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Sample records for operators temporally stable

  1. Representing operations procedures using temporal dependency networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fayyad, Kristina E.; Cooper, Lynne P.

    1993-01-01

    DSN Link Monitor & Control (LMC) operations consist primarily of executing procedures to configure, calibrate, test, and operate a communications link between an interplanetary spacecraft and its mission control center. Currently the LMC operators are responsible for integrating procedures into an end-to-end series of steps. The research presented in this paper is investigating new ways of specifying operations procedures that incorporate the insight of operations, engineering, and science personnel to improve mission operations. The paper describes the rationale for using Temporal Dependency Networks (TDN's) to represent the procedures, a description of how the data is acquired, and the knowledge engineering effort required to represent operations procedures. Results of operational tests of this concept, as implemented in the LMC Operator Assistant Prototype (LMCOA), are also presented.

  2. Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

  3. Regularity theory for general stable operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros-Oton, Xavier; Serra, Joaquim

    2016-06-01

    We establish sharp regularity estimates for solutions to Lu = f in Ω ⊂Rn, L being the generator of any stable and symmetric Lévy process. Such nonlocal operators L depend on a finite measure on S n - 1, called the spectral measure. First, we study the interior regularity of solutions to Lu = f in B1. We prove that if f is Cα then u belong to C α + 2 s whenever α + 2 s is not an integer. In case f ∈L∞, we show that the solution u is C2s when s ≠ 1 / 2, and C 2 s - ɛ for all ɛ > 0 when s = 1 / 2. Then, we study the boundary regularity of solutions to Lu = f in Ω, u = 0 in Rn ∖ Ω, in C 1 , 1 domains Ω. We show that solutions u satisfy u /ds ∈C s - ɛ (Ω ‾) for all ɛ > 0, where d is the distance to ∂Ω. Finally, we show that our results are sharp by constructing two counterexamples.

  4. Fiber Optic Cable Thermal Preparation to Ensure Stable Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thoames Jr, William J.; Chuska, Rick F.; LaRocca, Frank V.; Switzer, Robert C.; Macmurphy, Shawn L.; Ott, Melanie N.

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic cables are widely used in modern systems that must provide stable operation during exposure to changing environmental conditions. For example, a fiber optic cable on a satellite may have to reliably function over a temperature range of -50 C up to 125 C. While the system requirements for a particular application will dictate the exact method by which the fibers should be prepared, this work will examine multiple ruggedized fibers prepared in different fashions and subjected to thermal qualification testing. The data show that if properly conditioned the fiber cables can provide stable operation, but if done incorrectly, they will have large fluctuations in transmission.

  5. Operations automation using temporal dependency networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    1991-01-01

    Precalibration activities for the Deep Space Network are time- and work force-intensive. Significant gains in availability and efficiency could be realized by intelligently incorporating automation techniques. An approach is presented to automation based on the use of Temporal Dependency Networks (TDNs). A TDN represents an activity by breaking it down into its component pieces and formalizing the precedence and other constraints associated with lower level activities. The representations are described which are used to implement a TDN and the underlying system architecture needed to support its use. The commercial applications of this technique are numerous. It has potential for application in any system which requires real-time, system-level control, and accurate monitoring of health, status, and configuration in an asynchronous environment.

  6. Modeling spatial-temporal operations with context-dependent associative memories.

    PubMed

    Mizraji, Eduardo; Lin, Juan

    2015-10-01

    We organize our behavior and store structured information with many procedures that require the coding of spatial and temporal order in specific neural modules. In the simplest cases, spatial and temporal relations are condensed in prepositions like "below" and "above", "behind" and "in front of", or "before" and "after", etc. Neural operators lie beneath these words, sharing some similarities with logical gates that compute spatial and temporal asymmetric relations. We show how these operators can be modeled by means of neural matrix memories acting on Kronecker tensor products of vectors. The complexity of these memories is further enhanced by their ability to store episodes unfolding in space and time. How does the brain scale up from the raw plasticity of contingent episodic memories to the apparent stable connectivity of large neural networks? We clarify this transition by analyzing a model that flexibly codes episodic spatial and temporal structures into contextual markers capable of linking different memory modules.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotopic ratios of fish otoliths have been used in numerous studies as natural tags or markers to aid the study of connectivity among fish populations. We investigated the use of spatial and temporal changes in the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of otoliths to different...

  8. Spatial-temporal dynamics of stable fly (Diptera:muscidae) trap catches in eastern Nebraska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial and temporal relationships among catches of adult stable flies on sticky traps in eastern Nebraska were evaluated. Twenty-five alsynite sticky traps were placed in a 5 × 5 grid with ˜1.6 km intervals in a mixed agricultural environment from 2003 to 2011. Denser grids of 45-90 traps were impl...

  9. Encapsulated graphene field-effect transistors for air stable operation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos Kymissis, Ioannis; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James

    2015-03-16

    In this work, we report the fabrication of encapsulated graphene field effects transistors (GFETs) with excellent air stability operation in ambient environment. Graphene's 2D nature makes its electronics properties very sensitive to the surrounding environment, and thus, non-encapsulated graphene devices show extensive vulnerability due to unintentional hole doping from the presence of water molecules and oxygen limiting their performance and use in real world applications. Encapsulating GFETs with a thin layer of parylene-C and aluminum deposited on top of the exposed graphene channel area resulted in devices with excellent electrical performance stability for an extended period of time. Moisture penetration is reduced significantly and carrier mobility degraded substantially less when compared to non-encapsulated control devices. Our CMOS compatible encapsulation method minimizes the problems of environmental doping and lifetime performance degradation, enabling the operation of air stable devices for next generation graphene-based electronics.

  10. Improving Prediction of Surgery Duration using Operational and Temporal Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kayis, Enis; Wang, Haiyan; Patel, Meghna; Gonzalez, Tere; Jain, Shelen; Ramamurthi, RJ; Santos, Cipriano; Singhal, Sharad; Suermondt, Jaap; Sylvester, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Inherent uncertainties in surgery durations impact many critical metrics about the performance of an operating room (OR) environment. OR schedules that are robust to natural variability in surgery durations require surgery duration estimates that are unbiased, with high accuracy, and with few cases with large absolute errors. Earlier studies have shown that factors such as patient severity, personnel, and procedure type greatly affect the accuracy of such estimations. In this paper we investigate whether operational and temporal factors can be used to improve these estimates further. We present an adjustment method based on a combination of these operational and temporal factors. We validate our method with two years of detailed operational data from an electronic medical record. We conclude that while improving estimates of surgery durations is possible, the inherent variability in such estimates remains high, necessitating caution in their use when optimizing OR schedules. PMID:23304316

  11. Nuclear DNA synthesis in vitro is mediated via stable replication forks assembled in a temporally specific fashion in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Heintz, N H; Stillman, B W

    1988-01-01

    A cell-free nuclear replication system that is S-phase specific, that requires the activity of DNA polymerase alpha, and that is stimulated three- to eightfold by cytoplasmic factors from S-phase cells was used to examine the temporal specificity of chromosomal DNA synthesis in vitro. Temporal specificity of DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei was assessed directly by examining the replication of restriction fragments derived from the amplified 200-kilobase dihydrofolate reductase domain of methotrexate-resistant CHOC 400 cells as a function of the cell cycle. In nuclei prepared from cells collected at the G1/S boundary of the cell cycle, synthesis of amplified sequences commenced within the immediate dihydrofolate reductase origin region and elongation continued for 60 to 80 min. The order of synthesis of amplified restriction fragments in nuclei from early S-phase cells in vitro appeared to be indistinguishable from that in vivo. Nuclei prepared from CHOC 400 cells poised at later times in the S phase synthesized characteristic subsets of other amplified fragments. The specificity of fragment labeling patterns was stable to short-term storage at 4 degrees C. The occurrence of stimulatory factors in cytosol extracts was cell cycle dependent in that minimal stimulation was observed with early G1-phase extracts, whereas maximal stimulation was observed with cytosol extracts from S-phase cells. Chromosomal synthesis was not observed in nuclei from G1 cells, nor did cytosol extracts from S-phase cells induce chromosomal replication in G1 nuclei. In contrast to chromosomal DNA synthesis, mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro was not stimulated by cytoplasmic factors and occurred at equivalent rates throughout the G1 and S phases. These studies show that chromosomal DNA replication in isolated nuclei is mediated by stable replication forks that are assembled in a temporally specific fashion in vivo and indicate that the synthetic mechanisms observed in vitro accurately

  12. Spatial and Temporal Migration Patterns of Neotropical Migrants in the Southwest Revealed by Stable Isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Kristina L.; van Riper, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary We used stable hydrogen isotopes (?D) to investigate both temporal and spatial patterns during spring migration for three warbler species, Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla), MacGillivray's Warbler (Oporornis tolmiei), and Nashville Warbler (Vermivora ruficapilla), across multiple migration routes in southwest North America. A strong correlation between stable hydrogen isotope values of feathers and the local precipitation at sites where feathers where collected across the breeding range for all three species reaffirmed that stable hydrogen isotopes were a good predictor of breeding locations. For the Wilson's Warbler, we found a significant negative relationship between the date when warblers passed through the sampling station and ?D values of their feathers, indicating that warblers who bred the previous season at southern latitudes migrated through the migration stations earlier than did warblers that had previously bred at more northern latitudes. This pattern was consistent across their southwestern migration route (5 sites sampled) and was consistent between years. Comparing ?D values between migration stations also showed a shift towards more negative ?D values from the western to the eastern migration stations sampled in this study, which corresponded to different geographical regions of the Wilson's Warblers' western breeding range. For MacGillivray's Warbler we found the same temporal pattern as Wilson's Warbler, with warblers that bred the previous season at southern latitudes migrating through the migration stations earlier than warblers that had previously bred at more northern latitudes. This pattern was consistent at the Lower Colorado River and Arivaca Creek, the two sites where sample sizes were adequate to test these hypotheses. Comparison of the ?D between the two sites indicated that the majority of warblers migrating through these stations were breeding within a geographically limited area of MacGillivray's Warblers' overall

  13. Cluster Analysis in Sociometric Research: A Pattern-Oriented Approach to Identifying Temporally Stable Peer Status Groups of Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zettergren, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A modern clustering technique was applied to age-10 and age-13 sociometric data with the purpose of identifying longitudinally stable peer status clusters. The study included 445 girls from a Swedish longitudinal study. The identified temporally stable clusters of rejected, popular, and average girls were essentially larger than corresponding…

  14. A spatio-temporal extension to the map cube operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, Juan C.; Moreno, Francisco J.; Echeverri, Jaime

    2012-09-01

    OLAP (On Line Analytical Processing) is a set of techniques and operators to facilitate the data analysis usually stored in a data warehouse. In this paper, we extend the functionality of an OLAP operator known as Map Cube with the definition and incorporation of a function that allows the formulation of spatio-temporal queries. For example, consider a data warehouse about crimes that includes data about the places where the crimes were committed. Suppose we want to find and visualize the trajectory (a trajectory is just the path that an object follows through space as a function of time) of the crimes of a suspect beginning with his oldest crime and ending with his most recent one. In order to meet this requirement, we extend the Map Cube operator.

  15. Temporal variations in the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane emitted from Minnesota peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Cheryl A.; Dise, Nancy B.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1992-09-01

    The stable carbon isotopic composition of methane (δ13C) emitted from two peatland sites in the Marcell Experimental Forest in northern Minnesota was investigated during the snow-free season of 1989-1990. A seasonal range in δ13C values of 13‰ was seen for a forested bog with heavier (13C enriched) methane emitted during the wanner summer months. This shift was correlated with water table level suggesting control by microbial oxidation. Methane from a nearby poor fen transitional to bog dominated by Carex oligosperma showed a similar temporal trend but with a much smaller range of 5‰ during the same time period and with no water table level correlation. The methane emitted from the fen was consistently heavier than that emitted by the bog.

  16. Highly enhanced and temporally stable field emission from MWCNTs grown on aluminum coated silicon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sreekanth, M.; Ghosh, S. Patra, R.; Srivastava, P.

    2015-06-15

    In this work, a detailed field emission study of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown on Si and Al coated Si substrates is reported. Morphological and microstructural studies of the films show higher entanglement of CNTs in the case of CNT/Si film as compared to CNT/Al/Si film. Raman studies show that the defect mediated peak (D) is substantially suppressed as compared to graphitic peak (G) resulting in significant reduction in I{sub D}/I{sub G} value in CNT/Al/Si film. Field emission (FE) current density of CNT/Al/Si film (∼25 mA/cm{sup 2}) is significantly higher as compared to that of CNT/Si film (∼1.6 mA/cm{sup 2}). A substantial improvement in temporal stability is also observed in CNT/Al/Si film. This enhancement in field emission current is attributed to strong adhesion between substrate and CNTs, low work function, high local field enhancement factor at the CNT tips and less entanglement of CNTs grown on Al/Si. The temporally stable CNT/Al/Si cold cathode can be a potential candidate to replace conventional electron sources in prototype devices.

  17. Stable Associations Masked by Temporal Variability in the Marine Copepod Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Moisander, Pia H.; Sexton, Andrew D.; Daley, Meaghan C.

    2015-01-01

    Copepod-bacteria interactions include permanent and transient epi- and endobiotic associations that may play roles in copepod health, transfer of elements in the food web, and biogeochemical cycling. Microbiomes of three temperate copepod species (Acartia longiremis, Centropages hamatus, and Calanus finmarchicus) from the Gulf of Maine were investigated during the early summer season using high throughput amplicon sequencing. The most prominent stable component of the microbiome included several taxa within Gammaproteobacteria, with Pseudoalteromonas spp. especially abundant across copepod species. These Gammaproteobacteria appear to be promoted by the copepod association, likely benefitting from nutrient enriched microenvironments on copepods, and forming a more important part of the copepod-associated community than Vibrio spp. during the cold-water season in this temperate system. Taxon-specific associations included an elevated relative abundance of Piscirickettsiaceae and Colwelliaceae on Calanus, and Marinomonas sp. in Centropages. The communities in full and voided gut copepods had distinct characteristics, thus the presence of a food-associated microbiome was evident, including higher abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and chloroplast sequences in the transient communities. The observed variability was partially explained by collection date that may be linked to factors such as variable time since molting, gender differences, and changes in food availability and type over the study period. While some taxon-specific and stable associations were identified, temporal changes in environmental conditions, including food type, appear to be key in controlling the composition of bacterial communities associated with copepods in this temperate coastal system during the early summer. PMID:26393930

  18. Stable Associations Masked by Temporal Variability in the Marine Copepod Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Moisander, Pia H; Sexton, Andrew D; Daley, Meaghan C

    2015-01-01

    Copepod-bacteria interactions include permanent and transient epi- and endobiotic associations that may play roles in copepod health, transfer of elements in the food web, and biogeochemical cycling. Microbiomes of three temperate copepod species (Acartia longiremis, Centropages hamatus, and Calanus finmarchicus) from the Gulf of Maine were investigated during the early summer season using high throughput amplicon sequencing. The most prominent stable component of the microbiome included several taxa within Gammaproteobacteria, with Pseudoalteromonas spp. especially abundant across copepod species. These Gammaproteobacteria appear to be promoted by the copepod association, likely benefitting from nutrient enriched microenvironments on copepods, and forming a more important part of the copepod-associated community than Vibrio spp. during the cold-water season in this temperate system. Taxon-specific associations included an elevated relative abundance of Piscirickettsiaceae and Colwelliaceae on Calanus, and Marinomonas sp. in Centropages. The communities in full and voided gut copepods had distinct characteristics, thus the presence of a food-associated microbiome was evident, including higher abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and chloroplast sequences in the transient communities. The observed variability was partially explained by collection date that may be linked to factors such as variable time since molting, gender differences, and changes in food availability and type over the study period. While some taxon-specific and stable associations were identified, temporal changes in environmental conditions, including food type, appear to be key in controlling the composition of bacterial communities associated with copepods in this temperate coastal system during the early summer.

  19. Pre-operative preparation for otologic surgery: temporal bone simulation

    PubMed Central

    Sethia, Rishabh; Wiet, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The field of temporal bone simulation (TBS) has largely focused on the development and validation of simulators as training and assessment tools. However, as technology has progressed over the years, researchers have envisioned new clinical applications for simulators extending to pre-operative surgical planning and case rehearsal. The purpose of this article is to review the current state of the art in TBS and to highlight recent advancements in the field. Due to space limitations, we will limit our discussion to computer-based virtual reality (VR) simulators. Recent findings A review of the recent literature on TBS revealed very limited application of VR simulators for pre-operative preparation. Current evidence suggests limitations in fidelity preclude successful patient-specific case rehearsal using VR simulation. Further investigation and clinical evaluation are required to validate its use outside of training and skill assessment. Summary This article provides an overview of the current use of VR simulators with emphasis on pre-operative planning. We evaluate the limitations of the technology, and discuss potential areas of improvement for the future. More studies are necessary to assess the value of VR simulation for pre-operative preparation. PMID:26339966

  20. Alaska peninsula stable isotope and radioisotope chemistry: a study in temporal and adaptive diversity.

    PubMed

    Coltrain, Joan Brenner

    2010-12-01

    Purified bone collagen from a small suite of human remains recovered at three sites on the Alaska Peninsula (Port Moller, Brooks River, and Mink Island) were analyzed for stable carbon and nitrogen isotope chemistry and were accelerator radiocarbon dated. Because samples sizes were small and faunal isotope chemistry lacking, results should be considered preliminary. However, these data indicate that each locality was represented by a somewhat different suite of subsistence strategies and covered a distinct temporal span. Port Moller burials (n = 7) from the Hot Springs site date to a calibrated 2σ range of 3547-1388 BP. Although marine foods clearly made the greatest contribution to these diets, individuals were not as heavily reliant on high-trophic-level marine taxa as eastern Aleutian groups to the west, given their intake of salmon and evidence of caribou hunting. Brooks River burials (n = 9) expressed an inland foraging focus with significant reliance on caribou and spawning salmon and covered a calibrated 2σ range of 1484-381 BP. In contrast, individuals from Mink Island (n = 7), dating to cal. 666-292 BP, were heavily reliant on high-trophic-level marine prey similar to but not as enriched isotopically as the Aleut, perhaps a consequence of limited access to caribou and greater reliance on invertebrates. This pattern suggests that prehistoric economic strategies on the Alaska Peninsula were diverse, characterized by fine-tuned adaptations to local ecological settings, perhaps mediated by ethnic factors and territorial and social pressures.

  1. Humans display a 'cooperative phenotype' that is domain general and temporally stable.

    PubMed

    Peysakhovich, Alexander; Nowak, Martin A; Rand, David G

    2014-01-01

    Understanding human cooperation is of major interest across the natural and social sciences. But it is unclear to what extent cooperation is actually a general concept. Most research on cooperation has implicitly assumed that a person's behaviour in one cooperative context is related to their behaviour in other settings, and at later times. However, there is little empirical evidence in support of this assumption. Here, we provide such evidence by collecting thousands of game decisions from over 1,400 individuals. A person's decisions in different cooperation games are correlated, as are those decisions and both self-report and real-effort measures of cooperation in non-game contexts. Equally strong correlations exist between cooperative decisions made an average of 124 days apart. Importantly, we find that cooperation is not correlated with norm-enforcing punishment or non-competitiveness. We conclude that there is a domain-general and temporally stable inclination towards paying costs to benefit others, which we dub the 'cooperative phenotype'.

  2. Humans display a 'cooperative phenotype' that is domain general and temporally stable.

    PubMed

    Peysakhovich, Alexander; Nowak, Martin A; Rand, David G

    2014-01-01

    Understanding human cooperation is of major interest across the natural and social sciences. But it is unclear to what extent cooperation is actually a general concept. Most research on cooperation has implicitly assumed that a person's behaviour in one cooperative context is related to their behaviour in other settings, and at later times. However, there is little empirical evidence in support of this assumption. Here, we provide such evidence by collecting thousands of game decisions from over 1,400 individuals. A person's decisions in different cooperation games are correlated, as are those decisions and both self-report and real-effort measures of cooperation in non-game contexts. Equally strong correlations exist between cooperative decisions made an average of 124 days apart. Importantly, we find that cooperation is not correlated with norm-enforcing punishment or non-competitiveness. We conclude that there is a domain-general and temporally stable inclination towards paying costs to benefit others, which we dub the 'cooperative phenotype'. PMID:25225950

  3. Mimicking nature by codelivery of stimulant and inhibitor to create temporally stable and spatially restricted angiogenic zones

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, William W.; Du, Nan R.; Chan, Chun H.; Silva, Eduardo A.; Mooney, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Nature frequently utilizes opposing factors to create a stable activator gradient to robustly control pattern formation. This study employs a biomimicry approach, by delivery of both angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors from spatially restricted zones of a synthetic polymer to achieve temporally stable and spatially restricted angiogenic zones in vivo. The simultaneous release of the two spatially separated agents leads to a spatially sharp angiogenic region that is sustained over 3 wk. Further, the contradictory action of the two agents leads to a stable level of proangiogenic stimulation in this region, in spite of significant variations in the individual release rates over time. The resulting spatially restrictive and temporally sustained profiles of active signaling allow the creation of a spatially heterogeneous and functional vasculature. PMID:20921366

  4. Temporal characterization of bacteria in hayrings serving as stable fly larval development sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae) are important pests of pastured cattle, reducing weight gains, and causing discomfort to the animals. The focus of stable fly control has historically been on preventing adult stable flies from biting cattle. While the adult files biting t...

  5. Spatial-temporal changes in Andean plateau climate and elevation from stable isotopes of mammal teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershaw, John; Garzione, Carmala N.; Higgins, Pennilyn; MacFadden, Bruce J.; Anaya, Frederico; Alvarenga, Herculano

    2010-01-01

    Paleoelevation constraints from fossil leaf physiognomy and stable isotopes of sedimentary carbonate suggest that significant surface uplift of the northern Andean plateau, on the order of 2.5 ± 1 km, occurred between ˜ 10.3 and 6.4 Ma. Independent spatial and temporal constraints on paleoelevation and paleoclimate of both the northern and southern plateau are important for understanding the distribution of rapid surface uplift and its relation to climate evolution across the plateau. This study focuses on teeth from modern and extinct mammal taxa (including notoungulates, pyrotheres, and litopterns) spanning ˜ 29 Ma to present, collected from the Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera of Bolivia (16.2°S to 21.4°S), and lowland Brazil. Tooth enamel of large, water-dependent mammals preserves a record of surface water isotopes and the type of plants that animals ingested while their teeth were mineralizing. Previous studies have shown that the δ18O of modern precipitation and surface waters decrease systematically with increasing elevations across the central Andes. Our results from high elevation sites between 3600 and 4100 m show substantially more positive δ18O values for late Oligocene tooth samples compared to < 10 Ma tooth δ18O values. Late Oligocene teeth collected from low elevation sites in southeast Brazil show δ18O values similar (within 2‰) to contemporaneous teeth collected at high elevation in the Eastern Cordillera. This affirms that the Andean plateau was at a very low elevation during the late Oligocene. Late Oligocene teeth from the northern Eastern Cordillera also yield consistent δ13C values of about - 9‰, indicating that the environment was semi-arid at that time. Latitudinal gradients in δ18O values of late Miocene to Pliocene fossil teeth are similar to modern values for large mammals, suggesting that by ˜ 8 Ma in the northern Altiplano and by ˜ 3.6 Ma in the southern Altiplano, both regions had reached high elevation and

  6. Temporal evolution of stable water isotopologues in cloud droplets during HCCT-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, J. K.; Aemisegger, F.; Scholl, M.; Wienhold, F. G.; Collett, J. L., Jr.; Lee, T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Mertes, S.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.; Werner, R. A.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, we present the first study resolving the temporal evolution of δ2H and δ18O values in cloud droplets during the course of 13 different cloud events. The cloud events were probed on a 937 m high mountain chain in Germany in the framework of the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010) in September and October 2010. δ values of cloud droplets ranged from -77‰ to -15‰ (δ2H ) and from -12.1‰ to -3.9‰ (δ18O) over the whole campaign. The cloud water line of the measured δ values was δ2H=7.8×δ18O+13×10-3 which is of similar slope but with higher deuterium excess (d-excess) than Central European Meteoric Water Lines. While seasonality was reflected in decreasing δ values towards the colder season, d-excess of cloud samples was an indicator of air mass origin: polar air masses had a higher d-excess than Mediterranean air masses. The variations in δ values during one cloud event could either result from changes in meteorological conditions during condensation or from variations in δ values of the water vapor feeding the cloud. To test which of both aspect dominated during the measured cloud events, we modeled the variation in δ values in cloud water using a closed box model. We could show that the variation in δ values of two cloud events was mainly due to changes in local temperature conditions. For the other eleven cloud events the variation was most likely caused by changes in the isotopic composition of the advected and entrained vapor. Frontal passages led to the highest gradients both in δ2H (≈6‰ per hour) and δ18O (≈0.6‰ per hour) during two of the latter cloud events. Moreover, a detailed trajectory analysis for the two longest cloud events revealed that variations in the entrained vapor were most likely related to rain out or changes in relative humidity and temperature at the moisture source region or both. This study illustrates the sensitivity of stable isotope composition of cloud water to changes in large

  7. Temporal logic and operation relations based knowledge representation for land cover change web services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Wu, Hao; Li, Songnian; Liao, Anping; He, Chaoying; Peng, Shu

    2013-09-01

    Providing land cover spatio-temporal information and geo-computing through web service is a new challenge for supporting global change research, earth system simulation and many other societal benefit areas. This requires an integrated knowledge representation and web implementation of static land cover and change information, as well as the related operations for geo-computing. The temporal logic relations among land cover snapshots and increments were examined with a matrix-based three-step analysis. Twelve temporal logic relations were identified and five basic spatial operations were formalized with set operators, which were all used to develop algorithms for deriving implicit change information. A knowledge representation for land cover change information was then developed based on these temporal logic and operation relations. A prototype web-service system was further implemented based on OWL-DL. Both online access and conversion of land cover spatio-temporal information can be facilitated with such a web service system.

  8. Haptic simulation of the milling process in temporal bone operations.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Magnus; Flemmer, Henrik; Wikander, Jan

    2005-01-01

    A VR-simulation system for educating surgeons of the temporal bone milling processes is presented in this paper. E.g. the milling process that occurs during the removal of certain cancer tumors in the brain. The research project is recently started up and this paper is an introduction to the bone milling simulation topic. We present how the graphical rendering of the temporal bone is done. Acquired data are managed using the Marching cubes algorithm to perform a visual representation. A re-production of iso-surfaces will represent the material removal occurred during the milling process. Force models are discussed and will be implemented in the H3D API, which is used to control the virtual simulation and collision detection. Equipment, implementation and future work are also presented in the paper.

  9. Note: A new regulation method of stable operation of high power cathode ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. C.; Xie, Y. H. Hu, C. D.; Xie, Y. L.; Liu, S.; Liang, L. Z.; Liu, Z. M.

    2015-05-15

    The hot cathode ion source will tend to be unstable when operated with high power and long pulse. In order to achieve stable operation, a new regulation method based on the arc power (discharge power) feedback control was designed and tested on the hot cathode ion source test bed with arc discharge and beam extraction. The results show that the new regulation method can achieve stable arc discharge and beam extraction. It verifies the success of feedback control of arc source with arc power.

  10. Application Of Stable Isotope Analysis To Study Temporal Changes In Foraging Ecology In A Highly Endangered Amphibian

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, J. Hayley

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding dietary trends for endangered species may be essential to assessing the effects of ecological disturbances such as habitat modification, species introductions or global climate change. Documenting temporal variation in prey selection may also be crucial for understanding population dynamics. However, the rarity, secretive behaviours and obscure microhabitats of some endangered species can make direct foraging observations difficult or impossible. Furthermore, the lethality or invasiveness of some traditional methods of dietary analysis (e.g. gut contents analysis, gastric lavage) makes them inappropriate for such species. Stable isotope analysis facilitates non-lethal, indirect analysis of animal diet that has unrealized potential in the conservation of endangered organisms, particularly amphibians. Methodology/findings I determined proportional contributions of aquatic macroinvertebrate prey to the diet of an endangered aquatic salamander Eurycea sosorum over a two-year period using stable isotope analysis of 13/12C and 15/14N and the Bayesian stable isotope mixing model SIAR. I calculated Strauss’ dietary electivity indices by comparing these proportions with changing relative abundance of potential prey species through time. Stable isotope analyses revealed that a previously unknown prey item (soft-bodied planarian flatworms in the genus Dugesia) made up the majority of E. sosorum diet. Results also demonstrate that E. sosorum is an opportunistic forager capable of diet switching to include a greater proportion of alternative prey when Dugesia populations decline. There is also evidence of intra-population dietary variation. Conclusions/significance Effective application of stable isotope analysis can help circumvent two key limitations commonly experienced by researchers of endangered species: the inability to directly observe these species in nature and the invasiveness or lethality of traditional methods of dietary analysis. This

  11. Stable isotopes in river waters in the Tajik Pamirs: regional and temporal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Meier, Christiane; Knoche, Malte; Merz, Ralf; Weise, Stephan M

    2013-01-01

    The Gunt River catchment in the Central Pamirs is a representative of the headwater catchments of the Aral Sea Basin. It covers 14,000 km(2), spanning altitudes between 2000 and 6700 m a.s.l. In a monitoring network, water samples were taken at 30 sampling points every month and analysed for the stable water isotopes ((18)O and (2)H). Our first results show δ(2)H values in the range from-131.2 to-94.9 ‰ and δ(18)O values from-18.0 to-14.0 ‰. The stable isotope patterns in the catchment seem to follow a systematic way, dominated by an altitude effect with a mean Δ δ(2)H=-3.6 ‰/100 m. The observed seasonal variations can be explained by geographical aspects such as the influence of different wind systems as well as melting processes. PMID:24313375

  12. Spatial and temporal analysis of stable isotopes in tap water across China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, S.; Hu, H.; Tian, F.; Tie, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotopes in water (δ2H and δ18O) are important indicators of hydrological and ecological pattern and process. Water isotopes have been used to trace atmospheric moisture source, identify source of groundwater and surface water charge, reconstruct paleoclimate, and so on. Tap water appears to reflect pervasive features of regional integrated hydrological process. China is a large-size country with high variations in both environmental and geographical factors including temperature, precipitation amount, relative humidity, latitude, altitude et al. Here we present a first national-scale survey on stable isotope of tap water across China. More than 1000 tap water samples have been collected from 93 cities across China by monthly between December 2014 and November 2015. Stable isotope composition of tap water ranged from -132.1‰ to -25.6‰ (δ2H) and from -17.5‰ to -4.2‰ (δ18O). The Meteoric Water Line is δ2H = 7.77 δ18O + 5.79 (r2 = 0.95) and the LMWL of Chinese precipitation is δ2H =7.6δ18O+ 9.94 (r2= 0.97). Spatial distribution of stable isotopes present typical "continental effect", isotope values generally decrease from coastal regions to inland. Isotopes in different regions present different correlations with temperature, precipitation amount, latitude and altitude as a result of varied moisture source and local water supply. The results of the study could provide mapping information of tap water for fundamental isotope hydrological studies in different regions of China.

  13. Temporal variation in mycorrhizal diversity and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope abundance in the wintergreen meadow orchid Anacamptis morio.

    PubMed

    Ercole, Enrico; Adamo, Martino; Rodda, Michele; Gebauer, Gerhard; Girlanda, Mariangela; Perotto, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    Many adult orchids, especially photoautotrophic species, associate with a diverse range of mycorrhizal fungi, but little is known about the temporal changes that might occur in the diversity and functioning of orchid mycorrhiza during vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Temporal variations in the spectrum of mycorrhizal fungi and in stable isotope natural abundance were investigated in adult plants of Anacamptis morio, a wintergreen meadow orchid. Anacamptis morio associated with mycorrhizal fungi belonging to Tulasnella, Ceratobasidium and a clade of Pezizaceae (Ascomycetes). When a complete growing season was investigated, multivariate analyses indicated significant differences in the mycorrhizal fungal community. Among fungi identified from manually isolated pelotons, Tulasnella was more common in autumn and winter, the pezizacean clade was very frequent in spring, and Ceratobasidium was more frequent in summer. By contrast, relatively small variations were found in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope natural abundance, A. morio samples showing similar (15)N enrichment and (13)C depletion at the different sampling times. These observations suggest that, irrespective of differences in the seasonal environmental conditions, the plant phenological stages and the associated fungi, the isotopic content in mycorrhizal A. morio remains fairly constant over time.

  14. Spatial and temporal characteristics of stable isotopes in the Tarim River Basin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congjian; Li, Xingong; Chen, Yaning; Li, Weihong; Stotler, Randy L; Zhang, Yongqing

    2016-06-01

    By using 233 isotope samples, we investigated the spatial and temporal variations of δ(18)O and δ(2)H in precipitation and surface water, and the contribution of different water sources in the rivers within the Tarim River Basin (TRB), which receives snow/glacier meltwater, groundwater, and rainfall. Our study revealed a similar seasonal pattern of precipitation δ(18)O and δ(2)H at both the north and south edges of the basin, indicating the dominant effect of westerly air masses in the summer and the combined influence of westerly and polar air masses during the winter, although the southern part showed more complex precipitation processes in the summer. River water in the basin has relatively large temporal variations in both δ(18)O and δ(2)H showing a distinct seasonal pattern with lower isotope values in May than in September. Higher d-excess values throughout the year in the Aksu river and the Tizinafu river suggest that water may be intensively recycled in the mountains of the TRB. Based on isotopic hydrograph separation, we found that groundwater is the main water source that discharges the entire basin although individual rivers vary. PMID:26862902

  15. Spatial and temporal characteristics of stable isotopes in the Tarim River Basin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congjian; Li, Xingong; Chen, Yaning; Li, Weihong; Stotler, Randy L; Zhang, Yongqing

    2016-06-01

    By using 233 isotope samples, we investigated the spatial and temporal variations of δ(18)O and δ(2)H in precipitation and surface water, and the contribution of different water sources in the rivers within the Tarim River Basin (TRB), which receives snow/glacier meltwater, groundwater, and rainfall. Our study revealed a similar seasonal pattern of precipitation δ(18)O and δ(2)H at both the north and south edges of the basin, indicating the dominant effect of westerly air masses in the summer and the combined influence of westerly and polar air masses during the winter, although the southern part showed more complex precipitation processes in the summer. River water in the basin has relatively large temporal variations in both δ(18)O and δ(2)H showing a distinct seasonal pattern with lower isotope values in May than in September. Higher d-excess values throughout the year in the Aksu river and the Tizinafu river suggest that water may be intensively recycled in the mountains of the TRB. Based on isotopic hydrograph separation, we found that groundwater is the main water source that discharges the entire basin although individual rivers vary.

  16. Stable isotope analysis of temporal variation in the diets of pre-fledged Laughing Gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knoff, A.J.; Macko, S.A.; Erwin, R.M.; Brown, K.M.

    2002-01-01

    The *13C, *15N, and *34S stable isotopic values of feathers from pre-fledged Laughing Gulls (Larus atricilla) in coastal Virginia and Jamaica Bay, New York were used to examine dietary variation during the nestling period. The tip portions of the feathers were used to indicate diet during the initiation of primary feather growth, whereas the base portions indicated diet during the period immediately prior to fledging. The results indicate that diets of the nestlings in Virginia moved to a higher trophic level during the period prior to fledging, however the New York nestlings did not appear to undergo any appreciable dietary change during this period. Overall, nestlings from both colonies consumed proportionately more foods of marine origin than freshwater or terrestrial. Therefore, the results do not support those of earlier studies that suggested that partially developed salt glands in young gulls might restrict the diet to more terrestrial or freshwater prey in the early stages of nestling growth.

  17. Remotely operated compact underwater temporally encoded imager: CUTEI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, Derek; Cochenour, Brandon; Mullen, Linda

    2016-05-01

    Remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) typically use traditional optical imaging systems, such as cameras, for high resolution imaging. Cameras are effective in clear water, but have extremely poor performance in degraded visual environments (DVEs) such as turbid coastal waters and harbors. This is due to the multiple scattering of the light from the particulates and organic matter in the water. Laser-based sensors have been developed to enhance optical imaging in DVEs1,3,4,5,6. However, since conventional approaches require that the illuminator and receiver be located on the same platform, the size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements are incompatible with small ROVs. Researchers at NAVAIR have developed a low cost optical imager utilizing a bistatic geometry where the illuminator and receiver are mounted on separate, smaller platforms. The illuminator steers a modulated laser beam with a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanner to sequentially illuminate an underwater object. A distant receiver collects the object reflected laser light and reconstructs the imagery. Communications information, including a synchronization sequence, is encoded onto the modulation which is used by the receiver to build the image. The SWaP of the illuminator's components have been optimized and integrated into a modified version of the OpenROV, a miniature, commercial off-the-shelf ROV. This paper reports on the efforts to reduce the SWaP of the modulated illuminator and the results of testing this system in a laboratory water tank environment.

  18. Contextual determinants of temporal control: Behavioral contrast in a free-operant psychophysical procedure.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Stephanie P; Lattal, Kennon A

    2006-02-28

    The question of how temporal control of responding might be influenced by contingency changes in other contexts was investigated. Each of three pigeons first was exposed to a two-component multiple schedule in which a two-key free-operant psychophysical procedure operated in one component and a variable-interval schedule operated in the other component. The variable-interval schedule then was changed to extinction while the free-operant psychophysical procedure remained unchanged. Finally, the variable-interval schedule was reintroduced. Response rates on the left key and the estimated temporal threshold under the free-operant psychophysical procedure increased for each pigeon when the alternate component schedule was changed to extinction and then decreased again when the variable-interval schedule was reintroduced. The results suggest one way that temporal control is affected by its context, and may be interpreted through the direct effects of overall reinforcement rate on temporal control mechanisms or the disruptive effects of alternative sources of reinforcement on temporally controlled behavior.

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of stable isotopes and biological parameters for the Danube River in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Mitrovic, Tatjana; Obradovic, Vesna; Golobocanin, Dusan; Ogrinc, Nives; Miljevic, Nada

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents the results of hydrological, physicochemical, biological, and isotopic investigations of the Danube River along the stretch through Serbian territory conducted during four campaigns in September and November 2007, September 2008 and April 2009. The stable isotope values exhibited significant changes both in the Danube (-10.7 to-9.5 per thousand for delta(18)O and-73.7 to-67.1 per thousand for delta(2)H) and in its tributaries (-9.1 to-8.5 per thousand for delta(18)O and-69.4 to-59.4 per thousand for delta(2)H) depending on the time of survey, which could be partly attributed to the influences of seasonal effects. Results emphasise the dominant role of tributaries inflows from aquifers along the Danube. The very narrow range of delta(13)C(POC) (from-28.9 to-27.4 per thousand) was associated with relatively high C/N ratios (C/N>9), and together with delta(15)N(TPN) values, the date suggested that, in early spring, a major fraction of particulate organic matter was derived from allochthonous matter. An orthogonal varimax rotation of the principal components analysis identified four latent factors ('mineral related', 'biological', 'hardness', and 'soil inlets') which are responsible for the data structure covering 79% of the observed variations among the variables studied. A reliable grouping of samples with respect to the season was found.

  20. Spatial distribution and temporal variability of stable water isotopes in a large and shallow lake.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Wen, Xuefa; Wang, Wei; Xiao, Qitao; Xu, Jingzheng; Cao, Chang; Xu, Jiaping; Hu, Cheng; Shen, Jing; Liu, Shoudong; Lee, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotopic compositions of lake water provide additional information on hydrological, meteorological and paleoclimate processes. In this study, lake water isotopic compositions were measured for more than three years in Lake Taihu, a large and shallow lake in southern China, to investigate the isotopic spatial and seasonal variations. The results indicated that (1) the whole-lake mean δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of the lake water varied seasonally from -48.4 ± 5.8 to -25.1 ± 3.2 ‰ and from -6.5 ± 0.9 to -3.5 ± 0.8 ‰, respectively, (2) the spatial pattern of the lake water isotopic compositions was controlled by the direction of water flow and not by local evaporation rate, and (3) using a one-site isotopic measurement to represent the whole-lake mean may result in unreasonable estimates of the isotopic composition of lake evaporation and the lake water residence time in poorly mixed lakes. The original data, documented here as an online supplement, provides a good reference for testing sensitivity of lake water budget to various isotopic sampling strategies. We propose that detailed spatial measurement of lake water isotopic compositions provides a good proxy for water movement and pollutant and alga transports, especially over big lakes. PMID:26983027

  1. Spatial and temporal variation of stable isotopes in precipitation across Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh Unwala, K.; Sanchez-Murillo, R.; Esquivel-Hernandez, G.; Brooks, E. S.; Boll, J.; Alfaro-Solis, R.; Valdes-Gonzalez, J.

    2013-12-01

    The geographic location of Costa Rica on the Central American Isthmus creates unique mountainous microclimate systems across the country that receive moisture inputs directly from the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean. These microclimate systems offer an exceptional opportunity to study isotopic variations in precipitation over the Central American continental divide. Here, we present a spatial and temporal analysis of historic Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) records and current monitoring efforts. GNIP Sampling campaigns were mainly comprised of monthly-integrated samples during intermittent years from 1990 to 2005. Ongoing monitoring includes three distinct microclimate locations along the continental divide. Samples were grouped into four main regions: Nicoya Peninsula (δ2H = 6.65δ18O-0.13; r2=0.86); Pacific Coast (δ2H = 7.60δ18O+7.95; r2=0.99); Caribbean Slope (δ2H = 6.97δ18O+4.97; r2=0.97); and Central Valley (δ2H = 7.94δ18O+10.38; r2=0.98). The overall meteoric water line for Costa Rica can be defined as δ2H = 7.61δ18O+7.40 (r2=0.98). The regression of precipitation amount with annual arithmetic means in samples from all four regions yields a slope of -1.6 ‰ δ18O per 100 mm of rain (r2 = 0.57), which corresponds with a temperature effect of -0.37 ‰ δ18O/°C. A strong correlation (r2=0.77) of -2.0 ‰ δ18O per km of elevation was found. Samples within the Nicoya Peninsula and Caribbean lowlands appear to be dominated by evaporation enrichment, especially during the dry months (January-April), likely resulting from small precipitation amounts. In the inter-mountainous region of the Central Valley and Pacific slope, complex moisture recycling processes may dominate isotopic variations. Generally, isotopic values tend to be more depleted as the rainy season progresses over the year (May-October). HYSPLIT back trajectory analyses indicate that enriched isotopic compositions are related to central Caribbean parental moisture

  2. Assessing site-specific spatio-temporal variations in hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes of human drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, C. D.; Bowen, G. J.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen (δ2H and δ18O) are environmental forensic tracers that can be used to constrain the origin and movement of animals, people, and products. The fundamental assumption underlying this method is that water resources at different geographic locations have distinct and characteristic isotopic signatures that are assimilated into organic tissues. Although much is known about regional-scale spatio-temporal variability in δ2H and δ18O of water, few studies have addressed the question of how distinct these geographic and seasonal patterns are for any given site. To address this question, a 2-year survey of δ2H and δ18O in tap water from across the contiguous U.S. and Canada was conducted. The data show that seasonal variability in δ2H and δ18O of tap water is generally low (<10 ‰ for δ2H), and those with the highest variability can be classified as: a) cities or towns in areas of high climate seasonality, or b) large cities in arid or seasonally arid regions which access and switch among multiple water sources throughout the year. The data suggest that inter-annual variation in tap water isotope ratios is typically low, with a median difference for month-month pairs during the 2 sampling years of 2.7 (δ2H). The results from this study confirm the existence of temporal variability in δ2H and δ18O of tap water, but suggest that this variability in human-managed systems is highly damped and may be amenable to classification, modeling, and prediction. In all, the data provide the foundation for incorporating temporal variation in predictive models of water and organic δ2H and δ18O, leading to more robust and statistically defensible tests of geographic origin.

  3. Stable Artificial Dissipation Operators for Finite Volume Schemes on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svard, Magnus; Gong, Jing; Nordstrom, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Our objective is to derive stable first-, second- and fourth-order artificial dissipation operators for node based finite volume schemes. Of particular interest are general unstructured grids where the strength of the finite volume method is fully utilized. A commonly used finite volume approximation of the Laplacian will be the basis in the construction of the artificial dissipation. Both a homogeneous dissipation acting in all directions with equal strength and a modification that allows different amount of dissipation in different directions are derived. Stability and accuracy of the new operators are proved and the theoretical results are supported by numerical computations.

  4. Temporal variation of nitrogen balance within constructed wetlands treating slightly polluted water using a stable nitrogen isotope experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanguang; Lei, Qiongye; Li, Zhengkui; Han, Huayang

    2016-02-01

    Slightly polluted water has become one of the main sources of nitrogen contaminants in recent years, for which constructed wetlands (CW) is a typical and efficient treatment. However, the knowledge about contribution of individual nitrogen removal pathways and nitrogen balance in constructed wetlands is still limited. In this study, a stable-isotope-addition experiment was performed in laboratory-scale constructed wetlands treating slightly polluted water to determine quantitative contribution of different pathways and temporal variation of nitrogen balance using Na(15)NO3 as tracer. Microbial conversion and substrate retention were found to be the dominant pathways in nitrogen removal contributing 24.4-79.9 and 8.9-70.7 %, respectively, while plant contributed only 4.6-11.1 % through direct assimilation but promoted the efficiency of other pathways. In addition, microbial conversion became the major way to remove N whereas nitrogen retained in substrate at first was gradually released to be utilized by microbes and plants over time. The findings indicated that N2 emission representing microbial conversion was not only the major but also permanent nitrogen removal process, thus keeping a high efficiency of microbial conversion is important for stable and efficient nitrogen removal in constructed wetlands.

  5. Temporal variation of nitrogen balance within constructed wetlands treating slightly polluted water using a stable nitrogen isotope experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanguang; Lei, Qiongye; Li, Zhengkui; Han, Huayang

    2016-02-01

    Slightly polluted water has become one of the main sources of nitrogen contaminants in recent years, for which constructed wetlands (CW) is a typical and efficient treatment. However, the knowledge about contribution of individual nitrogen removal pathways and nitrogen balance in constructed wetlands is still limited. In this study, a stable-isotope-addition experiment was performed in laboratory-scale constructed wetlands treating slightly polluted water to determine quantitative contribution of different pathways and temporal variation of nitrogen balance using Na(15)NO3 as tracer. Microbial conversion and substrate retention were found to be the dominant pathways in nitrogen removal contributing 24.4-79.9 and 8.9-70.7 %, respectively, while plant contributed only 4.6-11.1 % through direct assimilation but promoted the efficiency of other pathways. In addition, microbial conversion became the major way to remove N whereas nitrogen retained in substrate at first was gradually released to be utilized by microbes and plants over time. The findings indicated that N2 emission representing microbial conversion was not only the major but also permanent nitrogen removal process, thus keeping a high efficiency of microbial conversion is important for stable and efficient nitrogen removal in constructed wetlands. PMID:26438366

  6. Highly Stable Operation of Metal Oxide Nanowire Transistors in Ambient Humidity, Water, Blood, and Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Lim, Taekyung; Bong, Jihye; Mills, Edmund M; Kim, Sangtae; Ju, Sanghyun

    2015-08-01

    The capability for robust operation of nanoscale transistors under harsh environments is equally important as their operating parameters such as high on-currents, high mobility, and high sensing selectivity. For electronic/biomedical applications, in particular, transistor operation must be stable under diverse conditions including ambient humidity, water, blood, and oxygen. Here we demonstrate the use of a self-assembled monolayer of octadecylphosphonic acid (OD-PA) to passivate a functionalized nanowire transistor, allowing the device to operate consistently in such environments. In contrast, without passivation, the characteristics (especially the threshold voltage) of identical nanowire transistors were dramatically altered under these conditions. Furthermore, the OD-PA-passivated transistor shows no signs of long-term stability deterioration and maintains equally high sensing selectivity to light under the harsh environments because of OD-PA's optical transparency. These results demonstrate the suitability of OD-PA passivation methods for fabricating commercial nanoelectronics.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Characterization of the Stable Isotopic Composition of the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Amour, N. A.; Longstaffe, F. J.; MacDonald, R. A.; Crowe, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Great Lakes of North America are a valuable resource for the region's growing population, which depends on them for drinking water, hydroelectric power, shipping, recreation and other services. Even small shifts in the water balance of this large-scale chain-of-lakes system causes significant stress for the economy, environment and society. The Great Lakes also have a substantial impact on the region's climate through lake-effect precipitation and enhanced humidity, which is superimposed on the large-scale processes involving three main air masses (i.e., Pacific, Arctic, Tropical), which generate a characteristic temperature, humidity and atmospheric/precipitation isotopic gradient across the region. The potential consequences of climate change for the Great Lakes are a serious concern, given the lake level fluctuations known to have occurred throughout the Holocene. To understand this hydrological system better, we have collected a total of 2719 surface water samples, and some at depth of 2 m from bottom, intermittently during spring, summer and fall seasons from 2004 to 2011 across the Great Lakes, including connecting channels. The distribution of water isotopes along the Great Lakes chain produces a mixing line, defined as δ2H = 8.0(±0.2)δ18O + 3.1(±1.6) ‰. Several hydrological processes affect the variability of the lake-water isotope signatures in each of the Great Lakes, which are modified under their own characteristic climatic setting before exiting downstream. These processes include the amount and isotopic composition of precipitation, surface runoff and river inputs, groundwater seepage, surface water evaporative enrichment, and the proportion and isotopic composition of upstream water contributions. The Great Lakes mixing line provides a baseline against which spatial and temporal variability in lake water isotopic composition can be evaluated. Isotopic shifts parallel to the mixing line denote connectedness or degree of mixing along the

  8. Modelling neural informational propagation and functional auditory sensory memory with temporal multi-scale operators.

    PubMed

    Serman, Maja; Serman, Nikola; Griffith, Niall J L

    2007-08-01

    In this paper we prove that both diffusion and the leaky integrators cascade based transport mechanisms have as their inherent property the effect of temporal multi-scaling. The two transport mechanisms are modeled not as convolution based algorithms but as causal physical processes. This implies that propagation of information through a neural map may act as a mechanism for achieving temporal multi-scale analysis in the auditory system. Specifically, we are interested in the effects of such a transport process on the formation and the dynamics of auditory sensory memory. Two temporal models of information propagation are discussed and compared in terms of their ability to model auditory sensory memory effects and the biological plausibility of their structure: the causal diffusion based operator (CD) and the leaky integrator cascade based operator (LINC). We show that temporal multi-scale representations achieved by both models exhibit the effects similar to those of auditory sensory memory (filtering, time delay and binding of information). As regards higher-level functions of auditory sensory memory such as change detection, the LINC operator seems to be a biologically more plausible solution for modeling temporal cortical processing.

  9. Experimental evaluation of stable long term operation of semiconductor magnetic sensors at ITER relevant environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakova, I.; Belyaev, S.; Bulavin, M.; Brudnyi, V.; Chekanov, V.; Coccorese, V.; Duran, I.; Gerasimov, S.; Holyaka, R.; Kargin, N.; Konopleva, R.; Kost, Ya.; Kuech, T.; Kulikov, S.; Makido, O.; Moreau, Ph; Murari, A.; Quercia, A.; Shurygin, F.; Strikhanov, M.; Timoshyn, S.; Vasil'evskii, I.; Vinichenko, A.

    2015-08-01

    The paper deals with radiation resistant sensors and their associated measuring instrumentation developed in the course of R and D activities carried out in the framework of an international collaboration. The first trial tests of three-dimensional (3D) probes with Hall sensors have been performed in European tokamaks TORE SUPRA (2004) and JET (2005). Later in 2009 six sets of 3D probes were installed in JET and now continue to operate. The statistical analysis performed in 2014 on the basis of the JET database have demonstrated stable long term operation of all 18 sensors of 3D probes. The results of measurements conducted at the neutron fluxes of nuclear reactors have demonstrated the operability of the sensors up to high neutron fluences of F  >  1018n • cm-2 that exceeds the maximum one for the locations of steady state sensors in ITER over its total lifetime.

  10. Nuclear DNA synthesis in vitro is mediated via stable replication forks assembled in a temporally specific fashion in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, N.H.; Stillman, B.W.

    1988-05-01

    A cell-free nuclear replication system that is S-phase specific, that requires the activity of DNA polymerase alpha, and that is stimulated three- to eightfold by cytoplasmic factors from S-phase cells was used to examine the temporal specificity of chromosomal DNA synthesis in vitro. Temporal specificity of DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei was assessed directly by examining the replication of restriction fragments derived from the amplified 200-kilobase dihydrofolate reductase domain of methotrexate-resistant CHOC 400 cells as a function of the cell cycle. In nuclei prepared from cells collected at the G1/S boundary of the cell cycle, synthesis of amplified sequences commenced within the immediate dihydrofolate reductase origin region and elongation continued for 60 to 80 min. The order of synthesis of amplified restriction fragments in nuclei from early S-phase cells in vitro appeared to be indistinguishable from that in vivo. Nuclei prepared from CHOC 400 cells poised at later times in the S phase synthesized characteristic subsets of other amplified fragments. The specificity of fragment labeling patterns was stable to short-term storage at 4/sup 0/C. The occurrence of stimulatory factors in cytosol extracts was cell cycle dependent in that minimal stimulation was observed with early G1-phase extracts, whereas maximal stimulation was observed with cytosol extracts from S-phase cells. Chromosomal synthesis was not observed in nuclei from G1 cells, nor did cytosol extracts from S-phase cells induce chromosomal replication in G1 nuclei. In contrast to chromosomal DNA synthesis, mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro was not stimulated by cytoplasmic factors and occurred at equivalent rates throughout the G1 and S phases.

  11. Knowledge engineering for temporal dependency networks as operations procedures. [in space communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fayyad, Kristina E.; Hill, Randall W., Jr.; Wyatt, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the knowledge engineering process employed to support the Link Monitor and Control Operator Assistant (LMCOA). The LMCOA is a prototype system which automates the configuration, calibration, test, and operation (referred to as precalibration) of the communications, data processing, metric data, antenna, and other equipment used to support space-ground communications with deep space spacecraft in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). The primary knowledge base in the LMCOA is the Temporal Dependency Network (TDN), a directed graph which provides a procedural representation of the precalibration operation. The TDN incorporates precedence, temporal, and state constraints and uses several supporting knowledge bases and data bases. The paper provides a brief background on the DSN, and describes the evolution of the TDN and supporting knowledge bases, the process used for knowledge engineering, and an analysis of the successes and problems of the knowledge engineering effort.

  12. High voltage threshold for stable operation in a dc electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nishimori, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    We report clear observation of a high voltage (HV) threshold for stable operation in a dc electron gun. The HV hold-off time without any discharge is longer than many hours for operation below the threshold, while it is roughly 10 min above the threshold. The HV threshold corresponds to the minimum voltage where discharge ceases. The threshold increases with the number of discharges during HV conditioning of the gun. Above the threshold, the amount of gas desorption per discharge increases linearly with the voltage difference from the threshold. The present experimental observations can be explained by an avalanche discharge model based on the interplay between electron stimulated desorption (ESD) from the anode surface and subsequent secondary electron emission from the cathode by the impact of ionic components of the ESD molecules or atoms.

  13. Exactness of the generalized Dolbeault complex for k Dirac operators in the stable rank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krump, Lukáš; Salač, Tomáš

    2012-09-01

    The Hartog's type phenomena in several complex variables are best understood in terms of the Dolbeault sequence. A lot of attention was paid in the last decades to its analogue in the function theory of several Clifford variables, i.e. the Dirac operator in several variables. A so-called BGG resolution of this operator is then an analogue to the Dolbeault sequence. The complete description is known in dimension 4. Much less is known in higher dimensions. The case of three variables was described completely by F. Colombo, I. Sabadini, F. Sommen, D. C. Struppa. The full description of the complex for all dimensions is not known at present. In the case of the stable rank (i.e., when the number of variables is less or equal to the half of the even dimension), certain progress has been done. In the paper, we construct the resolution for the case of k variables in the stable range, we show the case of k = 4 in details, and we show the exactness of this sequence. The tools used in the construction are the Penrose transform, Čech cohomology and Leray theorem.

