ryan T; Liew, Allan S L; Danter, Matthew R; Patterson, Stuart D; King, Graham J W; Chess, David G; Johnson, James A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of implant thickness and glenohumeral conformity on fixation of an all-metal glenoid component. A stainless steel glenoid component was designed and implanted in 10 cadaveric scapulae. A testing apparatus capable of producing a loading vector at various angles, magnitudes, and directions was used. The independent variables included 6 directions and 3 angles of joint load, 3 implant thicknesses, and 4 glenohumeral conformities. Implant micromotion relative to bone was measured by use of 4 displacement transducers at the superior, inferior, anterior, and posterior sites. The components displayed a consistent response to loading of ipsilateral compression and contralateral distraction. Stability decreased as the load application angle increased (P < .05). A decrease in the implant thickness and glenohumeral conformity resulted in increased implant stability (P < .05). Decreasing implant thickness and glenohumeral conformity reduce the eccentric component of loading and may improve the durability of glenoid implants.

  8. Aerogel Antennas Communications Study Using Error Vector Magnitude Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Mueller, Carl H.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses an aerogel antennas communication study using error vector magnitude (EVM) measurements. The study was performed using 4x2 element polyimide (PI) aerogel-based phased arrays designed for operation at 5 GHz as transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) antennas separated by a line of sight (LOS) distance of 8.5 meters. The results of the EVM measurements demonstrate that polyimide aerogel antennas work appropriately to support digital communication links with typically used modulation schemes such as QPSK and pi/4 DQPSK. As such, PI aerogel antennas with higher gain, larger bandwidth and lower mass than typically used microwave laminates could be suitable to enable aerospace-to-ground communication links with enough channel capacity to support voice, data and video links from cubesats, unmanned air vehicles (UAV), and commercial aircraft.

  9. Aerogel Antennas Communications Study Using Error Vector Magnitude Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Mueller, Carl H.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation discusses an aerogel antennas communication study using error vector magnitude (EVM) measurements. The study was performed using 2x4 element polyimide (PI) aerogel-based phased arrays designed for operation at 5 GHz as transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) antennas separated by a line of sight (LOS) distance of 8.5 meters. The results of the EVM measurements demonstrate that polyimide aerogel antennas work appropriately to support digital communication links with typically used modulation schemes such as QPSK and 4 DQPSK. As such, PI aerogel antennas with higher gain, larger bandwidth and lower mass than typically used microwave laminates could be suitable to enable aerospace-to- ground communication links with enough channel capacity to support voice, data and video links from CubeSats, unmanned air vehicles (UAV), and commercial aircraft.

  10. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  11. Implant treatment planning: endodontic considerations.

    PubMed

    Simonian, Krikor; Frydman, Alon; Verdugo, Fernando; Roges, Rafael; Kar, Kian

    2014-12-01

    Implants are a predictable and effective method for replacing missing teeth. Some clinicians have advocated extraction and replacement of compromised but treatable teeth on the assumption that implants will outperform endodontically and/or periodontally treated teeth. However, evidence shows that conventional therapy is as effective as implant treatment. With data on implants developing complications long term and a lack of predictable treatment for peri-implantitis, retaining and restoring the natural dentition should be the first choice when possible. PMID:25928961

  12. Survival of single crystal sapphire implants supporting mandibular overdentures.

    PubMed

    Berge, T I; Grønningsaeter, A G

    2000-04-01

    One hundred and sixteen sapphire (Bioceram, Kyocera) implants were inserted in 30 patients between 1984 and 1991 to support mandibular overdentures. Survival analyses were made on the basis of clinical and radiographic follow-up evaluation for 15 patients with 56 implants. For the 15 patients who were lost to follow-up, 7 of whom were deceased, reviews of records and available radiographs determined outcome and observation time. The resulting Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival rate for the sapphire implants was 68.66%, mean survival time 11.44 years, 95% confidence interval 10.56-12.32 years. Uni- and multivariate analysis using the Cox Regression model, indicated an increased risk of implant failure in patients over 60 years at time of operation, and in patients who smoke. Limited experience in implant surgery were associated with increased implant failure rate. A qualitative analysis of survived implants showed a mean annual bone loss of 0.2 mm, moderate to excellent plaque control, and excellent to good subjective global assessment of the treatment. The long-term results of the sapphire implant system used for mandibular overdenture support are inferior to other implants systems.

  13. Kinetic changes in gait during low magnitude military load carriage.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Deepti; Pal, Madhu Sudan; Pramanik, Anilendu; Majumdar, Dhurjati

    2013-01-01

    Indian infantry soldiers carry smaller magnitudes of loads for operational requirements. The ground reaction forces (GRFs) and impulse responses of 10 healthy male Indian infantry soldiers were collected while they walked carrying operational loads between 4.2 and 17.5 kg (6.5-27.2% of mean body weight (BW)) and a control condition of no external load (NL). The GRF and impulse components were normalised for BW, and data for each load condition were compared with NL in each side applying one-way analysis of variance followed by Dunnett's post hoc test. Right foot data were compared with corresponding left foot GRF data for all load conditions and NL. There were significant increases in vertical and anteroposterior GRFs with increase in load. Left and right feet GRF data in corresponding load conditions were significantly different in anteroposterior plane. No significant change was observed in the temporal components of support phase of gait. Changes in impulse parameter were observed in the anteroposterior and vertical planes while carrying load greater than 23 and 16.6% of BW for the right foot and left foot, respectively. Result indicates that smaller magnitudes of loads produced kinetic changes proportional to system weight, similar to heavier loads with the possibility of increased injury risk. Observed smaller asymmetric changes in gait may be considered as postural adjustment due to load. Unique physical characteristics of Indian soldiers and the probable design shortcomings of the existing backpack might have caused significant changes in GRF and peak impulse during smaller load carriage.

  14. Automatic computation of moment magnitudes for small earthquakes and the scaling of local to moment magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Benjamin; Allmann, Bettina; Fäh, Donat; Clinton, John

    2010-10-01

    Moment magnitudes (MW) are computed for small and moderate earthquakes using a spectral fitting method. 40 of the resulting values are compared with those from broadband moment tensor solutions and found to match with negligible offset and scatter for available MW values of between 2.8 and 5.0. Using the presented method, MW are computed for 679 earthquakes in Switzerland with a minimum ML = 1.3. A combined bootstrap and orthogonal L1 minimization is then used to produce a scaling relation between ML and MW. The scaling relation has a polynomial form and is shown to reduce the dependence of the predicted MW residual on magnitude relative to an existing linear scaling relation. The computation of MW using the presented spectral technique is fully automated at the Swiss Seismological Service, providing real-time solutions within 10 minutes of an event through a web-based XML database. The scaling between ML and MW is explored using synthetic data computed with a stochastic simulation method. It is shown that the scaling relation can be explained by the interaction of attenuation, the stress-drop and the Wood-Anderson filter. For instance, it is shown that the stress-drop controls the saturation of the ML scale, with low-stress drops (e.g. 0.1-1.0 MPa) leading to saturation at magnitudes as low as ML = 4.

  15. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  16. Dexamethasone: intravitreal implant.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Macular oedema is one of the complications of retinal vein occlusion. About half of the patients recover spontaneously within 3 to 6 months. There is currently no drug that improves outcome. An intravitreal implant delivering 0.7 mg of dexamethasone has been authorised for the treatment of macular oedema in this setting. Clinical assessment is based on two double-blind randomised trials including a total of 1267 patients, comparing treatment with intravitreal implants delivering about 0.7 mg or 0.35 mg of dexamethasone, versus a sham procedure. Despite a more rapid initial improvement with dexamethasone, the number of patients whose reading ability improved at 6 months did not significantly differ between the groups. A retrospective subgroup analysis raised the possibility that dexamethasone implants may be beneficial in patients with central retinal vein occlusion. The adverse effects of dexamethasone intravitreal implants are the same as those of intraocular steroid injections, including elevated intraocular pressure (25% of patients), cataracts (27%), conjunctival haemorrhage (20%), and ocular pain. In practice, dexamethasone intravitreal implants do not have a positive harm-benefit balance in most patients with macular oedema following retinal vein occlusion. More rapid recovery after central vein occlusion remains to be confirmed. Pending such studies, it is better to avoid using dexamethasone implants. Patients should instead receive ophthalmologic monitoring to detect and manage possible complications, and any risk factors should be treated.

  17. Implantable imaging system for visual prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanqing; Tao, Chen; Chai, Xinyu; Sun, Yong; Ren, Qiushi

    2010-06-01

    In order to propose a method of intraocular imaging system for the visual prosthesis, an implantable microcamera was developed and evaluated in vivo. The microcamera was specially developed and shaped to fit the rabbit's lens capsule and encapsulated with the biocompatible silicone. To evaluate the feasibility of this novel approach, the custom-built device was implanted following the surgical extraction of rabbit's lens. And clinical examinations were performed 1 day, 3 days, 1 week, 2 week, and 1 month postoperatively, including slit-lamp examination, intraocular pressure, wound status, anterior chamber depth, the presence of the iris fibrosi of neovascularization, and the position of the implant. Real-time imaging was performed in vivo 1 month after the operation, and the acquired images were processed with the software and hardware that were specially developed for generating the stimulating pulses. Short-term results showed the novel approach is promising.

  18. Improvement of device isolation using field implantation for GaN MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying; Wang, Qingpeng; Zhang, Fuzhe; Li, Liuan; Shinkai, Satoko; Wang, Dejun; Ao, Jin-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with boron field implantation isolation and mesa isolation were fabricated and characterized. The process of boron field implantation was altered and subsequently conducted after performing high-temperature ohmic annealing and gate oxide thermal treatment. Implanted regions with high resistivity were achieved. The circular MOSFET fabricated in the implanted region showed an extremely low current of 6.5 × 10-12 A under a gate voltage value up to 10 V, thus demonstrating that the parasitic MOSFET in the isolation region was eliminated by boron field implantation. The off-state drain current of the rectangular MOSFET with boron field implantation was 5.5 × 10-11 A, which was only one order of magnitude higher than the 6.6 × 10-12 A of the circular device. By contrast, the rectangular MOSFET with mesa isolation presented an off-state drain current of 3.2 × 10-9 A. The field isolation for GaN MOSFETs was achieved by using boron field implantation. The implantation did not reduce the field-effect mobility. The isolation structure of both mesa and implantation did not influence the subthreshold swing, whereas the isolation structure of only the implantation increased the subthreshold swing. The breakdown voltage of the implanted region with 5 μm spacing was up to 901.5 V.

  19. Friction coefficient and effective interference at the implant-bone interface.

    PubMed

    Damm, Niklas B; Morlock, Michael M; Bishop, Nicholas E

    2015-09-18

    Although the contact pressure increases during implantation of a wedge-shaped implant, friction coefficients tend to be measured under constant contact pressure, as endorsed in standard procedures. Abrasion and plastic deformation of the bone during implantation are rarely reported, although they define the effective interference, by reducing the nominal interference between implant and bone cavity. In this study radial forces were analysed during simulated implantation and explantation of angled porous and polished implant surfaces against trabecular bone specimens, to determine the corresponding friction coefficients. Permanent deformation was also analysed to determine the effective interference after implantation. For the most porous surface tested, the friction coefficient initially increased with increasing normal contact stress during implantation and then decreased at higher contact stresses. For a less porous surface, the friction coefficient increased continually with normal contact stress during implantation but did not reach the peak magnitude measured for the rougher surface. Friction coefficients for the polished surface were independent of normal contact stress and much lower than for the porous surfaces. Friction coefficients were slightly lower for pull-out than for push-in for the porous surfaces but not for the polished surface. The effective interference was as little as 30% of the nominal interference for the porous surfaces. The determined variation in friction coefficient with radial contact force, as well as the loss of interference during implantation will enable a more accurate representation of implant press-fitting for simulations.

  20. Influence of Time and Space Correlations on Earthquake Magnitude

    SciTech Connect

    Lippiello, E.; Arcangelis, L. de; Godano, C.

    2008-01-25

    A crucial point in the debate on the feasibility of earthquake predictions is the dependence of an earthquake magnitude from past seismicity. Indeed, while clustering in time and space is widely accepted, much more questionable is the existence of magnitude correlations. The standard approach generally assumes that magnitudes are independent and therefore in principle unpredictable. Here we show the existence of clustering in magnitude: earthquakes occur with higher probability close in time, space, and magnitude to previous events. More precisely, the next earthquake tends to have a magnitude similar but smaller than the previous one. A dynamical scaling relation between magnitude, time, and space distances reproduces the complex pattern of magnitude, spatial, and temporal correlations observed in experimental seismic catalogs.

  1. Implant interactions with orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Celenza, Frank

    2012-09-01

    Many situations arise in which orthodontic therapy in conjunction with implant modalities is beneficial, relevant or necessary. These situations might entail orthodontic treatment preparatory to the placement of an implant, such as in the site preparation for implant placement. Traditionally, this has been somewhat well understood, but there are certain guidelines that must be adhered to as well as diagnostic steps that must be followed. Provision of adequate space for implant placement is of paramount importance, but there is also the consideration of tissue manipulation and remodeling which orthodontic therapy can achieve very predictably and orthodontists should be well versed in harnessing and employing this modality of site preparation. In this way, hopeless teeth that are slated for extraction can still be utilized by orthodontic extraction to augment tissues, both hard and soft, thereby facilitating site development. On the corollary, and representing a significant shift in treatment sequencing, there are many situations in which orthodontic mechanotherapy can be simplified, expedited, and facilitated by the placement of an implant and utilization as an integral part of the mechanotherapy. Implants have proven to provide excellent anchorage, and have resulted in a new class of anchorage known as "absolute anchorage". Implants can be harnessed as anchors both in a direct and indirect sense, depending upon the dictates of the case. Further, this has led to the development of orthodontic miniscrew systems and techniques, which can have added features such as flexibility in location and placement, as well as ease of use and removal. As orthodontic appliances evolve, the advent of aligner therapy has become mainstream and well accepted, and many of the aforementioned combined treatment modalities can and should be incorporated into this relatively new treatment modality as well. PMID:23040348

  2. The Biolink Implantable Telemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betancourt-Zamora, Rafael J.

    1999-01-01

    Most biotelemetry applications deal with the moderated data rates of biological signals. Few people have studied the problem of transcutaneous data transmission at the rates required by NASA's Life Sciences-Advanced BioTelemetry System (LS-ABTS). Implanted telemetry eliminate the problems associated with wire breaking the skin, and permits experiments with awake and unrestrained subjects. Our goal is to build a low-power 174-216MHz Radio Frequency (RF) transmitter suitable for short range biosensor and implantable use. The BioLink Implantable Telemetry System (BITS) is composed of three major units: an Analog Data Module (ADM), a Telemetry Transmitter Module (TTM), and a Command Receiver Module (CRM). BioLink incorporates novel low-power techniques to implement a monolithic digital RF transmitter operating at 100kbps, using quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulation in the 174-216MHz ISM band. As the ADM will be specific for each application, we focused on solving the problems associated with a monolithic implementation of the TTM and CRM, and this is the emphasis of this report. A system architecture based on a Frequency-Locked Loop (FLL) Frequency Synthesizer is presented, and a novel differential frequency that eliminates the need for a frequency divider is also shown. A self sizing phase modulation scheme suitable for low power implementation was also developed. A full system-level simulation of the FLL was performed and loop filter parameters were determined. The implantable antenna has been designed, simulated and constructed. An implant package compatible with the ABTS requirements is also being proposed. Extensive work performed at 200MHz in 0.5um complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) showed the feasibility of integrating the RF transmitter circuits in a single chip. The Hajimiri phase noise model was used to optimize the Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) for minimum power consumption. Two test chips were fabricated in a 0.5pm, 3V CMOS

  3. Symbolic Magnitude Modulates Perceptual Strength in Binocular Rivalry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paffen, Chris L. E.; Plukaard, Sarah; Kanai, Ryota

    2011-01-01

    Basic aspects of magnitude (such as luminance contrast) are directly represented by sensory representations in early visual areas. However, it is unclear how symbolic magnitudes (such as Arabic numerals) are represented in the brain. Here we show that symbolic magnitude affects binocular rivalry: perceptual dominance of numbers and objects of…

  4. 48 CFR 1852.236-74 - Magnitude of requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Magnitude of requirement... 1852.236-74 Magnitude of requirement. As prescribed in 1836.570(d), insert the following provision: Magnitude of Requirement (DEC 1988) The Government estimated price range of this project is...

  5. 48 CFR 1852.236-74 - Magnitude of requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Magnitude of requirement... 1852.236-74 Magnitude of requirement. As prescribed in 1836.570(d), insert the following provision: Magnitude of Requirement (DEC 1988) The Government estimated price range of this project is...

  6. 48 CFR 1852.236-74 - Magnitude of requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Magnitude of requirement... 1852.236-74 Magnitude of requirement. As prescribed in 1836.570(d), insert the following provision: Magnitude of Requirement (DEC 1988) The Government estimated price range of this project is...

  7. 48 CFR 1852.236-74 - Magnitude of requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Magnitude of requirement... 1852.236-74 Magnitude of requirement. As prescribed in 1836.570(d), insert the following provision: Magnitude of Requirement (DEC 1988) The Government estimated price range of this project is...

  8. Sign-And-Magnitude Up/Down Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Steven W.

    1991-01-01

    Magnitude-and-sign counter includes conventional up/down counter for magnitude part and special additional circuitry for sign part. Negative numbers indicated more directly. Counter implemented by programming erasable programmable logic device (EPLD) or programmable logic array (PLA). Used in place of conventional up/down counter to provide sign and magnitude values directly to other circuits.

  9. Numerical Magnitude Processing in Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brankaer, Carmen; Ghesquiere, Pol; De Smedt, Bert

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated numerical magnitude processing in children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and examined whether these children have difficulties in the ability to represent numerical magnitudes and/or difficulties in the ability to access numerical magnitudes from formal symbols. We compared the performance of 26 children…

  10. 48 CFR 1852.236-74 - Magnitude of requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Magnitude of requirement... 1852.236-74 Magnitude of requirement. As prescribed in 1836.570(d), insert the following provision: Magnitude of Requirement (DEC 1988) The Government estimated price range of this project is...

  11. [Exploration of the dental peri-implantitis therapy

    PubMed

    Zou, D R; Dai, Q C

    1999-12-01

    OBJECTIVE:Our study is try to establish the treatment mehtod for periimplantitis from clinical aspect,so as to treat failing implant effectively.METHODS:Peri-implantitis was treated using four methods:(1)essential treatment,(2)gingivectomy,(3)flap operation,(4)guided bone regeneration(GBR).Clinical peri-implant assessments included probing depth (PD),gingival index(GI),mibility (MOB),data analysis was carried out using singed-rank test.RESULTS:27 cases were successfully treated,and the rate was 71.05%,11 implants were extracted,the parameters before and after treatment have significant difference.CONCLUSION:It is essential to maintain good oral hygiene,determine the standard of diagnosis of peri-implantitis and successful treatment.

  12. Scuba diving with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Kompis, Martin; Vibert, Dominique; Senn, Pascal; Vischer, Mattheus W; Häusler, Rudolf

    2003-05-01

    We report on a patient with bilateral cochlear implants (a Med-El Combi40 and a Med-El Combi40+), as well as considerable experience in scuba diving with both of his implants. After having been exposed to 68 and 89 dives, respectively, in depths of up to 43 m, both cochlear implants are in working order and the patient continues to receive excellent speech recognition scores with both cochlear implant systems. The presented data show that scuba diving after cochlear implantation is possible over a considerable number of dives without any major negative impact on the implants.

  13. Fracture analysis of randomized implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur E.; Neal, Dan; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fractures of posterior fixed dental all-ceramic prostheses can be caused by one or more factors including prosthesis design, flaw distribution, direction and magnitude of occlusal loading, and nature of supporting infrastructure (tooth root/implant), and presence of adjacent teeth. This clinical study of implant-supported, all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, determined the effects of (1) presence of a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; (2) prosthesis loading either along the non-load bearing or load bearing areas; (3) presence of excursive contacts or maximum intercuspation contacts in the prosthesis; and (4) magnitude of bite force on the occurrence of veneer ceramic fracture. Methods 89 implant-supported FDPs were randomized as either a three-unit posterior metal-ceramic (Au-Pd-Ag alloy and InLine POM, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP or a ceramic-ceramic (ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP. Two implants (Osseospeed, Dentsply) and custom abutments (Atlantis, Dentsply) supported these FDPs, which were cemented with resin cement (RelyX Universal Cement). Baseline photographs were made with markings of teeth from maximum intercuspation (MI) and excursive function. Patients were recalled at 6 months and 1 to 3 years. Fractures were observed, their locations recorded, and images compared with baseline photographs of occlusal contacts. Conclusion No significant relationship exists between the occurrence of fracture and: (1) the magnitude of bite force; (2) a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; and (3) contacts in load-bearing or non-load-bearing areas. However, there was a significantly higher likelihood of fracture in areas with MI contacts only. Clinical Significance This clinical study demonstrates that there is a need to evaluate occlusion differently with implant-supported prostheses than with natural tooth supported prostheses because of the absence of a periodontal ligament. Implant supported prostheses should have minimal occlusion and

  14. [Subretinal visual implants].

    PubMed

    Stingl, K; Greppmaier, U; Wilhelm, B; Zrenner, E

    2010-12-01

    Visual implants are medical technologies that replace parts of the visual neuronal pathway. The subretinal implant developed by our group is being used in a human trials since 2005 and replaces the function of degenerated photoreceptors by an electronic device in blind patients. The subretinal implant consists of a 70-µm thin microchip with 1500 microphotodiodes each with an amplifier and an electrode with area of 3 mm × 3 mm. The power supply is provided by a subdermal power supply cable. The microchip is implanted under the macula and transforms the light signal into an electrical one, which is referred directly to the bipolar cells. Requirements for a good function of the implant are a preserved function of the inner retina, as well as clear optic media and a good visual acuity in the earlier life. The current technology can mediate a visual field of 10 - 12° and a computed resolution of up to 0.25° visual angle (corresponding to a visual acuity of 63 / 1000 - 80 / 1000) in blind patients. The so far best results from our studies reached a visual acuity of 21 / 1000 in blind retinitis pigmentosa patients. This overview is intended to inform the ophthalmologist about the current state of the technology and help him/her to advise interested patients.

  15. Binocular disparity magnitude affects perceived depth magnitude despite inversion of depth order.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Harold; Hill, Harold; Palmisano, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The hollow-face illusion involves a misperception of depth order: our perception follows our top-down knowledge that faces are convex, even though bottom-up depth information reflects the actual concave surface structure. While pictorial cues can be ambiguous, stereopsis should unambiguously indicate the actual depth order. We used computer-generated stereo images to investigate how, if at all, the sign and magnitude of binocular disparities affect the perceived depth of the illusory convex face. In experiment 1 participants adjusted the disparity of a convex comparison face until it matched a reference face. The reference face was either convex or hollow and had binocular disparities consistent with an average face or had disparities exaggerated, consistent with a face stretched in depth. We observed that apparent depth increased with disparity magnitude, even when the hollow faces were seen as convex (ie when perceived depth order was inconsistent with disparity sign). As expected, concave faces appeared flatter than convex faces, suggesting that disparity sign also affects perceived depth. In experiment 2, participants were presented with pairs of real and illusory convex faces. In each case, their task was to judge which of the two stimuli appeared to have the greater depth. Hollow faces with exaggerated disparities were again perceived as deeper. PMID:22132512

  16. Endoscopic assisted cochlear implants in ear malformations.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Soloperto, Davide; Guarnaccia, Maria C; Genovese, Elisabetta; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Presutti, Livio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of present study is to describe the use of the endoscopic assisted cochlear implant approach in cases with severely malformed temporal bones and with anomalous anatomy of the inner ear and tympanic cavity. Eight patients with malformed middle and inner ear and bilateral profound hearing loss were operated using an endoscopic assisted cochlear implant procedure at our tertiary university referral center between January and September 2013. Five patients received a cochlear implant using a suprameatal endoscopic assisted approach. A chart review of clinical data and videos from the operations was performed. All procedures were re-analyzed and codified. In all patients, discharge from hospital was on the third day post-surgery. No immediate or late postoperative complications were noted. The current mean follow-up is 6 months, with range between 4 and 12 months. This approach proved to be successful in cochlear implant placement. It guaranteed a very good control on the facial nerve, even in cases with difficult anatomical conditions, mainly thanks to the endoscopic procedure. It also permitted an appropriate anatomical orientation of the abnormal middle ear with a direct safe cochleostomy, when the round window position would have been difficult to treat using a traditional approach. PMID:25085636

  17. Immunological aspects of implantation and implantation failure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P M; Christmas, S E; Vince, G S

    1999-12-01

    The human endometrium contains a significant proportion of leukocytes (8-35% of all cells), the absolute numbers and proportions varying during both the menstrual cycle and early in pregnancy. T cells, macrophages and a population of phenotypically unusual large granular lymphocytes (LGL) are commonly present, although B cells are absent. Relative T cell numbers decrease significantly in first trimester decidua, and hence are unlikely to play an important role in maintenance of human pregnancy, but T cells could be important in implantation where their relative numbers are greater. In addition to producing cytokines, local tissue macrophages may provide an immediate antigen non-specific host defence to infection. Most attention has, nevertheless, focused on a role for LGL in implantation and maintenance of pregnancy since, at the time of implantation, LGL comprise 70-80% of the total endometrial leukocyte population. Although endometrial LGL have been shown to express natural killer (NK) cell-type cytotoxicity against classical NK cell targets, such cytotoxicity against trophoblast is induced only after activation by interleukin (IL)-2. Selective expression of the unusual class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule, HLA-G, by extravillous cytotrophoblast may assist in protecting invasive cytotrophoblast from potential maternal NK cell attack, probably via interactions with killer inhibitory receptor molecules on LGL. Many cytokines have been demonstrated to be expressed at the maternal-fetal interface although, currently, in mice only two (IL-11 and leukaemia inhibitory factor) appear to be absolutely essential for successful pregnancy outcome. Immune effector cells and cytokines may also play a role in human pregnancy pathologies, such as recurrent early pregnancy loss.

  18. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  19. The Vestibular Implant: Quo Vadis?

    PubMed Central

    van de Berg, Raymond; Guinand, Nils; Stokroos, Robert J.; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Kingma, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant (VI) and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: A search was performed in Pubmed, Medline, and Embase. Key words used were “vestibular prosth*” and “VI.” The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation. Study selection: All studies about the VI and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the VI. Data extraction and synthesis: Data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: To use a basic VI in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation), complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt. PMID:21991260

  20. Modulation Techniques for Biomedical Implanted Devices and Their Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Mahammad A.; Abbas, Saad M.; Samad, Salina A.; Hussain, Aini

    2012-01-01

    Implanted medical devices are very important electronic devices because of their usefulness in monitoring and diagnosis, safety and comfort for patients. Since 1950s, remarkable efforts have been undertaken for the development of bio-medical implanted and wireless telemetry bio-devices. Issues such as design of suitable modulation methods, use of power and monitoring devices, transfer energy from external to internal parts with high efficiency and high data rates and low power consumption all play an important role in the development of implantable devices. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various modulation and demodulation techniques such as amplitude shift keying (ASK), frequency shift keying (FSK) and phase shift keying (PSK) of the existing wireless implanted devices. The details of specifications, including carrier frequency, CMOS size, data rate, power consumption and supply, chip area and application of the various modulation schemes of the implanted devices are investigated and summarized in the tables along with the corresponding key references. Current challenges and problems of the typical modulation applications of these technologies are illustrated with a brief suggestions and discussion for the progress of implanted device research in the future. It is observed that the prime requisites for the good quality of the implanted devices and their reliability are the energy transformation, data rate, CMOS size, power consumption and operation frequency. This review will hopefully lead to increasing efforts towards the development of low powered, high efficient, high data rate and reliable implanted devices. PMID:22368470

  1. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  2. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  3. Multichannel extracochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Pulec, J L; Smith, J C; Lewis, M L; Hortmann, G

    1989-03-01

    The transcutaneous eight-channel extracochlear implant has undergone continuous revision to simplify the surgical technique, to minimize patient morbidity, and to improve performance. The extracochlear electrode array has been miniaturized so that it can be inserted through the facial recess without disturbing the external auditory canal, tympanic membrane, or malleus. The use of the remote antenna placed around the external auditory canal has greatly increased battery life and patient comfort. With its simplified incisions, the surgical procedure can be performed as out-patient surgery. Preoperative cochlear nerve testing and use of evoked response cochlear nerve testing allow preadjustment of the speech processor. Current features and performance of the implant are discussed.

  4. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  5. Current trends in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja; Ong, Joo L

    2014-04-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants.

  6. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  7. Stress magnitudes in the crust: constraints from stress orientation and relative magnitude data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.L.; Magee, M.

    1991-01-01

    The World Stress Map Project is a global cooperative effort to compile and interpret data on the orientation and relative magnitudes of the contemporary in situ tectonic stress field in the Earth's lithosphere. The intraplate stress field in both the oceans and continents is largely compressional with one or both of the horizontal stresses greater than the vertical stress. The regionally uniform horizontal intraplate stress orientations are generally consistent with either relative or absolute plate motions indicating that plate-boundary forces dominate the stress distribution within the plates. Current models of stresses due to whole mantle flow inferred from seismic topography models predict a general compressional stress state within continents but do not match the broad-scale horizontal stress orientations. The broad regionally uniform intraplate stress orientations are best correlated with compressional plate-boundary forces and the geometry of the plate boundaries. -from Authors

  8. EFFECT OF MECHANICAL STIMULI ON SKELETAL REGENERATION AROUND IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Leucht, Philipp; Kim, Jae-Beom; Wazen, Rima; Currey, Jennifer A.; Nanci, Antonio; Brunski, John B.; Helms, Jill A.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the aging population and the increasing need for total joint replacements, osseointegration is of a great interest for various clinical disciplines. Our objective was to investigate the molecular and cellular foundation that underlies this process. Here, we used an in vivo mouse model to study the cellular and molecular response in three distinct areas of unloaded implants: the periosteum, the gap between implant and cortical bone, and the marrow space. Our analyses began with the early phases of healing, and continued until the implants were completely osseointegrated. We investigated aspects of osseointegration ranging from vascularization, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone remodeling. In doing so, we gained an understanding of the healing mechanisms of different skeletal tissues during unloaded implant osseointegration. To continue our analysis, we used a micromotion device to apply a defined physical stimulus to the implants, and in doing so, we dramatically enhanced bone formation in the peri-implant tissue. By comparing strain measurements with cellular and molecular analyses, we developed an understanding of the correlation between strain magnitudes and fate decisions of cells shaping the skeletal regenerate. PMID:17175211

  9. Metal levels in corrosion of spinal implants

    PubMed Central

    Beguiristain, Jose; Duart, Julio

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion affects spinal instrumentations and may cause local and systemic complications. Diagnosis of corrosion is difficult, and nowadays it is performed almost exclusively by the examination of retrieved instrumentations. We conducted this study to determine whether it is possible to detect corrosion by measuring metal levels on patients with posterior instrumented spinal fusion. Eleven asymptomatic patients, with radiological signs of corrosion of their stainless steel spinal instrumentations, were studied by performing determinations of nickel and chromium in serum and urine. Those levels were compared with the levels of 22 patients with the same kind of instrumentation but without evidence of corrosion and to a control group of 22 volunteers without any metallic implants. Statistical analysis of our results revealed that the patients with spinal implants without radiological signs of corrosion have increased levels of chromium in serum and urine (P < 0.001) compared to volunteers without implants. Corrosion significantly raised metal levels, including nickel and chromium in serum and urine when compared to patients with no radiological signs of corrosion and to volunteers without metallic implants (P < 0.001). Metal levels measured in serum have high sensibility and specificity (area under the ROC curve of 0.981). By combining the levels of nickel and chromium in serum we were able to identify all the cases of corrosion in our series of patients. The results of our study confirm that metal levels in serum and urine are useful in the diagnosis of corrosion of spinal implants and may be helpful in defining the role of corrosion in recently described clinical entities such as late operative site pain or late infection of spinal implants. PMID:17256156

  10. MEMS-based power generation techniques for implantable biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied A

    2011-01-01

    Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS)-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient.