  14. Temporal evolution of stable water isotopologues in cloud droplets in a hill cap cloud in central Europe (HCCT-2010)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiegel, J.K.; Aemisegger, F.; Scholl, M.; Wienhold, F.G.; Collett, J.L.; Lee, T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Mertes, S.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.; Werner, Roland A.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present the first study resolving the temporal evolution of δ2H and δ18O values in cloud droplets during 13 different cloud events. The cloud events were probed on a 937 m high mountain chain in Germany in the framework of the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010) in September and October 2010. The δ values of cloud droplets ranged from −77‰ to −15‰ (δ2H) and from −12.1‰ to −3.9‰ (δ18O) over the whole campaign. The cloud water line of the measured δ values was δ2H=7.8×δ18O+13×10−3, which is of similar slope, but with higher deuterium excess than other Central European Meteoric Water Lines. Decreasing δ values in the course of the campaign agree with seasonal trends observed in rain in central Europe. The deuterium excess was higher in clouds developing after recent precipitation revealing episodes of regional moisture recycling. The variations in δ values during one cloud event could either result from changes in meteorological conditions during condensation or from variations in the δ values of the water vapor feeding the cloud. To test which of both aspects dominated during the investigated cloud events, we modeled the variation in δ values in cloud water using a closed box model. We could show that the variation in δ values of two cloud events was mainly due to changes in local temperature conditions. For the other eleven cloud events, the variation was most likely caused by changes in the isotopic composition of the advected and entrained vapor. Frontal passages during two of the latter cloud events led to the strongest temporal changes in both δ2H (≈ 6‰ per hour) and δ18O (≈ 0.6‰ per hour). Moreover, a detailed trajectory analysis for the two longest cloud events revealed that variations in the entrained vapor were most likely related to rain out or changes in relative humidity and temperature at the moisture source region or both. This study illustrates the sensitivity of stable isotope

  15. Temporal evolution of stable water isotopologues in cloud droplets in a hill cap cloud in central Europe (HCCT-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, J. K.; Aemisegger, F.; Scholl, M.; Wienhold, F. G.; Collett, J. L., Jr.; Lee, T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Mertes, S.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.; Werner, R. A.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we present the first study resolving the temporal evolution of δ2H and δ18O values in cloud droplets during 13 different cloud events. The cloud events were probed on a 937 m high mountain chain in Germany in the framework of the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010) in September and October 2010. The δ values of cloud droplets ranged from -77‰ to -15‰ (δ2H) and from -12.1‰ to -3.9‰ (δ18O) over the whole campaign. The cloud water line of the measured δ values was δ2H=7.8×δ18O+13×10-3, which is of similar slope, but with higher deuterium excess than other Central European Meteoric Water Lines. Decreasing δ values in the course of the campaign agree with seasonal trends observed in rain in central Europe. The deuterium excess was higher in clouds developing after recent precipitation revealing episodes of regional moisture recycling. The variations in δ values during one cloud event could either result from changes in meteorological conditions during condensation or from variations in the δ values of the water vapor feeding the cloud. To test which of both aspects dominated during the investigated cloud events, we modeled the variation in δ values in cloud water using a closed box model. We could show that the variation in δ values of two cloud events was mainly due to changes in local temperature conditions. For the other eleven cloud events, the variation was most likely caused by changes in the isotopic composition of the advected and entrained vapor. Frontal passages during two of the latter cloud events led to the strongest temporal changes in both δ2H (≈ 6‰ per hour) and δ18O (≈ 0.6‰ per hour). Moreover, a detailed trajectory analysis for the two longest cloud events revealed that variations in the entrained vapor were most likely related to rain out or changes in relative humidity and temperature at the moisture source region or both. This study illustrates the sensitivity of stable isotope

  16. Temporal and spatial variability in stable isotope compositions of a freshwater mussel: Implications for biomonitoring and ecological studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gustafson, L.; Showers, W.; Kwak, T.; Levine, J.; Stoskopf, M.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotopes can be used to elucidate ecological relationships in community and trophic studies. Findings are calibrated against baselines, e.g. from a producer or primary consumer, assumed to act as a reference to the isotopic context created by spatio-temporal attributes such as geography, climate, nutrient, and energy sources. The ability of an organism to accurately represent a community base depends on how, and over what time-scale, it assimilates ambient materials. Freshwater mussels have served as references for trophic studies of freshwater communities and as indicators of change in nutrient pollution load or source. Their suitability as reference animals has not yet been fully explored, however. We conducted a series of studies examining the suitability of freshwater mussels as isotopic baselines, using their ability to reflect variation in ambient nutrient loads as a case scenario. (1) We analyzed bivalve foot tissue ??15N and ??13C from 22 stream reaches in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, USA to show that compositions varied substantially among locations. Site mean bivalve ??13C values correlated with site ambient particulate organic matter (POM) ??13C values, and site mean bivalve ??15N values correlated with site ambient water dissolved ??15N-NO3 values. (2) Similarity of results among sample types demonstrated that the minimally invasive hemolymph sample is a suitable substitute for foot tissue in ??15N analyses, and that small sample sizes generate means representative of a larger population. Both findings can help minimize the impact of sampling on imperiled freshwater mussel populations. (3) In a bivalve transplantation study we showed that hemolymph ??15N compositions responded to a shift in ambient dissolved ??15N-NO3, although slowly. The tissue turnover time for bivalve hemolymph was 113 days. We conclude that bivalves serve best as biomonitors of chronic, rather than acute, fluctuations in stream nutrient loads, and provide initial

  17. Spatial and temporal migration patterns of Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) in the southwest as revealed by stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, K.L.; van Riper, Charles; Theimer, T.C.; Paxton, E.H.

    2007-01-01

    We used stable hydrogen isotopes (??D) to identify the breeding locations of Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) migrating through five sites spanning a cross-section of the species' southwestern migration route during the springs of 2003 and 2004. Determining the temporal and spatial patterns of migration and degree of population segregation during migration is critical to understanding long-term population trends of migrant birds. At all five migration sites, we found a significant negative relationship between the date Wilson's Warblers passed through the sampling station and ??D values of their feathers. These data were consistent with a pattern of "leap-frog" migration, in which individuals that bred the previous season at southern latitudes migrated through migration stations earlier than individuals that had previously bred at more northern latitudes. We documented that this pattern was consistent across sites and in multiple years. This finding corroborates previous research conducted on Wilson's Warbler during the fall migration. In addition, mean ??D values became more negative across sampling stations from west to east, with the mean ??D values at each station corresponding to different geographic regions of the Wilson's Warblers' western breeding range. These data indicate that Wilson's Warblers passing through each station represented a specific regional subset of the entire Wilson's Warbler western breeding range. As a result, habitat alterations at specific areas across the east-west expanse of the bird's migratory route in the southwestern United States could differentially affect Wilson's Warblers at different breeding areas. This migration information is critical for management of Neotropical migrants, especially in light of the rapid changes presently occurring over the southwestern landscape. ?? The American Ornithologists' Union, 2007.

  18. All-optical buffer based on temporal cavity solitons operating at 10 Gb/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jae K.; Erkintalo, Miro; Schröder, Jochen; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Murdoch, Stuart G.; Coen, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate the operation of an all-optical buffer based on temporal cavity solitons stored in a nonlinear passive fiber ring resonator. Unwanted acoustic interactions between neighboring solitons are suppressed by modulating the phase of the external laser driving the cavity. A new locking scheme is presented that allows the buffer to operate with an arbitrarily large number of cavity solitons in the loop. Experimentally, we are able to demonstrate the storage of 4536 bits of data, written all-optically into the fiber ring at 10 Gb/s, for 1 minute.

  19. Does the ocean-atmosphere system have more than one stable mode of operation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, W. S.; Peteet, D. M.; Rind, D.

    1985-01-01

    The climate record obtained from two long Greenland ice cores reveals several brief climate oscillations during glacial time. The most recent of these oscillations, also found in continental pollen records, has greatest impact in the area under the meteorological influence of the northern Atlantic, but none in the United States. This suggests that these oscillations are caused by fluctuations in the formation rate of deep water in the northern Atlantic. As the present production of deep water in this area is driven by an excess of evaporation over precipitation and continental runoff, atmospheric water transport may be an important element in climate change. Changes in the production rate of deep water in this sector of the ocean may push the climate system from one quasi-stable mode of operation to another.

  20. Fast and stable explicit operator splitting methods for phase-field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuanzhen; Kurganov, Alexander; Qu, Zhuolin; Tang, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations of phase-field models require long time computations and therefore it is necessary to develop efficient and highly accurate numerical methods. In this paper, we propose fast and stable explicit operator splitting methods for both one- and two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations for thin film epitaxy with slope selection and the Cahn-Hilliard equation. The equations are split into nonlinear and linear parts. The nonlinear part is solved using a method of lines together with an efficient large stability domain explicit ODE solver. The linear part is solved by a pseudo-spectral method, which is based on the exact solution and thus has no stability restriction on the time-step size. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed methods on a number of one- and two-dimensional numerical examples, where different stages of coarsening such as the initial preparation, alternating rapid structural transition and slow motion can be clearly observed.

  1. Stable operation of a Secure QKD system in the real-world setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Akihisa

    2007-06-01

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) now steps forward from the proof of principle to the validation of the practical feasibility. Nevertheless, the QKD technology should respond to the challenges from the real-world such as stable operation against the fluctuating environment, and security proof under the practical setting. We report our recent progress on stable operation of a QKD system, and key generation with security assurance. A QKD system should robust to temperature fluctuation in a common office environment. We developed a loop-mirror, a substitution of a Faraday mirror, to allow easy compensation for the temperature dependence of the device. Phase locking technique was also employed to synchronize the system clock to the quantum signals. This technique is indispensable for the transmission system based on the installed fiber cables, which stretch and shrink due to the temperature change. The security proof of QKD, however, has assumed the ideal conditions, such as the use of a genuine single photon source and/or unlimited computational resources. It has been highly desirable to give an assurance of security for practical systems, where the ideal conditions are no longer satisfied. We have constructed a theory to estimate the leakage information on the transmitted key under the practically attainable conditions, and have developed a QKD system equipped with software for secure key distillation. The QKD system generates the final key at the rate of 2000 bps after 20 km fiber transmission. Eavesdropper's information on the final key is guaranteed to be less than 2-7 per bit. This is the first successful generation of the secure key with quantitative assurance of the upper bound of the leakage information. It will put forth the realization of highly secure metropolitan optical communication network against any types of eavesdropping.

  2. Temporal variability in Chemical and Stable isotopic characteristics of ambient bulk aerosols over a coastal environment of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnihotri, R.; Karapurkar, S. G.; Sarma, V. V.; Praveen, P.; Kumar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols are known to influence regional biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in addition to regional radiation budgets. Owing to multiplicity of primary sources of natural and anthropogenic origin, their detailed chemical and isotopic characterization can greatly help in source apportionment and identifying secondary processes. From the roof of NIO-Goa (India) [15.46οN, 73.8oE; at ~55.8 MASL], atmospheric bulk aerosols (n=22) were collected on Quartz filters, from 2009 December to January 2011 covering entire 2010 (except monsoon period) to investigate temporal variability in their chemical and isotopic characteristics of the carbonaceous fraction i.e. TC, TOC and TN mass concentrations and their stable isotopic ratios (δ13CTC, δ13CTOC and δ15NTN). Both δ13CTC and δ13CTOC varied in narrow ranges (-24.9±1.1‰, -25.7±0.9‰ respectively), but significant differences were observed between the two during pre-monsoon months (as high as 2.3‰), possibly due to mixing of inorganic mineral dust. δ15NTN values showed a wide range of variability (average = 13.6±7.2‰), with significantly lower values (~2-5‰; as reported earlier by Agnihotri et al. 2011) during pre-monsoon period compared to those during winter (as high as ~26‰). Using δ13CTC values and two end-member mixing model (assuming δ13C of marine and continental carbon as -21 and -27‰ respectively), the average marine carbon fraction for Goa aerosols was estimated as 36±18.5%, significantly higher than reported for Chennai aerosols (~19%) (Pavuluri et al., 2011), but close to the reported average for marine aerosols at Bermuda (38%) (Turekian et al., 2003). Chemical and isotopic characteristics of ambient aerosols over Goa along with contemporaneous meteorological data indicate that winter aerosols contain significant proportion of carbonaceous fraction originated from biomass burning and other anthropogenic activities carried out in northern parts of

  3. Atmospheric pressure ion lens extends the stable operational region of an electrospray ion source for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuai Sherry; Zhong, Xuefei; Chen, David D Y

    2012-04-01

    An atmospheric ion lens incorporated into an electrospray ion source for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is found to extend the stable operational regions for both flow rates and electrospray ionization (ESI) voltages. The stable operating conditions for the ESI source with and without the ion lens were characterized. The results showed that the stable operation region was widest when the voltage difference between the sprayer and the ion lens ranges from 2.6 to 2.8 kV, and under these condition, the CE-MS interface can be adapted to a broader range of electroosmotic and modifier flow rates. Modeling of the electric field in the electrospray ion source with the ion lens suggests that the extension of the stable region is attributed to the flatter equipotential surfaces around the sprayer tip and higher electric field strengths in the rest of the interface region. PMID:22589113

  4. 50 mW stable single longitudinal mode operation of a 780 nm GaAlAs DFB laser

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, S.; Kume, M.; Hamada, K.; Yoshikawa, N.; Shimizu, H.; Gano, G.; Uno, T.

    1989-06-01

    Stable single longitudinal mode (SLM) operation has been attained with powers as high as 50 mW in a 780 nm GaAlAs distributed feedback laser. This excellent operation is due to the use of the buried twin-ridge substrate structure which allows the stable fundamental spatial mode operation even at high-power levels. The coupling strength designed is 0.5 from the viewpoint of obtaining a low operation current at 50 mW. The SLM operation in this laser was maintained for powers up to 50 mW at room temperature and in the temperature range from -17 to 37/sup 0/C at 50 mW. The maximum power attained was 62 mW.

  5. An evaluation of teeth of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Greenland as a matrix to monitor spatial and temporal trends of mercury and stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Aubail, Aurore; Dietz, Rune; Rigét, Frank; Simon-Bouhet, Benoît; Caurant, Florence

    2010-10-01

    Total mercury (Hg) concentrations were measured in teeth of ringed seals from Qeqertarsuaq, central West Greenland (1982 to 2006) and Ittoqqortoormiit, central East Greenland (1986 to 2006). Stable isotopic ratios of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) were determined as well to provide insights into diet variations between regions or through time. Mercury concentrations decreased the first years of life of the animals suggesting that Hg had been transferred from the mother to the foetus and newborn. The Hg concentrations in teeth were significantly lesser in ringed seals from central West Greenland compared to those from central East Greenland. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic values measured in the animals differed also significantly between the two regions. Increasing temporal trends of dental Hg concentrations between 1994 and 2006 were observed in ringed seals from both central West Greenland and central East Greenland. These increases were attributed to global changes in environmental Hg levels since no temporal trends in delta(15)N values were found to support the hypothesis of a diet shift over time. Furthermore, a decreasing temporal trend in delta(13)C values was observed in the teeth of seals from central East Greenland, and explained by a likely change over time towards more pelagic feeding habits; alternatively, the so-known Seuss effect was thought to be responsible for this decrease. Finally, it was concluded that the tooth of ringed seal was a good monitoring tissue to assess Hg trends.

  6. Delay Discounting Rates Are Temporally Stable in an Equivalent Present Value Procedure Using Theoretical and Area under the Curve Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Justin; McKay, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Temporal discounting rates have become a popular dependent variable in social science research. While choice procedures are commonly employed to measure discounting rates, equivalent present value (EPV) procedures may be more sensitive to experimental manipulation. However, their use has been impeded by the absence of test-retest reliability data.…

  7. Air-stable operation of transparent, colloidal quantum dot based LEDs with a unipolar device architecture.

    PubMed

    Wood, Vanessa; Panzer, Matthew J; Caruge, Jean-Michel; Halpert, Jonathan E; Bawendi, Moungi G; Bulović, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    We report a novel unipolar light-emitting device architecture that operates using direct-current, field-driven electroluminescence of colloidally synthesized quantum dots (QDs). This device architecture, which is based only on transparent ceramics and QDs, enables emission from different color QDs and, for the first time, constant QD electroluminescence during extended operation in air, unpackaged.

  8. Elastomeric Microchip Electrospray Emitter for Stable Cone-Jet Mode Operation in the Nanoflow Regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Irimia, Daniel; Toner, Mehmet; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-05-15

    Despite widespread interest in applying lab-on-a-chip technologies to mass spectrometry (MS)-based analyses, the coupling of microfluidics to electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS remains challenging. We report a robust, integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip interface for ESI-MS using simple and widely accessible microfabrication procedures. The interface uses an auxiliary channel to provide electrical contact in the Taylor cone of the electrospray without sample loss or dilution. The electric field at the channel terminus is enhanced by two vertical cuts that cause the interface to taper to a line rather than to a point, and the formation of small Taylor cones at the channel exit ensures sub-nL post-column dead volumes. While comparable ESI-MS sensitivities were achieved using both microchip and conventional fused silica capillary emitters, stable cone-jet mode electrospray could be established over a far broader range of flow rates (from 50–1000 nL/min) and applied potentials using the microchip emitters. This special feature of the microchip emitter should minimize the fine tuning required for electrospray optimization and make the stable electrospray more resistant to external perturbations.

  9. Devices and methods of operation thereof for providing stable flow for centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J. (Inventor); Stevens, Mark A. (Inventor); Jett, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Centrifugal compressor flow stabilizing devices and methods of operation thereof are disclosed that act upon the flow field discharging from the impeller of a centrifugal compressor and modify the flow field ahead of the diffuser vanes such that flow conditions contributing to rotating stall and surge are reduced or even eliminated. In some embodiments, shaped rods and methods of operation thereof are disclosed, whereas in other embodiments reverse-tangent air injection devices and methods are disclosed.

  10. Graph theoretical stable allocation as a tool for reproduction of control by human operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nooijen, Ronald; Ertsen, Maurits; Kolechkina, Alla

    2016-04-01

    During the design of central control algorithms for existing water resource systems under manual control it is important to consider the interaction with parts of the system that remain under manual control and to compare the proposed new system with the existing manual methods. In graph theory the "stable allocation" problem has good solution algorithms and allows for formulation of flow distribution problems in terms of priorities. As a test case for the use of this approach we used the algorithm to derive water allocation rules for the Gezira Scheme, an irrigation system located between the Blue and White Niles south of Khartoum. In 1925, Gezira started with 300,000 acres; currently it covers close to two million acres.

  11. Raceway control with oxygen, steam and coal for stable blast furnace operation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, L.M.

    1996-12-31

    Tata Steel operates seven blast furnaces at its Jamshedpur works. Coal injection was introduced in the three larger furnaces starting in 1991, and coal tar injection was commissioned in the A blast furnace in June, 1996. Presently, a coal injection level of 130 kg/thm has been achieved at G blast furnace, which is the newest and the largest among all blast furnaces at Tata Steel. The paper discusses the operational features of the blast furnaces at Tata Steel, practical limits of fuel injection, the philosophy of the control of raceway conditions, and experience with fuel injection at Tata Steel.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) biomarkers in soil and sediment tracing: towards improved sampling protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiffarth, Dominic; Petticrew, Ellen; Owens, Philip; Lobb, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of CSSI in biomarkers, specifically fatty acids and derivatives thereof, has recently been investigated as a potential tracer in soil and sediment fingerprinting. The use of CSSIs is of interest because of the potential to discern sediment providence based on land use, which is often difficult or not possible with other tracing techniques alone, such as geochemistry and fallout radionuclides. However, challenges exist in producing a representative sample of potential source materials. This presentation focuses on the development of improved protocols for sample collection. The data presented here are part of a larger investigation into using CSSIs as tracers in an agricultural watershed (South Tobacco Creek) in southern Manitoba, Canada. Extensive sampling was performed throughout the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons in several locations within the watershed, with a focus on capturing within and between field spatial and temporal variability in one particular sub-watershed (the "Stepler" watershed). The Stepler watershed provided a unique opportunity to perform sampling in a natural environment where agricultural crops were hydrologically separated, thereby allowing for a sampling regime of transects strategically placed with little influence from nearby crops. A portion of the data which has been analyzed, showing temporal and spatial variability in terms of carbon stable isotope signal, biomarker concentrations and soil organic carbon, is presented. As CSSI protocols for tracing are still in development, these data aid in determining the robustness of the technique as well as helping to inform sampling approaches.

  13. [Startup, stable operation and process failure of EBPR system under the low temperature and low dissolved oxygen condition].

    PubMed

    Ma, Juan; Li, Lu; Yu, Xiao-Jun; Wei, Xue-Fen; Liu, Juan-Li

    2015-02-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was started up and operated with alternating anaerobic/oxic (An/O) to perform enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) under the condition of 13-16 degrees C. The results showed that under the condition of low temperature, the EBPR system was successfully started up in a short time (<6 d). The reactor achieved a high and stable phosphorus removal performance with an influent phosphate concentration of 20 mg x L(-1) and the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 2 mg x L(-1). The effluent phosphate concentration was lower than 0.5 mg x L(-1). It was found that decreasing DO had an influence on the steady operation of EBPR system. As DO concentration of aerobic phase decreased from 2 mg x L(-1) to 1 mg x L(-1), the system could still perform EBPR and the phosphorus removal efficiency was greater than 97.4%. However, the amount of phosphate released during anaerobic phase was observed to decrease slightly compared with that of 2 mg x L(-1) DO condition. Moreover, the phosphorus removal performance of the system deteriorated immediately and the effluent phosphate concentration couldn't meet the national integrated wastewater discharge standard when DO concentration was further lowered to 0.5 mg x L(-1). The experiments of increasing DO to recover phosphorus removal performance of the EBPR suggested the process failure resulted from low DO was not reversible in the short-term. It was also found that the batch tests of anoxic phosphorus uptake using nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors had an impact on the stable operation of EBPR system, whereas the resulting negative influence could be recovered within 6 cycles. In addition, the mixed liquid suspended solids (MLSS) of the EBPR system remained stable and the sludge volume index (SVI) decreased to a certain extend in a long run, implying long-term low temperature and low DO condition favored the sludge sedimentation. PMID:26031088

  14. Design optimization of MR-compatible rotating anode x-ray tubes for stable operation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Mihye; Lillaney, Prasheel; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Hybrid x-ray/MR systems can enhance the diagnosis and treatment of endovascular, cardiac, and neurologic disorders by using the complementary advantages of both modalities for image guidance during interventional procedures. Conventional rotating anode x-ray tubes fail near an MR imaging system, since MR fringe fields create eddy currents in the metal rotor which cause a reduction in the rotation speed of the x-ray tube motor. A new x-ray tube motor prototype has been designed and built to be operated close to a magnet. To ensure the stability and safety of the motor operation, dynamic characteristics must be analyzed to identify possible modes of mechanical failure. In this study a 3D finite element method (FEM) model was developed in order to explore possible modifications, and to optimize the motor design. The FEM provides a valuable tool that permits testing and evaluation using numerical simulation instead of building multiple prototypes.Methods: Two experimental approaches were used to measure resonance characteristics: the first obtained the angular speed curves of the x-ray tube motor employing an angle encoder; the second measured the power spectrum using a spectrum analyzer, in which the large amplitude of peaks indicates large vibrations. An estimate of the bearing stiffness is required to generate an accurate FEM model of motor operation. This stiffness depends on both the bearing geometry and adjacent structures (e.g., the number of balls, clearances, preload, etc.) in an assembly, and is therefore unknown. This parameter was set by matching the FEM results to measurements carried out with the anode attached to the motor, and verified by comparing FEM predictions and measurements with the anode removed. The validated FEM model was then used to sweep through design parameters [bearing stiffness (1×10{sup 5}–5×10{sup 7} N/m), shaft diameter (0.372–0.625 in.), rotor diameter (2.4–2.9 in.), and total length of motor (5.66–7.36 in.)] to

  15. Design optimization of MR-compatible rotating anode x-ray tubes for stable operation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mihye; Lillaney, Prasheel; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Hybrid x-ray/MR systems can enhance the diagnosis and treatment of endovascular, cardiac, and neurologic disorders by using the complementary advantages of both modalities for image guidance during interventional procedures. Conventional rotating anode x-ray tubes fail near an MR imaging system, since MR fringe fields create eddy currents in the metal rotor which cause a reduction in the rotation speed of the x-ray tube motor. A new x-ray tube motor prototype has been designed and built to be operated close to a magnet. To ensure the stability and safety of the motor operation, dynamic characteristics must be analyzed to identify possible modes of mechanical failure. In this study a 3D finite element method (FEM) model was developed in order to explore possible modifications, and to optimize the motor design. The FEM provides a valuable tool that permits testing and evaluation using numerical simulation instead of building multiple prototypes. Methods: Two experimental approaches were used to measure resonance characteristics: the first obtained the angular speed curves of the x-ray tube motor employing an angle encoder; the second measured the power spectrum using a spectrum analyzer, in which the large amplitude of peaks indicates large vibrations. An estimate of the bearing stiffness is required to generate an accurate FEM model of motor operation. This stiffness depends on both the bearing geometry and adjacent structures (e.g., the number of balls, clearances, preload, etc.) in an assembly, and is therefore unknown. This parameter was set by matching the FEM results to measurements carried out with the anode attached to the motor, and verified by comparing FEM predictions and measurements with the anode removed. The validated FEM model was then used to sweep through design parameters [bearing stiffness (1×105–5×107 N/m), shaft diameter (0.372–0.625 in.), rotor diameter (2.4–2.9 in.), and total length of motor (5.66–7.36 in.)] to increase the

  16. RF-driven tokamak reactor with sub-ignited, thermally stable operation

    SciTech Connect

    Harten, L.P.; Bers, A.; Fuchs, V.; Shoucri, M.M.

    1981-02-01

    A Radio-Frequency Driven Tokamak Reactor (RFDTR) can use RF-power, programmed by a delayed temperature measurement, to thermally stabilize a power equilibrium below ignition, and to drive a steady state current. We propose the parameters for such a device generating approx. = 1600 MW thermal power and operating with Q approx. = 40 (= power out/power in). A one temperature zero-dimensional model allows simple analytical formulation of the problem. The relevance of injected impurities for locating the equilibrium is discussed. We present the results of a one-dimensional (radial) code which includes the deposition of the supplementary power, and compare with our zero-dimensional model.

  17. Stable Electrical Operation of 6H-SiC JFETs and ICs for Thousands of Hours at 500 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Beheim, Glenn M.; Okojie, Robert S.; Chang, Carl W.; Meredith, Roger D.; Ferrier, Terry L.; Evans, Laura J.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Prokop, Norman F.

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication and testing of the first semiconductor transistors and small-scale integrated circuits (ICs) to achieve up to 3000 h of stable electrical operation at 500 C in air ambient is reported. These devices are based on an epitaxial 6H-SiC junction field-effect transistor process that successfully integrated high temperature ohmic contacts, dielectric passivation, and ceramic packaging. Important device and circuit parameters exhibited less than 10% of change over the course of the 500 C operational testing. These results establish a new technology foundation for realizing durable 500 C ICs for combustion-engine sensing and control, deep-well drilling, and other harsh-environment applications.

  18. Nonlinear dynamics analysis of a membrane Stirling engine: Starting and stable operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formosa, Fabien

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the work devoted to the study of the operation of a miniaturized membrane Stirling engine. Indeed, such an engine relies on the dynamic coupling of the motion of two membranes to achieve a prime mover Stirling thermodynamic cycle. The modelling of the system introduces the large vibration amplitudes of the membrane as well as the nonlinear dissipative effects associated to the fluid flow within the engine. The nonlinearities are expressed as polynomial functions with quadratic and cubic terms. This paper displays the stability analysis to predict the starting of the engine and the instability problem which leads to the steady-state behaviour. The centre manifold-normal form theory is used to obtain the simplest expression for the limit cycle amplitudes. The approach allows the reduction of the number of equations of the original system in order to obtain a simplified system, without loosing the dynamics of the original system as well as the contributions of nonlinear terms. The model intends to be used as a semi-analytical design tool for the optimization of miniaturized Stirling machines from the starting to the steady operation.

  19. Stable single-mode operation of surface-emitting terahertz lasers with graded photonic heterostructure resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gangyi; Halioua, Yacine; Moumdji, Souad; Colombelli, Raffaele; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.

    2013-06-01

    Graded photonic heterostructures (GPH) can be regarded as energy wells for photons. We show that judicious engineering of such photonic wells, obtained by tailoring the grading and the slit width of the GPH resonator, allows one to ensure spectrally single-mode emission on the fundamental symmetric mode in the whole lasing dynamical range of terahertz quantum cascade lasers. Furthermore, the radiative character of the symmetric mode leads to single-mode emission with mW output power in continuous-wave operation, as well as to single-lobed far-field beam patterns. A careful combination of theoretical analysis and experimental observations reveals that the results stem from interplay between mode competition and spatial hole burning effects.

  20. Development of a muon radiographic imaging electronic board system for a stable solar power operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Tanaka, M.

    2010-02-01

    Cosmic-ray muon radiography is a method that is used to study the internal structure of volcanoes. We have developed a muon radiographic imaging board with a power consumption low enough to be powered by a small solar power system. The imaging board generates an angular distribution of the muons. Used for real-time reading, the method may facilitate the prediction of eruptions. For real-time observations, the Ethernet is employed, and the board works as a web server for a remote operation. The angular distribution can be obtained from a remote PC via a network using a standard web browser. We have collected and analyzed data obtained from a 3-day field study of cosmic-ray muons at a Satsuma-Iwojima volcano. The data provided a clear image of the mountain ridge as a cosmic-ray muon shadow. The measured performance of the system is sufficient for a stand-alone cosmic-ray muon radiography experiment.

  1. Patient positioning on the operative table for more accurate reduction during elastic stable intramedullary nailing of the femur: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Valaikaite, Raimonda; Salvo, Davide; Ceroni, Dimitri

    2015-04-15

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing is currently considered a clinical practice standard for the treatment of femoral fractures in children in the age-appropriate group. Malreduction, particularly in rotation, due to the closed reduction technique has been reported. We describe a new technique of positioning on a standard operating table that permits better control of rotational alignment during femoral elastic stable intramedullary nailing.

  2. Functionalizing Titanium Disilicide Nanonets with Cobalt Oxide and Palladium for Stable Li Oxygen Battery Operations.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiahui; Cheng, Qingmei; Xie, Jin; Dong, Qi; Wang, Dunwei

    2015-10-01

    Li oxygen (Li-O2) batteries promise high energy densities but suffer from challenges such as poor cycling lifetime and low round-trip efficiencies. Recently, the instability of carbon cathode support has been recognized to contribute significantly to the problems faced by Li-O2 batteries. One strategy to address the challenge is to replace carbon materials with carbon-free ones. Here, we present titanium silicide nanonets (TiSi2) as such a new material platform for this purpose. Because TiSi2 exhibits no oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) or oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activities, catalysts are required to promote discharge and recharge reactions at reduced overpotentials. Pd nanoparticles grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were observed to provide the bifunctionalities of ORR and OER. Their adhesion to TiSi2 nanonets, however, was found to be poor, leading to drastic performance decay due to Pd detachments and aggregation. The problem was solved by adding another layer of Co3O4, also prepared by ALD. Together, the Pd/Co3O4/TiSi2 combination affords the desired functionalities and stability. Li-O2 test cells that lasted more than 126 cycles were achieved. The reversible formation and decomposition of Li2O2 was verified by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ferrocenium back-titration, and gas-chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our results provide a new material platform for detailed studies of Li-O2 operations for better understanding of the chemistries involved, which is expected to help pave the way toward practical Li-O2 battery realizations.

  3. Prospects for Ultra-Stable Timekeeping with Sealed Vacuum Operation in Multi-Pole Linear Ion Trap Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    A recent long-term comparison between the compensated multi-pole Linear Ion Trap Standard (LITS) and the laser-cooled primary standards via GPS carrier phase time transfer showed a deviation of less than 2.7x10(exp -17)/day. A subsequent evaluation of potential drift contributors in the LITS showed that the leading candidates are fluctuations in background gases and the neon buffer gas. The current vacuum system employs a "flow-through" turbomolecular pump and a diaphragm fore pump. Here we consider the viability of a "sealed" vacuum system pumped by a non-evaporable getter for long-term ultra-stable clock operation. Initial tests suggests that both further stability improvement and longer mean-time-between-maintenance can be achieved using this approach

  4. Vascularized rotational temporal bone flap for repair of anterior skull base defects: a novel operative technique.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Kaufmann, Anthony M

    2015-11-01

    Repair of anterior skull base defects with vascularized grafts poses a significant challenge, given the location and small number of adequately sized vessels for free-flap anastomosis. This is particularly the case in the setting of redo surgery or in patients with preexisting soft-tissue trauma. Even more difficult is achieving a vascularized bone flap closure of such bony defects. The authors report a novel technique involving a rotational temporal bone flap with a temporalis muscle vascularized pedicle, which was used to repair an anterior fossa bony and soft-tissue defect created by recurrent malignancy. A 55-year-old man with history of scalp avulsion during a motor vehicle accident, anterior fossa/nasopharyngeal malignant neuroendocrine carcinoma postresection, and bone flap infection presented with a recurrence of his skull base malignancy. The tumor was located in the anterior fossa, extending interhemispherically and down through the cribriform plate, ethmoid air cells, and extending into the nasopharyngeal cavity. Resection of the recurrent tumor was performed. The bony defect in the anterior skull base was repaired with a novel vascularized rotational temporal bone flap, with acceptable separation of the nasopharynx from the intracranial cavity. The vascularized rotational temporal bone flap, in which a temporalis muscle pedicle is used, provides a novel and easily accessible means of vascularized bone closure of anterior skull base defects without the need for microsurgical free-flap grafting.

  5. Operating conditions for the generation of stable anode spot plasma in front of a positively biased electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yeong-Shin; Lee, Yuna; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-02-15

    Stability of an anode spot plasma, which is an additional high density plasma generated in front of a positively biased electrode immersed in ambient plasma, is a critical issue for its utilization to various types of ion sources. In this study, operating conditions for the generation of stable anode spot plasmas are experimentally investigated. Diagnostics of the bias current flowing into the positively biased electrode and the properties of ambient plasma reveal that unstable nature of the anode spot is deeply associated with the reduction of double layer potential between the anode spot plasma and the ambient plasma. It is found that stability of the anode spot plasma can be improved with increasing the ionization rate in ambient plasma so as to compensate the loss of electrons across the double layer or with enlarging the area of the biased electrode to prevent electron accumulation inside the anode spot. The results obtained from the present study give the guideline for operating conditions of anode spot plasmas as an ion source with high brightness.

  6. Stable operation during pilot-scale anaerobic digestion of nutrient-supplemented maize/sugar beet silage.

    PubMed

    Nges, Ivo Achu; Björn, Annika; Björnsson, Lovisa

    2012-08-01

    Biogas production from maize/sugar beet silage was studied under mesophilic conditions in a continuous stirred tank reactor pilot-scale process. While energy crop mono-digestion is often performed with very long hydraulic retention times (HRTs), the present study demonstrated an efficient process operating with a 50-day HRT and a corrected total solids (TS(corr)) based organic loading rate of 3.4 kg/m(3)d. The good performance was attributed to supplementation with both macro- and micronutrients and was evidenced by good methane yields (318 m(3)/ton TS(corr)), which were comparable to laboratory maximum expected yields, plus low total volatile fatty acid concentrations (<0.8 g/L). A viscoplastic and thixotropic digester fluid behaviour was observed, and the viscosity problems common in crop mono-digestion were not seen in this study. The effluent also complied with Swedish certification standards for bio-fertilizer for farmland application. Nutrient addition thus rendered a stable biogas process, while the effluent was a good quality bio-fertilizer.

  7. Nonretinotopic perception of orientation: Temporal integration of basic features operates in object-based coordinates.

    PubMed

    Wutz, Andreas; Drewes, Jan; Melcher, David

    2016-08-01

    Early, feed-forward visual processing is organized in a retinotopic reference frame. In contrast, visual feature integration on longer time scales can involve object-based or spatiotopic coordinates. For example, in the Ternus-Pikler (T-P) apparent motion display, object identity is mapped across the object motion path. Here, we report evidence from three experiments supporting nonretinotopic feature integration even for the most paradigmatic example of retinotopically-defined features: orientation. We presented observers with a repeated series of T-P displays in which the perceived rotation of Gabor gratings indicates processing in either retinotopic or object-based coordinates. In Experiment 1, the frequency of perceived retinotopic rotations decreased exponentially for longer interstimulus intervals (ISIs) between T-P display frames, with object-based percepts dominating after about 150-250 ms. In a second experiment, we show that motion and rotation judgments depend on the perception of a moving object during the T-P display ISIs rather than only on temporal factors. In Experiment 3, we cued the observers' attentional state either toward a retinotopic or object motion-based reference frame and then tracked both the observers' eye position and the time course of the perceptual bias while viewing identical T-P display sequences. Overall, we report novel evidence for spatiotemporal integration of even basic visual features such as orientation in nonretinotopic coordinates, in order to support perceptual constancy across self- and object motion.

  8. Nonretinotopic perception of orientation: Temporal integration of basic features operates in object-based coordinates.

    PubMed

    Wutz, Andreas; Drewes, Jan; Melcher, David

    2016-08-01

    Early, feed-forward visual processing is organized in a retinotopic reference frame. In contrast, visual feature integration on longer time scales can involve object-based or spatiotopic coordinates. For example, in the Ternus-Pikler (T-P) apparent motion display, object identity is mapped across the object motion path. Here, we report evidence from three experiments supporting nonretinotopic feature integration even for the most paradigmatic example of retinotopically-defined features: orientation. We presented observers with a repeated series of T-P displays in which the perceived rotation of Gabor gratings indicates processing in either retinotopic or object-based coordinates. In Experiment 1, the frequency of perceived retinotopic rotations decreased exponentially for longer interstimulus intervals (ISIs) between T-P display frames, with object-based percepts dominating after about 150-250 ms. In a second experiment, we show that motion and rotation judgments depend on the perception of a moving object during the T-P display ISIs rather than only on temporal factors. In Experiment 3, we cued the observers' attentional state either toward a retinotopic or object motion-based reference frame and then tracked both the observers' eye position and the time course of the perceptual bias while viewing identical T-P display sequences. Overall, we report novel evidence for spatiotemporal integration of even basic visual features such as orientation in nonretinotopic coordinates, in order to support perceptual constancy across self- and object motion. PMID:27494545

  9. Water column distribution of stable isotopes and carbonate properties in the South-eastern Levantine basin (Eastern Mediterranean): Vertical and temporal change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisma-Ventura, G.; Yam, R.; Kress, N.; Shemesh, A.

    2016-06-01

    Water column distributions of the oxygen isotopic composition of sea-water (δ18OSW) and the stable carbon isotope ratio of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC), total alkalinity (AT) and the pH (total scale) at 25 °C (25 °CpHTotal) were investigated along the Southeast Mediterranean (SE-Med) shelf and open water, during 2009-2010. While, the vertical profiles of δ18OSW lacked a clear depth signature, those of δ13CDIC were characterized by a structure that reflects the major water masses in the Levantine basin, with noticeable vertical gradients. The δ13CDIC Suess effect of the Levantine water column was estimated from the difference between the average profiles of 1988 and 2009-2010 (Δδ13CDIC). We observed δ13CDIC temporal change, which indicates propagation of anthropogenic CO2 (Cant) to depth of about 700 m. The Modified Atlantic Water (MAW; 0-200 m) and the Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW; 200-400 m) exhibited a depletion rate of - 0.13 ± 0.03 and - 0.11 ± 0.03‰ decade- 1, respectively, representing ~ 50% of the atmospheric change, while the deep water of the Adriatic source (700-1300 m) did not change during this period. A Δδ13CDIC depletion trend was also recognized below 1350 m, corresponding to the Aegean source deep water (EMDWAeg) and therefore associated to the Eastern Mediterranean Transient (EMT) event. Anthropogenic CO2 accumulation rate of 0.38 ± 0.12 mol C m- 2 yr- 1 for the upper 700 m of the SE-Med, over the last 22 yr, was estimated on the basis of mean depth-integrated δ13CDIC Suess effect profile. Our results confirm lower accumulation rate than that of the subtropical North Atlantic, resulting due to the super-saturation with respect to CO2 of the well-stratified Levantine surface water. High pCO2 saturation during summer (+ 150 μatm), in oppose to a small degree of under-saturation in winter (- 30 μatm) was calculated from surface water AT and 25 °CpHTotal data. However, the δ13CDIC depletion trend of the LIW and the

  10. Conservative versus operative management in stable patients with penetrating abdominal trauma: the experience of a Canadian level 1 trauma centre

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Sean; Amath, Aysah; Knight, Heather; Lampron, Jacinthe

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of conservative management (CM) of penetrating abdominal trauma is to avoid nontherapeutic laparotomies while identifying injuries early. Factors that may predict CM failure are not well established, and the experience of CM has not been well described in the Canadian context. Methods We searched a Canadian level 1 trauma centre database for all penetrating abdominal traumas treated between 2004 and 2014. Hemodynamically stable patients without peritonitis and without clear indications for immediate surgery were considered potential candidates for CM, and were included in the study. We compared those who were managed with CM with those who underwent immediate operative management (OM). Outcomes included mortality and length of stay (LOS). Further analysis was performed to identify predictors of CM failure. Results A total of 72 patients with penetrating abdominal trauma were classified as potential candidates for CM. Ten patients were managed with OM, and 62 with CM, with 9 (14.5%) ultimately failing CM and requiring laparotomy. The OM and CM groups were similar in terms of age, sex, injury severity, mechanism and number of injuries. There were no deaths in either group. The LOS in the intensive care (ICU)/trauma unit was 4.8 ± 3.2 days in the OM group and 2.9 ± 2.6 days in the CM group (p = 0.039). The only predictor for CM failure was intra-abdominal fluid on computed tomography (CT) scan (odds ratio 5.3, 95% confidence interval 1.01–28.19). Conclusion In select patients with penetrating abdominal trauma, CM is safe and results in a reduced LOS in the ICU/trauma unit of 1.9 days. Fluid on CT scan is a predictor for failure. PMID:27668329

  11. The Severity of Gliosis in Hippocampal Sclerosis Correlates with Pre-Operative Seizure Burden and Outcome After Temporal Lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alexandra M; Sugo, Ella; Barreto, Daniela; Hiew, Chee-Chung; Lawson, John A; Connolly, Anne M; Somerville, Ernest; Hasic, Enisa; Bye, Annie Me; Cunningham, Anne M

    2016-10-01

    Astrogliosis and microgliosis in hippocampal sclerosis (HS) are widespread and are postulated to contribute to the pro-excitatory neuropathological environment. This study aimed to establish if seizure burden at the time of surgery or post-surgical outcome were correlated with the extent of gliosis in HS. As a secondary aim, we wanted to determine if the degree of gliosis could be predicted by pre-operative neuroimaging.Children and adults who underwent epilepsy surgery for HS between 2002 and 2011 were recruited (n = 43), and age-matched autopsy controls obtained (n = 15). Temporal lobe specimens were examined by DAB immunohistochemistry for astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)) and microglia (CD68). Cell counting for GFAP and CD68 was performed and quantitative densitometry undertaken for GFAP. Seizure variables and outcome (Engel) were determined through medical record and patient review. Seizure frequency in the 6 months prior to surgery was measured to reflect the acute seizure burden. Duration of seizures, age at onset and age at operation were regarded to reflect chronic seizure burden. Focal, lobar and generalized atrophy on pre-operative MRI were independently correlated with the degree of cortical gliosis in the surgical specimen.In HS, both acute and chronic seizure burden were positively correlated with the degree of gliosis. An increase in reactive astrocyte number in CA3 was the strongest predictor of poor post-operative seizure outcome at 1 and 3 years post-operatively in this cohort. Changes in lower cortical astrocyte and upper cortical microglial number also correlated with post-operative outcome at 1 year. Post-surgical seizure outcome (1, 3 and 5 years) did not otherwise correlate with GFAP immunoreactivity (GFAP-IR) or CD68 immunoreactivity (CD68-IR). Increased microglial activation was detected in patients with pre-operative bilateral convulsive seizures, compared to those without convulsive seizures. Furthermore

  12. How Stable Is Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehr, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Provides a problem where students are asked to find the point at which a soda can floating in some liquid changes its equilibrium between stable and unstable as the soda is removed from the can. Requires use of Newton's first law, center of mass, Archimedes' principle, stable and unstable equilibrium, and buoyant force position. (MVL)

  13. The Nature of Temporally Variable Methane Emissions at Oil and Natural Gas Operations in the Eagle Ford Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, T. N.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Stirm, B. H.; Conley, S. A.; Mehrotra, S.; Faloona, I. C.; Mayfield, M.; Lyon, D. R.; Alvarez, R.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the current state of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas operations, policy makers refer to national inventories and reporting programs, and therefore, it is imperative that these reports are accurate and representative. Many studies exist that investigate the reliability of current monitoring methods, however, to our knowledge the temporal variability of the magnitude and source of methane (CH4) emissions from oil and gas facilities has not been reported in the literature. We present results from a field campaign conducted in June 2014 in the Eagle Ford basin, Texas to assess the temporal variability of emissions from a variety of facilities using data obtained through four different methods. The variability of total CH4 emission rate from individual facilities was investigated by repeated measurement of emissions from five gathering facilities using two aircraft-based mass balance approaches. Basin-wide emissions variation was examined by conducting a series of eight four hour afternoon aerial surveys of two 35 x 35 km areas, with transects oriented perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction. The emission source-type and magnitude were further investigated using helicopter-based FLIR camera observations conducted repeatedly at eight oil wells, one gas well, and four gathering facilities. Results indicate a high degree of variability in day-to-day and sometimes hour-to-hour CH4 emissions magnitude. FLIR camera observations suggest that the component-level source of facility emissions is also highly variable over time, with both storage tank vent stacks and tank hatches representing important components of the observed day-to-day variability. While some emissions were due to scheduled maintenance, others appeared to occur due to faulty and/or aging equipment. Here we discuss what was learned in terms of factors that explain the observed emission rate variability.

  14. Gas-particle concentrations of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at an urban and a residential site in Osaka, Japan: effect of the formation of atmospherically stable layer on their temporal change.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Masao; Nishikawa, Ayako; Fujimori, Keiichi; Shibutani, Yasuhiko

    2011-09-15

    A comparative study on atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particulate matter and the gaseous phase was performed at an urban and a residential site in Osaka, Japan, during 2005-2006. PAH concentrations at the urban site were found to be approximately twice higher than those at the residential site. At both sites, particulate PAH concentrations increased mainly in winter while the trends of temporal change in gaseous PAH concentrations were not clearly observed. The main sources of PAHs were estimated to be local traffic, e.g., diesel engines with catalytic converter. PAH concentrations did not significantly negatively correlate with ozone concentrations and meteorological parameters. Gas-particle partitioning coefficients of representative PAHs with low molecular weight (LMW) significantly negatively correlated with ambient temperature, showing that temporal change in the LMW PAH concentrations in PM could be attributable to the shift of their gas-particle distribution caused by the change in ambient temperature. For the first time, we studied the effect of the formation of atmospherically stable layer following an increase in PAH concentrations in Japan. At the urban site, PAHs showed a significant positive correlation with potential temperature gradients, indicating that temporal variability in PAH concentrations would be dominantly controlled by the formation of atmospherically stable layer in Osaka area.

  15. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Gilbert, Jack A; Stephens, Brent

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO2 concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ∼8×106 data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  16. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  17. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE PAGES

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore » measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is

  18. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Indoor Environmental Conditions, Human Occupancy, and Operational Characteristics in a New Hospital Building

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO2 concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ∼8×106 data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  19. Temporal variatiions of Sea ice cover in the Baltic Sea derived from operational sea ice products used in NWP.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Martin; Paul, Gerhard; Potthast, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Sea ice cover is a crucial parameter for surface fluxes of heat and moisture over water areas. The isolating effect and the much higher albedo strongly reduces the turbulent exchange of heat and moisture from the surface to the atmosphere and allows for cold and dry air mass flow with strong impact on the stability of the whole boundary layer and consequently cloud formation as well as precipitation in the downstream regions. Numerical weather centers as, ECMWF, MetoFrance or DWD use external products to initialize SST and sea ice cover in their NWP models. To the knowledge of the author there are mainly two global sea ice products well established with operational availability, one from NOAA NCEP that combines measurements with satellite data, and the other from OSI-SAF derived from SSMI/S sensors. The latter one is used in the Ostia product. DWD additionally uses a regional product for the Baltic Sea provided by the national center for shipping and hydrografie which combines observations from ships (and icebreakers) for the German part of the Baltic Sea and model analysis from the hydrodynamic HIROMB model of the Swedish meteorological service for the rest of the domain. The temporal evolution of the three different products are compared for a cold period in Februar 2012. Goods and bads will be presented and suggestions for a harmonization of strong day to day jumps over large areas are suggested.

  20. Temporal changes in the bacterial community of animal feces and their correlation with stable fly oviposition, larval development, and adult fitness.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Thais A; Zurek, Ludek

    2014-01-01

    Stable flies are blood-feeding insects with a great negative impact on animals world wide. Larvae develop primarily in animal manure and bacteria are essential for larval development; however, the principle of this dependence is not understood. We hypothesized that as the microbial community of animal manure changes over time, it plays an important role in stable fly fitness. Two-choice bioassays were conducted using 2 week old horse manure (control) and aging horse manure (fresh to 5 week old) to evaluate the effect of manure age on stable fly oviposition. Our data showed that fresh feces did not stimulate oviposition and that the attractiveness increased as manure aged but started to decline after 3 weeks. Bioassays assessing the effect of manure age at the time of oviposition on larval development demonstrated that 1-3 week old manure supported larval development significantly better than fresh, 4, and 5 week old manure. In addition, adult fitness (body size) was significantly higher in flies from 1 and 2 week old manure comparing to that of all other treatments. Analysis of the bacterial community of aging horse manure by 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA revealed a great reduction in bacterial diversity and richness from fresh to 1-5 week old manure and a major shift from strict anaerobes in fresh manure to facultative anaerobes and strict aerobes in aged manure. Overall, the microbial community of 2 and 3 week old horse manure with its dominant bacterial taxa Rhizobium, Devosia, and Brevundimonas stimulated stable fly oviposition the most and provided a suitable habitat for larval development. These bacteria represent the candidates for studies focused on better understanding of stable fly - microbial interactions.

  1. Stable CW Single-Frequency Operation of Fabry-Perot Laser Diodes by Self-Injection Phase Locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerksen, Gary L.; Krainak, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Previously, single-frequency semiconductor laser operation using fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) has been achieved by two methods: (1) use of the FBG as the output coupler for an anti-reflection-coated semiconductor gain element; (2) pulsed operation of a gain-switched Fabry-Perot laser diode with FBG-optical and RF-electrical feedback. Here, we demonstrate CW single frequency operation from a non-AR coated Fabry-Perot laser diode using only FBG optical feedback.

  2. Stable CW Single Frequency Operation of Fabry-Perot Laser Diodes by Self-Injection Phase Locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerksen, Gary L.; Krainak, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    Previously, single-frequency semiconductor laser operation using fiber Bragg gratings has been achieved by tWo methods: 1) use of the FBG as the output coupler for an anti-reflection-coated semiconductor gain element'; 2) pulsed operation of a gain-switched Fabry-Perot laser diode with FBG-optical and RF-electrical feedback'. Here, we demonstrate CW single frequency operation from a non-AR coated Fabry-Perot laser diode using only FBG optical feedback.

  3. Temporal Scaling of Age-Dependent Mortality: Dynamics of Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans Is Easy to Speed Up or Slow Down, but Its Overall Trajectory Is Stable.

    PubMed

    Markov, A V; Naimark, E B; Yakovleva, E U

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of aging is often described by survival curves that show the proportion of individuals surviving to a given age. The shape of the survival curve reflects the dependence of mortality on age, and it varies greatly for different organisms. In a recently published paper, Stroustrup and coauthors ((2016) Nature, 530, 103-107) showed that many factors affecting the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans do not change the shape of the survival curve, but only stretch or compress it in time. Apparently, this means that aging is a programmed process whose trajectory is difficult to change, although it is possible to speed it up or slow it down. More research is needed to clarify whether the "rule of temporal scaling" is applicable to other organisms. A good indicator of temporal scaling is the coefficient of lifespan variation: similar values of this coefficient for two samples indicate similar shape of the survival curves. Preliminary results of experiments on adaptation of Drosophila melanogaster to unfavorable food show that temporal scalability of survival curves is sometimes present in more complex organisms, although this is not a universal rule. Both evolutionary and environmental changes sometimes affect only the average lifespan without changing the coefficient of variation (in this case, temporal scaling is present), but often both parameters (i.e. both scale and shape of the survival curve) change simultaneously. In addition to the relative stability of the coefficient of variation, another possible argument in favor of genetic determination of the aging process is relatively low variability of the time of death, which is sometimes of the same order of magnitude as the variability of timing of other ontogenetic events, such as the onset of sexual maturation. PMID:27677559

  4. High variability in spatial and temporal size-based trophodynamics of deep-sea fishes from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge elucidated by stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, William D. K.; Sweeting, Christopher J.; Wigham, Ben D.; McGill, Rona A. R.; Polunin, Nicholas V. C.

    2013-12-01

    Demersal fish play an important role in the deep-sea ecosystem by acting as a link to mobile food in the water column, consuming benthic fauna, breaking down large food parcels and dispersing organic matter over large areas. Poor diet resolution from stomach content analysis often impairs the ability to assess differences in inter- and intra-population trophodynamics and therefore understand resource partitioning among deep-sea fishes. Antimora rostrata (predator-scavenger), Coryphaenoides armatus (predator-scavenger), Coryphaenoides brevibarbis (predator) and Halosauropsis macrochir (predator) were collected from 3 stations on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) in 2007 and 2009 to investigate trophic ecology using δ13C and δ15N. Variability in lipid-normalised δ13C (δ13Cn) and δ15N was explained by body length in all species but slope and significance of the isotope-length relationships varied both temporally and spatially. δ15N increases with length were observed in A. rostrata at all stations, C. brevibarbis and H. macrochir at one or more stations but were absent in C. armatus. δ13Cn increased with length in A. rostrata but the slope of δ13Cn-length relationships varied spatially and temporally in C. armatus and C. brevibarbis. The co-occurring δ13Cn and δ15N size-based trends in A. rostrata and H. macrochir suggested that size-based trends were a result of increasing trophic position. In C. armatus and C. brevibarbis the isotope-length trends were difficult to distinguish among trophic position increases, shifts in resource use i.e. benthic to pelagic or internal physiology. However, the overall strength, direction and significance of isotope-length trends varied temporally and spatially which suggested varying degrees of overlap in trophic ecology and feeding plasticity among these species.

  5. Frequency-stable operation of a diode-pumped continuous-wave RbTiOAsO(4) optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, M; Beier, B; Boller, K J; Wallenstein, R

    1997-09-01

    Frequency-stable operation of a diode-pumped continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator (OPO) of RbTiOAsO(4) is demonstrated. Piezoelectric and fast electro-optic control of the optical length of the two-mirror OPO cavity (resonant for the pump and the idler waves) compensates for thermal changes in the refractive index of the OPO crystal (induced by absorption of pump light) and acoustic perturbations of the cavity length. Pumped by 405mW of the 810-nm output of a GaAlAs masterf-oscillator-tapered-amplifier diode laser system, the OPO generates a power-stable single-frequency signal wave at 1.24microm with an output of 84mW and a spectral bandwidth of less than 10MHz. PMID:18188215

  6. Characterizing the Spatial and Temporal Variations in Organic Carbon Abundance and Stable Isotope Ratios in Lake Sediments Containing Evidence of Prehistoric Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Z. P.; Finkelstein, D. B.; Horn, S. P.

    2009-12-01

    Intra-basin spatial variability in lake sediments has the potential to limit the utility of interpretations based on the analysis of a single sediment core. We analyzed a network of five sediment cores to assess geochemical and isotopic spatial variability across a lake in southern Costa Rica. Laguna Zoncho (8.813°N, 82.963°W) provides an excellent opportunity to detect spatial variability because it is a small lake (0.75 ha) with a known history of prehistoric maize agriculture in its watershed. During the agricultural period (1770-570 cal BP) at Zoncho, stable carbon isotope values in the five cores average -23 ‰ V-PDB; these values increase to -27 ‰ V-PDB during the subsequent period of forest recovery. In prior work at the lake, this forest recovery was assumed to have been initiated by the Spanish Conquest about AD 1500, but our new findings suggest it may have occurred earlier and have been driven by a different set of circumstances. We attribute the more positive values during the agricultural period to a greater abundance of C4 vegetation in the watershed as the result of agricultural activity that removed native C3 forest vegetation and created fields and disturbed environments that favor C4 plants. Organic carbon contents during the agricultural period average 5 % and increase to an average of 16 % post-Conquest. Molar C/N ratios range from 13 during the agricultural period to 16 after the cessation of agriculture in the watershed. The cores may indicate a non-simultaneous end to agriculture in the watershed. Stable carbon isotope values and organic carbon contents in three of the four cores collected closer to shore contain evidence of an abrupt end of agriculture around 1000 cal. BP. In these cores, stable carbon isotope values indicate a dramatic shift from C4 to C3 inputs and a rapid increase in organic contents. The fourth core shows this shift around 700 cal. BP. The core recovered from the center of the lake records a gradual end to

  7. Stable CW Single-Frequency Operation of Fabry-Perot Laser Diodes by Self-Injection Phase Locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerksen, Gary L.; Krainak, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    Previously, single-frequency semiconductor laser operation using fiber Bragg gratings has been achieved by two methods: 1) use of the FBG as the output coupler for an anti-reflection-coated semiconductor gain element'; 2) pulsed operation of a gain-switched Fabry-Perot laser diode with FBG-optical and RF-electrical feedback. Here, we demonstrate CW single frequency operation from a non-AR coated Fabry-Perot laser diode using only FBG optical feedback. We coupled a nominal 935 run-wavelength Fabry-Perot laser diode to an ultra narrow band (18 pm) FBG. When tuned by varying its temperature, the laser wavelength is pulled toward the centerline of the Bragg grating, and the spectrum of the laser output is seen to fall into three discrete stability regimes as measured by the side-mode suppression ratio.

  8. Spatial and temporal expression of vegetation and atmospheric variability from stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of bat guano in the southern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, Christopher M.; McFarlane, Donald A.; Bird, Michael I.

    2007-07-01

    Stable isotopes of faeces contain information related to the animals feeding ecology. The use of stable isotope values from subfossil faeces as a palaeoenvironmental indicator depends on how faithfully the animal records their local environment. Here we present insectivorous bat guano δ 13C and δ 15N values from a precipitation gradient across the southern United States and northern Mexico to compare with local vegetation and climate. We find δ 13C values to be an excellent predictor of expected C 4/CAM vegetation, indicating that the bats are non-selective in their diet. Moreover, we find bat guano δ 13C values to be strongly correlated with summer precipitation amount and winter precipitation ratio. We also find evidence for a significant relationship with mean annual temperature. In general, we do not find δ 15N values to be related to any parameters along the climatic gradient we examined. Additionally, we measured δ 13C and δ 15N values of bulk guano deposited annually from 1968 to 1987 in a varved guano deposit at Eagle Creek Cave, Arizona. Neither δ 13C nor δ 15N values were significantly related to various local meteorological variables; however, we found δ 13C values of guano to be significantly related to drought and to the North American Monsoon indicating bat guano δ 13C values preserve an interpretable record of large-scale atmospheric variability.

  9. Self-healing chemistry enables the stable operation of silicon microparticle anodes for high-energy lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wu, Hui; Chen, Zheng; McDowell, Matthew T; Cui, Yi; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-12-01

    The ability to repair damage spontaneously, which is termed self-healing, is an important survival feature in nature because it increases the lifetime of most living creatures. This feature is highly desirable for rechargeable batteries because the lifetime of high-capacity electrodes, such as silicon anodes, is shortened by mechanical fractures generated during the cycling process. Here, inspired by nature, we apply self-healing chemistry to silicon microparticle (SiMP) anodes to overcome their short cycle-life. We show that anodes made from low-cost SiMPs (~3-8 µm), for which stable deep galvanostatic cycling was previously impossible, can now have an excellent cycle life when coated with a self-healing polymer. We attain a cycle life ten times longer than state-of-art anodes made from SiMPs and still retain a high capacity (up to ~3,000 mA h g(-1)). Cracks and damage in the coating during cycling can be healed spontaneously by the randomly branched hydrogen-bonding polymer used.

  10. Enhanced stable long-term operation of biotrickling filters treating VOCs by low-dose ozonation and its affecting mechanism on biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingwei; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Jianmeng; Luo, Yong; Zou, Haikui; Sun, Baochang

    2016-11-01

    For long-term operation of highly loaded biotrickling filters (BTFs), the prevention of excess biomass accumulation was essential for avoiding BTF failure. In this study, we proposed low-dose ozonation as a biomass control strategy to maintain high removal efficiencies of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over extended operation of BTFs. To obtain an optimized biomass control strategy, the relative performance of five parallel BTFs receiving different ozone doses was determined, and the affecting mechanism of ozonation on biofilm was elucidated. Experimental results showed that the decline in ozone-free BTF performance began from day 150, which was correlated with excess biomass accumulation, abundant excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and a decline in metabolic activity of biofilm over extended operation. Ozone of 5-10 mg m(-3) was effective in preventing excessive growth and uneven distribution of biomass, and eventually maintaining long-term stable operations. Ozone of over 20 mg m(-3) possibly inhibited microorganism growth severely, thereby deteriorating the elimination performance instead. Comparison of the biofilm EPS indicated that the presence of ozone reduce EPS contents to different extents, which was possibly beneficial for mass transfer and metabolic activity. Comparative community analysis showed that ozonation resulted in different microbial communities in the BTFs. Dyella was found to be the most abundant bacterial genera in all BTFs regardless of ozonation, indicating strong resistance to ozonation. Chryseobacterium and Burkholderia members were markedly enriched in the ozone-added biofilm, implying good adaptation to ozone presence. These findings provided an improved understanding of low-dose ozonation in maintaining a stable long-term operation of BTF. PMID:27494314

  11. Stable operation of a 300-m laser interferometer with sufficient sensitivity to detect gravitational-wave events within our galaxy.

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Arai, K; Takahashi, R; Heinzel, G; Kawamura, S; Tatsumi, D; Kanda, N; Tagoshi, H; Araya, A; Asada, H; Aso, Y; Barton, M A; Fujimoto, M K; Fukushima, M; Futamase, T; Hayama, K; Horikoshi, G; Ishizuka, H; Kamikubota, N; Kawabe, K; Kawashima, N; Kobayashi, Y; Kojima, Y; Kondo, K; Kozai, Y; Kuroda, K; Matsuda, N; Mio, N; Miura, K; Miyakawa, O; Miyama, S M; Miyoki, S; Moriwaki, S; Musha, M; Nagano, S; Nakagawa, K; Nakamura, T; Nakao, K; Numata, K; Ogawa, Y; Ohashi, M; Ohishi, N; Okutomi, S; Oohara, K; Otsuka, S; Saito, Y; Sasaki, M; Sato, S; Sekiya, A; Shibata, M; Somiya, K; Suzuki, T; Takamori, A; Tanaka, T; Taniguchi, S; Telada, S; Tochikubo, K; Tomaru, T; Tsubono, K; Tsuda, N; Uchiyama, T; Ueda, A; Ueda, K; Waseda, K; Watanabe, Y; Yakura, H; Yamamoto, K; Yamazaki, T

    2001-04-30

    TAMA300, an interferometric gravitational-wave detector with 300-m baseline length, has been developed and operated with sufficient sensitivity to detect gravitational-wave events within our galaxy and sufficient stability for observations; the interferometer was operated for over 10 hours stably and continuously. With a strain-equivalent noise level of h approximately 5x10(-21)/sqrt[Hz], a signal-to-noise ratio of 30 is expected for gravitational waves generated by a coalescence of 1.4M-1.4M binary neutron stars at 10 kpc distance. We evaluated the stability of the detector sensitivity with a 2-week data-taking run, collecting 160 hours of data to be analyzed in the search for gravitational waves.

  12. The feasibility of trace element supplementation for stable operation of wheat stillage-fed biogas tank reactors.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, J; Svensson, B H; Karlsson, A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of trace element supplementation on operation of wheat stillage-fed biogas tank reactors. The stillage used was a residue from bio-ethanol production, containing high levels of sulfate. In biogas production, high sulfate content has been associated with poor process stability in terms of low methane production and accumulation of process intermediates. However, the results of the present study show that this problem can be overcome by trace element supplementations. Four lab-scale wheat stillage-fed biogas tank reactors were operated for 345 days at a hydraulic retention time of 20 days (37 degrees C). It was concluded that daily supplementation with Co (0.5 mg L(-1)), Ni (0.2 mg L(-1)) and Fe (0.5 g L(-1)) were required for maintaining process stability at the organic loading rate of 4.0 g volatile solids L(-1) day(-1).

  13. Interpretation of anthropogenic impacts (agriculture and urbanization) on tropical deltaic river network through the spatio-temporal variation of stable (N, O) isotopes of NO(-)3.

    PubMed

    Ta, Thi Thao; Le, Si Hung; Trinh, Hong Quan; Luu, Thi Nguyet Minh; Trinh, Anh Duc

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, the dual isotope approach was applied to trace the sources of impacts and to identify the governing biogeochemical processes in a river network in the tropical deltaic region of the Red River (Vietnam). Our long term surveys concluded that water in this river network was severely impacted by anthropogenic activities. Analysis has shown strong spatio-temporal variation of nitrate isotopes; ranges of δ(15)N-[Formula: see text] and δ(18)O-[Formula: see text] were from -5 to 15 ‰ and from -10 to 10 ‰, respectively. Average values of δ(15)N-[Formula: see text] and δ(18)O-[Formula: see text] in the dry season, when fertilizer is applied, were 3.54 and 3.15 ‰, respectively. In the rainy season, the values changed to 6.41 and -2.23 ‰, respectively. Denitrification and biological assimilation were active throughout the year, but were especially enhanced during fertilization time. Mineralization of domestic organic matter and consequent nitrification of mineralized [Formula: see text] were the dominant processes, particularly during the rainy period. PMID:26954849

  14. Dynamics of an estuarine nursery ground: the spatio-temporal relationship between the river flow and the food web of the juvenile common sole ( Solea solea, L.) as revealed by stable isotopes analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostecki, C.; Le Loc'h, F.; Roussel, J.-M.; Desroy, N.; Huteau, D.; Riera, P.; Le Bris, H.; Le Pape, O.

    2010-07-01

    Estuaries are essential fish habitats because they provide nursery grounds for a number of marine species. Previous studies in the Bay of Vilaine (part of the Bay of Biscay, France) have underlined the estuarine dependence of juvenile common sole ( Solea solea, L.) and shown that the extent of sole nursery grounds was positively influenced by the variability of the river flow. In the present study, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes were used to describe the trophic network until the young-of-the-year sole and to compare interannual variations in the dominant trophic pathways in the sole nursery areas in this bay. Particulate organic matter (POM), sediment organic matter (SOM), microphytobenthos, benthic invertebrate sole prey and young-of-the-year common sole were collected during the summer over 4 years characterised by contrasting river discharges. POM isotopic signatures were used to identify the origins of nutrient and organic matter assimilated into the estuarine food web through benthic organisms to juvenile common sole. Interannual spatial variations were found in the POM carbon stable isotope signatures, with the importance of these variations depending on the interannual fluctuations of the river flow. Moreover, the spatio-temporal variability of this POM isotopic signature was propagated along the food webs up to juvenile sole, confirming the central role of river discharge and terrigeneous subsidy input in the estuarine benthic food web in determining the size of the sole nursery habitat.

  15. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy versus standard temporal lobectomy in patients with mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis: post-operative facial emotion recognition abilities.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Anne-Sophie; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Bodin, Frédéric; Staack, Anke M; Zentner, Josef; Scholly, Julia; Valenti, Maria-Paula; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Hirsch, Edouard

    2015-03-01

    Surgical treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients involves the removal either of the left or the right hippocampus. Since the mesial temporal lobe is responsible for emotion recognition abilities, we aimed to assess facial emotion recognition (FER) in two homogeneous patient cohorts that differed only in the administered surgery design since anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) or selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) were performed independently of the underlying electroclinical conditions. The patient selection for the two respective surgical procedures was carried out retrospectively between 2000 and 2009 by two independent epilepsy centres, the Kork Epilepsy Centre, Germany and the University Hospital of Strasbourg, France. All included patients had presented with unilateral hippocampus sclerosis (HS) without associated dysplasia or white matter blurring and had become seizure-free postoperatively. Psychometric evaluation was carried out with the Ekman 60 Faces Test and screened for depression and psychosomatic symptoms with the SCL-90 R and the BDI. Thirty healthy volunteers participated as control subjects. Sixty patients were included, 27 had undergone SAH and 33 ATL. Patients and controls obtained comparable scores in FER for surprise, happiness, anger and sadness. Concerning fear and disgust the patient group scored significantly worse. Left-sided operations led to the the most pronounced impairment. The ATL group scored significantly worse for recognition of fear compared with SAH patients. Inversely, after SAH scores for disgust were significantly lower than after ATL, independently of the side of resection. Unilateral temporal damage impairs FER. Different neurosurgical procedures may affect FER differently. PMID:25769370

  16. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy versus standard temporal lobectomy in patients with mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis: post-operative facial emotion recognition abilities.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Anne-Sophie; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Bodin, Frédéric; Staack, Anke M; Zentner, Josef; Scholly, Julia; Valenti, Maria-Paula; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Hirsch, Edouard

    2015-03-01

    Surgical treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients involves the removal either of the left or the right hippocampus. Since the mesial temporal lobe is responsible for emotion recognition abilities, we aimed to assess facial emotion recognition (FER) in two homogeneous patient cohorts that differed only in the administered surgery design since anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) or selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) were performed independently of the underlying electroclinical conditions. The patient selection for the two respective surgical procedures was carried out retrospectively between 2000 and 2009 by two independent epilepsy centres, the Kork Epilepsy Centre, Germany and the University Hospital of Strasbourg, France. All included patients had presented with unilateral hippocampus sclerosis (HS) without associated dysplasia or white matter blurring and had become seizure-free postoperatively. Psychometric evaluation was carried out with the Ekman 60 Faces Test and screened for depression and psychosomatic symptoms with the SCL-90 R and the BDI. Thirty healthy volunteers participated as control subjects. Sixty patients were included, 27 had undergone SAH and 33 ATL. Patients and controls obtained comparable scores in FER for surprise, happiness, anger and sadness. Concerning fear and disgust the patient group scored significantly worse. Left-sided operations led to the the most pronounced impairment. The ATL group scored significantly worse for recognition of fear compared with SAH patients. Inversely, after SAH scores for disgust were significantly lower than after ATL, independently of the side of resection. Unilateral temporal damage impairs FER. Different neurosurgical procedures may affect FER differently.

  17. Towards the next generation of solid oxide fuel cells operating below 600 °c with chemically stable proton-conducting electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Emiliana; Bi, Lei; Pergolesi, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico

    2012-01-10

    The need for reducing the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operating temperature below 600 °C is imposed by cost reduction, which is essential for widespread SOFC use, but might also disclose new applications. To this aim, high-temperature proton-conducting (HTPC) oxides have gained widespread interest as electrolyte materials alternative to oxygen-ion conductors. This Progress Report describes recent developments in electrolyte, anode, and cathode materials for protonic SOFCs, addressing the issue of chemical stability, processability, and good power performance below 600 °C. Different fabrication methods are reported for anode-supported SOFCs, obtained using state-of-the-art, chemically stable proton-conducting electrolyte films. Recent findings show significant improvements in the power density output of cells based on doped barium zirconate electrolytes, pointing out towards the feasibility of the next generation of protonic SOFCs, including a good potential for the development of miniaturized SOFCs as portable power supplies.

  18. Niche partition of Bacteriovorax operational taxonomic units along salinity and temporal gradients in the Chesapeake Bay reveals distinct estuarine strains.

    PubMed

    Pineiro, Silvia; Chauhan, Ashvini; Berhane, Timkhite-kulu; Athar, Rana; Zheng, Guili; Wang, Cynthia; Dickerson, Tamar; Liang, Xiaobing; Lymperopoulou, Despoina S; Chen, Huan; Christman, Mary; Louime, Clifford; Babiker, Wisal; Stine, O Colin; Williams, Henry N

    2013-04-01

    The predatory Bacteriovorax are Gram-negative bacteria ubiquitous in saltwater systems that prey upon other Gram-negative bacteria in a similar manner to the related genus Bdellovibrio. Among the phylogenetically defined clusters of Bacteriovorax, cluster V has only been isolated from estuaries suggesting that it may be a distinct estuarine phylotype. To assess this hypothesis, the spatial and temporal distribution of cluster V and other Bacteriovorax phylogenetic assemblages along the salinity gradient of Chesapeake Bay were determined. Cluster V was expected to be found in significantly greater numbers in low to moderate salinity waters compared to high salinity areas. The analyses of water and sediment samples from sites in the bay revealed cluster V to be present at the lower salinity and not high salinity sites, consistent with it being an estuarine phylotype. Cluster IV had a similar distribution pattern and may also be specifically adapted to estuaries. While the distribution of clusters V and IV were similar for salinity, they were distinct on temperature gradients, being found in cooler and in warmer temperatures, respectively. The differentiation of phylotype populations along the salinity and temporal gradients in Chesapeake Bay revealed distinct niches inhabited by different phylotypes of Bacteriovorax and unique estuarine phylotypes.

  19. Temporal Non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filk, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    In this article I investigate several possibilities to define the concept of "temporal non-locality" within the standard framework of quantum theory. In particular, I analyze the notions of "temporally non-local states", "temporally non-local events" and "temporally non-local observables". The idea of temporally non-local events is already inherent in the standard formalism of quantum mechanics, and Basil Hiley recently defined an operator in order to measure the degree of such a temporal non-locality. The concept of temporally non-local states enters as soon as "clock-representing states" are introduced in the context of special and general relativity. It is discussed in which way temporally non-local measurements may find an interesting application for experiments which test temporal versions of Bell inequalities.

  20. Analysing the Advantages of High Temporal Resolution Geostationary MSG SEVIRI Data Compared to Polar Operational Environmental Satellite Data for Land Surface Monitoring in Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fensholt, R.; Anyamba, A.; Huber, S.; Proud, S. R.; Tucker, C. J.; Small, J.; Pak, E.; Rasmussen, M. O.; Sandholt, I.; Shisanya, C.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1972, satellite remote sensing of the environment has been dominated by polar-orbiting sensors providing useful data for monitoring the earth s natural resources. However their observation and monitoring capacity are inhibited by daily to monthly looks for any given ground surface which often is obscured by frequent and persistent cloud cover creating large gaps in time series measurements. The launch of the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite into geostationary orbit has opened new opportunities for land surface monitoring. The Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) instrument on-board MSG with an imaging capability every 15 minutes which is substantially greater than any temporal resolution that can be obtained from existing polar operational environmental satellites (POES) systems currently in use for environmental monitoring. Different areas of the African continent were affected by droughts and floods in 2008 caused by periods of abnormally low and high rainfall, respectively. Based on the effectiveness of monitoring these events from Earth Observation (EO) data the current analyses show that the new generation of geostationary remote sensing data can provide higher temporal resolution cloud-free (less than 5 days) measurements of the environment as compared to existing POES systems. SEVIRI MSG 5-day continental scale composites will enable rapid assessment of environmental conditions and improved early warning of disasters for the African continent such as flooding or droughts. The high temporal resolution geostationary data will complement existing higher spatial resolution polar-orbiting satellite data for various dynamic environmental and natural resource applications of terrestrial ecosystems.

  1. High-speed highly temperature stable 980 nm VCSELs operating at 25 Gb/s at up to 85 °C for short reach optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutig, Alex; Lott, James A.; Blokhin, Sergey A.; Moser, Philip; Wolf, Philip; Hofmann, Werner; Nadtochiy, Alexey M.; Bimberg, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The progressive penetration of optical communication links into traditional copper interconnect markets greatly expands the applications of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for the next-generation of board-to-board, moduleto- module, chip-to-chip, and on-chip optical interconnects. Stability of the VCSEL parameters at high temperatures is indispensable for such applications, since these lasers typically reside directly on or near integrated circuit chips. Here we present 980 nm oxide-confined VCSELs operating error-free at bit rates up to 25 Gbit/s at temperatures as high as 85 °C without adjustment of the drive current and peak-to-peak modulation voltage. The driver design is therefore simplified and the power consumption of the driver electronics is lowered, reducing the production and operational costs. Small and large signal modulation experiments at various temperatures from 20 up to 85 °C for lasers with different oxide aperture diameters are presented in order to analyze the physical processes controlling the performance of the VCSELs. Temperature insensitive maximum -3 dB bandwidths of around 13-15 GHz for VCSELs with aperture diameters of 10 μm and corresponding parasitic cut-off frequencies exceeding 22 GHz are observed. Presented results demonstrate the suitability of our VCSELs for practical high speed and high temperature stable short-reach optical links.

  2. Stable, tunable, and single-mode operation of an erbium-doped fibre laser system using a saturable absorber for gas spectroscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsad, Norhana; Stewart, George

    2009-02-01

    We present an erbium doped fibre ring laser system to realize single frequency lasing by incorporating a reflector with ~2m of un-pumped polarization-maintaining erbium-doped fibre to act as a saturable absorber. Depending on the particular requirements, the fibre reflector may be a fibre Bragg grating (FBG), loop mirror (LM) or a reflective coating on the fibre end. In this way, a transient grating is formed in the saturable absorber which acts as a narrow-band optical filter, reducing the number of modes over which the laser can operate and hence suppressing mode hopping in the cavity. Polarization-maintaining (PM) components are used throughout the system, except for the EDFA, and a polarization controller is used for enhancing stability and to ensure that the state of polarization is properly aligned. With this system we have observed a long period of stable, narrow line-width and single mode operation, tuneable over 30nm. The intended application is for gas spectroscopy using wavelength scanning and pump modulation. A Sagnac loop filter (SLF) can be used to scan the centre wavelength over a gas absorption line while the pump modulation produces an amplitude modulated signal on the output, suitable for detection by a lock-in (phase-sensitive) amplifier. The method is useful for the recovery of absorption line-shapes in the near-IR where the overtone absorption lines are weak. Compared with the use of a traditional DFB laser source, the fibre laser offers the advantages of a much broader tuning range and recovery of distortion-free line-shapes since wavelength and amplitude modulation may be performed independently.

  3. Temporal contingency.

    PubMed

    Gallistel, C R; Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Contingency, and more particularly temporal contingency, has often figured in thinking about the nature of learning. However, it has never been formally defined in such a way as to make it a measure that can be applied to most animal learning protocols. We use elementary information theory to define contingency in such a way as to make it a measurable property of almost any conditioning protocol. We discuss how making it a measurable construct enables the exploration of the role of different contingencies in the acquisition and performance of classically and operantly conditioned behavior.

  4. Temporal contingency.

    PubMed

    Gallistel, C R; Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Contingency, and more particularly temporal contingency, has often figured in thinking about the nature of learning. However, it has never been formally defined in such a way as to make it a measure that can be applied to most animal learning protocols. We use elementary information theory to define contingency in such a way as to make it a measurable property of almost any conditioning protocol. We discuss how making it a measurable construct enables the exploration of the role of different contingencies in the acquisition and performance of classically and operantly conditioned behavior. PMID:23994260

  5. Revisiting the use of δ15N in meso-scale studies of marine food webs by considering spatio-temporal variations in stable isotopic signatures - The case of an open ecosystem: The Bay of Biscay (North-East Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouvelon, T.; Spitz, J.; Caurant, F.; Mèndez-Fernandez, P.; Chappuis, A.; Laugier, F.; Le Goff, E.; Bustamante, P.

    2012-08-01

    Most of the recent framework directives and environmental policies argue for the development and the use of indicators - notably trophodynamic indicators - that should be able to follow ecosystems' evolution in space and time, particularly under anthropogenic perturbations. In the last decades, the use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes ratios has increased exponentially, particularly in studies of marine ecosystems' trophic structure and functioning. This method is principally based on the assumption that the isotopic composition of a consumer directly reflects that of its food. Nevertheless, few studies have attempted to define the limits of this tool, before using it and drawing ecological conclusions from isotopic analysis. This study aimed to assess the importance of considering spatio-temporal variations in isotopic signatures of consumers when using δ13C and especially δ15N values in open ecosystems with complex food webs, using the Bay of Biscay (North-East Atlantic) as a case study. To this end, more than 140 species from this marine ecosystem were analysed for the isotopic signatures in their muscle tissue. They were sampled from coastal to oceanic and deep-sea areas and at different latitudes, to evaluate spatial variations of isotopic signatures. Selected species were also sampled over several years and in two seasons to account for inter-annual and seasonal variations. In the Bay of Biscay temperate ecosystem, which is subject to both coastal and oceanic influences - two main river inputs and upwelling areas - , δ13C and δ15N values significantly decreased from inshore to offshore species, and to a lesser extent from benthic to pelagic organisms. River discharges appeared to be the first factor influencing δ13C and δ15N values in consumers. From the important spatial variations detected in δ15N values in particular, we suggest that in such contrasted ecosystem, nitrogen isotopic ratios may also be revisited as an indicator of the feeding

  6. Differences in temporal aspects of food acquisition between rats and two strains of mice in a closed operant economy.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Neil E; Minaya, Dulce M; Cervantez, Melissa R; Minervini, Vanessa; Robertson, Kimberly L

    2015-07-15

    Rats and mice were studied for changes in meal-taking structure in a closed operant food economy, in which the consummatory or unit prices for food were increased. In experiment 1, as food price increased, male rats modestly decreased the number of meals per day and increased mean meal size. Female rats were similar to males but had smaller meal size and, at low costs, took more meals per day. In experiment 2, male and female B6 mice reduced food intake as price increased, accompanied by decreased meal number without change in meal size. They showed grazing-like behavior in the first part of the night. In contrast, we report in experiment 3, a large increase in intake and meal size during the final trimester of pregnancy. In experiment 4, we report that CD1 male mice subjected to a unit price series performed comparably to rats, and not like B6 mice. Other CD1 mice were tested using an interval schedule, and we found that mice were able to adapt eating patterns to greatly increased time demands without compromising total intake. Data are discussed in terms of the intercalation of food acquisition with global patterns of activity. Such interactions of organism and food environment are in particular need of mechanistic investigation.

  7. How Stable Is Stable? Function versus Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Ana; Huang, Suiying; Seston, Sherry; Xing, Jian; Hickey, Robert; Criddle, Craig; Tiedje, James

    1999-01-01

    The microbial community dynamics of a functionally stable, well-mixed, methanogenic reactor fed with glucose were analyzed over a 605-day period. The reactor maintained constant pH and chemical oxygen demand removal during this period. Thirty-six rrn clones from each of seven sampling events were analyzed by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for the Bacteria and Archaea domains and by sequence analysis of dominant members of the community. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs), distinguished as unique ARDRA patterns, showed reproducible distribution for three sample replicates. The highest diversity was observed in the Bacteria domain. The 16S ribosomal DNA Bacteria clone library contained 75 OTUs, with the dominant OTU accounting for 13% of the total clones, but just 21 Archaea OTUs were found, and the most prominent OTU represented 50% of the clones from the respective library. Succession in methanogenic populations was observed, and two periods were distinguished: in the first, Methanobacterium formicicum was dominant, and in the second, Methanosarcina mazei and a Methanobacterium bryantii-related organism were dominant. Higher variability in Bacteria populations was detected, and the temporal OTU distribution suggested a chaotic pattern. Although dominant OTUs were constantly replaced from one sampling point to the next, phylogenetic analysis indicated that inferred physiologic changes in the community were not as dramatic as were genetic changes. Seven of eight dominant OTUs during the first period clustered with the spirochete group, although a cyclic pattern of substitution occurred among members within this order. A more flexible community structure characterized the second period, since a sequential replacement of a Eubacterium-related organism by an unrelated deep-branched organism and finally by a Propionibacterium-like species was observed. Metabolic differences among the dominant fermenters detected suggest that changes in carbon and

  8. Dynamics of temporal discrimination.

    PubMed

    Guilhardi, Paulo; Church, Russell M

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe and explain the acquisition of temporal discriminations, transitions from one temporal interval to another, and asymptotic performance of stimulus and temporal discriminations. Rats were trained on a multiple cued interval (MCI) procedure with a head entry response on three signaled fixed-interval schedules of reinforcement (30, 60, and 120 sec). They readily learned the three temporal discriminations, whether they were presented simultaneously or successively, and they rapidly adjusted their performance to new intervals when the intermediate interval was varied daily. Although exponential functions provided good descriptions of many measures of temporal discrimination, different parameter values were required for each measure. The addition of a linear operator to a packet theory of timing with a single set of parameters provided a quantitative process model that fit many measures of the dynamics of temporal discrimination.

  9. Studies and optimization of Pohang Light Source-II superconducting radio frequency system at stable top-up operation with beam current of 400 mA

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Youngdo Yu, Inha; Park, Insoo; Chun, Myunghwan; Lee, Byung-Joon; Hwang, Ilmoon; Ha, Taekyun; Shin, Seunghwan; Sohn, Younguk

    2014-12-21

    After three years of upgrading work, the Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) is now successfully operating. The final quantitative goal of PLS-II is a top-up user-service operation with beam current of 400 mA to be completed by the end of 2014. During the beam store test up to 400 mA in the storage ring (SR), it was observed that the vacuum pressure around the radio frequency (RF) window of the superconducting cavity rapidly increases over the interlock level limiting the availability of the maximum beam current storing. Although available beam current is enhanced by setting a higher RF accelerating voltage, it is better to keep the RF accelerating voltage as low as possible in the long time top-up operation. We investigated the cause of the window vacuum pressure increment by studying the changes in the electric field distribution at the superconducting cavity and waveguide according to the beam current. In our simulation, an equivalent physical modeling was developed using a finite-difference time-domain code. The simulation revealed that the electric field amplitude at the RF window is exponentially increased as the beam current increases, thus this high electric field amplitude causes a RF breakdown at the RF window, which comes with the rapid increase of window vacuum pressure. The RF accelerating voltage of PLS-II RF system was set to 4.95 MV, which was estimated using the maximum available beam current that works as a function of RF voltage, and the top-up operation test with the beam current of 400 mA was successfully carried out.

  10. Stable, high-order SBP-SAT finite difference operators to enable accurate simulation of compressible turbulent flows on curvilinear grids, with application to predicting turbulent jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Jaeseung; Bodony, Daniel; Pantano, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Improved order-of-accuracy discretizations often require careful consideration of their numerical stability. We report on new high-order finite difference schemes using Summation-By-Parts (SBP) operators along with the Simultaneous-Approximation-Terms (SAT) boundary condition treatment for first and second-order spatial derivatives with variable coefficients. In particular, we present a highly accurate operator for SBP-SAT-based approximations of second-order derivatives with variable coefficients for Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. These terms are responsible for approximating the physical dissipation of kinetic and thermal energy in a simulation, and contain grid metrics when the grid is curvilinear. Analysis using the Laplace transform method shows that strong stability is ensured with Dirichlet boundary conditions while weaker stability is obtained for Neumann boundary conditions. Furthermore, the benefits of the scheme is shown in the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a Mach 1.5 compressible turbulent supersonic jet using curvilinear grids and skew-symmetric discretization. Particularly, we show that the improved methods allow minimization of the numerical filter often employed in these simulations and we discuss the qualities of the simulation.

  11. Stable Multibubble Sonoluminescence Bubble Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Posakony, Gerald J.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2006-06-30

    Multibubble standing wave patterns can be generated from a flat piezoceramic transducer element propagating into water. By adding a second transducer positioned at 90 degrees from the transducer generating the standing wave, a 3-dimensional volume of stable single bubbles can be established. Further, the addition of the second transducer stabilizes the bubble pattern so that individual bubbles may be studied. The size of the bubbles and the separation of the standing waves depend on the frequency of operation. Two transducers, operating at frequencies above 500 kHz, provided the most graphic results for the configuration used in this study. At these frequencies stable bubbles exhibit a bright sonoluminescence pattern. Whereas stable SBSL is well-known, stable MBSL has not been previously reported. This paper includes discussions of the acoustic responses, standing wave patterns, and pictorial results of the separation of individual bubble of sonoluminescence in a multibubble sonoluminescence environment.

  12. Temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Saramäki, Jari

    2012-10-01

    A great variety of systems in nature, society and technology-from the web of sexual contacts to the Internet, from the nervous system to power grids-can be modeled as graphs of vertices coupled by edges. The network structure, describing how the graph is wired, helps us understand, predict and optimize the behavior of dynamical systems. In many cases, however, the edges are not continuously active. As an example, in networks of communication via e-mail, text messages, or phone calls, edges represent sequences of instantaneous or practically instantaneous contacts. In some cases, edges are active for non-negligible periods of time: e.g., the proximity patterns of inpatients at hospitals can be represented by a graph where an edge between two individuals is on throughout the time they are at the same ward. Like network topology, the temporal structure of edge activations can affect dynamics of systems interacting through the network, from disease contagion on the network of patients to information diffusion over an e-mail network. In this review, we present the emergent field of temporal networks, and discuss methods for analyzing topological and temporal structure and models for elucidating their relation to the behavior of dynamical systems. In the light of traditional network theory, one can see this framework as moving the information of when things happen from the dynamical system on the network, to the network itself. Since fundamental properties, such as the transitivity of edges, do not necessarily hold in temporal networks, many of these methods need to be quite different from those for static networks. The study of temporal networks is very interdisciplinary in nature. Reflecting this, even the object of study has many names-temporal graphs, evolving graphs, time-varying graphs, time-aggregated graphs, time-stamped graphs, dynamic networks, dynamic graphs, dynamical graphs, and so on. This review covers different fields where temporal graphs are considered

  13. Temporal naturalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  14. Investigation of spatio-temporal variability of water uptake in a groundwater-dependent ecosystem using a stable isotope approach (δ18O, δ2H): Pfyn Forest, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, G.; Masini, J.; Goldscheider, N.; Gobat, J. M.; Hunkeler, D.

    2012-04-01

    total humidity of soil, this could be due to rapid infiltration and/or fractionation mainly under equilibrium, i.e. with a relatively high atmospheric humidity, what is possible under forest canopy. Plant water is located under the LMWL in September 2010 when the soil was relatively drought. This evaporative signature could be a clue of water stress. More investigations are however needed to check if this parameter can be used routinely to address water stress. - Secondly, through an analysis of variance, data reveal that at the ecosystem scale, water uptake depends on the site (type of soil, surrounding vegetation, distance from the river), on the growing status (non growing, flowering, mature, water stress) and on the species (poplar, willow, alder, pine). - At last, when focusing at the temporal variability for some individuals, it appears that both rainwater and groundwater may participate to water uptake. The water uptake patterns seem more complicated in mature areas (far from the riverbed) than in frequently flooded zones. This could be due to a more complex soil texture patchwork in the former, and a globally finer soil texture. In particular, it appears that groundwater may sometimes replace rainwater through capillary rise during warm periods.

  15. Spatio-temporal variations of carbon dioxide and its gross emission regulated by artificial operation in a typical hydropower reservoir in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Zhang, Zengyu; Xiao, Yan; Guo, Jinsong; Wu, Shengjun; Liu, Jing

    2014-05-01

    Supersaturation and excess emission of greenhouse gases in freshwater reservoirs have received a great deal of attention in recent years. Although impoundment of reservoirs has been shown to contribute to the net emission of greenhouse gases, reservoir age, geographical distribution, submerged soil type and artificial regulation also have a great impact on their emissions. To examine how large scale reservoir operation impact the water column CO2 and its air-water interface flux, a field study was conducted in 2010 to evaluate potential ecological processes that regulate the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in the water column in the Pengxi River backwater area (PBA), a typical tributary in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China. Measurements of total alkalinity (TA), pH and water temperature were applied to compute the pCO2. And this approach was also validated by calculation of pCO2 from the dissolved inorganic carbon data of samples. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to determine how the dynamics of the water pCO2 were related to the available variables. The estimated pCO2 in our sample ranged from 26 to 4,087 μatm in the surface water. During low water operation from July to early September, there was an obvious pCO2 stratification, and pCO2 in the surface was almost unsaturated. This phenomenon was also observed in the spring bloom during discharge period. Conversely, there was no significant pCO2 stratification and the entire water column was supersaturated during high water operation from November to the following February. Significant correlation was observed between the magnitude of pCO2, DO and chlorophyll a, suggesting that phytoplankton dynamics regulate pCO2 in the PBA. The average areal rate of CO2 emissions from the Pengxi River ranged from 18.06 to 48.09 mmol m(-2) day(-1), with an estimated gross CO2 emission from the water surface of 14-37 t day(-1) in this area in 2010. Photosynthesis and respiration rates by phytoplankton might be the

  16. Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina) Updated:Aug 24,2016 You may have heard the term “angina pectoris” or “stable angina” in your doctor’s office, but ...

  17. Temporal dark polariton solitons.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Skryabin, Dmitry V

    2016-04-15

    We predict that strong coupling between waveguide photons and excitons of quantum well embedded into waveguide results in the formation of hybrid-dark and antidark light-matter solitons. Such temporal solitons exist due to interplay between repulsive excitonic nonlinearity and giant group-velocity dispersion arising in the vicinity of excitonic resonance. Such fully conservative states do not require external pumping to counteract losses and form continuous families parameterized by the power-dependent phase shift and velocity of their motion. Dark solitons are stable in the considerable part of their existence domain, while antidark solitons are always unstable. Both families exist outside the forbidden frequency gap of the linear system. PMID:27082338

  18. Temporal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, M D; Hoyert, M S

    1989-09-01

    A signal appeared for a certain time period. After the period elapsed, pigeons had to begin and complete a sequence of 15 responses in a time window ranging from the signal duration to 50% longer. Sessions involved as many as 10 different signal durations occurring in a random sequence. The times produced by pigeons often were in the same ranges as those that have been found with adult human subjects. The average times were described equally well as linear or power functions of signal duration. However, instead of the overestimation of durations usually found when animals have timed the duration of antecedent stimuli, the linear functions suggested that the pigeons underestimated the durations of their own behavior. The birds showing the strongest control when the conditions involved eight or 10 different duration requirements revealed the constant coefficients of variation that support Weber's law and scalar timing theory. Scalar timing in temporal differentiation appears to depend on non-ambiguous information about the duration required for reinforcement and on a high degree of sensitivity to the duration requirement.

  19. Temporal logics meet telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutten, Eric; Marce, Lionel

    1989-01-01

    The specificity of telerobotics being the presence of a human operator, decision assistance tools are necessary for the operator, especially in hostile environments. In order to reduce execution hazards due to a degraded ability for quick and efficient recovery of unexpected dangerous situations, it is of importance to have the opportunity, amongst others, to simulate the possible consequences of a plan before its actual execution, in order to detect these problematic situations. Hence the idea of providing the operator with a simulator enabling him to verify the temporal and logical coherence of his plans. Therefore, the power of logical formalisms is used for representation and deduction purposes. Starting from the class of situations that are represented, a STRIPS (the STanford Research Institute Problem Solver)-like formalism and its underlying logic are adapted to the simulation of plans of actions in time. The choice of a temporal logic enables to build a world representation, on which the effects of plans, grouping actions into control structures, will be transcribed by the simulation, resulting in a verdict and information about the plan's coherence.

  20. Temporal generalization.

    PubMed

    Church, R M; Gibbon, J

    1982-04-01

    Responses of 26 rats were reinforced following a signal of a certain duration, but not following signals of shorter or longer durations. This led to a positive temporal generalization gradient with a maximum at the reinforced duration in six experiments. Spacing of the nonreinforced signals did not influence the gradient, but the location of the maximum and breadth of the gradient increased with the duration of the reinforced signal. Reduction of reinforcement, either by partial reinforcement or reduction in the probability of a positive signal, led to a decrease in the height of the generalization gradient. There were large, reliable individual differences in the height and breadth of the generalization gradient. When the conditions of reinforcement were reversed (responses reinforced following all signals longer or shorter than a single nonreinforced duration), eight additional rats had a negative generalization gradient with a minimum at a signal duration shorter than the single nonreinforced duration. A scalar timing theory is described that provided a quantitative fit of the data. This theory involved a clock that times in linear units with an accurate mean and a negligible variance, a distribution of memory times that is normally distributed with an accurate mean and a scalar standard deviation, and a rule to respond if the clock is "close enough" to a sample of the memory time distribution. This decision is based on a ratio of the discrepancy between the clock time and the remembered time, to the remembered time. When this ratio is below a (variable) threshold, subjects respond. When three timing parameters--coefficient of variation of the memory time, the mean and the standard deviation of the threshold--were set at their median values, a theory with two free parameters accounted for 96% of the variance. The two parameters reflect the probability of attention to time and the probability of a response given inattention. These parameters were not influenced

  1. Stable Gain-Switched Thulium Fiber Laser With 140-nm Tuning Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengqiu; Meng, Yafei; Kelleher, Edmund; Guo, Guoxiang; Li, Yao; Xu, Yongbing; Zhu, Shining

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a gain-switched thulium fiber laser that can be continuously tuned over 140 nm, while maintaining stable nanosecond single-pulse operation. To the best of our knowledge, this system represents the broadest tuning range for a gain-switched fiber laser. The system simplicity and wideband wavelength tunability combined with the ability to control the temporal characteristics of the gain-switched pulses mean this is a versatile source highly suited to a wide range of applications in the eye-safe region of the infrared, including spectroscopy, sensing and material processing, as well as being a practical seed source for pumping nonlinear processes.

  2. The whole is faster than its parts: evidence for temporally independent attention to distinct spatial locations.

    PubMed

    Clement, Andrew; Matthews, Nestor

    2016-02-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological evidence suggests that visual attention operates in parallel at distinct spatial locations and samples the environment in periodic episodes. This combination of spatial and temporal characteristics raises the question of whether attention samples locations in a phase-locked or temporally independent manner. If attentional sampling rates were phase locked, attention would be limited by a global sampling rate. However, if attentional sampling rates were temporally independent, they could operate additively to sample higher rates of information. We tested these predictions by requiring participants to identify targets in 2 or 4 rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) streams, synchronized or asynchronized to manipulate the rate of new information globally (across streams). Identification accuracy exhibited little or no change when the global rate of new information doubled from 7.5 to 15 Hz (Experiment 1) or quadrupled to 30 Hz (Experiment 2). This relatively stable identification accuracy occurred even though participants reliably discriminated 7.5 Hz synchronous displays from displays globally asynchronized at 15 and 30 Hz (Metamer Control Experiment). Identification accuracy in the left visual field also significantly exceeded that in the right visual field. Overall, our results are consistent with temporally independent attention across distinct spatial locations and support previous reports of a right parietal "when" pathway specialized for temporal attention.

  3. Fuzzy branching temporal logic.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seong-ick; Lee, Kwang H; Lee, Doheon

    2004-04-01

    Intelligent systems require a systematic way to represent and handle temporal information containing uncertainty. In particular, a logical framework is needed that can represent uncertain temporal information and its relationships with logical formulae. Fuzzy linear temporal logic (FLTL), a generalization of propositional linear temporal logic (PLTL) with fuzzy temporal events and fuzzy temporal states defined on a linear time model, was previously proposed for this purpose. However, many systems are best represented by branching time models in which each state can have more than one possible future path. In this paper, fuzzy branching temporal logic (FBTL) is proposed to address this problem. FBTL adopts and generalizes concurrent tree logic (CTL*), which is a classical branching temporal logic. The temporal model of FBTL is capable of representing fuzzy temporal events and fuzzy temporal states, and the order relation among them is represented as a directed graph. The utility of FBTL is demonstrated using a fuzzy job shop scheduling problem as an example. PMID:15376850

  4. Temporal mapping and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Charles G. (Inventor); Shrestha, Bijay (Inventor); Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan (Inventor); Mali, Preeti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A compositing process for selecting spatial data collected over a period of time, creating temporal data cubes from the spatial data, and processing and/or analyzing the data using temporal mapping algebra functions. In some embodiments, the temporal data cube is creating a masked cube using the data cubes, and computing a composite from the masked cube by using temporal mapping algebra.

  5. Overview and first results from Project STABLE (Stable Boundary Layer Experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, A. H.; Kurzeja, R. J.

    The STABLE project (STAble Boundary Layer Experiment) is a multiyear research effort conceived in 1984 by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and planned by several research groups to study turbulence and diffusion in the stable boundary layer (SBL). The program was jointly planned by Department of Energy (DOE) affiliated laboratories and universities including SRL, Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), North Carolina State University (NCSU), and The Pennsylvania State University. STABLE's goals are to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of turbulent events during the nighttime, to determine the validity of present models and theories in describing the structure and evolution of the SBL, to determine the role of waves and intermittent turbulence in dispersing chemicals, and to determine better parameterization for describing the mean state and intermittent events in the SBL. By taking advantage of special facility, the program seeks to economize effort and cost.

  6. Overview and first results from project STABLE (STAble Boundary Layer Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.H.; Kurzeja, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The STABLE project (STAble Boundary Layer Experiment) is a multiyear research effort conceived in 1984 by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and planned by several research groups to study turbulence and diffusion in the stable boundary layer (SBL). The program was jointly planned by Department of Energy (DOE) affiliated laboratories and universities including SRL, Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), North Carolina State University (NCSU), and The Pennsylvania State University. STABLE's goals are to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of turbulent events during the nighttime, to determine the validity of present models and theories in describing the structure and evolution of the SBL, to determine the role of waves and intermittent turbulence in dispersing chemicals, and to determine better parameterization for describing the mean state and intermittent events in the SBL. By taking advantage of special facility, the program seeks to economize effort and cost. 1 ref., 7 figs.

  7. How stable are the 'stable ancient shields'?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Giulio; Mattila, Jussi

    2014-05-01

    "Archean cratons are relatively flat, stable regions of the crust that have remained undeformed since the Precambrian, forming the ancient cores of the continents" (King, EPSL, 2005). While this type of statement is supported by a wealth of constraints in the case of episodes of thoroughgoing ductile deformation affecting shield regions of Archean and also Peleoproterozoic age, a growing amount of research indicates that shields are not nearly as structurally stable within the broad field of environmental conditions leading to brittle deformation. In fact, old crystalline basements usually present compelling evidence of long brittle deformation histories, often very complex and challenging to unfold. Recent structural and geochronological studies point to a significant mechanical instability of the shield areas, wherein large volumes of 'stable' rocks actually can become saturated with fractures and brittle faults soon after regional cooling exhumes them to below c. 300-350° C. How cold, rigid and therefore strong shields respond to applied stresses remains, however, still poorly investigated and understood. This in turn precludes a better definition of the shallow rheological properties of large, old crystalline blocks. In particular, we do not yet have good constraints on the mechanisms of mechanical reactivation that control the partial (if not total) accommodation of new deformational episodes by preexisting structures, which remains a key to untangle brittle histories lasting several hundred Myr. In our analysis, we use the Svecofennian Shield (SS) as an example of a supposedly 'stable' region with Archean nucleii and Paleoproterozoic cratonic areas to show how it is possible to unravel the details of brittle histories spanning more than 1.5 Gyr. New structural and geochronological results from Finland are integrated with a review of existing data from Sweden to explore how the effects of far-field stresses are partitioned within a shield, which was growing

  8. Temporal Ventriloquism in a Purely Temporal Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartcher-O'Brien, Jessica; Alais, David

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how audiovisual signals are combined in time for a temporal analogue of the ventriloquist effect in a purely temporal context, that is, no spatial grounding of signals or other spatial facilitation. Observers were presented with two successive intervals, each defined by a 1250-ms tone, and indicated in which interval a brief…

  9. Stable Imaging for Astronomy (SIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Mathilde; Ottogalli, Sebastien; Preis, Olivier; Bresson, Yves; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Abe, Lyu; Vakili, Farrokh

    2014-07-01

    One of the most challenging fields of astronomical instrumentation is probably high-contrast imaging since it ultimately combines ultra-high sensitivity at low flux and the ability to cope with photon flux contrasts of several hundreds of millions or even more. These two aspects implicitly require that high-contrast instruments should be highly stable in the sense of the reproducibility of their measurements at different times, but also, continuously stable over time. In most high contrast instruments or experiments, their sensitivity is broken after at most tens of minutes of operation due to uncontrolled and unknown behaviour of the whole experiment regarding the environmental conditions. In this paper, we introduce a general approach of an exhaustive stability study for high-contrast imaging that has been initiated at Lagrange Laboratory, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA). On a practical ground, one of the fundamental issues of this study is the metrology, which is the basis of all reproducible measurements. We describe a small experiment designed to understand the behaviour of one of our ultra-precise metrology tools (a commercial sub-nanometric 3-way interferometer) and derive the conditions under which its operation delivers reliable results. The approach will apply to the high-contrast imaging test-bench SPEED, under development at OCA.

  10. Operant Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Staddon, J. E. R.; Cerutti, D. T.

    2005-01-01

    Operant behavior is behavior “controlled” by its consequences. In practice, operant conditioning is the study of reversible behavior maintained by reinforcement schedules. We review empirical studies and theoretical approaches to two large classes of operant behavior: interval timing and choice. We discuss cognitive versus behavioral approaches to timing, the “gap” experiment and its implications, proportional timing and Weber's law, temporal dynamics and linear waiting, and the problem of simple chain-interval schedules. We review the long history of research on operant choice: the matching law, its extensions and problems, concurrent chain schedules, and self-control. We point out how linear waiting may be involved in timing, choice, and reinforcement schedules generally. There are prospects for a unified approach to all these areas. PMID:12415075

  11. Temporal nonlocality in bistable perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmanspacher, Harald; Filk, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    A novel conceptual framework for theoretical psychology is presented and illustrated for the example of bistable perception. A basic formal feature of this framework is the non-commutativity of operations acting on mental states. A corresponding model for the bistable perception of ambiguous stimuli, the Necker-Zeno model, is sketched and some empirical evidence for it so far is described. It is discussed how a temporal nonlocality of mental states, predicted by the model, can be understood and tested.

  12. The Stable Pairing Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwell, Raymond N.; Seabold, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The Gale-Shapley stable marriage theorem is a fascinating piece of twentieth-century mathematics that has many practical applications--from labor markets to school admissions--yet is accessible to secondary school mathematics students. David Gale and Lloyd Shapley were both mathematicians and economists who published their work on the Stable…

  13. Stable Ejection Seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    Drogue chute for ejection seat slows down seat in more stable fashion than conventional parachutes and thus improves chances for survival. Square drogue linked to seat from its corners suppresses tendency of seat to rotate in pitch and yaw. New parachute expected to reduce dynamic forces on ejected person and extend maximum possible ejection altitude by 50 percent. Used at high or low speeds.

  14. Stable Unhappy Marriages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Tim B.; Albrecht, Stan L.

    1991-01-01

    Examined prevalence and determinants of stable unhappy marriage using data from national survey. Results indicated age, lack of prior marital experience, commitment to marriage as an institution, low social activity, lack of control over one's life, and belief that divorce would detract from happiness were all predictive of stability in unhappy…

  15. Stable isotope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  16. Comprehensive Retrieval of Spatio-temporal Variations in Atmospheric Radionuclides just after the Fukushima Accident by Analyzing Filter-tapes of Operational Air Pollution Monitoring Stations in Eastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Moriguchi, Yuichi; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2016-04-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FD1NPS) accident on March 11, 2011, many datasets have been available of deposition density of radionuclides in soils in eastern Japan. By contrast, no time-series data of atmospheric radionuclides has been measured in the Fukushima prefecture (FP), although very limited data is available in the Tokyo metropolitan area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPS. As a result, atmospheric transport models simulating the atmospheric concentrations and surface deposition of radionuclides have large uncertainty, as well as the estimate of release rate of source terms and of internal exposure from inhalation. One year after the accident, we collected the used filter-tapes installed in Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) monitors with beta-ray attenuation method operated by local governments in the air pollution monitoring network of eastern Japan. The SPM monitoring stations are mostly located in the urban and/or industrial area to measure the hourly mass concentration of SPM less than 10 μm in diameter for health effect due to atmospheric aerosols. By measuring radionuclides in SPM on the filter-tapes, we retrieved hourly atmospheric Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations during March 12-23, 2011, when atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial environments were seriously suffered in most of eastern Japan. Until now, we measured hourly radiocesium at around 100 SPM sites in the southern Tohoku region (ST) including the FP and in the TMA. By analysing the dataset, about 10 plumes/polluted air masses with Cs-137 concentrations higher than 10 Bq m-3 were found, and some plumes were newly detected in this study. And the spatio-temporal distributions of atmospheric Cs-137 were clearly shown for all the plumes. The east coast area of the FP where the FD1NPS was located in the centre was attacked several times by the plumes, and suffered the highest time-integrated Cs-137 concentration during the period among the ST and TMA

  17. High-Order Entropy Stable Formulations for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Fisher, Travis C.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic approach is presented for developing entropy stable (SS) formulations of any order for the Navier-Stokes equations. These SS formulations discretely conserve mass, momentum, energy and satisfy a mathematical entropy inequality. They are valid for smooth as well as discontinuous flows provided sufficient dissipation is added at shocks and discontinuities. Entropy stable formulations exist for all diagonal norm, summation-by-parts (SBP) operators, including all centered finite-difference operators, Legendre collocation finite-element operators, and certain finite-volume operators. Examples are presented using various entropy stable formulations that demonstrate the current state-of-the-art of these schemes.

  18. Implementation and Operational Research: CD4 Count Monitoring Frequency and Risk of CD4 Count Dropping Below 200 Cells Per Cubic Millimeter Among Stable HIV-Infected Patients in New York City, 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qiang; Torian, Lucia V.; Irvine, Mary; Harriman, Graham; Sepkowitz, Kent A.; Shepard, Colin W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The evidence has begun to mount for diminishing the frequency of CD4 count testing. To determine whether these observations were applicable to an urban US population, we used New York City (NYC) surveillance data to explore CD4 testing among stable patients in NYC, 2007–2013. Methods: We constructed a population-based retrospective open cohort analysis of NYC HIV surveillance data. HIV+ patients aged ≥13 years with stable viral suppression (≥1 viral load the previous year; all <400 copies per milliliter) and immune status (≥1 CD4 the previous year; all ≥200 cells per cubic millimeter) entered the cohort the following year beginning January 1, 2007. Each subsequent year, eligible patients not previously included entered the cohort on January 1. Outcomes were annual frequency of CD4 monitoring and probability of maintaining CD4 ≥200 cells per cubic millimeter. A multivariable Cox model identified factors associated with maintaining CD4 ≥200 cells per cubic millimeter. Results: During 1.9 years of observation (median), 62,039 patients entered the cohort. The mean annual number of CD4 measurements among stable patients was 2.8 and varied little by year or characteristic. Two years after entering, 93.4% and 97.8% of those with initial CD4 350–499 and CD4 ≥500 cells per cubic millimeter, respectively, maintained CD4 ≥200 cells per cubic millimeter. Compared to those with initial CD4 ≥500 cells per cubic millimeter, those with CD4 200–349 cells per cubic millimeter and CD4 350–499 cells per cubic millimeter were more likely to have a CD4 <200 cells per cubic millimeter, controlling for sex, race, age, HIV risk group, and diagnosis year. Conclusions: In a population-based US cohort with well-controlled HIV, the probability of maintaining CD4 ≥200 cells per cubic millimeter for ≥2 years was >90% among those with initial CD4 ≥350 cells per cubic millimeter, suggesting that limited CD4 monitoring in these patients is appropriate

  19. Handbook of stable strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Skoryna, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: chemistry of strontium; biogeochemistry of strontium; uptake of stable strontium by plants and effects on plant growth; divalent cation-dependent deposits in paramecium; effects of strontium ion on the hydrolysis of ATP; stronium ions and membranes - screening versus binding at charged surfaces; mitochondrial granules in the liver of rats kept on stable strontium supplementation; divalent cations and regulation of cyclic nucleotides in nervous systems; strontium as the substitute for calcium in the excitation-contraction coupling of crayfish muscle fibers; hemodynamic effects of strontium in the dog; some mechanical characteristics of strontium-mediated contractions in heart muscle; effects of calcium, magnesium, and strontium on drug-receptor interactions; strontium and histamine secretion; and effects of strontium in human dental enamel.

  20. Stable glow discharge detector

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2004-05-18

    A highly sensitive electronic ion cell for the measurement of trace elements in He carrier gas which involves glow discharge. A constant wave (CW) stable glow discharge detector which is controlled through a biased resistor, can detect the change of electron density caused by impurities in the He carrier gas by many orders of magnitude larger than that caused by direct ionization or electron capture. The stable glow discharge detector utilizes a floating pseudo-electrode to form a probe in or near the plasma and a solid rod electrode. By using this probe, the large variation of electron density due to trace amounts of impurities can be directly measured. The solid rod electrode provides greater stability and thus easier alignment.

  1. Stable isotopes in mineralogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Stable isotope fractionations between minerals are functions of the fundamental vibrational frequencies of the minerals and therefore bear on several topics of mineralogical interest. Isotopic compositions of the elements H, C, O, Si, and S can now be determined routinely in almost any mineral. A summary has been made of both published and new results of laboratory investigations, analyses of natural materials, and theoretical considerations which bear on the importance of temperature, pressure, chemical composition and crystal structure to the isotopic properties of minerals. It is shown that stable isotope studies can sometimes provide evidence for elucidating details of crystal structure and can be a powerful tool for use in tracing the reaction paths of mineralogical reactions. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Stable local oscillator module.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  3. Stable Charged Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, H.; Quandt, M.; Graham, N.

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius {approx_equal}10{sup -18} m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  4. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored. PMID:21469786

  5. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  6. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  7. Conditional flux analysis and stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeman, M. J.; Knohl, A.; Sturm, P.; Buchmann, N. C.; Thomas, C. K.

    2009-12-01

    We propose to investigate to what extend conditional flux analysis can benefit from the addition of stable isotope information. Stable isotopes have been recognized for their potential as process tracer, and could add an extra dimension to the conditional flux concept, which aims at directly quantifying component fluxes and identifying their sources. Differences in 13C abundance in carbon dioxide can be used to distinguish assimilation or respiration sources, whereas the 18O abundance expresses differences in water exchange, for instance between canopy and soil. Lending to recent advances in measurement technology, stable isotopes can now be measured at high temporal resolutions (10Hz) required for commonly applied micrometeorological methods such as the eddy-covariance technique, or related conditional flux methods. We will present current ideas on how the conditional flux method, as recently proposed and evaluated by Thomas et al. (2008), Scanlon & Sahu (2008), to perform daytime flux partitioning at the ecosystem level, can be refined by stable isotope analysis (13C and 18O) of carbon dioxide as additional dimension for identification of fluxes.

  8. STABLE ISOTOPES AS INDICATORS OF SOIL WATER DYNAMICS IN WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream water quality and quantity depend on discharge rates of water and nutrients from soils. However, soil-water storage is very dynamic and strongly influenced by plants. We analyzed stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to quantify spatial and temporal changes in evaporati...

  9. Robust temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perissinotto, Andrea; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Baptista, Maria J.; Monaghan, Mark; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; D'hooge, Jan; Vilaça, João. L.; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Given the dynamic nature of cardiac function, correct temporal alignment of pre-operative models and intraoperative images is crucial for augmented reality in cardiac image-guided interventions. As such, the current study focuses on the development of an image-based strategy for temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac imaging sequences, such as cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or 3D Ultrasound (US). First, we derive a robust, modality-independent signal from the image sequences, estimated by computing the normalized cross-correlation between each frame in the temporal sequence and the end-diastolic frame. This signal is a resembler for the left-ventricle (LV) volume curve over time, whose variation indicates different temporal landmarks of the cardiac cycle. We then perform the temporal alignment of these surrogate signals derived from MRI and US sequences of the same patient through Dynamic Time Warping (DTW), allowing to synchronize both sequences. The proposed framework was evaluated in 98 patients, which have undergone both 3D+t MRI and US scans. The end-systolic frame could be accurately estimated as the minimum of the image-derived surrogate signal, presenting a relative error of 1.6 +/- 1.9% and 4.0 +/- 4.2% for the MRI and US sequences, respectively, thus supporting its association with key temporal instants of the cardiac cycle. The use of DTW reduces the desynchronization of the cardiac events in MRI and US sequences, allowing to temporally align multimodal cardiac imaging sequences. Overall, a generic, fast and accurate method for temporal synchronization of MRI and US sequences of the same patient was introduced. This approach could be straightforwardly used for the correct temporal alignment of pre-operative MRI information and intra-operative US images.

  10. Temporal plus epilepsy is a major determinant of temporal lobe surgery failures.

    PubMed

    Barba, Carmen; Rheims, Sylvain; Minotti, Lorella; Guénot, Marc; Hoffmann, Dominique; Chabardès, Stephan; Isnard, Jean; Kahane, Philippe; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Reasons for failed temporal lobe epilepsy surgery remain unclear. Temporal plus epilepsy, characterized by a primary temporal lobe epileptogenic zone extending to neighboured regions, might account for a yet unknown proportion of these failures. In this study all patients from two epilepsy surgery programmes who fulfilled the following criteria were included: (i) operated from an anterior temporal lobectomy or disconnection between January 1990 and December 2001; (ii) magnetic resonance imaging normal or showing signs of hippocampal sclerosis; and (iii) postoperative follow-up ≥ 24 months for seizure-free patients. Patients were classified as suffering from unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy, bitemporal epilepsy or temporal plus epilepsy based on available presurgical data. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to calculate the probability of seizure freedom over time. Predictors of seizure recurrence were investigated using Cox proportional hazards model. Of 168 patients included, 108 (63.7%) underwent stereoelectroencephalography, 131 (78%) had hippocampal sclerosis, 149 suffered from unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (88.7%), one from bitemporal epilepsy (0.6%) and 18 (10.7%) from temporal plus epilepsy. The probability of Engel class I outcome at 10 years of follow-up was 67.3% (95% CI: 63.4-71.2) for the entire cohort, 74.5% (95% CI: 70.6-78.4) for unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy, and 14.8% (95% CI: 5.9-23.7) for temporal plus epilepsy. Multivariate analyses demonstrated four predictors of seizure relapse: temporal plus epilepsy (P < 0.001), postoperative hippocampal remnant (P = 0.001), past history of traumatic or infectious brain insult (P = 0.022), and secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (P = 0.023). Risk of temporal lobe surgery failure was 5.06 (95% CI: 2.36-10.382) greater in patients with temporal plus epilepsy than in those with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. Temporal plus epilepsy represents a hitherto unrecognized prominent cause of

  11. Stable predictive control horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Raúl; Favela, Antonio; Raimondi, Angelo; Nevado, Antonio; Requena, Ricardo; Beltrán-Carbajal, Francisco

    2012-04-01

    The stability theory of predictive and adaptive predictive control for processes of linear and stable nature is based on the hypothesis of a physically realisable driving desired trajectory (DDT). The formal theoretical verification of this hypothesis is trivial for processes with a stable inverse, but it is not for processes with an unstable inverse. The extended strategy of predictive control was developed with the purpose of overcoming methodologically this stability problem and it has delivered excellent performance and stability in its industrial applications given a suitable choice of the prediction horizon. From a theoretical point of view, the existence of a prediction horizon capable of ensuring stability for processes with an unstable inverse was proven in the literature. However, no analytical solution has been found for the determination of the prediction horizon values which guarantee stability, in spite of the theoretical and practical interest of this matter. This article presents a new method able to determine the set of prediction horizon values which ensure stability under the extended predictive control strategy formulation and a particular performance criterion for the design of the DDT generically used in many industrial applications. The practical application of this method is illustrated by means of simulation examples.