  11. MEMS-Based Power Generation Techniques for Implantable Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied A.

    2011-01-01

    Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS)-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient. PMID:22319362

  12. The ruptured PIP breast implant.

    PubMed

    Helyar, V; Burke, C; McWilliams, S

    2013-08-01

    Public concern erupted about the safety of Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants when it was revealed in 2011 that they contained an inferior, unlicensed industrial-grade silicone associated with a high rate of rupture. There followed national guidance for UK clinicians, which led to a considerable increase in referrals of asymptomatic women for breast implant assessment. In this review we discuss possible approaches to screening the PIP cohort and the salient characteristics of a ruptured implant. PMID:23622796

  13. Instrumented knee joint implants: innovations and promising concepts.

    PubMed

    Torrão, João N D; Dos Santos, Marco P Soares; Ferreira, Jorge A F

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on in vivo implementations of instrumented knee implants and recent prototypes with highly innovative potential. An in-depth analysis of the evolution of these systems was conducted, including three architectures developed by two research teams for in vivo operation that were implanted in 13 patients. The specifications of their various subsystems: sensor/transducers, power management, communication and processing/control units are presented, and their features are compared. These systems were designed to measure biomechanical quantities to further assist in rehabilitation and physical therapy, to access proper implant placement and joint function and to help predicting aseptic loosening. Five prototype systems that aim to improve their operation, as well as include new abilities, are also featured. They include technology to assist proper ligament tensioning and ensure self-powering. One can conclude that the concept of instrumented active knee implant seems the most promising trend for improving the outcomes of knee replacements.

  14. Implant-isolated SAW storage correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S. S.; Gunshor, R. L.; Pierret, R. F.

    1985-09-01

    The development of surface acoustic wave (SAW) convolvers and correlators is reviewed. This is followed by the introduction of a new type of monolithic metal-zinc oxide-silicon dioxide-silicon storage correlator. Fabrication and operation of the implant isolated storage correlator, which relies on ion implantation for confinement of storage regions, is detailed. A capacitance-time measurement procedure for evaluation of the charge storage capability of the device is described, and correlation output information is used to estimate the effective recombination rate of the inversion layer charges. Finally, operational characteristics are examined and the new bias stable device is shown to exhibit a 3-dB storage time in excess of 0.5 s. The cited storage time exceeds reported storage times of other structures fabricated in the ZnO-SiO2-Si layered medium configuration.

  15. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  16. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  17. Ion implantation in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintersgill, M. C.

    1984-02-01

    An introductory overview will be given of the effects of ion implantation on polymers, and certain areas will be examined in more detail. Radiation effects in general and ion implantation in particular, in the field of polymers, present a number of contrasts with those in ionic crystals, the most obvious difference being that the chemical effects of both the implanted species and the energy transfer to the host may profoundly change the nature of the target material. Common effects include crosslinking and scission of polymer chains, gas evolution, double bond formation and the formation of additional free radicals. Research has spanned the chemical processes involved, including polymerization reactions achievable only with the use of radiation, to applied research dealing both with the effects of radiation on polymers already in commercial use and the tailoring of new materials to specific applications. Polymers are commonly divided into two groups, in describing their behavior under irradiation. Group I includes materials which form crosslinks between molecules, whereas Group II materials tend to degrade. In basic research, interest has centered on Group I materials and of these polyethylene has been studied most intensively. Applied materials research has investigated a variety of polymers, particularly those used in cable insulation, and those utilized in ion beam lithography of etch masks. Currently there is also great interest in enhancing the conducting properties of polymers, and these uses would tend to involve the doping capabilities of ion implantation, rather than the energy deposition.

  18. Peritoneal trophoblastic implant.

    PubMed

    Rachagan, S P; Kutty, K; Govindan, K S

    1997-09-01

    A case of persistent trophoblastic tissue on the pelvic peritoneum is presented. While most cases are secondary to conservative surgery for tubal ectopic pregnancy, primary implantation can also occur as highlighted by this case. A brief pathophysiology of the condition is presented. The importance of monitoring the serum for beta subunit human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) is emphasised.

  19. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  20. Implantable Impedance Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Theodor, Michael; Ruh, Dominic; Ocker, Martin; Spether, Dominik; Förster, Katharina; Heilmann, Claudia; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Manoli, Yiannos; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate by theory, as well as by ex vivo and in vivo measurements that impedance plethysmography, applied extravascularly directly on large arteries, is a viable method for monitoring various cardiovascular parameters, such as blood pressure, with high accuracy. The sensor is designed as an implant to monitor cardiac events and arteriosclerotic progression over the long term. PMID:25123467

  1. The reverse zygomatic implant: a new implant for maxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Andrew; Collier, Jonathan; Darwood, Alastair; Tanner, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the rehabilitation of a patient who had been treated with a hemimaxillectomy, reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi vascularized free flap, and radiotherapy for carcinoma of the sinus some years previously. Limited jaw opening, difficult access through the flap to the bony site, and the very small amount of bone available in which to anchor the implant inspired the development and use of a new "reverse zygomatic" implant. For this treatment, site preparation and implant insertion were accomplished using an extraoral approach. The implant was used along with two other conventional zygomatic implants to provide support for a milled titanium bar and overdenture to rehabilitate the maxilla. Two years later, the patient continues to enjoy a healthy reconstruction. The reverse zygomatic implant appears to show promise as a useful addition to the implant armamentarium for the treatment of the patient undergoing maxillectomy. PMID:26574864

  2. Legal aspects in implantable defibrillator extraction.

    PubMed

    D'Ovidio, C; Costantini, S; Vellante, P; Carnevale, A

    2013-10-01

    At the Institute of Legal Medicine in Chieti, a case of iatrogenic superior vena cava perforation was observed during laser extraction of an infected biventricular implantable cardiac defibrillator. The presentation of this particular case represented a starting point for studying the occurrence of similar complications in literature, since their knowledge and understanding should induce resolution of any organisation problems, aid in increasing physicians' training and impose the availability of cardiac surgeons during such operations.

  3. Atg17 regulates the magnitude of the autophagic response.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Heesun; Yorimitsu, Tomohiro; Reggiori, Fulvio; Legakis, Julie E; Wang, Chao-Wen; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2005-07-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process used by eukaryotic cells for the degradation and recycling of cytosolic proteins and excess or defective organelles. In yeast, autophagy is primarily a response to nutrient limitation, whereas in higher eukaryotes it also plays a role in developmental processes. Due to its essentially unlimited degradative capacity, it is critical that regulatory mechanisms are in place to modulate the timing and magnitude of the autophagic response. One set of proteins that seems to function in this regard includes a complex that contains the Atg1 kinase. Aside from Atg1, the proteins in this complex participate primarily in either nonspecific autophagy or specific types of autophagy, including the cytoplasm to vacuole targeting pathway, which operates under vegetative growth conditions, and peroxisome degradation. Accordingly, these proteins are prime candidates for factors that regulate the conversion between these pathways, including the change in size of the sequestering vesicle, the most obvious morphological difference. The atg17delta mutant forms a reduced number of small autophagosomes. As a result, it is defective in peroxisome degradation and is partially defective for autophagy. Atg17 interacts with both Atg1 and Atg13, via two coiled-coil domains, and these interactions facilitate its inclusion in the Atg1 complex.

  4. Anchors Aweigh: A Demonstration of Cross-Modality Anchoring and Magnitude Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Daniel M.; LeBoeuf, Robyn A.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2008-01-01

    Research has shown that judgments tend to assimilate to irrelevant "anchors." We extend anchoring effects to show that anchors can even operate across modalities by, apparently, priming a general sense of magnitude that is not moored to any unit or scale. An initial study showed that participants drawing long "anchor" lines made higher numerical…

  5. [Infections secondary to implantation of cardiac pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Da Costa, A; Kirkorian, G; Chevalier, P; Cerisier, A; Chalvidan, T; Obadia, J F; Etienne, J; Isaaz, K; Touboul, P

    1998-06-01

    Infectious complications of pacemaker implantation are not common but may be particularly severe. Localised wound infections at the site of implantation have been reported in 0.5% of cases in the most recent series with an average of about 2%. The incidence of septicaemia and infectious endocarditis is lower, about 0.5% of cases. The operator's experience, the duration of the procedure and repeat procedures are considered to be predisposing factors. The main cause of these infections is though to be local contamination during the implantation. The commonest causal organism is the staphylococcus (75 to 92%), the staphylococcus aureus being the cause of acute infections whereas the staphylococcus epidermis is associated with cases of secondary infection. The usual clinical presentation is infection at the site of the pacemaker but other forms such as abscess, endocarditis, rejection of the implanted material, septic emboli and septic phlebitis have been described. The diagnosis is confirmed by local and systemic biological investigations and by echocardiography (especially transoesophageal echocardiography) in cases of right heart endocarditis. There are two axes of treatment: bactericidal double antibiotherapy and surgical ablation of the infected material either percutaneously or by cardiotomy. Though controversial, and unsupported by scientific evidence, the role of systematic, preoperative, prophylactic antibiotic therapy in the prevention of these complications seems to be increasing. PMID:9749192

  6. [Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach].

    PubMed

    Szyfter, W; Colletti, V; Pruszewicz, A; Kopeć, T; Szymiec, E; Kawczyński, M; Karlik, M

    2001-01-01

    The inner part of cochlear implant is inserted into inner ear during surgery through mastoid and middle ear. It is a classical method, used in the majority cochlear centers in the world. This is not a suitable method in case of chronic otitis media and middle ear malformation. In these cases Colletti proposed the middle fossa approach and cochlear implant insertion omitting middle ear structures. In patient with bilateral chronic otitis media underwent a few ears operations without obtaining dry postoperative cavity. Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach was performed in this patient. The bone fenster was cut, temporal lobe was bent and petrosus pyramid upper surface was exposed. When the superficial petrosal greater nerve, facial nerve and arcuate eminence were localised, the cochlear was open in the basal turn and electrode were inserted. The patient achieves good results in the postoperative speech rehabilitation. It confirmed Colletti tesis that deeper electrode insertion in the cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach enable use of low and middle frequencies, which are very important in speech understanding.

  7. Ion-implanted PLZT ceramics: a new high-sensitivity image storage medium

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Results were presented of our studies of photoferroelectric (PFE) image storage in H- and He-ion implanted PLZT (lead lanthanum zirconate titanate) ceramics which demonstrate that the photosensitivity of PLZT can be significantly increased by ion implantation in the ceramic surface to be exposed to image light. More recently, implantations of Ar and Ar + Ne into the PLZT surface have produced much greater photosensitivity enhancement. For example, the photosensitivity after implantation with 1.5 x 10/sup 14/ 350 keV Ar/cm/sup 2/ + 1 x 10/sup 15/ 500 keV Ne/cm/sup 2/ is increased by about four orders of magnitude over that of unimplanted PLZT. Measurements indicate that the photosensitivity enhancement in ion-implanted PLZT is controlled by implantation-produced disorder which results in marked decreases in dielectric constant and dark conductivity and changes in photoconductivity of the implanted layer. The effects of Ar- and Ar + Ne-implantation are presented along with a phenomenological model which describes the enhancement in photosensitivity obtained by ion implantation. This model takes into account both light- and implantation-induced changes in conductivity and gives quantitative agreement with the measured changes in the coercive voltage V/sub c/ as a function of near-uv light intensity for both unimplanted and implanted PLZT. The model, used in conjunction with calculations of the profiles of implantation-produced disorder, has provided the information needed for co-implanting ions of different masses, e.g., Ar and Ne, to improve photosensitivity.

  8. Multicenter study on breast reconstruction outcome using Becker implants.

    PubMed

    Scuderi, Nicolò; Alfano, Carmine; Campus, Gian Vittorio; Rubino, Corrado; Chiummariello, Stefano; Puddu, Antonella; Mazzocchi, Marco

    2011-02-01

    The use of tissue expanders and implants is the simplest option for breast reconstruction following mastectomy. In the 1980s, Hilton Becker introduced a round, inflatable breast implant that could be used as a permanent implant. Since then, the original implant has been improved in both design and architecture. The new Becker device consists of an anatomical implant composed of 35% cohesive silicone gel in the outer chamber and 65% normal saline in the inner chamber. This multicenter study describes our experience with the new anatomical Becker implants in a large series of patients, in both immediate and delayed breast reconstruction. We reviewed the clinical records of 204 patients who underwent a breast reconstruction with an anatomical Becker-type implant in the sub-muscular position between November 2004 and December 2006. Data on the patients' characteristics, indications for reconstruction, operative technique, device size used, complications, and need for further operations were collected and analyzed. A total of 248 breast reconstructions were performed in 204 patients. One hundred forty-three patients (70%) underwent an immediate reconstruction; in the remaining 61 cases (30%), the breast reconstruction was performed later. The patients' age ranged from 26 to 66 years, with a median age of 47.5 years. The implant was placed unilaterally in 160 women (78.5%) and bilaterally in the remaining 44 (21.5%). Complications occurred in 85 cases (34.2%), in both the immediate and delayed reconstruction groups, and were related to wound healing, bleeding, seroma, and problems with the inflatable expanders. Iatrogenic implant rupture was documented in one case (0.4%). Inflation was impossible in 7 cases (2.8%) as a result of valve obstruction (3 cases, 1.2%) and valve displacement (4 cases, 1.6%). Implant malposition was the most troublesome complication; indeed, 34 patients (13.7%) complained of device malposition. Capsular contracture was assessed in all the

  9. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Hunter, Jerry L.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-06-01

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500-1625 °C, were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated, including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.

  10. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Jerry L. Hunter, Jr.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-17

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500–1625°C, were investigated in this study by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated, including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Lastly, estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.

  11. Drug loading of polymer implants by supercritical CO2 assisted impregnation: A review.

    PubMed

    Champeau, M; Thomassin, J-M; Tassaing, T; Jérôme, C

    2015-07-10

    Drug loaded implants also called drug-eluting implants have proven their benefits over simple implants. Among the developed manufacturing processes, the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) assisted impregnation has attracted growing attention to load Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients into polymer implants since it enables to recover a final implant free of any solvent residue and to operate under mild temperature which is suitable for processing with thermosensitive drugs. This paper is a review of the state-of-the-art and the application of the scCO2 assisted impregnation process to prepare drug-eluting implants. It introduces the process and presents its advantages for biomedical applications. The influences of the characteristics of the implied binary systems and of the experimental conditions on the drug loading are described. Then, the various current applications of this process for manufacturing drug-eluting implants are reviewed. Finally, the new emerging variations of this process are described.

  12. Comparison of local magnitude scales in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysel, Robert; Kristek, Jozef; Moczo, Peter; Cipciar, Andrej; Csicsay, Kristian; Srbecky, Miroslav; Kristekova, Miriam

    2015-04-01

    Efficient monitoring of earthquakes and determination of their magnitudes are necessary for developing earthquake catalogues at a regional and national levels. Unification and homogenization of the catalogues in terms of magnitudes has great importance for seismic hazard assessment. Calibrated local earthquake magnitude scales are commonly used for determining magnitudes of regional earthquakes by all national seismological services in the Central Europe. However, at the local scale, each seismological service uses its own magnitude determination procedure. There is no systematic comparison of the approaches and there is no unified procedure. We present a comparison of the local magnitude scales used by the national seismological services of Slovakia (Geophysical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences), Czech Republic (Institute of Geophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic), Austria (ZAMG), Hungary (Geodetic and Geophysical Institute, Hungarian Academy of Sciences) and Poland (Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences), and by the local network of seismic stations located around the Nuclear Power Plant Jaslovske Bohunice, Slovakia. The comparison is based on the national earthquake catalogues and annually published earthquake bulletins for the period from 1985 to 2011. A data set of earthquakes has been compiled based on identification of common events in the national earthquake catalogues and bulletins. For each pair of seismic networks, magnitude differences have been determined and investigated as a function of time. The mean and standard deviations of the magnitude differences as well as regression coefficients between local magnitudes from the national seismological networks have been computed. Results show relatively big scatter between different national local magnitudes and its considerable time variation. A conversion between different national local magnitudes in a scale 1:1 seems inappropriate, especially for the compilation of the

  13. Spectral subtraction-based speech enhancement for cochlear implant patients in background noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2005-03-01

    A single-channel speech enhancement algorithm utilizing speech pause detection and nonlinear spectral subtraction is proposed for cochlear implant patients in the present study. The spectral subtraction algorithm estimates the short-time spectral magnitude of speech by subtracting the estimated noise spectral magnitude from the noisy speech spectral magnitude. The artifacts produced by spectral subtraction (such as ``musical noise'') were significantly reduced by combining variance-reduced gain function and spectral flooring. Sentence recognition by seven cochlear implant subjects was tested under different noisy listening conditions (speech-shaped noise and 6-talker speech babble at +9, +6, +3, and 0 dB SNR) with and without the speech enhancement algorithm. For speech-shaped noise, performance for all subjects at all SNRs was significantly improved by the speech enhancement algorithm; for speech babble, performance was only modestly improved. The results suggest that the proposed speech enhancement algorithm may be beneficial for implant users in noisy listening. .

  14. Some Effects of Magnitude of Reinforcement on Persistence of Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McComas, Jennifer J.; Hartman, Ellie C.; Jimenez, Angel

    2008-01-01

    The influence of magnitude of reinforcement was examined on both response rate and behavioral persistence. During Phase 1, a multiple schedule of concurrent reinforcement was implemented in which reinforcement for one response option was held constant at VI 30 s across both components, while magnitude of reinforcement for the other response option…

  15. Number Games, Magnitude Representation, and Basic Number Skills in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Jemma Catherine; Bull, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    The effect of 3 intervention board games (linear number, linear color, and nonlinear number) on young children's (mean age = 3.8 years) counting abilities, number naming, magnitude comprehension, accuracy in number-to-position estimation tasks, and best-fit numerical magnitude representations was examined. Pre- and posttest performance was…

  16. The Weight of Time: Affordances for an Integrated Magnitude System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Aitao; Mo, Lei; Hodges, Bert H.

    2011-01-01

    In five experiments we explored the effects of weight on time in different action contexts to test the hypothesis that an integrated magnitude system is tuned to affordances. Larger magnitudes generally seem longer; however, Lu and colleagues (2009) found that if numbers were presented as weights in a range heavy enough to affect lifting, the…

  17. The Effects of Reinforcer Magnitude on Timing in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludvig, Elliot A.; Conover, Kent; Shizgal, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The relation between reinforcer magnitude and timing behavior was studied using a peak procedure. Four rats received multiple consecutive sessions with both low and high levels of brain stimulation reward (BSR). Rats paused longer and had later start times during sessions when their responses were reinforced with low-magnitude BSR. When estimated…

  18. Reinforcement Magnitude: An Evaluation of Preference and Reinforcer Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trosclair-Lasserre, Nicole M.; Lerman, Dorothea C.; Call, Nathan A.; Addison, Laura R.; Kodak, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Consideration of reinforcer magnitude may be important for maximizing the efficacy of treatment for problem behavior. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about children's preferences for different magnitudes of social reinforcement or the extent to which preference is related to differences in reinforcer efficacy. The purpose of the current…

  19. Linear Numerical-Magnitude Representations Aid Children's Memory for Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Clarissa A.; Siegler, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the relation between children's numerical-magnitude representations and their memory for numbers. Results of three experiments indicated that the more linear children's magnitude representations were, the more closely their memory of the numbers approximated the numbers presented. This relation was present for preschoolers and…

  20. Magnitude Knowledge: The Common Core of Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The integrated theory of numerical development posits that a central theme of numerical development from infancy to adulthood is progressive broadening of the types and ranges of numbers whose magnitudes are accurately represented. The process includes four overlapping trends: 1) representing increasingly precisely the magnitudes of non-symbolic…

  1. Magnitude Knowledge: The Common Core of Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The integrated theory of numerical development posits that a central theme of numerical development from infancy to adulthood is progressive broadening of the types and ranges of numbers whose magnitudes are accurately represented. The process includes four overlapping trends: (1) representing increasingly precisely the magnitudes of non-symbolic…

  2. Congruency Effects between Number Magnitude and Response Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vierck, Esther; Kiesel, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Numbers are thought to be represented in space along a mental left-right oriented number line. Number magnitude has also been associated with the size of grip aperture, which might suggest a connection between number magnitude and intensity. The present experiment aimed to confirm this possibility more directly by using force as a response…

  3. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of Pannonian earthquake magnitude series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesca, Luciano; Toth, Laszlo

    2016-04-01

    The multifractality of the series of magnitudes of the earthquakes occurred in Pannonia region from 2002 to 2012 has been investigated. The shallow (depth less than 40 km) and deep (depth larger than 70 km) seismic catalogues were analysed by using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. The shallow and deep catalogues are characterized by different multifractal properties: (i) the magnitudes of the shallow events are weakly persistent, while those of the deep ones are almost uncorrelated; (ii) the deep catalogue is more multifractal than the shallow one; (iii) the magnitudes of the deep catalogue are characterized by a right-skewed multifractal spectrum, while that of the shallow magnitude is rather symmetric; (iv) a direct relationship between the b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law and the multifractality of the magnitudes is suggested.

  4. Reinforcement Magnitude: An Evaluation of Preference and Reinforcer Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Trosclair-Lasserre, Nicole M; Lerman, Dorothea C; Call, Nathan A; Addison, Laura R; Kodak, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Consideration of reinforcer magnitude may be important for maximizing the efficacy of treatment for problem behavior. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about children's preferences for different magnitudes of social reinforcement or the extent to which preference is related to differences in reinforcer efficacy. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relations among reinforcer magnitude, preference, and efficacy by drawing on the procedures and results of basic experimentation in this area. Three children who engaged in problem behavior that was maintained by social positive reinforcement (attention, access to tangible items) participated. Results indicated that preference for different magnitudes of social reinforcement may predict reinforcer efficacy and that magnitude effects may be mediated by the schedule requirement. PMID:18595284

  5. Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Why Do Children Receive Implants Late?

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Julia; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Early cochlear implantation has been widely promoted for children who derive inadequate benefit from conventional acoustic amplification. Universal newborn hearing screening has led to earlier identification and intervention, including cochlear implantation in much of the world. The purpose of this study was to examine age and time to cochlear implantation and to understand the factors that affected late cochlear implantation in children who received cochlear implants. Design: In this population-based study, data were examined for all children who underwent cochlear implant surgery in one region of Canada from 2002 to 2013. Clinical characteristics were collected prospectively as part of a larger project examining outcomes from newborn hearing screening. For this study, audiologic details including age and severity of hearing loss at diagnosis, age at cochlear implant candidacy, and age at cochlear implantation were documented. Additional detailed medical chart information was extracted to identify the factors associated with late implantation for children who received cochlear implants more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Results: The median age of diagnosis of permanent hearing loss for 187 children was 12.6 (interquartile range: 5.5, 21.7) months, and the age of cochlear implantation over the 12-year period was highly variable with a median age of 36.2 (interquartile range: 21.4, 71.3) months. A total of 118 (63.1%) received their first implant more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Detailed analysis of clinical profiles for these 118 children revealed that late implantation could be accounted for primarily by progressive hearing loss (52.5%), complex medical conditions (16.9%), family indecision (9.3%), geographical location (5.9%), and other miscellaneous known (6.8%) and unknown factors (8.5%). Conclusions: This study confirms that despite the trend toward earlier implantation, a substantial number of children

  6. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  7. High Curie temperature drive layer materials for ion-implanted magnetic bubble devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratello, V. J.; Wolfe, R.; Blank, S. L.; Nelson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ion implantation of bubble garnets can lower the Curie temperature by 70 C or more, thus limiting high temperature operation of devices with ion-implanted propagation patterns. Therefore, double-layer materials were made with a conventional 2-micron bubble storage layer capped by an ion-implantable drive layer of high Curie temperature, high magnetostriction material. Contiguous disk test patterns were implanted with varying doses of a typical triple implant. Quality of propagation was judged by quasistatic tests on 8-micron period major and minor loops. Variations of magnetization, uniaxial anisotropy, implant dose, and magnetostriction were investigated to ensure optimum flux matching, good charged wall coupling, and wide operating margins. The most successful drive layer compositions were in the systems (SmDyLuCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and (BiGdTmCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and had Curie temperatures 25-44 C higher than the storage layers.

  8. Prediction of lubrication regimes in wrist implants with spherical bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pylios, T; Shepherd, D E T

    2004-03-01

    The wrist joint is frequently affected by rheumatoid arthritis, resulting in wrist pain, deformity and ultimately loss of function. Artificial wrist implants have been introduced to treat the rheumatoid wrist, to attempt to alleviate pain and restore some function to the joint. The aim of this study was to predict the likely lubrication regimes that occur in wrist implants with spherical bearing surfaces. The implant was modelled as an equivalent ball-on-plane. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to determine the minimum film thickness for the implant under different load, entraining velocity, lubricant viscosity, size of implant and material combinations. The results show that the highest film thickness is found in large implants, with high viscosity, high entraining velocity and low load. Hard-on-soft material combinations will operate with a boundary lubrication regime. Material combinations involving ceramic bearing surfaces have the potential to operate with a mixed lubrication regime.

  9. Relationship between multipulse integration and speech recognition with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ning; Pfingst, Bryan E.

    2014-01-01

    Comparisons of performance with cochlear implants and postmortem conditions in the cochlea in humans have shown mixed results. The limitations in those studies favor the use of within-subject designs and non-invasive measures to estimate cochlear conditions. One non-invasive correlate of cochlear health is multipulse integration, established in an animal model. The present study used this measure to relate neural health in human cochlear implant users to their speech recognition performance. The multipulse-integration slopes were derived based on psychophysical detection thresholds measured for two pulse rates (80 and 640 pulses per second). A within-subject design was used in eight subjects with bilateral implants where the direction and magnitude of ear differences in the multipulse-integration slopes were compared with those of the speech-recognition results. The speech measures included speech reception threshold for sentences and phoneme recognition in noise. The magnitude of ear difference in the integration slopes was significantly correlated with the magnitude of ear difference in speech reception thresholds, consonant recognition in noise, and transmission of place of articulation of consonants. These results suggest that multipulse integration predicts speech recognition in noise and perception of features that use dynamic spectral cues. PMID:25190399

  10. Typical whole body vibration exposure magnitudes encountered in the open pit mining industry.

    PubMed

    Howard, Bryan; Sesek, Richard; Bloswick, Don

    2009-01-01

    According to recent research, a causal link has been established between occupational exposure to whole body vibration and an increased occurrence of low back pain. To aid in the further development of an in-house health and safety program for a large open pit mining facility interested in reducing back pain among its operators, whole body vibration magnitudes were characterized for a range of jobs. Specifically, thirty-five individual jobs from five different areas across the facility were evaluated for tri-axial acceleration levels during normal operating conditions. Tri-axial acceleration magnitudes were categorized into thirteen job groups. Job groups were ranked according to exposure and compared to the ISO 2631-1 standard for health risk assessment. Three of the thirteen job groups produced tri-axial acceleration magnitudes below the ISO 2631-1 low/moderate health caution limit for a twelve hour exposure. Six of the thirteen job groups produced exposures within the moderate health risk range. Four job groups were found to subject operators to WBV acceleration magnitudes above the moderate/high health caution limit. PMID:20037244

  11. Implants for cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, H B; McDermott, M W; Cooke, D D

    1995-04-01

    As long as there have been skull defects, there has been a recognized need to cover them in some way. Cranioplasty is the surgical correction of skull defects. The two major purposes of performing a cranioplasty are to protect the brain and to provide reasonable cosmesis. The two physical requirements of the implant are strength and malleability. Originally, foreign materials such as precious metals were used. Autogenous bone grafts have also achieved successful results. Over the past quarter-century, the popularization of acrylics and radiolucent metals has favored them over bone because of their ease of use, the absence of need to harvest donor bone, and, particularly, bone's tendency to resorb or scar. Yet foreign materials can cause excessive inflammation, producing a synovial membrane at the interface between the host bone and cranioplasty construct, increasing the risk of infection. Currently, hydroxyapatite-based ceramics, which may induce bone growth into the implant, are increasingly being used. Future applications will include antibiotic-impregnated implants and computer-generated models to improve the precision of cranioplasty fit and cosmesis.

  12. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology.

  13. Combined use of transcranial magnetic stimulation and metal electrode implants: a theoretical assessment of safety considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Rouhani, Hossein; Elahi, Behzad; Shahim, Kamal; Chen, Robert; Mosig, Juan R.; Pollo, Claudio; Graham, Simon J.

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides a theoretical assessment of the safety considerations encountered in the simultaneous use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and neurological interventions involving implanted metallic electrodes, such as electrocorticography. Metal implants are subject to magnetic forces due to fast alternating magnetic fields produced by the TMS coil. The question of whether the mechanical movement of the implants leads to irreversible damage of brain tissue is addressed by an electromagnetic simulation which quantifies the magnitude of imposed magnetic forces. The assessment is followed by a careful mechanical analysis determining the maximum tolerable force which does not cause irreversible tissue damage. Results of this investigation provide useful information on the range of TMS stimulator output powers which can be safely used in patients having metallic implants. It is shown that conventional TMS applications can be considered safe when applied on patients with typical electrode implants as the induced stress in the brain tissue remains well below the limit of tissue damage.

  14. Incorporating seed orientation in brachytherapy implant reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu; Jain, Ameet K.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2006-03-01

    Intra-operative quality assurance and dosimetry optimization in prostate brachytherapy critically depends on the ability of discerning the locations of implanted seeds. Various methods exist for seed matching and reconstruction from multiple segmented C-arm images. Unfortunately, using three or more images makes the problem NP-hard, i.e. no polynomial-time algorithm can provably compute the complete matching. Typically, a statistical analysis of performance is considered sufficient. Hence it is of utmost importance to exploit all the available information in order to minimize the matching and reconstruction errors. Current algorithms use only the information about seed centers, disregarding the information about the orientations and length of seeds. While the latter has little dosimetric impact, it can positively contribute to improving seed matching rate and 3D implant reconstruction accuracy. It can also become critical information when hidden and spuriously segmented seeds need to be matched, where reliable and generic methods are not yet available. Expecting orientation information to be useful in reconstructing large and dense implants, we have developed a method which incorporates seed orientation information into our previously proposed reconstruction algorithm (MARSHAL). Simulation study shows that under normal segmentation errors, when considering seed orientations, implants of 80 to 140 seeds with the density of 2.0- 3.0 seeds/cc give an average matching rate >97% using three-image matching. It is higher than the matching rate of about 96% when considering only seed positions. This means that the information of seed orientations appears to be a valuable additive to fluoroscopy-based brachytherapy implant reconstruction.

  15. 3D finite element analysis of immediate loading of single wide versus double implants for replacing mandibular molar

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Shrikar R.; Karthikeyan, I.; Gaddale, Reetika

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this finite element study was to compare the stresses, strains, and displacements of double versus single implant in immediate loading for replacing mandibular molar. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM (finite element method) models were made to simulate implant designs. The first model used 5-mm-wide diameter implant to support a single molar crown. The second model used 3.75-3.75 double implant design. Anisotropic properties were assigned to bone model. Each model was analyzed with single force magnitude (100 N) in vertical axis. Results: This FEM study suggested that micromotion can be controlled better for double implants compared to single wide-diameter implants. The Von Mises stress for double implant showed 74.44% stress reduction compared to that of 5-mm implant. The Von Mises elastic strain was reduced by 61% for double implant compared to 5-mm implant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, when the mesiodistal space for artificial tooth is more than 12.5 mm, under immediate loading, the double implant support should be considered. PMID:24554890

  16. COMPARISON BETWEEN LONG AND STANDARD LENGTH IMPLANTS10.

    PubMed

    Boni, W; Delle Donne, U; Corradini, G; Tettamanti, L; Tagliabue, A

    2015-01-01

    Long implants (LI, i.e. longer than 13 mm) are thought to give longer survival than standard length fixtures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the survival rate of 780 LI. In the period between January 2008 and December 2013, 877 patients (498 females and 379 males) were operated at the BDD private Practice Clinic (Milan, Italy). The mean post-surgical follow-up was 30±17 months (max – min, 84 – 1). One thousand seven hundred and fifty-three fixtures (EDIERRE Implant System SpA, Genoa, Italy) were evaluated in the present study, 780 15 mm long (LI) and 972 13 mm long (i.e. standard length implants). All patients underwent the same surgical protocol and agreed to participate in a post-operative check-up program. SPSS program was used for statistical analysis. Survival rate (SVR) was 97.8% since only 38 fixtures were lost from a total of 1,752 implants. Cross-tabulation between failures and jaws had a statistical significant value (p= 0.027) with worse results fox maxilla (23 failures out of 768 implants). Also tooth position has an impact (p= 0.027) since incisors plus canines had 18 failures out of 550 implants whereas premolars and molars had 20 lost fixtures out of 1,202. LIs give a small but significative advantage in oral rehabilitation.

  17. Bone attachment to glass-fibre-reinforced composite implant with porous surface.

    PubMed

    Mattila, R H; Laurila, P; Rekola, J; Gunn, J; Lassila, L V J; Mäntylä, T; Aho, A J; Vallittu, P K

    2009-06-01

    A method has recently been developed for producing fibre-reinforced composites (FRC) with porous surfaces, intended for use as load-bearing orthopaedic implants. This study focuses on evaluation of the bone-bonding behaviour of FRC implants. Three types of cylindrical implants, i.e. FRC implants with a porous surface, solid polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) implants and titanium (Ti) implants, were inserted in a transverse direction into the intercondular trabeculous bone area of distal femurs and proximal tibias of New Zealand White rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post operation, and push-out tests (n=5-6 per implant type per time point) were then carried out. At 12 weeks the shear force at the porous FRC-bone interface was significantly higher (283.3+/-55.3N) than the shear force at interfaces of solid PMMA/bone (14.4+/-11.0 N; p<0.001) and Ti/bone (130.6+/-22.2N; p=0.001). Histological observation revealed new bone growth into the porous surface structure of FRC implants. Solid PMMA and Ti implants were encapsulated mostly with fibrous connective tissue. Finite element analysis (FEA) revealed that porous FRC implants had mechanical properties which could be tailored to smooth the shear stress distribution at the bone-implant interface and reduce the stress-shielding effect. PMID:19268643

  18. Assessment of metal artefact reduction around dental titanium implants in cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, N; Hassan, B; Syriopoulos, K; van der Stelt, P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate if the metal artefact reduction (MAR) tool used in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH® OP300 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland) can improve the gray value levels in post-operative implant scans. Methods: 20 potential implant sites were selected from 5 edentulous human dry mandibles. Each mandible was scanned by a CBCT scanner, and images were produced under three different conditions: implant sites drilled but no implants inserted, implants inserted without application of MAR and implants inserted with application of MAR. Using Geomagic® Studio 2012 (Geomagic, Morrisville, NC) and 3Diagnosys® v. 5.3.1 (3Diemme® SRL, Cantù, Italy) software, three scans of each mandible were superimposed. The mean gray value of identical regions of bone around the implants was derived for each condition. The differences between gray value measurements at implant sites derived from different conditions were assessed. Results: A significant difference was found between mean gray values from the scans with no implants inserted and with implants inserted (with and without MAR) (p = 0.012). No significant difference was revealed for gray values measured from scans with and without MAR (p = 0.975). Conclusions: The MAR tool in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH OP300 CBCT scanner does not significantly correct the voxel gray values affected by the metal artefact in the vicinity of an implant in human dry mandibles. PMID:25135316

  19. Extracardiac autologous pericardial tunnel Fontan allows implantation of an endocardial atrial lead for sinus node dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Newcombe, Jennifer; Gordon, Brent; Razzouk, Anees; Bailey, Leonard; Mandapati, Ravi

    2014-09-01

    Sinus node dysfunction is common after the Fontan procedure, and pacemaker implantation has been reported in 9.2% of Fontan patients. The two options for pacemaker implantation for sinus node dysfunction after the Fontan operation are epicardial lead placement, which allows for dual-chamber pacing, or transvenous atrial pacing. We report the first successful implantation of an endocardial atrial lead for sinus node dysfunction in a patient with an extracardiac lateral tunnel Fontan.

  20. Orthopaedic implant removal at Royal Naval Hospital Stonehouse: a three-year review.

    PubMed

    Howell, G E; Hand, C J; Dodenhoff, R

    1995-01-01

    A recent study stated that 11% of all elective orthopaedic procedures performed at a Regional Orthopaedic Unit involved removal of orthopaedic implants. Indications for certain orthopaedic implant removal remain unclear. As budgets are squeezed even tighter throughout all branches of the Royal Navy, we looked at each operation performed for orthopaedic implant removal at Royal Naval Hospital Stonehouse and questioned their effectiveness with respect to finance and working days lost for serving personnel. PMID:7562705

  1. Orthopaedic implant removal at Royal Naval Hospital Stonehouse: a three-year review.

    PubMed

    Howell, G E; Hand, C J; Dodenhoff, R

    1995-01-01

    A recent study stated that 11% of all elective orthopaedic procedures performed at a Regional Orthopaedic Unit involved removal of orthopaedic implants. Indications for certain orthopaedic implant removal remain unclear. As budgets are squeezed even tighter throughout all branches of the Royal Navy, we looked at each operation performed for orthopaedic implant removal at Royal Naval Hospital Stonehouse and questioned their effectiveness with respect to finance and working days lost for serving personnel.

  2. Sub-meninges implantation reduces immune response to neural implants.

    PubMed

    Markwardt, Neil T; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L

    2013-04-15

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability.

  3. Sub-meninges Implantation Reduces Immune Response to Neural Implants

    PubMed Central

    Markwardt, Neil T.; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability. PMID:23370311

  4. Trapping of interstitials during ion implantation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Culbertson, R.J.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The solid phase epitaxial regrowth of silicon implanted with a group V dopant, such as antimony, results in excellent incorporation of the dopant atoms into silicon lattice sites. However, annealing at higher temperatures or longer times results in transient dopant precipitation with a diffusion coefficient up to five orders of magnitude above that of tracer diffusion and with a reduced activation energy. This precipitation is accompanied by the nucleation of dislocation loops that are interstitial in nature, and the transient ceases as the dislocation loops develop. It is believed that Si interstitials are trapped in a stable defect complex during the implantation process. Although they survive SPE these complexes dissolve at higher temperatures and release a large supply of interstitials which serve to promote dopant migration via an interstitialcy mechanism until they condense to form the observed dislocation loops. By following the Sb implantation with an implantation of B to an equivalent concentration profile the loop formation is efficiently suppressed. For higher B concentrations the Sb precipitation is no longer observed. Results for As implantation are similar to Sb except that As precipitates cannot be directly observed. Calculations of the dopant and interstitial concentration depth distributions were also performed.

  5. Induced earthquake magnitudes are as large as (statistically) expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elst, Nicholas J.; Page, Morgan T.; Weiser, Deborah A.; Goebel, Thomas H. W.; Hosseini, S. Mehran

    2016-06-01

    A major question for the hazard posed by injection-induced seismicity is how large induced earthquakes can be. Are their maximum magnitudes determined by injection parameters or by tectonics? Deterministic limits on induced earthquake magnitudes have been proposed based on the size of the reservoir or the volume of fluid injected. However, if induced earthquakes occur on tectonic faults oriented favorably with respect to the tectonic stress field, then they may be limited only by the regional tectonics and connectivity of the fault network. In this study, we show that the largest magnitudes observed at fluid injection sites are consistent with the sampling statistics of the Gutenberg-Richter distribution for tectonic earthquakes, assuming no upper magnitude bound. The data pass three specific tests: (1) the largest observed earthquake at each site scales with the log of the total number of induced earthquakes, (2) the order of occurrence of the largest event is random within the induced sequence, and (3) the injected volume controls the total number of earthquakes rather than the total seismic moment. All three tests point to an injection control on earthquake nucleation but a tectonic control on earthquake magnitude. Given that the largest observed earthquakes are exactly as large as expected from the sampling statistics, we should not conclude that these are the largest earthquakes possible. Instead, the results imply that induced earthquake magnitudes should be treated with the same maximum magnitude bound that is currently used to treat seismic hazard from tectonic earthquakes.

  6. Derivation of Johnson-Cousins Magnitudes from DSLR Camera Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Woojin; Pak, Soojong; Shim, Hyunjin; Le, Huynh Anh N.; Im, Myungshin; Chang, Seunghyuk; Yu, Joonkyu

    2016-01-01

    The RGB Bayer filter system consists of a mosaic of R, G, and B filters on the grid of the photo sensors which typical commercial DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) cameras and CCD cameras are equipped with. Lot of unique astronomical data obtained using an RGB Bayer filter system are available, including transient objects, e.g. supernovae, variable stars, and solar system bodies. The utilization of such data in scientific research requires that reliable photometric transformation methods are available between the systems. In this work, we develop a series of equations to convert the observed magnitudes in the RGB Bayer filter system (RB, GB, and BB) into the Johnson-Cousins BVR filter system (BJ, VJ, and RC). The new transformation equations derive the calculated magnitudes in the Johnson-Cousins filters (BJcal, VJcal, and RCcal) as functions of RGB magnitudes and colors. The mean differences between the transformed magnitudes and original magnitudes, i.e. the residuals, are (BJ - BJcal) = 0.064 mag, (VJ - VJcal) = 0.041 mag, and (RC - RCcal) = 0.039 mag. The calculated Johnson-Cousins magnitudes from the transformation equations show a good linear correlation with the observed Johnson-Cousins magnitudes.

  7. Quantifying Heartbeat Dynamics by Magnitude and Sign Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2003-05-01

    We review a recently developed approach for analyzing time series with long-range correlations by decomposing the signal increment series into magnitude and sign series and analyzing their scaling properties. We show that time series with identical long-range correlations can exhibit different time organization for the magnitude and sign. We apply our approach to series of time intervals between consecutive heartbeats. Using the detrended fluctuation analysis method we find that the magnitude series is long-range correlated, while the sign series is anticorrelated and that both magnitude and sign series may have clinical applications. Further, we study the heartbeat magnitude and sign series during different sleep stages — light sleep, deep sleep, and REM sleep. For the heartbeat sign time series we find short-range anticorrelations, which are strong during deep sleep, weaker during light sleep and even weaker during REM sleep. In contrast, for the heartbeat magnitude time series we find long-range positive correlations, which are strong during REM sleep and weaker during light sleep. Thus, the sign and the magnitude series provide information which is also useful for distinguishing between different sleep stages.

  8. Regression between earthquake magnitudes having errors with known variances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Jose

    2016-07-01

    Recent publications on the regression between earthquake magnitudes assume that both magnitudes are affected by error and that only the ratio of error variances is known. If X and Y represent observed magnitudes, and x and y represent the corresponding theoretical values, the problem is to find the a and b of the best-fit line y = a x + b. This problem has a closed solution only for homoscedastic errors (their variances are all equal for each of the two variables). The published solution was derived using a method that cannot provide a sum of squares of residuals. Therefore, it is not possible to compare the goodness of fit for different pairs of magnitudes. Furthermore, the method does not provide expressions for the x and y. The least-squares method introduced here does not have these drawbacks. The two methods of solution result in the same equations for a and b. General properties of a discussed in the literature but not proved, or proved for particular cases, are derived here. A comparison of different expressions for the variances of a and b is provided. The paper also considers the statistical aspects of the ongoing debate regarding the prediction of y given X. Analysis of actual data from the literature shows that a new approach produces an average improvement of less than 0.1 magnitude units over the standard approach when applied to Mw vs. mb and Mw vs. MS regressions. This improvement is minor, within the typical error of Mw. Moreover, a test subset of 100 predicted magnitudes shows that the new approach results in magnitudes closer to the theoretically true magnitudes for only 65 % of them. For the remaining 35 %, the standard approach produces closer values. Therefore, the new approach does not always give the most accurate magnitude estimates.

  9. [Professional occupation after cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kós, Maria-Izabel; Degive, Colette; Boëx, Colette; Maire, Raphaël; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2006-10-01

    This study verifies whether cochlear implants helps deaf adults to maintain or develop their professional occupations. Sixty-seven patients received a questionnaire concerning their professional activities before and after implantation. At the time of implantation 34 were professionally active. After the implantation 29 remained active, 4 of them reporting positive developments in their careers. Five patients became inactive. The previously inactive patients remained inactive. There was no difference in auditory performances between professionally active or inactive patients. Cochlear implants enable most implanted adults to maintain and even progress in their professions. However, deafness still represents an obstacle to social integration as inactive patients who searched for a job were rejected after the job interviews. PMID:17076153

  10. Cochlear Implantation in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Adrien A.; Nazarian, Ronen; Telischi, Fred F.; Martinez, Diane; Hodges, Annelle; Velandia, Sandra; Cejas-Cruz, Ivette; Balkany, Thomas J.; Lo, Kaming; Lang, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the outcome of cochlear implantation in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Study Design Retrospective case review and survey Setting Tertiary referral center Patients Children who meet criteria for cochlear implantation and diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder Main Outcome Measures Receptive and expressive language scores and parental survey data. Results 15 patients with history of ASD and cochlear implantation were analyzed and compared to 15 patients who received cochlear implant and have no other disability. Post-operatively, more than 67% of children with ASD significantly improved their speech perception skills and 60% significantly improved their speech expression skills while all patients in the control group showed significant improvement in both aspects. The top three reported improvements after cochlear implantation were name recognition, response to verbal requests, and enjoyment of music. Of all behavioral aspects, the use of eye contact was the least improved. Survey results in regards to improvements in patient interaction were more subtle when compared to those related to sound and speech perception. The most improved aspects in the ASD patients’ lives after cochlear implantation appeared to be attending to other people’s requests and conforming to family routines. Of note, awareness of the child’s environment is the most highly ranked improvement attributed to the cochlear implant. Conclusions Cochlear implants are effective and beneficial for hearing impaired members of the ASD population even though development of language may lag behind that of implanted children with no additional disabilities. Significant speech perception and overall behavior improvement are noted. PMID:25899551

  11. Comparison of magnetic probe calibration at nano and millitesla magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahl, Ryan A.; Rovey, Joshua L.; Pommerenke, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field probes are invaluable diagnostics for pulsed inductive plasma devices where field magnitudes on the order of tenths of tesla or larger are common. Typical methods of providing a broadband calibration of dot{{B}} probes involve either a Helmholtz coil driven by a function generator or a network analyzer. Both calibration methods typically produce field magnitudes of tens of microtesla or less, at least three and as many as six orders of magnitude lower than their intended use. This calibration factor is then assumed constant regardless of magnetic field magnitude and the effects of experimental setup are ignored. This work quantifies the variation in calibration factor observed when calibrating magnetic field probes in low field magnitudes. Calibration of two dot{{B}} probe designs as functions of frequency and field magnitude are presented. The first dot{{B}} probe design is the most commonly used design and is constructed from two hand-wound inductors in a differential configuration. The second probe uses surface mounted inductors in a differential configuration with balanced shielding to further reduce common mode noise. Calibration factors are determined experimentally using an 80.4 mm radius Helmholtz coil in two separate configurations over a frequency range of 100-1000 kHz. A conventional low magnitude calibration using a vector network analyzer produced a field magnitude of 158 nT and yielded calibration factors of 15 663 ± 1.7% and 4920 ± 0.6% {T}/{V {s}} at 457 kHz for the surface mounted and hand-wound probes, respectively. A relevant magnitude calibration using a pulsed-power setup with field magnitudes of 8.7-354 mT yielded calibration factors of 14 615 ± 0.3% and 4507 ± 0.4% {T}/{V {s}} at 457 kHz for the surface mounted inductor and hand-wound probe, respectively. Low-magnitude calibration resulted in a larger calibration factor, with an average difference of 9.7% for the surface mounted probe and 12.0% for the hand-wound probe. The

  12. Electroluminescence of Carbon-Implanted Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risch, Marcel; Bradley, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Silicon, being the staple semiconductor of integrated circuits and microchips, features an indirect band gap which limits its application in photonic devices. However, there is a large demand for an interface between electric circuits and optical circuits and therefore light-emitting silicon-compatible devices. A possible approach to enhance the room-temperature light properties of silicon is carbon ion implantation. We compute the absolute number of implanted ions using the Lieberman model for the ion current. Subsequently, SRIM calculations yield the concentration distribution, which has great influence on the emission spectrum. We produced Schottky diodes from the processed samples and found the most stable and efficient operation at a current density of about 2.5 A/cm^2. The observed electroluminescence, caused by compositional and structural disorder, appears orange-white to the eye. The discussed method has limitations for the quantum efficiency but shows some potential for cost-effective on-chip light emitting diodes (LED).

  13. Practical ways to reduce radiation dose for patients and staff during device implantations and electrophysiological procedures.

    PubMed

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Wittkampf, Fred H M; Vano, Eliseo; Ernst, Sabine; Schilling, Richard; Picano, Eugenio; Mont, Lluis; Jais, Pierre; de Bono, Joseph; Piorkowski, Christopher; Saad, Eduardo; Femenia, Francisco

    2014-07-01

    Despite the advent of non-fluoroscopic technology, fluoroscopy remains the cornerstone of imaging in most interventional electrophysiological procedures, from diagnostic studies over ablation interventions to device implantation. Moreover, many patients receive additional X-ray imaging, such as cardiac computed tomography and others. More and more complex procedures have the risk to increase the radiation exposure, both for the patients and the operators. The professional lifetime attributable excess cancer risk may be around 1 in 100 for the operators, the same as for a patient undergoing repetitive complex procedures. Moreover, recent reports have also hinted at an excess risk of brain tumours among interventional cardiologists. Apart from evaluating the need for and justifying the use of radiation to assist their procedures, physicians have to continuously explore ways to reduce the radiation exposure. After an introduction on how to quantify the radiation exposure and defining its current magnitude in electrophysiology compared with the other sources of radiation, this position paper wants to offer some very practical advice on how to reduce exposure to patients and staff. The text describes how customization of the X-ray system, workflow adaptations, and shielding measures can be implemented in the cath lab. The potential and the pitfalls of different non-fluoroscopic guiding technologies are discussed. Finally, we suggest further improvements that can be implemented by both the physicians and the industry in the future. We are confident that these suggestions are able to reduce patient and operator exposure by more than an order of magnitude, and therefore think that these recommendations are worth reading and implementing by any electrophysiological operator in the field.

  14. Multi-objective control of nonlinear boiler-turbine dynamics with actuator magnitude and rate constraints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pang-Chia

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates multi-objective controller design approaches for nonlinear boiler-turbine dynamics subject to actuator magnitude and rate constraints. System nonlinearity is handled by a suitable linear parameter varying system representation with drum pressure as the system varying parameter. Variation of the drum pressure is represented by suitable norm-bounded uncertainty and affine dependence on system matrices. Based on linear matrix inequality algorithms, the magnitude and rate constraints on the actuator and the deviations of fluid density and water level are formulated while the tracking abilities on the drum pressure and power output are optimized. Variation ranges of drum pressure and magnitude tracking commands are used as controller design parameters, determined according to the boiler-turbine's operation range.

  15. Smart polymers for implantable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Taylor H.

    Neural interfaces have been heavily investigated due to their unique ability to tap into the communication system of the body. Substrates compatible with microelectronics processing are planar and 5-7 orders of magnitude stiffer than the tissue with which they interact. This work enables fabrication of devices by photolithography that are stiff enough to penetrate soft tissue, change in stiffness to more closely match the modulus of tissue after implantation and adopt shapes to conform to tissue. Several classes of physiologically-responsive, amorphous polymer networks with the onset of the glass transition above 37 °C are synthesized and thermomechanically characterized. These glassy networks exhibit an isothermal reduction in modulus due to plasticization in the presence of aqueous fluids. Modulus after plasticization can be tuned by the dry glass transition temperature, degree of plasticization and crosslink density. Acrylic shape memory polymer based intracortical probes, which can change in modulus from above 1 GPa to less than 1 MPa, are fabricated through a transfer process that shields the substrate from processing and enhances adhesion to the microelectronics. Substrates capable of withstanding the conditions of photolithography are fabricated "thiol-ene" and "thiol-epoxy" substrates. These materials provide processing windows that rival engineering thermoplastics, swell less than 6% in water, and exhibit a controllable reduction in modulus from above 1 GPa to between 5 and 150 MPa. Substrates, planar for processing, that subsequently recover 3D shapes are synthesized by the formation of post-gelation crosslinks either covalent or supramolecular in nature. Acrylics with varied supramolecular, based on ureidopyrimidone moieties, and covalent crosslink density demonstrate triple-shape memory behavior. Post-gelation covalent crosslinks are established to permanently fix 3D shapes in thiol-ene networks. Devices fabricated include intracortical and nerve cuff

  16. The Evolution of Breast Implants.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allen; Maxwell, G Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Breast augmentation remains one of the most common procedures performed in the United States. However, shape, feel, safety, and longevity of the implants remain important areas of research. The data provided by manufacturers show the safety and efficacy of these medical devices. Clinicians should strive to provide ongoing data and sound science to continue to improve clinical outcomes in the future. This article explores the evolution of breast implants with special emphasis on the advancement of silicone implants.

  17. Trabeculectomy with Ex-PRESS implant versus Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation-a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Waisbourd, Michael; Fischer, Naomi; Shalev, Hadas; Spierer, Oriel; Ben Artsi, Elad; Rachmiel, Rony; Shemesh, Gabi; Kurtz, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the surgical outcomes of trabeculectomy with Ex-PRESS implant and Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation. METHODS Patients who underwent trabeculectomy with Ex-PRESS implants or AGV implantation separately were included in this retrospective chart review. Main outcome measures were surgical failure and complications. Failure was defined as intraocular pressure (IOP) >21 mm Hg or <5 mm Hg on two consecutive visits after 3mo, reoperation for glaucoma, or loss of light perception. Eyes that had not failed were considered as complete success if they did not required supplemental medical therapy. RESULTS A total of 64 eyes from 57 patients were included: 31 eyes in the Ex-PRESS group and 33 eyes in the AGV group. The mean follow-up time was 2.6±1.1y and 3.3±1.6y, respectively. Patients in the AGV group had significantly higher baseline mean IOP (P=0.005), lower baseline mean visual acuity (VA) (P=0.02), and higher proportion of patients with history of previous trabeculectomy (P<0.0001). Crude failure rates were 16.1%, n=5/31 in the Ex-PRESS group and 24.2%, n=8/33 in the AGV group. The cumulative proportion of failure was similar between the groups, P=0.696. The proportion of eyes that experienced postoperative complications was 32.3% in the Ex-PRESS group and 60.1% in the AGV group (P=0.0229). CONCLUSION Trabeculectomy with Ex-PRESS implant and AGV implantation had comparable failure rates. The AGV group had more post-operative complications, but also included more complex cases with higher baseline mean IOP, worse baseline mean VA, and more previous glaucoma surgeries. Therefore, the results are limited to the cohort included in this study. PMID:27803857

  18. Implant biomaterials: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Arora, Pooja; Arora, Vipin; Jain, Krati

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate selection of the implant biomaterial is a key factor for long term success of implants. The biologic environment does not accept completely any material so to optimize biologic performance, implants should be selected to reduce the negative biologic response while maintaining adequate function. Every clinician should always gain a thorough knowledge about the different biomaterials used for the dental implants. This article makes an effort to summarize various dental bio-materials which were used in the past and as well as the latest material used now. PMID:25610850

  19. Professional occupation after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Kos, M-I; Degive, C; Boex, C; Guyot, J-P

    2007-03-01

    The aims of this study were to verify whether cochlear implants helped profoundly deaf adults to maintain or even to develop their professional occupations, and to identify other elements that may contribute to or, on the contrary, impede such patients' professional success. All adult patients received a questionnaire concerning their professional activities before and after implantation. Demographic data, health information, hearing performance and degree of satisfaction with the implant were also considered. Sixty-seven adults had been implanted, with three different devices, since 1985. At the time of implantation, 34 had been professionally active. After implantation, 29 had remained professionally active, four of whom reported positive developments in their careers. Five patients had become professionally inactive. Those patients who had previously been professionally inactive remained so. There had been no difference in performance, either between different types of cochlear implants or between professionally active or inactive patients. The implanted patients had kept their jobs and many of them had developed their professional skills. In spite of this, cochlear implants may still be perceived as proving insufficiently satisfactory hearing to enable professionally inactive patients to reintegrate and to facilitate further learning or career developments. PMID:17052367

  20. Magnitude-frequency distribution of volcanic explosion earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Iguchi, Masato; Hendrasto, Mohammad; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Yamada, Taishi; Ripepe, Maurizio; Genco, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    Magnitude-frequency distributions of volcanic explosion earthquakes that are associated with occurrences of vulcanian and strombolian eruptions, or gas burst activity, are examined at six active volcanoes. The magnitude-frequency distribution at Suwanosejima volcano, Japan, shows a power-law distribution, which implies self-similarity in the system, as is often observed in statistical characteristics of tectonic and volcanic earthquakes. On the other hand, the magnitude-frequency distributions at five other volcanoes, Sakurajima and Tokachi-dake in Japan, Semeru and Lokon in Indonesia, and Stromboli in Italy, are well explained by exponential distributions. The statistical features are considered to reflect source size, as characterized by a volcanic conduit or chamber. Earthquake generation processes associated with vulcanian, strombolian and gas burst events are different from those of eruptions ejecting large amounts of pyroclasts, since the magnitude-frequency distribution of the volcanic explosivity index is generally explained by the power law.

  1. When Should Zero Be Included on a Scale Showing Magnitude?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses an important problem of graphing quantitative data: should one include zero on the scale showing magnitude? Based on a real time series example, the problem is discussed and some recommendations are proposed.

  2. Constant-Magnitude Acceleration on a Curved Path.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, David L.

    1996-01-01

    Presents the theory behind a two-dimensional curved path along which the magnitude of the acceleration vector remains constant for an object moving frictionlessly under the influence of gravity. (JRH)

  3. Age-Dependent Cost-Utility of Pediatric Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Semenov, Yevgeniy R.; Yeh, Susan T.; Seshamani, Meena; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Tobey, Emily A.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Frick, Kevin D.; Niparko, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cochlear implantation has become the mainstay of treatment for children with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Yet, despite mounting evidence on the clinical benefits of early implantation, little data are available on the long-term societal benefits and comparative effectiveness of this procedure across various ages of implantation--a choice parameter for parents and clinicians with high prognostic value for clinical outcome. As such, the aim of the current study is to evaluate a model of the consequences of the timing of this intervention from a societal economic perspective. Average cost-utility of pediatric cochlear implantation by age at intervention will be analyzed. Design Prospective, longitudinal assessment of health-utility and educational placement outcomes in 175 children recruited from 6 US centers between November 2002 and December 2004, who had severe-to-profound SNHL onset within 1 year of age, underwent cochlear implantation before 5 years of age, and had up to 6 years of post-implant follow-up that ended in November 2008 to December 2011. Costs of care were collected retrospectively and stratified by pre-operative, operative, and post-operative expenditures. Incremental costs and benefits of implantation were compared between the three age groups and relative to a non-implantation baseline. Results Children implanted at <18 months of age gained an average of 10.7 QALYs over their projected lifetime as compared to 9.0 and 8.4 QALYs for those implanted between 18 and 36 months and at >36 months of age, respectively. Medical and surgical complication rates were not significantly different between the 3 age groups. Additionally, mean lifetime costs of implantation were similar between the 3 groups, at approximately $2,000/child/year (77.5 year life expectancy), yielding costs of $14,996, $17,849, and $19,173 per QALY for the youngest, middle, and oldest implant age groups, respectively. Full mainstream classroom

  4. Magnitude knowledge: the common core of numerical development.

    PubMed

    Siegler, Robert S

    2016-05-01

    The integrated theory of numerical development posits that a central theme of numerical development from infancy to adulthood is progressive broadening of the types and ranges of numbers whose magnitudes are accurately represented. The process includes four overlapping trends: (1) representing increasingly precisely the magnitudes of non-symbolic numbers, (2) connecting small symbolic numbers to their non-symbolic referents, (3) extending understanding from smaller to larger whole numbers, and (4) accurately representing the magnitudes of rational numbers. The present review identifies substantial commonalities, as well as differences, in these four aspects of numerical development. With both whole and rational numbers, numerical magnitude knowledge is concurrently correlated with, longitudinally predictive of, and causally related to multiple aspects of mathematical understanding, including arithmetic and overall math achievement. Moreover, interventions focused on increasing numerical magnitude knowledge often generalize to other aspects of mathematics. The cognitive processes of association and analogy seem to play especially large roles in this development. Thus, acquisition of numerical magnitude knowledge can be seen as the common core of numerical development.

  5. Threshold magnitude for Ionospheric TEC response to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevalova, N. P.; Sankov, V. A.; Astafyeva, E. I.; Zhupityaeva, A. S.

    2014-02-01

    We have analyzed ionospheric response to earthquakes with magnitudes of 4.1-8.8 which occurred under quiet geomagnetic conditions in different regions of the world (the Baikal region, Kuril Islands, Japan, Greece, Indonesia, China, New Zealand, Salvador, and Chile). This investigation relied on measurements of total electron content (TEC) variations made by ground-based dual-frequency GPS receivers. To perform the analysis, we selected earthquakes with permanent GPS stations installed close by. Data processing has revealed that after 4.1-6.3-magnitude earthquakes wave disturbances in TEC variations are undetectable. We have thoroughly analyzed publications over the period of 1965-2013 which reported on registration of wave TIDs after earthquakes. This analysis demonstrated that the magnitude of the earthquakes having a wave response in the ionosphere was no less than 6.5. Based on our results and on the data from other researchers, we can conclude that there is a threshold magnitude (near 6.5) below which there are no pronounced earthquake-induced wave TEC disturbances. The probability of detection of post-earthquake TIDs with a magnitude close to the threshold depends strongly on geophysical conditions. In addition, reliable identification of the source of such TIDs generally requires many GPS stations in an earthquake zone. At low magnitudes, seismic energy is likely to be insufficient to generate waves in the neutral atmosphere which are able to induce TEC disturbances observable at the level of background fluctuations.