  12. Dynamics of Dissipative Temporal Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschel, U.; Michaelis, D.; Bakonyi, Z.; Onishchukov, G.; Lederer, F.

    nonlinear interaction of forward and backward propagating fields, where cavity (radiation) losses are compensated for by gain or an external holding beam. Cavity solitons have been observed in Fabry-Perot cavities and single mirror feedback setups (for an overview see [8]). In contrast, propagating dissipative solitons consist of forward-propagating fields only. Recently, the existence of both stable temporal [9] and spatial propagating dissipative solitons [10] was experimentally demonstrated. It is evident that the study of dissipative solitons is of great practical relevance, because most real optical systems are dissipative by nature.

  13. Temporal Organization in Prose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhavy, Raymond W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    High school students read textual passages organized around a semantic, temporal, or random theme. Free recall, semantically, and temporally-cued tests measured recall. During free recall, the organized passages yielded greater recall. For the cued tests, more words were remembered when the passage organization matched the type of test cue.…

  14. Temporal Prediction in lieu of Periodic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Charles E.; Wyart, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Predicting not only what will happen, but also when it will happen is extremely helpful for optimizing perception and action. Temporal predictions driven by periodic stimulation increase perceptual sensitivity and reduce response latencies. At the neurophysiological level, a single mechanism has been proposed to mediate this twofold behavioral improvement: the rhythmic entrainment of slow cortical oscillations to the stimulation rate. However, temporal regularities can occur in aperiodic contexts, suggesting that temporal predictions per se may be dissociable from entrainment to periodic sensory streams. We investigated this possibility in two behavioral experiments, asking human participants to detect near-threshold auditory tones embedded in streams whose temporal and spectral properties were manipulated. While our findings confirm that periodic stimulation reduces response latencies, in agreement with the hypothesis of a stimulus-driven entrainment of neural excitability, they further reveal that this motor facilitation can be dissociated from the enhancement of auditory sensitivity. Perceptual sensitivity improvement is unaffected by the nature of temporal regularities (periodic vs aperiodic), but contingent on the co-occurrence of a fulfilled spectral prediction. Altogether, the dissociation between predictability and periodicity demonstrates that distinct mechanisms flexibly and synergistically operate to facilitate perception and action. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Temporal predictions are increasingly recognized as fundamental instruments for optimizing performance, enabling mammals to exploit regularities in the world. However, the notion of temporal predictions is often confounded with the idea of entrainment to periodic sensory inputs. At the behavioral level, it is also unclear whether perceptual sensitivity and reaction time improvements benefit the same way from temporal predictions and periodic stimulation. In two behavioral experiments on human

  15. Stable lepton mass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domcke, Valerie; Romanino, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We study natural lepton mass matrices, obtained assuming the stability of physical flavour observables with respect to the variations of individual matrix elements. We identify all four possible stable neutrino textures from algebraic conditions on their entries. Two of them turn out to be uniquely associated to specific neutrino mass patterns. We then concentrate on the semi-degenerate pattern, corresponding to an overall neutrino mass scale within the reach of future experiments. In this context we show that i) the neutrino and charged lepton mixings and mass matrices are largely constrained by the requirement of stability, ii) naturalness considerations give a mild preference for the Majorana phase most relevant for neutrinoless double- β decay, α ˜ π/2, and iii) SU(5) unification allows to extend the implications of stability to the down quark sector. The above considerations would benefit from an experimental determination of the PMNS ratio | U 32 /U 31|, i.e. of the Dirac phase δ.

  16. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  17. Electrically actuatable temporal tristimulus-color device

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1992-01-01

    The electrically actuated light filter operates in a cyclical temporal mode to effect a tristimulus-color light analyzer. Construction is based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer comprised of a high-speed movable mirror pair and cyclically powered electrical actuators. When combined with a single vidicon tube or a monochrome solid state image sensor, a temporally operated tristimulus-color video camera is effected. A color-generated is accomplished when constructed with a companion light source and is a flicker-free colored-light source for transmission type display systems. Advantages of low cost and small physical size result from photolithographic batch-processing manufacturability.

  18. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  19. Juvenile temporal arteritis revisited.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, F H; Lie, J T; Nienhuis, B J; Konzen, K M; Groover, R V

    1994-05-01

    We describe a case of arteritis involving the superficial temporal artery in an 8-year-old boy. After a 2-week prodrome of headache in the right temporal region, a painful pulsatile 6-mm nodule developed. No history of trauma or systemic disease was noted. The differential diagnosis included vasculitis or thrombosis of a vascular malformation of the temporal artery. The lesion was surgically excised for both diagnostic and cosmetic reasons. Histologic features of the nodule were diagnostic of juvenile temporal arteritis and characterized by non-giant cell granulomatous inflammation of the temporal artery, occlusive fibrous intimal proliferation, and microaneurysmal disruption of the media. At 12-month follow-up, the patient was well; no recurrent lesions or systemic disease was noted. Although rare, this disease should be recognized as arteritis that affects the external carotid circulation and should not be confused with classic giant cell temporal arteritis. If physicians are aware of this benign inflammatory disease of the temporal artery in children and young adults, unnecessary treatment will not be administered.

  20. Temperature Compensated Sapphire Resonator for Ultra-Stable Oscillator Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Santiago, D. G.; Wang, R. T.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the design and test of a whispering gallery sapphire resonator for which the dominant microwave mode family shows frequency-stable, compensated operation for temperatures above 77 kelvin.

  1. The Voronoi spatio-temporal data structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, Darka

    2002-04-01

    Current GIS models cannot integrate the temporal dimension of spatial data easily. Indeed, current GISs do not support incremental (local) addition and deletion of spatial objects, and they can not support the temporal evolution of spatial data. Spatio-temporal facilities would be very useful in many GIS applications: harvesting and forest planning, cadastre, urban and regional planning, and emergency planning. The spatio-temporal model that can overcome these problems is based on a topological model---the Voronoi data structure. Voronoi diagrams are irregular tessellations of space, that adapt to spatial objects and therefore they are a synthesis of raster and vector spatial data models. The main advantage of the Voronoi data structure is its local and sequential map updates, which allows us to automatically record each event and performed map updates within the system. These map updates are executed through map construction commands that are composed of atomic actions (geometric algorithms for addition, deletion, and motion of spatial objects) on the dynamic Voronoi data structure. The formalization of map commands led to the development of a spatial language comprising a set of atomic operations or constructs on spatial primitives (points and lines), powerful enough to define the complex operations. This resulted in a new formal model for spatio-temporal change representation, where each update is uniquely characterized by the numbers of newly created and inactivated Voronoi regions. This is used for the extension of the model towards the hierarchical Voronoi data structure. In this model, spatio-temporal changes induced by map updates are preserved in a hierarchical data structure that combines events and corresponding changes in topology. This hierarchical Voronoi data structure has an implicit time ordering of events visible through changes in topology, and it is equivalent to an event structure that can support temporal data without precise temporal

  2. Strategies for Global Optimization of Temporal Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Paul; Morris, Robert; Khatib, Lina; Ramakrishnan, Sailesh

    2004-01-01

    A temporal reasoning problem can often be naturally characterized as a collection of constraints with associated local preferences for times that make up the admissible values for those constraints. Globally preferred solutions to such problems emerge as a result of well-defined operations that compose and order temporal assignments. The overall objective of this work is a characterization of different notions of global preference, and to identify tractable sub-classes of temporal reasoning problems incorporating these notions. This paper extends previous results by refining the class of useful notions of global temporal preference that are associated with problems that admit of tractable solution techniques. This paper also answers the hitherto open question of whether problems that seek solutions that are globally preferred from a Utilitarian criterion for global preference can be found tractably.

  3. Construct validity of Stable-2000 and Stable-2007 scores.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Kevin L; Babchishin, Kelly M

    2012-02-01

    We addressed the construct validity of Stable-2000 and Stable-2007 scores by examining correlations between selected items and validated independent measures of relevant constructs in samples of convicted sex offenders. In Study 1, the Child Molester Attitudes item of the Stable-2000 shared 23% of the variance with a self-report measure of beliefs supportive of child molestation, r(19) = .48. The Deviant Sexual Interests items of the Stable-2000 and Stable-2007 shared 7% to 66% of the variance, respectively, with an offense-history-based measure of pedophilic interests, r(18) = .27 for the Stable-2000 and r(11) = .81 for the Stable-2007. In Study 2, the Lovers/Intimate Partners, General Social Rejection/Loneliness, Rapist Attitudes, and Child Molester Attitudes items of the Stable-2000 shared 4% to 19% of the variance with self-report measures of, respectively, intimacy, r(90) = -.44; loneliness, r(88) = .34; beliefs supportive of rape, r(72) = .21; and beliefs supportive of child molestation, r(78) = .36. The results generally suggest that the Stable items examined are associated with measures of similar constructs; however, the degree of convergence was lower than expected. More systematic and comprehensive research is needed to examine convergence of the Stable items with other relevant measures and additional aspects of construct validity. Such efforts will provide a clearer understanding of dynamic risk factors, appropriate areas of focus for treatment efforts, and, more generally, why some sex offenders recidivate.

  4. [Duration and temporality].

    PubMed

    Fouks, L; Guibert, S; Cardon; Montot

    1990-01-01

    The notion of temporality in living is in perpetual motion between passive temporality and creative conscience. Human existence is not purely immanent, a flow of transcedence continually runs through it. Melancholia is a lose of creativity accompanied by a feeling that time as lived has stopped, time being lived as a new mode of space. Maniac temporality is an improductive and unsociable furious flight toward. The melancholic feeling out of time is crushed by the problematic of alterity, sin and eternity. The maniac lives an imaginary and deceptive problematic. The ambivalent ideal of the schizophrenic is both a return to biological life as well as a fascination by formal thought.

  5. Stable face representations

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Rob; Burton, A. Mike

    2011-01-01

    Photographs are often used to establish the identity of an individual or to verify that they are who they claim to be. Yet, recent research shows that it is surprisingly difficult to match a photo to a face. Neither humans nor machines can perform this task reliably. Although human perceivers are good at matching familiar faces, performance with unfamiliar faces is strikingly poor. The situation is no better for automatic face recognition systems. In practical settings, automatic systems have been consistently disappointing. In this review, we suggest that failure to distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar face processing has led to unrealistic expectations about face identification in applied settings. We also argue that a photograph is not necessarily a reliable indicator of facial appearance, and develop our proposal that summary statistics can provide more stable face representations. In particular, we show that image averaging stabilizes facial appearance by diluting aspects of the image that vary between snapshots of the same person. We review evidence that the resulting images can outperform photographs in both behavioural experiments and computer simulations, and outline promising directions for future research. PMID:21536553

  6. Tin and iron co-doping strategy for developing active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts from SrCoO3-δ for operating below 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yubo; Qian, Baoming; Shao, Zongping

    2015-10-01

    SrCoO3-δ has long been a promising catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). However, its rather unstable cubic phase structure greatly hinders its practical application. Stabilizing the simple cubic phase structure of SrCoO3-δ while preserving a suitable oxygen reduction activity is an important topic of research. Herein, we propose a Sn and Fe co-doping strategy for tuning the B-site of SrCoO3-δ to stabilize its oxygen vacancy-disordered cubic lattice structure at the operating temperatures of intermediate-temperature SOFCs (600-800 °C). Fe doping can greatly increase the solubility of Sn in SrCoO3-δ, which mainly acts as the dopant for cubic phase structure stabilization. Materials with a nominal composition of SrCo0.6(Fe0.4-xSnx)O3-δ (x = 0-0.15) are designed, and the solubility of Sn in SrCoO3-δ can reach x = 0.1. For the first time, we prepare a phase-pure Sn-doped and SrCoO3-δ-based cubic perovskite oxide of SrCo0.6(Fe0.3Sn0.1)O3-δ with long-term cubic structure stability. More importantly, the Sn doping does not harm the oxygen reduction activity of SrCo0.6Fe0.4O3-δ, and the electrode composed of SrCo0.6(Fe0.3Sn0.1)O3-δ possesses a low polarization resistance of ∼0.1 Ω cm2 at 600 °C. A 400-h-long stability test demonstrates that the SrCo0.6(Fe0.3Sn0.1)O3-δ material is a promising oxygen reduction catalyst for SOFCs.

  7. Stable One-Dimensional Dissipative Solitons in Complex Cubic-Quintic Ginzburg-Landau Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksic, N. B.; Pavlovic, G.; Skarka, V.

    2007-11-01

    The generation and nonlinear dynamics of one-dimensional optical dissipative solitonic pulses are examined. The variational method is extended to complex dissipative systems, in order to obtain steady state solutions of the (1+1)-dimensional complex cubic-quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation. A stability criterion is established fixing a domain of dissipative parameters for stable steady state solutions. Following numerical simulations, evolution of any input pulse from this domain leads to stable dissipative temporal solitons. Analytical predictions are confirmed by numerical evolution of input temporal pulses towards stable dissipative solitons.

  8. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  9. Temporal coherency for video tone mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boitard, Ronan; Bouatouch, Kadi; Cozot, Remi; Thoreau, Dominique; Gruson, Adrien

    2012-10-01

    Tone Mapping Operators (TMOs) aim at converting real world high dynamic range (HDR) images captured with HDR cameras, into low dynamic range (LDR) images that can be displayed on LDR displays. Several TMOs have been proposed over the last decade, from the simple global mapping to the more complex one simulating the human vision system. While these solutions work generally well for still pictures, they are usually less e_cient for video sequences as they are source of visual artifacts. Only few of them can be adapted to cope with a sequence of images. In this paper we present a major problem that a static TMO usually encounters while dealing with video sequences, namely the temporal coherency. Indeed, as each tone mapper deals with each frame separately, no temporal coherency is taken into account and hence the results can be quite disturbing for high varying dynamics in a video. We propose a temporal coherency algorithm that is designed to analyze a video as a whole, and from its characteristics adapts each tone mapped frame of a sequence in order to preserve the temporal coherency. This temporal coherency algorithm has been tested on a set of real as well as Computer Graphics Image (CGI) content and put in competition with several algorithms that are designed to be time-dependent. Results show that temporal coherency preserves the overall contrast in a sequence of images. Furthermore, this technique is applicable to any TMO as it is a post-processing that only depends on the used TMO.

  10. A temporal cloak at telecommunication data rate.

    PubMed

    Lukens, Joseph M; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2013-06-13

    Through advances in metamaterials--artificially engineered media with exotic properties, including negative refractive index--the once fanciful invisibility cloak has now assumed a prominent place in scientific research. By extending these concepts to the temporal domain, investigators have recently described a cloak which hides events in time by creating a temporal gap in a probe beam that is subsequently closed up; any interaction which takes place during this hole in time is not detected. However, these results are limited to isolated events that fill a tiny portion of the temporal period, giving a fractional cloaking window of only about 10(-4) per cent at a repetition rate of 41 kilohertz (ref. 15)--which is much too low for applications such as optical communications. Here we demonstrate another technique for temporal cloaking, which operates at telecommunication data rates and, by exploiting temporal self-imaging through the Talbot effect, hides optical data from a receiver. We succeed in cloaking 46 per cent of the entire time axis and conceal pseudorandom digital data at a rate of 12.7 gigabits per second. This potential to cloak real-world messages introduces temporal cloaking into the sphere of practical application, with immediate ramifications in secure communications.

  11. Delayed Reinforcement of Operant Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattal, Kennon A.

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of delay of reinforcement is considered from the perspective of three questions that seem basic not only to understanding delay of reinforcement but also, by implication, the contributions of temporal relations between events to operant behavior. The first question is whether effects of the temporal relation between…

  12. General asymmetric neutral networks and structure design by genetic algorithms: A learning rule for temporal patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Bornholdt, S.; Graudenz, D.

    1993-07-01

    A learning algorithm based on genetic algorithms for asymmetric neural networks with an arbitrary structure is presented. It is suited for the learning of temporal patterns and leads to stable neural networks with feedback.

  13. Stable isotopes in leaf water of terrestrial plants.

    PubMed

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Barbour, Margaret M; Arndt, Stefan K; Cheesman, Alexander W; English, Nathan B; Feild, Taylor S; Helliker, Brent R; Holloway-Phillips, Meisha M; Holtum, Joseph A M; Kahmen, Ansgar; McInerney, Francesca A; Munksgaard, Niels C; Simonin, Kevin A; Song, Xin; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; West, Jason B; Farquhar, Graham D

    2016-05-01

    Leaf water contains naturally occurring stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in abundances that vary spatially and temporally. When sufficiently understood, these can be harnessed for a wide range of applications. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of stable isotope enrichment of leaf water, and its relevance for isotopic signals incorporated into plant organic matter and atmospheric gases. Models describing evaporative enrichment of leaf water have become increasingly complex over time, reflecting enhanced spatial and temporal resolution. We recommend that practitioners choose a model with a level of complexity suited to their application, and provide guidance. At the same time, there exists some lingering uncertainty about the biophysical processes relevant to patterns of isotopic enrichment in leaf water. An important goal for future research is to link observed variations in isotopic composition to specific anatomical and physiological features of leaves that reflect differences in hydraulic design. New measurement techniques are developing rapidly, enabling determinations of both transpired and leaf water δ(18) O and δ(2) H to be made more easily and at higher temporal resolution than previously possible. We expect these technological advances to spur new developments in our understanding of patterns of stable isotope fractionation in leaf water.

  14. High-order entropy stable finite difference schemes for nonlinear conservation laws: Finite domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference operators including boundary closure stencils, for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A comparison technique is used to derive a new Entropy Stable Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (SSWENO) finite difference method, appropriate for simulations of problems with shocks. Viscous terms are approximated using conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference operators. The efficacy of the new discrete operators is demonstrated using both smooth and discontinuous test cases.

  15. Tempered stable Lévy motion driven by stable subordinator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Janusz; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka

    2013-08-01

    In this article we propose a new model for financial data description. Combining two independent mechanisms, namely the tempered stable process and inverse stable subordinator, we obtain a new model which captures not only the tempered stable character of the underlying data but also such a property as periods in which the values of an asset stay on the same level. Moreover, we classify our system to the family of subdiffusive processes and investigate its tail behavior. We describe in detail testing and estimation procedures for the proposed model. In the last step we calibrate our model to the real data.

  16. Compact and stable multibeam fiber injector

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L. F., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    A compact and stable 20-beam injector was built for launching laser light into fibers for Fabry Perot velocity measurements of shock-driven surfaces. The fiber injector uses commercial mounts on mini-rails. Dielectric-coated beamsplitters provide accurate amplitude division. Minimal adjustments for stable operation are permitted by the use of a real-time video-viewer. The video system includes a non-linear camera for CW alignment and a linearized camera with a frame grabber for pulsed measurement and analysis. All 20-injection points are displayed on a single monitor. Optical requirements are given for image relay and magnification. Stimulated Brillouin scattering limitations on high-power are quantified.

  17. Spatial and temporal variations of microbial community in a mixed plug-flow loop reactor fed with dairy manure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Chen, Po-Hsu; Yu, Zhongtang

    2014-01-01

    Mixed plug-flow loop reactor (MPFLR) has been widely adopted by the US dairy farms to convert cattle manure to biogas. However, the microbiome in MPFLR digesters remains unexplored. In this study, the microbiome in a MPFLR digester operated on a mega-dairy farm was examined thrice over a 2 month period. Within 23 days of retention time, 55–70% of total manure solid was digested. Except for a few minor volatile fatty acids (VFAs), total VFA concentration and pH remained similar along the course of the digester and over time. Metagenomic analysis showed that although with some temporal variations, the bacterial community was rather stable spatially in the digester. The methanogenic community was also stable both spatially and temporally in the digester. Among methanogens, genus Methanosaeta dominated in the digester. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis and metagenomic analysis yielded different relative abundance of individual genera of methanogens, especially for Methanobacterium, which was predominant based on qPCR analysis but undetectable by metagenomics. Collectively, the results showed that only small microbial and chemical gradients existed within the digester, and the digestion process occurred similarly throughout the MPFLR digester. The findings of this study may help improve the operation and design of this type of manure digesters. PMID:24690147

  18. Temporal radiance caching.

    PubMed

    Gautron, Pascal; Bouatouch, Kadi; Pattanaik, Sumanta

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel method for fast, high quality computation of glossy global illumination in animated environments. Building on the irradiance caching and radiance caching algorithms, our method leverages temporal coherence by sparse temporal sampling and interpolation of the indirect lighting. In our approach, part of the global illumination solution computed in previous frames is reused in the current frame. Our reusing scheme adapts to the change of incoming radiance by updating the indirect lighting only where there is a significant change. By reusing data in several frames, our method removes the flickering artifacts and yields a significant speedup compared to classical computation in which a new cache is computed for every frame. We also define temporal gradients for smooth temporal interpolation. A key aspect of our method is the absence of any additional complex data structure, making the implementation into any existing renderer based on irradiance and radiance caching straightforward. We describe the implementation of our method using graphics hardware for improved performance.

  19. Information and Temporality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flender, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Being able to give reasons for what the world is and how it works is one of the defining characteristics of modernity. Mathematical reason and empirical observation brought science and engineering to unprecedented success. However, modernity has reached a post-state where an instrumental view of technology needs revision with reasonable arguments and evidence, i.e. without falling back to superstition and mysticism. Instrumentally, technology bears the potential to ease and to harm. Easing and harming can't be controlled like the initial development of technology is a controlled exercise for a specific, mostly easing purpose. Therefore, a revised understanding of information technology is proposed based upon mathematical concepts and intuitions as developed in quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics offers unequaled opportunities because it raises foundational questions in a precise form. Beyond instrumentalism it enables to raise the question of essences as that what remains through time what it is. The essence of information technology is acausality. The time of acausality is temporality. Temporality is not a concept or a category. It is not epistemological. As an existential and thus more comprehensive and fundamental than a concept or a category temporality is ontological; it does not simply have ontic properties. Rather it exhibits general essences. Datability, significance, spannedness and openness are general essences of equiprimordial time (temporality).

  20. Stable and sporadic symbiotic communities of coral and algal holobionts

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Eric R; Barott, Katie L; Nulton, Jim; Vermeij, Mark JA; Rohwer, Forest L

    2016-01-01

    Coral and algal holobionts are assemblages of macroorganisms and microorganisms, including viruses, Bacteria, Archaea, protists and fungi. Despite a decade of research, it remains unclear whether these associations are spatial–temporally stable or species-specific. We hypothesized that conflicting interpretations of the data arise from high noise associated with sporadic microbial symbionts overwhelming signatures of stable holobiont members. To test this hypothesis, the bacterial communities associated with three coral species (Acropora rosaria, Acropora hyacinthus and Porites lutea) and two algal guilds (crustose coralline algae and turf algae) from 131 samples were analyzed using a novel statistical approach termed the Abundance-Ubiquity (AU) test. The AU test determines whether a given bacterial species would be present given additional sampling effort (that is, stable) versus those species that are sporadically associated with a sample. Using the AU test, we show that coral and algal holobionts have a high-diversity group of stable symbionts. Stable symbionts are not exclusive to one species of coral or algae. No single bacterial species was ubiquitously associated with one host, showing that there is not strict heredity of the microbiome. In addition to the stable symbionts, there was a low-diversity community of sporadic symbionts whose abundance varied widely across individual holobionts of the same species. Identification of these two symbiont communities supports the holobiont model and calls into question the hologenome theory of evolution. PMID:26555246

  1. Stable and sporadic symbiotic communities of coral and algal holobionts.

    PubMed

    Hester, Eric R; Barott, Katie L; Nulton, Jim; Vermeij, Mark Ja; Rohwer, Forest L

    2016-05-01

    Coral and algal holobionts are assemblages of macroorganisms and microorganisms, including viruses, Bacteria, Archaea, protists and fungi. Despite a decade of research, it remains unclear whether these associations are spatial-temporally stable or species-specific. We hypothesized that conflicting interpretations of the data arise from high noise associated with sporadic microbial symbionts overwhelming signatures of stable holobiont members. To test this hypothesis, the bacterial communities associated with three coral species (Acropora rosaria, Acropora hyacinthus and Porites lutea) and two algal guilds (crustose coralline algae and turf algae) from 131 samples were analyzed using a novel statistical approach termed the Abundance-Ubiquity (AU) test. The AU test determines whether a given bacterial species would be present given additional sampling effort (that is, stable) versus those species that are sporadically associated with a sample. Using the AU test, we show that coral and algal holobionts have a high-diversity group of stable symbionts. Stable symbionts are not exclusive to one species of coral or algae. No single bacterial species was ubiquitously associated with one host, showing that there is not strict heredity of the microbiome. In addition to the stable symbionts, there was a low-diversity community of sporadic symbionts whose abundance varied widely across individual holobionts of the same species. Identification of these two symbiont communities supports the holobiont model and calls into question the hologenome theory of evolution.

  2. Stable isotopes in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Marsh, Julian B; Das, Sai Krupa; Welty, Francine K

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is recognized as a major public health problem. Obesity is a multifactorial disease and is often associated with a wide range of comorbidities including hypertension, non-insulin dependent (Type II) diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease, all of which contribute to morbidity and mortality. This review deals with stable isotope mass spectrometric methods and the application of stable isotopes to metabolic studies of obesity. Body composition and total energy expenditure (TEE) can be measured by mass spectrometry using stable isotope labeled water, and the metabolism of protein, lipid, and carbohydrate can be measured using appropriate labeled tracer molecules.

  3. Temporal codes and computations for sensory representation and scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Cariani, Peter A

    2004-09-01

    This paper considers a space of possible temporal codes, surveys neurophysiological and psychological evidence for their use in nervous systems, and presents examples of neural timing networks that operate in the time-domain. Sensory qualities can be encoded temporally by means of two broad strategies: stimulus-driven temporal correlations (phase-locking) and stimulus-triggering of endogenous temporal response patterns. Evidence for stimulus-related spike timing patterns exists in nearly every sensory modality, and such information can be potentially utilized for representation of stimulus qualities, localization of sources, and perceptual grouping. Multiple strategies for temporal (time, frequency, and code-division) multiplexing of information for transmission and grouping are outlined. Using delays and multiplications (coincidences), neural timing networks perform time-domain signal processing operations to compare, extract and separate temporal patterns. Separation of synthetic double vowels by a recurrent neural timing network is used to illustrate how coherences in temporal fine structure can be exploited to build up and separate periodic signals with different fundamentals. Timing nets constitute a time-domain scene analysis strategy based on temporal pattern invariance rather than feature-based labeling, segregation and binding of channels. Further potential implications of temporal codes and computations for new kinds of neural networks are explored.

  4. Stable Lobed Mixer With Combustion Demonstrated and Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center collaborated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on an experiment to study the use of lobed mixers to improve the fuel-air mixing process and increase combustion intensity in combustors with minimal pressure loss. This experiment is the first known stable combusting flow studied for this device, and the data show a much faster and much more uniform combustion process than for flat-plate mixers. Several potential benefits may be realized from this study in future combustors, including a reduction in NO_x emissions because of the more uniform temperature distribution. The experiment was done in Lewis' Planar Reacting Shear Layer facility, which was adapted to accept a lobed mixer in addition to the original planar tip. A graduate student at MIT provided the mixer design concept, and Lewis provided the engineering, operations, and research expertise. The experiment used hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures to react with vitiated hot air at 920 K. A flow speed of about 120 m/sec and a speed ratio of 0.5 were used. Flow diagnostics consisted of traversing fine-wire thermocouples and pitot probes for flow mapping. Supplementary fluorescence images were taken with a charged coupled device (CCD) camera to show the location and temporal behavior of the reaction zone. The data showed that the lobed mixer consumed the reactants between 3 to 10 times faster than a corresponding planar shear layer. The figure shows the dramatic difference in the measured temperature distribution with and without the lobed mixer. The increased mixing rate was due to a larger interfacial area as well as to the secondary flow from the streamwise vortices off the tips of the lobes. In addition, the fluorescence images showed that the lobes acted as flame stabilizers.

  5. Earthquakes in Stable Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Arch C.; Kanter, Lisa R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are some of the reasons for earthquakes which occur in stable crust away from familiar zones at the ends of tectonic plates. Crust stability and the reactivation of old faults are described using examples from India and Australia. (CW)

  6. Shelf-Stable Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... process of packing meat and poultry in glass bottles, corking them, and submerging them in boiling water. ... fsis.usda.gov. [ Top of Page ] Are any egg products shelf stable? Pasteurized, dried egg products can ...

  7. Optimal Temporal Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Fuat; Freestone, David; Simen, Patrick; deSouza, Laura; Cohen, Jonathan D.; Holmes, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Time is an essential feature of most decisions, because the reward earned from decisions frequently depends on the temporal statistics of the environment (e.g., on whether decisions must be made under deadlines). Accordingly, evolution appears to have favored a mechanism that predicts intervals in the seconds to minutes range with high accuracy on average, but significant variability from trial to trial. Importantly, the subjective sense of time that results is sufficiently imprecise that maximizing rewards in decision-making can require substantial behavioral adjustments (e.g., accumulating less evidence for a decision in order to beat a deadline). Reward maximization in many daily decisions therefore requires optimal temporal risk assessment. Here, we review the temporal decision-making literature, conduct secondary analyses of relevant published datasets, and analyze the results of a new experiment. The paper is organized in three parts. In the first part, we review literature and analyze existing data suggesting that animals take account of their inherent behavioral variability (their “endogenous timing uncertainty”) in temporal decision-making. In the second part, we review literature that quantitatively demonstrates nearly optimal temporal risk assessment with sub-second and supra-second intervals using perceptual tasks (with humans and mice) and motor timing tasks (with humans). We supplement this section with original research that tested human and rat performance on a task that requires finding the optimal balance between two time-dependent quantities for reward maximization. This optimal balance in turn depends on the level of timing uncertainty. Corroborating the reviewed literature, humans and rats exhibited nearly optimal temporal risk assessment in this task. In the third section, we discuss the role of timing uncertainty in reward maximization in two-choice perceptual decision-making tasks and review literature that implicates timing uncertainty

  8. Distributed Weighted Stable Marriage Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amira, Nir; Giladi, Ran; Lotker, Zvi

    The Stable Matching problem was introduced by Gale and Shapley in 1962. The input for the stable matching problem is a complete bipartite K n,n graph together with a ranking for each node. Its output is a matching that does not contain a blocking pair, where a blocking pair is a pair of elements that are not matched together but rank each other higher than they rank their current mates. In this work we study the Distributed Weighted Stable Matching problem. The input to the Weighted Stable Matching problem is a complete bipartite K n,n graph and a weight function W. The ranking of each node is determined by W, i.e. node v prefers node u 1 over node u 2 if W((v,u 1)) > W((v, u 2)). Using this ranking we can solve the original Stable Matching problem. We consider two different communication models: the billboard model and the full distributed model. In the billboard model, we assume that there is a public billboard and each participant can write one message on it in each time step. In the distributed model, we assume that each node can send O(logn) bits on each edge of the K n,n . In the billboard model we prove a somewhat surprising tight bound: any algorithm that solves the Stable Matching problem requires at least n - 1 rounds. We provide an algorithm that meets this bound. In the distributed communication model we provide an algorithm named intermediation agencies algorithm, in short (IAA), that solves the Distributed Weighted Stable Marriage problem in O(sqrt{n}) rounds. This is the first sub-linear distributed algorithm that solves some subcase of the general Stable Marriage problem.

  9. Temporal Prediction in lieu of Periodic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Morillon, Benjamin; Schroeder, Charles E; Wyart, Valentin; Arnal, Luc H

    2016-02-24

    Predicting not only what will happen, but also when it will happen is extremely helpful for optimizing perception and action. Temporal predictions driven by periodic stimulation increase perceptual sensitivity and reduce response latencies. At the neurophysiological level, a single mechanism has been proposed to mediate this twofold behavioral improvement: the rhythmic entrainment of slow cortical oscillations to the stimulation rate. However, temporal regularities can occur in aperiodic contexts, suggesting that temporal predictions per se may be dissociable from entrainment to periodic sensory streams. We investigated this possibility in two behavioral experiments, asking human participants to detect near-threshold auditory tones embedded in streams whose temporal and spectral properties were manipulated. While our findings confirm that periodic stimulation reduces response latencies, in agreement with the hypothesis of a stimulus-driven entrainment of neural excitability, they further reveal that this motor facilitation can be dissociated from the enhancement of auditory sensitivity. Perceptual sensitivity improvement is unaffected by the nature of temporal regularities (periodic vs aperiodic), but contingent on the co-occurrence of a fulfilled spectral prediction. Altogether, the dissociation between predictability and periodicity demonstrates that distinct mechanisms flexibly and synergistically operate to facilitate perception and action. PMID:26911682

  10. L-Band Transmit/Receive Module for Phase-Stable Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andricos, Constantine; Edelstein, Wendy; Krimskiy, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been shown to provide very sensitive measurements of surface deformation and displacement on the order of 1 cm. Future systematic measurements of surface deformation will require this capability over very large areas (300 km) from space. To achieve these required accuracies, these spaceborne sensors must exhibit low temporal decorrelation and be temporally stable systems. An L-band (24-cmwavelength) InSAR instrument using an electronically steerable radar antenna is suited to meet these needs. In order to achieve the 1-cm displacement accuracy, the phased array antenna requires phase-stable transmit/receive (T/R) modules. The T/R module operates at L-band (1.24 GHz) and has less than 1- deg absolute phase stability and less than 0.1-dB absolute amplitude stability over temperature. The T/R module is also high power (30 W) and power efficient (60-percent overall efficiency). The design is currently implemented using discrete components and surface mount technology. The basic T/R module architecture is augmented with a calibration loop to compensate for temperature variations, component variations, and path loss variations as a function of beam settings. The calibration circuit consists of an amplitude and phase detector, and other control circuitry, to compare the measured gain and phase to a reference signal and uses this signal to control a precision analog phase shifter and analog attenuator. An architecture was developed to allow for the module to be bidirectional, to operate in both transmit and receive mode. The architecture also includes a power detector used to maintain a transmitter power output constant within 0.1 dB. The use of a simple, stable, low-cost, and high-accuracy gain and phase detector made by Analog Devices (AD8302), combined with a very-high efficiency T/R module, is novel. While a self-calibrating T/R module capability has been sought for years, a practical and cost-effective solution has

  11. Phase-stable, microwave FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; May, L.; Potter, M.

    1995-07-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiency and high output power for microwave wavelengths. However, using present technology, microwave FEL amplifiers are not phase stable enough to be suitable for driving linear accelerators, where several much amplifiers need to be phase locked. The growing wave`s phase sensitivity to the beam voltage in the small-signal gain regime is responsible for the largest contribution to this phase instability. We discuss a scheme that reduces the phase sensitivity to the beam voltage by operating off synchronism and matching the phase variation resulting from the desynchronism to the phase variation from the reduced plasma wavenumber as the beam voltage changes.

  12. Hadamard Factorization of Stable Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo-Villalobos, Carlos Arturo; Aguirre-Hernández, Baltazar

    2011-11-01

    The stable (Hurwitz) polynomials are important in the study of differential equations systems and control theory (see [7] and [19]). A property of these polynomials is related to Hadamard product. Consider two polynomials p,q ∈ R[x]:p(x) = anxn+an-1xn-1+...+a1x+a0q(x) = bmx m+bm-1xm-1+...+b1x+b0the Hadamard product (p × q) is defined as (p×q)(x) = akbkxk+ak-1bk-1xk-1+...+a1b1x+a0b0where k = min(m,n). Some results (see [16]) shows that if p,q ∈R[x] are stable polynomials then (p×q) is stable, also, i.e. the Hadamard product is closed; however, the reciprocal is not always true, that is, not all stable polynomial has a factorization into two stable polynomials the same degree n, if n> 4 (see [15]).In this work we will give some conditions to Hadamard factorization existence for stable polynomials.

  13. Functionally Stable and Phylogenetically Diverse Microbial Enrichments from Microbial Fuel Cells during Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Shun'ichi; Suzuki, Shino; Norden-Krichmar, Trina M.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Gorby, Yuri A.; Bretschger, Orianna

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microorganisms as biocatalysts to recover energy from organic matter in the form of electricity. One of the goals of MFC research is to develop the technology for cost-effective wastewater treatment. However, before practical MFC applications are implemented it is important to gain fundamental knowledge about long-term system performance, reproducibility, and the formation and maintenance of functionally-stable microbial communities. Here we report findings from a MFC operated for over 300 days using only primary clarifier effluent collected from a municipal wastewater treatment plant as the microbial resource and substrate. The system was operated in a repeat-batch mode, where the reactor solution was replaced once every two weeks with new primary effluent that consisted of different microbial and chemical compositions with every batch exchange. The turbidity of the primary clarifier effluent solution notably decreased, and 97% of biological oxygen demand (BOD) was removed after an 8–13 day residence time for each batch cycle. On average, the limiting current density was 1000 mA/m2, the maximum power density was 13 mW/m2, and coulombic efficiency was 25%. Interestingly, the electrochemical performance and BOD removal rates were very reproducible throughout MFC operation regardless of the sample variability associated with each wastewater exchange. While MFC performance was very reproducible, the phylogenetic analyses of anode-associated electricity-generating biofilms showed that the microbial populations temporally fluctuated and maintained a high biodiversity throughout the year-long experiment. These results suggest that MFC communities are both self-selecting and self-optimizing, thereby able to develop and maintain functional stability regardless of fluctuations in carbon source(s) and regular introduction of microbial competitors. These results contribute significantly toward the practical application of

  14. Temporal Bone Localized Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Hasan; Acioğlu, Engin; Durna, Yusuf Muhammed; Yiğit, Özgür; Bozkurt, Erol Rüştü; Karagöz, Yeşim

    2015-11-01

    Chondroblastoma is a highly destructive tumor originating from immature cartilage cells. Although chondroblastoma is defined as a benign tumor, it may exhibit malign tumor behaviors such as invasion or metastasis on neighboring structures. Magnetic resonance (MR) image is a solid mass lesion, which included heterogeneous hypointense in T2A and heterogeneous minimal hyperintense in T1A with destructive expansile characteristics and millimetric calcifications. Temporal bone chondroblastomas may complicate the diagnosis because of their different histologic characteristics. Microscopically, chondroblastic cell nests and calcification of locally "chicken wire" type around the cells are observed. These tumors secrete s-100 and vimentin and are used for differential diagnosis. In this study, a temporal bone localized chondroblastoma case is presented.

  15. Temporal Bone Localized Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Hasan; Acioğlu, Engin; Durna, Yusuf Muhammed; Yiğit, Özgür; Bozkurt, Erol Rüştü; Karagöz, Yeşim

    2015-11-01

    Chondroblastoma is a highly destructive tumor originating from immature cartilage cells. Although chondroblastoma is defined as a benign tumor, it may exhibit malign tumor behaviors such as invasion or metastasis on neighboring structures. Magnetic resonance (MR) image is a solid mass lesion, which included heterogeneous hypointense in T2A and heterogeneous minimal hyperintense in T1A with destructive expansile characteristics and millimetric calcifications. Temporal bone chondroblastomas may complicate the diagnosis because of their different histologic characteristics. Microscopically, chondroblastic cell nests and calcification of locally "chicken wire" type around the cells are observed. These tumors secrete s-100 and vimentin and are used for differential diagnosis. In this study, a temporal bone localized chondroblastoma case is presented. PMID:26517458

  16. Coverage centralities for temporal networks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Yano, Yosuke; Yoshida, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Structure of real networked systems, such as social relationship, can be modeled as temporal networks in which each edge appears only at the prescribed time. Understanding the structure of temporal networks requires quantifying the importance of a temporal vertex, which is a pair of vertex index and time. In this paper, we define two centrality measures of a temporal vertex based on the fastest temporal paths which use the temporal vertex. The definition is free from parameters and robust against the change in time scale on which we focus. In addition, we can efficiently compute these centrality values for all temporal vertices. Using the two centrality measures, we reveal that distributions of these centrality values of real-world temporal networks are heterogeneous. For various datasets, we also demonstrate that a majority of the highly central temporal vertices are located within a narrow time window around a particular time. In other words, there is a bottleneck time at which most information sent in the temporal network passes through a small number of temporal vertices, which suggests an important role of these temporal vertices in spreading phenomena. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Temporal Network Theory and Applications", edited by Petter Holme.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-60498-7

  17. Temporal stability of chemical hormesis (CH): Is CH just a temporary stop on the road to thresholds and toxic responses?

    PubMed

    Mushak, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Chemical hormesis (CH) is currently described as a nonmonotonic, bidirectional dose-response relationship for chemicals, where a stimulatory, (beneficial?) response at low dose or exposure is followed by an inhibitory response at higher doses/exposures (or vice-versa). CH is depicted as U(J)-shaped or inverse U(J)-shaped curves, i.e., curve slopes change sign. Some describe CH as a homeostasis-preserving response; others view CH as adaptive or (pre)conditioning responses to chemical stress. One aspect of CH and stress hormesis in general that has not been researched is its temporal stability, i.e., persistence, particularly in experimental animals and humans having long-term chemical stressing. Once maximized, does the CH response remain operative over the entire time of chemical exposure? One possible reason for the question's neglect is that temporal stability, e.g., 'steady-state hormesis,' has been assumed. Another is that CH temporality is not well understood or has been under-appreciated as to its importance. Available data, mainly for simpler biological systems, describe cases of transitory CH. Other examples, in human and experimental animal studies, show transitory existence of CH and, in some specialized cases, persisting CH. Also, certain disease state-induced hormetic responses are transitory over time in humans. The question requires resolution if CH is to be considered (i) a stable and beneficial or adverse response, (ii) a stable dose-response model competitive with stable threshold and linear, nonthreshold (LNT) dose-response models, and (iii) a model having any impact on, or role in, regulatory and public health policies. PMID:27396315

  18. Morphological study of surgical approach by superior temporal sulcus-temporal horn of lateral ventricle approach using volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Jia, Linpei; Dong, Yidian; Zhao, Hang; Liu, Haoyuan; Yang, Kerong; Li, Youqiong

    2014-03-01

    In this research, we acquired the length of the superior temporal sulcus, the shortest distance from the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle, and the approach angle between the median sagittal plane and the shortest segment from the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle measuring 98 specimens by magnetic resonance imaging volume rendering. At the same time, we preliminarily oriented the point of the superior temporal sulcus, which is closest to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle, aimed at finding out the best entrance point of surgical approach through the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle and reducing the damage to optic radiation as well as other nerve fibers during the operation. The results indicate that the point at the front side 3/5 of the superior temporal sulcus may be the ideal surgical approach entrance point, and there is no difference between 2 cerebral hemispheres (P < 0.05).

  19. Coded aperture compressive temporal imaging.

    PubMed

    Llull, Patrick; Liao, Xuejun; Yuan, Xin; Yang, Jianbo; Kittle, David; Carin, Lawrence; Sapiro, Guillermo; Brady, David J

    2013-05-01

    We use mechanical translation of a coded aperture for code division multiple access compression of video. We discuss the compressed video's temporal resolution and present experimental results for reconstructions of > 10 frames of temporal data per coded snapshot.

  20. Temporal bone chondroblastoma: big and small.

    PubMed

    Leong, H K; Chong, P Y; Sinniah, R

    1994-12-01

    Chondroblastoma represents approximately one per cent of all primary bone tumours. It is even rarer in the temporal bone and so far only 34 cases have been reported. We report here two cases with chondroblastoma of the temporal bone. The first case was discovered as a small lesion of the attic and root of zygoma. It was removed via mastoidectomy and reconstruction of the bony defect achieved normal external ear canal anatomy and hearing post-operatively. The second case presented as an advanced tumour involving the infratemporal fossa and parapharyngeal space. It was treated surgically via the infratemporal fossa approach. As clear surgical margins were not obtained, post-operative radiotherapy was also given to minimize the chance of recurrence. PMID:7861099

  1. Stable Degeneracies for Ising Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauf, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    We introduce and consider the notion of stable degeneracies of translation invariant energy functions, taken at spin configurations of a finite Ising model. By this term we mean the lack of injectivity that cannot be lifted by changing the interaction. We show that besides the symmetry-induced degeneracies, related to spin flip, translation and reflection, there exist additional stable degeneracies, due to more subtle symmetries. One such symmetry is the one of the Singer group of a finite projective plane. Others are described by combinatorial relations akin to trace identities. Our results resemble traits of the length spectrum for closed geodesics on a Riemannian surface of constant negative curvature. There, stable degeneracy is defined w.r.t. Teichmüller space as parameter space.

  2. Temporal Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. D.; Thomas, B. C.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999, Stolz and Adams unveiled a subgrid-scale model for LES based upon approximately inverting (defiltering) the spatial grid-filter operator and termed .the approximate deconvolution model (ADM). Subsequently, the utility and accuracy of the ADM were demonstrated in a posteriori analyses of flows as diverse as incompressible plane-channel flow and supersonic compression-ramp flow. In a prelude to the current paper, a parameterized temporal ADM (TADM) was developed and demonstrated in both a priori and a posteriori analyses for forced, viscous Burger's flow. The development of a time-filtered variant of the ADM was motivated-primarily by the desire for a unifying theoretical and computational context to encompass direct numerical simulation (DNS), large-eddy simulation (LES), and Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes simulation (RANS). The resultant methodology was termed temporal LES (TLES). To permit exploration of the parameter space, however, previous analyses of the TADM were restricted to Burger's flow, and it has remained to demonstrate the TADM and TLES methodology for three-dimensional flow. For several reasons, plane-channel flow presents an ideal test case for the TADM. Among these reasons, channel flow is anisotropic, yet it lends itself to highly efficient and accurate spectral numerical methods. Moreover, channel-flow has been investigated extensively by DNS, and a highly accurate data base of Moser et.al. exists. In the present paper, we develop a fully anisotropic TADM model and demonstrate its utility in simulating incompressible plane-channel flow at nominal values of Re(sub tau) = 180 and Re(sub tau) = 590 by the TLES method. The TADM model is shown to perform nearly as well as the ADM at equivalent resolution, thereby establishing TLES as a viable alternative to LES. Moreover, as the current model is suboptimal is some respects, there is considerable room to improve TLES.

  3. [Temporal meaning of suffering].

    PubMed

    Porée, J

    2015-09-01

    If we had to find a few simple words to express what a suffering human being experiences, no matter what ills are causing the suffering and no matter what circumstances underlie the ills themselves, we could unmistakably say that it is the experience of not being able to go on like this. Suffering can be described, in this same sense, as an alteration in temporality. However, describing suffering as such only makes sense if we already have a conception of normal temporality. Yet for this, philosophical tradition offers not one but four competing conceptions. In the present article, we begin by briefly presenting these different conceptions. We then show how each one sheds light, by way of contrast, on a phenomenon whose meaning thus appears to be essentially negative. But does this phenomenon have a negative meaning only? Doesn't it correspond as much to a transformation as an alteration of temporality? This is what we will strive to establish in the third part of the article by relating suffering to hope, in a paradoxical sense of the term. Of the four conceptions of time likely to shed a contrasting light on the upheavals that suffering introduces into our life experience, the one described by Aristotle in Physics is historically the first. In particular, the notion of succession originates therein. But this conception does not account for what makes time the unit of a past, a present, and a future. In Book XI of Confessions, St. Augustine situated this unit not in nature but in the human mind. Hence, his definition of time as a distension of the soul and the necessary division into physical time and psychic time it entails. Husserl's Lessons on the phenomenology of the consciousness of internal time lend credit to this division, but they illuminate only the internal constitution of the "present", which is at the heart of the psychological conception of time. In Being and Time, Heidegger breaks away from this long-standing tradition; in his view, physical time

  4. Long-term CEP-stable high energy few-cycle pulses using the feed-forward method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücking, Fabian; Anderson, Alexandria; Apolonskiy, Alexander; Krausz, Ferenc; Steinmeyer, Günter; Tempea, Gabriel; Assion, Andreas

    2012-03-01

    The feed-forward technique has recently revolutionized carrier-envelope phase stabilization, enabling unprecedented values of residual phase jitter. Nevertheless, in its original demonstrations the stabilized beam exhibited angular and temporal dispersion. We demonstrate that these problems can be solved, resulting in few-cycle pulses with good beam quality. This in turn enables the use of monolithic interferometers, providing excellent long-term stability of the system. Out-of-loop RMS phase noise of less than 80 mrad over 33 minutes (0.5 mHz to 5 kHz) is measured, i.e., a value that has previously been reported for a few seconds integration time. The current method promises to enable reliable operation of CEP-stable systems over several days.

  5. Comprehensive Retrieval of Spatio-temporal Variations in Atmospheric Radionuclides just after the Fukushima Accident by Analyzing Filter-tapes of Operational Air Pollution Monitoring Stations in Eastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, H.; Oura, Y.; Ebihara, M.; Ohara, T.; Nakajima, T.

    2015-12-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FD1NPS) accident on March 11, 2011, many datasets have been available of deposition density of radionuclides in soils in eastern Japan. By contrast, no time-series data of atmospheric radionuclides has been measured in the Fukushima prefecture (FP), although very limited data is available in the Tokyo metropolitan area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPS. As a result, atmospheric transport models simulating the atmospheric concentrations and surface deposition of radionuclides have large uncertainty, as well as the estimate of release rate of source terms and of internal exposure from inhalation. One year after the accident, we collected the used filter-tapes installed in Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) monitors with beta-ray attenuation method operated by local governments in the air pollution monitoring network of eastern Japan. By measuring radionuclides in SPM on the filter-tapes, we retrieved hourly atmospheric Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations during March 12-23, 2011, when atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial environments were seriously suffered in most of eastern Japan. Until now, we measured hourly radiocesium at around 100 SPM sites in the southern Tohoku region (ST) including the FP and in the TMA. By analysing the dataset, nine major plumes with Cs-137 concentrations higher than 10 Bq m-3 were found, and some plumes were newly found in this study. A local area of relatively high Cs-137 deposition density in the TMA by precipitation on the morning of March 21, was consistent with an area where the time-integrated atmospheric Cs-137 concentrations were also high due to the transport of a plume on the morning of March 21. In the FP, however, the correlation was not so clear. High radionuclides trapped in a cloud layer might be transported to the ST with relatively high Cs-137 deposition densities, because the atmospheric Cs-137 concentrations were under the detection limit.

  6. Pre-semantically defined temporal windows for cognitive processing

    PubMed Central

    Pöppel, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations of different frequencies are hypothesized to be basic for temporal perception; this theoretical concept provides the frame to discuss two temporal mechanisms that are thought to be essential for cognitive processing. One such mechanism operates with periods of oscillations in the range of some tens of milliseconds, and is used for complexity reduction of temporally and spatially distributed neuronal activities. Experimental evidence comes from studies on temporal-order threshold, choice reaction time, single-cell activities, evoked responses in neuronal populations or latency distributions of oculomotor responses. The other mechanism refers to pre-semantic integration in the temporal range of approximately 2–3 s. Experimental evidence comes from studies on temporal reproduction, sensorimotor synchronization, intentional movements, speech segmentation, the shift rate of ambiguous stimuli in the visual or auditory modality or the temporal modulation of the mismatch negativity. These different observations indicate the existence of a universal process of temporal integration underlying the mental machinery. This process is believed to be basic for maintenance and change of perceptual identity. Owing to the omnipresence of this kind of temporal segmentation, it is suggested to use this process for a pragmatic definition of the states of being conscious or the ‘subjective presence’. PMID:19487191

  7. Behavioral Sensitivity of Temporally Modulated Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, George S.; Wilson, A. George; Matell, Matthew S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent investigations into the neural mechanisms that underlie temporal perception have revealed that the striatum is an important contributor to interval timing processes, and electrophysiological recording studies have shown that the firing rates of striatal neurons are modulated by the time in a trial at which an operant response is made. However, it remains unclear whether striatal firing rate modulations are related to the passage of time alone (i.e., whether temporal information is represented in an “abstract” manner independent of other attributes of biological importance), or whether this temporal information is embedded within striatal activity related to co-occurring contextual information, such as motor behaviors. This study evaluated these two hypotheses by recording from striatal neurons while rats performed a temporal production task. Rats were trained to respond at different nosepoke apertures for food reward under two simultaneously active reinforcement schedules: a variable-interval (VI-15 s) schedule and a fixed-interval (FI-15 s) schedule of reinforcement. Responding during a trial occurred in a sequential manner composing three phases; VI responding, FI responding, VI responding. The vast majority of task-sensitive striatal neurons (95%) varied their firing rates associated with equivalent behaviors (e.g., periods in which their snout was held within the nosepoke) across these behavioral phases, and 96% of cells varied their firing rates for the same behavior within a phase, thereby demonstrating their sensitivity to time. However, in a direct test of the abstract timing hypothesis, 91% of temporally modulated “hold” cells were further modulated by the overt motor behaviors associated with transitioning between nosepokes. As such, these data are inconsistent with the striatum representing time in an “abstract’ manner, but support the hypothesis that temporal information is embedded within contextual and motor functions of the

  8. Multi-stable cylindrical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrera, Alberto; Lachenal, Xavier; Daynes, Stephen; Weaver, Paul M.; Chenchiah, Isaac V.

    2013-11-01

    We present a cylindrical lattice structure that mimics the behaviour of the virus bacteriophage T4 in having two (or more) stable states which differ in their radii and length. While the virus achieves bistability through molecular mechanisms we use composite materials to exploit the interplay between pre-stress, material properties and structural geometry. We demonstrate (computationally) that multi-stability is a robust phenomenon. We also show (analytically) that it is possible to choose the design variables so that the energy is independent of the radius, thus resulting in every state of the structure being stable.

  9. Metal Stable Isotopes in Paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, Ariel D.; Rouxel, Olivier

    2007-05-01

    Considered esoteric only a few years ago, research into the stable isotope geochemistry of transition metals is moving into the geoscience mainstream. Although initial attention focused on the potential use of some of these nontraditional isotope systems as biosignatures, they are now emerging as powerful paleoceanographic proxies. In particular, the Fe and Mo isotope systems are providing information about changes in oxygenation and metal cycling in ancient oceans. Zn, Cu, Tl, and a number of other metals and metalloids also show promise. Here we review the basis of stable isotope fractionation as it applies to these elements, analytical considerations, and the current status and future prospects of this rapidly developing research area.

  10. Temporal debugging and profiling of multimedia applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertsson, Lars

    2001-12-01

    We present a temporal debugger, capable of examining time flow of applications in general-purpose computer systems. The debugger is attached to a complete system simulator, which models an entire workstation in sufficient detail to run commodity operating systems and workloads. Unlike traditional debuggers, a debugger operating on a simulated system does not disturb the timing of the target program, allowing reproducible experiments and large amounts of instrumentation and monitoring without intrusion. We have implemented the temporal debugger by modifying the GNU debugger to operate on applications in a simulated Linux system. Debugger implementation is difficult because the debugger expects application-related data, whereas the simulator provides low-level data. We introduce a technique, virtual machine translation, for mapping simulator data to the debugger by parsing operating system data structures in the simulated system. The debugger environment allows collection of performance statistics from multiple abstraction levels: hardware, operating system, and application level. We show how this data can be used to profile quality of service performance of a video decoder. The debugger is used to detect display jitter, and by correlating runtime statistics to image rendering time, we expose deviations when the application is unable to render an image in time, thereby locating the cause of the display jitter.

  11. Temporal processing in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, K L; Ogden, N; Lind-Blad, F

    1990-02-01

    The temporal processing capabilities of 15 children with dyslexia versus 15 age-matched and 15 reading-matched controls in a word identification task were examined. The hypothesis underlying the present experiment was that word recognition would be inferior in children with dyslexia, relative to controls, when the task demanded the temporal integration (sequencing) of two-syllable words. Such a hypothesis must predict that one-syllable word recognition does not distinguish between these two populations and that these effects cannot be accounted for in terms of eye movement differences. To test this hypothesis, one- and two-syllable words displayed for 100, 300, and 3,000 msec were required to be identified. The results yielded evidence of decreased accuracy of word identification by the children with dyslexia in the two-syllable, 300-msec condition, as predicted. A second experiment was unable to uncover any differences in eye movement behaviors that could account for the effects observed in the first experiment. The results are discussed in terms of potential sequential processing deficits in individuals with dyslexia.

  12. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

  13. Stable Black Families. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Lawrence E.; And Others

    This document is the final report of a study conducted to determine what factors contribute to strong Black family life and how these strong families solve problems, in order to add to the knowledge base on stable families so as to enhance practical intervention with families in need, and to identify models of self-help strategies used by stable…

  14. Synthesis of thermally stable polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, G. B.

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of bis triazo linediones with divinyl esters and substituted styrenes was investigated. Twenty new polymers were derived via reaction of two previously synthesized bis triazol linediones and four new bis atriazol linediones with eight styrenes. The structure and polymer properties of these thermally stable polymers was examined. The reaction of triazo linediones with enol esters was also considered.

  15. Higher Order Fractional Stable Motion: Hyperdiffusion with Heavy Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Reiichiro

    2016-08-01

    We introduce the class of higher order fractional stable motions that can exhibit hyperdiffusive spreading with heavy tails. We define the class as a generalization of higher order fractional Brownian motion as well as a generalization of linear fractional stable motions. Higher order fractional stable motions are self-similar with Hurst index larger than one and non-Gaussian stable marginals with infinite variance and have stationary higher order increments. We investigate their sample path properties and asymptotic dependence structure on the basis of codifference. In particular, by incrementing or decrementing sample paths once under suitable conditions, the diffusion rate can be accelerated or decelerated by one order. With a view towards simulation study, we provide a ready-for-use sample path simulation recipe at discrete times along with error analysis. The proposed simulation scheme requires only elementary numerical operations and is robust to high frequency sampling, irregular spacing and super-sampling.