  6. Magnitude knowledge: the common core of numerical development.

    PubMed

    Siegler, Robert S

    2016-05-01

    The integrated theory of numerical development posits that a central theme of numerical development from infancy to adulthood is progressive broadening of the types and ranges of numbers whose magnitudes are accurately represented. The process includes four overlapping trends: (1) representing increasingly precisely the magnitudes of non-symbolic numbers, (2) connecting small symbolic numbers to their non-symbolic referents, (3) extending understanding from smaller to larger whole numbers, and (4) accurately representing the magnitudes of rational numbers. The present review identifies substantial commonalities, as well as differences, in these four aspects of numerical development. With both whole and rational numbers, numerical magnitude knowledge is concurrently correlated with, longitudinally predictive of, and causally related to multiple aspects of mathematical understanding, including arithmetic and overall math achievement. Moreover, interventions focused on increasing numerical magnitude knowledge often generalize to other aspects of mathematics. The cognitive processes of association and analogy seem to play especially large roles in this development. Thus, acquisition of numerical magnitude knowledge can be seen as the common core of numerical development. PMID:27074723

  7. The Current Testing Protocols for Biomechanical Evaluation of Lumbar Spinal Implants in Laboratory Setting: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A.; Doulgeris, James J.; Lee, William E.; Shea, Thomas M.; Vrionis, Frank D.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro biomechanical investigations have become a routinely employed technique to explore new lumbar instrumentation. One of the most important advantages of such investigations is the low risk present when compared to clinical trials. However, the best use of any experimental data can be made when standard testing protocols are adopted by investigators, thus allowing comparisons among studies. Experimental variables, such as the length of the specimen, operative level, type of loading (e.g., dynamic versus quasistatic), magnitude, and rate of load applied, are among the most common variables controlled during spinal biomechanical testing. Although important efforts have been made to standardize these protocols, high variability can be found in the current literature. The aim of this investigation was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to identify the current trends in the protocols reported for the evaluation of new lumbar spinal implants under laboratory setting. PMID:25785272

  8. The current testing protocols for biomechanical evaluation of lumbar spinal implants in laboratory setting: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A; Doulgeris, James J; Lee, William E; Shea, Thomas M; Aghayev, Kamran; Vrionis, Frank D

    2015-01-01

    In vitro biomechanical investigations have become a routinely employed technique to explore new lumbar instrumentation. One of the most important advantages of such investigations is the low risk present when compared to clinical trials. However, the best use of any experimental data can be made when standard testing protocols are adopted by investigators, thus allowing comparisons among studies. Experimental variables, such as the length of the specimen, operative level, type of loading (e.g., dynamic versus quasistatic), magnitude, and rate of load applied, are among the most common variables controlled during spinal biomechanical testing. Although important efforts have been made to standardize these protocols, high variability can be found in the current literature. The aim of this investigation was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to identify the current trends in the protocols reported for the evaluation of new lumbar spinal implants under laboratory setting.

  9. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  10. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  11. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  12. Computer implants and death.

    PubMed

    Gert, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Although a patient whose whole brain has ceased to function may have his heart, lungs, and other organs continue to function if they are connected to the appropriate machines, the patient is still dead and the machines can be disconnected. In the future, nanotechnology, or other technology, may allow putting implants in the brainstem that can keep a patient's heart, lungs and other organs functioning, even though the whole natural brain has ceased to function. It would be useful to consider how this technology might affect the criterion of death before it is actually available.

  13. Bone cement implantation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Razuin, R; Effat, O; Shahidan, M N; Shama, D V; Miswan, M F M

    2013-06-01

    Bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) is characterized by hypoxia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, increased pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac arrest. It is a known cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing cemented orthopaedic surgeries. The rarity of the condition as well as absence of a proper definition has contributed to under-reporting of cases. We report a 59-year-old woman who sustained fracture of the neck of her left femur and underwent an elective hybrid total hip replacement surgery. She collapsed during surgery and was revived only to succumb to death twelve hours later. Post mortem findings showed multiorgan disseminated microembolization of bone marrow and amorphous cement material. PMID:23817399

  14. Virtual estimates of fastening strength for pedicle screw implantation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linte, Cristian A.; Camp, Jon J.; Augustine, Kurt E.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2014-03-01

    Traditional 2D images provide limited use for accurate planning of spine interventions, mainly due to the complex 3D anatomy of the spine and close proximity of nerve bundles and vascular structures that must be avoided during the procedure. Our previously developed clinician-friendly platform for spine surgery planning takes advantage of 3D pre-operative images, to enable oblique reformatting and 3D rendering of individual or multiple vertebrae, interactive templating, and placement of virtual pedicle implants. Here we extend the capabilities of the planning platform and demonstrate how the virtual templating approach not only assists with the selection of the optimal implant size and trajectory, but can also be augmented to provide surrogate estimates of the fastening strength of the implanted pedicle screws based on implant dimension and bone mineral density of the displaced bone substrate. According to the failure theories, each screw withstands a maximum holding power that is directly proportional to the screw diameter (D), the length of the in-bone segm,ent of the screw (L), and the density (i.e., bone mineral density) of the pedicle body. In this application, voxel intensity is used as a surrogate measure of the bone mineral density (BMD) of the pedicle body segment displaced by the screw. We conducted an initial assessment of the developed platform using retrospective pre- and post-operative clinical 3D CT data from four patients who underwent spine surgery, consisting of a total of 26 pedicle screws implanted in the lumbar spine. The Fastening Strength of the planned implants was directly assessed by estimating the intensity - area product across the pedicle volume displaced by the virtually implanted screw. For post-operative assessment, each vertebra was registered to its homologous counterpart in the pre-operative image using an intensity-based rigid registration followed by manual adjustment. Following registration, the Fastening Strength was computed

  15. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants.

    PubMed

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-21

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient's anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant's RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B(1)(+) field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient's anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty. PMID:26350025

  16. Long-range effect of ion implantation of Raex and Hardox steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzyński, P.; Kamiński, M.; Droździel, A.; Wiertel, M.

    2016-09-01

    Ion implantation involves introduction of ionized atoms of any element (nitrogen) to metals thanks to the high kinetic energy that they acquired in the electric field. The distribution of nitrogen ions implanted at E = 65 keV energy and D = 1.1017 N+ /cm2 fluence in the steel sample and vacancies produced by them was calculated using the SRIM program. This result was confirmed by RBS measurements. The initial maximum range of the implanted nitrogen ions is ∼⃒0.17 μm. This value is relatively small compared to the influence of nitriding on the thickness surface layer of modified steel piston rings. Measurements of the friction coefficient during the pin-on-disc tribological test were performed under dry friction conditions. The friction coefficient of the implanted sample increased to values characteristic of an unimplanted sample after ca. 1500 measurement cycles. The depth of wear trace is ca. 2.4 μm. This implies that the thickness of the layer modified by the implantation process is ∼⃒2.4 μm and exceeds the initial range of the implanted ions by an order of magnitude. This effect, referred to as a long-range implantation effect, is caused by migration of vacancies and nitrogen atoms into the sample. This phenomenon makes ion implantation a legitimate process of modification of the surface layer in order to enhance the tribological properties of critical components of internal combustion engines such as steel piston rings.

  17. Induced earthquake magnitudes are as large as (statistically) expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Elst, N.; Page, M. T.; Weiser, D. A.; Goebel, T.; Hosseini, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Key questions with implications for seismic hazard and industry practice are how large injection-induced earthquakes can be, and whether their maximum size is smaller than for similarly located tectonic earthquakes. Deterministic limits on induced earthquake magnitudes have been proposed based on the size of the reservoir or the volume of fluid injected. McGarr (JGR 2014) showed that for earthquakes confined to the reservoir and triggered by pore-pressure increase, the maximum moment should be limited to the product of the shear modulus G and total injected volume ΔV. However, if induced earthquakes occur on tectonic faults oriented favorably with respect to the tectonic stress field, then they may be limited only by the regional tectonics and connectivity of the fault network, with an absolute maximum magnitude that is notoriously difficult to constrain. A common approach for tectonic earthquakes is to use the magnitude-frequency distribution of smaller earthquakes to forecast the largest earthquake expected in some time period. In this study, we show that the largest magnitudes observed at fluid injection sites are consistent with the sampling statistics of the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) distribution for tectonic earthquakes, with no assumption of an intrinsic upper bound. The GR law implies that the largest observed earthquake in a sample should scale with the log of the total number induced. We find that the maximum magnitudes at most sites are consistent with this scaling, and that maximum magnitude increases with log ΔV. We find little in the size distribution to distinguish induced from tectonic earthquakes. That being said, the probabilistic estimate exceeds the deterministic GΔV cap only for expected magnitudes larger than ~M6, making a definitive test of the models unlikely in the near future. In the meantime, however, it may be prudent to treat the hazard from induced earthquakes with the same probabilistic machinery used for tectonic earthquakes.

  18. Parsing pain perception between nociceptive representation and magnitude estimation.

    PubMed

    Baliki, M N; Geha, P Y; Apkarian, A V

    2009-02-01

    Assessing the size of objects rapidly and accurately clearly has survival value. A central multisensory module for subjective magnitude assessment is therefore highly likely, suggested by psychophysical studies, and proposed on theoretical grounds. Given that pain perception is fundamentally an assessment of stimulus intensity, it must necessarily engage such a central module. Accordingly, we compared functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity of pain magnitude ratings to matched visual magnitude ratings in 14 subjects. We show that brain activations segregate into two groups, one preferentially activated for pain and another equally activated for both visual and pain magnitude ratings. The properties of regions in the first group were consistent with encoding nociception, whereas those in the second group with attention and task control. Insular cortex responses similarly segregated to a pain-specific area and an area (extending to the lateral prefrontal cortex) conjointly representing perceived magnitudes for pain and vision. These two insular areas were differentiated by their relationship to task variance, ability to encode perceived magnitudes for each stimulus epoch, temporal delay differences, and brain intrinsic functional connectivity. In a second group of subjects (n=11) we contrasted diffusion tensor imaging-based white matter connectivity for these two insular areas and observed anatomical connectivity closely corresponding to the functional connectivity identified with fMRI. These results demonstrate that pain perception is due to the transformation of nociceptive representation into subjective magnitude assessment within the insula. Moreover, we argue that we have identified a multisensory cortical area for "how much" complementary and analogous to the "where" and "what" as described for central visual processing.

  19. The Implantable Cardiac Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, A. S.; Heimbecker, R. O.; Bigelow, W. G.

    1964-01-01

    The transistorized implanted pacemaker is proving to be an effective and reliable method for long-term pacing of the heart. All patients suffering from Stokes-Adams seizures were first given a trial period of conservative therapy, including isoproterenol (Isuprel), ephedrine, atropine and steroids. Twenty-four pacemaker implants were performed on 23 patients over a 21-month period. The preoperative insertion of a pacemaker cardiac catheter was a very valuable safety precaution. In this way the heart could be safely and reliably paced during the period of preoperative assessment and during the critical periods of anesthetic induction and thoracotomy. Infection did not occur, probably because of careful gas sterilization of the units. Various models of pacemakers are compared, and the reasons for two pacemaker failures are presented. There were two early deaths and one late death in the series. The relationship of progressive coronary disease to recent infarction is stressed. Patients having intermittent heart block frequently showed the picture of “competing pacemakers” postoperatively, but without deleterious effect. Twenty patients, between 54 and 88 years of age, are alive and well at the time of reporting, with excellent pacemaker response and no further Stokes-Adams attacks. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:14118681

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2009-12-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most important valvular heart disease affecting the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment, although a substantial number of patients are considered high risk for surgery. Many of these patients do not undergo surgery and have poor outcomes from medically treated symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) provides a promising treatment option for some of these patients. Several devices are under investigation. The Edwards Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) and the CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) have the largest human experience to date. Initial data suggest that these devices have an acceptable safety profile and provide excellent hemodynamic relief of aortic stenosis. The Edwards Sapien valve is currently under investigation in the United States in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve) trial in high-risk surgical or inoperable patients; TAVI is available for clinical use in both Canada and Europe. TAVI is not used in low- or intermediate-risk surgical patients; however, future studies may prove its applicability in these subsets. The major complications of TAVI include access site-related problems and device malpositioning/migration. There are several new-generation prosthetic valves and delivery systems designed to be low profile and repositionable. Technical advances and refinement of the implantation methods may make TAVI even safer and ultimately a better treatment option, not only for patients with high surgical risk but also for those with moderate or low risk.

  1. Porous metal for orthopedics implants

    PubMed Central

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Botti, Alessandra; Sirleo, Luigi; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Porous metal has been introduced to obtain biological fixation and improve longevity of orthopedic implants. The new generation of porous metal has intriguing characteristics that allows bone healing and high osteointegration of the metallic implants. This article gives an overview about biomaterials properties of the contemporary class of highly porous metals and about the clinical use in orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24133527

  2. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  3. Awake transapical aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Francesco Dimitri; Savini, Carlo; Castelli, Andrea; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation is being employed as a less invasive alternative to open heart surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Here we report the case of an awake transapical aortic valve implantation in a patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  4. Photonic technologies for visual implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Ruediger; Praemassing, F.; Puettjer, D.; Stawski, N.; Jaeger, Dieter

    2003-02-01

    In this paper two applications of photonic technologies for visual implants in the field of medicine are presented. Both are technical systems working as vision aid for people suffering from blindness due to damages in their visual system. The first system is a retinal implant (RI), the second an intraocular vision aid (IoVA) for people with opaque cornea.

  5. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  6. Numerical simulation of in vivo intraosseous torsional failure of a hollow-screw oral implant

    PubMed Central

    Cehreli, Murat; Akkocaoglu, Murat; Akca, Kivanc

    2006-01-01

    Background Owing to the complexity and magnitude of functional forces transferred to the bone-implant interface, the mechanical strength of the interface is of great importance. The purpose of this study was to determine the intraosseous torsional shear strength of an osseointegrated oral implant using 3-D finite element (FE) stress analysis implemented by in vivo failure torque data of an implant. Methods A Ø 3.5 mm × 12 mm ITI® hollow screw dental implant in a patient was subjected to torque failure test using a custom-made strain-gauged manual torque wrench connected to a data acquisition system. The 3-D FE model of the implant and peri-implant circumstances was constructed. The in vivo strain data was converted to torque units (N.cm) to involve in loading definition of FE analysis. Upon processing of the FE analysis, the shear stress of peri-implant bone was evaluated to assume torsional shear stress strength of the bone-implant interface. Results The in vivo torque failure test yielded 5952 μstrains at custom-made manual torque wrench level and conversion of the strain data resulted in 750 N.cm. FE revealed that highest shear stress value in the trabecular bone, 121 MPa, was located at the first intimate contact with implant. Trabecular bone in contact with external surface of hollow implant body participated shear stress distribution, but not the bone resting inside of the hollow. Conclusion The torsional strength of hollow-screw implants is basically provided by the marginal bone and the hollow part has negligible effect on interfacial shear strength. PMID:17083739

  7. Photoelastic stress analysis of different designs of cement-retained fixed partial dentures on Morse taper oral implants.

    PubMed

    Menani, Luiz Ricardo; Tiossi, Rodrigo; de Torres, Érica Miranda; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; de Almeida, Rossana Pereira

    2011-03-01

    There is no consensus in literature regarding the best plan for prosthetic rehabilitation with partial multiple adjacent implants to minimize stress generated in the bone-implant interface. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of cemented fixed partial dentures, splinted and nonsplinted, on Morse taper implants and with different types of coating material (ceramic and resin), using photoelastic stress analysis. A photoelastic model of an interposed edentulous space, missing a second premolar and a first molar, and rehabilitated with 4 different types of cemented crowns and supported by 2 adjacent implants was used. Groups were as follows: UC, splinted ceramic crowns; IC, nonsplinted ceramic crowns; UR, splinted resin crowns; and IR, nonsplinted resin crowns. Different vertical static loading conditions were performed: balanced occlusal load, 10 kgf; simultaneous punctiform load on the implanted premolar and molar, 10 kgf; and alternate punctiform load on the implanted premolar and molar, 5 kgf. Changes in stress distribution were analyzed in a polariscope, and digital photographs were taken of each condition to allow comparison of stress pattern distribution around the implants. Cementation of the fixed partial dentures generated stresses between implants. Splinted restorations distributed the stresses more evenly between the implants than nonsplinted when force was applied. Ceramic restorations presented better distribution of stresses than resin restorations. Based on the results obtained, it was concluded that splinted ceramic restorations promote better stress distribution around osseointegrated implants when compared with nonsplinted crowns; metal-ceramic restorations present less stress concentration and magnitude than metal-plastic restorations.

  8. Method for Providing Semiconductors Having Self-Aligned Ion Implant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method is disclosed that provides a self-aligned nitrogen-implant particularly suited for a Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) semiconductor device preferably comprised of a silicon carbide (SiC). This self-aligned nitrogen-implant allows for the realization of durable and stable electrical functionality of high temperature transistors such as JFETs. The method implements the self-aligned nitrogen-implant having predetermined dimensions, at a particular step in the fabrication process, so that the SiC junction field effect transistors are capable of being electrically operating continuously at 500.degree. C. for over 10,000 hours in an air ambient with less than a 10% change in operational transistor parameters.

  9. Method for Providing Semiconductors Having Self-Aligned Ion Implant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method is disclosed that provides a self-aligned nitrogen-implant particularly suited for a Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) semiconductor device preferably comprised of a silicon carbide (SiC). This self-aligned nitrogen-implant allows for the realization of durable and stable electrical functionality of high temperature transistors such as JFETs. The method implements the self-aligned nitrogen-implant having predetermined dimensions, at a particular step in the fabrication process, so that the SiC junction field effect transistors are capable of being electrically operating continuously at 500.degree. C. for over 10,000 hours in an air ambient with less than a 10% change in operational transistor parameters.

  10. The role of radiology in active middle ear implantation.

    PubMed

    Loney, E L

    2014-08-01

    Active middle ear implants (AMEIs) have been available for a number of years and yet most radiologists have never heard of them. Some bear a striking resemblance to cochlear implants whereas others are more similar to conventional hearing aids. The aims of this review are to provide an introduction as to the types of implants available, how they work and when they are indicated. Also, to highlight important pre-operative imaging features that can influence surgery and to consider the role of imaging in the post-operative setting. As patient choice increases, it becomes more likely that radiologists will encounter these devices in daily practice and knowledge of them may prove useful.

  11. An assessment of template-guided implant surgery in terms of accuracy and related factors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee-Ho; Park, Ji-Man; Kim, Soung-Min; Kim, Myung-Joo; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Template-guided implant therapy has developed hand-in-hand with computed tomography (CT) to improve the accuracy of implant surgery and future prosthodontic treatment. In our present study, the accuracy and causative factors for computer-assisted implant surgery were assessed to further validate the stable clinical application of this technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 102 implants in 48 patients were included in this study. Implant surgery was performed with a stereolithographic template. Pre- and post-operative CTs were used to compare the planned and placed implants. Accuracy and related factors were statistically analyzed with the Spearman correlation method and the linear mixed model. Differences were considered to be statistically significant at P≤.05. RESULTS The mean errors of computer-assisted implant surgery were 1.09 mm at the coronal center, 1.56 mm at the apical center, and the axis deviation was 3.80°. The coronal and apical errors of the implants were found to be strongly correlated. The errors developed at the coronal center were magnified at the apical center by the fixture length. The case of anterior edentulous area and longer fixtures affected the accuracy of the implant template. CONCLUSION The control of errors at the coronal center and stabilization of the anterior part of the template are needed for safe implant surgery and future prosthodontic treatment. PMID:24353883

  12. Implanted Miniaturized Antenna for Brain Computer Interface Applications: Analysis and Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Rennaker, Robert L.; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are designed to provide real-time control signals for prosthetic devices, study brain function, and/or restore sensory information lost as a result of injury or disease. Using Radio Frequency (RF) to wirelessly power a BCI could widely extend the number of applications and increase chronic in-vivo viability. However, due to the limited size and the electromagnetic loss of human brain tissues, implanted miniaturized antennas suffer low radiation efficiency. This work presents simulations, analysis and designs of implanted antennas for a wireless implantable RF-powered brain computer interface application. The results show that thin (on the order of 100 micrometers thickness) biocompatible insulating layers can significantly impact the antenna performance. The proper selection of the dielectric properties of the biocompatible insulating layers and the implantation position inside human brain tissues can facilitate efficient RF power reception by the implanted antenna. While the results show that the effects of the human head shape on implanted antenna performance is somewhat negligible, the constitutive properties of the brain tissues surrounding the implanted antenna can significantly impact the electrical characteristics (input impedance, and operational frequency) of the implanted antenna. Three miniaturized antenna designs are simulated and demonstrate that maximum RF power of up to 1.8 milli-Watts can be received at 2 GHz when the antenna implanted around the dura, without violating the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) limits. PMID:25079941

  13. A remotely powered implantable biomedical system with location detector.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Enver G; Ghanad, Mehrdad A; Maloberti, Franco; Dehollain, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    An universal remote powering and communication system is presented for the implantable medical devices. The system be interfaced with different sensors or actuators. A mobile external unit controls the operation of the implantable chip and reads the sensor's data. A locator system is proposed to align the mobile unit with the implant unit for the efficient magnetic power transfer. The location of the implant is detected with 6 mm resolution from the rectified voltage level at the implanted side. The rectified voltage level is fedback to the mobile unit to adjust the magnetic field strength and maximize the efficiency of the remote powering system. The sensor's data are transmitted by using a free running oscillator modulated with on-off key scheme. To tolerate large data carrier drifts, a custom designed receiver is implemented for the mobile unit. The circuits have been fabricated in 0.18 um CMOS technology. The remote powering link is optimized to deliver power at 13.56 MHz. On chip voltage regulator creates 1.8 V from a 0.9 V reference voltage to supply the sensor/actuator blocks. The implantable chip dissipates 595 μW and requires 1.48 V for start up. PMID:24988596

  14. A planning system for transapical aortic valve implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessat, Michael; Merk, Denis R.; Falk, Volkmar; Walther, Thomas; Jacobs, Stefan; Nöttling, Alois; Burgert, Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve is a common cardiac disease. It is usually corrected surgically by replacing the valve with a mechanical or biological prosthesis. Transapical aortic valve implantation is an experimental minimally invasive surgical technique that is applied to patients with high operative risk to avoid pulmonary arrest. A stented biological prosthesis is mounted on a catheter. Through small incisions in the fifth intercostal space and the apex of the heart, the catheter is positioned under flouroscopy in the aortic root. The stent is expanded and unfolds the valve which is thereby implanted into the aortic root. Exact targeting is crucial, since major complications can arise from a misplaced valve. Planning software for the perioperative use is presented that allows for selection of the best fitting implant and calculation of the safe target area for that implant. The software uses contrast enhanced perioperative DynaCT images acquired under rapid pacing. In a semiautomatic process, a surface segmentation of the aortic root is created. User selected anatomical landmarks are used to calculate the geometric constraints for the size and position of the implant. The software is integrated into a PACS network based on DICOM communication to query and receive the images and implants templates from a PACS server. The planning results can be exported to the same server and from there can be rertieved by an intraoperative catheter guidance device.

  15. [PIP breast implants: a series of 217 explants].

    PubMed

    Tropet, Yves; Oulharj, Sarah; Pauchot, Julien

    2013-01-01

    On 29 march 2010, the French authorities (Afssaps) issued a health alert concerning breast implants manufactured by the company Poly Implant Prothèse, because of a high rupture rate. Marketing authorization was suspended and the use of PIP breast implants was prohibited. In our hospital department, 630 patients had received these prostheses since 2001. We conducted a retrospective study of all patients who underwent explantation between May 2010 and January 2012, corresponding to 434 explanted prostheses and 217 patients, all operated on by the same surgeon. Median age was 42 years and the prostheses had been implanted an average of 4 years 7 months earlier. We found that 38 implants (8.7%) had ruptured, in 33 patients (15.2%). Five patients had bilateral rupture. Preoperative ultrasonography, performed in 166 patients, detected 30 ruptures that were confirmed at surgery, but missed a further 9 cases (8%). Biopsy samples of capsular tissue were obtained in 103 cases, revealing granulation tissue possibly due to silicone exposure in 33 cases, 22 of which were associated with intact implants. Surgical complications included three hematomas, with no infections. Despite the low false-negative rate of ultrasonography, we recommend systematic preventive explantation, owing to the risk of silicone impregnation of capsular tissue even in the absence of rupture. PMID:24672984

  16. Magnitude Characterization Using Complex Networks in Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasten, D.; Comte, D.; Munoz, V.

    2013-12-01

    Studies using complex networks are applied to many systems, like traffic, social networks, internet and earth science. In this work we make an analysis using complex networks applied to magnitude of seismicity in the central zone of Chile, we use the preferential attachment in order to construct a seismic network using local magnitudes and the hypocenters of a seismic data set in central Chile. In order to work with a complete catalogue in magnitude, the data associated with the linear part of the Gutenberg-Richter law, with magnitudes greater than 2.7, were taken. We then make a grid in space, so that each seismic event falls into a certain cell, depending on the location of its hypocenter. Now the network is constructed: the first node corresponds to the cell where the first seismic event occurs. The node has an associated number which is the magnitude of the event which occured in it, and a probability is assigned to the node. The probability is a nonlinear mapping of the magnitude (a Gaussian function was taken), so that nodes with lower magnitude events are more likely to be attached to. Each time a new node is added to the network, it is attached to the previous node which has the larger probability; the link is directed from the previous node to the new node. In this way, a directed network is constructed, with a ``preferential attachment''-like growth model, using the magnitudes as the parameter to determine the probability of attachment to future nodes. Several events could occur in the same node. In this case, the probability is calculated using the average of the magnitudes of the events occuring in that node. Once the directed network is finished, the corresponding undirected network is constructed, by making all links symmetric, and eliminating the loops which may appear when two events occur in the same cell. The resulting directed network is found to be scale free (with very low values of the power-law distribution exponent), whereas the undirected

  17. Zero Magnitude Effect for the Productivity of Triggered Tsunami Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model is applied to tsunami events to explain previously observed temporal clustering of tsunami sources. Tsunami events are defined by National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) tsunami database. For the ETAS analysis, the earthquake magnitude associated with each tsunami event in the NGDC database is replaced by the primary magnitude listed in the Centennial catalog up until 1976 and in the Global CMT catalog from 1976 through 2010. Tsunamis with a submarine landslide or volcanic component are included if they are accompanied by an earthquake, which is most often the case. Tsunami size is used as a mark for determining a tsunami-generating event, according to a minimum completeness level. The tsunami catalog is estimated to be complete for tsunami sizes greater than 1 m since 1900 and greater than 0.1 m since 1960. Of the five parameters in the temporal ETAS model (Ogata, 1988), the parameter that scales the magnitude dependence in the productivity of triggered events is the one that is most different from ETAS parameters derived from similar earthquake catalogs. Maximum likelihood estimates of this magnitude effect parameter is essentially zero, within 95% confidence, for both the 0.1 m and 1.0 m tsunami completeness levels. To explain this result, parameter estimates are determined for the Global CMT catalog under three tsunamigenic conditions: (1) M≥7 and focal depth ≤50 km, (2) submarine location, and (3) dominant component of dip slip. Successive subcatalogs are formed from the Global CMT catalog according to each of these conditions. The high magnitude threshold for tsunamigenesis alone (subcatalog 1) does not explain the zero magnitude effect. The zero magnitude effect also does not appear to be caused the smaller number of tsunamigenic events analyzed in comparison to earthquake catalogs with a similar magnitude threshold. ETAS parameter estimates from the subcatalog (3) with all three tsunamigenic conditions

  18. [Dental implants in tooth grinders].

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2004-03-01

    Bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly due to the large variation in the technical and the biological aspects of the investigations. Although there is still no proof that bruxism causes overload of dental implants and their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. Practical advices as to minimize the chance of implant failure are given. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these advices concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the use of a hard nightguard. PMID:15058243

  19. Power Approaches for Implantable Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, Achraf; Kouki, Ammar B; Cao, Hung

    2015-01-01

    Implantable medical devices have been implemented to provide treatment and to assess in vivo physiological information in humans as well as animal models for medical diagnosis and prognosis, therapeutic applications and biological science studies. The advances of micro/nanotechnology dovetailed with novel biomaterials have further enhanced biocompatibility, sensitivity, longevity and reliability in newly-emerged low-cost and compact devices. Close-loop systems with both sensing and treatment functions have also been developed to provide point-of-care and personalized medicine. Nevertheless, one of the remaining challenges is whether power can be supplied sufficiently and continuously for the operation of the entire system. This issue is becoming more and more critical to the increasing need of power for wireless communication in implanted devices towards the future healthcare infrastructure, namely mobile health (m-Health). In this review paper, methodologies to transfer and harvest energy in implantable medical devices are introduced and discussed to highlight the uses and significances of various potential power sources. PMID:26580626

  20. Power Approaches for Implantable Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amar, Achraf; Kouki, Ammar B.; Cao, Hung

    2015-01-01

    Implantable medical devices have been implemented to provide treatment and to assess in vivo physiological information in humans as well as animal models for medical diagnosis and prognosis, therapeutic applications and biological science studies. The advances of micro/nanotechnology dovetailed with novel biomaterials have further enhanced biocompatibility, sensitivity, longevity and reliability in newly-emerged low-cost and compact devices. Close-loop systems with both sensing and treatment functions have also been developed to provide point-of-care and personalized medicine. Nevertheless, one of the remaining challenges is whether power can be supplied sufficiently and continuously for the operation of the entire system. This issue is becoming more and more critical to the increasing need of power for wireless communication in implanted devices towards the future healthcare infrastructure, namely mobile health (m-Health). In this review paper, methodologies to transfer and harvest energy in implantable medical devices are introduced and discussed to highlight the uses and significances of various potential power sources. PMID:26580626

  1. An Implanted, Stimulated Muscle Powered Piezoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Gustafson, Kenneth; Kilgore, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A totally implantable piezoelectric generator system able to harness power from electrically activated muscle could be used to augment the power systems of implanted medical devices, such as neural prostheses, by reducing the number of battery replacement surgeries or by allowing periods of untethered functionality. The features of our generator design are no moving parts and the use of a portion of the generated power for system operation and regulation. A software model of the system has been developed and simulations have been performed to predict the output power as the system parameters were varied within their constraints. Mechanical forces that mimic muscle forces have been experimentally applied to a piezoelectric generator to verify the accuracy of the simulations and to explore losses due to mechanical coupling. Depending on the selection of system parameters, software simulations predict that this generator concept can generate up to approximately 700 W of power, which is greater than the power necessary to drive the generator, conservatively estimated to be 50 W. These results suggest that this concept has the potential to be an implantable, self-replenishing power source and further investigation is underway.

  2. Treatment of the contaminated implant surface using the Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert J

    2004-06-01

    Treatment of the contaminated implant surface by mechanical and chemotherapeutic means has met with mixed success. Incomplete surface debridement or alteration of the implant surface could compromise attempts at grafting and reintegration of the implant body. Development of a laser system operating at 2780 nm and using an ablative hydrokinetic process offers the possibility for more efficient decontamination and debridement. The Er,Cr: YSGG laser is evaluated and compared with the most commonly used chemotherapeutic modality for treatment of the implant surface. A scanning electron microscope study is presented comparing YSGG ablation to citric acid treatment of the titanium plasma sprayed and HA-coated implant surface. We can conclude that laser ablation using the YSGG laser is highly efficient at removing potential contaminants on the roughened implant surface while demonstrating no effects on the titanium substrate.

  3. Treatment of the contaminated implant surface using the Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert J

    2004-06-01

    Treatment of the contaminated implant surface by mechanical and chemotherapeutic means has met with mixed success. Incomplete surface debridement or alteration of the implant surface could compromise attempts at grafting and reintegration of the implant body. Development of a laser system operating at 2780 nm and using an ablative hydrokinetic process offers the possibility for more efficient decontamination and debridement. The Er,Cr: YSGG laser is evaluated and compared with the most commonly used chemotherapeutic modality for treatment of the implant surface. A scanning electron microscope study is presented comparing YSGG ablation to citric acid treatment of the titanium plasma sprayed and HA-coated implant surface. We can conclude that laser ablation using the YSGG laser is highly efficient at removing potential contaminants on the roughened implant surface while demonstrating no effects on the titanium substrate. PMID:15179093

  4. Transverse femoral implant prominence: four cases demonstrating a preventable complication for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Argintar, Evan; Scherer, Benjamin; Jordan, Tom; Klimkiewicz, John

    2010-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is a commonly occurring injury that often demands surgical reconstruction. Although the utility of this operation is widely accepted, many specific components, including graft fixation technique, remain controversial. Many clinicians favor transverse femoral implant fixation for soft tissue ACL grafts. This technique can be accomplished successfully; however, in a minority of the cases, the femoral implant can be excessively prominent, leading to iatrogenic postoperative iliotibial band syndrome. This article presents 4 patients that developed postoperative iliotibial band syndrome resulting from transverse femoral implant prominence. Despite achievement of knee ligamentous stability, implant prominence compromised final clinical results following ACL reconstruction. Through change in Lysholm value, we reviewed the clinical outcomes of these patients following femoral implant hardware removal for treatment of iliotibial band syndrome. On hardware removal, all patients demonstrated complete symptomatic improvement, mirroring an average Lysholm value increase of 38. We believe transverse femoral implant prominence is avoidable, and subsequent iliotibial band syndrome is a preventable postoperative complication.

  5. Effects of an implant on temperature distribution in tissue during ultrasound diathermy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Kuan; Shieh, Jay; Chen, Chuin-Shan; Chiang, Hongsen; Huang, Chang-Wei; Chen, Wen-Shiang

    2016-09-01

    The effects of an implant on temperature distribution in a tissue-mimicking hydrogel phantom during the application of therapeutic ultrasound were investigated. In vitro experiments were conducted to compare the influences of plastic and metal implants on ultrasound diathermy and to calibrate parameters in finite element simulation models. The temperature histories and characteristics of the opaque (denatured) areas in the hydrogel phantoms predicted by the numerical simulations show good correlation with those observed in the in vitro experiments. This study provides an insight into the temperature profile in the vicinity of an implant by therapeutic ultrasound heating typically used for physiotherapy. A parametric study was conducted through numerical simulations to investigate the effects of several factors, such as implant material type, ultrasound operation frequency, implant thickness and tissue thickness on the temperature distribution in the hydrogel phantom. The results indicate that the implant material type and implant thickness are the main parameters influencing the temperature distribution. In addition, once the implant material and ultrasound operation frequency are chosen, an optimal implant thickness can be obtained so as to avoid overheating injuries in tissue. PMID:27150744

  6. Deep photometry and integral magnitudes of 8 nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Ts. B.

    2016-02-01

    We estimated integral magnitudes of galaxies trying to include the contribution of the brightest part of their halos. We performed surface photometry based on (i) concentric elliptical rims, corresponding to the peripheral ellipticity of the image, (ii) median estimation of the mean value of the rim pixels, (iii) apparent radial brightness profiles, corresponding to the rim medians, and (iv) magnitude curves of growth, derived by numerical integrations of the apparent rim profiles, without preliminary background estimation and removal. Furthermore, we used the magnitude curves of growth to determine the integral magnitudes (limited by size and deepness of our frames) and compared them with the total magnitudes in the data base HyperLeda. Also, we used the rim-profiles to estimate the background level far enough from the galaxy center and we build (here—only for trial) the intrinsic radial profiles (with background removal). We apply this photometry on 8 nearby galaxies, observed with CCD in the system BVRC IC by the 50 cm Schmidt telescope of the Rozhen NAO in 2003-2004. We build radial profiles which occur to be as average 1.8 times (1.2-2.5 times) larger than in data base NED and of integral brightness that occurs to be about 1.4 times (1.2-1.7 times) higher than in data base HyperLeda. The relative brightness additions, found here, correlate with the color index and anti-correlate with the luminosity of the galaxy.

  7. Correlating Total Visual Magnitude Estimates and CCD Photometry for Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidger, Mark Richard

    2015-08-01

    A key facet of understanding the activity of comets is coverage of their light curve. For some comets such as 2P/Encke there is good light curve coverage from visual observers extending back over many returns over more than 2 centuries. However, in recent years, CCD photometry by amateur astronomers has become the dominant data source and the number of total visual magnitude estimates has reduced sharply, making comparison of recent and historical photometric data for comets increasingly difficult. The relationship between total visual magnitude estimates - dominated by the emission from the Swan bands of C2 - and CCD aperture photometry - dominated by the dust continuum - has been far from clear.This paper compares CCD aperture photometry and total visual magnitude for several recent well-observed bright comets, including C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) using a consistent and homogeneous database of observations from (mainly) Spanish observers. For comets with a 1/r radial coma profile, good agreement is found between CCD aperture photometry and total visual magnitude estimates for a CCD aperture corresponding to a physical coma diameter of ≈105km.The relationship between the coma radial brightness slope and the equivalent physical aperture for CCD photometry to obtain agreement with total visual magnitude estimates is investigated.

  8. The manufacture of generic replicas of implants for arthroplasty of the hip and knee: is it regulated and will it save money?

    PubMed

    Atrey, A; Heylen, S; Gosling, O; Porteous, M J L; Haddad, F S

    2016-07-01

    Joint replacement of the hip and knee remain very satisfactory operations. They are, however, expensive. The actual manufacturing of the implant represents only 30% of the final cost, while sales and marketing represent 40%. Recently, the patents on many well established and successful implants have expired. Companies have started producing and distributing implants that purport to replicate existing implants with good long-term results. The aims of this paper are to assess the legality, the monitoring and cost saving implications of such generic implants. We also assess how this might affect the traditional orthopaedic implant companies. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:892-900. PMID:27365466

  9. Examination of reinforcement magnitude on the pharmacological disruption of fixed-ratio performance.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; Ginsburg, Brett C; Lamb, R J

    2009-08-01

    Behavioral momentum theory proposes that operant behavior is the product of two separable processes: its rate of occurrence and its resistance to change. Generally speaking, operant situations providing more densely spaced or greater magnitudes of reinforcement should be more resistant to disruption. Attempts to disrupt ongoing behavior by manipulating the availability of food or deprivation level typically have supported the predictions of behavioral momentum. Tests with pharmacological disruptors, however, have yielded mixed results. Most investigations of pharmacological disruption of operant behavior have evaluated momentum across situations that differ in rate of reinforcement. The present experiment was an attempt to systematically replicate prior work, but under conditions of differing reinforcement magnitudes. Pigeons were trained to key peck on a multiple fixed-ratio 30 schedule of food presentation, where different components programmed 2-, 4-, or 8-s access to grain. Resistance to rate-decreasing effects of drugs was evaluated with several compounds drawn from distinct pharmacological classes: chlordiazepoxide, cocaine, clonidine, haloperidol, morphine, and ethanol were tested. Additionally, disruption by prefeeding and extinction was examined. Generally, resistance to change by drug administration was not modulated by reinforcement magnitude. Prefeeding and extinction tests, however, replicated previous work, indicating that our procedure was sensitive to more common disruptors. The results give additional support to the notion that pharmacological disruptors may not behave in the manner predicted by behavioral momentum theory. PMID:19653789

  10. Examination of reinforcement magnitude on the pharmacological disruption of fixed-ratio performance.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; Ginsburg, Brett C; Lamb, R J

    2009-08-01

    Behavioral momentum theory proposes that operant behavior is the product of two separable processes: its rate of occurrence and its resistance to change. Generally speaking, operant situations providing more densely spaced or greater magnitudes of reinforcement should be more resistant to disruption. Attempts to disrupt ongoing behavior by manipulating the availability of food or deprivation level typically have supported the predictions of behavioral momentum. Tests with pharmacological disruptors, however, have yielded mixed results. Most investigations of pharmacological disruption of operant behavior have evaluated momentum across situations that differ in rate of reinforcement. The present experiment was an attempt to systematically replicate prior work, but under conditions of differing reinforcement magnitudes. Pigeons were trained to key peck on a multiple fixed-ratio 30 schedule of food presentation, where different components programmed 2-, 4-, or 8-s access to grain. Resistance to rate-decreasing effects of drugs was evaluated with several compounds drawn from distinct pharmacological classes: chlordiazepoxide, cocaine, clonidine, haloperidol, morphine, and ethanol were tested. Additionally, disruption by prefeeding and extinction was examined. Generally, resistance to change by drug administration was not modulated by reinforcement magnitude. Prefeeding and extinction tests, however, replicated previous work, indicating that our procedure was sensitive to more common disruptors. The results give additional support to the notion that pharmacological disruptors may not behave in the manner predicted by behavioral momentum theory.

  11. The refractive outcome of Toric Lentis Mplus implant in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chiam, Patrick J; Quah, Say A

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the refractive outcome of Toric Lentis Mplus intraocular lens (IOL) implant. METHODS This is a retrospective case series. Consecutive patients with corneal astigmatism of at least 1.5 D had Toric Lentis Mplus IOL implant during cataract surgery. The exclusion criteria included irregular astigmatism on corneal topography, large scotopic pupil diameter (>6 mm), poor visual potential and significant ocular comorbidity. Postoperative manifest refraction, uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), best-corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA), uncorrected intermediate visual acuity (UIVA) at 3/4 m and uncorrected near visual acuity (UNVA) were obtained. RESULTS There were 70 eyes from 49 patients in this study. Patients were refracted at a median of 8.9wk (range 4.0 to 15.5) from the operation date. Sixty-five percent of eyes had 6/7.5 (0.10 logMAR) or better, and 99% 6/12 (0.30 logMAR) or better postoperative UDVA. Eighty-nine percent could read Jaeger (J) 3 (0.28 logMAR) and 95% J5 (0.37 logMAR) at 40 cm. The median magnitude of astigmatism decreased from 1.91 D to 0.49 D (Wilcoxon, P<0.001) after the operation. The range of the cylindrical error was reduced from 1.5-3.95 D (keratometric) preoperatively to 0.00-1.46 D (subjective refraction transposed to corneal plane) postoperatively. CONCLUSION Toric Lentis Mplus IOL has good predictability in reducing preexisting corneal astigmatism. PMID:27275424

  12. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancharoen, K.; Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency associated with body motion of patients. The prototype is designed based on the constrained volume available in a hip prosthesis and the challenge is to harvest energy from low frequency movements (< 1 Hz) which is an average frequency during free walking of a patient. The concept of magnetic-force-driven energy harvesting is applied to this prototype considering the hip movements during routine activities of patients. The magnetic field within the harvester was simulated using COMSOL. The simulated resonant frequency was around 30 Hz and the voltage induced in a coil was predicted to be 47.8 mV. A prototype of the energy harvester was fabricated and tested. A maximum open circuit voltage of 39.43 mV was obtained and the resonant frequency of 28 Hz was observed. Moreover, the power output of 0.96 μW was achieved with an optimum resistive load of 250Ω.

  13. Speech Production Intelligibility of Early Implanted Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Mirette G.; Waltzman, Susan B.; Tajudeen, Bobby; Svirsky, Mario A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the influence of age, and age at implantation, on speech production intelligibility in prelingually deaf pediatric cochlear implant recipients. Methods Forty prelingually, profoundly deaf children who received cochlear implants between 8 and 40 months of age. Their age at testing ranged between 2.5 – 18 years. Children were recorded repeating the ten sentences in the Beginner’s Intelligibility Test. These recordings were played back to normal-hearing listeners who were unfamiliar with deaf speech and who were instructed to write down what they heard. They also rated each subject for the intelligibility of their speech production on a 5-point rating scale. The main outcome measures were the percentage of target words correctly transcribed, and the intelligibility ratings, in both cases averaged across three normal-hearing listeners. Results The data showed a strong effect of age at testing, with older children being more intelligible. This effect was particularly pronounced for children implanted in the first 24 months of life, all of whom had speech production intelligibility scores of 80% or higher when they were tested at age 5.5 years or older. This was true for only five out of nine children implanted at age 25 to 36 months. Conclusions Profoundly deaf children who receive cochlear implants in the first two years of life produce highly intelligible speech before age 6. This is also true for most, but not all children implanted in their third year. PMID:20472308

  14. Newmark design spectra considering earthquake magnitudes and site categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Xie, Wei-Chau; Pandey, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    Newmark design spectra have been implemented in many building codes, especially in building codes for critical structures. Previous studies show that Newmark design spectra exhibit lower amplitudes at high frequencies and larger amplitudes at low frequencies in comparison with spectra developed by statistical methods. To resolve this problem, this study considers three suites of ground motions recorded at three types of sites. Using these ground motions, influences of the shear-wave velocity, earthquake magnitudes, source-to-site distances on the ratios of ground motion parameters are studied, and spectrum amplification factors are statistically calculated. Spectral bounds for combinations of three site categories and two cases of earthquake magnitudes are estimated. Site design spectrum coefficients for the three site categories considering earthquake magnitudes are established. The problems of Newmark design spectra could be resolved by using the site design spectrum coefficients to modify the spectral values of Newmark design spectra in the acceleration sensitive, velocity sensitive, and displacement sensitive regions.

  15. Absolute magnitude calibration using trigonometric parallax - Incomplete, spectroscopic samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Casertano, Stefano

    1991-01-01

    A new numerical algorithm is used to calibrate the absolute magnitude of spectroscopically selected stars from their observed trigonometric parallax. This procedure, based on maximum-likelihood estimation, can retrieve unbiased estimates of the intrinsic absolute magnitude and its dispersion even from incomplete samples suffering from selection biases in apparent magnitude and color. It can also make full use of low accuracy and negative parallaxes and incorporate censorship on reported parallax values. Accurate error estimates are derived for each of the fitted parameters. The algorithm allows an a posteriori check of whether the fitted model gives a good representation of the observations. The procedure is described in general and applied to both real and simulated data.

  16. Development of magnitude scaling relationship for earthquake early warning system in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, D.

    2011-12-01

    Seismicity in South Korea is low and magnitudes of recent earthquakes are mostly less than 4.0. However, historical earthquakes of South Korea reveal that many damaging earthquakes had occurred in the Korean Peninsula. To mitigate potential seismic hazard in the Korean Peninsula, earthquake early warning (EEW) system is being installed and will be operated in South Korea in the near future. In order to deliver early warnings successfully, it is very important to develop stable magnitude scaling relationships. In this study, two empirical magnitude relationships are developed from 350 events ranging in magnitude from 2.0 to 5.0 recorded by the KMA and the KIGAM. 1606 vertical component seismograms whose epicentral distances are within 100 km are chosen. The peak amplitude and the maximum predominant period of the initial P wave are used for finding magnitude relationships. The peak displacement of seismogram recorded at a broadband seismometer shows less scatter than the peak velocity of that. The scatters of the peak displacement and the peak velocity of accelerogram are similar to each other. The peak displacement of seismogram differs from that of accelerogram, which means that two different magnitude relationships for each type of data should be developed. The maximum predominant period of the initial P wave is estimated after using two low-pass filters, 3 Hz and 10 Hz, and 10 Hz low-pass filter yields better estimate than 3 Hz. It is found that most of the peak amplitude and the maximum predominant period are estimated within 1 sec after triggering.

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  18. A catalog of observed nuclear magnitudes of Jupiter family comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, G.; Fernández, J. A.; Rickman, H.; Licandro, J.

    2000-10-01

    A catalog of a sample of 105 Jupiter family (JF) comets (defined as those with Tisserand constants T > 2 and orbital periods P < 20 yr) is presented with our ``best estimates'' of their absolute nuclear magnitudes H_N = V(1,0,0). The catalog includes all the nuclear magnitudes reported after 1950 until August 1998 that appear in the International Comet Quarterly Archive of Cometary Photometric Data, the Minor Planet Center (MPC) data base, IAU Circulars, International Comet Quarterly, and a few papers devoted to some particular comets, together with our own observations. Photometric data previous to 1990 have mainly been taken from the Comet Light Curve Catalogue (CLICC) compiled by Kamél (\\cite{kamel}). We discuss the reliability of the reported nuclear magnitudes in relation to the inherent sources of errors and uncertainties, in particular the coma contamination often present even at large heliocentric distances. A large fraction of the JF comets of our sample indeed shows various degrees of activity at large heliocentric distances, which is correlated with recent downward jumps in their perihelion distances. The reliability of coma subtraction methods to compute the nuclear magnitude is also discussed. Most absolute nuclear magnitudes are found in the range 15 - 18, with no magnitudes fainter than H_N ~ 19.5. The catalog can be found at: http://www.fisica.edu.uy/ ~ gonzalo/catalog/. Table 2 and Appendix B are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org Table 5 is also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  19. Every reinforcer counts: reinforcer magnitude and local preference.

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Michael; Baum, William M

    2003-01-01

    Six pigeons were trained on concurrent variable-interval schedules. Sessions consisted of seven components, each lasting 10 reinforcers, with the conditions of reinforcement differing between components. The component sequence was randomly selected without replacement. In Experiment 1, the concurrent-schedule reinforcer ratios in components were all equal to 1.0, but across components reinforcer-magnitude ratios varied from 1:7 through 7:1. Three different overall reinforcer rates were arranged across conditions. In Experiment 2, the reinforcer-rate ratios varied across components from 27:1 to 1:27, and the reinforcer-magnitude ratios for each alternative were changed across conditions from 1:7 to 7:1. The results of Experiment 1 replicated the results for changing reinforcer-rate ratios across components reported by Davison and Baum (2000, 2002): Sensitivity to reinforcer-magnitude ratios increased with increasing numbers of reinforcers in components. Sensitivity to magnitude ratio, however, fell short of sensitivity to reinforcer-rate ratio. The degree of carryover from component to component depended on the reinforcer rate. Larger reinforcers produced larger and longer postreinforcer preference pulses than did smaller reinforcers. Similar results were found in Experiment 2, except that sensitivity to reinforcer magnitude was considerably higher and was greater for magnitudes that differed more from one another. Visit durations following reinforcers measured either as number of responses emitted or time spent responding before a changeover were longer following larger than following smaller reinforcers, and were longer following sequences of same reinforcers than following other sequences. The results add to the growing body of research that informs model building at local levels. PMID:13677611

  20. Magnitude comparison with different types of rational numbers.

    PubMed

    DeWolf, Melissa; Grounds, Margaret A; Bassok, Miriam; Holyoak, Keith J

    2014-02-01

    An important issue in understanding mathematical cognition involves the similarities and differences between the magnitude representations associated with various types of rational numbers. For single-digit integers, evidence indicates that magnitudes are represented as analog values on a mental number line, such that magnitude comparisons are made more quickly and accurately as the numerical distance between numbers increases (the distance effect). Evidence concerning a distance effect for compositional numbers (e.g., multidigit whole numbers, fractions and decimals) is mixed. We compared the patterns of response times and errors for college students in magnitude comparison tasks across closely matched sets of rational numbers (e.g., 22/37, 0.595, 595). In Experiment 1, a distance effect was found for both fractions and decimals, but response times were dramatically slower for fractions than for decimals. Experiments 2 and 3 compared performance across fractions, decimals, and 3-digit integers. Response patterns for decimals and integers were extremely similar but, as in Experiment 1, magnitude comparisons based on fractions were dramatically slower, even when the decimals varied in precision (i.e., number of place digits) and could not be compared in the same way as multidigit integers (Experiment 3). Our findings indicate that comparisons of all three types of numbers exhibit a distance effect, but that processing often involves strategic focus on components of numbers. Fractions impose an especially high processing burden due to their bipartite (a/b) structure. In contrast to the other number types, the magnitude values associated with fractions appear to be less precise, and more dependent on explicit calculation. PMID:23750968

  1. Turned versus anodised dental implants: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, marginal bone loss (MBL)and post-operative infection for patients being rehabilitated by turned versus anodised-surface implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in November 2015. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomised or not. Thirty-eight publications were included. The results suggest a risk ratio of 2·82 (95% CI 1·95-4·06, P < 0·00001) for failure of turned implants, when compared to anodised-surface implants. Sensitivity analyses showed similar results when only the studies inserting implants in maxillae or mandibles were pooled. There were no statistically significant effects of turned implants on the MBL (mean difference-MD 0·02, 95%CI -0·16-0·20; P = 0·82) in comparison to anodised implants. The results of a meta-regression considering the follow-up period as a covariate suggested an increase of the MD with the increase in the follow-up time (MD increase 0·012 mm year(-1) ), however, without a statistical significance (P = 0·813). Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analysis for the outcome 'post-operative infection' was not performed. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies.

  2. Origin of limiting magnitude counting triangles and squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggemans, Paul

    2010-08-01

    Meteor astronomers worldwide struggled for over a century with the problem of how to calibrate visual meteor counts. Although the effect of variable sky conditions was already recognized in the earliest studies of meteor counts, it took until the end of the 1940s before the limiting magnitude was commonly considered as the parameter to calibrate the sky conditions. The brilliant idea to use counting areas in the sky for limiting magnitude determination was proposed by Hugo van Woerden in the 1950s. This method is still used today and helped the IMO to fulfill the expectations of Hugo van Woerden many years after it was first published.

  3. Toward Reconciling Magnitude Discrepancies Estimated from Paleoearthquake Data

    SciTech Connect

    N. Seth Carpenter; Suzette J. Payne; Annette L. Schafer

    2012-06-01

    We recognize a discrepancy in magnitudes estimated for several Basin and Range, U.S.A. faults. For example, magnitudes predicted for the Wasatch (Utah), Lost River (Idaho), and Lemhi (Idaho) faults from fault segment lengths (L{sub seg}) where lengths are defined between geometrical, structural, and/or behavioral discontinuities assumed to persistently arrest rupture, are consistently less than magnitudes calculated from displacements (D) along these same segments. For self-similarity, empirical relationships (e.g. Wells and Coppersmith, 1994) should predict consistent magnitudes (M) using diverse fault dimension values for a given fault (i.e. M {approx} L{sub seg}, should equal M {approx} D). Typically, the empirical relationships are derived from historical earthquake data and parameter values used as input into these relationships are determined from field investigations of paleoearthquakes. A commonly used assumption - grounded in the characteristic-earthquake model of Schwartz and Coppersmith (1984) - is equating L{sub seg} with surface rupture length (SRL). Many large historical events yielded secondary and/or sympathetic faulting (e.g. 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquake) which are included in the measurement of SRL and used to derive empirical relationships. Therefore, calculating magnitude from the M {approx} SRL relationship using L{sub seg} as SRL leads to an underestimation of magnitude and the M {approx} L{sub seg} and M {approx} D discrepancy. Here, we propose an alternative approach to earthquake magnitude estimation involving a relationship between moment magnitude (Mw) and length, where length is L{sub seg} instead of SRL. We analyze seven historical, surface-rupturing, strike-slip and normal faulting earthquakes for which segmentation of the causative fault and displacement data are available and whose rupture included at least one entire fault segment, but not two or more. The preliminary Mw {approx} L{sub seg} results are strikingly consistent

  4. Preferred tools and techniques for implantation of cardiac electronic devices in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Marinskis, Germanas; Pison, Laurent; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to the tools and techniques used for cardiac implantable electronic devices procedures in the European countries. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 62 members of the EHRA research network. The survey involved high-, medium-, and low-volume implanting centres, performing, respectively, more than 200, 100-199 and under 100 implants per year. The following topics were explored: the side approach for implantation, surgical techniques for pocket incision, first venous access for lead implantation, preference of lead fixation, preferred coil number for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads, right ventricular pacing site, generator placement site, subcutaneous ICD implantation, specific tools and techniques for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), lead implantation sequence in CRT, coronary sinus cannulation technique, target site for left ventricular lead placement, strategy in left ventricular lead implant failure, mean CRT implantation time, optimization of the atrioventricular (AV) and ventriculo-ventricular intervals, CRT implants in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation, AV node ablation in patients with permanent AF. This panoramic view allows us to find out the operator preferences regarding the techniques and tools for device implantation in Europe. The results showed different practices in all the fields we investigated, nevertheless the survey also outlines a good adherence to the common standards and recommendations.

  5. Potential impact of prostate edema on the dosimetry of permanent seed implants using the new {sup 131}Cs (model CS-1) seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhe; Deng Jun; Roberts, Kenneth; Nath, Ravinder

    2006-04-15

    Our aim in this work was to study the potential dosimetric effect of prostate edema on the accuracy of conventional pre- and post-implant dosimetry for prostate seed implants using the newly introduced {sup 131}Cs seed, whose radioactive decay half-life ({approx}9.7 days) is directly comparable to the average edema resolution half-life ({approx}10 days) observed previously by Waterman et al. for {sup 125}I implants [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069-1077 (1998)]. A systematic calculation of the relative dosimetry effect of prostate edema on the {sup 131}Cs implant was performed by using an analytic solution obtained previously [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000)]. It was found that conventional preimplant dosimetry always overestimates the true delivered dose as it ignores the temporary increase of the interseed distance caused by edema. The overestimation for {sup 131}Cs implants ranged from 1.2% (for a small edema with a magnitude of 10% and a half-life of 2 days) to approximately 45% (for larger degree edema with a magnitude of 100% and a half-life of 25 days). The magnitude of pre- and post-implant dosimetry error for {sup 131}Cs implants was found to be similar to that of {sup 103}Pd implants for typical edema characteristics (magnitude <100%, and half-life <25 days); both of which are worse compared to {sup 125}I implants. The preimplant dosimetry error for {sup 131}Cs implants cannot be compensated effectively without knowing the edema characteristics before the seed implantation. On the other hand, the error resulted from a conventional post-implant dosimetry can be minimized (to within {+-}6%) for {sup 131}Cs implants if the post-implant dosimetry is performed at 10{+-}2 days post seed implantation. This 'optimum' post-implant dosimetry time is shorter than those determined previously for the {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I implants at 16{+-}4 days and 6{+-}1 weeks, respectively.

  6. IMMEDIATE VERSUS DELAYED LOADING IMPLANTS: RATIONALE AND CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Corradini, G; Delle Donne, U; Boni, W; Tettamanti, L; Tagliabue, A

    2015-01-01

    Loading implants immediately after their position in alveolar bone crest is a procedure that has become popular in the last decade. The aim of this study is to evaluate the survival rate of 811 immediate loaded implants (ILIs). In the period between January 2008 and December 2013, 877 patients (498 females and 379 males) were operated at the BDD private Practice Clinic (Milan, Italy). The mean post-surgical follow-up was 30±17 months (max – min, 84 – 1). One thousasnd three hundred and eighty-six fixtures (EDIERRE Implant System SpA, Genoa, Italy) were evaluated in the present study, 811 immediately loaded and 575 loaded after 3 months. All patients underwent the same surgical protocol and agreed to participate in a post-operative check-up program. SPSS program was used for statistical analysis. Survival rate (SVR) was 97.3% since only 38 fixtures were lost from a total of 1,348 implants. Cross-tabulation between failures demonstrated slight but significant worse results for ILIs (p= 0.037). There were 28 failures out of 811 ILIs whereas only 10 fixtures were lost out of 565 implants loaded after 3 months. Immediate loading performed in selected cases is a reliable tool for oral rehabilitation.

  7. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care.

  8. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Siebert, Sean M.; Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J. B.; Brenckle, Mark A.; Amsden, Jason J.; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  9. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M; Siebert, Sean M; Pritchard, Eleanor M; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J B; Brenckle, Mark A; Amsden, Jason J; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2012-11-27

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  10. Standard magnitude prize reinforcers can be as efficacious as larger magnitude reinforcers in cocaine-dependent methadone patients

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Barry, Danielle; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Contingency management (CM) reduces cocaine use in methadone patients, but only about 50% of patients respond to CM interventions. This study evaluated whether increasing magnitudes of reinforcement will improve outcomes. Methods Cocaine-dependent methadone patients (N = 240) were randomized to one of four 12-week treatment conditions: usual care (UC), UC plus “standard” prize CM in which average expected prize earnings were about $300, UC plus high magnitude prize CM in which average expected prize earnings were about $900, or UC plus voucher CM with an expected maximum of about $900 in vouchers. Results All three CM conditions yielded significant reductions in cocaine use relative to UC, with effect sizes (d) ranging from 0.38 to 0.59. No differences were noted between CM conditions, with at least 55% of patients in each CM condition achieving one week or more of cocaine abstinence versus 35% in UC. During the 12 weeks after the intervention ended, CM increased time until relapse relative to UC, but the effects of CM were no longer significant at a 12-month follow-up. Conclusions Providing the standard magnitude of $300 in prizes was as effective as larger magnitude CM in cocaine-dependent methadone patients in this study. Given its strong evidence base and relatively low costs, standard magnitude prize CM should be considered for adoption in methadone clinics to encourage cocaine abstinence, but new methods need to be developed to sustain abstinence. PMID:25198284

  11. Software for goniometer control in the Triple Ion Implantation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, W.R.

    1994-02-01

    A computer program is described tat controls the goniometer employed in the ion scattering chamber of the Triple Ion Implantation Facility (TIF) in the Metals and Ceramics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Details of goniometer operation and its incorporation into the ion scattering setup specific to the TIF are also discussed.

  12. Objective intraoperative method to record averaged electromyographic stapedius muscle reflexes in cochlear implant patients.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, B; Harris, S; Shallop, J K

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a procedure to measure the averaged stapedius muscle reflex in response to electrical stimulation (AESR) with a cochlear implant. The AESR, as activated by ipsilateral stimulation with a cochlear implant, was investigated intra-operatively in a series of 12 children. After the cochlear implant was placed into the cochlea and secured by the surgeon, an electromyographic (EMG) needle electrode was gently placed into the stapedius muscle. During stimulation of the cochlear implant, the stapedius reflex was monitored visually (VESR) and as an averaged EMG response (AESR). Consistent AESRs were obtained in 7 of the 12 children. These measures provide a method to obtain stapedius muscle responses that may be helpful in the programming of young children with cochlear implants. Comparative post-operative measures were also obtained, including behavioral threshold levels, behavioral comfort levels, and the contralateral stapedius reflex threshold (ESR) on selected electrodes.