  16. Higher Order Fractional Stable Motion: Hyperdiffusion with Heavy Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Reiichiro

    2016-10-01

    We introduce the class of higher order fractional stable motions that can exhibit hyperdiffusive spreading with heavy tails. We define the class as a generalization of higher order fractional Brownian motion as well as a generalization of linear fractional stable motions. Higher order fractional stable motions are self-similar with Hurst index larger than one and non-Gaussian stable marginals with infinite variance and have stationary higher order increments. We investigate their sample path properties and asymptotic dependence structure on the basis of codifference. In particular, by incrementing or decrementing sample paths once under suitable conditions, the diffusion rate can be accelerated or decelerated by one order. With a view towards simulation study, we provide a ready-for-use sample path simulation recipe at discrete times along with error analysis. The proposed simulation scheme requires only elementary numerical operations and is robust to high frequency sampling, irregular spacing and super-sampling.

  17. Stable continuous-time autoregressive process driven by stable subordinator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Gajda, Janusz

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we examine the continuous-time autoregressive moving average process driven by α-stable Lévy motion delayed by inverse stable subordinator. This process can be applied to high-frequency data with visible jumps and so-called "trapping-events". Those properties are often visible in financial time series but also in amorphous semiconductors, technical data describing the rotational speed of a machine working under various load regimes or data related to indoor air quality. We concentrate on the main characteristics of the examined subordinated process expressed in the language of the measures of dependence which are main tools used in statistical investigation of real data. However, because the analyzed system is based on the α-stable distribution therefore we cannot consider here the correlation (or covariance) as a main measure which indicates at the dependence inside the process. In the paper we examine the codifference, the more general measure of dependence defined for wide class of processes. Moreover we present the simulation procedure of the considered system and indicate how to estimate its parameters. The theoretical results we illustrate by the simulated data analysis.

  18. EXAMINING THE TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF AMMONIA AND NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM AGRICULTURAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper examines the temporal variability of airborne emissions of ammonia from livestock operations and fertilizer application and nitric oxide from soils. In the United States, the livestock operations and fertilizer categories comprise the majority of the ammonia emissions...

  19. Qualitative and temporal reasoning in engine behavior analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, W. E.; Stamps, M. E.; Ali, M.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulation models, engine experts, and experimental data are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of abnormal engine behavior. Engine parameters monitored during operation are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of actual engine behavior. Similarities between the representations of failure scenarios and the actual engine behavior are used to diagnose fault conditions which have already occurred, or are about to occur; to increase the surveillance by the monitoring system of relevant engine parameters; and to predict likely future engine behavior.

  20. How I do it: an improved temporal bone holder.

    PubMed

    Gendeh, B S; Gibb, A G; Khalid, B A

    1995-07-01

    Although some form of temporal bone holder is in use in virtually all ENT postgraduate teaching departments, a paucity of information in the literature may cause problems in selecting the most appropriate model to those responsible for equipping temporal bone laboratories. The bone holder which we describe is based on existing designs but incorporates a built-in irrigation system which offers considerable advantages to the unassisted operator.

  1. Changes in multifractal properties for stable angina pectoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knežević, Andrea; Martinis, Mladen; Krstačić, Goran; Vargović, Emil

    2005-12-01

    The multifractal approach has been applied to temporal fluctuations of heartbeat (RR) intervals, measured in various regimes of physical activity (ergometric data), taken from healthy subjects and those having stable angina pectoris (SAP). The problem we address here is whether SAP changes multifractality observed in healthy subjects. The G-moment method is used to analyse the multifractal spectrum. It is observed that both sets of data characterize multifractality, but a different trend in multifractal behaviour is found for SAP disease, under pronounced physical activity.

  2. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created inmore » practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.« less

  3. Verbal memory decline is less frequent at 10 years than at 2 years after temporal lobe surgery for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Andersson-Roswall, Lena; Malmgren, Kristina; Engman, Elisabeth; Samuelsson, Hans

    2012-08-01

    We investigated individual short- and long-term verbal memory changes after temporal lobe resection for epilepsy. Fifty-one patients (23 operated on the speech-dominant temporal lobe, DTL and 28 on the non-dominant temporal lobe, NDTL) were tested on learning/immediate recall and delayed recall of word-list and word-pairs preoperatively, 2 years postoperatively and 10years postoperatively. Changes were defined using reliable change indices of 23 healthy controls assessed at corresponding intervals. Fewer patients had reliable declines at 10 years than at 2 years (DTL: 13-35% vs 35-44%; NDTL: 0-4% vs 7-21%). Four DTL patients (17%) had reliable declines in ≥2 tests at 10-year follow-up. More NDTL patients had improvement at 10 years than at 2 years (18-30% vs 4-22%). The only risk factor for decline both short and long term was DTL resection. In conclusion, most patients had stable verbal memory postoperatively. A few DTL patients had a lasting decline at long-term follow-up, but more patients showed partial recovery, especially in the NDTL group.

  4. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  5. Temporal Variations in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hammel, H. B.; dePater, I.; Noll, K.; Wong, M.; Clarke, J.; Sanchez-Levega, A.; Orton, G. S.; Gonzaga, S.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Jupiter has undergone many atmospheric changes from storms turning red to global. cloud upheavals, and most recently, a cornet or asteroid impact. Yet, on top of these seemingly random changes events there are also periodic phenomena, analogous to observed Earth and Saturn atmospheric oscillations. We will present 15 years of Hubble data, from 1994 to 2009, to show how the equatorial tropospheric cloud deck and winds have varied over that time, focusing on the F953N, F41 ON and F255W filters. These filters give leverage on wind speeds plus cloud opacity, cloud height and tropospheric haze thickness, and stratospheric haze, respectively. The wind data consistently show a periodic oscillation near 7-8 S latitude. We will discuss the potential for variations with longitude and cloud height, within the calibration limits of those filters. Finally, we will discuss the role that large atmospheric events, such as the impacts in 1994 and 2009, and the global upheaval of 2007, have on temporal studies, This work was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program. HST observational support was provided by NASA through grants from Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract NAS5-26555.

  6. Spatial and temporal scene analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, J. Michael; Chaapel, Charles; Bleiweiss, Max P.

    1994-06-01

    Current efforts to design reliable background scene generation programs require validation using real images for comparison. A crucial step in making objective comparisons is to parameterize the real and generated images into a common set of feature metrics. Such metrics can be derived from statistical and transform-based analyses and yield information about the structures and textures present in various image regions of interest. This paper presents the results of such a metrics-development process for the smart weapons operability enhancement (SWOE) joint test and evaluation (JT&E) program. Statistical and transform based techniques were applied to images obtained from two separate locations, Grayling, Michigan and Yuma, Arizona, at various times of day and under a variety of environmental conditions. Statistical analyses of scene radiance distributions and `clutter' content were performed both spatially and temporally. Fourier and wavelet transform methods were applied as well. Results and their interpretations are given for the image analyses. The metrics that provide the clearest and most reliable distinction between feature classes are recommended.

  7. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  8. Stable maps and Quot schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Mihnea; Roth, Mike

    2003-06-01

    In this paper we study the relationship between two different compactifications of the space of vector bundle quotients of an arbitrary vector bundle on a curve. One is Grothendieck's Quot scheme, while the other is a moduli space of stable maps to the relative Grassmannian. We establish an essentially optimal upper bound on the dimension of the two compactifications. Based on that, we prove that for an arbitrary vector bundle, the Quot schemes of quotients of large degree are irreducible and generically smooth. We precisely describe all the vector bundles for which the same thing holds in the case of the moduli spaces of stable maps. We show that there are in general no natural morphisms between the two compactifications. Finally, as an application, we obtain new cases of a conjecture on effective base point freeness for pluritheta linear series on moduli spaces of vector bundles.

  9. Advanced Thermally Stable Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    A. Boehman; C. Song; H. H. Schobert; M. M. Coleman; P. G. Hatcher; S. Eser

    1998-01-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet fuels has five components: 1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; 2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles during thermal stressing; 3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; 4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and 5) assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics from coal.

  10. Combining spatial and temporal expectations to improve visual perception

    PubMed Central

    Rohenkohl, Gustavo; Gould, Ian C.; Pessoa, Jéssica; Nobre, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of temporal expectations in modulating perceptual functions is increasingly recognized. However, the means through which temporal expectations can bias perceptual information processing remains ill understood. Recent theories propose that modulatory effects of temporal expectations rely on the co-existence of other biases based on receptive-field properties, such as spatial location. We tested whether perceptual benefits of temporal expectations in a perceptually demanding psychophysical task depended on the presence of spatial expectations. Foveally presented symbolic arrow cues indicated simultaneously where (location) and when (time) target events were more likely to occur. The direction of the arrow indicated target location (80% validity), while its color (pink or blue) indicated the interval (80% validity) for target appearance. Our results confirmed a strong synergistic interaction between temporal and spatial expectations in enhancing visual discrimination. Temporal expectation significantly boosted the effectiveness of spatial expectation in sharpening perception. However, benefits for temporal expectation disappeared when targets occurred at unattended locations. Our findings suggest that anticipated receptive-field properties of targets provide a natural template upon which temporal expectations can operate in order to help prioritize goal-relevant events from early perceptual stages. PMID:24722562

  11. Temporal characterization of a multi-wavelength Brillouin–erbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambin Iezzi, Victor; Büttner, Thomas F. S.; Tehranchi, Amirhossein; Loranger, Sébastien; Kabakova, Irina V.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides the first detailed temporal characterization of a multi-wavelength-Brillouin–erbium fiber laser (MWBEFL) by measuring the optical intensity of the individual frequency channels with high temporal resolution. It is found that the power in each channel is highly unstable due to the excitation of several cavity modes for typical conditions of operation. Also provided is the real-time measurements of the MWBEFL output power for two configurations that were previously reported to emit phase-locked picosecond pulse trains, concluded from their autocorrelation measurements. Real-time measurements reveal a high degree of instability without the formation of a stable pulse train. Finally, we model the MWBEFL using coupled wave equations describing the evolution of the Brillouin pump, Stokes and acoustic waves in the presence of stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the optical Kerr effect. A good qualitative consistency between the simulation and experimental results is evident, in which the interference signal at the output shows strong instability as well as the chaotic behavior due to the dynamics of participating pump and Stokes waves.

  12. LP based approach to optimal stable matchings

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, Chung-Piaw; Sethuraman, J.

    1997-06-01

    We study the classical stable marriage and stable roommates problems using a polyhedral approach. We propose a new LP formulation for the stable roommates problem. This formulation is non-empty if and only if the underlying roommates problem has a stable matching. Furthermore, for certain special weight functions on the edges, we construct a 2-approximation algorithm for the optimal stable roommates problem. Our technique uses a crucial geometry of the fractional solutions in this formulation. For the stable marriage problem, we show that a related geometry allows us to express any fractional solution in the stable marriage polytope as convex combination of stable marriage solutions. This leads to a genuinely simple proof of the integrality of the stable marriage polytope. Based on these ideas, we devise a heuristic to solve the optimal stable roommates problem. The heuristic combines the power of rounding and cutting-plane methods. We present some computational results based on preliminary implementations of this heuristic.

  13. Temporal Adverbials in Text Structuring: On Temporal Text Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virtanen, Tuija

    This paper discusses clause-initial adverbials of time functioning as signals of the temporal text strategy. A chain of such markers creates cohesion and coherence by forming continuity in the text and also signals textual boundaries that occur on different hierarchic levels. The temporal text strategy is closely associated with narrative text.…

  14. Medical Temporal-Knowledge Discovery via Temporal Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    Moskovitch, Robert; Shahar, Yuval

    2009-01-01

    Medical knowledge includes frequently occurring temporal patterns in longitudinal patient records. These patterns are not easily detectable by human clinicians. Current knowledge could be extended by automated temporal data mining. However, multivariate time-oriented data are often present at various levels of abstraction and at multiple temporal granularities, requiring a transformation into a more abstract, yet uniform dimension suitable for mining. Temporal abstraction (of both the time and value dimensions) can transform multiple types of point-based data into a meaningful, time-interval-based data representation, in which significant, interval-based temporal patterns can be discovered. We introduce a modular, fast time-interval mining method, KarmaLego, which exploits the transitivity inherent in temporal relations. We demonstrate the usefulness of KarmaLego in finding meaningful temporal patterns within a set of records of diabetic patients; several patterns seem to have a different frequency depending on gender. We also suggest additional uses of the discovered patterns for temporal clustering of the mined population and for classifying multivariate time series. PMID:20351898

  15. Rapid auditory learning of temporal gap detection.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Panda, Manasa R

    2016-07-01

    The rapid initial phase of training-induced improvement has been shown to reflect a genuine sensory change in perception. Several features of early and rapid learning, such as generalization and stability, remain to be characterized. The present study demonstrated that learning effects from brief training on a temporal gap detection task using spectrally similar narrowband noise markers defining the gap (within-channel task), transfer across ears, however, not across spectrally dissimilar markers (between-channel task). The learning effects associated with brief training on a gap detection task were found to be stable for at least a day. These initial findings have significant implications for characterizing early and rapid learning effects. PMID:27475211

  16. Interannual Variation in Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Biogeochemistry of the Mattaponi River, Virginia

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript addresses the difficult issue of identifying the origin of particulate organic matter (POM) in estuaries . . . The objectives of this study were to quantify spatial and temporal variability of the C and N stable isotope composition of suspended POM, and to identif...

  17. Ultra-stable oscillator with complementary transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A high frequency oscillator, having both good short and long term stability, is formed by including a piezoelectric crystal in the base circuit of a first bi-polar transistor circuit, the bi-polar transistor itself operated below its transitional frequency and having its emitter load chosen so that the input impedance, looking into the base thereof, exhibits a negative resistance in parallel with a capacitive reactance. Combined with this basic circuit is an auxiliary, complementary, second bi-polar transistor circuit of the same form with the piezoelectric crystal being common to both circuits. By this configuration small changes in quiescent current are substantially cancelled by opposite variations in the second bi-polar transistor circuit, thereby achieving from the oscillator a signal having its frequency of oscillation stable over long time periods as well as short time periods.

  18. Stable isotope investigations of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.; Heraty, L. J.; Holt, B. D.; Huang, L.; Sturchio, N. C.

    1999-06-01

    Stable isotope ratio measurements for carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) can be used to elucidate the processes affecting transformation and transportation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) in the environment. Methods recently developed in our laboratory for isotopic analysis of CAHs have been applied to laboratory measurements of the kinetic isotope effects associated with aerobic degradation of dichloromethane (DCM) and with both anaerobic and aerobic cometabolic degradation of trichlomethene (TCE) in batch and column microbial cultures. These experimental determinations of fractionation factors are crucial for understanding the behavior of CAHs in complex natural systems, where the extent of biotransformation can be masked by dispersion and volatilization. We have also performed laboratory investigations of kinetic isotope effects accompanying evaporation of CAHs, as well as field investigations of natural attenuation and in situ remediation of CAHs in a number of contaminated shallow aquifers at sites operated by the federal government and the private sector.

  19. Reaction diffusion equation with spatio-temporal delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhihong; Rong, Erhua

    2014-07-01

    We investigate reaction-diffusion equation with spatio-temporal delays, the global existence, uniqueness and asymptotic behavior of solutions for which in relation to constant steady-state solution, included in the region of attraction of a stable steady solution. It is shown that if the delay reaction function satisfies some conditions and the system possesses a pair of upper and lower solutions then there exists a unique global solution. In terms of the maximal and minimal constant solutions of the corresponding steady-state problem, we get the asymptotic stability of reaction-diffusion equation with spatio-temporal delay. Applying this theory to Lotka-Volterra model with spatio-temporal delay, we get the global solution asymptotically tend to the steady-state problem's steady-state solution.

  20. Local temporal pattering of operant behavior in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wearden, John H.; Shimp, Charles P.

    1985-01-01

    Button pressing by 44 college students intermittently produced points and the words “GOOD” or “POOR” on a computer screen. The events were arranged according to a paced random-interval 10-s schedule in which the target interresponse-time categories were 1 to 3, 3 to 5, or 6 to 12 s. The degree to which instructions specified certain aspects of the contingency (e.g., whether response spacing was critical) was also varied, and in some conditions the experimenter prompted specifically paced responses during the first 2 min of the session. The procedures shaped the local patterning of behavior of some subjects in less than 30 min of exposure to the contingencies. Most subjects who, in a postexperimental questionnaire, accurately identified the schedule contingencies also responded more accurately than those whose verbal descriptions were inaccurate or imprecise. PMID:16812434

  1. Biocybernetic system evaluates indices of operator engagement in automated task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, A. T.; Bogart, E. H.; Bartolome, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    A biocybernetic system has been developed as a method to evaluate automated flight deck concepts for compatibility with human capabilities. A biocybernetic loop is formed by adjusting the mode of operation of a task set (e.g., manual/automated mix) based on electroencephalographic (EEG) signals reflecting an operator's engagement in the task set. A critical issue for the loop operation is the selection of features of the EEG to provide an index of engagement upon which to base decisions to adjust task mode. Subjects were run in the closed-loop feedback configuration under four candidate and three experimental control definitions of an engagement index. The temporal patterning of system mode switching was observed for both positive and negative feedback of the index. The indices were judged on the basis of their relative strength in exhibiting expected feedback control system phenomena (stable operation under negative feedback and unstable operation under positive feedback). Of the candidate indices evaluated in this study, an index constructed according to the formula, beta power/(alpha power + theta power), reflected task engagement best.

  2. Temporal Scattering And Response

    1992-12-15

    TSAR2.3 (Temporal Scattering and Response) is a finite-difference time-domain electromagnetics code suite. TSAR2.3 is a software package for simulating the interactions of electromagnetic waves with linear materials through the use of the finite-difference time-domain method. The code suite contains grid generation, grid verification, input-file creation and post-processing utilities. The physics package, written in Fortran 77, can be pre-processed to run on many different architectures including Cray, Vax and many Unix workstations. Tools are provided tomore » easily port the code to new computers. The physics package is an efficient, flexible electromagnetic simulator. A body under study can be represented as a three-dimensional grid of materials with arbitrary linear properties. This grid can be simulated in a number of ways including incident plane waves, dipoles, and arbitrary incident fields. The grid can be terminated with numerous boundary conditions including free-space radiation, electric conductor, or magnetic conductor. Projection to the far-field in both the time and frequency domains is possible. This distribution includes make files for installing and maintaining the entire code suite.« less

  3. Temporal Scattering And Response

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, R. R.; Ray, S. L.; Laguna, G.; Allison, M.; Cabral, B.

    1992-12-15

    TSAR2.3 (Temporal Scattering and Response) is a finite-difference time-domain electromagnetics code suite. TSAR2.3 is a software package for simulating the interactions of electromagnetic waves with linear materials through the use of the finite-difference time-domain method. The code suite contains grid generation, grid verification, input-file creation and post-processing utilities. The physics package, written in Fortran 77, can be pre-processed to run on many different architectures including Cray, Vax and many Unix workstations. Tools are provided to easily port the code to new computers. The physics package is an efficient, flexible electromagnetic simulator. A body under study can be represented as a three-dimensional grid of materials with arbitrary linear properties. This grid can be simulated in a number of ways including incident plane waves, dipoles, and arbitrary incident fields. The grid can be terminated with numerous boundary conditions including free-space radiation, electric conductor, or magnetic conductor. Projection to the far-field in both the time and frequency domains is possible. This distribution includes make files for installing and maintaining the entire code suite.

  4. Massive Temporal Lobe Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Waidyasekara, Pasan; Dowthwaite, Samuel A.; Stephenson, Ellison; Bhuta, Sandeep; McMonagle, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Intracranial extension of cholesteatoma is rare. This may occur de novo or recur some time later either contiguous with or separate to the site of the original cholesteatoma. Presentation of Case. A 63-year-old female presented to a tertiary referral hospital with a fluctuating level of consciousness, fever, headache, and right-sided otorrhoea, progressing over several days. Her past medical history included surgery for right ear cholesteatoma and drainage of intracranial abscess 23 years priorly. There had been no relevant symptoms in the interim until 6 weeks prior to this presentation. Imaging demonstrated a large right temporal lobe mass contiguous with the middle ear and mastoid cavity with features consistent with cholesteatoma. The patient underwent a combined transmastoid/middle fossa approach for removal of the cholesteatoma and repair of the tegmen dehiscence. The patient made an uneventful recovery and remains well over 12 months later. Conclusion. This case presentation details a large intracranial cholesteatoma which had extended through a tegmen tympani dehiscence from recurrent right ear cholesteatoma treated by modified radical mastoidectomy over two decades priorly. There was a completely asymptomatic progression of disease until several weeks prior to this presentation. PMID:25821620

  5. Stable long-range interhemispheric coordination is supported by direct anatomical projections.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kelly; Mišić, Bratislav; Cipollini, Ben N; Bezgin, Gleb; Buschkuehl, Martin; Hutchison, R Matthew; Jaeggi, Susanne M; Kross, Ethan; Peltier, Scott J; Everling, Stefan; Jonides, John; McIntosh, Anthony R; Berman, Marc G

    2015-05-19

    The functional interaction between the brain's two hemispheres includes a unique set of connections between corresponding regions in opposite hemispheres (i.e., homotopic regions) that are consistently reported to be exceptionally strong compared with other interhemispheric (i.e., heterotopic) connections. The strength of homotopic functional connectivity (FC) is thought to be mediated by the regions' shared functional roles and their structural connectivity. Recently, homotopic FC was reported to be stable over time despite the presence of dynamic FC across both intrahemispheric and heterotopic connections. Here we build on this work by considering whether homotopic FC is also stable across conditions. We additionally test the hypothesis that strong and stable homotopic FC is supported by the underlying structural connectivity. Consistent with previous findings, interhemispheric FC between homotopic regions were significantly stronger in both humans and macaques. Across conditions, homotopic FC was most resistant to change and therefore was more stable than heterotopic or intrahemispheric connections. Across time, homotopic FC had significantly greater temporal stability than other types of connections. Temporal stability of homotopic FC was facilitated by direct anatomical projections. Importantly, temporal stability varied with the change in conductive properties of callosal axons along the anterior-posterior axis. Taken together, these findings suggest a notable role for the corpus callosum in maintaining stable functional communication between hemispheres. PMID:25941372

  6. Spatial Grouping Determines Temporal Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermens, Frouke; Scharnowski, Frank; Herzog, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    To make sense out of a continuously changing visual world, people need to integrate features across space and time. Despite more than a century of research, the mechanisms of features integration are still a matter of debate. To examine how temporal and spatial integration interact, the authors measured the amount of temporal fusion (a measure of…

  7. Short-term cognitive changes after unilateral temporal lobectomy or unilateral amygdalo-hippocampectomy for the relief of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, L H; Polkey, C E

    1993-01-01

    Forty two patients who had unilateral temporal lobe surgery (either temporal lobectomy or amygdalo-hippocampectomy) were evaluated using a selection of cognitive tests before and soon after surgery, to examine whether the amygdalo-hippocampectomy produces less cognitive impairment than the standard en bloc resection. On specific indices of cognitive functioning an amygdalo-hippocampectomy rather than a temporal lobectomy, undertaken on the temporal lobe thought to mediate that particular function, produced less impairment, in terms of change in cognitive function resulting from the operation. An amygdalo-hippocampectomy carried out on the temporal lobe not thought to mediate such skills, however, resulted in less improvement or more deterioration in these functions than a temporal lobectomy, except in the case of delayed prose recall, where a right amygdalo-hippocampectomy led to more improvement than a right temporal lobectomy. Overall there were few scores which distinguished between the different surgical procedures for cognitive outcome. PMID:8437000

  8. Effects of temporal fluctuations on mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pool, Maria; Dentz, Marco; Post, Vincent E. A.; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-04-01

    Mixing and dispersion in coastal aquifers are strongly influenced by periodic temporal flow fluctuations on multiple time-scales ranging from days (tides), seasons (pumping and recharge) to glacial cycles (regression and transgressions). Transient forcing effects lead to a complex space- ant time-dependent flow response which induces enhanced spreading and mixing of a dissolved substance. We study effective mixing and solute transport in temporally fluctuating one-dimensional flow for a stable stratification of two fluids of different density. We derive explicit expressions for the concentration distribution and variance to identify the controls and obtain realistic predictions of the coupling between mixing and oscillatory transient flow. We find that the magnitude of transient-driven mixing is mainly controlled by the hydraulic diffusivity, the period and the initial interface location. We also find a spatial dependence of the effective dispersion coefficient which at long times causes the concentration profile to become asymmetric. Sand column experiments under well-controlled laboratory conditions are presented to validate the theoretical effective model defined. The proposed formulation is found to provide very good predictions and correctly reproduces the experimental mixing dynamics.

  9. Tungsten Stable Isotope Compositions of Ferromanganese Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, K.; Barling, J.; Hein, J. R.; Schauble, E. A.; Halliday, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first accurate and precise data for mass-dependent fractionation of tungsten (W) stable isotopes, using a double spike technique and MC-ICPMS. Results are expressed relative to the NIST 3136 W isotope standard as per mil deviations in 186W/184W (δ186W). Although heavy element mass-dependent fractionations are expected to be small, Tl and U both display significant low temperature isotopic fractionations. Theoretical calculations indicate that W nuclear volume isotopic effects should be smaller than mass-dependent fractionations at low temperatures. Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts precipitate directly from seawater and have been used as paleoceanographic recorders of temporal changes in seawater chemistry. Crusts are strongly enriched in W and other metals, and are a promising medium for exploring W isotopic variability. Tungsten has a relatively long residence time in seawater of ~61,000 years, mainly as the tungstate ion (WO42-). Water depth profiles show conservative behaviour. During adsorption on Fe-Mn crusts, W species form inner-sphere complexes in the hexavalent (W6+) state. The major host phase is thought to be Mn oxides and the lighter W isotope is expected to be absorbed preferentially. Surface scrapings of 13 globally distributed hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts display δ186W from -0.08 to -0.22‰ (±0.03‰, 2sd). A trend toward lighter W isotope composition exists with increasing water depth (~1500 to ~5200m) and W concentration. One hydrothermal Mn-oxide sample is anomalously light and Mn nodules are both heavy and light relative to Fe-Mn crusts. Tungsten speciation depends on concentration, pH, and time in solution and is not well understood because of the extremely slow kinetics of the reactions. In addition, speciation of aqueous and/or adsorbed species might be sensitive to pressure, showing similar thermodynamic stability but different effective volumes. Thus, W stable isotopes might be used as a water-depth barometer in

  10. Re-examining "temporal niche".

    PubMed

    Smarr, Benjamin L; Schwartz, Michael D; Wotus, Cheryl; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2013-07-01

    The circadian system temporally organizes physiology and behavior throughout the 24-h day. At the core of this organization lies a network of multiple circadian oscillators located within the central nervous system as well as in virtually every peripheral organ. These oscillators define a 24-h temporal landscape of mutually interacting circadian rhythms that is known as the temporal niche of a species. This temporal niche is constituted by the collective phases of all biological rhythms emerging from this multi-oscillatory system. We review evidence showing that under different environmental conditions, this system can adopt different harmonic configurations. Thus, the classic chronobiological approach of searching for "the" circadian phase of an animal-typically by studying circadian rhythms of locomotor activity-represents a narrow look into the circadian system of an animal. We propose that the study of hormonal rhythms may lead to a more insightful assessment of a species' temporal niche.

  11. Stable vices and trailer problems.

    PubMed

    Houpt, K A

    1986-12-01

    Stable vices include oral vices such as cribbing, wood chewing, and coprophagia, as well as stall walking, weaving, pawing, and stall kicking. Some of these behaviors are escape behaviors; others are forms of self-stimulation. Most can be eliminated by pasturing rather than stall confinement. Trailering problems include failure to load, scrambling in the moving trailer, struggling in the stationary trailer, and refusal to unload. Gradual habituation to entering the trailer, the presence of another horse, or a change in trailer type can be used to treat these problems. PMID:3492249

  12. Stable Hemiaminals: 2-Aminopyrimidine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, Anna; Ciunik, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Stable hemiaminals can be obtained in the one-pot reaction between 2-aminopyrimidine and nitrobenzaldehyde derivatives. Ten new hemiaminals have been obtained, six of them in crystal state. The molecular stability of these intermediates results from the presence of both electron-withdrawing nitro groups as substituents on the phenyl ring and pyrimidine ring, so no further stabilisation by intramolecular interaction is required. Hemiaminal molecules possess a tetrahedral carbon atom constituting a stereogenic centre. As the result of crystallisation in centrosymmetric space groups both enantiomers are present in the crystal structure. PMID:26258772

  13. Temporal context in floristic classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R. W.; Lees, B. G.

    1996-11-01

    Multi-temporal remote sensing data present a number of significant problems for the statistical and spatial competence of a classifier. Ideally, a classifier of multi-temporal data should be temporally invariant. It must have the capacity to account for the variations in season, growth cycle, radiometric, and atmospheric conditions at any point in time when classifying the land cover. This paper tests two methods of creating a temporally invariant classifier based on the pattern recognition capabilities of a neural network. A suite of twelve multi-temporal datasets spread over 5 yr along with a comprehensive mix of environmental variables are fused into floristic classification images by the neural network. Uncertainties in the classifications are addressed explicitly with a confidence mask generated from the fuzzy membership value's output by the neural network. These confidence masks are used to produce constrained classification images. The overall accuracy percentage achieved from a study site containing highly disturbed undulating terrain averages 60%. The first method of training, sequential learning of temporal context, is tested by an examination of the step-by-step evolution of the sequential training process. This reveals that the sequential classifier may not have learned about time, because time was constant during each network training session. It also suggests that there are optimal times during the annual cycle to train the classifier for particular floristic classes. The second method of training the classifier is randomised exposure to the entire temporal training suite. Time was now a fluctuating input variable during the network training process. This method produced the best spatially accurate results. The performance of this classifier as a temporally invariant classifier is tested amongst four multi-temporal datasets with encouraging results. The classifier consistently achieved an overall accuracy percentage of 60%. The pairwise predicted

  14. Ancestry, Temporality, and Potentiality

    PubMed Central

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I examine the variety of ways potential is articulated, entailed, and produced in how the field of cancer genetics is being constituted as a domain of transnational research and an emerging site of health-care intervention in southern Brazil. Drawing on analysis of fieldwork in Brazilian cancer-genetics clinics, I explore how different expressions of potential come to inform dynamically the pursuit of prevention, care, and research as diversely scaled investments for those working and living with cancer-genetics knowledge and technologies. It illustrates how specific temporalities help to constitute and “abductively” frame the meaning of these different potentials particularly as this relates to a focus on ancestry. Colonial histories of migration, the embodied effects of dietary habits, or the moral failings of near and distant ancestors as well as promissory futures and the contingency of lived lives become at different times templates for identifying, materializing, and transforming how the potential of cancer genetics in Brazil is articulated. Potential is also expressed through an idiom of “choice” in different efforts to situate participation in cancer-genetics research as prevention or to negotiate access to basic public health. I explore how these expressions of cancer genetics as potential powerfully yet unevenly work to sustain knowledge practices as well as propel patients and their families into fledgling domains of clinical practice and scientific research. At the same time there is always an “excess of meaning” in these endeavors that make visible lines of fracture and disjuncture in collective efforts to make future histories of and from the pursuit of cancer genetics in southern Brazil. PMID:25018561

  15. Temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: definition of candidacy.

    PubMed

    Jones, M W; Andermann, F

    2000-05-01

    Medical intractability is one of the absolute indications for considering temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. This is a relative concept that has to be highly individualized. It is quite easy to determine when a patient's seizures are fully controlled. On the other hand, "continuing seizures are not necessarily a measure of intractability or disability". A positive decision to operate would be based on some of the following factors: assurance of a firm diagnosis, seizures that are frequent and disabling, and seizures occurring in patients who are drug refractory to optimal anti-epileptic medications and dosages.

  16. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  17. Paleoproxies: Heavy Stable Isotope Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, T. F.; Hippler, D.; Siebert, C.; Kramers, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Recent advances in isotope ratio mass spectrometry, namely multiple collector ICP-MS and refined TIMS techniques, will significantly enhance the ability to measure heavy stable isotope fractionation, which will lead to the development of a wide array of process-identifying (bio)-geochemical tools. Thus far research in this area is not easily assessable to scientists outside the isotope field. This is due to the fact that analyzing heavy stable isotopes does not provide routine numbers which are per se true (the preciser the truer) but is still a highly experimental field. On the other hand resolving earth science problems requires specialists familiar with the environment being studied. So what is in there for paleoceanographers? In a first order approach, relating isotope variations to physical processes is straightforward. A prominent example are oxygen isotope variations with temperature. The total geological signal is of course far more complicated. At low temperatures, heavy stable isotopes variations have been reported for e.g. Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Mo and Tl. Fractionation mechanisms and physical parameters responsible for the observed variations are not yet resolved for most elements. Significant equilibrium isotope fractionation is expected from redox reactions of transition metals. However a difference in coordination number between two coexisting speciations of an element in the same oxidation state can also cause fractionation. Protonation of dissolved Mo is one case currently discussed. For paleoceanography studies, a principal distinction between transition metals essential for life (V to Zn plus Mo) or not will be helpful. In case of the former group, distinction between biogenic and abiogenic isotope fractionation will remain an important issue. For example, abiotic Fe redox reactions result in isotope fractionations indistinguishable in direction and magnitude from microbial effects. Only a combination of different stable isotope systems bears the

  18. Interpreting bryophyte stable carbon isotope composition: Plants as temporal and spatial climate recorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royles, Jessica; Horwath, Aline B.; Griffiths, Howard

    2014-04-01

    are unable to control tissue water content although physiological adaptations allow growth in a wide range of habitats. Carbon isotope signals in two mosses (Syntrichia ruralis and Chorisodontium aciphyllum) and two liverworts (Conocephalum conicum and Marchantia polymorpha), whether instantaneous (real time, Δ13C), or organic matter (as δ13COM), provide an assimilation-weighted summary of bryophyte environmental adaptations. In mosses, δ13COM is within the measured range of Δ13C values, which suggests that other proxies, such as compound-specific organic signals, will be representative of historical photosynthetic and growth conditions. The liverworts were photosynthetically active over a wider range of relative water contents (RWC) than the mosses. There was a consistent 5‰ offset between Δ13C values in C. conicum and M. polymorpha, suggestive of greater diffusion limitation in the latter. Analysis of a C. aciphyllum moss-peat core showed the isotopic composition over the past 200 years reflects recent anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Once corrected for source-CO2 inputs, the seasonally integrated Δ13COM between 1350 and 2000 A.D. varied by 1.5‰ compared with potential range of the 12‰ measured experimentally, demonstrating the relatively narrow range of conditions under which the majority of net assimilation takes place. Carbon isotope discrimination also varies spatially, with a 4‰ shift in epiphytic bryophyte organic matter found between lowland Amazonia and upper montane tropical cloud forest in the Peruvian Andes, associated with increased diffusion limitation.

  19. Longitudinal progression of frontal and temporal lobe changes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cobia, Derin J; Smith, Matthew J; Wang, Lei; Csernansky, John G

    2012-08-01

    Cortical abnormalities are considered a neurobiological characteristic of schizophrenia. However, the pattern of such deficits as they progress over the illness remains poorly understood. The goal of this project was to assess the progression of cortical thinning in frontal and temporal cortical regions in schizophrenia, and determine whether relationships exist between them and neuropsychological and clinical symptom profiles. As part of a larger longitudinal 2-year follow-up study, schizophrenia (n=20) and healthy participants (n=20) group-matched for age, gender, and recent-alcohol use, were selected. Using MRI, estimates of gray matter thickness were derived from primary anatomical gyri of the frontal and temporal lobes using surface-based algorithms. These values were entered into repeated-measures analysis of variance models to determine group status and time effects. Change values in cortical regions were correlated with changes in neuropsychological functioning and clinical symptomatology. Results revealed exaggerated cortical thinning of the middle frontal, superior temporal, and middle temporal gyri in schizophrenia participants. These thickness changes strongly influenced volumetric reductions, but were not related to shrinking surface area. Neuropsychological and clinical symptom profiles were stable in the schizophrenia participants despite these neuroanatomic changes. Overall it appears that ongoing abnormalities in the cerebral cortex continue after initial onset of schizophrenia, particularly the lateral aspects of frontal and temporal regions, and do not relate to neuropsychological or clinical measures over time. Maintenance of neuropsychological performance and clinical stability in the face of changing neuroanatomical structure suggests the involvement of alternative compensatory mechanisms. PMID:22647883

  20. Organic Mood Disorder Following Left Anterior Temporal Lobectomy with Amygdalohippocampectomy.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Nishanth J; Kalayil, Rajeesh V; Tharayil, Harish M; Rappai, Mary P

    2015-01-01

    One third of patients with antiepileptic-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) will have to undergo surgery for a better seizure control. Anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) is done for mesial temporal sclerosis that is the most common histopathological lesion associated with TLE. Psychiatric manifestations following ATL are not uncommon with depressive symptoms more common with left ATL and manic symptoms following right ATL. Mr. A is a 42-year-old left cerebral dominant (Confirmed by WADA test) male with no past history of psychiatric illness who had undergone anterior temporal lobectomy with amygdalohippocampectomy. He started having manic episodes post operatively which subsided with antipsychotics. He had multiple such episodes over the next 13 years with minimal inter episodic symptoms. This is a rare instance of manic symptoms following left-sided ATL that emphasizes the need for better understanding of the cerebral laterality of affective symptoms. PMID:26702178

  1. Temporal and structural heterogeneities emerging in adaptive temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Rocha, Luis E. C.; Gross, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a model of adaptive temporal networks whose evolution is regulated by an interplay between node activity and dynamic exchange of information through links. We study the model by using a master equation approach. Starting from a homogeneous initial configuration, we show that temporal and structural heterogeneities, characteristic of real-world networks, spontaneously emerge. This theoretically tractable model thus contributes to the understanding of the dynamics of human activity and interaction networks.

  2. Complementarity in temporal ghost interference and temporal quantum eraser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kiyoung; Noh, Jaewoo

    2015-06-01

    We present a theory for the complementarity in temporal interference and quantum erasure. We consider the case of entangled biphoton where we can get the information of single photon's arrival time without making a disturbing measurement. We find a mathematical equation for the complementary relation for a temporal double slit experiment. We also propose a quantum eraser scheme that will elucidate that the complementarity is originated from the quantum entanglement.

  3. Temporal stability of network partitions.

    PubMed

    Petri, Giovanni; Expert, Paul

    2014-08-01

    We present a method to find the best temporal partition at any time scale and rank the relevance of partitions found at different time scales. This method is based on random walkers coevolving with the network and as such constitutes a generalization of partition stability to the case of temporal networks. We show that, when applied to a toy model and real data sets, temporal stability uncovers structures that are persistent over meaningful time scales as well as important isolated events, making it an effective tool to study both abrupt changes and gradual evolution of a network mesoscopic structures.

  4. Temporal stability of network partitions.

    PubMed

    Petri, Giovanni; Expert, Paul

    2014-08-01

    We present a method to find the best temporal partition at any time scale and rank the relevance of partitions found at different time scales. This method is based on random walkers coevolving with the network and as such constitutes a generalization of partition stability to the case of temporal networks. We show that, when applied to a toy model and real data sets, temporal stability uncovers structures that are persistent over meaningful time scales as well as important isolated events, making it an effective tool to study both abrupt changes and gradual evolution of a network mesoscopic structures. PMID:25215787

  5. Mixture of Skewed α-Stable Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, S. R. Hosseini; Nassiri, V.; Mohammadian, Gh. R.; Mohammadpour, A.

    2011-03-01

    Expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and the Bayesian techniques are two approaches for statistical inference of mixture models [3, 4]. By noting the advantages of the Bayesian methods, practitioners prefer them. However, implementing Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms can be very complicated for stable distributions, due to the non-analytic density or distribution function formulas. In this paper, we introduce a new class of mixture of heavy-tailed distributions, called mixture of skewed stable distributions. Skewed stable distributions belongs to the exponential family and they have analytic density representation. It is shown that skewed stable distributions dominate skew stable distribution functions and they can be used to model heavy-tailed data. The class of skewed stable distributions has an analytic representation for its density function and the Bayesian inference can be done similar to the exponential family of distributions. Finally, mixture of skewed stable distributions are compared to the mixture of stable distributions through a simulations study.

  6. Severe amnesia: an usual late complication after temporal lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Oxbury, S; Oxbury, J; Renowden, S; Squier, W; Carpenter, K

    1997-07-01

    A patient developed the severe amnesic syndrome 8 years after temporal lobe surgery for epilepsy. He underwent left temporal lobectomy (6 cm, 43.5 g; hippocampal sclerosis) aged 19, and remained seizure free for 8 years until a convulsion followed a head injury. He became severely amnesic after a fourth convulsion 16 months later. He was right-handed, pre-operative IQ was average, verbal memory poor and non-verbal memory normal. Post-operatively, these were unchanged. After the first post-operative seizure he began professional training. After onset of amnesia IQ was unchanged, anterograde memory severely impaired and retrograde amnesia dense for at least 16 months. He died 2 years later. Magnetic resonance imaging before amnesia showed absence of anterior left temporal lobe, atrophy of left fornix and mamillary body, and normal right temporal lobe. Four months after onset of amnesia, right hippocampal volume had reduced by 36%. Autopsy showed: previous left temporal lobectomy with absence of left amygdala and hippocampus, atrophy of fornix and mamillary body; neuronal loss in the right hippocampus, severe in CA1 and CA4; intact right amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus; recent diffuse damage associated with cause of death. A convulsion can cause severe hippocampal damage in adult life. Hippocampal zones CA1 and/or CA4 are critical for maintaining memory and the amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus cortex alone cannot support acquisition of new memories.

  7. Super-stable Poissonian structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we characterize classes of Poisson processes whose statistical structures are super-stable. We consider a flow generated by a one-dimensional ordinary differential equation, and an ensemble of particles ‘surfing’ the flow. The particles start from random initial positions, and are propagated along the flow by stochastic ‘wave processes’ with general statistics and general cross correlations. Setting the initial positions to be Poisson processes, we characterize the classes of Poisson processes that render the particles’ positions—at all times, and invariantly with respect to the wave processes—statistically identical to their initial positions. These Poisson processes are termed ‘super-stable’ and facilitate the generalization of the notion of stationary distributions far beyond the realm of Markov dynamics.

  8. Stable density stratification solar pond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A stable density-stratification solar pond for use in the collection and storage of solar thermal energy including a container having a first section characterized by an internal wall of a substantially cylindrical configuration and a second section having an internal wall of a substantially truncated conical configuration surmounting the first section in coaxial alignment therewith, the second section of said container being characterized by a base of a diameter substantially equal to the diameter of the first section and a truncated apex defining a solar energy acceptance opening is discussed. A body of immiscible liquids is disposed within the container and comprises a lower portion substantially filling the first section of the container and an upper portion substantially filling the second section of the container, said lower portion being an aqueous based liquid of a darker color than the upper portion and of a greater density. A protective cover plate is removably provided for covering the acceptance opening.

  9. A stable perfluorochemical blood substitute.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, B; Sloviter, H A

    1991-05-01

    A stable emulsion of perfluorodecalin, made up of 34 percent (vol/vol) perfluorodecalin dispersed by sonication in isotonic Tyrode's buffer (pH 7.4) containing egg yolk lecithin, has been developed. The viscosity of the emulsion is the same as that of human blood, and the particle size is 0.2 microns in diameter. On storage at 5 degrees C, there was no change in viscosity for up to 60 weeks. At 21 degrees C, viscosity increased after 20 weeks of storage; this increase was considerably diminished by the presence of tocopherol in the emulsion. The accumulation of malondialdehyde indicated that there was continuous slow oxidation of the lecithin on storage of the emulsion at either 5 or 21 degrees C; this oxidation was markedly reduced by the presence of tocopherol. PMID:2020995

  10. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  11. Stable line defects in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-11-01

    Line defects in two-dimensional (2D) materials greatly modulate various properties of their pristine form. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, we investigate the structural reconstructions of different kinds of grain boundaries in the silicene sheets. It is evident that depending upon the presence of silicon adatoms and edge shape of grain boundaries (i.e., armchair or zigzag), stable extended line defects (ELDs) can be introduced in a controlled way. Further studies show the stability of these line-defects in silicene, grown on Ag(111) surface at room-temperature. Importantly, unlike most of the 2D sheet materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, 5-5-8 line defects modify the nonmagnetic semimetallic pristine silicene sheet to spin-polarized metal. As ferromagnetically ordered magnetic moments remain strongly localized at the line defect, a one-dimensional spin channel gets created in silicene. Interestingly, these spin channels are quite stable because, unlike the edge of nanoribbons, structural reconstruction or contamination cannot destroy the ordering of magnetic moments here. Zigzag silicene nanoribbons with a 5-5-8 line defect also exhibit various interesting electronic and magnetic properties depending upon their width as well as the nature of the magnetic coupling between edge and defect spin states. Upon incorporation of other ELDs, such as 4-4-4 and 4-8 defects, 2D sheets and nanoribbons of silicene show a nonmagnetic metallic or semiconducting ground state. Highlighting the controlled formation of ELDs and consequent emergence of technologically important properties in silicene, we propose new routes to realize silicene-based nanoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  12. Uses of stable isotopes in fish ecology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of fish tissues (other than otoliths) for stable isotope ratios can provide substantial information on fish ecology, including physiological ecology. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon frequently are used to determine the mix of diet sources for consumers. Stable i...

  13. Stable bound orbits around black rings

    SciTech Connect

    Igata, Takahisa; Ishihara, Hideki; Takamori, Yohsuke

    2010-11-15

    We examine bound orbits of particles around singly rotating black rings. We show that there exist stable bound orbits in toroidal spiral shape near the 'axis' of the ring, and also stable circular orbits on the axis as special cases. The stable bound orbits can have arbitrary large size if the thickness of the ring is less than a critical value.

  14. Stable CSR in storage rings: A model

    SciTech Connect

    Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Venturini, Marco; Abo-Bakr, Michael; Feikes, Jorge; Holldack, Karsten; Kuske, Peter; Wustefeld, Godehart; Hubers, Heinz-Willerm; Warnock, Robert

    2005-01-03

    A comprehensive historical view of the work done on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in storage rings is given in reference [1]. Here we want just to point out that even if the issue of CSR in storage rings was already discussed over 50 years ago, it is only recently that a considerable number of observations have been reported. In fact, intense bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation with a stochastic character were measured in the terahertz frequency range, at several synchrotron light source storage rings [2-8]. It has been shown [8-11], that this bursting emission of CSR is associated with a single bunch instability, usually referred as microbunching instability (MBI), driven by the fields of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the bunch itself. Of remarkably different characteristics was the CSR emission observed at BESSY II in Berlin, when the storage ring was tuned into a special low momentum compaction mode [12, 13]. In fact, the emitted radiation was not the quasi-random bursting observed in the other machines, but a powerful and stable flux of broadband CSR in the terahertz range. This was an important result, because it experimentally demonstrated the concrete possibility of constructing a stable broadband source with extremely high power in the terahertz region. Since the publication of the first successful experiment using the ring as a CSR source [14], BESSY II has regular scheduled user s shifts dedicated to CSR experiments. At the present time, several other laboratories are investigating the possibility of a CSR mode of operation [15-17] and a design for a new ring optimized for CSR is at an advanced stage [18]. In what follows, we describe a model that first accounts for the BESSY II observations and then indicates that the special case of BESSY II is actually quite general and typical when relativistic electron storage rings are tuned for short bunches. The model provides a scheme for predicting and optimizing the performance of ring

  15. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    O`Connor, P.

    1998-08-11

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit. 11 figs.

  16. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, Paul

    1998-08-11

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit.

  17. Power and reduced temporal discounting.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Priyanka D; Fast, Nathanael J

    2013-04-01

    Decision makers generally feel disconnected from their future selves, an experience that leads them to prefer smaller immediate gains to larger future gains. This pervasive tendency is known as temporal discounting, and researchers across disciplines are interested in understanding how to overcome it. Following recent advances in the power literature, we suggest that the experience of power enhances one's connection with the future self, which in turn results in reduced temporal discounting. In Study 1, we found that participants assigned to high-power roles were less likely than participants assigned to low-power roles to display temporal discounting. In Studies 2 and 3, priming power reduced temporal discounting in monetary and nonmonetary tasks, and, further, connection with the future self mediated the relation between power and reduced discounting. In Study 4, experiencing a general sense of power in the workplace predicted actual lifetime savings. These results have important implications for future research.

  18. Automated Learning of Temporal Expressions.

    PubMed

    Redd, Douglas; Shaoa, YiJun; Yang, Jing; Divita, Guy; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Clinical notes contain important temporal information that are critical for making clinical diagnosis and treatment as well as for retrospective analyses. Manually created regular expressions are commonly used for the extraction of temporal information; however, this can be a time consuming and brittle approach. We describe a novel algorithm for automatic learning of regular expressions in recognizing temporal expressions. Five classes of temporal expressions are identified. Keywords specific to those classes are used to retrieve snippets of text representing the same keywords in context. Those snippets are used for Regular Expression Discovery Extraction (REDEx). These learned regular expressions are then evaluated using 10-fold cross validation. Precision and recall are very high, above 0.95 for most classes.

  19. Treatment of Temporal Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Rodney C; Cervenka, Brian; Brodie, Hilary A

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic injury to the temporal bone can lead to significant morbidity or mortality and knowledge of the pertinent anatomy, pathophysiology of injury, and appropriate management strategies is critical for successful recovery and rehabilitation of such injured patients. Most temporal bone fractures are caused by motor vehicle accidents. Temporal bone fractures are best classified as either otic capsule sparing or otic capsule disrupting-type fractures, as such classification correlates well with risk of concomitant functional complications. The most common complications of temporal bone fractures are facial nerve injury, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, and hearing loss. Assessment of facial nerve function as soon as possible following injury greatly facilitates clinical decision making. Use of prophylactic antibiotics in the setting of CSF leak is controversial; however, following critical analysis and interpretation of the existing classic and contemporary literature, we believe its use is absolutely warranted.

  20. Treatment of Temporal Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Rodney C; Cervenka, Brian; Brodie, Hilary A

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic injury to the temporal bone can lead to significant morbidity or mortality and knowledge of the pertinent anatomy, pathophysiology of injury, and appropriate management strategies is critical for successful recovery and rehabilitation of such injured patients. Most temporal bone fractures are caused by motor vehicle accidents. Temporal bone fractures are best classified as either otic capsule sparing or otic capsule disrupting-type fractures, as such classification correlates well with risk of concomitant functional complications. The most common complications of temporal bone fractures are facial nerve injury, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, and hearing loss. Assessment of facial nerve function as soon as possible following injury greatly facilitates clinical decision making. Use of prophylactic antibiotics in the setting of CSF leak is controversial; however, following critical analysis and interpretation of the existing classic and contemporary literature, we believe its use is absolutely warranted. PMID:27648399

  1. Turbulence Spreading into Linearly Stable Zone and Transport Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    T.S. Hahm; P.H. Diamond; Z. Lin; K. Itoh; S.-I. Itoh

    2003-10-20

    We study the simplest problem of turbulence spreading corresponding to the spatio-temporal propagation of a patch of turbulence from a region where it is locally excited to a region of weaker excitation, or even local damping. A single model equation for the local turbulence intensity I(x, t) includes the effects of local linear growth and damping, spatially local nonlinear coupling to dissipation and spatial scattering of turbulence energy induced by nonlinear coupling. In the absence of dissipation, the front propagation into the linearly stable zone occurs with the property of rapid progression at small t, followed by slower subdiffusive progression at late times. The turbulence radial spreading into the linearly stable zone reduces the turbulent intensity in the linearly unstable zone, and introduces an additional dependence on the rho* is always equal to rho i/a to the turbulent intensity and the transport scaling. These are in broad, semi-quantitative agreements with a number of global gyrokinetic simulation results with zonal flows and without zonal flows. The front propagation stops when the radial flux of fluctuation energy from the linearly unstable region is balanced by local dissipation in the linearly stable region.

  2. Temporal yoking in continuous multitasking.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong V; Swallow, Khena M

    2014-12-01

    Continuous tasks such as baggage screening often involve selective gating of sensory information when "targets" are detected. Previous research has shown that temporal selection of behaviorally relevant information triggers changes in perception, learning, and memory. However, it is unclear whether temporal selection has broad effects on concurrent tasks. To address this question, we asked participants to view a stream of faces and encoded faces of a particular gender for a later memory test. At the same time, they listened to a sequence of tones, pressing a button for specific pitched tones. We manipulated the timing of temporal selection such that target faces and target tones could be unrelated, perfectly correlated, or anticorrelated. Temporal selection was successful when the temporally coinciding stimuli were congruent (e.g., both were targets), but not when they were incongruent (i.e., only 1 was a target). This pattern suggests that attentional selection for separate tasks is yoked in time-when the attentional gate opens for 1 task it also opens for the other. Temporal yoking is a unique form of dual-task interaction.

  3. The grounding of temporal metaphors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Vicky T; Desai, Rutvik H

    2016-03-01

    Grounded cognition suggests that the processing of conceptual knowledge cued by language relies on the sensory-motor regions. Does temporal language similarly engage brain areas involved in time perception? Participants read sentences that describe the temporal extent of events with motion verbs (The hours crawled until the release of the news) and their static controls. Comparison conditions were fictive motion (The trail crawled until the end of the hills) and literal motion (The caterpillar crawled towards the top of the tree), along with their static controls. Several time sensitive locations, identified using a meta-analysis, showed activation specific to temporal metaphors, including in the left insula, right claustrum, and bilateral posterior superior temporal sulci. Fictive and literal motion contrasts did not show this difference. Fictive motion contrast showed activation in a conceptual motion sensitive area of the left posterior inferior temporal sulcus (ITS). These data suggest that language of time is at least partially grounded in experiential time. In addition, motion semantics has different consequences for events and objects: temporal events become animate, while static entities become motional. PMID:26854961

  4. Stereopsis after anterior temporal lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Decramer, Thomas; van Loon, Johannes; Goffin, Jan; Van Paesschen, Wim; Janssen, Peter; Theys, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Brain areas critical for stereopsis have been investigated in non-human primates but are largely unknown in the human brain. Microelectrode recordings and functional MRI (fMRI) studies in monkeys have shown that in monkeys the inferior temporal cortex is critically involved in 3D shape categorization. Furthermore, some human fMRI studies similarly suggest an involvement of visual areas in the temporal lobe in depth perception. We aimed to investigate the role of the human anterior temporal neocortex in stereopsis by assessing stereoscopic depth perception before and after anterior temporal lobectomy. Eighteen epilepsy surgery patients were tested, pre- and postoperatively, in 3 different depth discrimination tasks. Sensitivity for local and global disparity was tested in a near-far discrimination task and sensitivity for 3D curvature was assessed in a convex-concave discrimination task, where 3D shapes were presented at different positions in depth. We found no evidence that temporal lobe epilepsy surgery has a significant effect on stereopsis. In contrast with earlier findings, we conclude that local as well as global stereopsis is maintained after unilateral resection of the temporal pole in epilepsy surgery patients. Our findings, together with previous studies, suggest that in humans more posterior visual regions underlie depth perception. PMID:27344239

  5. Temporal yoking in continuous multitasking.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong V; Swallow, Khena M

    2014-12-01

    Continuous tasks such as baggage screening often involve selective gating of sensory information when "targets" are detected. Previous research has shown that temporal selection of behaviorally relevant information triggers changes in perception, learning, and memory. However, it is unclear whether temporal selection has broad effects on concurrent tasks. To address this question, we asked participants to view a stream of faces and encoded faces of a particular gender for a later memory test. At the same time, they listened to a sequence of tones, pressing a button for specific pitched tones. We manipulated the timing of temporal selection such that target faces and target tones could be unrelated, perfectly correlated, or anticorrelated. Temporal selection was successful when the temporally coinciding stimuli were congruent (e.g., both were targets), but not when they were incongruent (i.e., only 1 was a target). This pattern suggests that attentional selection for separate tasks is yoked in time-when the attentional gate opens for 1 task it also opens for the other. Temporal yoking is a unique form of dual-task interaction. PMID:25365568

  6. Microwave Radiometer Networks for Measurement of the Spatio-Temporal Variability of Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, S. C.; Iturbide-Sanchez, F.; Padmanabhan, S.

    2006-12-01

    Tropospheric water vapor plays a key role in the prediction of convective storm initiation, precipitation and extreme weather events. Conventionally, water vapor profiles are derived from dewpoint and temperature measurements using instrumented weather balloons, including radiosondes. These balloons take approximately one hour to measure from surface to tropopause, and transmitter-sensor packages cannot be reused. Such in-situ measurements provide profiles with very high vertical resolution but with severe limitations in temporal and spatial coverage. Raman lidars use active optical techniques to provide comparable vertical resolution and measurement accuracy to radiosondes. However, these lidars are bulky and expensive, and their operation is limited to clear-sky conditions due to the high optical opacity of clouds. Microwave radiometers provide path-integrated water vapor and liquid water with high temporal resolution during nearly all weather conditions. If multiple frequencies are measured near the water vapor resonance, coarse vertical profiles can be obtained using statistical inversion. Motivated by the need for improved temporal and spatial resolutions, a network of elevation and azimuth scanning radiometers is being developed to provide coordinated volumetric measurements of tropospheric water vapor. To realize this network, two Miniaturized Water Vapor profiling Radiometers (MVWR) have been designed and fabricated at Colorado State University. MWVR is small, light-weight, consumes little power and is highly stable. To reduce the mass, volume, cost and power consumption as compared to traditional waveguide techniques, MWVR was designed based on monolithic microwave integrated-circuit technology developed for the wireless communication and defense industries. It was designed for network operation, in which each radiometer will perform a complete volumetric scan within a few minutes, and overlapping scans from multiple sensors will be combined

  7. An extended SQL for temporal data management in clinical decision-support systems.

    PubMed

    Das, A K; Tu, S W; Purcell, G P; Musen, M A

    1992-01-01

    We are developing a database implementation to support temporal data management for the T-HELPER physician workstation, an advice system for protocol-based care of patients who have HIV disease. To understand the requirements for the temporal database, we have analyzed the types of temporal predicates found in clinical-trial protocols. We extend the standard relational data model in three ways to support these querying requirements. First, we incorporate timestamps into the two-dimensional relational table to store the temporal dimension of both instant- and interval-based data. Second, we develop a set of operations on timepoints and intervals to manipulate timestamped data. Third, we modify the relational query language SQL so that its underlying algebra supports the specified operations on timestamps in relational tables. We show that our temporal extension to SQL meets the temporal data-management needs of protocol-directed decision support.