  13. Long-term comparison of a newly designed gold implant with the conventional implant in facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, H Y; Hong, S E; Lew, J M

    1999-11-01

    Patients with complete facial nerve palsy are at risk for eye complications resulting from exposure of the cornea and loss of the blinking reflex. Failure of protection predisposes the patient to exposure keratitis, corneal abrasion and, in rare cases, blindness. The mainstays of non-surgical therapy are cumbersome, obscure vision, and are mostly helpful in patients with acute facial paralysis in whom recovery of orbicularis oculi function is expected. Methods of lid-loading using metal implants and gold eyelid weights have been reported in the literature. Between October of 1988 and March of 1995, 32 patients with lagophthalmos due to facial nerve palsy underwent a total of 34 procedures for the insertion of a gold eyelid weight. Each patient had a gold weight inserted into a small pocket between the orbicularis oculi and the tarsal plate of the upper eyelid. The gold implant is curved to fit the curvature of the eye and contains holes for fixation to the tarsus with sutures. Ingrowth of fibrous tissue through the holes may also help fix the weight in position. Between 1988 and 1991, 10 patients received 10 commercially available rectangular gold implants with 2 holes; these implants resulted in adverse effects, such as infection and exposure in up to 30 percent of the cases. Because of the high complication rate with the rectangular gold implant, the authors began using a new, elliptical gold implant with 3 holes, which is longer, thinner, wider in the center, and narrower in the peripheral portion. This new elliptical implant was used on 22 patients (24 implants) from December of 1991 through March of 1995. The mean follow-up time for the 32 patients in the study was 41.3 months (range, 6 to 63 months), 49.8 months for patients with rectangular implants and 32.8 months for patients with elliptical implants. The elliptical gold implant resulted in dynamic closure of the eyelid and in excellent protection and cosmesis. Lagophthalmos and exposure keratitis resolved

  14. Magnitude Estimation with Noisy Integrators Linked by an Adaptive Reference

    PubMed Central

    Thurley, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Judgments of physical stimuli show characteristic biases; relatively small stimuli are overestimated whereas relatively large stimuli are underestimated (regression effect). Such biases likely result from a strategy that seeks to minimize errors given noisy estimates about stimuli that itself are drawn from a distribution, i.e., the statistics of the environment. While being conceptually well described, it is unclear how such a strategy could be implemented neurally. The present paper aims toward answering this question. A theoretical approach is introduced that describes magnitude estimation as two successive stages of noisy (neural) integration. Both stages are linked by a reference memory that is updated with every new stimulus. The model reproduces the behavioral characteristics of magnitude estimation and makes several experimentally testable predictions. Moreover, the model identifies the regression effect as a means of minimizing estimation errors and explains how this optimality strategy depends on the subject's discrimination abilities and on the stimulus statistics. The latter influence predicts another property of magnitude estimation, the so-called range effect. Beyond being successful in describing decision-making, the present work suggests that noisy integration may also be important in processing magnitudes. PMID:26909028

  15. The Role of Executive Functions in Numerical Magnitude Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolkman, Meijke E.; Hoijtink, Herbert J. A.; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.; Leseman, Paul P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) are closely related to math performance. Little is known, however, about the role of EF in numerical magnitude skills (NS), although these skills are widely acknowledged to be important precursors of math learning. The current study focuses on the different roles of updating, shifting, and inhibition in NS. EF and NS were…

  16. The Magnitude of Premenstrual and Menstrual Mood Changes in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, Sharon; Murphy, Denise

    Frequent mood changes in adolescents are often attributed to the influence of shifting hormone levels. The presence and magnitude of menstrual-related mood changes in adolescent women were examined in 10th and 11th grade females (N=158) who completed the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ). Self-reports of the onset date for the next two…

  17. A dissociation between symbolic number knowledge and analogue magnitude information.

    PubMed

    Polk, T A; Reed, C L; Keenan, J M; Hogarth, P; Anderson, C A

    2001-12-01

    Semantic understanding of numbers and related concepts can be dissociated from rote knowledge of arithmetic facts. However, distinctions among different kinds of semantic representations related to numbers have not been fully explored. Working with numbers and arithmetic requires representing semantic information that is both analogue (e.g., the approximate magnitude of a number) and symbolic (e.g., what / means). In this article, the authors describe a patient (MC) who exhibits a dissociation between tasks that require symbolic number knowledge (e.g., knowledge of arithmetic symbols including numbers, knowledge of concepts related to numbers such as rounding) and tasks that require an analogue magnitude representation (e.g., comparing size or frequency). MC is impaired on a variety of tasks that require symbolic number knowledge, but her ability to represent and process analogue magnitude information is intact. Her deficit in symbolic number knowledge extends to a variety of concepts related to numbers (e.g., decimal points, Roman numerals, what a quartet is) but not to any other semantic categories that we have tested. These findings suggest that symbolic number knowledge is a functionally independent component of the number processing system, that it is category specific, and that it is anatomically and functionally distinct from magnitude representations. PMID:11748908

  18. High magnitude head impacts experienced during youth football practices.

    PubMed

    Young, Tyler; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2014-01-01

    To reduce the risk of concussion in the 3.5 million youth athletes who participate in organized football leagues in the United States each year, practice structure can be modified to decrease impact frequency and magnitude. The objective of this study is to identify activities that result in high magnitude head impacts in youth football players during practice. The HIT System was used to record the head acceleration magnitude, impact location on the helmet, and time of each impact for each game and practice players participated in. These data were used to quantify the head impact exposure associated with players between the ages of 9 and 11 years. Video footage recorded during each practice and game session was used to identify the activity associated with any impact above 45 g. The incidence rate of high magnitude impacts in various activities were compared by normalizing by the amount of time associated with each activity. It was determined that scrimmages accounted for 0.094 impacts greater than 45 g per minute in practices while contact drills contributed to 0.102 impacts greater than 45 g per minute during practices. The results of this study indicate future youth football practice modifications should focus on both scrimmages and contact drills. PMID:25405410

  19. Neural representations of magnitude for natural and rational numbers.

    PubMed

    DeWolf, Melissa; Chiang, Jeffrey N; Bassok, Miriam; Holyoak, Keith J; Monti, Martin M

    2016-11-01

    Humans have developed multiple symbolic representations for numbers, including natural numbers (positive integers) as well as rational numbers (both fractions and decimals). Despite a considerable body of behavioral and neuroimaging research, it is currently unknown whether different notations map onto a single, fully abstract, magnitude code, or whether separate representations exist for specific number types (e.g., natural versus rational) or number representations (e.g., base-10 versus fractions). We address this question by comparing brain metabolic response during a magnitude comparison task involving (on different trials) integers, decimals, and fractions. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that the strength and pattern of activation for fractions differed systematically, within the intraparietal sulcus, from that of both decimals and integers, while the latter two number representations appeared virtually indistinguishable. These results demonstrate that the two major notations formats for rational numbers, fractions and decimals, evoke distinct neural representations of magnitude, with decimals representations being more closely linked to those of integers than to those of magnitude-equivalent fractions. Our findings thus suggest that number representation (base-10 versus fractions) is an important organizational principle for the neural substrate underlying mathematical cognition.

  20. Strategy Use and Strategy Choice in Fraction Magnitude Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Lisa K.; DeWolf, Melissa; Siegler, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    We examined, on a trial-by-trial basis, fraction magnitude comparison strategies of adults with more and less mathematical knowledge. College students with high mathematical proficiency used a large variety of strategies that were well tailored to the characteristics of the problems and that were guaranteed to yield correct performance if executed…

  1. What Is the Meaning of the Physical Magnitude "Work"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanderakis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Usually, in physics textbooks, the physical magnitude "work" is introduced as the product of a force multiplied by its displacement, in relation to the transfer of energy. In other words, "work" is presented as an internal affair of physics theory, while its relation to the world of experience, that is its empirical meaning, is…

  2. Children's Sensitivity to Error Magnitude when Evaluating Informants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einav, Shiri; Robinson, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments examined children's (N = 80; 40; 48) sensitivity to error magnitude as a measure of informants' past accuracy, and indication of future reliability. Experiments 1 and 2 assessed whether, in a forced-choice task, children would evaluate as better and show greater trust in an informant whose previous errors were consistently within…

  3. Asteroid magnitudes, UBV colors, and IRAS albedos and diameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper lists absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for known asteroids numbered through 3318. The values presented are those used in reducing asteroid IR flux data obtained with the IRAS. U-B colors are given for 938 asteroids, and B-V colors are given for 945 asteroids. The IRAS albedos and diameters are tabulated for 1790 asteroids.

  4. Discriminability and Sensitivity to Reinforcer Magnitude in a Detection Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsop, Brent; Porritt, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Three pigeons discriminated between two sample stimuli (intensities of red light). The difficulty of the discrimination was varied over four levels. At each level, the relative reinforcer magnitude for the two correct responses was varied across conditions, and the reinforcer rates were equal. Within levels, discriminability between the sample…

  5. Fraction Development in Children: Importance of Building Numerical Magnitude Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Carrique, Jessica; Hansen, Nicole; Resnick, Ilyse

    2016-01-01

    This chapter situates fraction learning within the integrated theory of numerical development. We argue that the understanding of numerical magnitudes for whole numbers as well as for fractions is critical to fraction learning in particular and mathematics achievement more generally. Results from the Delaware Longitudinal Study, which examined…

  6. Magnitude scaling relationship from the first P-wave arrivals on Canada's west coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshaghi, A.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2011-12-01

    The empirical magnitude scaling relationship from ground-motion period parameter τc is derived using vertical waveforms recorded in the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) along Canada's west coast. A high-pass filtered displacement amplitude parameter, Pd, is calculated from the initial 3 s of the P waveforms and the empirical relationship between Pd and peak ground velocity, PGV, is derived using the same data set. We selected earthquakes of M >3.0 recorded during 1996-2009 by the seismic network stations in the region operated by National Resources Canada (NRCan). In total, 90 events were selected and the vertical components of the earthquakes signals were converted to ground velocity and displacement. The displacements were filtered with a one-way Butterworth high-pass filter with a cut-off frequency of 0.075 Hz. Pd and τc are computed from the vertical seismogram components. While the average magnitude error was approximately 0.70 magnitude units when using the individual record, the error dropped to approximately 0.5 magnitude units when using the average τc for each event. In case of PGV, the average error is approximately 0.3. These relationships may be used for initial steps in establishing an earthquake early warning system for the CSZ.

  7. Bayesian Predictive Distribution for the Magnitude of the Largest Aftershock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    Aftershock sequences, which follow large earthquakes, last hundreds of days and are characterized by well defined frequency-magnitude and spatio-temporal distributions. The largest aftershocks in a sequence constitute significant hazard and can inflict additional damage to infrastructure. Therefore, the estimation of the magnitude of possible largest aftershocks in a sequence is of high importance. In this work, we propose a statistical model based on Bayesian analysis and extreme value statistics to describe the distribution of magnitudes of the largest aftershocks in a sequence. We derive an analytical expression for a Bayesian predictive distribution function for the magnitude of the largest expected aftershock and compute the corresponding confidence intervals. We assume that the occurrence of aftershocks can be modeled, to a good approximation, by a non-homogeneous Poisson process with a temporal event rate given by the modified Omori law. We also assume that the frequency-magnitude statistics of aftershocks can be approximated by Gutenberg-Richter scaling. We apply our analysis to 19 prominent aftershock sequences, which occurred in the last 30 years, in order to compute the Bayesian predictive distributions and the corresponding confidence intervals. In the analysis, we use the information of the early aftershocks in the sequences (in the first 1, 10, and 30 days after the main shock) to estimate retrospectively the confidence intervals for the magnitude of the expected largest aftershocks. We demonstrate by analysing 19 past sequences that in many cases we are able to constrain the magnitudes of the largest aftershocks. For example, this includes the analysis of the Darfield (Christchurch) aftershock sequence. The proposed analysis can be used for the earthquake hazard assessment and forecasting associated with the occurrence of large aftershocks. The improvement in instrumental data associated with early aftershocks can greatly enhance the analysis and

  8. Apparent LFE Magnitude-Frequency Distributions and the Tremor Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. M.; Bostock, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Over a decade since its discovery, it is disconcerting that we know so little about the kinematics of the tremor source. One could say we are hampered by low signal-to-noise ratio, but often the LFE signal is large and the "noise" is just other LFEs, often nearly co-located. Here we exploit this feature to better characterize the tremor source. A quick examination of LFE catalogs shows, unsurprisingly, that detected magnitudes are large when the background tremor amplitude is large. A simple interpretation is that small LFEs are missed when tremor is loud. An unanswered question is whether, in addition, there is a paucity of small LFEs when tremor is loud. Because we have both the LFE Green's function (from stacks) and some minimum bound on the overall LFE rate (from our catalogs), tremor waveforms provide a consistency check on any assumed magnitude-frequency (M-f) distribution. Beneath southern Vancouver Island, the magnitudes of >10^5 LFEs range from about 1.2-2.4 (Bostock et al. 2015). Interpreted in terms of a power-law distribution, the b-value is >5. But missed small events make even this large value only a lower bound. Binning by background tremor amplitude, and assuming a time-invariant M-f distribution, the b-value increases to >7, implying (e.g.) more than 10 million M>1.2 events for every M=2.2 event. Such numbers are inconsistent with the observed modest increase in tremor amplitude with LFE magnitude, as well as with geodetically-allowable slips. Similar considerations apply to exponential and log-normal moment-frequency distributions. Our preliminary interpretation is that when LFE magnitudes are large, the same portion of the fault is producing larger LFEs, rather than a greater rate of LFEs pulled from the same distribution. If correct, this distinguishes LFEs from repeating earthquakes, where larger background fault slip rates lead not to larger earthquakes but to more frequent earthquakes of similar magnitude. One possible explanation, that LFEs

  9. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material.

  10. Tantalum implants as markers for evaluating postoperative orthognathic surgical changes.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, L K; Strauss, R A; Lindauer, S J; Davidovitch, M; Isaacson, R J

    1993-01-01

    The stability of sagittal split osteotomy advancements is not always 100% predictable. Assessment of postsurgical changes has historically relied on clinical evaluation of dental changes and superimposition of serial cephalograms, both of which have been shown to have serious drawbacks. A technique that improves the analysis of postsurgical changes is described in this paper; tantalum pin implants are placed in the osteotomized segments of patients undergoing surgical advancements. Implants eliminate many of the problems (orthodontic, growth, and remodeling changes) related to superimposition of presurgical and postsurgical cephalograms. Using this technique, surgical changes can be precisely analyzed, and the contribution of each factor of postsurgical relapse can be determined. This information, concerning the magnitude and direction of postsurgical changes, aids in following an individual's progress and increases the accuracy of large group studies by eliminating sources of variability in radiographic and clinical interpretation.

  11. [Computer-aided surgery planning for implantation of artificial ear].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yufeng; Huang, Yuanliang; Niu, Mao; Wang, Lisheng; Chang, Shixin

    2009-08-01

    In conventional ear implantation surgery, clinical physicians usually make a surgery planning based on their observation on series of 2D X-ray images or CT images. Such a planning method requires the physicians to have a high level of clinical experience. Besides, the whole operation is unintuitive, and might have certain risk. Considering these facts, we have developed a computer-aided system for the surgery planning of the implantation of artificial ear based on CT imaging and 3D reconstruction techniques. The system effectively overcomes the main drawbacks in conventional surgery planning techniques, and it makes the surgery planning procedure more precise, safe, and intuitive. PMID:19813593

  12. Baseball orbital implants: a review of 39 patients.

    PubMed

    Tyers, A G; Collin, J R

    1985-06-01

    Thirty-five secondary and six primary 'baseball' implants--acrylic balls in envelopes of donor sclera--were followed up for a minimum of 24 months. 97.1% secondary and 50% primary implants were retained. Volume replacement was satisfactory in 83.8% with a single operation, and motility of the artificial eye was at least 14 degrees of horizontal gaze in 86%, at least 7 degrees of upgaze in 95%, and at least 14 degrees of downgaze in 62.6%. Ptosis associated with the procedure occurred in 22%, and 12.2% developed a shallow fornix with instability of the artificial eye.

  13. The robo-pigeon based on the multiple brain regions synchronization implanted microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Huai, Rui-Tuo; Yang, Jun-Qing; Wang, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Almost all multichannel microelectrodes are only applied to the same nucleus. The multiple brain regions synchronization implanted microelectrodes can be implanted in the several brain regions at the same time, when used in the robo-animal, which can reduce the operation process, shorten animals operation time. Due to electrode position relatively fixed, errors caused by each separately implanted electrode were reduced and the animal control effect was greatly increased compared to the original electrodes. The electrode fixed time was also extended. This microelectrode provided beneficial reference function for the study of the free state of small animals in different brain regions. PMID:27459594

  14. [Imaging in silicone breast implantation].

    PubMed

    Gielens, Maaike P M; Koolen, Pieter G L; Hermens, Roland A E C; Rutten, Matthieu J C M

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there have been concerns regarding the use of breast implants from Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP, Seyne sur Mer, France) for breast augmentation due to their tendency to rupture and the possibility of having toxic contents. MRI using a specific silicone-sensitive sequence has proven to be the most sensitive and specific technique in the detection of intra- and extracapsular implant rupture. However, given its high costs, it is important that this technique is used sparingly. In this clinical lesson, we compare the sensitivity and specificity of mammography, ultrasound, CT and MRI for the detection of breast implant rupture. Based on two cases, a diagnostic approach is given in order to reduce health care costs. PMID:24252405

  15. Forecasting magnitude, time, and location of aftershocks for aftershock hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Tsai, Y.; Huang, M.; Chang, W.

    2011-12-01

    In this study we investigate the spatial and temporal seismicity parameters of the aftershock sequence accompanying the 17:47 20 September 1999 (UTC) 7.45 Chi-Chi earthquake Taiwan. Dividing the epicentral zone into north of the epicenter, at the epicenter, and south of the epicenter, it is found that immediately after the earthquake the area close by the epicenter had a lower value than both the northern and southern sections. This pattern suggests that at the time of the Chi-Chi earthquake, the area close by the epicenter remained prone to large magnitude aftershocks and strong shaking. However, with time the value increases. An increasing value indicates a reduced likelihood of large magnitude aftershocks. The study also shows that the value is higher at the southern section of the epicentral zone, indicating a faster rate of decay in this section. The primary purpose of this paper is to design a predictive model for forecasting the magnitude, time, and location of aftershocks to large earthquakes. The developed model is presented and applied to the 17:47 20 September 1999 7.45 Chi-Chi earthquake Taiwan, and the 09:32 5 November 2009 (UTC) Nantou 6.19, and 00:18 4 March 2010 (UTC) Jiashian 6.49 earthquake sequences. In addition, peak ground acceleration trends for the Nantou and Jiashian aftershock sequences are predicted and compared to actual trends. The results of the estimated peak ground acceleration are remarkably similar to calculations from recorded magnitudes in both trend and level. To improve the predictive skill of the model for occurrence time, we use an empirical relation to forecast the time of aftershocks. The empirical relation improves time prediction over that of random processes. The results will be of interest to seismic mitigation specialists and rescue crews. We apply also the parameters and empirical relation from Chi-Chi aftershocks of Taiwan to forecast aftershocks with magnitude M > 6.0 of 05:46 11 March 2011 (UTC) Tohoku 9

  16. Behavior of induced microseismic events with large magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, H.; Nozaki, H.; Niitsuma, H.; Wyborn, D.; Baria, R.

    2006-12-01

    Hydraulic stimulation of geothermal and oil/gas reservoir is one of the conventional techniques used for enhancing the productivity from reservoirs. In most cases, the stimulation process induces microseismic events. Based on the activity, location, magnitude and source mechanism of such events, the 3D localization and characterization of the reservoir can be carried out with practical resolution. Typically, microseismic events from a reservoir have moment magnitudes of less than zero, and most of them are detectable only by downhole sensors with high sensitivity. However, it is known that some of these events have higher magnitudes and can be felt at the surface. These large events can be hazardous from an environmental point of view, while resulting in enhanced permeability in the reservoir at the same time. The authors have analyzed the spatio-temporal distribution, and source mechanism of such microseismic events having large magnitudes (big events) observed during the hydraulic stimulations at Australian hot fractured rock (HFR) site in the Cooper Basin (Asanuma et al., SEG Exp. Abst., 2004) and also at the European hot dry rock (HDR) site in Soultz, France (Asanuma et al., Trans. GRC, 2004). A comparison between the origin time of these big events and the hydraulic records showed that many of the big events occurred after the shut-ins at both the sites. Besides, during pumping, most of these events did not show a clear correlation to the wellhead pressure and the rate of pumping. In most cases, the source mechanism of the big events were consistent with the shear slip of a preexisting fracture. We have also found that some of the big events at the Australian site brought very clear extension of the seismic cloud into zones that were seismically silent before, suggesting that some kind of hydraulic barrier was overcome by these big events. The observational data also showed that the microseismic events at those sites originated mainly from a slip of asperities

  17. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient’s anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant’s RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B1+ field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient’s anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty.

  18. [A totally implantable hearing aid for inner ear deafness: TICA LZ 3001].

    PubMed

    Leysieffer, H; Baumann, J W; Mayer, R; Müller, D; Müller, G; Schön, T; Volz, A; Zenner, H P

    1998-10-01

    Recently, Zenner et al. implanted the first totally implantable electronic hearing devices in patients with SNHL (HNO 46 [1998] 844-852). In the present report, technical and audiological features of the implant TICA are published. The development of the piezoelectric transducer and the microphone for implantation in the posterior wall of the auditory canal as components for the present fully implantable hearing system has already been described (HNO 45, 1997, 792-880). Here we report about our experience with the electronic main module that completes the TICA LZ 3001 system. This module is suited for implantation in the mastoid bone and contains the signal-processing electronics and an integrated battery that can be recharged transcutaneously with a portable charger. The recharging time is around 2 h for an implant operating time of 50 h. The microphone and transducer connectors allow for easy replacement of the main module when the battery lifetime is reached. This lifetime is around 3-5 years. A small wireless remote control allows volume adjustment, contains an on/off switch, and permits selection of four different individual hearing programs. The basic audiological features are provided by a flexible, digitally programmable 3-channel-AGC-system with a peak clipping function. The total bandwidth is around 10 kHz. To our knowledge this is the first fully implantable hearing system that has been in implanted in humans.

  19. Cochlear implants in young children.

    PubMed

    Niparko, John K; Blankenhorn, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    The cochlear implant is best characterized as a device that provides access to the sound environment. The device enables the hearing pathway to respond to environmental and speech sounds, providing informational cues from the surroundings and from others that may escape visual detection. As the developmental effects of a profound hearing loss are multiple, cochlear implants have been applied to ever younger children in an attempt to promote a more normal level of developmental learning through audition. In deafness, transducer elements of the inner ear fail to trigger auditory nerve afferent nerves in the presence of sound input. However, large reserves of afferent fibers exist even in the auditory nerve of a profoundly deaf patient. Furthermore, these nerve fibers retain the ability to respond to prosthetic activation. Through developmental learning in the early, formative years, auditory centers of the brain appear capable of processing information from the implant to provide speech comprehension and oral language development. Multichannel implants have replaced original single channel designs. multichannel devices enable larger percentages of recipients to recognize the spoken word without visual cues because they provide spectral information in addition to temporal and intensity cues. Testing under conditions of auditory (implant)-only input reveals significant open-set speech understanding capabilities in more than 75% of children after three years of device use. The benefit provided by implants may vary with a number of conditions including: hearing history, age of deafness onset, age at implantation, etiology of deafness, linguistic abilities, and the presence of a motivated system of support of oral language development. Patient variables should be given individual consideration in judging candidacy for a cochlear implant and in planning rehabilitative and education services after surgery and activation of the device.

  20. The future of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Christian W; Arsalan, Mani; Mack, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Since the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) into clinical practice, the treatment of aortic stenosis has changed dramatically. In the past, medical therapy with or without balloon aortic valvuloplasty was the only option for inoperable patients. More recently, TAVI has become the treatment of choice for these patients and the preferred alternative for high-risk operable patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) currently remains the gold standard for patients at low or intermediate operative risk. As randomized trials have demonstrated comparable results between TAVI and SAVR in the high-risk population, there is now a clear trend towards performing TAVI even in intermediate-risk patients while awaiting the results of randomized trials in that population. Nevertheless, there are still questions regarding TAVI involving paravalvular leak (PVL), stroke, pacemaker requirements, and durability that remain to be more definitively answered before TAVI can routinely be performed in a broader, lower risk population. Improvements in patient selection, imaging, and second and third generation devices have decreased the incidence of PVLs and vascular complications that followed the earliest TAVI procedures, but the rates of perioperative stroke and permanent pacemaker implantation must still be addressed. Furthermore, the long-term durability of TAVI devices and a role for post-procedure antithrombotic management remain unanswered. Until these questions are more clearly answered, it is the Heart Team's task to determine the optimal treatment for each patient based on risk scores, frailty metrics, comorbidities, patient preference, and potential for improvement in quality of life.

  1. Detection capability of seismic network based on noise analysis and magnitude of completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Tomáš; Bachura, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the detection threshold of seismic networks becomes of increased importance namely in the context of monitoring induced seismicity due to underground operations. Achieving the maximum possible sensitivity of industrial seismic monitoring is a precondition for successful control of technological procedures. Similarly, the lowest detection threshold is desirable when monitoring the natural seismic activity aimed to imaging the fault structures in 3D and to understanding the ongoing processes in the crust. We compare the application of two different methods to the data of the seismic network WEBNET that monitors the earthquake swarm activity of the West-Bohemia/Vogtland region. First, we evaluate the absolute noise level and its possible non-stationary character that results in hampering the detectability of the seismic network by producing false alarms. This is realized by the statistical analysis of the noise amplitudes using the ratio of 99 and 95 percentiles. Second, the magnitude of completeness is determined for each of the nine stations by analysing the automatic detections of an intensive swarm period from August 2011. The magnitude-frequency distributions of all detected events and events detected at individual stations are compared to determine the magnitude of completeness at a selected completeness level. The resulting magnitude of completeness M c of most of the stations varies between -0.9 and -0.5; an anomalous high M c of 0.0 is found at the most distant station, which is probably due to inadequate correction for attenuation. We find that while the absolute noise level has no significant influence to the station sensitivity, the noise stationarity correlates with station sensitivity expressed in low magnitude of completeness and vice versa. This qualifies the method of analysing the stationary character of seismic noise as an effective tool for site surveying during the seismic station deployment.

  2. Improved instrumental magnitude prediction expected from version 2 of the NASA SKY2000 master star catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sande, C. B.; Brasoveanu, D.; Miller, A. C.; Home, A. T.; Tracewell, D. A.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The SKY2000 Master Star Catalog (MC), Version 2 and its predecessors have been designed to provide the basic astronomical input data needed for satellite acquisition and attitude determination on NASA spacecraft. Stellar positions and proper motions are the primary MC data required for operations support followed closely by the stellar brightness observed in various standard astronomical passbands. The instrumental red-magnitude prediction subsystem (REDMAG) in the MMSCAT software package computes the expected instrumental color index (CI) [sensor color correction] from an observed astronomical stellar magnitude in the MC and the characteristics of the stellar spectrum, astronomical passband, and sensor sensitivity curve. The computation is more error prone the greater the mismatch of the sensor sensitivity curve characteristics and those of the observed astronomical passbands. This paper presents the preliminary performance analysis of a typical red-sensitive CCDST during acquisition of sensor data from the two Ball CT-601 ST's onboard the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). A comparison is made of relative star positions measured in the ST FOV coordinate system with the expected results computed from the recently released Tycho Catalogue. The comparison is repeated for a group of observed stars with nearby, bright neighbors in order to determine the tracker behavior in the presence of an interfering, near neighbor (NN). The results of this analysis will be used to help define a new photoelectric photometric instrumental sensor magnitude system (S) that is based on several thousand bright star magnitudes observed with the PXTE ST's. This new system will be implemented in Version 2 of the SKY2000 MC to provide improved predicted magnitudes in the mission run catalogs.

  3. Orbital implants: potential new directions.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Celia R; Morrison, David; Lou, Xia; Crawford, Geoffrey J; Gadjatsy, Adam; Constable, Ian J

    2006-11-01

    This article reviews orbital implants used to replace an eye after enucleation or evisceration. Advantages of implant placement are described, with discussion of implant and wrap material, and design features that affect clinical outcomes. Implants may be porous or nonporous, pegged for linkage with a cosmetic shell or unpegged, and may be wrapped with a covering material or tissue or unwrapped. Device shape, volume and material qualities affect tissue tolerance and the risk of exposure or extrusion. Limitations of currently available devices are discussed, with factors affecting surgeon and patient choice. Ideally, a device should be easy to insert, avoid the need for wrapping or adjunctive tissues, be light, biointegratable, comfortable after implantation and provide satisfactory orbital volume replacement, movement and cosmesis without requiring further surgery or pegging. This review briefly discusses developments in implant design and aspects of design that affect function, but is not a detailed clinical review; rather, it aims to stimulate thought on optimal design and discusses recent developments. Novel technology in the form of a prototype device with a soft, biointegratable anterior surface is described as an example of newer approaches.

  4. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years. PMID:23344062

  5. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  6. [Implant-associated infections - Diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Renz, N; Müller, M; Perka, C; Trampuz, A

    2016-10-01

    The diagnosis of implant-associated infections is challenging as chronic low-grade infections often only manifest as subtle clinical symptoms. Clinical evaluation, patient history, imaging, histopathological and microbiological examinations build the cornerstones of the diagnostics for implant-associated infections. New onset of pain at rest, local symptoms at the surgical site and early loosening of the prosthesis or pseudarthrosis should raise suspicion for an infection and prompt further evaluation. Percutaneous sinus tracts, purulent wound secretions and skin erosions with exposure of the implant are certain signs of implant-associated infections. Elevated C‑reactive protein levels in blood support the diagnosis of infection but are neither sufficient sensitive nor specific to confirm or exclude infection. Preoperative antibiotic therapy interferes with the diagnostic evaluation and should be avoided. In periprosthetic joint infections, joint aspiration with determination of the leukocyte count and microbiological examination is a crucial first diagnostic step. Through microbiological and histopathological examinations of intraoperative tissue samples, as well as sonication of explanted implants, the causative pathogen can be identified in most cases. In osteosynthesis-associated infections imaging plays a key role to detect non-union, infection callus, sequester, peri-implant osteolysis and extraosseous and intramedullary pathologies. In prosthetic joint infections imaging provides information about the position and stability of the prosthesis. In case of hematogenic infection seeding from a distant focus, blood cultures should be sampled, followed by a meticulous investigation of potential primary focus of infection, depending on the causative agent.

  7. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability. PMID:24403565

  8. The magnitude distribution of earthquakes near Southern California faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, M.T.; Alderson, D.; Doyle, J.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate seismicity near faults in the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Fault Model. We search for anomalously large events that might be signs of a characteristic earthquake distribution. We find that seismicity near major fault zones in Southern California is well modeled by a Gutenberg-Richter distribution, with no evidence of characteristic earthquakes within the resolution limits of the modern instrumental catalog. However, the b value of the locally observed magnitude distribution is found to depend on distance to the nearest mapped fault segment, which suggests that earthquakes nucleating near major faults are likely to have larger magnitudes relative to earthquakes nucleating far from major faults. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. A Search for 23rd Magnitude Kuiper Belt Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Jane

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the project was to identify a statistically significant sample of large (200 km-sized) Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), by covering 10 sq. degrees of the sky to a red limiting magnitude m(sub R) = 23. This work differs from, but builds on, previous surveys of the outer solar system in that it will cover a large area to a limiting magnitude that is deep enough to guarantee positive results. The proposed work should provide us with a significant number of 200 km-size KBOs (approx. 20 are expected) for subsequent studies. Such a sample is crucial if we are to investigate the statistical properties of the Belt and its members. It was modified the original research strategy to accommodate unanticipated problems such as the urgent need for follow-up observations,the original goal was still reached: we have substantially increased the number of Kuiper Belt Objects brighter than 23rd mag.

  10. On the internal representation of numerical magnitude and physical size.

    PubMed

    Fitousi, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    A nascent idea in the numerical cognition literature--the analogical hypothesis (Pinel, Piazza, Bihan, & Dehaene, 2004)--assumes a common noisy code for the representation of symbolic (e.g., numerals) and nonsymbolic (e.g., numerosity, physical size, luminance) magnitudes. The present work subjected this assumption to various tests from the perspective of General Recognition Theory (GRT; Ashby &Townsend, 1986)--a multidimensional extension of Signal Detection Theory (Green & Swets, 1966). The GRT was applied to the dimensions of numerical magnitude and physical size with the following goals: (a) characterizing the internal representation of these dimensions in the psychological space, and (b) assessing various types of (in)dependence and separability governing the perception of these dimensions. The results revealed various violations of independence and separability with Stroop incongruent, but not with Stroop congruent stimuli. The outcome suggests that there are deep differences in architecture between Stroop congruent and incongruent stimuli that reach well beyond the semantic relationship involved.

  11. Order of magnitude dose reduction in intraoral radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Angin, L.L.; Lorton, L.

    1987-03-01

    This comparative clinical investigation concerns the radiation dose from intraoral radiography using E-speed film and rectangular and circular beam collimation. Dose to organs not of diagnostic importance (brain, lens of the eye, thyroid, and breast) is reduced by approximately an order of magnitude when rectangular collimation and E-speed film are used in periapical radiography. And dose to the thyroid and breast is further reduced by a third with the use of a full leaded apron and thyroid shield.

  12. Spatial patterns of landslide dimension: A tool for magnitude mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, Filippo; Tofani, Veronica; Lagomarsino, Daniela

    2016-11-01

    The magnitude of mass movements, which may be expressed by their dimension in terms of area or volume, is an important component of intensity together with velocity. In the case of slow-moving deep-seated landslides, the expected magnitude is the prevalent parameter for defining intensity when assessed as a spatially distributed variable in a given area. In particular, the frequency-volume statistics of past landslides may be used to understand and predict the magnitude of new landslides and reactivations. In this paper we study the spatial properties of volume frequency distributions in the Arno river basin (Central Italy, about 9100 km2). The overall landslide inventory taken into account (around 27,500 events) shows a power-law scaling of volumes for values greater than a cutoff value of about 2 × 104 m3. We explore the variability of the power-law exponent in the geographic space by setting up local subsets of the inventory based on neighbourhoods with radii between 5 and 50 km. We found that the power-law exponent α varies according to geographic position and that the exponent itself can be treated as a random space variable with autocorrelation properties both at local and regional scale. We use this finding to devise a simple method to map the magnitude frequency distribution in space and to create maps of exceeding probability of landslide volume for risk analysis. We also study the causes of spatial variation of α by analysing the dependence of power-law properties on geological and geomorphological factors, and we find that structural settings and valley density exert a strong influence on mass movement dimensions.