  8. Spatio-temporal intensity dynamics of passively mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churkin, Dmitry V.; Sugavanam, Srikanth

    2016-03-01

    We present recent results on measurements of intensity spatio-temporal dynamics in passively mode-locked fibre laser. We experimentally uncover distinct, dynamic and stable spatio-temporal generation regimes of various stochasticity and periodicity properties in though-to-be unstable laser. We present a method to distinguish various types of generated coherent structures, including rogue and shock waves, within the radiation by means of introducing of intensity ACF evolution map. We also discuss how the spectral dynamics could be measured in fiber lasers generating irregular train of pulses of quasi-CW generation via combination of heterodyning and intensity spatio-temporal measurement concept.

  9. On nonstable and stable population momentum.

    PubMed

    Espenshade, Thomas J; Olgiati, Analia S; Levin, Simon A

    2011-11-01

    This article decomposes total population momentum into two constituent and multiplicative parts: "nonstable" momentum and "stable" momentum. Nonstable momentum depends on deviations between a population's current age distribution and its implied stable age distribution. Stable momentum is a function of deviations between a population's implied stable and stationary age distributions. In general, the factorization of total momentum into the product of nonstable and stable momentum is a very good approximation. The factorization is exact, however, when the current age distribution is stable or when observed fertility is already at replacement. We provide numerical illustrations by calculating nonstable, stable, and total momentum for 176 countries, the world, and its major regions. In short, the article brings together disparate strands of the population momentum literature and shows how the various kinds of momentum fit together into a single unifying framework.

  10. A stable monomeric nickel borohydride.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Patrick J; LeLievre, Stacey; Johnson, Rosemary J; Lamb, Brian T; Phelps, Andrea L; Cordes, A W; Gu, Weiwei; Cramer, Stephen P

    2003-12-01

    A stable discrete nickel borohydride complex (Tp*NiBH(4) or Tp*NiBD(4)) was prepared using the nitrogen-donor ligand hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate (Tp*-). This complex represents one of the best characterized nickel(II) borohydrides to date. Tp*NiBH(4) and Tp*NiBD(4) are stable toward air, boiling water, and high temperatures (mp > 230 degrees C dec). X-ray crystallographic measurements for Tp*NiBH(4) showed a six-coordinate geometry for the complex, with the nickel(II) center facially coordinated by three bridging hydrogen atoms from borohydride and a tridentate Tp(-) ligand. For Tp*NiBH(4), the empirical formula is C(15)H(26)B(2)N(6)Ni, a = 13.469(9) A, b = 7.740(1) A, c = 18.851(2) A, beta = 107.605(9) degrees, the space group is monoclinic P2(1)/c, and Z = 4. Infrared measurements confirmed the presence of bridging hydrogen atoms; both nu(B[bond]H)(terminal) and nu(B[bond]H)(bridging) are assignable and shifted relative to nu(B-D) of Tp*NiBD(4) by amounts in agreement with theory. Despite their hydrolytic stability, Tp*NiBH(4) and Tp*NiBD(4) readily reduce halocarbon substrates, leading to the complete series of Tp*NiX complexes (X = Cl, Br, I). These reactions showed a pronounced hydrogen/deuterium rate dependence (k(H)/k(D) approximately 3) and sharp isosbestic points in progressive electronic spectra. Nickel K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of a hydride-rich nickel center were obtained for Tp*NiBH(4), Tp*NiBD(4), and Tp*NiCl. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy results confirmed the similar six-coordinate geometries for Tp*NiBH(4) and Tp*NiBD(4). These contrasted with XAS results for the crystallographically characterized pseudotetrahedral Tp*NiCl complex. The stability of Tp*Ni-coordinated borohydride is significant given this ion's accelerated decomposition and hydrolysis in the presence of transition metals and simple metal salts. PMID:14632512

  11. Brain Regions Underlying Word Finding Difficulties in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trebuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnes; Guedj, Eric; Alario, F-Xavier; Laguitton, Virginie; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Liegeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Word finding difficulties are often reported by epileptic patients with seizures originating from the language dominant cerebral hemisphere, for example, in temporal lobe epilepsy. Evidence regarding the brain regions underlying this deficit comes from studies of peri-operative electro-cortical stimulation, as well as post-surgical performance.…

  12. Temporal Factors of the Rorschach White Space Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Roy W.; Morris, Gary W.

    1980-01-01

    The claim by Bandura that the Rorschach space response is an artifact of longer blot exposure is questioned because of failure to account for the relationship between productivity and space response rates. Results of this study indicate that no significant temporal effect operates on space response rate. (Author/BEF)

  13. Closed-Cycle, Frequency-Stable CO2 Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batten, Carmen E. (Editor); Miller, Irvin M. (Editor); Wood, George M., Jr. (Editor); Willetts, David V. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings contain a collection of papers and comments presented at a workshop on technology associated with long-duration closed-cycle operation of frequency-stable, pulsed carbon dioxide lasers. This workshop was held at the NASA Langley Research Center June 10 to 12, 1986. The workshop, jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), was attended by 63 engineers and scientists from the United States and the United Kingdom. During the 2 1/2 days of the workshop, a number of issues relating to obtaining frequency-stable operation and to the catalytic control of laser gas chemistry were discussed, and specific recommendations concerning future activities were drafted.

  14. Temporal stability of electrical conductivity in a sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera-Parrilla, Aura; Brevik, Eric C.; Giráldez, Juan V.; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2016-07-01

    Understanding of soil spatial variability is needed to delimit areas for precision agriculture. Electromagnetic induction sensors which measure the soil apparent electrical conductivity reflect soil spatial variability. The objectives of this work were to see if a temporally stable component could be found in electrical conductivity, and to see if temporal stability information acquired from several electrical conductivity surveys could be used to better interpret the results of concurrent surveys of electrical conductivity and soil water content. The experimental work was performed in a commercial rainfed olive grove of 6.7 ha in the `La Manga' catchment in SW Spain. Several soil surveys provided gravimetric soil water content and electrical conductivity data. Soil electrical conductivity values were used to spatially delimit three areas in the grove, based on the first principal component, which represented the time-stable dominant spatial electrical conductivity pattern and explained 86% of the total electrical conductivity variance. Significant differences in clay, stone and soil water contents were detected between the three areas. Relationships between electrical conductivity and soil water content were modelled with an exponential model. Parameters from the model showed a strong effect of the first principal component on the relationship between soil water content and electrical conductivity. Overall temporal stability of electrical conductivity reflects soil properties and manifests itself in spatial patterns of soil water content.

  15. Evolutionary routes to stable ownership.

    PubMed

    Hare, D; Reeve, H K; Blossey, B

    2016-06-01

    Ownership can evolve in potentially any species. Drawing on insights from across disciplines, we distinguish between possession and ownership and present species-neutral criteria for ownership, defined as respect for possession. We use a variant of the tug-of-war evolutionary game to demonstrate how ownership can evolve in the form of a new, biologically realistic strategy, Restraint With Retaliation (RWR). In our game, resource holding potential (RHP) is assumed to be equal between interactants, and resource holding asymmetry determines whether ownership is adaptive. RWR will be evolutionarily stable when the ratio of resource holdings between interactants is relatively low, but not when this ratio is sufficiently high. We offer RWR as one evolutionary route to ownership among many, and discuss how ownership unites previously described behavioural phenomena across taxa. We propose that some but not all mechanisms of territory formation and maintenance can be considered ownership, and show that territories are not the only resources that can be owned. We argue that ownership can be a powerful cooperative solution to tragedies of the commons and problems of collective action throughout the biological world. We advance recent scholarship that has begun to investigate the biological importance of ownership, and we call for a comprehensive account of its evolutionary logic and taxonomic distribution. We propose that ownership should be considered a fundamental, unifying biological phenomenon. PMID:26991035

  16. Evolutionary routes to stable ownership.

    PubMed

    Hare, D; Reeve, H K; Blossey, B

    2016-06-01

    Ownership can evolve in potentially any species. Drawing on insights from across disciplines, we distinguish between possession and ownership and present species-neutral criteria for ownership, defined as respect for possession. We use a variant of the tug-of-war evolutionary game to demonstrate how ownership can evolve in the form of a new, biologically realistic strategy, Restraint With Retaliation (RWR). In our game, resource holding potential (RHP) is assumed to be equal between interactants, and resource holding asymmetry determines whether ownership is adaptive. RWR will be evolutionarily stable when the ratio of resource holdings between interactants is relatively low, but not when this ratio is sufficiently high. We offer RWR as one evolutionary route to ownership among many, and discuss how ownership unites previously described behavioural phenomena across taxa. We propose that some but not all mechanisms of territory formation and maintenance can be considered ownership, and show that territories are not the only resources that can be owned. We argue that ownership can be a powerful cooperative solution to tragedies of the commons and problems of collective action throughout the biological world. We advance recent scholarship that has begun to investigate the biological importance of ownership, and we call for a comprehensive account of its evolutionary logic and taxonomic distribution. We propose that ownership should be considered a fundamental, unifying biological phenomenon.

  17. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  18. Stable microbial community composition on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Musilova, Michaela; Tranter, Martyn; Bennett, Sarah A; Wadham, Jemma; Anesio, Alexandre M

    2015-01-01

    The first molecular-based studies of microbes in snow and on glaciers have only recently been performed on the vast Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). Aeolian microbial seeding is hypothesized to impact on glacier surface community compositions. Localized melting of glacier debris (cryoconite) into the surface ice forms cryoconite holes, which are considered 'hot spots' for microbial activity on glaciers. To date, few studies have attempted to assess the origin and evolution of cryoconite and cryoconite hole communities throughout a melt season. In this study, a range of experimental approaches was used for the first time to study the inputs, temporal and structural transformations of GrIS microbial communities over the course of a whole ablation season. Small amounts of aeolian (wind and snow) microbes were potentially seeding the stable communities that were already present on the glacier (composed mainly of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria). However, the dominant bacterial taxa in the aeolian samples (Firmicutes) did not establish themselves in local glacier surface communities. Cryoconite and cryoconite hole community composition remained stable throughout the ablation season following the fast community turnover, which accompanied the initial snow melt. The presence of stable communities in cryoconite and cryoconite holes on the GrIS will allow future studies to assess glacier surface microbial diversity at individual study sites from sampling intervals of short duration only. Aeolian inputs also had significantly different organic δ(13)C values (-28.0 to -27.0‰) from the glacier surface values (-25.7 to -23.6‰), indicating that in situ microbial processes are important in fixing new organic matter and transforming aeolian organic carbon. The continuous productivity of stable communities over one melt season makes them important contributors to biogeochemical nutrient cycling on glaciers.

  19. Parallel indexing technique for spatio-temporal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenwen; Kraak, Menno-Jan; Huisman, Otto; Ma, Xiaogang; Xiao, Jing

    2013-04-01

    The requirements for efficient access and management of massive multi-dimensional spatio-temporal data in geographical information system and its applications are well recognized and researched. The most popular spatio-temporal access method is the R-Tree and its variants. However, it is difficult to use them for parallel access to multi-dimensional spatio-temporal data because R-Trees, and variants thereof, are in hierarchical structures which have severe overlapping problems in high dimensional space. We extended a two-dimensional interval space representation of intervals to a multi-dimensional parallel space, and present a set of formulae to transform spatio-temporal queries into parallel interval set operations. This transformation reduces problems of multi-dimensional object relationships to simpler two-dimensional spatial intersection problems. Experimental results show that the new parallel approach presented in this paper has superior range query performance than R*-trees for handling multi-dimensional spatio-temporal data and multi-dimensional interval data. When the number of CPU cores is larger than that of the space dimensions, the insertion performance of this new approach is also superior to R*-trees. The proposed approach provides a potential parallel indexing solution for fast data retrieval of massive four-dimensional or higher dimensional spatio-temporal data.

  20. Directional flow sensing by passively stable larvae.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Heidi L; Christman, Adam J; Gerbi, Gregory P; Hunter, Elias J; Diez, F Javier

    2015-09-01

    Mollusk larvae have a stable, velum-up orientation that may influence how they sense and react to hydrodynamic signals applied in different directions. Directional sensing abilities and responses could affect how a larva interacts with anisotropic fluid motions, including those in feeding currents and in boundary layers encountered during settlement. Oyster larvae (Crassostrea virginica) were exposed to simple shear in a Couette device and to solid-body rotation in a single rotating cylinder. Both devices were operated in two different orientations, one with the axis of rotation parallel to the gravity vector, and one with the axis perpendicular. Larvae and flow were observed simultaneously with near-infrared particle-image velocimetry, and behavior was quantified as a response to strain rate, vorticity and centripetal acceleration. Only flows rotating about a horizontal axis elicited the diving response observed previously for oyster larvae in turbulence. The results provide strong evidence that the turbulence-sensing mechanism relies on gravity-detecting organs (statocysts) rather than mechanosensors (cilia). Flow sensing with statocysts sets oyster larvae apart from zooplankters such as copepods and protists that use external mechanosensors in sensing spatial velocity gradients generated by prey or predators. Sensing flow-induced changes in orientation, rather than flow deformation, would enable more efficient control of vertical movements. Statocysts provide larvae with a mechanism of maintaining their upward swimming when rotated by vortices and initiating dives toward the seabed in response to the strong turbulence associated with adult habitats. PMID:26333930

  1. Low energy stable plasma calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Frederick-Frost, K M; Lynch, K A

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a low energy plasma calibration facility for testing and calibration of rocket-borne charged-particle detectors and for the investigation of plasma sheath formation in an environment with ionospheric plasma energies, densities, and Debye lengths. We describe the vacuum system and associated plasma source, which was modified from a Naval Research Laboratory design [Bowles et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 455 (1996)]. Mechanical and electrical modifications to this cylindrical microwave resonant source are outlined together with a different method of operating the magnetron that achieves a stable discharge. This facility produces unmagnetized plasmas with densities from 1x10(3)/cm(3) to 6x10(5)/cm(3), electron temperatures from 0.1 to 1.7 eV, and plasma potentials from 0.5 to 8 V depending on varying input microwave power and neutral gas flow. For the range of input microwave power explored (350-600 W), the energy density of the plasma remains constant because of an inverse relationship between density and temperature. This relationship allows a wide range of Debye lengths (0.3-8.4 cm) to be investigated, which is ideal for simulating the ionospheric plasma sheaths we explore.

  2. Directional flow sensing by passively stable larvae.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Heidi L; Christman, Adam J; Gerbi, Gregory P; Hunter, Elias J; Diez, F Javier

    2015-09-01

    Mollusk larvae have a stable, velum-up orientation that may influence how they sense and react to hydrodynamic signals applied in different directions. Directional sensing abilities and responses could affect how a larva interacts with anisotropic fluid motions, including those in feeding currents and in boundary layers encountered during settlement. Oyster larvae (Crassostrea virginica) were exposed to simple shear in a Couette device and to solid-body rotation in a single rotating cylinder. Both devices were operated in two different orientations, one with the axis of rotation parallel to the gravity vector, and one with the axis perpendicular. Larvae and flow were observed simultaneously with near-infrared particle-image velocimetry, and behavior was quantified as a response to strain rate, vorticity and centripetal acceleration. Only flows rotating about a horizontal axis elicited the diving response observed previously for oyster larvae in turbulence. The results provide strong evidence that the turbulence-sensing mechanism relies on gravity-detecting organs (statocysts) rather than mechanosensors (cilia). Flow sensing with statocysts sets oyster larvae apart from zooplankters such as copepods and protists that use external mechanosensors in sensing spatial velocity gradients generated by prey or predators. Sensing flow-induced changes in orientation, rather than flow deformation, would enable more efficient control of vertical movements. Statocysts provide larvae with a mechanism of maintaining their upward swimming when rotated by vortices and initiating dives toward the seabed in response to the strong turbulence associated with adult habitats.

  3. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  4. Macroscopic hotspots identification: A Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ni; Huang, Helai; Lee, Jaeyoung; Gao, Mingyun; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    This study proposes a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach for hotspot identification by applying the full Bayesian (FB) technique in the context of macroscopic safety analysis. Compared with the emerging Bayesian spatial and temporal approach, the Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction model contributes to a detailed understanding of differential trends through analyzing and mapping probabilities of area-specific crash trends as differing from the mean trend and highlights specific locations where crash occurrence is deteriorating or improving over time. With traffic analysis zones (TAZs) crash data collected in Florida, an empirical analysis was conducted to evaluate the following three approaches for hotspot identification: FB ranking using a Poisson-lognormal (PLN) model, FB ranking using a Bayesian spatial and temporal (B-ST) model and FB ranking using a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction (B-ST-I) model. The results show that (a) the models accounting for space-time effects perform better in safety ranking than does the PLN model, and (b) the FB approach using the B-ST-I model significantly outperforms the B-ST approach in correctly identifying hotspots by explicitly accounting for the space-time variation in addition to the stable spatial/temporal patterns of crash occurrence. In practice, the B-ST-I approach plays key roles in addressing two issues: (a) how the identified hotspots have evolved over time and (b) the identification of areas that, whilst not yet hotspots, show a tendency to become hotspots. Finally, it can provide guidance to policy decision makers to efficiently improve zonal-level safety.

  5. Macroscopic hotspots identification: A Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ni; Huang, Helai; Lee, Jaeyoung; Gao, Mingyun; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    This study proposes a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach for hotspot identification by applying the full Bayesian (FB) technique in the context of macroscopic safety analysis. Compared with the emerging Bayesian spatial and temporal approach, the Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction model contributes to a detailed understanding of differential trends through analyzing and mapping probabilities of area-specific crash trends as differing from the mean trend and highlights specific locations where crash occurrence is deteriorating or improving over time. With traffic analysis zones (TAZs) crash data collected in Florida, an empirical analysis was conducted to evaluate the following three approaches for hotspot identification: FB ranking using a Poisson-lognormal (PLN) model, FB ranking using a Bayesian spatial and temporal (B-ST) model and FB ranking using a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction (B-ST-I) model. The results show that (a) the models accounting for space-time effects perform better in safety ranking than does the PLN model, and (b) the FB approach using the B-ST-I model significantly outperforms the B-ST approach in correctly identifying hotspots by explicitly accounting for the space-time variation in addition to the stable spatial/temporal patterns of crash occurrence. In practice, the B-ST-I approach plays key roles in addressing two issues: (a) how the identified hotspots have evolved over time and (b) the identification of areas that, whilst not yet hotspots, show a tendency to become hotspots. Finally, it can provide guidance to policy decision makers to efficiently improve zonal-level safety. PMID:27110645

  6. Contact process with temporal disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghathi, Hatem; Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, José A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of time-varying environmental noise, i.e., temporal disorder, on the nonequilibrium phase transition of the contact process. Combining a real-time renormalization group, scaling theory, and large scale Monte-Carlo simulations in one and two dimensions, we show that the temporal disorder gives rise to an exotic critical point. At criticality, the effective noise amplitude diverges with increasing time scale, and the probability distribution of the density becomes infinitely broad, even on a logarithmic scale. Moreover, the average density and survival probability decay only logarithmically with time. This infinite-noise critical behavior can be understood as the temporal counterpart of infinite-randomness critical behavior in spatially disordered systems, but with exchanged roles of space and time. We also analyze the generality of our results, and we discuss potential experiments.

  7. Contact process with temporal disorder.

    PubMed

    Barghathi, Hatem; Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, José A

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of time-varying environmental noise, i.e., temporal disorder, on the nonequilibrium phase transition of the contact process. Combining a real-time renormalization group, scaling theory, and large scale Monte-Carlo simulations in one and two dimensions, we show that the temporal disorder gives rise to an exotic critical point. At criticality, the effective noise amplitude diverges with increasing time scale, and the probability distribution of the density becomes infinitely broad, even on a logarithmic scale. Moreover, the average density and survival probability decay only logarithmically with time. This infinite-noise critical behavior can be understood as the temporal counterpart of infinite-randomness critical behavior in spatially disordered systems, but with exchanged roles of space and time. We also analyze the generality of our results, and we discuss potential experiments. PMID:27627250

  8. On Nonstable and Stable Population Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Olgiati, Analia S.; Levin, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    This article decomposes total population momentum into two constituent and multiplicative parts: “nonstable” momentum and “stable” momentum. Nonstable momentum depends on deviations between a population’s current age distribution and its implied stable age distribution. Stable momentum is a function of deviations between a population’s implied stable and stationary age distributions. In general, the factorization of total momentum into the product of nonstable and stable momentum is a very good approximation. The factorization is exact, however, when the current age distribution is stable or when observed fertility is already at replacement. We provide numerical illustrations by calculating nonstable, stable, and total momentum for 176 countries, the world, and its major regions. In short, the article brings together disparate strands of the population momentum literature and shows how the various kinds of momentum fit together into a single unifying framework. PMID:21948106

  9. Processing Temporal Constraints: An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggio, Giosue

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates how linguistic expressions of time--in particular, temporal adverbs and verb tense morphemes--are used to establish temporal reference at the level of brain physiology. First, a formal semantic analysis of tense and temporal adverbs is outlined. It is argued that computing temporal reference amounts to solving a…

  10. The temporal weighting of loudness: effects of the level profile.

    PubMed

    Oberfeld, Daniel; Plank, Tina

    2011-01-01

    In four experiments, we studied the influence of the level profile of time-varying sounds on temporal perceptual weights for loudness. The sounds consisted of contiguous wideband noise segments on which independent random-level perturbations were imposed. Experiment 1 showed that in sounds with a flat level profile, the first segment receives the highest weight (primacy effect). If, however, a gradual increase in level (fade-in) was imposed on the first few segments, the temporal weights showed a delayed primacy effect: The first unattenuated segment received the highest weight, while the fade-in segments were virtually ignored. This pattern argues against a capture of attention to the onset as the origin of the primacy effect. Experiment 2 demonstrated that listeners adjust their temporal weights to the level profile on a trial-by-trial basis. Experiment 3 ruled out potentially inferior intensity resolution at lower levels as the cause of the delayed primacy effect. Experiment 4 showed that the weighting patterns cannot be explained by perceptual segmentation of the sounds into a variable and a stable part. The results are interpreted in terms of memory and attention processes. We demonstrate that the prediction of loudness can be improved significantly by allowing for nonuniform temporal weights.

  11. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, David

    2016-01-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that ‘kernels’ reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual. PMID:27335223

  12. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds.

    PubMed

    Stowell, Dan; Gill, Lisa; Clayton, David

    2016-06-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that 'kernels' reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual.

  13. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds.

    PubMed

    Stowell, Dan; Gill, Lisa; Clayton, David

    2016-06-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that 'kernels' reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual. PMID:27335223

  14. Applications, considerations, and sources of uncertainty when using stable isotope analysis in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Timothy D; Kidd, Karen A; Fisk, Aaron T

    2006-12-15

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) has become a powerful tool for ecotoxicologists to study dietary exposure and biomagnification of contaminants in wild animal populations. The use of SIA in ecotoxicology continues to expand and, while much more is known about the mechanisms driving patterns of isotopic ratios in consumers, there remain several considerations or sources of uncertainty that can influence interpretation of data from field studies. We outline current uses of SIA in ecotoxicology, including estimating the importance of dietary sources of carbon and their application in biomagnification studies, and we present six main considerations or sources of uncertainty associated with the approach: (1) unequal diet-tissue stable isotope fractionation among species, (2) variable diet-tissue stable isotope fractionation within a given species, (3) different stable isotope ratios in different tissues of the animal, (4) fluctuating baseline stable isotope ratios across systems, (5) the presence of true omnivores, and (6) movement of animals and nutrients between food webs. Since these considerations or sources of uncertainty are difficult to assess in field studies, we advocate that researchers consider the following in designing ecotoxicological research and interpreting results: assess and utilize variation in stable isotope diet-tissue fractionation among animal groups available in the literature; determine stable isotope ratios in multiple tissues to provide a temporal assessment of feeding; adequately characterize baseline isotope ratios; utilize stomach contents when possible; and assess and integrate life history of study animals in a system.

  15. Infections on Temporal Networks—A Matrix-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Koher, Andreas; Lentz, Hartmut H. K.; Hövel, Philipp; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2016-01-01

    We extend the concept of accessibility in temporal networks to model infections with a finite infectious period such as the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. This approach is entirely based on elementary matrix operations and unifies the disease and network dynamics within one algebraic framework. We demonstrate the potential of this formalism for three examples of networks with high temporal resolution: networks of social contacts, sexual contacts, and livestock-trade. Our investigations provide a new methodological framework that can be used, for instance, to estimate the epidemic threshold, a quantity that determines disease parameters, for which a large-scale outbreak can be expected. PMID:27035128

  16. Infections on Temporal Networks--A Matrix-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Koher, Andreas; Lentz, Hartmut H K; Hövel, Philipp; Sokolov, Igor M

    2016-01-01

    We extend the concept of accessibility in temporal networks to model infections with a finite infectious period such as the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. This approach is entirely based on elementary matrix operations and unifies the disease and network dynamics within one algebraic framework. We demonstrate the potential of this formalism for three examples of networks with high temporal resolution: networks of social contacts, sexual contacts, and livestock-trade. Our investigations provide a new methodological framework that can be used, for instance, to estimate the epidemic threshold, a quantity that determines disease parameters, for which a large-scale outbreak can be expected. PMID:27035128

  17. Coding of multisensory temporal patterns in human superior temporal sulcus

    PubMed Central

    Noesselt, Tömme; Bergmann, Daniel; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Münte, Thomas; Spence, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists have long been interested in how the temporal aspects of perception are represented in the brain. In the present study, we investigated the neural basis of the temporal perception of synchrony/asynchrony for audiovisual speech stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Subjects judged the temporal relation of (a)synchronous audiovisual speech streams, and indicated any changes in their perception of the stimuli over time. Differential hemodynamic responses for synchronous versus asynchronous stimuli were observed in the multisensory superior temporal sulcus complex (mSTS-c) and prefrontal cortex. Within mSTS-c we found adjacent regions expressing an enhanced BOLD-response to the different physical (a)synchrony conditions. These regions were further modulated by the subjects' perceptual state. By calculating the distances between the modulated regions within mSTS-c in single-subjects we demonstrate that the “auditory leading (AL)” and “visual leading (VL) areas” lie closer to “synchrony areas” than to each other. Moreover, analysis of interregional connectivity indicates a stronger functional connection between multisensory prefrontal cortex and mSTS-c during the perception of asynchrony. Taken together, these results therefore suggest the presence of distinct sub-regions within the human STS-c for the maintenance of temporal relations for audiovisual speech stimuli plus differential functional connectivity with prefrontal regions. The respective local activity in mSTS-c is dependent both upon the physical properties of the stimuli presented and upon the subjects' perception of (a)synchrony. PMID:22973202

  18. A Structural Characterization of Temporal Dynamic Controllability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Paul

    2006-01-01

    An important issue for temporal planners is the ability to handle temporal uncertainty. Recent papers have addressed the question of how to tell whether a temporal network is Dynamically Controllable, i.e., whether the temporal requirements are feasible in the light of uncertain durations of some processes. Previous work has presented an O(N5) algorithm for testing this property. Here, we introduce a new analysis of temporal cycles that leads to an O(N4) algorithm.

  19. Higher order temporal finite element methods through mixed formalisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkyu

    2014-01-01

    The extended framework of Hamilton's principle and the mixed convolved action principle provide new rigorous weak variational formalism for a broad range of initial boundary value problems in mathematical physics and mechanics. In this paper, their potential when adopting temporally higher order approximations is investigated. The classical single-degree-of-freedom dynamical systems are primarily considered to validate and to investigate the performance of the numerical algorithms developed from both formulations. For the undamped system, all the algorithms are symplectic and unconditionally stable with respect to the time step. For the damped system, they are shown to be accurate with good convergence characteristics. PMID:25210664

  20. Higher order temporal finite element methods through mixed formalisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkyu

    2014-01-01

    The extended framework of Hamilton's principle and the mixed convolved action principle provide new rigorous weak variational formalism for a broad range of initial boundary value problems in mathematical physics and mechanics. In this paper, their potential when adopting temporally higher order approximations is investigated. The classical single-degree-of-freedom dynamical systems are primarily considered to validate and to investigate the performance of the numerical algorithms developed from both formulations. For the undamped system, all the algorithms are symplectic and unconditionally stable with respect to the time step. For the damped system, they are shown to be accurate with good convergence characteristics.

  1. Stable walking with asymmetric legs.

    PubMed

    Merker, Andreas; Rummel, Juergen; Seyfarth, Andre

    2011-12-01

    Asymmetric leg function is often an undesired side-effect in artificial legged systems and may reflect functional deficits or variations in the mechanical construction. It can also be found in legged locomotion in humans and animals such as after an accident or in specific gait patterns. So far, it is not clear to what extent differences in the leg function of contralateral limbs can be tolerated during walking or running. Here, we address this issue using a bipedal spring-mass model for simulating walking with compliant legs. With the help of the model, we show that considerable differences between contralateral legs can be tolerated and may even provide advantages to the robustness of the system dynamics. A better understanding of the mechanisms and potential benefits of asymmetric leg operation may help to guide the development of artificial limbs or the design novel therapeutic concepts and rehabilitation strategies.

  2. First stable isotope analysis of Asiatic wild ass tail hair from the Mongolian Gobi

    PubMed Central

    Horacek, Micha; Sturm, Martina Burnik; Kaczensky, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has become a powerful tool to study feeding ecology, water use or movement pattern in contemporary, historic and ancient species. Certain hair and teeth grow continuously, and when sampled longitudinally can provide temporally explicit information on dietary regime and movement pattern. In an initial trial, we analysed a tail sample of an Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus) from the Mongolian Gobi. We found seasonal variations in H, C and N isotope patterns, likely being the result of temporal variations in available feeds, water supply and possibly physiological status. Thus stable isotope analysis shows promise to study the comparative ecology of the three autochthonous equid species in the Mongolian Gobi. PMID:26339116

  3. Spatio-temporal generation regimes in quasi-CW Raman fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Nikita; Sugavanam, Srikanth; Churkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-21

    We present experimental measurements of intensity spatio-temporal dynamics in quasi-CW Raman fiber laser. Depending on the power, the laser operates in different spatio-temporal regimes varying from partial mode-locking near the generation threshold to almost stochastic radiation and a generation of short-lived pulses at high power. The transitions between the generation regimes are evident in intensity spatio-temporal dynamics. Two-dimensional auto-correlation functions provide an additional insight into temporal and spatial properties of the observed regimes. PMID:26406625

  4. Free-space spectro-temporal and spatio-temporal conversion for pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Poem, E; Hiemstra, T; Eckstein, A; Jin, X-M; Walmsley, I A

    2016-09-15

    We present a new apparatus for converting between spectral and temporal representation of optical information, designed for operating with pulsed light sources. Every input pulse is converted into a pulse train in which the pulse intensities represent the spatial or temporal frequency spectrum of the original pulse. This method enables spectral measurements to be performed by following the temporal response of a single detector and, thus, is useful for real-time spectroscopy and imaging, and for spectral correlation measurements. The apparatus is based on multiple round-trips inside a 2f-cavity-like mirror arrangement in which the spectrum is spread on the back focal plane, and a small section of it is allowed to escape after each round-trip. Unlike existing methods, it relies neither on fibers nor on interference effects. It offers easy wavelength range tunability, and a prototype built achieves over 10% average efficiency in the near infrared (NIR). We demonstrate the application of the prototype for an efficient measurement of the joint spectrum of a non-degenerate bi-photon source in which one of the photons is in the NIR. PMID:27628389

  5. Reduced temporal integration in Belgian Waterslager canaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Amanda M.; Dooling, Robert J.

    2001-05-01

    Belgian Waterslager canaries (BWS) are bred for their low-frequency song and have been shown to have hair cell abnormalities in the inner ear that result in elevated thresholds at higher frequencies. Previous results show that resolution of temporal fine structure, or the ability to resolve rapidly occurring changes in complex sounds, is enhanced in BWS canaries. In a continuing effort to assess the effects of the BWS inner ear pathology on hearing, we here investigate the ability to integrate acoustic information over longer periods of time. Absolute thresholds for 1.0-, 2.0-, and 4.0-kHz pure tones were measured in BWS and normal-hearing nonBWS canary strains for durations ranging from 5 to 480 ms using operant conditioning methods. NonBWS canaries showed a decrease in threshold of approximately 10-15 dB with increasing tone duration for all frequencies. In contrast, BWS showed almost no change in threshold across the range of durations tested for all frequencies. The reduced temporal integration in BWS canaries with hair cell abnormalities parallels similar findings in humans with cochlear damage. [Work supported by NIH DC01372 to RJD and DC05450 to AML.

  6. Connecting laboratory behavior to field function through stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Glon, Mael G; Larson, Eric R; Pangle, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    Inherent difficulties of tracking and observing organisms in the field often leave researchers with no choice but to conduct behavioral experiments under laboratory settings. However, results of laboratory experiments do not always translate accurately to natural conditions. A fundamental challenge in ecology is therefore to scale up from small area and short-duration laboratory experiments to large areas and long durations over which ecological processes generally operate. In this study, we propose that stable isotope analysis may be a tool that can link laboratory behavioral observations to past field interactions or function of individual organisms. We conducted laboratory behavioral assays to measure dominance of invasive rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus, and used stable isotope analysis to hindcast trophic positions of these crayfish under preceding natural conditions. We hypothesized that more dominant crayfish in our assays would have higher trophic positions if dominance were related to competitive ability or willingness to pursue high-risk, high-reward prey. We did not find a relationship between crayfish dominance and trophic position, and therefore infer that laboratory dominance of crayfish may not necessarily relate to their ecology in the field. However, this is to our knowledge the first attempt to directly relate laboratory behavior to field performance via stable isotope analysis. We encourage future studies to continue to explore a possible link between laboratory and field behavior via stable isotope analysis, and propose several avenues to do so. PMID:27077010

  7. Connecting laboratory behavior to field function through stable isotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric R.; Pangle, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Inherent difficulties of tracking and observing organisms in the field often leave researchers with no choice but to conduct behavioral experiments under laboratory settings. However, results of laboratory experiments do not always translate accurately to natural conditions. A fundamental challenge in ecology is therefore to scale up from small area and short-duration laboratory experiments to large areas and long durations over which ecological processes generally operate. In this study, we propose that stable isotope analysis may be a tool that can link laboratory behavioral observations to past field interactions or function of individual organisms. We conducted laboratory behavioral assays to measure dominance of invasive rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus, and used stable isotope analysis to hindcast trophic positions of these crayfish under preceding natural conditions. We hypothesized that more dominant crayfish in our assays would have higher trophic positions if dominance were related to competitive ability or willingness to pursue high-risk, high-reward prey. We did not find a relationship between crayfish dominance and trophic position, and therefore infer that laboratory dominance of crayfish may not necessarily relate to their ecology in the field. However, this is to our knowledge the first attempt to directly relate laboratory behavior to field performance via stable isotope analysis. We encourage future studies to continue to explore a possible link between laboratory and field behavior via stable isotope analysis, and propose several avenues to do so. PMID:27077010

  8. Auditory Temporal Conditioning in Neonates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, W. K.; And Others

    Twenty normal newborns, approximately 36 hours old, were tested using an auditory temporal conditioning paradigm which consisted of a slow rise, 75 db tone played for five seconds every 25 seconds, ten times. Responses to the tones were measured by instantaneous, beat-to-beat heartrate; and the test trial was designated as the 2 1/2-second period…

  9. Temporal Processing Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Christine A.; Boggs, Jennifer; O'Donnell, Brian F.; Shekhar, Anantha; Hetrick, William P.

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia may be associated with a fundamental disturbance in the temporal coordination of information processing in the brain, leading to classic symptoms of schizophrenia such as thought disorder and disorganized and contextually inappropriate behavior. Despite the growing interest and centrality of time-dependent conceptualizations of the…

  10. Temporal Profiles of SEP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Herrero, R.; del Peral, L.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Sequeiros, J.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; Kunow, H.

    2001-08-01

    This work is a preliminary study of 18 solar energetic particle (SEP) events detected by SOHO/EPHIN between 1996 and 2000. Temporal profiles of Impulsive and Gradual SEP events have been parameterized to determinate differences among SEP events depending on the magnetic connection and Physical conditions of the interplanetary transport.

  11. Temporal scaling in information propagation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-01-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers. PMID:24939414

  12. Combining Simultaneous with Temporal Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermens, Frouke; Herzog, Michael H.; Francis, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous and temporal masking are two frequently used techniques in psychology and vision science. Although there are many studies and theories related to each masking technique, there are no systematic investigations of their mutual relationship, even though both techniques are often applied together. Here, the authors show that temporal…

  13. Temporal scaling in information propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  14. Temporal binding within and across events.

    PubMed

    DuBrow, Sarah; Davachi, Lila

    2016-10-01

    Remembering the order in which events occur is a fundamental component of episodic memory. However, the neural mechanisms supporting serial recall remain unclear. Behaviorally, serial recall is greater for information encountered within the same event compared to across event boundaries, raising the possibility that contextual stability may modulate the cognitive and neural processes supporting serial encoding. In the present study, we used fMRI during the encoding of consecutive face and object stimuli to elucidate the neural encoding signatures supporting subsequent serial recall behavior both within and across events. We found that univariate BOLD activation in both the middle hippocampus and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) was associated with subsequent serial recall of items that occur across event boundaries. By contrast, successful serial encoding within events was associated with increased functional connectivity between the hippocampus and ventromedial PFC, but not with univariate activation in these or other regions. These findings build on evidence implicating hippocampal and PFC processes in encoding temporal aspects of memory. They further suggest that these encoding processes are influenced by whether binding occurs within a stable context or bridges two adjacent but distinct events. PMID:27422018

  15. Temporal binding within and across events.

    PubMed

    DuBrow, Sarah; Davachi, Lila

    2016-10-01

    Remembering the order in which events occur is a fundamental component of episodic memory. However, the neural mechanisms supporting serial recall remain unclear. Behaviorally, serial recall is greater for information encountered within the same event compared to across event boundaries, raising the possibility that contextual stability may modulate the cognitive and neural processes supporting serial encoding. In the present study, we used fMRI during the encoding of consecutive face and object stimuli to elucidate the neural encoding signatures supporting subsequent serial recall behavior both within and across events. We found that univariate BOLD activation in both the middle hippocampus and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) was associated with subsequent serial recall of items that occur across event boundaries. By contrast, successful serial encoding within events was associated with increased functional connectivity between the hippocampus and ventromedial PFC, but not with univariate activation in these or other regions. These findings build on evidence implicating hippocampal and PFC processes in encoding temporal aspects of memory. They further suggest that these encoding processes are influenced by whether binding occurs within a stable context or bridges two adjacent but distinct events.

  16. Temporal Coding of Volumetric Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llull, Patrick Ryan

    'Image volumes' refer to realizations of images in other dimensions such as time, spectrum, and focus. Recent advances in scientific, medical, and consumer applications demand improvements in image volume capture. Though image volume acquisition continues to advance, it maintains the same sampling mechanisms that have been used for decades; every voxel must be scanned and is presumed independent of its neighbors. Under these conditions, improving performance comes at the cost of increased system complexity, data rates, and power consumption. This dissertation explores systems and methods capable of efficiently improving sensitivity and performance for image volume cameras, and specifically proposes several sampling strategies that utilize temporal coding to improve imaging system performance and enhance our awareness for a variety of dynamic applications. Video cameras and camcorders sample the video volume (x,y,t) at fixed intervals to gain understanding of the volume's temporal evolution. Conventionally, one must reduce the spatial resolution to increase the framerate of such cameras. Using temporal coding via physical translation of an optical element known as a coded aperture, the compressive temporal imaging (CACTI) camera emonstrates a method which which to embed the temporal dimension of the video volume into spatial (x,y) measurements, thereby greatly improving temporal resolution with minimal loss of spatial resolution. This technique, which is among a family of compressive sampling strategies developed at Duke University, temporally codes the exposure readout functions at the pixel level. Since video cameras nominally integrate the remaining image volume dimensions (e.g. spectrum and focus) at capture time, spectral (x,y,t,lambda) and focal (x,y,t,z) image volumes are traditionally captured via sequential changes to the spectral and focal state of the system, respectively. The CACTI camera's ability to embed video volumes into images leads to exploration

  17. Updating representations of temporal intervals.

    PubMed

    Danckert, James; Anderson, Britt

    2015-12-01

    Effectively engaging with the world depends on accurate representations of the regularities that make up that world-what we call mental models. The success of any mental model depends on the ability to adapt to changes-to 'update' the model. In prior work, we have shown that damage to the right hemisphere of the brain impairs the ability to update mental models across a range of tasks. Given the disparate nature of the tasks we have employed in this prior work (i.e. statistical learning, language acquisition, position priming, perceptual ambiguity, strategic game play), we propose that a cognitive module important for updating mental representations should be generic, in the sense that it is invoked across multiple cognitive and perceptual domains. To date, the majority of our tasks have been visual in nature. Given the ubiquity and import of temporal information in sensory experience, we examined the ability to build and update mental models of time. We had healthy individuals complete a temporal prediction task in which intervals were initially drawn from one temporal range before an unannounced switch to a different range of intervals. Separate groups had the second range of intervals switch to one that contained either longer or shorter intervals than the first range. Both groups showed significant positive correlations between perceptual and prediction accuracy. While each group updated mental models of temporal intervals, those exposed to shorter intervals did so more efficiently. Our results support the notion of generic capacity to update regularities in the environment-in this instance based on temporal information. The task developed here is well suited to investigations in neurological patients and in neuroimaging settings.

  18. Updating representations of temporal intervals.

    PubMed

    Danckert, James; Anderson, Britt

    2015-12-01

    Effectively engaging with the world depends on accurate representations of the regularities that make up that world-what we call mental models. The success of any mental model depends on the ability to adapt to changes-to 'update' the model. In prior work, we have shown that damage to the right hemisphere of the brain impairs the ability to update mental models across a range of tasks. Given the disparate nature of the tasks we have employed in this prior work (i.e. statistical learning, language acquisition, position priming, perceptual ambiguity, strategic game play), we propose that a cognitive module important for updating mental representations should be generic, in the sense that it is invoked across multiple cognitive and perceptual domains. To date, the majority of our tasks have been visual in nature. Given the ubiquity and import of temporal information in sensory experience, we examined the ability to build and update mental models of time. We had healthy individuals complete a temporal prediction task in which intervals were initially drawn from one temporal range before an unannounced switch to a different range of intervals. Separate groups had the second range of intervals switch to one that contained either longer or shorter intervals than the first range. Both groups showed significant positive correlations between perceptual and prediction accuracy. While each group updated mental models of temporal intervals, those exposed to shorter intervals did so more efficiently. Our results support the notion of generic capacity to update regularities in the environment-in this instance based on temporal information. The task developed here is well suited to investigations in neurological patients and in neuroimaging settings. PMID:26303026

  19. Blood feeding behavior of the stable fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable fly is a fly that looks similar to a house fly but both sexes are blood feeders. Blood is required for successful fertilization and development of eggs. Bites are painful but there is usually no pain after the fly stops feeding. The stable fly is a persistent feeder and will continue trying t...

  20. Temporal shape analysis via the spectral signature.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, Elena; Konukoglu, Ender; Ou, Yangming; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Desjardins, Benoit; Pohl, Kilian M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we adapt spectral signatures for capturing morphological changes over time. Advanced techniques for capturing temporal shape changes frequently rely on first registering the sequence of shapes and then analyzing the corresponding set of high dimensional deformation maps. Instead, we propose a simple encoding motivated by the observation that small shape deformations lead to minor refinements in the spectral signature composed of the eigenvalues of the Laplace operator. The proposed encoding does not require registration, since spectral signatures are invariant to pose changes. We apply our representation to the shapes of the ventricles extracted from 22 cine MR scans of healthy controls and Tetralogy of Fallot patients. We then measure the accuracy score of our encoding by training a linear classifier, which outperforms the same classifier based on volumetric measurements. PMID:23286031

  1. GMRES and integral operators

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, C.T.; Xue, Z.Q.

    1994-12-31

    Many discretizations of integral equations and compact fixed point problems are collectively compact and strongly convergent in spaces of continuous functions. These properties not only lead to stable and convergent approximations but also can be used in the construction of fast multilevel algorithms. Recently the GMRES algorithm has become a standard coarse mesh solver. The purpose of this paper is to show how the special properties of integral operators and their approximations are reflected in the performance of the GMRES iteration and how these properties can be used to strengthen the norm in which convergence takes place. The authors illustrate these ideas with composite Gauss rules for integral equations on the unit interval.

  2. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  3. A semiparametric spatio-temporal model for solar irradiance data

    DOE PAGES

    Patrick, Joshua D.; Harvill, Jane L.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we evaluate semiparametric spatio-temporal models for global horizontal irradiance at high spatial and temporal resolution. These models represent the spatial domain as a lattice and are capable of predicting irradiance at lattice points, given data measured at other lattice points. Using data from a 1.2 MW PV plant located in Lanai, Hawaii, we show that a semiparametric model can be more accurate than simple interpolation between sensor locations. We investigate spatio-temporal models with separable and nonseparable covariance structures and find no evidence to support assuming a separable covariance structure. These results indicate a promising approach for modeling irradiance atmore » high spatial resolution consistent with available ground-based measurements. Moreover, this kind of modeling may find application in design, valuation, and operation of fleets of utility-scale photovoltaic power systems.« less

  4. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  5. Structure of acid-stable carmine.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naoki; Kawasaki, Yoko; Sato, Kyoko; Aoki, Hiromitsu; Ichi, Takahito; Koda, Takatoshi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Maitani, Tamio

    2002-02-01

    Acid-stable carmine has recently been distributed in the U.S. market because of its good acid stability, but it is not permitted in Japan. We analyzed and determined the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine, in order to establish an analytical method for it. Carminic acid was transformed into a different type of pigment, named acid-stable carmine, through amination when heated in ammonia solution. The features of the structure were clarified using a model compound, purpurin, in which the orientation of hydroxyl groups on the A ring of the anthraquinone skeleton is the same as that of carminic acid. By spectroscopic means and the synthesis of acid-stable carmine and purpurin derivatives, the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine was established as 4-aminocarminic acid, a novel compound. PMID:11998314

  6. Variance in saccadic eye movements reflects stable traits.

    PubMed

    Meyhöfer, Inga; Bertsch, Katja; Esser, Moritz; Ettinger, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Saccadic tasks are widely used to study cognitive processes, effects of pharmacological treatments, and mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders. In genetic studies, it is assumed that saccadic endophenotypes are traits. While internal consistency and temporal stability of saccadic performance is high for most of the measures, the magnitude of underlying trait components has not been estimated, and influences of situational aspects and person by situation interactions have not been investigated. To do so, 68 healthy participants performed prosaccades, antisaccades, and memory-guided saccades on three occasions at weekly intervals at the same time of day. Latent state-trait modeling was applied to estimate the proportions of variance reflecting stable trait components, situational influences, and Person × Situation interaction effects. Mean variables for all saccadic tasks showed high to excellent reliabilities. Intraindividual standard deviations were found to be slightly less reliable. Importantly, an average of 60% of variance of a single measurement was explained by trans-situationally stable person effects, while situation aspects and interactions between person and situation were found to play a negligible role. We conclude that saccadic variables, in standard laboratory settings, represent highly reliable measures that are largely unaffected by situational influences. Extending previous reliability studies, these findings clearly demonstrate the trait-like nature of these measures and support their role as endophenotypes.

  7. Your alliances are too stable.

    PubMed

    Ernst, David; Bamford, James

    2005-06-01

    A 2004 McKinsey survey of more than 30 companies reveals that at least 70% of them have major alliances that are underperforming and in need of restructuring. Moreover, JVs that broaden or otherwise adjust their scope have a 79% success rate, versus 33% for ventures that remain essentially unchanged. Yet most firms don't routinely evaluate the need to overhaul their alliances or intervene to correct performance problems. That means corporations are missing huge opportunities: By revamping just one large alliance, a company can generate 100 million dololars to 300 million dollars in extra income a year. Here's how to unlock more value from alliances: (1) Launch the process. Don't wait until your venture is in the middle of a crisis; regularly scan your major alliances to determine which need restructuring. Once you've targeted one, designate a restructuring team and find a senior sponsor to push the process along. Then delineate the scope of the team's work. (2) Diagnose performance. Evaluate the venture on the following performance dimensions: ownership and financials, strategy, operations, governance, and organization and talent. Identify the root causes of the venture's problems, not just the symptoms, and estimate how much each problem is costing the company. (3) Generate restructuring options. Based on the diagnosis, decide whether to fix, grow, or exit the alliance. Assuming the answer is fix or grow, determine whether fundamental or incremental changes are needed, using the five performance dimensions above as a framework. Then assemble three or four packages of restructuring options, test them with shareholders, and gain parents' approval. (4) Execute the changes. Embark on a widespread and consistent communication effort, building support among executives in the JV and the parent companies. So the process stays on track, assign accountability to certain groups or individuals. PMID:15938444

  8. Scaling of processes shaping the clonal dynamics and genetic mosaic of seagrasses through temporal genetic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Becheler, R; Benkara, E; Moalic, Y; Hily, C; Arnaud-Haond, S

    2014-01-01

    Theoretically, the dynamics of clonal and genetic diversities of clonal plant populations are strongly influenced by the competition among clones and rate of seedling recruitment, but little empirical assessment has been made of such dynamics through temporal genetic surveys. We aimed to quantify 3 years of evolution in the clonal and genetic composition of Zostera marina meadows, comparing parameters describing clonal architecture and genetic diversity at nine microsatellite markers. Variations in clonal structure revealed a decrease in the evenness of ramet distribution among genets. This illustrates the increasing dominance of some clonal lineages (multilocus lineages, MLLs) in populations. Despite the persistence of these MLLs over time, genetic differentiation was much stronger in time than in space, at the local scale. Contrastingly with the short-term evolution of clonal architecture, the patterns of genetic structure and genetic diversity sensu stricto (that is, heterozygosity and allelic richness) were stable in time. These results suggest the coexistence of (i) a fine grained (at the scale of a 20 × 30 m quadrat) stable core of persistent genets originating from an initial seedling recruitment and developing spatial dominance through clonal elongation; and (ii) a local (at the scale of the meadow) pool of transient genets subjected to annual turnover. This simultaneous occurrence of initial and repeated recruitment strategies highlights the different spatial scales at which distinct evolutionary drivers and mating systems (clonal competition, clonal growth, propagule dispersal and so on) operate to shape the dynamics of populations and the evolution of polymorphism in space and time. PMID:24022498

  9. Stochastic spatio-temporal modelling with PCRaster Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karssenberg, D.; Schmitz, O.; de Jong, K.

    2012-04-01

    PCRaster Python is a software framework for building spatio-temporal models of land surface processes (Karssenberg, Schmitz, Salamon, De Jong, & Bierkens, 2010; PCRaster, 2012). Building blocks of models are spatial operations on raster maps, including a large suite of operations for water and sediment routing. These operations, developed in C++, are available to model builders as Python functions. Users create models by combining these functions in a Python script. As construction of large iterative models is often difficult and time consuming for non-specialists in programming, the software comes with a set of Python framework classes that provide control flow for static modelling, temporal modelling, stochastic modelling using Monte Carlo simulation, and data assimilation techniques including the Ensemble Kalman filter and the Particle Filter. A framework for integrating model components with different time steps and spatial discretization is currently available as a prototype (Schmitz, de Jong, & Karssenberg, in review). The software includes routines for visualisation of stochastic spatio-temporal data for prompt, interactive, visualisation of model inputs and outputs. Visualisation techniques include animated maps, time series, probability distributions, and animated maps with exceedance probabilities. The PCRaster Python software is used by researchers from a large range of disciplines, including hydrology, ecology, sedimentology, and land use change studies. Applications include global scale hydrological modelling and error propagation in large-scale land use change models. The software runs on MS Windows and Linux operating systems, and OS X (under development).

  10. Spatio-Temporal Oscillations in Predator-Prey Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomé, T.; de Carvalho, K. Cristina

    2005-10-01

    In recent years a particularly great effort has been made to understand the role of space given by a spatial structure and local interactions in the characterization of the dynamics of competing biological species. Irreversible stochastic lattice models have been studied to mimic predator-prey systems with Markovian local rules based in the Lotka-Volterra model. One of the problems being studied is the stability of the temporal oscillations of the population of two-species systems-whether they are synchronized. Here we study the temporal oscillations of a two-species system by considering two probabilistic cellular automata defined in regular lattices where each site can be in three states: empty, occupied by a prey, or occupied by a predator. One of them, the isotropic model, has local rules similar to those of the contact process and try to mimic the Lotka-Volterra model mechanisms. The other automaton, the anisotropic model, is based in rules that are similar to the isotropic model, but a anisotropic neighborhood is considered. This model was introduced to explore the effect of spatial anisotropy in temporal oscillations. In fact, it has been pointed out that temporally periodic states can be stable in spatial anisotropic irreversible systems whose anisotropy is exploited conveniently. We show Monte Carlo simulations performed on square lattices for both automata. Our results indicate that, in the thermodynamic limit, oscillations can occur only at a local level, even in the anisotropic model. We observe that for given sets of control parameters a spatio-temporal oscillation occurs in the system. These structures are analyzed.

  11. Surgical treatment and outcomes of temporal bone chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, In Seok; Kim, Jin; Lee, Ho-Ki; Lee, Won-Sang

    2008-12-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon primary benign bone tumor that usually arises in the epiphyses of the long bones. Temporal bone chondroblastoma is a rare primary bone tumor that affects the floor of the middle cranial fossa and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The biological nature of temporal bone chondroblastoma is occasionally aggressive because of local invasion and is known to have a high recurrence after curettage. Therefore, complete resection is recommended. However, the literature provides little information regarding long-term surgical outcomes and complications after surgical resection. The authors have retrospectively analyzed four cases of temporal bone chondroblastoma that had been completely excised by a single surgeon with an eventual long-term follow-up. A single surgeon operated on four patients, two males and two females, with a mean age of 34 years, at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Severance Hospital. In all cases, the tumor involved the middle cranial fossa dura and the mandibular fossa with variable degree of infiltration. All patients have had no tumor recurrence to date (mean follow-up period of 5 years). Complete surgical resection of the temporal bone chondroblastoma is the gold standard for treatment. Precise preoperative image evaluation of tumor extension and proper management of the dura mater and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are the major important features in complete surgical removal that minimize complications in temporal bone chondroblastoma treatment.

  12. Stable Isotope Tracers in Large Scale Hydrological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, B. M.; Aggarwal, P.

    2004-05-01

    Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen (deuterium and oxygen-18) have been shown to be effective tracers for characterizing hydrological processes in small river basins. Their application in large river basins has lagged behind due to the lack of sufficient isotope data. Recent availability of isotope data from most US rivers and subsequent efforts by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to collect comprehensive global information on isotope compositions of river runoff is changing this situation. These data sets offer new opportunities to utilize stable isotopes in studies of large river basins. Recent work carried out jointly by the Water Systems Analysis Group of the University of New Hampshire and the Isotope Hydrology Section of the IAEA applied isotope-enabled global water balance and transport models to assess the feasibility of using isotope data for improving water balance estimations at large scales. The model implemented simple mixing in the various storage pools (e.g. snow pack, soil moisture, groundwater, and river channel) and fractionation during evapotranspiration. Sensitivity tests show that spatial and temporal distributions of isotopes in precipitation and their mixing in the various storage pools are the most important factors affecting the isotopic composition of river discharge. The groundwater storage pool plays a key role in the seasonal dynamics of stable isotope composition of river discharge. Fractionation during phase changes appears to have a less pronounced impact. These findings are consistent with those in small scale catchments where ``old water'' and ``new water'' (i.e. pre-event water and storm runoff) can be easily separated by using isotopes. Model validation using available data from the US rivers showed remarkable performance considering the inconsistencies in the temporal sampling of precipitation and runoff isotope composition records. The good model performance suggests that seasonal variations of the isotopic

  13. Functional Connectome before and following Temporal Lobectomy in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei; Ji, Gong-Jun; Xu, Qiang; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhengge; Yang, Fang; Sun, Kangjian; Jiao, Qing; Richardson, Mark P.; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Lu, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    As mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) has been recognized as a network disorder, a longitudinal connectome investigation may shed new light on the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology related to distinct surgical outcomes. Resting-state functional MRI data was acquired from mTLE patients before (n = 37) and after (n = 24) anterior temporal lobectomy. According to surgical outcome, patients were classified as seizure-free (SF, n = 14) or non-seizure-free (NSF, n = 10). First, we found higher network resilience to targeted attack on topologically central nodes in the SF group compared to the NSF group, preoperatively. Next, a two-way mixed analysis of variance with between-subject factor ‘outcome’ (SF vs. NSF) and within-subject factor ‘treatment’ (pre-operation vs. post-operation) revealed divergent dynamic reorganization in nodal topological characteristics between groups, in the temporoparietal junction and its connection with the ventral prefrontal cortex. We also correlated the network damage score (caused by surgical resection) with postsurgical brain function, and found that the damage score negatively correlated with postoperative global and local parallel information processing. Taken together, dynamic connectomic architecture provides vital information for selecting surgical candidates and for understanding brain recovery mechanisms following epilepsy surgery. PMID:27001417

  14. Functional Connectome before and following Temporal Lobectomy in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei; Ji, Gong-Jun; Xu, Qiang; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhengge; Yang, Fang; Sun, Kangjian; Jiao, Qing; Richardson, Mark P; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Lu, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    As mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) has been recognized as a network disorder, a longitudinal connectome investigation may shed new light on the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology related to distinct surgical outcomes. Resting-state functional MRI data was acquired from mTLE patients before (n = 37) and after (n = 24) anterior temporal lobectomy. According to surgical outcome, patients were classified as seizure-free (SF, n = 14) or non-seizure-free (NSF, n = 10). First, we found higher network resilience to targeted attack on topologically central nodes in the SF group compared to the NSF group, preoperatively. Next, a two-way mixed analysis of variance with between-subject factor 'outcome' (SF vs. NSF) and within-subject factor 'treatment' (pre-operation vs. post-operation) revealed divergent dynamic reorganization in nodal topological characteristics between groups, in the temporoparietal junction and its connection with the ventral prefrontal cortex. We also correlated the network damage score (caused by surgical resection) with postsurgical brain function, and found that the damage score negatively correlated with postoperative global and local parallel information processing. Taken together, dynamic connectomic architecture provides vital information for selecting surgical candidates and for understanding brain recovery mechanisms following epilepsy surgery. PMID:27001417

  15. Spatial-temporal database model based on geodatabase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongmei; Luo, Yu

    2009-10-01

    Entities in the real world have non-spatial attributes, as well as spatial and temporal features. A spatial-temporal data model aims at describing appropriately these intrinsic characteristics within the entities and model them on a conceptual level so that the model can present both static information and dynamic information that occurs over time. In this paper, we devise a novel spatial-temporal data model which is based on Geodatabase. The model employs object-oriented analysis method, combining object concept with event. The entity is defined as a feature class encapsulating attributes and operations. The operations detect change and store the changes automatically in a historic database in Geodatabase. Furthermore, the model takes advantage of the existing strengths of the relational database at the bottom level of Geodatabase, such as trigger and constraint, to monitor events on the attributes or locations and respond to the events correctly. A case of geographic database for Kunming municipal sewerage geographic information system is implemented by the model. The database reveals excellent performance on managing data and tracking the details of change. It provides a perfect data platform for querying, recurring history and predicting the trend of future. The instance demonstrates the spatial-temporal data model is efficient and practicable.