  13. MAGNITUDE GAP STATISTICS AND THE CONDITIONAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    More, Surhud

    2012-12-20

    In a recent preprint, Hearin et al. (H12) suggest that the halo mass-richness calibration of clusters can be improved by using the difference in the magnitude of the brightest and the second brightest galaxy (magnitude gap) as an additional observable. They claim that their results are at odds with the results from Paranjape and Sheth (PS12) who show that the magnitude distribution of the brightest and second brightest galaxies can be explained based on order statistics of luminosities randomly sampled from the total galaxy luminosity function. We find that a conditional luminosity function (CLF) for galaxies which varies with halo mass, in a manner which is consistent with existing observations, naturally leads to a magnitude gap distribution which changes as a function of halo mass at fixed richness, in qualitative agreement with H12. We show that, in general, the luminosity distribution of the brightest and the second brightest galaxy depends upon whether the luminosities of galaxies are drawn from the CLF or the global luminosity function. However, we also show that the difference between the two cases is small enough to evade detection in the small sample investigated by PS12. This shows that the luminosity distribution is not the appropriate statistic to distinguish between the two cases, given the small sample size. We argue in favor of the CLF (and therefore H12) based upon its consistency with other independent observations, such as the kinematics of satellite galaxies, the abundance and clustering of galaxies, and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  14. [Implantable hemodynamic monitoring devices].

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Butter, C

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure is one of the most frequent diagnoses in hospital admissions in Germany. In the majority of these admissions acute decompensation of an already existing chronic heart failure is responsible. New mostly wireless and remote strategies for monitoring, titration, adaptation and optimization are the focus for improvement of the treatment of heart failure patients and the poor prognosis. The implantation of hemodynamic monitoring devices follows the hypothesis that significant changes in hemodynamic parameters occur before the occurrence of acute decompensation requiring readmission. Three different hemodynamic monitoring devices have so far been investigated in clinical trials employing right ventricular pressure, left atrial pressure and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. Only one of these systems, the CardioMENS™ HF monitoring system, demonstrated a significant reduction of hospitalization due to heart failure over 6 months in the CHAMPION trial. The systematic adaptation of medication in the CHAMPION trial significantly differed from the usual care of the control arm over 6 months. This direct day to day management of diuretics is currently under intensive investigation; however, further studies demonstrating a positive effect on mortality are needed before translation of this approach into guidelines. Without this evidence a further implementation of pressure monitoring into currently used devices and justification of the substantial technical and personnel demands are not warranted.

  15. Supramid tip implants in rhinoplasty. Review of 98 cases.

    PubMed

    Fanous, N; Webster, R

    1987-07-01

    The nasal tip procedure is the most sophisticated aspect of a rhinoplasty, particularly in certain known problem types of nasal tips. A new approach, using Supramid tip implants, is introduced. Precise guidelines for the preoperative planning and operative techniques are developed, and the so-called pocket, experience, positioning, shape and size, and incision (PEPSI) rule is outlined. A comparative discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the Supramid implant vs cartilage grafts and/or repositioning of alar cartilages is presented. The Supramid implant was used in the tip area for nasal tip alteration in a total of 98 cases. Patients were monitored for a period of six months to four years. The results were satisfactory.

  16. Implantable radio frequency identification sensors: wireless power and communication.

    PubMed

    Hutchens, Chriswell; Rennaker, Robert L; Venkataraman, Srinivasan; Ahmed, Rehan; Liao, Ran; Ibrahim, Tamer

    2011-01-01

    There are significant technical challenges in the development of a fully implantable wirelessly powered neural interface. Challenges include wireless transmission of sufficient power to the implanted device to ensure reliable operation for decades without replacement, minimizing tissue heating, and adequate reliable communications bandwidth. Overcoming these challenges is essential for the development of implantable closed loop system for the treatment of disorders ranging from epilepsy, incontinence, stroke and spinal cord injury. We discuss the development of the wireless power, communication and control for a Radio-Frequency Identification Sensor (RFIDS) system with targeted power range for a 700 mV, 30 to 40 uA load attained at -2 dBm. PMID:22254944

  17. Implantable Radio Frequency Identification Sensors: Wireless Power and Communication

    PubMed Central

    Hutchens, Chriswell; Rennaker, Robert L.; Venkataraman, Srinivasan; Ahmed, Rehan; Liao, Ran; Ibrahim, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    There are significant technical challenges in the development of a fully implantable wirelessly powered neural interface. Challenges include wireless transmission of sufficient power to the implanted device to ensure reliable operation for decades without replacement, minimizing tissue heating, and adequate reliable communications bandwidth. Overcoming these challenges is essential for the development of implantable closed loop system for the treatment of disorders ranging from epilepsy, incontinence, stroke and spinal cord injury. We discuss the development of the wireless power, communication and control for a Radio-Frequency Identification Sensor (RFIDS) system with targeted power range for a 700mV, 30 to 40uA load attained at −2dBm. PMID:22254944

  18. [Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics as implant materials].

    PubMed

    Bader, R; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Siebels, W; Mittelmeier, W; Gradinger, R

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics have been used clinically as an implant material for different applications for over 20 years.A review of technical basics of the composite materials (carbon fibers and matrix systems), fields of application,advantages (e.g., postoperative visualization without distortion in computed and magnetic resonance tomography), and disadvantages with use as an implant material is given. The question of the biocompatibility of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics is discussed on the basis of experimental and clinical studies. Selected implant systems made of carbon composite materials for treatments in orthopedic surgery such as joint replacement, tumor surgery, and spinal operations are presented and assessed. Present applications for carbon fiber reinforced plastics are seen in the field of spinal surgery, both as cages for interbody fusion and vertebral body replacement.

  19. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amisha T; Jankharia, Bijal B

    2016-01-01

    The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer. PMID:27413269

  20. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss. PMID:25741821

  1. Estimating earthquake location and magnitude from seismic intensity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.; Wentworth, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of Modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) observations for a training set of 22 California earthquakes suggests a strategy for bounding the epicentral region and moment magnitude M from MMI observations only. We define an intensity magnitude MI that is calibrated to be equal in the mean to M. MI = mean (Mi), where Mi = (MMIi + 3.29 + 0.0206 * ??i)/1.68 and ??i is the epicentral distance (km) of observation MMIi. The epicentral region is bounded by contours of rms [MI] = rms (MI - Mi) - rms0 (MI - Mi-), where rms is the root mean square, rms0 (MI - Mi) is the minimum rms over a grid of assumed epicenters, and empirical site corrections and a distance weighting function are used. Empirical contour values for bounding the epicenter location and empirical bounds for M estimated from MI appropriate for different levels of confidence and different quantities of intensity observations are tabulated. The epicentral region bounds and MI obtained for an independent test set of western California earthquakes are consistent with the instrumental epicenters and moment magnitudes of these earthquakes. The analysis strategy is particularly appropriate for the evaluation of pre-1900 earthquakes for which the only available data are a sparse set of intensity observations.

  2. The Road to Convergence in Earthquake Frequency-Magnitude Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, M.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude relation is a fundamental empirical law of seismology, but its form remains uncertain for rare extreme events. Convergence trends can be diagnostic of the nature of an underlying distribution and its sampling even before convergence has occurred. We examine the evolution of an information criteria metric applied to earthquake magnitude time series, in order to test whether the Gutenberg-Richter law can be rejecting in various earthquake catalogues. This would imply that the catalogue is starting to sample roll-off in the tail though it cannot yet identify the form of the roll-off. We compare bootstrapped synthetic Gutenberg-Richter and synthetic modified Gutenberg-Richter catalogues with the convergence trends observed in real earthquake data e.g. the global CMT catalogue, Southern California and mining/geothermal data. Whilst convergence in the tail remains some way off, we show that the temporal evolution of model likelihoods and parameters for the frequency-magnitude distribution of the global Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor catalogue is inconsistent with an unbounded GR relation, despite it being the preferred model at the current time. Bell, A. F., M. Naylor, and I. G. Main (2013), Convergence of the frequency-size distribution of global earthquakes, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 2585-2589, doi:10.1002/grl.50416.

  3. Typical magnitude and spatial extent of crowding in autism

    PubMed Central

    Freyberg, Jan; Robertson, Caroline E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced spatial processing of local visual details has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC), and crowding is postulated to be a mechanism that may produce this ability. However, evidence for atypical crowding in ASC is mixed, with some studies reporting a complete lack of crowding in autism and others reporting a typical magnitude of crowding between individuals with and without ASC. Here, we aim to disambiguate these conflicting results by testing both the magnitude and the spatial extent of crowding in individuals with ASC (N = 25) and age- and IQ-matched controls (N = 23) during an orientation discrimination task. We find a strong crowding effect in individuals with and without ASC, which falls off as the distance between target and flanker is increased. Both the magnitude and the spatial range of this effect were comparable between individuals with and without ASC. We also find typical (uncrowded) orientation discrimination thresholds in individuals with ASC. These findings suggest that the spatial extent of crowding is unremarkable in ASC, and is therefore unlikely to account for the visual symptoms reported in individuals with the diagnosis. PMID:26998801

  4. Threshold magnitudes for a multichannel correlation detector in background seismicity

    DOE PAGES

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Hartse, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Colocated explosive sources often produce correlated seismic waveforms. Multichannel correlation detectors identify these signals by scanning template waveforms recorded from known reference events against "target" data to find similar waveforms. This screening problem is challenged at thresholds required to monitor smaller explosions, often because non-target signals falsely trigger such detectors. Therefore, it is generally unclear what thresholds will reliably identify a target explosion while screening non-target background seismicity. Here, we estimate threshold magnitudes for hypothetical explosions located at the North Korean nuclear test site over six months of 2010, by processing International Monitoring System (IMS) array data with a multichannelmore » waveform correlation detector. Our method (1) accounts for low amplitude background seismicity that falsely triggers correlation detectors but is unidentifiable with conventional power beams, (2) adapts to diurnally variable noise levels and (3) uses source-receiver reciprocity concepts to estimate thresholds for explosions spatially separated from the template source. Furthermore, we find that underground explosions with body wave magnitudes mb = 1.66 are detectable at the IMS array USRK with probability 0.99, when using template waveforms consisting only of P -waves, without false alarms. We conservatively find that these thresholds also increase by up to a magnitude unit for sources located 4 km or more from the Feb.12, 2013 announced nuclear test.« less

  5. Improving Children’s Knowledge of Fraction Magnitudes

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Lisa K.; Kennedy, Casey A.; Siegler, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether playing a computerized fraction game, based on the integrated theory of numerical development and on the Common Core State Standards’ suggestions for teaching fractions, would improve children’s fraction magnitude understanding. Fourth and fifth-graders were given brief instruction about unit fractions and played Catch the Monster with Fractions, a game in which they estimated fraction locations on a number line and received feedback on the accuracy of their estimates. The intervention lasted less than 15 minutes. In our initial study, children showed large gains from pretest to posttest in their fraction number line estimates, magnitude comparisons, and recall accuracy. In a more rigorous second study, the experimental group showed similarly large improvements, whereas a control group showed no improvement from practicing fraction number line estimates without feedback. The results provide evidence for the effectiveness of interventions emphasizing fraction magnitudes and indicate how psychological theories and research can be used to evaluate specific recommendations of the Common Core State Standards. PMID:27768756

  6. Correlating precursory declines in groundwater radon with earthquake magnitude.

    PubMed

    Kuo, T

    2014-01-01

    Both studies at the Antung hot spring in eastern Taiwan and at the Paihe spring in southern Taiwan confirm that groundwater radon can be a consistent tracer for strain changes in the crust preceding an earthquake when observed in a low-porosity fractured aquifer surrounded by a ductile formation. Recurrent anomalous declines in groundwater radon were observed at the Antung D1 monitoring well in eastern Taiwan prior to the five earthquakes of magnitude (Mw ): 6.8, 6.1, 5.9, 5.4, and 5.0 that occurred on December 10, 2003; April 1, 2006; April 15, 2006; February 17, 2008; and July 12, 2011, respectively. For earthquakes occurring on the longitudinal valley fault in eastern Taiwan, the observed radon minima decrease as the earthquake magnitude increases. The above correlation has been proven to be useful for early warning local large earthquakes. In southern Taiwan, radon anomalous declines prior to the 2010 Mw 6.3 Jiasian, 2012 Mw 5.9 Wutai, and 2012 ML 5.4 Kaohsiung earthquakes were also recorded at the Paihe spring. For earthquakes occurring on different faults in southern Taiwan, the correlation between the observed radon minima and the earthquake magnitude is not yet possible.

  7. Typical magnitude and spatial extent of crowding in autism.

    PubMed

    Freyberg, Jan; Robertson, Caroline E; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced spatial processing of local visual details has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC), and crowding is postulated to be a mechanism that may produce this ability. However, evidence for atypical crowding in ASC is mixed, with some studies reporting a complete lack of crowding in autism and others reporting a typical magnitude of crowding between individuals with and without ASC. Here, we aim to disambiguate these conflicting results by testing both the magnitude and the spatial extent of crowding in individuals with ASC (N = 25) and age- and IQ-matched controls (N = 23) during an orientation discrimination task. We find a strong crowding effect in individuals with and without ASC, which falls off as the distance between target and flanker is increased. Both the magnitude and the spatial range of this effect were comparable between individuals with and without ASC. We also find typical (uncrowded) orientation discrimination thresholds in individuals with ASC. These findings suggest that the spatial extent of crowding is unremarkable in ASC, and is therefore unlikely to account for the visual symptoms reported in individuals with the diagnosis.

  8. Relating Perturbation Magnitude to Temporal Gene Expression in Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; Parnell, John J.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Hashsham, Syed

    2009-03-19

    A method to quantitatively relate stress to response at the level of gene expression is described using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. Stress was defined as the magnitude of perturbation and strain was defined as the magnitude of cumulative response in terms of gene expression. Expression patterns of sixty genes previously reported to be significantly impacted by osmotic shock or belonging to the high-osmotic glycerol, glycerolipid metabolism, and glycolysis pathways were determined following perturbations of increasing sodium chloride concentrations (0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.5, and 1.4 M). Expression of these genes was quantified temporally using reverse transcriptase real time polymerase chain reaction. The magnitude of cumulative response was obtained by calculating the total moment of area of the temporal response envelope for all the 60 genes, either together or for the set of genes related to each pathway. A non-linear relationship between stress and response was observed for the range of stress studied. This study examines a quantitative approach to quantify the strain at the level of gene expression to relate stress to strain in biological systems. The approach should be generally applicable to quantitatively evaluate the response of organisms to environmental change.

  9. The magnitude-redshift relation for 561 Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, M.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.; Henry, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    The Hubble diagram for the 561 Abell clusters with measured redshifts has been examined using Abell's (1958) corrected photo-red magnitudes for the tenth-ranked cluster member (m10). After correction for the Scott effect and K dimming, the data are in good agreement with a linear magnitude-redshift relation with a slope of 0.2 out to z = 0.1. New redshift data are also presented for 20 Abell clusters. Abell's m10 is suitable for redshift estimation for clusters with m10 of no more than 16.5. At fainter m10, the number of foreground galaxies expected within an Abell radius is large enough to make identification of the tenth-ranked galaxy difficult. Interlopers bias the estimated redshift toward low values at high redshift. Leir and van den Bergh's (1977) redshift estimates suffer from this same bias but to a smaller degree because of the use of multiple cluster parameters. Constraints on deviations of cluster velocities from the mean cosmological flow require greater photometric accuracy than is provided by Abell's m10 magnitudes.

  10. The magnitude-redshift relation in a realistic inhomogeneous universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hada, Ryuichiro; Futamase, Toshifumi E-mail: tof@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-12-01

    The light rays from a source are subject to a local inhomogeneous geometry generated by inhomogeneous matter distribution as well as the existence of collapsed objects. In this paper we investigate the effect of inhomogeneities and the existence of collapsed objects on the propagation of light rays and evaluate changes in the magnitude-redshift relation from the standard relationship found in a homogeneous FRW universe. We give the expression of the correlation function and the variance for the perturbation of apparent magnitude, and calculate it numerically by using the non-linear matter power spectrum. We use the lognormal probability distribution function for the density contrast and spherical collapse model to truncate the power spectrum in order to estimate the blocking effect by collapsed objects. We find that the uncertainties in Ω{sub m} is ∼ 0.02, and that of w is ∼ 0.04 . We also discuss a possible method to extract these effects from real data which contains intrinsic ambiguities associated with the absolute magnitude.

  11. Magnitudes and timescales of total solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Greg

    2016-07-01

    The Sun's net radiative output varies on timescales of minutes to gigayears. Direct measurements of the total solar irradiance (TSI) show changes in the spatially- and spectrally-integrated radiant energy on timescales as short as minutes to as long as a solar cycle. Variations of ~0.01% over a few minutes are caused by the ever-present superposition of convection and oscillations with very large solar flares on rare occasion causing slightly-larger measurable signals. On timescales of days to weeks, changing photospheric magnetic activity affects solar brightness at the ~0.1% level. The 11-year solar cycle shows variations of comparable magnitude with irradiances peaking near solar maximum. Secular variations are more difficult to discern, being limited by instrument stability and the relatively short duration of the space-borne record. Historical reconstructions of the Sun's irradiance based on indicators of solar-surface magnetic activity, such as sunspots, faculae, and cosmogenic isotope records, suggest solar brightness changes over decades to millennia, although the magnitudes of these variations have high uncertainties due to the indirect historical records on which they rely. Stellar evolution affects yet longer timescales and is responsible for the greatest solar variabilities. In this manuscript I summarize the Sun's variability magnitudes over different temporal regimes and discuss the irradiance record's relevance for solar and climate studies as well as for detections of exo-solar planets transiting Sun-like stars.

  12. Cochlear implantation: a biomechanical prosthesis for hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Robert; Hunter, Jacob B; Sweeney, Alex D; Bennett, Marc L

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a medical prosthesis used to treat sensorineural deafness, and one of the greatest advances in modern medicine. The following article is an overview of cochlear implant technology. The history of cochlear implantation and the development of modern implant technology will be discussed, as well as current surgical techniques. Research regarding expansion of candidacy, hearing preservation cochlear implantation, and implantation for unilateral deafness are described. Lastly, innovative technology is discussed, including the hybrid cochlear implant and the totally implantable cochlear implant.

  13. Does low magnitude earthquake ground shaking cause landslides?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, Matthew; Rosser, Nick; Vann Jones, Emma; Tunstall, Neil

    2015-04-01

    Estimating the magnitude of coseismic landslide strain accumulation at both local and regional scales is a key goal in understanding earthquake-triggered landslide distributions and landscape evolution, and in undertaking seismic risk assessment. Research in this field has primarily been carried out using the 'Newmark sliding block method' to model landslide behaviour; downslope movement of the landslide mass occurs when seismic ground accelerations are sufficient to overcome shear resistance at the landslide shear surface. The Newmark method has the advantage of simplicity, requiring only limited information on material strength properties, landslide geometry and coseismic ground motion. However, the underlying conceptual model assumes that shear strength characteristics (friction angle and cohesion) calculated using conventional strain-controlled monotonic shear tests are valid under dynamic conditions, and that values describing shear strength do not change as landslide shear strain accumulates. Recent experimental work has begun to question these assumptions, highlighting, for example, the importance of shear strain rate and changes in shear strength properties following seismic loading. However, such studies typically focus on a single earthquake event that is of sufficient magnitude to cause permanent strain accumulation; by doing so, they do not consider the potential effects that multiple low-magnitude ground shaking events can have on material strength. Since such events are more common in nature relative to high-magnitude shaking events, it is important to constrain their geomorphic effectiveness. Using an experimental laboratory approach, we present results that address this key question. We used a bespoke geotechnical testing apparatus, the Dynamic Back-Pressured Shear Box (DynBPS), that uniquely permits more realistic simulation of earthquake ground-shaking conditions within a hillslope. We tested both cohesive and granular materials, both of which

  14. [Long-term functional outcomes of cochlear implants in children].

    PubMed

    Laszig, R; Aschendorff, A; Beck, R; Schild, C; Kröger, S; Wesarg, T; Arndt, S

    2009-07-01

    The treatment of deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants has been established for several years. Nonetheless, no long-term results exist for studies of a representatively large number of children in the German-speaking area. These are necessary in order to formulate prognoses regarding the development and results of children undergoing implantation at various ages. In a retrospective study, we assessed the data of 156 children with various implantation ages and a minimum follow-up period of 5 years for whom speech and audiological data (Oldenburg Sentence Test, Freiburg words/numbers test) were available. Our findings confirm the assumption that early-implanted children (<2 years) achieve the best speech-comprehension results. For this reason, support for a sufficient universal neonate hearing screen should be emphatically given so that implantation, after a hearing test phase, can be targeted in the first year of life. The surgical, anesthesiological, and rehabilitation conditions must be fulfilled, and surgical experience is required for operation on infants and small children. PMID:19517077

  15. Minimally invasive spine stabilisation with long implants

    PubMed Central

    Logroscino, Carlo Ambrogio; Proietti, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Originally aimed at treating degenerative syndromes of the lumbar spine, percutaneous minimally invasive posterior fixation is nowadays even more frequently used to treat some thoracolumbar fractures. According to the modern principles of saving segment of motion, a short implant (one level above and one level below the injured vertebra) is generally used to stabilise the injured spine. Although the authors generally use a short percutaneous fixation in treating thoracolumbar fractures with good results, they observed some cases in which the high fragmentation of the vertebral body and the presence of other associated diseases (co-morbidities) did not recommend the use of a short construct. The authors identified nine cases, in which a long implant (two levels above and two levels below the injured vertebra) was performed by a percutaneous minimally invasive approach. Seven patients (five males/two females) were affected by thoracolumbar fractures. T12 vertebra was involved in three cases, L1 in two cases, T10 and L2 in one case, respectively. Two fractures were classified as type A 3.1, two as A 3.2, two as A 3.3 and one as B 2.3, according to Magerl. In the present series, there were also two patients affected by a severe osteolysis of the spine (T9 and T12) due to tumoral localisation. All patients operated on with long instrumentation had a good outcome with prompt and uneventful clinical recovery. At the 1-year follow-up, all patients except one, who died 11 months after the operation, did not show any radiologic signs of mobilisation or failure of the implant. Based on the results of the present series, the long percutaneous fixation seems to represent an effective and safe system to treat particular cases of vertebral lesions. In conclusion, the authors believe that a long implant might be an alternative surgical method compared to more aggressive or demanding procedures, which in a few patients could represent an overtreatment. PMID:19399530

  16. Suitability of rapid energy magnitude determinations for emergency response purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Domenico; Parolai, Stefano; Bormann, Peter; Grosser, Helmut; Saul, Joachim; Wang, Rongjiang; Zschau, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    It is common practice in the seismological community to use, especially for large earthquakes, the moment magnitude Mw as a unique magnitude parameter to evaluate the earthquake's damage potential. However, as a static measure of earthquake size, Mw does not provide direct information about the released seismic wave energy and its high frequency content, which is the more interesting information both for engineering purposes and for a rapid assessment of the earthquake's shaking potential. Therefore, we recommend to provide to disaster management organizations besides Mw also sufficiently accurate energy magnitude determinations as soon as possible after large earthquakes. We developed and extensively tested a rapid method for calculating the energy magnitude Me within about 10-15 min after an earthquake's occurrence. The method is based on pre-calculated spectral amplitude decay functions obtained from numerical simulations of Green's functions. After empirical validation, the procedure has been applied offline to a large data set of 767 shallow earthquakes that have been grouped according to their type of mechanism (strike-slip, normal faulting, thrust faulting, etc.). The suitability of the proposed approach is discussed by comparing our rapid Me estimates with Mw published by GCMT as well as with Mw and Me reported by the USGS. Mw is on average slightly larger than our Me for all types of mechanisms. No clear dependence on source mechanism is observed for our Me estimates. In contrast, Me from the USGS is generally larger than Mw for strike-slip earthquakes and generally smaller for the other source types. For ~67 per cent of the event data set our Me differs <= +/-0.3 magnitude units (m.u.) from the respective Me values published by the USGS. However, larger discrepancies (up to 0.8 m.u.) may occur for strike-slip events. A reason of that may be the overcorrection of the energy flux applied by the USGS for this type of earthquakes. We follow the original

  17. Non-Invasive Pulse Wave Analysis in a Thrombus-Free Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm after Implantation of a Nitinol Aortic Endograft.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Georgiadis, George S; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has been associated with changes in arterial stiffness, as estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV). This marker is influenced by the medical status of the patient, the elastic characteristics of the aneurysm wall, and the presence of intraluminal thrombus. Therefore, in order to delineate the influence of the endograft implantation in the early post-operative period, we conducted non-invasively pulse wave analysis in a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm containing no intraluminal thrombus, unremarkable past medical history, and absence of peripheral arterial disease. The estimated parameters were the systolic and diastolic pressure calculated at the aortic level (central pressures), PWV, augmentation pressure (AP) and augmentation index (AI), pressure wave reflection magnitude (RM), and peripheral resistance. Central systolic and diastolic pressure decreased post-operatively. PWV showed subtle changes from 11.6 to 10.6 and 10.9 m/s at 1-week and 1-month, respectively. Accordingly, the AI decreased from 28 to 14% and continued to drop to 25%. The AP decreased gradually from 15 to 6 and 4 mmHg. The wave RM dropped from 68 to 52% at 1-month. Finally, the peripheral resistance dropped from 1.41 to 0.99 and 0.85 dyn × s × cm(-5). Our example shows that the implantation of an aortic endograft can modify the pressure wave reflection over the aortic bifurcation without causing significant alterations in PWV.

  18. Non-Invasive Pulse Wave Analysis in a Thrombus-Free Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm after Implantation of a Nitinol Aortic Endograft.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Georgiadis, George S; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has been associated with changes in arterial stiffness, as estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV). This marker is influenced by the medical status of the patient, the elastic characteristics of the aneurysm wall, and the presence of intraluminal thrombus. Therefore, in order to delineate the influence of the endograft implantation in the early post-operative period, we conducted non-invasively pulse wave analysis in a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm containing no intraluminal thrombus, unremarkable past medical history, and absence of peripheral arterial disease. The estimated parameters were the systolic and diastolic pressure calculated at the aortic level (central pressures), PWV, augmentation pressure (AP) and augmentation index (AI), pressure wave reflection magnitude (RM), and peripheral resistance. Central systolic and diastolic pressure decreased post-operatively. PWV showed subtle changes from 11.6 to 10.6 and 10.9 m/s at 1-week and 1-month, respectively. Accordingly, the AI decreased from 28 to 14% and continued to drop to 25%. The AP decreased gradually from 15 to 6 and 4 mmHg. The wave RM dropped from 68 to 52% at 1-month. Finally, the peripheral resistance dropped from 1.41 to 0.99 and 0.85 dyn × s × cm(-5). Our example shows that the implantation of an aortic endograft can modify the pressure wave reflection over the aortic bifurcation without causing significant alterations in PWV. PMID:26793712

  19. Non-Invasive Pulse Wave Analysis in a Thrombus-Free Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm after Implantation of a Nitinol Aortic Endograft

    PubMed Central

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Georgiadis, George S.; Lazarides, Miltos K.

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has been associated with changes in arterial stiffness, as estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV). This marker is influenced by the medical status of the patient, the elastic characteristics of the aneurysm wall, and the presence of intraluminal thrombus. Therefore, in order to delineate the influence of the endograft implantation in the early post-operative period, we conducted non-invasively pulse wave analysis in a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm containing no intraluminal thrombus, unremarkable past medical history, and absence of peripheral arterial disease. The estimated parameters were the systolic and diastolic pressure calculated at the aortic level (central pressures), PWV, augmentation pressure (AP) and augmentation index (AI), pressure wave reflection magnitude (RM), and peripheral resistance. Central systolic and diastolic pressure decreased post-operatively. PWV showed subtle changes from 11.6 to 10.6 and 10.9 m/s at 1-week and 1-month, respectively. Accordingly, the AI decreased from 28 to 14% and continued to drop to 25%. The AP decreased gradually from 15 to 6 and 4 mmHg. The wave RM dropped from 68 to 52% at 1-month. Finally, the peripheral resistance dropped from 1.41 to 0.99 and 0.85 dyn × s × cm−5. Our example shows that the implantation of an aortic endograft can modify the pressure wave reflection over the aortic bifurcation without causing significant alterations in PWV. PMID:26793712

  20. Causality between expansion of seismic cloud and maximum magnitude of induced seismicity in geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukuhira, Yusuke; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Ito, Takatoshi; Häring, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Occurrence of induced seismicity with large magnitude is critical environmental issues associated with fluid injection for shale gas/oil extraction, waste water disposal, carbon capture and storage, and engineered geothermal systems (EGS). Studies for prediction of the hazardous seismicity and risk assessment of induced seismicity has been activated recently. Many of these studies are based on the seismological statistics and these models use the information of the occurrence time and event magnitude. We have originally developed physics based model named "possible seismic moment model" to evaluate seismic activity and assess seismic moment which can be ready to release. This model is totally based on microseismic information of occurrence time, hypocenter location and magnitude (seismic moment). This model assumes existence of representative parameter having physical meaning that release-able seismic moment per rock volume (seismic moment density) at given field. Seismic moment density is to be estimated from microseismic distribution and their seismic moment. In addition to this, stimulated rock volume is also inferred by progress of microseismic cloud at given time and this quantity can be interpreted as the rock volume which can release seismic energy due to weakening effect of normal stress by injected fluid. Product of these two parameters (equation (1)) provide possible seismic moment which can be released from current stimulated zone as a model output. Difference between output of this model and observed cumulative seismic moment corresponds the seismic moment which will be released in future, based on current stimulation conditions. This value can be translated into possible maximum magnitude of induced seismicity in future. As this way, possible seismic moment can be used to have feedback to hydraulic stimulation operation in real time as an index which can be interpreted easily and intuitively. Possible seismic moment is defined as equation (1), where D

  1. Biomechanical load analysis of cantilevered implant systems.

    PubMed

    Osier, J F

    1991-01-01

    Historically, dental implants have been placed in areas where quality bone exists. The maxillary sinus areas and mandibular canal proximities have been avoided. From these placements, various cantilevered prosthetic applications have emerged. This analysis uses static engineering principles to define the loads (i.e., forces) placed upon the implants. These principles make use of Newton's first and third laws of mechanics by summing the forces and moments to zero. These summations then generate mathematical equations and their algebraic solutions. Three implant systems are analyzed. The first is a two-implant system. The second is a three-implant cross-arch stabilized system usually found in mandibular replacements of lower full dentures. The third is a five-implant system which is identical to the three-implant cantilevered system but which uses implants in the first molar area, thereby negating the cantilevered load magnification of the three-implant design. These analyses demonstrate that, in a cantilevered application, the implant closest to the point of load application (usually the most posterior implant) takes the largest compressive load. Implants opposite the load application (generally the anterior implant) are in tension. These loads on the implants are normally magnified over the biting force and can easily reach 2 1/2 to five times the biting load.