  16. Cubic map algebra functions for spatio-temporal analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mennis, J.; Viger, R.; Tomlin, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    We propose an extension of map algebra to three dimensions for spatio-temporal data handling. This approach yields a new class of map algebra functions that we call "cube functions." Whereas conventional map algebra functions operate on data layers representing two-dimensional space, cube functions operate on data cubes representing two-dimensional space over a third-dimensional period of time. We describe the prototype implementation of a spatio-temporal data structure and selected cube function versions of conventional local, focal, and zonal map algebra functions. The utility of cube functions is demonstrated through a case study analyzing the spatio-temporal variability of remotely sensed, southeastern U.S. vegetation character over various land covers and during different El Nin??o/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phases. Like conventional map algebra, the application of cube functions may demand significant data preprocessing when integrating diverse data sets, and are subject to limitations related to data storage and algorithm performance. Solutions to these issues include extending data compression and computing strategies for calculations on very large data volumes to spatio-temporal data handling.

  17. Finding Mutual Exclusion Invariants in Temporal Planning Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardini, Sara; Smith, David E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for automatically extracting temporal mutual exclusion invariants from PDDL2.2 planning instances. We first identify a set of invariant candidates by inspecting the domain and then check these candidates against properties that assure invariance. If these properties are violated, we show that it is sometimes possible to refine a candidate by adding additional propositions and turn it into a real invariant. Our technique builds on other approaches to invariant synthesis presented in the literature, but departs from their limited focus on instantaneous discrete actions by addressing temporal and numeric domains. To deal with time, we formulate invariance conditions that account for both the entire structure of the operators (including the conditions, rather than just the effects) and the possible interactions between operators. As a result, we construct a technique that is not only capable of identifying invariants for temporal domains, but is also able to find a broader set of invariants for non-temporal domains than the previous techniques.

  18. NICMOS FOM Operation Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith

    2001-07-01

    This test verifies the FOM's mechanical operation. A 7 x 1 grid of points will be made by moving the FOM in steps of 6.5 from -20 to +19 arcsec relative to the 0 position {-36 to +3 relative to the default NIC3 FOM position of +16 arcsec}. We also have an additional FOM position at the default NIC3 position. These exposures all use the F166N filter. At the end of this sequence we will take F222M exposures at three additional FOM positions, the default position {+16 arcsec relative to the center point of the FOM mechanical range} and +/- 2 arcsec. This is to test for vignetting. Prerequisites for this test are cool down to nominal operating temperature {cold and stable, near the expected final temperature set point, but not necessarily the final temperature set point} and the filter wheel minifunctional and the filter wheel tests {proposals 8944 and 8972}.

  19. Functions Controlling Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotopes of Precipitation in the Continental United States: Summarized Using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachon, R. W.

    2002-12-01

    Since its inception in 1978, the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) has collected and archived weekly precipitation samples from what now amounts to over 200 sites. We have seized this opportunity to analyze archived water samples, from 65 sites, for both hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes, spanning 1989 to present. This data is used to determine the degree to which certain factors contribute to fractionation of precipitation stable isotopes. The factors of interest are seasonality of precipitation, temperature, distance from moisture source, altitude, and precipitation amount. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has been used as an analytical tool to determine the spatial and temporal relationships between the stable isotopic composition of water and such parameters. The results from such a grand data set brings higher resolution to conclusions drawn from previous studies, and the use of GIS culminates in isotopic spatial models of the continental United States, calibrated by goespatial and temporal parameters.

  20. Effective Visualization of Temporal Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lihua; Healey, Christopher G; Bass, Steffen A

    2016-01-01

    An ensemble is a collection of related datasets, called members, built from a series of runs of a simulation or an experiment. Ensembles are large, temporal, multidimensional, and multivariate, making them difficult to analyze. Another important challenge is visualizing ensembles that vary both in space and time. Initial visualization techniques displayed ensembles with a small number of members, or presented an overview of an entire ensemble, but without potentially important details. Recently, researchers have suggested combining these two directions, allowing users to choose subsets of members to visualization. This manual selection process places the burden on the user to identify which members to explore. We first introduce a static ensemble visualization system that automatically helps users locate interesting subsets of members to visualize. We next extend the system to support analysis and visualization of temporal ensembles. We employ 3D shape comparison, cluster tree visualization, and glyph based visualization to represent different levels of detail within an ensemble. This strategy is used to provide two approaches for temporal ensemble analysis: (1) segment based ensemble analysis, to capture important shape transition time-steps, clusters groups of similar members, and identify common shape changes over time across multiple members; and (2) time-step based ensemble analysis, which assumes ensemble members are aligned in time by combining similar shapes at common time-steps. Both approaches enable users to interactively visualize and analyze a temporal ensemble from different perspectives at different levels of detail. We demonstrate our techniques on an ensemble studying matter transition from hadronic gas to quark-gluon plasma during gold-on-gold particle collisions.

  1. Effective Visualization of Temporal Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lihua; Healey, Christopher G; Bass, Steffen A

    2016-01-01

    An ensemble is a collection of related datasets, called members, built from a series of runs of a simulation or an experiment. Ensembles are large, temporal, multidimensional, and multivariate, making them difficult to analyze. Another important challenge is visualizing ensembles that vary both in space and time. Initial visualization techniques displayed ensembles with a small number of members, or presented an overview of an entire ensemble, but without potentially important details. Recently, researchers have suggested combining these two directions, allowing users to choose subsets of members to visualization. This manual selection process places the burden on the user to identify which members to explore. We first introduce a static ensemble visualization system that automatically helps users locate interesting subsets of members to visualize. We next extend the system to support analysis and visualization of temporal ensembles. We employ 3D shape comparison, cluster tree visualization, and glyph based visualization to represent different levels of detail within an ensemble. This strategy is used to provide two approaches for temporal ensemble analysis: (1) segment based ensemble analysis, to capture important shape transition time-steps, clusters groups of similar members, and identify common shape changes over time across multiple members; and (2) time-step based ensemble analysis, which assumes ensemble members are aligned in time by combining similar shapes at common time-steps. Both approaches enable users to interactively visualize and analyze a temporal ensemble from different perspectives at different levels of detail. We demonstrate our techniques on an ensemble studying matter transition from hadronic gas to quark-gluon plasma during gold-on-gold particle collisions. PMID:26529728

  2. Operational Amplifiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxcroft, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the introduction of low cost equipment into high school and college physical science classes. Examines the properties of an "ideal" operational amplifier and discusses how it might be used under saturated and non-saturated conditions. Notes the action of a "real" operational amplifier. (TW)

  3. Operating Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Brown, Robert L.

    1984-01-01

    A computer operating system spans multiple layers of complexity, from commands entered at a keyboard to the details of electronic switching. In addition, the system is organized as a hierarchy of abstractions. Various parts of such a system and system dynamics (using the Unix operating system as an example) are described. (JN)

  4. Payload Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cissom, R. D.; Melton, T. L.; Schneider, M. P.; Lapenta, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide the future ISS scientist and/or engineer a sense of what ISS payload operations are expected to be. This paper uses a real-time operations scenario to convey this message. The real-time operations scenario begins at the initiation of payload operations and runs through post run experiment analysis. In developing this scenario, it is assumed that the ISS payload operations flight and ground capabilities are fully available for use by the payload user community. Emphasis is placed on telescience operations whose main objective is to enable researchers to utilize experiment hardware onboard the International Space Station as if it were located in their terrestrial laboratory. An overview of the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) systems and user ground system options is included to provide an understanding of the systems and interfaces users will utilize to perform payload operations. Detailed information regarding POIC capabilities can be found in the POIC Capabilities Document, SSP 50304.

  5. Warehousing Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on warehousing operations is designed to provide instruction in the procedures used in warehousing operations. Introductory materials include specific information for MCI students and a study guide (guidelines to complete the course). The 22-hour…

  6. Temporal ecology in the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Wolkovich, E M; Cook, B I; McLauchlan, K K; Davies, T J

    2014-11-01

    Two fundamental axes - space and time - shape ecological systems. Over the last 30 years spatial ecology has developed as an integrative, multidisciplinary science that has improved our understanding of the ecological consequences of habitat fragmentation and loss. We argue that accelerating climate change - the effective manipulation of time by humans - has generated a current need to build an equivalent framework for temporal ecology. Climate change has at once pressed ecologists to understand and predict ecological dynamics in non-stationary environments, while also challenged fundamental assumptions of many concepts, models and approaches. However, similarities between space and time, especially related issues of scaling, provide an outline for improving ecological models and forecasting of temporal dynamics, while the unique attributes of time, particularly its emphasis on events and its singular direction, highlight where new approaches are needed. We emphasise how a renewed, interdisciplinary focus on time would coalesce related concepts, help develop new theories and methods and guide further data collection. The next challenge will be to unite predictive frameworks from spatial and temporal ecology to build robust forecasts of when and where environmental change will pose the largest threats to species and ecosystems, as well as identifying the best opportunities for conservation.

  7. Temporal ecology in the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Wolkovich, E M; Cook, B I; McLauchlan, K K; Davies, T J

    2014-11-01

    Two fundamental axes - space and time - shape ecological systems. Over the last 30 years spatial ecology has developed as an integrative, multidisciplinary science that has improved our understanding of the ecological consequences of habitat fragmentation and loss. We argue that accelerating climate change - the effective manipulation of time by humans - has generated a current need to build an equivalent framework for temporal ecology. Climate change has at once pressed ecologists to understand and predict ecological dynamics in non-stationary environments, while also challenged fundamental assumptions of many concepts, models and approaches. However, similarities between space and time, especially related issues of scaling, provide an outline for improving ecological models and forecasting of temporal dynamics, while the unique attributes of time, particularly its emphasis on events and its singular direction, highlight where new approaches are needed. We emphasise how a renewed, interdisciplinary focus on time would coalesce related concepts, help develop new theories and methods and guide further data collection. The next challenge will be to unite predictive frameworks from spatial and temporal ecology to build robust forecasts of when and where environmental change will pose the largest threats to species and ecosystems, as well as identifying the best opportunities for conservation. PMID:25199649

  8. Temporal Data Screening in PROS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deponte, J.; Conroy, M.

    Filtering and selection of photons is often a user's first step in the scientific analysis of astronomical data. For instance, satellite based X-ray observations are acquired under a set of constantly changing conditions. The position of the target on the detector is not constant, and observing conditions such as background rate, aspect quality, and bright object contamination change as a function of satellite position and telemetry quality. These conditions are recorded and saved in the data files provided to the observer along with the photon data that are stored with spatial, temporal and energy band attributes. In the PROS/IRAF environment event data are stored as QPOE files where there is IRAF support for filtering on each of the data attributes. Ancillary data are stored as TABLE files and supported by a package of tools that allows the user to view and manipulate the data. We present several tasks that have been developed to enhance the filtering capabilities of IRAF by allowing users to build temporal filters based on screens applied to TABLE files. The Temporal data intervals are then used to screen photons in the QPOE file, giving the user the opportunity to reject or recover photons, using the tasks: hkfilter -- generates a QPOE time filter from an input housekeeping filter tabfilter -- an interactive graphical data quality selection and display task. Specific examples applicable to ROSAT data will be discussed.

  9. Massive tongue necrosis secondary to temporal arteritis.

    PubMed

    Roseman, B B; Granite, E

    1984-10-01

    A case of unusually massive necrosis of the tongue secondary to temporal arteritis is presented. The clinician must include temporal arteritis in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with signs and symptoms of tongue ischemia.

  10. A System to Create Stable Nanoparticle Aerosols from Nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yaobo; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle aerosols released from nanopowders in workplaces are associated with human exposure and health risks. We developed a novel system, requiring minimal amounts of test materials (min. 200 mg), for studying powder aerosolization behavior and aerosol properties. The aerosolization procedure follows the concept of the fluidized-bed process, but occurs in the modified volume of a V-shaped aerosol generator. The airborne particle number concentration is adjustable by controlling the air flow rate. The system supplied stable aerosol generation rates and particle size distributions over long periods (0.5-2 hr and possibly longer), which are important, for example, to study aerosol behavior, but also for toxicological studies. Strict adherence to the operating procedures during the aerosolization experiments ensures the generation of reproducible test results. The critical steps in the standard protocol are the preparation of the material and setup, and the aerosolization operations themselves. The system can be used for experiments requiring stable aerosol concentrations and may also be an alternative method for testing dustiness. The controlled aerosolization made possible with this setup occurs using energy inputs (may be characterized by aerosolization air velocity) that are within the ranges commonly found in occupational environments where nanomaterial powders are handled. This setup and its operating protocol are thus helpful for human exposure and risk assessment. PMID:27501179

  11. A Stable and Conservative Interface Treatment of Arbitrary Spatial Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Nordstrom, Jan; Gottlieb, David

    1998-01-01

    Stable and accurate interface conditions are derived for the linear advection-diffusion equation. The conditions are functionally independent of the spatial order of accuracy and rely only on the form of the discrete operator. We focus on high-order finite-difference operators that satisfy the summation-by-parts (SBP) property. We prove that stability is a natural consequence of the SBP operators used in conjunction with the new boundary conditions. In addition, we show that the interface treatments are conservative. New finite-difference operators of spatial accuracy up to sixth order are constructed: these operators satisfy the SBP property. Finite-difference operators are shown to admit design accuracy (p(sup th)-order global accuracy) when (p - 1)(sup th)-order stencil closures are used near the boundaries if the physical boundary conditions are implemented to at least p(sup th)-order accuracy. Stability and accuracy are demonstrated on the nonlinear Burgers' equation for an twelve-subdomain problem with randomly distributed interfaces.

  12. Computing Stable Outcomes in Hedonic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gairing, Martin; Savani, Rahul

    We study the computational complexity of finding stable outcomes in symmetric additively-separable hedonic games. These coalition formation games are specified by an undirected edge-weighted graph: nodes are players, an outcome of the game is a partition of the nodes into coalitions, and the utility of a node is the sum of incident edge weights in the same coalition. We consider several natural stability requirements defined in the economics literature. For all of them the existence of a stable outcome is guaranteed by a potential function argument, so local improvements will converge to a stable outcome and all these problems are in PLS. The different stability requirements correspond to different local search neighbourhoods. For different neighbourhood structures, our findings comprise positive results in the form of polynomial-time algorithms for finding stable outcomes, and negative (PLS-completeness) results.

  13. Polymeric foams stable at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Harrison, E. S.; Delano, C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Crosslinked poly(N-arylenebenzimidazoles) are stable up to 370 C. Polymers are made by mixing appropriate stoichiometric amounts of tetramine and aromatic dicarboxylic acid anhydride with phenol or alkyl-substituted phenol.

  14. Thermally Stable Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    2006-01-01

    A class of thermally stable piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymers, and an improved method of making them, have been invented. These polymers can be used as substrates for a wide variety of electromechanical transducers, sensors, and actuators.

  15. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  16. Stable Isotope Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2012-01-03

    The isotopic distribution of the atoms composing the molecules of microorganisms is a function of the substrates used by the organisms. The stable isotope content of an organism is fixed so long as no further substrate consumption and biosynthesis occurs, while the radioactive isotopic content decays over time. The distribution of stable isotopes of C, N, O and H in heterotrophic microorganisms is a direct function of the culture medium, and therefore the stable isotope composition can be used to associate samples with potential culture media and also with one another. The 14C content depends upon the 14C content, and therefore the age, of the organic components of the culture medium, as well as on the age of the culture itself. Stable isotope signatures can thus be used for sample matching, to associate cultures with specific growth media, and to predict characteristics of growth media.

  17. Mechanically and thermally stable maser cavity resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Hoffman, T. E.; Levine, M. W.

    1972-01-01

    New type cavity resonator is designed for hydrogen maser. Resonator consists of three pieces of glass-ceramic material having extremely low thermal coefficient of expansion and provides very stable mechanical tuning.

  18. Evolutionary origin of asymptotically stable consensus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chang-Bing; Wu, Bin; Wang, Jian-Bo; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Consensus is widely observed in nature as well as in society. Up to now, many works have focused on what kind of (and how) isolated single structures lead to consensus, while the dynamics of consensus in interdependent populations remains unclear, although interactive structures are everywhere. For such consensus in interdependent populations, we refer that the fraction of population adopting a specified strategy is the same across different interactive structures. A two-strategy game as a conflict is adopted to explore how natural selection affects the consensus in such interdependent populations. It is shown that when selection is absent, all the consensus states are stable, but none are evolutionarily stable. In other words, the final consensus state can go back and forth from one to another. When selection is present, there is only a small number of stable consensus state which are evolutionarily stable. Our study highlights the importance of evolution on stabilizing consensus in interdependent populations. PMID:24699444

  19. A GRASS GIS based Spatio-Temporal Algebra for Raster-, 3D Raster- and Vector Time Series Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppelt, Thomas; Gebbert, Sören

    2015-04-01

    Enhancing the well known and widely used map algebra proposed by Dr. Charles Dana Tomlin [1] with the time dimension is an ongoing research topic. The efficient processing of large time series of raster, 3D raster and vector datasets, e. g. raster datasets for temperature or precipitations on continental scale, requires a sophisticated spatio-temporal algebra that is capable of handling datasets with different temporal granularities and spatio-temporal extents. With the temporal enabled GRASS GIS [2] and the GRASS GIS Temporal Framework new spatio-temporal data types are available in GRASS GIS 7, called space time datasets. These space time datasets represent time series of raster, 3D raster and vector map layers. Furthermore the temporal framework provides a wide range of functionalities to support the implementation of a temporal algebra. While spatial capabilities of GRASS GIS are used to perform the spatial processing of the time stamped map layers that are registered in a space time dataset, the temporal processing is provided by the GRASS GIS temporal framework that supports time intervals and time instances. Mixing time instance and time intervals as well as gaps, overlapping or inclusion of intervals and instances is possible. Hence this framework allows an arbitrary layout of the time dimension. We implemented two ways to process space time datasets with arbitrary temporal layout, the temporal topology and the granularity based spatio-temporal algebra. The algebra provides the functionality to define complex spatio-temporal topological operators that process time and space in a single expression. The algebra includes methods to select map layers from space time datasets based on their temporal relations, to temporally shift time stamped map layers, to create temporal buffer and to snap time instances of time stamped map layers to create a valid temporal topology. In addition spatio-temporal operations can be evaluated within conditional statements. These

  20. Temporal Phenomena in the Korean Conjunctive Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dongmin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize the temporal phenomena in the Korean conjunctive constructions. These constructions consist of three components: a verbal stem, a clause medial temporal suffix, and a clause terminal suffix. This study focuses on both the temporality of the terminal connective suffixes and the grammatical meanings of the…

  1. Lateralized Temporal Order Judgement in Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddle, Elizabeth B.; Jackson, Georgina M.; Rorden, Chris; Jackson, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Temporal and spatial attentional deficits in dyslexia were investigated using a lateralized visual temporal order judgment (TOJ) paradigm that allowed both sensitivity to temporal order and spatial attentional bias to be measured. Findings indicate that adult participants with a positive screen for dyslexia were significantly less sensitive to the…

  2. Chemodectomas arising in temporal bone structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, W.J.; Million, R.R.; Cassisi, N.J.; Singleton, G.T.

    1982-02-01

    Eighteen patients with chemodectomas arising in temporal bone structures were evaluated and treated at the University of Florida. Seventeen patients have each been followed a minimum of 3 years. Patients were retrospectively staged as having ''local'' or ''advanced'' disease, depending on the presence or absence of bone destruction and/or cranial nerve involvement. Fourteen of the patients received radiation therapy as all or part of their therapy; 6 patients were treated with radiation therapy alone, 3 patients were irradiated immediately postoperatively for residual disease, and 5 patients had radiation therapy for recurrence after operation. They were treated with cobalt-60 radiation with doses ranging from 3760 to 5640 rad. All irradiated patients demonstrated evidence of tumor regression, and none have had tumor recurrence with followup of 3-12 years. Of the 8 patients with cranial nerve paralysis prior to therapy, 5 had return of function of 1 or more cranial nerves. One of 6 patients treated initially with radiation therapy had a complication, while 6 of 8 patients irradiated postoperatively had complications. None of the complications were fatal. Three patients treated by operation for early disease limited to the hypotympanum had the disease controlled for 11-12 years. Guidelines for the selection of initial therapy are discussed.

  3. Temporal Stability of Genetic Structure in a Mesopelagic Copepod

    PubMed Central

    Goetze, Erica; Andrews, Kimberly R.; Peijnenburg, Katja T. C. A.; Portner, Elan; Norton, Emily L.

    2015-01-01

    Although stochasticity in oceanographic conditions is known to be an important driver of temporal genetic change in many marine species, little is known about whether genetically distinct plankton populations can persist in open ocean habitats. A prior study demonstrated significant population genetic structure among oceanic gyres in the mesopelagic copepod Haloptilus longicornis in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and we hypothesized that populations within each gyre represent distinct gene pools that persist over time. We tested this expectation through basin-scale sampling across the Atlantic Ocean in 2010 and 2012. Using both mitochondrial (mtCOII) and microsatellite markers (7 loci), we show that the genetic composition of populations was stable across two years in both the northern and southern subtropical gyres. Genetic variation in this species was partitioned among ocean gyres (FCT = 0.285, P < 0.0001 for mtCOII, FCT = 0.013, P < 0.0001 for microsatellites), suggesting strong spatial population structure, but no significant partitioning was found among sampling years. This temporal persistence of population structure across a large geographic scale was coupled with chaotic genetic patchiness at smaller spatial scales, but the magnitude of genetic differentiation was an order of magnitude lower at these smaller scales. Our results demonstrate that genetically distinct plankton populations persist over time in highly-dispersive open ocean habitats, and this is the first study to rigorously test for temporal stability of large scale population structure in the plankton. PMID:26302332

  4. Rational temporal predictions can underlie apparent failures to delay gratification

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Joseph T.; Kable, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    An important category of seemingly maladaptive decisions involves failure to postpone gratification. A person pursuing a desirable long-run outcome may abandon it in favor of a short-run alternative that has been available all along. Here we present a theoretical framework in which this seemingly irrational behavior emerges from stable preferences and veridical judgments. Our account recognizes that decision makers generally face uncertainty regarding the time at which future outcomes will materialize. When timing is uncertain, the value of persistence depends crucially on the nature of a decision-maker’s prior temporal beliefs. Certain forms of temporal beliefs imply that a delay’s predicted remaining length increases as a function of time already waited. In this type of situation, the rational, utility-maximizing strategy is to persist for a limited amount of time and then give up. We show empirically that people’s explicit predictions of remaining delay lengths indeed increase as a function of elapsed time in several relevant domains, implying that temporal judgments offer a rational basis for limiting persistence. We then develop our framework into a simple working model and show how it accounts for individual differences in a laboratory task (the well-known “marshmallow test”). We conclude that delay-of-gratification failure, generally viewed as a manifestation of limited self-control capacity, can instead arise as an adaptive response to the perceived statistics of one’s environment. PMID:23458085

  5. Learning input correlations through nonlinear temporally asymmetric Hebbian plasticity.

    PubMed

    Gütig, R; Aharonov, R; Rotter, S; Sompolinsky, Haim

    2003-05-01

    Triggered by recent experimental results, temporally asymmetric Hebbian (TAH) plasticity is considered as a candidate model for the biological implementation of competitive synaptic learning, a key concept for the experience-based development of cortical circuitry. However, because of the well known positive feedback instability of correlation-based plasticity, the stability of the resulting learning process has remained a central problem. Plagued by either a runaway of the synaptic efficacies or a greatly reduced sensitivity to input correlations, the learning performance of current models is limited. Here we introduce a novel generalized nonlinear TAH learning rule that allows a balance between stability and sensitivity of learning. Using this rule, we study the capacity of the system to learn patterns of correlations between afferent spike trains. Specifically, we address the question of under which conditions learning induces spontaneous symmetry breaking and leads to inhomogeneous synaptic distributions that capture the structure of the input correlations. To study the efficiency of learning temporal relationships between afferent spike trains through TAH plasticity, we introduce a novel sensitivity measure that quantifies the amount of information about the correlation structure in the input, a learning rule capable of storing in the synaptic weights. We demonstrate that by adjusting the weight dependence of the synaptic changes in TAH plasticity, it is possible to enhance the synaptic representation of temporal input correlations while maintaining the system in a stable learning regime. Indeed, for a given distribution of inputs, the learning efficiency can be optimized. PMID:12736341

  6. Temporal Stability of Genetic Structure in a Mesopelagic Copepod.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Erica; Andrews, Kimberly R; Peijnenburg, Katja T C A; Portner, Elan; Norton, Emily L

    2015-01-01

    Although stochasticity in oceanographic conditions is known to be an important driver of temporal genetic change in many marine species, little is known about whether genetically distinct plankton populations can persist in open ocean habitats. A prior study demonstrated significant population genetic structure among oceanic gyres in the mesopelagic copepod Haloptilus longicornis in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and we hypothesized that populations within each gyre represent distinct gene pools that persist over time. We tested this expectation through basin-scale sampling across the Atlantic Ocean in 2010 and 2012. Using both mitochondrial (mtCOII) and microsatellite markers (7 loci), we show that the genetic composition of populations was stable across two years in both the northern and southern subtropical gyres. Genetic variation in this species was partitioned among ocean gyres (FCT = 0.285, P < 0.0001 for mtCOII, FCT = 0.013, P < 0.0001 for microsatellites), suggesting strong spatial population structure, but no significant partitioning was found among sampling years. This temporal persistence of population structure across a large geographic scale was coupled with chaotic genetic patchiness at smaller spatial scales, but the magnitude of genetic differentiation was an order of magnitude lower at these smaller scales. Our results demonstrate that genetically distinct plankton populations persist over time in highly-dispersive open ocean habitats, and this is the first study to rigorously test for temporal stability of large scale population structure in the plankton. PMID:26302332

  7. Rational temporal predictions can underlie apparent failures to delay gratification.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Joseph T; Kable, Joseph W

    2013-04-01

    An important category of seemingly maladaptive decisions involves failure to postpone gratification. A person pursuing a desirable long-run outcome may abandon it in favor of a short-run alternative that has been available all along. Here we present a theoretical framework in which this seemingly irrational behavior emerges from stable preferences and veridical judgments. Our account recognizes that decision makers generally face uncertainty regarding the time at which future outcomes will materialize. When timing is uncertain, the value of persistence depends crucially on the nature of a decision maker's prior temporal beliefs. Certain forms of temporal beliefs imply that a delay's predicted remaining length increases as a function of time already waited. In this type of situation, the rational, utility-maximizing strategy is to persist for a limited amount of time and then give up. We show empirically that people's explicit predictions of remaining delay lengths indeed increase as a function of elapsed time in several relevant domains, implying that temporal judgments offer a rational basis for limiting persistence. We then develop our framework into a simple working model and show how it accounts for individual differences in a laboratory task (the well-known "marshmallow test"). We conclude that delay-of-gratification failure, generally viewed as a manifestation of limited self-control capacity, can instead arise as an adaptive response to the perceived statistics of one's environment.

  8. Apparatus to detect stable fractional charges on matter

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderspek, R.

    1980-04-01

    The construction of an apparatus designed to detect stable fractional charges on matter, if they exist, to the level of 10/sup -24/ per nucleon is reported and discussed. The charges on a stream of highly consistent droplets produced by the apparatus are determined by accurate measurement of the deflection of the droplets in falling through a static electric field. Maintenance of certain parameters of operation calculated to limit the random effects of electrical and aerodynamical disturbances on the droplets indicate a precision in the measurement of the charge on a droplet of 0.02e can be attained. 7 figures.

  9. Approach to inherently stable interfaces for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Kupp, E.R.; Stinton, D.P.; Shanmugham, S.

    1996-09-01

    Virtually all ceramic matrix composites require and interface coating between the fibers and matrix to achieve the desired mechanical performance. To date, the most effective interface materials for non- oxide matrix composites have been carbon and boron nitride. They are, however, susceptible to oxidation at elevated temperatures, and thus under many envisioned operating environments they will fail, possibly allowing oxidation of the fibers as well, adversely affecting mechanical behavior. Current efforts are directed toward developing stable interface coating, which include oxides and silicon carbide with appropriate thermomechanical properties.

  10. Temporal Variability of the Bioaerosol Background at a Subway Station: Concentration Level, Size Distribution, and Diversity of Airborne Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dybwad, Marius; Skogan, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring bioaerosol environments may present a challenge to biological detection-identification-monitoring (BIODIM) systems aiming at rapid and reliable warning of bioterrorism incidents. One way to improve the operational performance of BIODIM systems is to increase our understanding of relevant bioaerosol backgrounds. Subway stations are enclosed public environments which may be regarded as potential bioterrorism targets. This study provides novel information concerning the temporal variability of the concentration level, size distribution, and diversity of airborne bacteria in a Norwegian subway station. Three different air samplers were used during a 72-h sampling campaign in February 2011. The results suggested that the airborne bacterial environment was stable between days and seasons, while the intraday variability was found to be substantial, although often following a consistent diurnal pattern. The bacterial levels ranged from not detected to 103 CFU m−3 and generally showed increased levels during the daytime compared to the nighttime levels, as well as during rush hours compared to non-rush hours. The airborne bacterial levels showed rapid temporal variation (up to 270-fold) on some occasions, both consistent and inconsistent with the diurnal profile. Airborne bacterium-containing particles were distributed between different sizes for particles of >1.1 μm, although ∼50% were between 1.1 and 3.3 μm. Anthropogenic activities (mainly passengers) were demonstrated as major sources of airborne bacteria and predominantly contributed 1.1- to 3.3-μm bacterium-containing particles. Our findings contribute to the development of realistic testing and evaluation schemes for BIODIM equipment by providing information that may be used to simulate operational bioaerosol backgrounds during controlled aerosol chamber-based challenge tests with biological threat agents. PMID:24162566

  11. Development of a subway operation incident delay model using accelerated failure time approaches.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jinxian; Zheng, Yang; Yan, Xuedong; Meng, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to develop a subway operational incident delay model using the parametric accelerated time failure (AFT) approach. Six parametric AFT models including the log-logistic, lognormal and Weibull models, with fixed and random parameters are built based on the Hong Kong subway operation incident data from 2005 to 2012, respectively. In addition, the Weibull model with gamma heterogeneity is also considered to compare the model performance. The goodness-of-fit test results show that the log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is most suitable for estimating the subway incident delay. First, the results show that a longer subway operation incident delay is highly correlated with the following factors: power cable failure, signal cable failure, turnout communication disruption and crashes involving a casualty. Vehicle failure makes the least impact on the increment of subway operation incident delay. According to these results, several possible measures, such as the use of short-distance and wireless communication technology (e.g., Wifi and Zigbee) are suggested to shorten the delay caused by subway operation incidents. Finally, the temporal transferability test results show that the developed log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is stable over time. PMID:25171521

  12. Stability of autotrophic nitrogen removal system under four non-steady operations.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuya; Itokawa, Hiroki; Noto, Kazuhiko; Murakami, Takao; Isaka, Kazuichi

    2013-06-01

    Stable nitrogen removal from the digester supernatant for sludge via the nitritation-anammox process under steady operations of ammonium concentration and flow rate has been often reported. In this study, the effects of four non-steady operations, intentional fluctuations of influent concentration from 890 to 650 mg-N/L and hydraulic load of the 10% increase, temporally shutdown for 3-d and maximum capacity of each reactor, were evaluated in the nitritation-anammox process treating digester supernatant for sludge. No serious effects were observed in the anammox reactor because the aeration-control system in the nitritation reactor responded and controlled the nitritation efficiency satisfactorily against intentional fluctuations and temporally shutdown. Finally, the maximum capacity of each reactor was evaluated, and the nitritation rate was found to be 2.3 kg-N/m(3)/d at a DO of 4.0mg/L, and the nitrogen-conversion rate was 9.0 kg-N/m(3)/d. PMID:23587820

  13. Tracing amino acid exchange during host-pathogen interaction by combined stable-isotope time-resolved Raman spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Boitor, Radu A.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the temporal and spatial interchange of the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) between human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) and tachyzoites of the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is combined with Raman micro-spectroscopy to selectively monitor the incorporation of deuterium-labelled Phe into proteins in individual live tachyzoites. Our results show a very rapid uptake of L-Phe(D8) by the intracellular growing parasite. T. gondii tachyzoites are capable of extracting L-Phe(D8) from host cells as soon as it invades the cell. L-Phe(D8) from the host cell completely replaces the L-Phe within T. gondii tachyzoites 7-9 hours after infection. A quantitative model based on Raman spectra allowed an estimation of the exchange rate of Phe as 0.5-1.6 × 104 molecules/s. On the other hand, extracellular tachyzoites were not able to consume L-Phe(D8) after 24 hours of infection. These findings further our understanding of the amino acid trafficking between host cells and this strictly intracellular parasite. In particular, this study highlights new aspects of the metabolism of amino acid Phe operative during the interaction between T. gondii and its host cell.

  14. Tracing amino acid exchange during host-pathogen interaction by combined stable-isotope time-resolved Raman spectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Boitor, Radu A.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the temporal and spatial interchange of the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) between human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) and tachyzoites of the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is combined with Raman micro-spectroscopy to selectively monitor the incorporation of deuterium-labelled Phe into proteins in individual live tachyzoites. Our results show a very rapid uptake of l-Phe(D8) by the intracellular growing parasite. T. gondii tachyzoites are capable of extracting l-Phe(D8) from host cells as soon as it invades the cell. l-Phe(D8) from the host cell completely replaces the l-Phe within T. gondii tachyzoites 7–9 hours after infection. A quantitative model based on Raman spectra allowed an estimation of the exchange rate of Phe as 0.5–1.6 × 104 molecules/s. On the other hand, extracellular tachyzoites were not able to consume l-Phe(D8) after 24 hours of infection. These findings further our understanding of the amino acid trafficking between host cells and this strictly intracellular parasite. In particular, this study highlights new aspects of the metabolism of amino acid Phe operative during the interaction between T. gondii and its host cell. PMID:26857158

  15. Tracing amino acid exchange during host-pathogen interaction by combined stable-isotope time-resolved Raman spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Boitor, Radu A.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the temporal and spatial interchange of the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) between human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) and tachyzoites of the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is combined with Raman micro-spectroscopy to selectively monitor the incorporation of deuterium-labelled Phe into proteins in individual live tachyzoites. Our results show a very rapid uptake of L-Phe(D8) by the intracellular growing parasite. T. gondii tachyzoites are capable of extracting L-Phe(D8) from host cells as soon as it invades the cell. L-Phe(D8) from the host cell completely replaces the L-Phe within T. gondii tachyzoites 7–9 hours after infection. A quantitative model based on Raman spectra allowed an estimation of the exchange rate of Phe as 0.5–1.6 × 104 molecules/s. On the other hand, extracellular tachyzoites were not able to consume L-Phe(D8) after 24 hours of infection. These findings further our understanding of the amino acid trafficking between host cells and this strictly intracellular parasite. In particular, this study highlights new aspects of the metabolism of amino acid Phe operative during the interaction between T. gondii and its host cell.

  16. A novel setup for femtosecond pump-repump-probe IR spectroscopy with few cycle CEP stable pulses.

    PubMed

    Bradler, Maximilian; Werhahn, Jasper C; Hutzler, Daniel; Fuhrmann, Simon; Heider, Rupert; Riedle, Eberhard; Iglev, Hristo; Kienberger, Reinhard

    2013-08-26

    We present a three-color mid-IR setup for vibrational pump-repump-probe experiments with a temporal resolution well below 100 fs and a freely selectable spectral resolution of 20 to 360 cm(-1) for the pump and repump. The usable probe range without optical realignment is 900 cm(-1). The experimental design employed is greatly simplified compared to the widely used setups, highly robust and includes a novel means for generation of tunable few-cycle pulses with stable carrier-envelope phase. A Ti:sapphire pump system operating with 1 kHz and a modest 150 fs pulse duration supplies the total pump energy of just 0.6 mJ. The good signal-to-noise ratio of the setup allows the determination of spectrally resolved transient probe changes smaller than 6·10(-5) OD at 130 time delays in just 45 minutes. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated with transient IR spectra and decay curves of HDO molecules in lithium nitrate trihydrate and ice and a first all MIR pump-repump-probe measurement. PMID:24105560

  17. Stereoscopic video compression using temporal scalability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Atul; Kollarits, Richard V.; Haskell, Barry G.

    1995-04-01

    Despite the fact that human ability to perceive a high degree of realism is directly related to our ability to perceive depth accurately in a scene, most of the commonly used imaging and display technologies are able to provide only a 2D rendering of the 3D real world. Many current as well as emerging applications in areas of entertainment, remote operations, industrial and medicine can benefit from the depth perception offered by stereoscopic video systems which employ two views of a scene imaged under the constraints imposed by human visual system. Among the many challenges to be overcome for practical realization and widespread use of 3D/stereoscopic systems are efficient techniques for digital compression of enormous amounts of data while maintaining compatibility with normal video decoding and display systems. After a brief discussion on the relationship of digital stereoscopic 3DTV with digital TV and HDTV, we present an overview of tools in the MPEG-2 video standard that are relevant to our discussion on compression of stereoscopic video, which is the main topic of this paper. Next, we determine ways in which temporal scalability concepts can be applied to exploit redundancies inherent between the two views of a scene comprising stereoscopic video. Due consideration is given to masking properties of stereoscopic vision to determine bandwidth partitioning between the two views to realize an efficient coding scheme while providing sufficient quality. Simulations are performed on stereoscopic video of normal TV resolution to compare the performance of the two temporal scalability configurations with each other and with the simulcast solution. Preliminary results are quite promising and indicate that the configuration that exploits motion and disparity compensation significantly outperforms the one that exploits disparity compensation alone. Compression of both views of stereo video of normal TV resolution appears feasible in a total of 8 or 9 Mbit/s. Finally

  18. Improved Temporal Resolution of Ambient Seismic Noise Monitoring without the Green's Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadziioannou, Céline; Larose, Eric; Baig, Adam; Campillo, Michel

    2010-05-01

    Ambient noise crosscorrelations have been used on several occasions to monitor temporal variations in seismic velocity. In particular, Brenguier et al. (Science, 2008) find coseismic and postseismic velocity changes around a fault zone in Parkfield, California. In this study, and in others, it was initially assumed that a correct reconstruction of the Green's function is as necessary for temporal monitoring as it is for imaging. We show through laboratory experiments that a stable waveform reconstruction is sufficient to retrieve relative temporal variations. Armed with this knowledge, we revisit the data from Parkfield. One way to obtain a stable waveform, with an acceptable signal to noise ratio, is to average the correlations over a long period of time. However, for the application to monitoring one wants the possibility of following short-term variations. How can we resolve this conflict and improve temporal resolution without sacrificing SNR? We show that by applying an adaptive filter (Baig et al, J. Geophys. Res., 2009) to the Parkfield dataset the temporal resolution can be increased from 30 days up to 1 day. With this, we show that the velocity drop observed is coseismic with the Parkfield earthquake.

  19. Analysis of temporal jitter in a copper vapor laser system.

    PubMed

    Durga Praveen Kumar, D; Gantayet, L M; Singh, Sunita; Rawat, A S; Rana, Paramjit; Rajasree, V; Agarwalla, Sandeep K; Chakravarthy, D P

    2012-02-01

    Temporal jitter in a magnetic pulse compression based copper vapor laser (CVL) system is analyzed by considering ripple present in the input dc power supply and ripple present in the magnetic core resetting power supply. It is shown that the jitter is a function of the ratio of operating voltage to the designed voltage, percentage ripple, and the total propagation delay of the magnetic pulse compression circuit. Experimental results from a CVL system operating at a repetition rate of 9 kHz are presented. PMID:22380123

  20. Temporal pattern processing in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Comins, Jordan A; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2014-10-01

    Understanding how the brain perceives, organizes and uses patterned information is directly related to the neurobiology of language. Given the present limitations, such knowledge at the scale of neurons, neural circuits and neural populations can only come from non-human models, focusing on shared capacities that are relevant to language processing. Here we review recent advances in the behavioral and neural basis of temporal pattern processing of natural auditory communication signals in songbirds, focusing on European starlings. We suggest a general inhibitory circuit for contextual modulation that can act to control sensory representations based on patterning rules. PMID:25201176

  1. Structured illumination temporal compressive microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Pang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We present a compressive video microscope based on structured illumination with incoherent light source. The source-side illumination coding scheme allows the emission photons being collected by the full aperture of the microscope objective, and thus is suitable for the fluorescence readout mode. A 2-step iterative reconstruction algorithm, termed BWISE, has been developed to address the mismatch between the illumination pattern size and the detector pixel size. Image sequences with a temporal compression ratio of 4:1 were demonstrated. PMID:27231586

  2. Temporal resolution enhancement from motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollason, M. P.; Watson, G. H.; Strens, M. J. A.

    2009-09-01

    We describe progress in the third year of the EMRS DTC TEP theme project entitled "Temporal Resolution Enhancement from Motion". The aim is to develop algorithms that combine evidence over time from a sequence of images in order to improve spatial resolution and reduce unwanted artefacts. Years one and two of this project developed and demonstrated an efficient algorithm that provided good resolution enhancement of a scene viewed in the far field (approximately flat) [1]. This paper reports a new algorithm which is applicable to a three dimensional scene where substantial depth variation causes parallax within the imagery. The new algorithm is demonstrated using airborne infra-red imagery.

  3. Applied Operations Research: Operator's Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    NASA operates high value critical equipment (HVCE) that requires trouble shooting, periodic maintenance and continued monitoring by Operations staff. The complexity HVCE and information required to maintain and trouble shoot HVCE to assure continued mission success as paper is voluminous. Training on new HVCE is commensurate with the need for equipment maintenance. LaRC Research Directorate has undertaken a proactive research to support Operations staff by initiation of the development and prototyping an electronic computer based portable maintenance aid (Operator's Assistant). This research established a goal with multiple objectives and a working prototype was developed. The research identified affordable solutions; constraints; demonstrated use of commercial off the shelf software; use of the US Coast Guard maintenance solution; NASA Procedure Representation Language; and the identification of computer system strategies; where these demonstrations and capabilities support the Operator, and maintenance. The results revealed validation against measures of effectiveness and overall proved a substantial training and capability sustainment tool. The research indicated that the OA could be deployed operationally at the LaRC Compressor Station with an expectation of satisfactorily results and to obtain additional lessons learned prior to deployment at other LaRC Research Directorate Facilities. The research revealed projected cost and time savings.

  4. Compact, Highly Stable Ion Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John

    2008-01-01

    A mercury-ion clock now at the breadboard stage of development (see figure) has a stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock: In tests, the clock exhibited an Allan deviation of between 2 x 10(exp -13) and 3 x 10(exp -13) at a measurement time of 1 second, averaging to about 10(exp -15) at 1 day. However, the clock occupies a volume of only about 2 liters . about a hundredth of the volume of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling parts of the apparatus are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein only a getter pump is used to maintain the vacuum. Hence, this apparatus is a prototype of a generation of small, potentially portable high-precision clocks for diverse ground- and space-based navigation and radio science applications. Furthermore, this new ion-clock technology is about 100 times more stable and precise than the rubidium atomic clocks currently in use in the NAV STAR GPS Earth-orbiting satellites. In this clock, mercury ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole linear radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, the ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a Hg-202 radio-frequency-discharge ultraviolet lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions resonant at frequency of about 40.507 GHz are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at that frequency. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling caused by wall collisions inherent to gas-cell clocks. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave- resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. The basic ion-shuttling, two-trap scheme as described thus far is not new: it has been the basis of designs of prior larger clocks. The novelty of the present development lies in major redesigns of its physics package (the ion traps and the vacuum and optical subsystems) to effect

  5. Chondroblastoma of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Miyako; De Donato, Giuseppe; Falcioni, Maurizio; Sanna, Mario

    2011-08-01

    Chondroblastomas are highly destructive tumors that are derived from immature cartilage cells. The occurrence of this tumor in the temporal bone or skull base is uncommon. Approximately 70 cases have previously been reported, several of which have involved the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We report here the case of a 67-year-old woman who presented with right-sided mixed hearing loss, a right external auditory canal mass, ear fullness, otalgia, blood-stained otorrhea, and pain around the TMJ, associated with difficulty in opening the mouth. CT and MRI revealed a mass involving the TMJ, infratemporal fossa, and pterygopalatine fossa. The patient underwent tumor resection via an infratemporal fossa approach type B. Gross total tumor removal was achieved, with no facial nerve paralysis or other complications observed after surgery. No recurrence or residual tumors were observed on CT and MRI, even after 7.5 years of follow-up. We conclude that temporal bone chondroblastomas are extremely rare and aggressive, but the outcome after appropriate surgical treatment is favorable. From the review, it may be particularly important to deal with tumors that involve the TMJ, which could affect the long-term outcomes, as well as tumor recurrence.

  6. Temporal asynchrony and spatial perception

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Maria; Polat, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Collinear facilitation is an enhancement in the visibility of a target by laterally placed iso-oriented flankers in a collinear (COL) configuration. Iso-oriented flankers placed in a non-collinear configuration (side-by-side, SBS) produce less facilitation. Surprisingly, presentation of both configurations simultaneously (ISO-CROSS) abolishes the facilitation rather than increases it - a phenomenon that can’t be fully explained by the spatial properties of the target and flankers. Based on our preliminary data and recent studies, we hypothesized that there might be a novel explanation based on the temporal properties of the excitation and inhibition, resulting in asynchrony between the lateral inputs received from COL and SBS, leading to cancelation of the facilitatory component in ISO-CROSS. We explored this effect using a detection task in humans. The results replicated the previous results showing that the preferred facilitation for COL and SBS was abolished for the ISO-CROSS configuration. However, presenting the SBS flankers, but not the COL flankers 20 msec before ISO-CROSS restored the facilitatory effect. We propose a novel explanation that the perceptual advantage of collinear facilitation may be cancelled by the delayed input from the sides; thus, the final perception is determined by the overall spatial-temporal integration of the lateral interactions. PMID:27460532

  7. Temporal Constraint Reasoning With Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, Lina; Morris, Paul; Morris, Robert; Rossi, Francesca

    2001-01-01

    A number of reasoning problems involving the manipulation of temporal information can naturally be viewed as implicitly inducing an ordering of potential local decisions involving time (specifically, associated with durations or orderings of events) on the basis of preferences. For example. a pair of events might be constrained to occur in a certain order, and, in addition. it might be preferable that the delay between them be as large, or as small, as possible. This paper explores problems in which a set of temporal constraints is specified, where each constraint is associated with preference criteria for making local decisions about the events involved in the constraint, and a reasoner must infer a complete solution to the problem such that, to the extent possible, these local preferences are met in the best way. A constraint framework for reasoning about time is generalized to allow for preferences over event distances and durations, and we study the complexity of solving problems in the resulting formalism. It is shown that while in general such problems are NP-hard, some restrictions on the shape of the preference functions, and on the structure of the preference set, can be enforced to achieve tractability. In these cases, a simple generalization of a single-source shortest path algorithm can be used to compute a globally preferred solution in polynomial time.

  8. Temporal integration in sensorimotor synchronization.

    PubMed

    Mates, J; Müller, U; Radil, T; Pöppel, E

    1994-01-01

    Abstract The concept of a temporal integration process in the timing mechanisms in the brain, postulated on the basis of experimental observations from various paradigms (for a review see P$oUppel, 1978), has been explored in a sensorimotor synchronization task. Subjects synchronized their finger taps to sequences of auditory stimuli with interstimulus-onset intervals (ISIs) between 300 and 4800 msec in different trials. Each tonal sequence consisted of 110 stimuli; the tones had a frequency of 500 Hz and a duration of 100 msec. As observed previously, response onsets preceded onsets of the stimuli by some tens of milliseconcls for ISIs in the range from about 600 to 1800 msec. For ISIs longer than or equal to 2400 msec, the ability to time the response sequence in such a way that the response 5 were placed right ahead of the stimuli started to break clown, i.e., the task was fulfilled by reactions to the stimuli rather than by advanced responses. This observation can he understood within the general framework of a temporal integration puce 55 that is supposed to have a maximal capacity (integration interval) of approximately 3 sec. Only if successive stimuli fall within one integration period, can motor programs be initiated properly by a prior stimulus and thus lead to an appropriate synchronization between the stimulus sequence and corresponding motor acts.

  9. Awareness of Temporal Lag is Necessary for Motor–Visual Temporal Recalibration

    PubMed Central

    Tsujita, Masaki; Ichikawa, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Consistent exposure to a temporal lag between observers' voluntary action and its visual feedback induced recalibration of temporal order perception between a motor action and a visual stimulus. It remains unclear what kinds of processing underlie this motor–visual temporal recalibration. This study examined the necessity of awareness of a temporal lag between a motor action and its visual feedback for motor–visual temporal recalibration. In Experiment 1, we allocated observers to either the multiple-step or single-step lag conditions. In the multiple-step lag condition, we first inserted a small temporal lag and subsequently increased it with progress of the adaptation period, to make observers unaware of the temporal lag during the adaptation period. In the single-step lag condition, we instructed observers about the temporal lag before adaptation, and inserted a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of the adaptation period to ensure that they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration only in the single-step lag condition. In Experiment 2, we exposed all observers to a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of adaptation period with no instruction about insertion of the temporal lag. We asked observers at the end of the experiment whether they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration for only observers who were aware of the lag. These results suggest that awareness of the temporal lag plays a crucial role in motor–visual temporal recalibration. PMID:26778983

  10. Operation Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Operation Galileo education program took off with the first of four flights on board a U.S. Air Force C-130 transport aircraft from Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Teachers from Mississippi and Louisiana participated in the program which aims to enhance math and science education of high-risk students by allowing junior high and middle school teachers, students and parents to fly in cargo and tanker aircraft during routine training missions. The Air Force Reserve created Operation Galileo, which was implemented by NASA's Educator Resource Center at Stennis.

  11. The accumulation of stable cytogenetic rearrangements with age-determined by chromosome painting

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, M.J.; Lee, D.A.; Senft, J.R.; Briner, J.F.; Moore, D.H. II; Tucker, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Chromosome painting is a rapid method of quantifying structural chromosomal rearrangements. The method is particularly useful for detecting stable aberrations which are difficult and expensive to quantify with classical methods. Translocations, being inherently stable, can be used as a biodosimeter for chronic and temporally-displaced exposure to radiation. Translocations may also be useful for quantifying chronic exposure to environmentally related agents which may result in an accumulation of cytogenetic damage with age. Because most chemical exposures are low and chronic, conventional cytogenetic methods are not expected to be informative. To understand the extent that age and lifestyle factors impact the frequency of stable aberrations, we used chromosome painting in healthy individuals who have not been occupationally or accidentally exposed to radiation or chemicals, and who have not received chemo- or radiotherapy. To date we have analyzed 15 umbilical cord bloods as well as peripheral blood samples from 83 adults aged up to 77 years. Because stable aberrations are rare in unexposed people, we have scored large numbers of cells from each subject. Thus far we have analyzed the equivalent of more than 78,000 metaphases from these 83 people, and have observed an average of 0.75% of cells with translocations or stable insertions. A significant curvilinear relationship with age is apparent (R{sup 2} = 0.69, p <0.00001). No effect with smoking was seen.

  12. Stable lithium electrodeposition in liquid and nanoporous solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A.

    2014-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium, sodium and aluminium metal-based batteries are among the most versatile platforms for high-energy, cost-effective electrochemical energy storage. Non-uniform metal deposition and dendrite formation on the negative electrode during repeated cycles of charge and discharge are major hurdles to commercialization of energy-storage devices based on each of these chemistries. A long-held view is that unstable electrodeposition is a consequence of inherent characteristics of these metals and their inability to form uniform electrodeposits on surfaces with inevitable defects. We report on electrodeposition of lithium in simple liquid electrolytes and in nanoporous solids infused with liquid electrolytes. We find that simple liquid electrolytes reinforced with halogenated salt blends exhibit stable long-term cycling at room temperature, often with no signs of deposition instabilities over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge and thousands of operating hours. We rationalize these observations with the help of surface energy data for the electrolyte/lithium interface and impedance analysis of the interface during different stages of cell operation. Our findings provide support for an important recent theoretical prediction that the surface mobility of lithium is significantly enhanced in the presence of lithium halide salts. Our results also show that a high electrolyte modulus is unnecessary for stable electrodeposition of lithium.

  13. Stable lithium electrodeposition in liquid and nanoporous solid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2014-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium, sodium and aluminium metal-based batteries are among the most versatile platforms for high-energy, cost-effective electrochemical energy storage. Non-uniform metal deposition and dendrite formation on the negative electrode during repeated cycles of charge and discharge are major hurdles to commercialization of energy-storage devices based on each of these chemistries. A long-held view is that unstable electrodeposition is a consequence of inherent characteristics of these metals and their inability to form uniform electrodeposits on surfaces with inevitable defects. We report on electrodeposition of lithium in simple liquid electrolytes and in nanoporous solids infused with liquid electrolytes. We find that simple liquid electrolytes reinforced with halogenated salt blends exhibit stable long-term cycling at room temperature, often with no signs of deposition instabilities over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge and thousands of operating hours. We rationalize these observations with the help of surface energy data for the electrolyte/lithium interface and impedance analysis of the interface during different stages of cell operation. Our findings provide support for an important recent theoretical prediction that the surface mobility of lithium is significantly enhanced in the presence of lithium halide salts. Our results also show that a high electrolyte modulus is unnecessary for stable electrodeposition of lithium.

  14. Large scale stochastic spatio-temporal modelling with PCRaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karssenberg, Derek; Drost, Niels; Schmitz, Oliver; de Jong, Kor; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2013-04-01

    PCRaster is a software framework for building spatio-temporal models of land surface processes (http://www.pcraster.eu). Building blocks of models are spatial operations on raster maps, including a large suite of operations for water and sediment routing. These operations are available to model builders as Python functions. The software comes with Python framework classes providing control flow for spatio-temporal modelling, Monte Carlo simulation, and data assimilation (Ensemble Kalman Filter and Particle Filter). Models are built by combining the spatial operations in these framework classes. This approach enables modellers without specialist programming experience to construct large, rather complicated models, as many technical details of modelling (e.g., data storage, solving spatial operations, data assimilation algorithms) are taken care of by the PCRaster toolbox. Exploratory modelling is supported by routines for prompt, interactive visualisation of stochastic spatio-temporal data generated by the models. The high computational requirements for stochastic spatio-temporal modelling, and an increasing demand to run models over large areas at high resolution, e.g. in global hydrological modelling, require an optimal use of available, heterogeneous computing resources by the modelling framework. Current work in the context of the eWaterCycle project is on a parallel implementation of the modelling engine, capable of running on a high-performance computing infrastructure such as clusters and supercomputers. Model runs will be distributed over multiple compute nodes and multiple processors (GPUs and CPUs). Parallelization will be done by parallel execution of Monte Carlo realizations and sub regions of the modelling domain. In our approach we use multiple levels of parallelism, improving scalability considerably. On the node level we will use OpenCL, the industry standard for low-level high performance computing kernels. To combine multiple nodes we will use

  15. CNTRO 2.0: A Harmonized Semantic Web Ontology for Temporal Relation Inferencing in Clinical Narratives.

    PubMed

    Tao, Cui; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2011-01-01

    The Clinical Narrative Temporal Relation Ontology (CNTRO) has been developed for the purpose of allowing temporal information of clinical data to be semantically annotated and queried, and using inference to expose new temporal features and relations based on the semantic assertions and definitions of the temporal aspects in the ontology. While CNTRO provides a formal semantic foundation to leverage the semantic-web techniques, it is still necessary to arrive at a shared set of semantics and operational rules with commonly used ontologies for the time domain. This paper introduces CNTRO 2.0, which tries to harmonize CNTRO 1.0 and a list of existing time ontologies or top-level ontologies into a unified model-an OWL based ontology of temporal relations for clinical research.

  16. Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma of the Petrous Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joy C.; Thorell, William E.; Treves, John S.; Fidler, Mary E.; Moore, Gary F.; Leibrock, Lyal G.