  2. Materials for endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wataha, J C

    1996-02-01

    The goal of placement of endosseous dental implants is to achieve osseointegration or biointegration of the bone with the implant. A wide variety of materials has been used for these implants, but only a few promote osseointegration and biointegration. Titanium and titanium alloy (Ti6A14V) have been the most widely used of these materials. The surface oxide of titanium appears to be central to the ability of this material to osseointegrate. The oxide limits dissolution of elements and promotes the deposition of biological molecules which allow bone to exist as close as 30 A to the surface of the implant. The details of the ultrastructure of the gap between the implant and bone remain undefined, and the consequences of elements which are released on the interface over time are not known. These areas of investigation are particularly important in defining the differences between commercially pure titanium implants and those made of titanium, aluminium and vanadium. The epithelial interface between the gingiva and titanium appears to contain many of the structural characteristics of the native tooth-gingiva interface, but details are still vague. The connective tissue interface with the titanium appears to be one of tightly fitting tissues rather than adhesion. Ceramic coatings appear to improve the ingrowth of bone and promote chemical integration of the implant with the bone. The characteristics of these coatings are complex and affect the bony response, but the mechanisms remain obscure. The degradation of the coatings is an issue of particular controversy. Progress in dental implantology is likely to continue as the interface between the material and bone is more clearly understood, and biological molecules and artificial tissues are developed.

  3. Drug-eluting medical implants.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital; Kraitzer, Amir; Grinberg, Orly; Elsner, Jonathan J

    2010-01-01

    Drug-eluting medical implants are actually active implants that induce healing effects, in addition to their regular task of support. This effect is achieved by controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) into the surrounding tissue. In this chapter we focus on three types of drug-eluting devices: drug-eluting vascular stents, drug-eluting wound dressings and protein-eluting scaffolds for tissue regeneration, thus describing both internal and external implants. Each of these drug-eluting devices also presents an approach for solving the drug release issue. Most drug-eluting vascular stents are loaded with water-insoluble antiproliferative agents, and their diffusion from the device to the surrounding tissue is relatively slow. In contrast, most drug-eluting wound dressings are loaded with highly water-soluble antibacterial agents and the issue of fast release must therefore be addressed. Growth factor release from scaffolds for tissue regeneration offers a new approach of incorporating high-molecular-weight bioactive agents which are very sensitive to process conditions and preserve their activity during the preparation stage. The drug-eluting medical implants are described here in terms of matrix formats and polymers, incorporated drugs and their release profiles from the implants, and implant functioning. Basic elements, such as new composite core/shell fibers and structured films, can be used to build new antibiotic-eluting devices. As presented in this chapter, the effect of the processing parameters on the microstructure and the resulting drug release profiles, mechanical and physical properties, and other relevant properties, must be elucidated in order to achieve the desired properties. Newly developed implants and novel modifications of previously developed approaches have enhanced the tools available for creating clinically important biomedical applications.

  4. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  5. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOEpatents

    Bogaty, John M.; Clifft, Benny E.; Bollinger, Lowell M.

    1995-01-01

    A beam current limiter for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity.

  6. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOEpatents

    Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1995-08-08

    A beam current limiter is disclosed for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity. 6 figs.

  7. Long-term evaluation of single crystal sapphire implants as abutments in fixed prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Fartash, B; Arvidson, K

    1997-02-01

    49 patients participated in a prospective study of treatment of total or partial edentulism with fixed prosthodontics supported by Bioceram sapphire implants. 15 patients were treated for maxillary or mandibular edentulism, and 7 for a missing maxillary anterior tooth. The remaining 27 patients, with Applegate-Kennedy Class I-IV residual dentitions, were treated with fixed bridges supported by free-standing implants, or bridges supported by teeth and implants. Implant success, prosthesis stability, radiographic marginal bone level as well as parameters for peri-implant health were evaluated. The study began in 1982, and clinical treatment of the last patients was completed in 1988, i.e., a follow-up period ranging from 7 to 13 years. Of the patients treated for total mandibular edentulism, one implant fractured after 6 years in situ. The bone implant score (BIS) values for those implants were at the time for the bridge cementation 63.5 +/- 1.4 and at 1, 2, 3 and 5 year follow-ups 62.1 +/- 1.4, 61.9 +/- 1.5, 61.5 +/- 1.6, and 60.95 +/- 1.3, respectively. The success rate was 100%, 100% and 97.7% for the mandible at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Of the 7 edentulous patients treated with maxillary fixed bridges, 6 implants in 1 patient had to be removed after 1 year in service. Another 2 patients lost all their implants, 6 each, after 36 months. 6 implants in the 4th patient did not fulfil the criteria for success and were rated as failures at the four year follow-up. The success rate was thus 58.1%, 44.2% and 44.2% for the maxilla at 3, 5 and 10 year follow-ups, respectively. Of the 7 patients in whom single missing teeth were replaced, 1 implant in the premolar region was lost during the 1st year post-operatively, but no other complications or changes in BIS were observed. Of the 27 patients treated for partial edentulism (56 implants total) 1 implant, of a 4-unit free standing maxillary bridge fractured after 6 years and was later replaced. There were no

  8. An Efficient Molecular Dynamics Scheme for Predicting Dopant Implant Profiles in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1998-09-15

    The authors present a highly efficient molecular dynamics scheme for calculating the concentration profile of dopants implanted in group-IV alloy, and III-V zinc blende structure materials. The program incorporates methods for reducing computational overhead, plus a rare event algorithm to give statistical accuracy over several orders of magnitude change in the dopant concentration. The code uses a molecular dynamics (MD) model, instead of the binary collision approximation (BCA) used in implant simulators such as TRIM and Marlowe, to describe ion-target interactions. Atomic interactions are described by a combination of 'many-body' and screened Coulomb potentials. Inelastic energy loss is accounted for using a Firsov model, and electronic stopping is described by a Brandt-Kitagawa model which contains the single adjustable parameter for the entire scheme. Thus, the program is easily extensible to new ion-target combinations with the minimum of tuning, and is predictive over a wide range of implant energies and angles. The scheme is especially suited for calculating profiles due to low energy, large angle implants, and for situations where a predictive capability is required with the minimum of experimental validation. They give examples of using their code to calculate concentration profiles and 2D 'point response' profiles of dopants in crystalline silicon, silicon-germanium blends, and gallium-arsenide. They can predict the experimental profiles over five orders of magnitude for <100> and <110> channeling and for non-channeling implants at energies up to hundreds of keV.

  9. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  10. Thermal donor formation and annihilation in oxygen-implanted float-zone silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S. ); Stein, H.J. ); Shatas, S.C. ); Ponce, F.A. )

    1992-09-01

    The formation and annihilation behaviors of thermal donors in {sup 16}O{sup +}-, {sup 18}O{sup +}-, or {sup 16}O{sup +}+{sup 12}C{sup +}-implanted float-zone silicon have been investigated with secondary ion mass spectrometry, spreading resistance probe, Hall effect, and transmission electron microscopy. Various oxygen or carbon+oxygen-implanted samples were laser annealed to remove implant damage and subjected to furnace annealing at 450 {degree}C for up to 100 h to activate oxygen-related thermal donors. Oxygen concentrations at the peak of the implanted profiles exceed the maximum for Czochralski Si by an order of magnitude. It is found that the third to fourth power dependence of thermal donor formation on oxygen generally observed for Czochralski Si does not hold for the higher oxygen concentration in the implanted layer. Annihilation characteristics of thermal donors formed in the oxygen implanted layers were investigated by the rapid thermal annealing technique. A rapid thermal anneal at 1150 {degree}C for 30 s was required to remove all the thermal donors. Based upon the annihilation kinetics data, it is tentatively concluded that both old and new thermal donors exist in the oxygen-implanted layer. For carbon+oxygen-coimplanted samples, the data have shown that carbon greatly increases the new thermal donor concentration in the implanted layer. Finally, precipitate morphologies for both oxygen-only- and carbon+oxygen-coimplanted samples after a 450 {degree}C furnace annealing were investigated by high resolution electron microscopy. In the case of oxygen-implant-only samples, predominant precipitate morphologies are needlelike while platelet defects predominate for carbon+oxygen-coimplanted samples. Since carbon increases the formation rate of new thermal donors, it is unlikely that they are distinctly related to needlelike precipitates as claimed in previous studies.

  11. Estimating station noise thresholds for seismic magnitude bias elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Sheila

    2014-05-01

    To eliminate the upward bias of seismic magnitude caused by censoring of signal hidden by noise, noise level at each station in a network must be estimated. Where noise levels are not measured directly, the method of Kelly and Lacoss (1969) has been used to infer them from bulletin data (Lilwall and Douglas 1984). To verify this estimate of noise level, noise thresholds of International Monitoring System (IMS) stations inferred from the International Data Centre (IDC) Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) by the Kelly and Lacoss method for 2005-2013 are compared with direct measurements on (i) noise preceding first arrivals in filtered (0.8-4.5 Hz) IMS seismic data, and (ii) noise preceding the expected time of arrival of signals from events, where signal was not actually seen (values gathered by the IDC for maximum-likelihood magnitude calculation). For most stations the direct pre-signal noise measurements are ~0.25 units of log A/T lower than the Kelly&Lacoss thresholds; because the IDC automatic system declares a detection only when the short-term-average-to-long-term-average ratio threshold, which varies with station and frequency band between ~3-6, is exceeded. The noise values at expected times of non-observed signal arrival are ~0.15 units lower than the Kelly and Lacoss thresholds. Exceptions are caused by faulty channels being used for the direct noise or body-wave magnitude (mb) measurements or, for station ARCES and possibly FINES, SPITS and HFS, the wider filter used for signal amplitude than for signal detection admitting noise that swamped the signal. Abrupt changes in thresholds might show mis-documented sensor sensitivity changes at individual stations.

  12. Understanding high magnitude flood risk: evidence from the past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, N.

    2009-04-01

    The average length of gauged river flow records in the UK is ~25 years, which presents a problem in determining flood risk for high-magnitude flood events. Severe floods have been recorded in many UK catchments during the past 10 years, increasing the uncertainty in conventional flood risk estimates based on river flow records. Current uncertainty in flood risk has implications for society (insurance costs), individuals (personal vulnerability) and water resource managers (flood/drought risk). An alternative approach is required which can improve current understanding of the flood frequency/magnitude relationship. Historical documentary accounts are now recognised as a valuable resource when considering the flood frequency/magnitude relationship, but little consideration has been given to the temporal and spatial distribution of these records. Building on previous research based on British rivers (urban centre): Ouse (York), Trent (Nottingham), Tay (Perth), Severn (Shrewsbury), Dee (Chester), Great Ouse (Cambridge), Sussex Ouse (Lewes), Thames (Oxford), Tweed (Kelso) and Tyne (Hexham), this work considers the spatial and temporal distribution of historical flooding. The selected sites provide a network covering many of the largest river catchments in Britain, based on urban centres with long detailed documentary flood histories. The chronologies offer an opportunity to assess long-term patterns of flooding, indirectly determining periods of climatic variability and potentially increased geomorphic activity. This research represents the first coherent large scale analysis undertaken of historical multi-catchment flood chronologies, providing an unparalleled network of sites, permitting analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of historical flood patterns on a national scale.

  13. Laparoscopic implantation of an artificial urinary sphincter around the prostatic urethra

    PubMed Central

    Chłosta, Piotr; Aboumarzouk, Omar; Bondad, Jasper; Szopiński, Tomasz; Korzelik, Ignacy; Borówka, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the first laparoscopic periprostatic implantation of an artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) after a transurethral resection of the prostate. Background The implantation of an AUS is a standard procedure for severe urinary incontinence. In men it is usually implanted through a perineal approach, with the cuff placed around the bulbous urethra, bladder neck, or even around the prostate. Method We report a laparoscopic periprostatic implantation of an AUS after a transurethral resection of a prostate in a 72-year-old-man with incontinence. Results The operative duration was 180 min and the blood loss was 150 mL. There were no complications. After activating the AUS the patient was totally continent. Conclusion The laparoscopic periprostatic implantation of an AUS is a safe, effective and considerably less invasive procedure. PMID:26413345

  14. Feedback characteristics between implantable microphone and transducer in middle ear cavity.

    PubMed

    Arman Woo, S H; Woo, Seong Tak; Song, Byung Seop; Cho, Jin-Ho

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of implantable hearing aids, implementation and acoustic sensing strategy of the implantable microphone becomes an important issue; among the many types of implantable microphone, placing the microphone in middle ear cavity (MEC) has advantages including simple operation and insensitive to skin touching or chewing motion. In this paper, an implantable microphone was implemented and researched feedback characteristic when both the implantable microphone and the transducer were placed in the MEC. Analytical and finite element analysis were conducted to design the microphone to have a natural frequency of 7 kHz and showed good characteristics of SNR and sensitivity. For the feedback test, simple analytical and finite element analysis were calculated and compared with in vitro experiments (n = 4). From the experiments, the open-loop gain and feedback factor were measured and the minimum gain margin measured as 14.3 dB.

  15. Phonological representation and speech understanding with cochlear implants in deafened adults.

    PubMed

    Lyxell, B; Andersson, J; Andersson, U; Arlinger, S; Bredberg, G; Harder, H

    1998-09-01

    In the present study cognitive performance in 15 deafened adult cochlear implant candidates was examined and related to level of speech understanding after 12 months of experience with the implant. The implant group performed on par with normal hearing controls in all cognitive tasks used in the study with one exception: Performance was significantly lower in cognitive tasks where use of a phonological representation of sound is a key task-demand. Observations of the implanted individuals' level of speech understanding indicate that only those individuals who, pre-operatively, were in possession of phonological representations comparable to that of normal hearing could follow and understand a speaker that was out of sight. The results are discussed with respect to (a) deterioration in the phonological representation of sounds as a function of absence of external auditory stimulation, and (b) the role of cognitive factors in predicting success in speech understanding with the implant.

  16. Simulation of ion beam transport through the 400 Kv ion implanter at Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naab, F. U.; Toader, O. F.; Was, G. S.

    2013-04-01

    The Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory houses a 400 kV ion implanter. An application that simulates the ion beam trajectories through the implanter from the ion source to the target was developed using the SIMION® code. The goals were to have a tool to develop an intuitive understanding of abstract physics phenomena and diagnose ion trajectories. Using this application, new implanter users of different fields in science quickly understand how the machine works and quickly learn to operate it. In this article we describe the implanter simulation application and compare the parameters of the implanter components obtained from the simulations with the measured ones. The overall agreement between the simulated and measured values of magnetic fields and electric potentials is ˜10%.

  17. Transcutaneous RF-Powered Implantable Minipump Driven by a Class-E Transmitter

    PubMed Central

    Moore, William H.; Holschneider, Daniel P.; Givrad, Tina K.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the design and testing of an inductive coupling system used to power an implantable minipump for applications in ambulating rats. A 2 MHz class-E oscillator driver powered a coil transmitter wound around a 33-cm-diameter rat cage. A receiver coil, a filtered rectifier, and a voltage-sensitive switch powered the implant. The implant DC current at the center of the primary coil (5.1 V) exceeded the level required to activate the solenoid valve in the pump. The variations of the implant current in the volume of the primary coil reflected the variations of the estimated coupling coefficient between the two coils. The pump could be activated in-vivo, while accommodating the vertical and horizontal movements of the animal. Advantages of this design include a weight reduction for the implant, an operation independent from a finite power source, and a remote activation/deactivation. PMID:16916107

  18. Cadaveric aorta implantation for aortic graft infection.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asad; Bahia, Sandeep S S; Ali, Tahir

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a 73-year-old gentleman who underwent explantation of an infected prosthetic aorto-iliac graft and replacement with a cryopreserved thoracic and aorto-iliac allograft. The patient has been followed up a for more than a year after surgery and remains well. After elective tube graft repair of his abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in 2003, he presented to our unit in 2012 in cardiac arrest as a result of a rupture of the distal graft suture line due to infection. After resuscitation he underwent aorto-bifemoral grafting using a cuff of the original aortic graft proximally. Distally the new graft was anastomosed to his common femoral arteries, with gentamicin beads left in situ. Post discharge the patient was kept under close surveillance with serial investigations including nuclear scanning, however it became apparent that his new graft was infected and that he would require aortic graft replacement, an operation with a mortality of at least 50%. The patient underwent the operation and findings confirmed a synthetic graft infection. This tube graft was explanted and a cryopreserved aorta was used to the refashion the abdominal aorta and its bifurcation. The operation required a return to theatre day one post operatively for a bleeding side branch, which was repaired. The patient went on to make a full recovery stepping down from the intensive therapy unit day 6 post operatively and went on to be discharged 32 days after his cryopreserved aorta implantation. PMID:27351624

  19. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  20. Magnitude Standardization Procedure for OWL-Net Optical Observations of LEO Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Dong-Goo; Choi, Jin; Jo, Jung Hyun; Yim, Hong-Suh; Park, Sun-Youp; Park, Maru; Choi, Young-Jun; Bae, Young-Ho; Park, Young-Sik; Jang, Hyun-Jung; Cho, Sungki; Kim, Ji-Hye; Park, Jang-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    As a governmentally approved domestic entity for Space Situational Awareness, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) is developing and operating an optical telescopes system, Optical Wide-field PatroL (OWL) Network. During the test phase of this system, it is necessary to determine the range of brightness of the observable satellites. We have defined standard magnitude for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites to calibrate their luminosity in terms of standard parameters such as distance, phase angle, and angular rate. In this work, we report the optical brightness range of five LEO Satellites using OWL-Net.

  1. The color-magnitude distribution of small Jupiter Trojans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ian; Brown, Michael E.; Emery, Joshua P.

    2014-11-01

    The Jupiter Trojans constitute a population of minor bodies that are situated in a 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jupiter and are concentrated in two swarms centered about the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points. Current theories of Solar System evolution describe a scenario in which the Trojans originated in a region beyond the primordial orbit of Neptune. It is hypothesized that during a subsequent period of chaotic dynamical disruptions in the outer Solar System, the primordial trans-Neptunian planetesimals were disrupted, and a fraction of them were scattered inwards and captured by Jupiter as Trojan asteroids, while the remaining objects were thrown outwards to larger heliocentric distances and eventually formed the Kuiper belt. If this is the case, a detailed study of the characteristics of Trojans may shed light on the relationships between the Trojans and other minor body populations in the outer Solar System, and more broadly, constrain models of late Solar System evolution. Several past studies of Trojans have revealed significant bimodalities with respect to various spectroscopic and photometric quantities, indicating the existence of two groupings among the Trojans - the so-called red and less-red sub-populations. In a previous work, we used primarily photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to categorize several hundred Trojans with absolute magnitudes in the range H<12.3 into the two sub-populations. We demonstrated that the magnitude distributions of the color sub-populations are distinct to a high confidence level, suggesting that the red and less-red Trojans were formed in different locations and/or experienced different evolutionary histories. Most notably, we found that the discrepancy between the two color-magnitude distributions is concentrated at the faint end. Here, we present the results of a follow-up study, in which we analyze color measurements of a large number of small Trojans collected using the Suprime-Cam instrument on the Subaru

  2. Sequence data - Magnitude and implications of some ambiguities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.; Jukes, T. H.

    1972-01-01

    A stochastic model is applied to the divergence of the horse-pig lineage from a common ansestor in terms of the alpha and beta chains of hemoglobin and fibrinopeptides. The results are compared with those based on the minimum mutation distance model of Fitch (1972). Buckwheat and cauliflower cytochrome c sequences are analyzed to demonstrate their ambiguities. A comparative analysis of evolutionary rates for various proteins of horses and pigs shows that errors of considerable magnitude are introduced by Glx and Asx ambiguities into evolutionary conclusions drawn from sequences of incompletely analyzed proteins.

  3. The magnitude of impact damage on LDEF materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allbrooks, Martha; Atkinson, Dale

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the magnitude and types of impact damage to materials and systems on the LDEF. This report will provide insights which permit NASA and industry space-systems designers to more rapidly identify potential problems and hazards in placing a spacecraft in low-Earth orbit (LEO). This report is structured to provide (1) a background on LDEF, (2) an introduction to the LEO meteoroid and debris environments, and (3) descriptions of the types of damage caused by impacts into structural materials, and contamination caused by spallation and ejecta from impact events.

  4. Smoke optical depths - Magnitude, variability, and wavelength dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Russell, P. B.; Colburn, D. A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Allen, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne autotracking sun-photometer has been used to measure magnitudes, temporal/spatial variabilities, and the wavelength dependence of optical depths in the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectrum of smoke from two forest fires and one jet fuel fire and of background air. Jet fuel smoke optical depths were found to be generally less wavelength dependent than background aerosol optical depths. Forest fire smoke optical depths, however, showed a wide range of wavelength depedences, such as incidents of wavelength-independent extinction.

  5. Magnitude of psychological gender differences. Another side to the story.

    PubMed

    Hyde, J S; Plant, E A

    1995-03-01

    A. H. Eagly (1995) argued that feminism created a political climate that has lead to research that inaccurately minimizes psychological gender differences. In this article, the authors assert that feminist psychologists do not have a uniform position on this issue, and that many have argued for large gender differences. Meta-analyses indicate great variability in the magnitude of gender differences across different behaviors. However, more psychological gender differences (25%) fall in the close-to-zero range than do other effects in psychology (6%). PMID:7726468

  6. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants.

    PubMed

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging.

  7. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT BIOCOMPATIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Thevenot, Paul; Hu, Wenjing; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implantable medical devices are increasingly important in the practice of modern medicine. Unfortunately, almost all medical devices suffer to a different extent from adverse reactions, including inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis and infection. To improve the safety and function of many types of medical implants, a major need exists for development of materials that evoked desired tissue responses. Because implant-associated protein adsorption and conformational changes thereafter have been shown to promote immune reactions, rigorous research efforts have been emphasized on the engineering of surface property (physical and chemical characteristics) to reduce protein adsorption and cell interactions and subsequently improve implant biocompatibility. This brief review is aimed to summarize the past efforts and our recent knowledge about the influence of surface functionality on protein:cell:biomaterial interactions. It is our belief that detailed understandings of bioactivity of surface functionality provide an easy, economic, and specific approach for the future rational design of implantable medical devices with desired tissue reactivity and, hopefully, wound healing capability. PMID:18393890

  8. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants.

    PubMed

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging. PMID:27660602

  9. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A.; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging. PMID:27660602

  10. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A.; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging.

  11. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  12. Fusing local patterns of Gabor magnitude and phase for face recognition.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shufu; Shan, Shiguang; Chen, Xilin; Chen, Jie

    2010-05-01

    Gabor features have been known to be effective for face recognition. However, only a few approaches utilize phase feature and they usually perform worse than those using magnitude feature. To investigate the potential of Gabor phase and its fusion with magnitude for face recognition, in this paper, we first propose local Gabor XOR patterns (LGXP), which encodes the Gabor phase by using the local XOR pattern (LXP) operator. Then, we introduce block-based Fisher's linear discriminant (BFLD) to reduce the dimensionality of the proposed descriptor and at the same time enhance its discriminative power. Finally, by using BFLD, we fuse local patterns of Gabor magnitude and phase for face recognition. We evaluate our approach on FERET and FRGC 2.0 databases. In particular, we perform comparative experimental studies of different local Gabor patterns. We also make a detailed comparison of their combinations with BFLD, as well as the fusion of different descriptors by using BFLD. Extensive experimental results verify the effectiveness of our LGXP descriptor and also show that our fusion approach outperforms most of the state-of-the-art approaches.

  13. Spatial Characterization of Flood Magnitudes from Hurricane Irene (2011) over Delaware River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P.; Smith, J. A.; Cunha, L.; Lin, N.

    2014-12-01

    Flooding from landfalling tropical cyclones can affect drainage networks over a large range of basin scales. We develop a method to characterize the spatial distribution of flood magnitudes continuously over a drainage network, with focus on flooding from landfalling tropical cyclones. We use hydrologic modeling to translate precipitation fields into a continuous representation of flood peaks over the drainage network. The CUENCAS model (Cunha 2012) is chosen because of its ability to predict flooding over various scales with minimal calibration. Taking advantage of scaling properties of flood magnitudes, a dimensionless flood index (Smith 1989, Villarini and Smith 2010) is obtained for a better representation of flood magnitudes for which the effects of basin scales are reduced. Case study analyses from Hurricane Irene are carried for the Delaware River using Stage IV radar rainfall fields. Reservoir regulation is implemented in CUENCAS since the Delaware River, like many large rivers, is strongly regulated. With limited info of dam operation and initial water level, reservoirs are represented as filters that directly reduce streamflow downstream, as a trade-off between efficiency and accuracy. Results show a correlation coefficient greater than 0.9 for all the available flood peak observations. Uncertainties are mostly from errors in rainfall fields for small watersheds, and reservoir regulation for large ones. The hydrological modeling can also be driven by simulated rainfall from historical or synthetic storms: this study fits into our long-term goal of developing a methodology to quantify the risk of inland flooding associated with landfalling tropical cyclone.

  14. Coastal erosion: Processes, timing and magnitudes at the bluff toe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, C.H.; Guy, D.E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Five Lake Erie bluffs (one interlaminated clay and silt, three clay-rich diamicts and one shale) were surveyed at about 2-week intervals and after wind storms for up to 5 years. Erosion of the bluff toes along this low-energy coast occurred during northeast wind storms, which produced surges of up to 1 m and surf-zone waves of up to 1.2 m. Wave impact and/or uprush caused quarrying, which removed most of the toe material, and abrasion. There were from 1 to 23 erosion events/sites, with maximum magnitudes of erosion ranging from 12 to 55 cm/event. Timing and magnitude were linked to erodibility, maximum water level, storm surge, storm duration and beach width. A threshold maximum water level and a threshold surge were necessary for erosion. At these thresholds, the beach was submerged and wave energy was directly expended on the toe. Erosion did not take place when there was shorefast ice or when debris slopes shielded the toe from waves. The originally cohesive toe materials are easily eroded when they weather to an essentially noncohesive state. Wave erosion is the crucial erosion process; removal of material from the toe prevents the development of a stable slope. ?? 1988.

  15. Constraining explosive volcanism: subjective choices during estimates of eruption magnitude

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klawonn, Malin; Houghton, Bruce F.; Swanson, Don; Fagents, Sarah A.; Wessel, Paul; Wolfe, Cecily J.

    2014-01-01

    When estimating the magnitude of explosive eruptions from their deposits, individuals make three sets of critical choices with respect to input data: the spacing of sampling sites, the selection of contour intervals to constrain the field measurements, and the hand contouring of thickness/isomass data, respectively. Volcanologists make subjective calls, as there are no accepted published protocols and few accounts of how these choices will impact estimates of eruption magnitude. Here, for the first time, we took a set of unpublished thickness measurements from the 1959 Kīlauea Iki pyroclastic fall deposit and asked 101 volcanologists worldwide to hand contour the data. First, there were surprisingly consistent volume estimates across maps with three different sampling densities. Second, the variability in volume calculations imparted by individuals’ choices of contours is also surprisingly low and lies between s = 5 and 8 %. Third, volume estimation is insensitive to the extent to which different individuals “smooth” the raw data in constructing contour lines. Finally, large uncertainty is associated with the construction of the thinnest isopachs, which is likely to underestimate the actual trend of deposit thinning. The net result is that researchers can have considerable confidence in using volume or dispersal data from multiple authors and different deposits for comparative studies. These insights should help volcanologists around the world to optimize design and execution of field-based studies to characterize accurately the volume of pyroclastic deposits.

  16. Estimating the magnitude of food waste generated in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Oelofse, Suzan Hh; Nahman, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the developed world, food is treated as a disposable commodity. Between a third and half of all food produced for human consumption globally is estimated to be wasted. However, attempts to quantify the actual magnitude of food wasted globally are constrained by limited data, particularly from developing countries. This article attempts to quantify total food waste generation (including both pre-consumer food losses, as well as post-consumer food waste) in South Africa. The estimates are based on available food supply data for South Africa and on estimates of average food waste generation at each step of the food supply chain for sub-Saharan Africa. The preliminary estimate of the magnitude of food waste generation in South Africa is in the order of 9.04 million tonnes per annum. On a per capita basis, overall food waste in South Africa in 2007 is estimated at 177 kg/capita/annum and consumption waste at 7 kg/capita/annum. However, these preliminary figures should be used with caution and are subject to verification through ongoing research.

  17. Fault-Zone Maturity Defines Maximum Earthquake Magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnhoff, M.; Bulut, F.; Stierle, E.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Estimating the maximum likely magnitude of future earthquakes on transform faults near large metropolitan areas has fundamental consequences for the expected hazard. Here we show that the maximum earthquakes on different sections of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) scale with the duration of fault zone activity, cumulative offset and length of individual fault segments. The findings are based on a compiled catalogue of historical earthquakes in the region, using the extensive literary sources that exist due to the long civilization record. We find that the largest earthquakes (M~8) are exclusively observed along the well-developed part of the fault zone in the east. In contrast, the western part is still in a juvenile or transitional stage with historical earthquakes not exceeding M=7.4. This limits the current seismic hazard to NW Turkey and its largest regional population and economical center Istanbul. Our findings for the NAFZ are consistent with data from the two other major transform faults, the San Andreas fault in California and the Dead Sea Transform in the Middle East. The results indicate that maximum earthquake magnitudes generally scale with fault-zone evolution.

  18. Strategy use and strategy choice in fraction magnitude comparison.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Lisa K; DeWolf, Melissa; Siegler, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    We examined, on a trial-by-trial basis, fraction magnitude comparison strategies of adults with more and less mathematical knowledge. College students with high mathematical proficiency used a large variety of strategies that were well tailored to the characteristics of the problems and that were guaranteed to yield correct performance if executed correctly. Students with less mathematical proficiency sometimes used strategies similar to those of the mathematically proficient students, but often used flawed strategies that yielded inaccurate performance. As predicted by overlapping waves theory, increases in accuracy and speed were related to differences in strategy use, strategy choice, and strategy execution. When asked to choose the best strategy from among 3 possibilities-the strategy the student originally used, a correct alternative, and an incorrect alternative-students with lower fraction knowledge rarely switched from an original incorrect strategy to a correct alternative. This finding suggests that use of poor fraction magnitude comparison strategies stems in large part from lack of conceptual understanding of the requirements of effective strategies, rather than difficulty recalling or generating such strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. A Study of LFE Magnitudes in Northern Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    We have compiled a comprehensive suite of ~250 low-frequency-earthquake (LFE) templates representing spatially distinct tremor sources on or near the plate boundary in northern Cascadia from northern Vancouver Island to southern Washington. Each template is assembled from 100's to 1000's of individual LFEs, representing a total of over 200,000 independent detections spanning a selection of episodic-tremor-and-slip (ETS) events between 2003 and 2013. On the basis of empirical evidence and analytical arguments, these templates can be considered as band-limited, empirical Green's functions excited from shallow-thrust point sources to station locations corresponding to a collection of temporary and permanent network sites. The high fidelity of template match-filtered detections enables precise alignment of individual LFE time series and analysis of LFE amplitudes. Upon correction for geometrical spreading, attenuation, free-surface magnification and radiation pattern, we solve for station-channel amplification factors and LFE magnitudes for all detections corresponding to a given ETS episode. We will present a spatio-temporal analysis of LFE magnitudes including their variability across different ETS events, their dependence in along-dip location, and their expression in different rupture modes, i.e. main front versus rapid tremor reversals of Houston [2011] versus small scale reversals of Rubin and Armbruster [2013].

  20. Predicted magnitudes and colors from cool-star model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Steiman-Cameron, T. Y.

    1982-02-01

    An intercomparison of model stellar atmospheres and observations of real stars can lead to a better understanding of the relationship between the physical properties of stars and their observed radiative flux. In this spirit we have determined wide-band and narrow-band magnitudes and colors for a subset of models of K and M giant and supergiant stars selected from the grid of 40 models by Johnson, Bernat and Krupp (1980) (hereafter referred to as JBK). The 24 models selected have effective temperatures of 4000, 3800, 3600, 3400, 3200, 3000, 2750 and 2500 K and log g = 0, 1 or 2. Emergent energy fluxes (erg/ sq cm s A) were calculated at 9140 wavelengths for each model. These computed flux curves were folded through the transmission functions of Wing's 8-color system (Wing, 1971; White and Wing, 1978) and through Johnson's (1965) wide-band (BVRIJKLM) system. The calibration of the resultant magnitudes was made by using the absolute calibration of the flux curve of Vega by Schild, et al. (1971).