    2000-01-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is an unusual, benign bone lesion that most commonly affects the maxilla and mandible; skull involvement is rare. The etiology is uncertain but may be related to trauma. GCRG is difficult to distinguish from giant cell tumor of the bone and has a lower recurrence rate. Thirteen reports of temporal bone GCRG in 11 patients have been reported. One report of a petrous GCRG in a 3-year-old girl has been identified. A 38-year-old male presented with a 2-year history of fullness in his left ear, ipsilateral hearing loss, and intermittent cacosmia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large left-sided anterior temporal extradural mass. The patient underwent a left frontotemporal craniotomy and resection of a left temporal fossa tumor that involved the petrous and squamous parts of the temporal bone. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful, except for increased hearing loss secondary to opening of the epitympanum. Follow-up at one month revealed no other problems. Histopathology of the specimen was consistent with a giant cell reparative granuloma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2p91-aFigure 3 PMID:17171108

  17. Spatio-Temporal Credit Assignment in Neuronal Population Learning

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Johannes; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2011-01-01

    In learning from trial and error, animals need to relate behavioral decisions to environmental reinforcement even though it may be difficult to assign credit to a particular decision when outcomes are uncertain or subject to delays. When considering the biophysical basis of learning, the credit-assignment problem is compounded because the behavioral decisions themselves result from the spatio-temporal aggregation of many synaptic releases. We present a model of plasticity induction for reinforcement learning in a population of leaky integrate and fire neurons which is based on a cascade of synaptic memory traces. Each synaptic cascade correlates presynaptic input first with postsynaptic events, next with the behavioral decisions and finally with external reinforcement. For operant conditioning, learning succeeds even when reinforcement is delivered with a delay so large that temporal contiguity between decision and pertinent reward is lost due to intervening decisions which are themselves subject to delayed reinforcement. This shows that the model provides a viable mechanism for temporal credit assignment. Further, learning speeds up with increasing population size, so the plasticity cascade simultaneously addresses the spatial problem of assigning credit to synapses in different population neurons. Simulations on other tasks, such as sequential decision making, serve to contrast the performance of the proposed scheme to that of temporal difference-based learning. We argue that, due to their comparative robustness, synaptic plasticity cascades are attractive basic models of reinforcement learning in the brain. PMID:21738460

  18. Stable Isotope Enrichment Capabilities at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Egle, Brian; Aaron, W Scott; Hart, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Department of Energy Nuclear Physics Program have built a high-resolution Electromagnetic Isotope Separator (EMIS) as a prototype for reestablishing a US based enrichment capability for stable isotopes. ORNL has over 60 years of experience providing enriched stable isotopes and related technical services to the international accelerator target community, as well as medical, research, industrial, national security, and other communities. ORNL is investigating the combined use of electromagnetic and gas centrifuge isotope separation technologies to provide research quantities (milligram to several kilograms) of enriched stable isotopes. In preparation for implementing a larger scale production facility, a 10 mA high-resolution EMIS prototype has been built and tested. Initial testing of the device has simultaneously collected greater than 98% enriched samples of all the molybdenum isotopes from natural abundance feedstock.

  19. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    A new third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially NonOscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme for scalar and vector linear hyperbolic equations with piecewise continuous initial conditions is developed. The new scheme is proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions. In contrast to the existing high-resolution shock-capturing schemes, no assumption that the reconstruction should be total variation bounded (TVB) is explicitly required to prove stability of the new scheme. A rigorous truncation error analysis is presented showing that the accuracy of the 3rd-order ESWENO scheme is drastically improved if the tuning parameters of the weight functions satisfy certain criteria. Numerical results show that the new ESWENO scheme is stable and significantly outperforms the conventional third-order WENO finite difference scheme of Jiang and Shu in terms of accuracy, while providing essentially nonoscillatory solutions near strong discontinuities.

  20. Concentration of stable elements in food products

    SciTech Connect

    Montford, M.A.; Shank, K.E.; Hendricks, C.; Oakes, T.W.

    1980-01-01

    Food samples were taken from commercial markets and analyzed for stable element content. The concentrations of most stable elements (Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hf, I, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sr, Ta, Th, Ti, V, Zn, Zr) were determined using multiple-element neutron activation analysis, while the concentrations of other elements (Cd, Hg, Ni, Pb) were determined using atomic absorption. The relevance of the concentrations found are noted in relation to other literature values. An earlier study was extended to include the determination of the concentration of stable elements in home-grown products in the vicinity of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Comparisons between the commercial and local food-stuff values are discussed.

  1. Low work function, stable thin films

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Fehring, Jr., Edward J.; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2000-01-01

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  2. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    A third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme developed by Yamaleev and Carpenter was proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions of systems of linear hyperbolic equations. Herein, a systematic approach is presented that enables 'energy stable' modifications for existing WENO schemes of any order. The technique is demonstrated by developing a one-parameter family of fifth-order upwind-biased ESWENO schemes; ESWENO schemes up to eighth order are presented in the appendix. New weight functions are also developed that provide (1) formal consistency, (2) much faster convergence for smooth solutions with an arbitrary number of vanishing derivatives, and (3) improved resolution near strong discontinuities.

  3. Stable isotope and elemental analysis in ants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chris R; Tillberg, Chadwick V

    2009-07-01

    Over the past 20 yr, the use of stable isotopes to infer feeding ecology and the examination of how energetic and elemental exchanges are affected by and affect life (ecological stoichiometry) have gained momentum. The ecological diversity of ants makes them interesting models to explore dietary ecology and their role in food webs. Moreover, their ecological dominance in most habitats facilitates sampling. The protocol described here will produce samples adequate for submission to most labs that specialize in high-throughput analysis of stable isotopes; one should check with any particular lab for specific submission instructions. Note, however, that this protocol is designed specifically for the quantification of the natural abundance of stable isotopes; it does not cover the preparation of trace samples. PMID:20147207

  4. From EGEE Operations Portal towards EGI Operations Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Hélène; L'Orphelin, Cyril; Reynaud, Sylvain; Lequeux, Olivier; Loikkanen, Sinikka; Veyre, Pierre

    Grid operators in EGEE have been using a dedicated dashboard as their central operational tool, stable and scalable for the last 5 years despite continuous upgrade from specifications by users, monitoring tools or data providers. In EGEE-III, recent regionalisation of operations led the Operations Portal developers to conceive a standalone instance of this tool. We will see how the dashboard reorganization paved the way for the re-engineering of the portal itself. The outcome is an easily deployable package customized with relevant information sources and specific decentralized operational requirements. This package is composed of a generic and scalable data access mechanism, Lavoisier; a renowned php framework for configuration flexibility, Symfony and a MySQL database. VO life cycle and operational information, EGEE broadcast and Downtime notifications are next for the major reorganization until all other key features of the Operations Portal are migrated to the framework. Features specifications will be sketched at the same time to adapt to EGI requirements and to upgrade. Future work on feature regionalisation, on new advanced features or strategy planning will be tracked in EGI- Inspire through the Operations Tools Advisory Group, OTAG, where all users, customers and third parties of the Operations Portal are represented from January 2010.

  5. Declined Neural Efficiency in Cognitively Stable Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Thomas; Yakupov, Renat; Nakama, Helenna; Crocket, Grace; Cole, Michael; Watters, Michael; Ricardo-Dukelow, Mary Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether brain activation changes in clinically and neurocognitively normal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected and in HIV-seronegative control (SN) participants over a 1-year period. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in 32 SN and 31 HIV patients (all with stable combination antiretroviral treatment) at baseline and after 1 year. Each participant performed a set of visual attention tasks with increasing attentional load (from tracking two, three, or four balls). All HIV and SN participants had normal neuropsychological function at both examinations. Results Over 1 year, HIV patients showed no change in their neurocognitive status or in task performance during fMRI. However, HIV patients showed significant 1-year increases in fMRI signals in the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices for the more difficult tasks, whereas SN control participants showed only decreases in brain activation in these regions. This resulted in significant interactions between HIV status and time of study in left insula, left parietal, left temporal, and several frontal regions (left and right middle frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate). Interpretation Because fMRI task performance remained unchanged in both groups, the HIV patients appeared to maintain performance by increasing usage of the attention network, whereas the control participants reduced usage of the attention network after 1 year. These findings suggest improved efficiency or a practice effect in the SN participants but declined efficiency of the neural substrate in HIV patients, possibly because of ongoing brain injury associated with the HIV infection, despite their apparent stable clinical course. PMID:19334060

  6. Subterranean Sympatry: An Investigation into Diet Using Stable Isotope Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Gillian N.; Woodborne, Stephan; Bennett, Nigel C.

    2012-01-01

    In the Western Cape three species of mole-rat occur in sympatry, however, little is known about differences in their dietary preferences. Dietary composition of the three species; the common mole-rat (Cryptomys hottentotus hottentotus), the Cape mole-rat (Georychus capensis) and the Cape dune mole-rat (Bathyergus suillus) were examined using stable isotope analysis. Blood, fur and claw samples were collected from 70 mole-rats, in addition to several potential food items, to assess food selection of the three species under natural conditions. Overall there was a significant difference in the isotopic composition (δ13C and δ15N) between all three species and significant differences in their diet composition. There were also significant differences between tissues in all three species suggesting temporal variation in diet. The small size and colonial lifestyle of C. h. hottentotus allows it to feed almost 100% on bulbs, while the solitary and larger species G. capensis and B. suillus fed to a greater extent on other resources such as grasses and clover. B. suillus, the largest of the species, had the most generalized diet. However, overall all species relied most heavily upon geophytes and consumed the same species suggesting competition for resources could exist. We also showed a high level of individual variation in diet choices. This was most pronounced in B. suillus and G. capensis and less so in C. h. hottentotus. We demonstrate that stable isotope analysis can successfully be applied to examine dietary patterns in subterranean mammals and provide insights into foraging patterns and dietary variation at both the inter and intra population level. PMID:23139795

  7. Stable water isotope and surface heat flux simulation using ISOLSM: Evaluation against in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Mick Y.; Wang, Lixin; Parkes, Stephen D.; Strauss, Josiah; McCabe, Matthew F.; Evans, Jason P.; Griffiths, Alan D.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotopes of water are useful tracers of water sources and hydrological processes. Stable water isotope-enabled land surface modeling is a relatively new approach for characterizing the hydrological cycle, providing spatial and temporal variability for a number of hydrological processes. At the land surface, the integration of stable water isotopes with other meteorological measurements can assist in constraining surface heat flux estimates and discriminate between evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). However, research in this area has traditionally been limited by a lack of continuous in-situ isotopic observations. Here, the National Centre for Atmospheric Research stable isotope-enabled Land Surface Model (ISOLSM) is used to simulate the water and energy fluxes and stable water isotope variations. The model was run for a period of one month with meteorological data collected from a coastal sub-tropical site near Sydney, Australia. The modeled energy fluxes (latent heat and sensible heat) agreed reasonably well with eddy covariance observations, indicating that ISOLSM has the capacity to reproduce observed flux behavior. Comparison of modeled isotopic compositions of evapotranspiration (ET) against in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured bulk water vapor isotopic data (10 m above the ground), however, showed differences in magnitude and temporal patterns. The disparity is due to a small contribution from local ET fluxes to atmospheric boundary layer water vapor (∼1% based on calculations using ideal gas law) relative to that advected from the ocean for this particular site. Using ISOLSM simulation, the ET was partitioned into E and T with 70% being T. We also identified that soil water from different soil layers affected T and E differently based on the simulated soil isotopic patterns, which reflects the internal working of ISOLSM. These results highlighted the capacity of using the isotope-enabled models to discriminate

  8. Spatio-temporal variation in European starling reproductive success at multiple small spatial scales

    PubMed Central

    Brickhill, Daisy; Evans, Peter GH; Reid, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding population dynamics requires spatio-temporal variation in demography to be measured across appropriate spatial and temporal scales. However, the most appropriate spatial scale(s) may not be obvious, few datasets cover sufficient time periods, and key demographic rates are often incompletely measured. Consequently, it is often assumed that demography will be spatially homogeneous within populations that lack obvious subdivision. Here, we quantify small-scale spatial and temporal variation in a key demographic rate, reproductive success (RS), within an apparently contiguous population of European starlings. We used hierarchical cluster analysis to define spatial clusters of nest sites at multiple small spatial scales and long-term data to test the hypothesis that small-scale spatio-temporal variation in RS occurred. RS was measured as the number of chicks alive ca. 12 days posthatch either per first brood or per nest site per breeding season (thereby incorporating multiple breeding attempts). First brood RS varied substantially among spatial clusters and years. Furthermore, the pattern of spatial variation was stable across years; some nest clusters consistently produced more chicks than others. Total seasonal RS also varied substantially among spatial clusters and years. However, the magnitude of variation was much larger and the pattern of spatial variation was no longer temporally consistent. Furthermore, the estimated magnitude of spatial variation in RS was greater at smaller spatial scales. We thereby demonstrate substantial spatial, temporal, and spatio-temporal variation in RS occurring at very small spatial scales. We show that the estimated magnitude of this variation depended on spatial scale and that spatio-temporal variation would not have been detected if season-long RS had not been measured. Such small-scale spatio-temporal variation should be incorporated into empirical and theoretical treatments of population dynamics. PMID:26380670

  9. Effects of oral supplementation with stable strontium

    PubMed Central

    Skoryna, Stanley C.

    1981-01-01

    The biologic effects of stable strontium, a naturally occurring trace element in the diet and the body, have been little investigated. This paper discusses the effects of oral supplementation with stable strontium in laboratory studies and clinical investigations. The extent of intestinal absorption of various doses of orally administered strontium was estimated by determining serum and tissue levels with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The central observation is that increased oral intake produces a direct increase in serum levels and intracellular uptake of strontium. The results of these studies, as well as those of other investigators, demonstrate that a moderate dosage of stable strontium does not adversely affect the level of calcium either in the serum or in soft tissues. In studies of patients receiving 1 to 1.5 g/d of strontium gluconate, a sustained increase in the serum level of strontium produced a 100-fold increase in the strontium:calcium ratio. In rats, studies indicate that an increase in intracellular strontium content following supplementation may exert a protective effect on mitochondrial structure, probably by means of a stabilizing effect of strontium on membranes. The strontium:calcium ratio in animals receiving a standard diet is higher in the cell than in the extracellular fluid; this may be of physiologic significance. An increase in density that corresponded to the deposition of stable strontium was observed in areas of bone lesions due to metastatic cancer in patients receiving stable strontium supplementation. This suggests the possibility of using strontium to mineralize osteophenic areas and to relieve bone pain. Also, because of reports of an inverse relation between the incidence of dental caries and a high strontium content in drinking water, the use of natural water containing relatively high levels of stable strontium should be considered. In each of these instances it is important to maintain a normal dietary intake of

  10. Effects of oral supplementation with stable strontium.

    PubMed

    Skoryna, S C

    1981-10-01

    The biologic effects of stable strontium, a naturally occurring trace element in the diet and the body, have been little investigated. This paper discusses the effects of oral supplementation with stable strontium in laboratory studies and clinical investigations. The extent of intestinal absorption of various doses of orally administered strontium was estimated by determining serum and tissue levels with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The central observation is that increased oral intake produces a direct increase in serum levels and intracellular uptake of strontium. The results of these studies, as well as those of other investigators, demonstrate that a moderate dosage of stable strontium does not adversely affect the level of calcium either in the serum or in soft tissues. In studies of patients receiving 1 to 1.5 g/d of strontium gluconate, a sustained increase in the serum level of strontium produced a 100-fold increase in the strontium:calcium ratio. In rats, studies indicate that an increase in intracellular strontium content following supplementation may exert a protective effect on mitochondrial structure, probably by means of a stabilizing effect of strontium on membranes. The strontium:calcium ratio in animals receiving a standard diet is higher in the cell than in the extracellular fluid; this may be of physiologic significance.An increase in density that corresponded to the deposition of stable strontium was observed in areas of bone lesions due to metastatic cancer in patients receiving stable strontium supplementation. This suggests the possibility of using strontium to mineralize osteophenic areas and to relieve bone pain. Also, because of reports of an inverse relation between the incidence of dental caries and a high strontium content in drinking water, the use of natural water containing relatively high levels of stable strontium should be considered. In each of these instances it is important to maintain a normal dietary intake of

  11. Treating autism by targeting the temporal lobes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Richard P; Snyder, Allan W

    2014-11-01

    Compelling new findings suggest that an early core signature of autism is a deficient left anterior temporal lobe response to language and an atypical over-activation of the right anterior temporal lobe. Intriguingly, our recent results from an entirely different line of reasoning and experiments also show that applying cathodal stimulation (suppressing) at the left anterior temporal lobe together with anodal stimulation (facilitating) at the right anterior temporal lobe, by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), can induce some autistic-like cognitive abilities in otherwise normal adults. If we could briefly induce autistic like cognitive abilities in healthy individuals, it follows that we might be able to mitigate some autistic traits by reversing the above stimulation protocol, in an attempt to restore the typical dominance of the left anterior temporal lobe. Accordingly, we hypothesize that at least some autistic traits can be mitigated, by applying anodal stimulation (facilitating) at the left anterior temporal lobe together with cathodal stimulation (suppressing) at the right anterior temporal lobe. Our hypothesis is supported by strong convergent evidence that autistic symptoms can emerge and later reverse due to the onset and subsequent recovery of various temporal lobe (predominantly the left) pathologies. It is also consistent with evidence that the temporal lobes (especially the left) are a conceptual hub, critical for extracting meaning from lower level sensory information to form a coherent representation, and that a deficit in the temporal lobes underlies autistic traits.

  12. Operation Uplift...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NJEA Review, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Article described a model policy on student care and counseling for prevention of drug and alcohol dependency. It was adopted by the Department of School Nurses through funding by the National Education Association for Operation Uplift--Better Health for Better Learning. (Author/RK)

  13. Operations Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Edward T.

    1984-01-01

    Describes operations research as an important management tool that can aid library managers in effectively using available resources and as a set of analytical tools that can enable researchers to better understand library and information services. Early history, definition, models, applications to libraries, and impact are noted. Twenty-five…

  14. Operating Efficiently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The ailing economy has spared few schools and universities. Faced with funding cutbacks, most education administrators have had to make difficult choices about where to allocate dwindling resources. Even in the best of financial times, educating students is the first priority. When money is tight, school maintenance and operations (M&O) programs…

  15. Spectro-temporal weighting of loudness.

    PubMed

    Oberfeld, Daniel; Heeren, Wiebke; Rennies, Jan; Verhey, Jesko

    2012-01-01

    Real-world sounds like speech or traffic noise typically exhibit spectro-temporal variability because the energy in different spectral regions evolves differently as a sound unfolds in time. However, it is currently not well understood how the energy in different spectral and temporal portions contributes to loudness. This study investigated how listeners weight different temporal and spectral components of a sound when judging its overall loudness. Spectral weights were measured for the combination of three loudness-matched narrowband noises with different center frequencies. To measure temporal weights, 1,020-ms stimuli were presented, which randomly changed in level every 100 ms. Temporal weights were measured for each narrowband noise separately, and for a broadband noise containing the combination of the three noise bands. Finally, spectro-temporal weights were measured with stimuli where the level of the three narrowband noises randomly and independently changed every 100 ms. The data consistently showed that (i) the first 300 ms of the sounds had a greater influence on overall loudness perception than later temporal portions (primacy effect), and (ii) the lowest noise band contributed significantly more to overall loudness than the higher bands. The temporal weights did not differ between the three frequency bands. Notably, the spectral weights and temporal weights estimated from the conditions with only spectral or only temporal variability were very similar to the corresponding weights estimated in the spectro-temporal condition. The results indicate that the temporal and the spectral weighting of the loudness of a time-varying sound are independent processes. The spectral weights remain constant across time, and the temporal weights do not change across frequency. The results are discussed in the context of current loudness models.

  16. Spectro-Temporal Weighting of Loudness

    PubMed Central

    Oberfeld, Daniel; Heeren, Wiebke; Rennies, Jan; Verhey, Jesko

    2012-01-01

    Real-world sounds like speech or traffic noise typically exhibit spectro-temporal variability because the energy in different spectral regions evolves differently as a sound unfolds in time. However, it is currently not well understood how the energy in different spectral and temporal portions contributes to loudness. This study investigated how listeners weight different temporal and spectral components of a sound when judging its overall loudness. Spectral weights were measured for the combination of three loudness-matched narrowband noises with different center frequencies. To measure temporal weights, 1,020-ms stimuli were presented, which randomly changed in level every 100 ms. Temporal weights were measured for each narrowband noise separately, and for a broadband noise containing the combination of the three noise bands. Finally, spectro-temporal weights were measured with stimuli where the level of the three narrowband noises randomly and independently changed every 100 ms. The data consistently showed that (i) the first 300 ms of the sounds had a greater influence on overall loudness perception than later temporal portions (primacy effect), and (ii) the lowest noise band contributed significantly more to overall loudness than the higher bands. The temporal weights did not differ between the three frequency bands. Notably, the spectral weights and temporal weights estimated from the conditions with only spectral or only temporal variability were very similar to the corresponding weights estimated in the spectro-temporal condition. The results indicate that the temporal and the spectral weighting of the loudness of a time-varying sound are independent processes. The spectral weights remain constant across time, and the temporal weights do not change across frequency. The results are discussed in the context of current loudness models. PMID:23209670

  17. Stable isotope labeling methods for DNA.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Frank H T; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Heus, Hans A

    2016-08-01

    NMR is a powerful method for studying proteins and nucleic acids in solution. The study of nucleic acids by NMR is far more challenging than for proteins, which is mainly due to the limited number of building blocks and unfavorable spectral properties. For NMR studies of DNA molecules, (site specific) isotope enrichment is required to facilitate specific NMR experiments and applications. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of isotope-labeling strategies for obtaining stable isotope labeled DNA as well as specifically stable isotope labeled building blocks required for enzymatic DNA synthesis. PMID:27573183

  18. Stable isotopes in Lithuanian bioarcheological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipityte, Raminta; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of bioarcheological material of ancient human populations allows us to understand the subsistence behavior associated with various adaptations to the environment. Feeding habits are essential to the survival and growth of ancient populations. Stable isotope analysis is accepted tool in paleodiet (Schutkowski et al, 1999) and paleoenvironmental (Zernitskaya et al, 2014) studies. However, stable isotopes can be useful not only in investigating human feeding habits but also in describing social and cultural structure of the past populations (Le Huray and Schutkowski, 2005). Only few stable isotope investigations have been performed before in Lithuanian region suggesting a quite uniform diet between males and females and protein intake from freshwater fish and animal protein. Previously, stable isotope analysis has only been used to study a Stone Age population however, more recently studies have been conducted on Iron Age and Late medieval samples (Jacobs et al, 2009). Anyway, there was a need for more precise examination. Stable isotope analysis were performed on human bone collagen and apatite samples in this study. Data represented various ages (from 5-7th cent. to 18th cent.). Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis on medieval populations indicated that individuals in studied sites in Lithuania were almost exclusively consuming C3 plants, C3 fed terrestrial animals, and some freshwater resources. Current investigation demonstrated social differences between elites and country people and is promising in paleodietary and daily life reconstruction. Acknowledgement I thank prof. dr. G. Grupe, Director of the Anthropological and Palaeoanatomical State Collection in Munich for providing the opportunity to work in her laboratory. The part of this work was funded by DAAD. Antanaitis-Jacobs, Indre, et al. "Diet in early Lithuanian prehistory and the new stable isotope evidence." Archaeologia Baltica 12 (2009): 12-30. Le Huray, Jonathan D., and Holger

  19. MHD stable regime of the tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Furth, H.P.; Boozer, A.H.

    1986-10-01

    A broad family of tokamak current profiles is found to be stable against ideal and resistive MHD kink modes for 1 less than or equal to q(0), with q(a) as low 2. For 0.5 less than or equal to q(0) < and q(a) > 1, current profiles can be found that are unstable only to the m = 1, n = 1 mode. A specific ''optimal'' tokamak profile can be selected from the range of stable solutions, by imposing a common upper limit on dj/dr - corresponding in ohmic equilibrium to a limitation of dT/sub e//dr by anomalous transport.

  20. Auditory Evoked Fields Elicited by Spectral, Temporal, and Spectral–Temporal Changes in Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Teismann, Henning; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo

    2012-01-01

    Natural sounds contain complex spectral components, which are temporally modulated as time-varying signals. Recent studies have suggested that the auditory system encodes spectral and temporal sound information differently. However, it remains unresolved how the human brain processes sounds containing both spectral and temporal changes. In the present study, we investigated human auditory evoked responses elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral–temporal sound changes by means of magnetoencephalography. The auditory evoked responses elicited by the spectral–temporal change were very similar to those elicited by the spectral change, but those elicited by the temporal change were delayed by 30–50 ms and differed from the others in morphology. The results suggest that human brain responses corresponding to spectral sound changes precede those corresponding to temporal sound changes, even when the spectral and temporal changes occur simultaneously. PMID:22593751

  1. Hourly temporal distribution of wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligiannis, Ilias; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2016-04-01

    The wind process is essential for hydrometeorology and additionally, is one of the basic renewable energy resources. Most stochastic forecast models are limited up to daily scales disregarding the hourly scale which is significant for renewable energy management. Here, we analyze hourly wind timeseries giving emphasis on the temporal distribution of wind within the day. We finally present a periodic model based on statistical as well as hydrometeorological reasoning that shows good agreement with data. Acknowledgement: This research is conducted within the frame of the undergraduate course "Stochastic Methods in Water Resources" of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The School of Civil Engineering of NTUA provided moral support for the participation of the students in the Assembly.

  2. Multiobjective optimization of temporal processes.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhe; Kusiak, Andrew

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents a dynamic predictive-optimization framework of a nonlinear temporal process. Data-mining (DM) and evolutionary strategy algorithms are integrated in the framework for solving the optimization model. DM algorithms learn dynamic equations from the process data. An evolutionary strategy algorithm is then applied to solve the optimization problem guided by the knowledge extracted by the DM algorithm. The concept presented in this paper is illustrated with the data from a power plant, where the goal is to maximize the boiler efficiency and minimize the limestone consumption. This multiobjective optimization problem can be either transformed into a single-objective optimization problem through preference aggregation approaches or into a Pareto-optimal optimization problem. The computational results have shown the effectiveness of the proposed optimization framework. PMID:19900853

  3. Establishing operations

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Jack

    1993-01-01

    The first two books on behavior analysis (Skinner, 1938; Keller & Schoenfeld, 1950) had chapter-length coverage of motivation. The next generation of texts also had chapters on the topic, but by the late 1960s it was no longer being given much treatment in the behavior-analytic literature. The present failure to deal with the topic leaves a gap in our understanding of operant functional relations. A partial solution is to reintroduce the concept of the establishing operation, defined as an environmental event, operation, or stimulus condition that affects an organism by momentarily altering (a) the reinforcing effectiveness of other events and (b) the frequency of occurrence of that part of the organism's repertoire relevant to those events as consequences. Discriminative and motivative variables can be distinguished as follows: The former are related to the differential availability of an effective form of reinforcement given a particular type of behavior; the latter are related to the differential reinforcing effectiveness of environmental events. An important distinction can also be made between unconditioned establishing operations (UEOs), such as food deprivation and painful stimulation, and conditioned establishing operations (CEOs) that depend on the learning history of the organism. One type of CEO is a stimulus that has simply been paired with a UEO and as a result may take on some of the motivative properties of that UEO. The warning stimulus in avoidance procedures is another important type of CEO referred to as reflexive because it establishes its own termination as a form of reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has accomplished such termination. Another CEO is closely related to the concept of conditional conditioned reinforcement and is referred to as a transitive CEO, because it establishes some other stimulus as a form of effective reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has produced that other stimulus. The multiple control of human

  4. Reclaimed mineland curve number response to temporal distribution of rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, R.C.; Agouridis, C.T.; Vingralek, P.T.; Fogle, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    The curve number (CN) method is a common technique to estimate runoff volume, and it is widely used in coal mining operations such as those in the Appalachian region of Kentucky. However, very little CN data are available for watersheds disturbed by surface mining and then reclaimed using traditional techniques. Furthermore, as the CN method does not readily account for variations in infiltration rates due to varying rainfall distributions, the selection of a single CN value to encompass all temporal rainfall distributions could lead engineers to substantially under- or over-size water detention structures used in mining operations or other land uses such as development. Using rainfall and runoff data from a surface coal mine located in the Cumberland Plateau of eastern Kentucky, CNs were computed for conventionally reclaimed lands. The effects of temporal rainfall distributions on CNs was also examined by classifying storms as intense, steady, multi-interval intense, or multi-interval steady. Results indicate that CNs for such reclaimed lands ranged from 62 to 94 with a mean value of 85. Temporal rainfall distributions were also shown to significantly affect CN values with intense storms having significantly higher CNs than multi-interval storms. These results indicate that a period of recovery is present between rainfall bursts of a multi-interval storm that allows depressional storage and infiltration rates to rebound. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association.

  5. Motor activity improves temporal expectancy.

    PubMed

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  6. Motor activity improves temporal expectancy.

    PubMed

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments.

  7. Synaptic encoding of temporal contiguity

    PubMed Central

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Fusi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Often we need to perform tasks in an environment that changes stochastically. In these situations it is important to learn the statistics of sequences of events in order to predict the future and the outcome of our actions. The statistical description of many of these sequences can be reduced to the set of probabilities that a particular event follows another event (temporal contiguity). Under these conditions, it is important to encode and store in our memory these transition probabilities. Here we show that for a large class of synaptic plasticity models, the distribution of synaptic strengths encodes transitions probabilities. Specifically, when the synaptic dynamics depend on pairs of contiguous events and the synapses can remember multiple instances of the transitions, then the average synaptic weights are a monotonic function of the transition probabilities. The synaptic weights converge to the distribution encoding the probabilities also when the correlations between consecutive synaptic modifications are considered. We studied how this distribution depends on the number of synaptic states for a specific model of a multi-state synapse with hard bounds. In the case of bistable synapses, the average synaptic weights are a smooth function of the transition probabilities and the accuracy of the encoding depends on the learning rate. As the number of synaptic states increases, the average synaptic weights become a step function of the transition probabilities. We finally show that the information stored in the synaptic weights can be read out by a simple rate-based neural network. Our study shows that synapses encode transition probabilities under general assumptions and this indicates that temporal contiguity is likely to be encoded and harnessed in almost every neural circuit in the brain. PMID:23641210

  8. Motor Activity Improves Temporal Expectancy

    PubMed Central

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  9. Improving the algorithm of temporal relation propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jifeng; Xu, Dan; Liu, Tongming

    2005-03-01

    In the military Multi Agent System, every agent needs to analyze the temporal relationships among the tasks or combat behaviors, and it"s very important to reflect the battlefield situation in time. The temporal relation among agents is usually very complex, and we model it with interval algebra (IA) network. Therefore an efficient temporal reasoning algorithm is vital in battle MAS model. The core of temporal reasoning is path consistency algorithm, an efficient path consistency algorithm is necessary. In this paper we used the Interval Matrix Calculus (IMC) method to represent the temporal relation, and optimized the path consistency algorithm by improving the efficiency of propagation of temporal relation based on the Allen's path consistency algorithm.

  10. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Surface Soil Moisture in Evaluating Ground Truth Monitoring Sites for Remotely Sensed Observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil moisture is an intrinsic state variable that varies considerably in space and time. Although soil moisture is highly variable, repeated measurements of soil moisture at the field or small watershed scale can often reveal certain locations as being temporally stable and representative of the are...

  11. Utilizing AI in Temporal, Spatial, and Resource Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stottler, Richard; Kalton, Annaka; Bell, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Aurora is a software system enabling the rapid, easy solution of complex scheduling problems involving spatial and temporal constraints among operations and scarce resources (such as equipment, workspace, and human experts). Although developed for use in the International Space Station Processing Facility, Aurora is flexible enough that it can be easily customized for application to other scheduling domains and adapted as the requirements change or become more precisely known over time. Aurora s scheduling module utilizes artificial-intelligence (AI) techniques to make scheduling decisions on the basis of domain knowledge, including knowledge of constraints and their relative importance, interdependencies among operations, and possibly frequent changes in governing schedule requirements. Unlike many other scheduling software systems, Aurora focuses on resource requirements and temporal scheduling in combination. For example, Aurora can accommodate a domain requirement to schedule two subsequent operations to locations adjacent to a shared resource. The graphical interface allows the user to quickly visualize the schedule and perform changes reflecting additional knowledge or alterations in the situation. For example, the user might drag the activity corresponding to the start of operations to reflect a late delivery.

  12. Operation Poorman

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, N.; Tsitouras, J.

    1981-03-18

    The objectives of Operation Poorman were to design and build a portable seismic system and to set up and use this system in a cold-weather environment. The equipment design uses current technology to achieve a low-power, lightweight system that is configured into three modules. The system was deployed in Alaska during wintertime, and the results provide a basis for specifying a mission-ready seismic verification system.

  13. UNCERTAINTY IN SOURCE PARTITIONING USING STABLE ISOTOPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope analyses are often used to quantify the contribution of multiple sources to a mixture, such as proportions of food sources in an animal's diet, C3 vs. C4 plant inputs to soil organic carbon, etc. Linear mixing models can be used to partition two sources with a sin...

  14. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1996-02-27

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw`s Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements. 32 figs.

  15. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1996-01-01

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw's Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements.

  16. Substitution of stable isotopes in Chlorella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.; Uphaus, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Replacement of biologically important isotopes in the alga Chlorella by corresponding heavier stable isotopes produces increasingly greater deviations from the normal cell size and changes the quality and distribution of certain cellular components. The usefulness of isotopically altered organisms increases interest in the study of such permuted organisms.

  17. Delayed-choice Measurement and Temporal Nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ilki; Mahler, Günter

    2001-02-01

    We study for a composite quantum system with a quantum Turing architecture the temporal non-locality of quantum mechanics by using the temporal Bell inequality, which will be derived for a discretized network dynamics by identifying the subsystem indices with (discrete) parameter time. However, the direct "observation" of the quantum system will lead to no violation of the temporal Bell inequality and to consistent histories of any subsystem. Its violation can be demonstrated, though, for a delayedchoice measurement

  18. The Temporal Configuration of Airline Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burghouwt, Guillaume; deWit, Jaap

    2003-01-01

    The deregulation of US aviation in 1978 resulted in the reconfiguration of airline networks into hub-and-spoke systems, spatially concentrated around a small number of central airports or 'hubs' through which an airline operates a number of daily waves of flights. A hub-and-spoke network requires a concentration of traffic in both space and time. In contrast to the U.S. airlines, European airlines had entered the phase of spatial network concentration long before deregulation. Bilateral negotiation of traffic fights between governments forced European airlines to focus their networks spatially on small number of 'national' airports. In general, these star-shaped networks were not coordinated in time. Transfer opportunities at central airports were mostly created 'by accident'. With the deregulation of the EU air transport market from 1988 on, a second phase of airline network concentration started. European airlines concentrated their networks in time by adopting or intensifying wave-system structures in their flight schedules. Temporal concentration may increase the competitive position of the network in a deregulated market because of certain cost and demand advantages.

  19. Determining Spatio-Temporal Cadastral Data Requirement for Infrastructure of Ladm for Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, M.; Polat, Z. A.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, the nature of land title and cadastral (LTC) data in the Turkey is dynamic from a temporal perspective which depends on the LTC operations. Functional requirements with respect to the characteristics are investigated based upon interviews of professionals in public and private sectors. These are; Legal authorities, Land Registry and Cadastre offices, Highway departments, Foundations, Ministries of Budget, Transportation, Justice, Public Works and Settlement, Environment and Forestry, Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Culture and Internal Affairs, State Institute of Statistics (SIS), execution offices, tax offices, real estate offices, private sector, local governments and banks. On the other hand, spatio-temporal LTC data very important component for creating infrastructure of Land Administration Model (LADM). For this reason, spatio-temporal LTC data needs for LADM not only updated but also temporal. The investigations ended up with determine temporal analyses of LTC data, traditional LTC system and tracing temporal analyses in traditional LTC system. In the traditional system, the temporal analyses needed by all these users could not be performed in a rapid and reliable way. The reason for this is that the traditional LTC system is a manual archiving system. The aims and general contents of this paper: (1) define traditional LTC system of Turkey; (2) determining the need for spatio-temporal LTC data and analyses for core domain model for LADM. As a results of temporal and spatio-temporal analysis LTC data needs, new system design is important for the Turkish LADM model. Designing and realizing an efficient and functional Temporal Geographic Information Systems (TGIS) is inevitable for the Turkish LADM core infrastructure. Finally this paper outcome is creating infrastructure for design and develop LADM for Turkey.

  20. Temporal variability of particulate organic carbon in the lower Changjiang (Yangtze River) in the post-Three Gorges Dam period: Links to anthropogenic and climate impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Bao, Hongyan; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Jing; Kattner, Gerhard

    2015-11-01

    Suspended particles from the lower Changjiang were collected monthly from 2003 to 2011, which corresponds to the three construction periods of the Three Gorges Dam. Organic carbon (%OC), organic carbon to total nitrogen molar ratio, stable carbon isotope, and terrestrial biomarkers were examined. Rating curve studies were applied for the temporal trend analysis. The composition of particulate lignin phenols exhibited clear annual and periodic variations but only minor seasonal changes. Lignin phenol ratios (vanillyl/syringyl and cinnamyl/vanillyl) indicated that the terrigenous organic matter (OM) was primarily composed of woody and nonwoody tissue derived from angiosperm plants. The low-lignin phenol yields (Λ8) in combination with higher acid to aldehyde ratios reflected a substantial contribution from soil OM to the particle samples or modifications during river transport. The temporal shift of the lignin phenol vegetation index with the sediment load during the flood seasons revealed particulate organic matter (POM) erosion from soils and the impact of hydrodynamic processes. The dam operations affected the seasonal variability of terrigenous OM fluxes, although the covariation of lignin and sediment loads with discharged water implies that unseasonal extreme conditions and climate change most likely had larger influences, because decreases in the sediment load and lignin flux alter the structure and composition of particulate OM (POM) on interannual time scales, indicating that they may be driven by climate variability. The modification of the composition and structure of POM will have significant impacts on regional carbon cycles and marine ecosystems.

  1. Concurrent design of a morphing aerofoil with variable stiffness bi-stable laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuder, I. K.; Fasel, U.; Ermanni, P.; Arrieta, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    Morphing systems able to efficiently adjust their characteristics to resolve the conflicting demands of changing operating conditions offer great potential for enhanced performance and functionality. The main practical challenge, however, consists in combining the desired compliance to accomplish radical reversible geometry modifications at reduced actuation effort with the requirement of high stiffness imposed by operational functions. A potential decoupling strategy entails combining the conformal shape adaptation benefits of distributed compliance with purely elastic stiffness variability provided by embedded bi-stable laminates. This selective compliance can allow for on-demand stiffness adaptation by switching between the stable states of the internal elements. The current paper considers the optimal positioning of the bi-stable components within the structure while assessing the energy required for morphing under aerodynamic loading. Compared to a time-invariant system, activating specific deformation modes permits decreasing the amount of actuation energy, and hence the amount of actuation material to be carried. A concurrent design and optimisation framework is implemented to develop selective configurations targeting different flight conditions. First, an aerodynamically favourable high-lift mode achieves large geometric changes due to reduced actuation demands. This is only possible by virtue of the internally tailored compliance, arising from the stable state switch of the embedded bi-stable components. A second, stiff configuration, targets operation under increased aerodynamic loading. The dynamic adequacy of the design is proved via high fidelity fluid–structure interaction simulations.

  2. Chondroblastoma of the temporal base with high mitotic activity.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Eiichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Onizawa, Kojiro; Hara, Akira; Kusakari, Jun; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nose, Tadao

    2002-11-01

    A 24-year-old man presented with a rare chondroblastoma of the temporal base manifesting as local pain accompanied by difficulty in opening the mouth. Gross total removal was achieved at initial surgery, but the tumor demonstrated rapid and destructive regrowth from a very small residual volume without definite histological malignant transformation. Growth activity estimated by MIB-1 staining increased spontaneously from 2.5% at the initial operation to 18.7% at recurrence. Further extensive radical tumor removal by surgeons from multiple disciplines was performed. The patient has been free of recurrence for 3 years without radiotherapy. Chondroblastoma of the temporal bone is widely accepted as a benign tumor and regrowth after gross total removal is very rare. However, some cases of chondroblastoma have potentially high mitotic activity.

  3. Temporal cognition: a key ingredient of intelligent systems.

    PubMed

    Maniadakis, Michail; Trahanias, Panos

    2011-01-01

    Experiencing the flow of time is an important capacity of biological systems that is involved in many ways in the daily activities of humans and animals. However, in the field of robotics, the key role of time in cognition is not adequately considered in contemporary research, with artificial agents focusing mainly on the spatial extent of sensory information, almost always neglecting its temporal dimension. This fact significantly obstructs the development of high-level robotic cognitive skills, as well as the autonomous and seamless operation of artificial agents in human environments. Taking inspiration from biological cognition, the present work puts forward time perception as a vital capacity of artificial intelligent systems and contemplates the research path for incorporating temporal cognition in the repertoire of robotic skills. PMID:21954384

  4. Temporal cognition: a key ingredient of intelligent systems.

    PubMed

    Maniadakis, Michail; Trahanias, Panos

    2011-01-01

    Experiencing the flow of time is an important capacity of biological systems that is involved in many ways in the daily activities of humans and animals. However, in the field of robotics, the key role of time in cognition is not adequately considered in contemporary research, with artificial agents focusing mainly on the spatial extent of sensory information, almost always neglecting its temporal dimension. This fact significantly obstructs the development of high-level robotic cognitive skills, as well as the autonomous and seamless operation of artificial agents in human environments. Taking inspiration from biological cognition, the present work puts forward time perception as a vital capacity of artificial intelligent systems and contemplates the research path for incorporating temporal cognition in the repertoire of robotic skills.

  5. Chondroblastoma of the temporal base with high mitotic activity.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Eiichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Onizawa, Kojiro; Hara, Akira; Kusakari, Jun; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nose, Tadao

    2002-11-01

    A 24-year-old man presented with a rare chondroblastoma of the temporal base manifesting as local pain accompanied by difficulty in opening the mouth. Gross total removal was achieved at initial surgery, but the tumor demonstrated rapid and destructive regrowth from a very small residual volume without definite histological malignant transformation. Growth activity estimated by MIB-1 staining increased spontaneously from 2.5% at the initial operation to 18.7% at recurrence. Further extensive radical tumor removal by surgeons from multiple disciplines was performed. The patient has been free of recurrence for 3 years without radiotherapy. Chondroblastoma of the temporal bone is widely accepted as a benign tumor and regrowth after gross total removal is very rare. However, some cases of chondroblastoma have potentially high mitotic activity. PMID:12472218

  6. On the cross-well dynamics of a bi-stable composite plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, Andres F.; Neild, Simon A.; Wagg, David J.

    2011-07-01

    Multi-stable composites are a novel type of composites capable of adopting multiple statically stable configurations. Due to the multi-stability property this type of composite material has been considered for several applications, particularly for morphing structures. The change of shape between stable states is achieved by a nonlinear mechanism known as snap-through. Most of the research done on these composites has focused on predicting the configuration after manufacture, its static characteristics and static actuation strategies to induce snap-through. However, these structures will operate subject to dynamic loads. Yet, very little work has been carried out to examine the dynamic behaviour of bi-stable composites. This paper focuses on the study of the cross-well dynamics of a bi-stable composite plate. A simple model previously derived for the dynamics confined to a single stable state is extended to include cross-well dynamics. The rich dynamics are experimentally investigated, focusing on cross-well oscillations and the key dynamic features of snap-through. Numerical simulations are obtained and compared to the experimental results showing good agreement. In particular, experimentally observed characteristics suggesting chaotic oscillations for cross-well dynamics are captured well by the proposed model. The results herein could be used for implementing control strategies for both configuration morphing and undesired snap-through suppression of bi-stable composites.

  7. Temporal efficiency evaluation and small-worldness characterization in temporal networks

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhongxiang; Chen, Yu; Li, Junhua; Fam, Johnson; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Numerous real-world systems can be modeled as networks. To date, most network studies have been conducted assuming stationary network characteristics. Many systems, however, undergo topological changes over time. Temporal networks, which incorporate time into conventional network models, are therefore more accurate representations of such dynamic systems. Here, we introduce a novel generalized analytical framework for temporal networks, which enables 1) robust evaluation of the efficiency of temporal information exchange using two new network metrics and 2) quantitative inspection of the temporal small-worldness. Specifically, we define new robust temporal network efficiency measures by incorporating the time dependency of temporal distance. We propose a temporal regular network model, and based on this plus the redefined temporal efficiency metrics and widely used temporal random network models, we introduce a quantitative approach for identifying temporal small-world architectures (featuring high temporal network efficiency both globally and locally). In addition, within this framework, we can uncover network-specific dynamic structures. Applications to brain networks, international trade networks, and social networks reveal prominent temporal small-world properties with distinct dynamic network structures. We believe that the framework can provide further insight into dynamic changes in the network topology of various real-world systems and significantly promote research on temporal networks. PMID:27682314

  8. Stable isotopes in biosciences, their measurement and models for amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bier, D M

    1997-08-01

    In order to follow the movement and quantify the metabolic fates of biologically important molecules in vivo, both tracers and kinetic modeling are required. For the study of intermediary metabolism in children, stable isotopically labeled substrates satisfy both the analytical and ethical requirements for tracer use in children. Stable isotope tracers have been proven safe over more than a half-century of use in humans. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis of stable nuclide molecular position and isotopic enrichment in biological molecules is both highly specific and extraordinarily precise. Using stable isotope data to develop models of biological system dynamics in vivo is an essential element of estimating substrate events that take place in cells or organs otherwise inaccessible for ethical sampling in children. Further, modeling is also a critical component in the development and the testing of hypotheses about the structure of the biological system in question and the mechanisms which control its operational parameters. PMID:9266207

  9. Stable isotope paleoaltimetry and the evolution of landscapes and life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    circulation and associated teleconnections in the global climate system that affect δ18O or δD of precipitation; (2) Evaluating on a case-by-case basis if temporal and spatial changes in isotope lapse rates influence interpretations of paleoelevation; (3) Interfacing with phylogenetic techniques to evaluate competing hypotheses with respect to the timing of surface uplift and the diversification of lineages; (4) Characterizing feedbacks between changes in surface elevation and atmospheric circulation as these are likely to be equally important to the diversification of lineages than changes in surface elevation alone. Tackling these challenges will benefit from the accelerating pace of improved data-model comparisons and rapidly evolving geochemical techniques for reconstructing precipitation patterns. Most importantly, stable isotope paleoaltimetry has the potential to develop into a truly interdisciplinary field if innovative tectonic/paleoclimatic and evolutionary biology/phylogenetic approaches are integrated into a common research framework. It therefore, opens new avenues to study the long-term evolution of landscapes and life.

  10. Development of a Safety Management Web Tool for Horse Stables.

    PubMed

    Leppälä, Jarkko; Kolstrup, Christina Lunner; Pinzke, Stefan; Rautiainen, Risto; Saastamoinen, Markku; Särkijärvi, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Managing a horse stable involves risks, which can have serious consequences for the stable, employees, clients, visitors and horses. Existing industrial or farm production risk management tools are not directly applicable to horse stables and they need to be adapted for use by managers of different types of stables. As a part of the InnoEquine project, an innovative web tool, InnoHorse, was developed to support horse stable managers in business, safety, pasture and manure management. A literature review, empirical horse stable case studies, expert panel workshops and stakeholder interviews were carried out to support the design. The InnoHorse web tool includes a safety section containing a horse stable safety map, stable safety checklists, and examples of good practices in stable safety, horse handling and rescue planning. This new horse stable safety management tool can also help in organizing work processes in horse stables in general. PMID:26569319

  11. Development of a Safety Management Web Tool for Horse Stables.

    PubMed

    Leppälä, Jarkko; Kolstrup, Christina Lunner; Pinzke, Stefan; Rautiainen, Risto; Saastamoinen, Markku; Särkijärvi, Susanna

    2015-11-12

    Managing a horse stable involves risks, which can have serious consequences for the stable, employees, clients, visitors and horses. Existing industrial or farm production risk management tools are not directly applicable to horse stables and they need to be adapted for use by managers of different types of stables. As a part of the InnoEquine project, an innovative web tool, InnoHorse, was developed to support horse stable managers in business, safety, pasture and manure management. A literature review, empirical horse stable case studies, expert panel workshops and stakeholder interviews were carried out to support the design. The InnoHorse web tool includes a safety section containing a horse stable safety map, stable safety checklists, and examples of good practices in stable safety, horse handling and rescue planning. This new horse stable safety management tool can also help in organizing work processes in horse stables in general.

  12. Spatio-temporal coherence of free-electron laser radiation in the extreme ultraviolet determined by a Michelson interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hilbert, V.; Rödel, C.; Zastrau, U.; Brenner, G.; Düsterer, S.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Harmand, M.; Przystawik, A.; Redlin, H.; Toleikis, S.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Fletcher, L.; Förster, E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Lee, H. J.; Hartley, N. J.; Kazak, L.; Komar, D.; Skruszewicz, S.; and others

    2014-09-08

    A key feature of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from free-electron lasers (FELs) is its spatial and temporal coherence. We measured the spatio-temporal coherence properties of monochromatized FEL pulses at 13.5 nm using a Michelson interferometer. A temporal coherence time of (59±8) fs has been determined, which is in good agreement with the spectral bandwidth given by the monochromator. Moreover, the spatial coherence in vertical direction amounts to about 15% of the beam diameter and about 12% in horizontal direction. The feasibility of measuring spatio-temporal coherence properties of XUV FEL radiation using interferometric techniques advances machine operation and experimental studies significantly.

  13. Osteopetrosis of the Temporal Bone Treated with Cochlear Implant.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Marcin; Zasławska, Katarzyna; Trojanowska, Agnieszka; Szymanska, Anna; Zadrozniak, Marek

    2015-08-01

    Osteopetrosis is a heterogeneous group of skeletal disorders. It is a rare genetic disease caused by osteoclast dysfunction, leading to invalid bone desorption and remodeling and an increase in skeletal mass and density. We present the case of a 52-year-old female with osteopetrosis of the temporal bone. She reported loss of hearing in her left ear 14 years ago because of a head trauma. Four months ago, she was conservatively treated because of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in her right ear with no improvement. Her pure tone average audiogram was bilaterally 90 dB with 10% speech recognition. The patient was implanted with a cochlear implant. Except for the extremely thick and dense cortical bone of the mastoid, surgery was uneventful. Speech recognition 6 months after the surgery showed 75%. The results were stable for 3 years follow-up. Patients with profound hearing loss caused by osteopetrosis may benefit from cochlear implantation. PMID:26381012

  14. Plant diversity increases spatio-temporal niche complementarity in plant-pollinator interactions.

    PubMed

    Venjakob, Christine; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Ebeling, Anne; Tscharntke, Teja; Scherber, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing biodiversity decline impairs ecosystem processes, including pollination. Flower visitation, an important indicator of pollination services, is influenced by plant species richness. However, the spatio-temporal responses of different pollinator groups to plant species richness have not yet been analyzed experimentally. Here, we used an experimental plant species richness gradient to analyze plant-pollinator interactions with an unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution. We observed four pollinator functional groups (honeybees, bumblebees, solitary bees, and hoverflies) in experimental plots at three different vegetation strata between sunrise and sunset. Visits were modified by plant species richness interacting with time and space. Furthermore, the complementarity of pollinator functional groups in space and time was stronger in species-rich mixtures. We conclude that high plant diversity should ensure stable pollination services, mediated via spatio-temporal niche complementarity in flower visitation. PMID:27069585

  15. Plant diversity increases spatio-temporal niche complementarity in plant-pollinator interactions.

    PubMed

    Venjakob, Christine; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Ebeling, Anne; Tscharntke, Teja; Scherber, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing biodiversity decline impairs ecosystem processes, including pollination. Flower visitation, an important indicator of pollination services, is influenced by plant species richness. However, the spatio-temporal responses of different pollinator groups to plant species richness have not yet been analyzed experimentally. Here, we used an experimental plant species richness gradient to analyze plant-pollinator interactions with an unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution. We observed four pollinator functional groups (honeybees, bumblebees, solitary bees, and hoverflies) in experimental plots at three different vegetation strata between sunrise and sunset. Visits were modified by plant species richness interacting with time and space. Furthermore, the complementarity of pollinator functional groups in space and time was stronger in species-rich mixtures. We conclude that high plant diversity should ensure stable pollination services, mediated via spatio-temporal niche complementarity in flower visitation.

  16. Operations automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, Charles Thomas

    1994-01-01

    This is truly the era of 'faster-better-cheaper' at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA/JPL). To continue JPL's primary mission of building and operating interplanetary spacecraft, all possible avenues are being explored in the search for better value for each dollar spent. A significant cost factor in any mission is the amount of manpower required to receive, decode, decommutate, and distribute spacecraft engineering and experiment data. The replacement of the many mission-unique data systems with the single Advanced Multimission Operations System (AMMOS) has already allowed for some manpower reduction. Now, we find that further economies are made possible by drastically reducing the number of human interventions required to perform the setup, data saving, station handover, processed data loading, and tear down activities that are associated with each spacecraft tracking pass. We have recently adapted three public domain tools to the AMMOS system which allow common elements to be scheduled and initialized without the normal human intervention. This is accomplished with a stored weekly event schedule. The manual entries and specialized scripts which had to be provided just prior to and during a pass are now triggered by the schedule to perform the functions unique to the upcoming pass. This combination of public domain software and the AMMOS system has been run in parallel with the flight operation in an online testing phase for six months. With this methodology, a savings of 11 man-years per year is projected with no increase in data loss or project risk. There are even greater savings to be gained as we learn other uses for this configuration.

  17. Temporal Ontologies for Geoscience: Alignment Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Time is a central concept in geoscience. Geologic histories are composed of sequences of geologic processes and events. Calibration of their timing ties a local history into a broader context, and enables correlation of events between locations. The geologic timescale is standardized in the International Chronostratigraphic Chart, which specifies interval names, and calibrations for the ages of the interval boundaries. Time is also a key concept in the world at large. A number of general purpose temporal ontologies have been developed, both stand-alone and as parts of general purpose or upper ontologies. A temporal ontology for geoscience should apply or extend a suitable general purpose temporal ontology. However, geologic time presents two challenges: Geology involves greater spans of time than in other temporal ontologies, inconsistent with the year-month-day/hour-minute-second formalization that is a basic assumption of most general purpose temporal schemes; The geologic timescale is a temporal topology. Its calibration in terms of an absolute (numeric) scale is a scientific issue in its own right supporting a significant community. In contrast, the general purpose temporal ontologies are premised on exact numeric values for temporal position, and do not allow for temporal topology as a primary structure. We have developed an ontology for the geologic timescale to account for these concerns. It uses the ISO 19108 distinctions between different types of temporal reference system, also linking to an explicit temporal topology model. Stratotypes used in the calibration process are modelled as sampling-features following the ISO 19156 Observations and Measurements model. A joint OGC-W3C harmonization project is underway, with standardization of the W3C OWL-Time ontology as one of its tasks. The insights gained from the geologic timescale ontology will assist in development of a general ontology capable of modelling a richer set of use-cases from geoscience.

  18. Processes driving temporal dynamics in the nested pattern of waterbird communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastián-González, Esther; Botella, Francisco; Paracuellos, Mariano; Sánchez-Zapata, José Antonio

    2010-03-01

    Nestedness is a common pattern of bird communities in habitat patches, and it describes the situation where smaller communities form proper subsets of larger communities. Several studies have examined the processes causing nestedness and the implications for conservation, but few have considered the temporal changes in these processes. We used data from 6 years and two seasons (wintering and breeding) to explore the temporal changes in the causes of the nested pattern of a waterbird community in man-made irrigation ponds. Nestedness was significant in both seasons and in all years, and thus temporally stable. Despite the nestedness of waterbird communities, the proportion of idiosyncratic species (species that do not follow the nested pattern) was higher than in other studies. Furthermore, the idiosyncratic species often had endangered status. Selective colonisation and, mainly, selective extinction were the most important factors producing the nested pattern. In addition, the nested structure of the microhabitats at the ponds also caused the pattern. The causes of the pattern changed temporally even in the absence of big disturbance events. In general, breeding communities were more stable than wintering communities, and the seasonal differences in the causes of the nestedness were larger than the inter-annual differences. Consequently, studies of community nestedness from only one snapshot in time should be considered with caution.

  19. Explicit Fourier wavefield operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, R. J.; Margrave, G. F.

    2006-04-01

    Explicit wavefield extrapolators are based on direct analytic mathematical formulae that express the output as an extrapolation operator acting on the input, while implicit methods usually require the calculation of the numerical inverse of a matrix to obtain the output. Typically, explicit methods are faster than implicit methods, and they often give more insight into the physics of the wave propagation, but they often suffer from instability. Four different explicit extrapolators based on Fourier theory are presented and analysed. They are: PS (ordinary phase shift), GPSPI (generalized phase shift plus interpolation), NSPS (non-stationary phase shift) and SNPS (symmetric non-stationary phase shift). A formal proof is given that NSPS in a direction orthogonal to the velocity gradient is the mathematical adjoint process to GPSPI in the opposite direction. This motivates the construction of SNPS that combines NSPS and GPSPI in a symmetric fashion. This symmetry (under interchange of input and output lateral coordinates) is required by reciprocity arguments. PS and SNPS are symmetric while NSPS and GPSPI are not. A numerical stability study using SVD (singular value decomposition) shows that all of these extrapolators can become unstable for strong lateral velocity gradients. Unstable operators allow amplitudes to grow non-physically in a recursion. Stability is enhanced by introducing a small (~3 per cent) imaginary component to the velocities. This causes a numerical attenuation that tends to stabilize the operators but does not address the cause of the instability. For the velocity model studied (a very challenging case) GPSPI and NSPS have exactly the same instability while SNPS is always more stable. Instability manifests in a complicated way as a function of extrapolation step size, frequency, velocity gradient, and strength of numerical attenuation. The SNPS operator can be stabilized over a wide range of conditions with considerably less attenuation than is

  20. Highly stable, extremely high-temperature, nonvolatile memory based on resistance switching in polycrystalline Pt nanogaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroya; Shinomura, Yuma; Kashiwabara, Shota; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Naitoh, Yasuhisa

    2016-10-01

    Highly stable, nonvolatile, high-temperature memory based on resistance switching was realized using a polycrystalline platinum (Pt) nanogap. The operating temperature of the memory can be drastically increased by the presence of a sharp-edged Pt crystal facet in the nanogap. A short distance between the facet edges maintains the nanogap shape at high temperature, and the sharp shape of the nanogap densifies the electric field to maintain a stable current flow due to field migration. Even at 873 K, which is a significantly higher temperature than feasible for conventional semiconductor memory, the nonvolatility of the proposed memory allows stable ON and OFF currents, with fluctuations of less than or equal to 10%, to be maintained for longer than eight hours. An advantage of this nanogap scheme for high-temperature memory is its secure operation achieved through the assembly and disassembly of a Pt needle in a high electric field.