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Sample records for operators temporally stable

  1. Representing operations procedures using temporal dependency networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fayyad, Kristina E.; Cooper, Lynne P.

    1993-01-01

    DSN Link Monitor & Control (LMC) operations consist primarily of executing procedures to configure, calibrate, test, and operate a communications link between an interplanetary spacecraft and its mission control center. Currently the LMC operators are responsible for integrating procedures into an end-to-end series of steps. The research presented in this paper is investigating new ways of specifying operations procedures that incorporate the insight of operations, engineering, and science personnel to improve mission operations. The paper describes the rationale for using Temporal Dependency Networks (TDN's) to represent the procedures, a description of how the data is acquired, and the knowledge engineering effort required to represent operations procedures. Results of operational tests of this concept, as implemented in the LMC Operator Assistant Prototype (LMCOA), are also presented.

  2. Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

  3. Temporally And Thermally Stable Iron/Nickel Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.; O'Donnell, Timothy P.; Lane, Marc S.; Hsieh, Cheng H.

    1995-01-01

    Specially prepared version of commerical low-thermal-expansion iron/nickel alloy exhibits unprecedented thermal and temporal dimensional stability. Consists of high-purity powder-metallurgy process followed by heat treatment. High-purity processing imparts unusual combination of properties.

  4. Stable, inflatable life raft for high seas rescue operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, J. H., Jr.; Harrison, F.; Marak, R.; Radnofsky, M. I.

    1971-01-01

    Raft is easily deployed and highly maneuverable in water. It has false bottom of water ballast containers attached to underside, making it exceptionally stable platform from which swimmers can operate. Raft is attachable to external moorings.

  5. Fiber Optic Cable Thermal Preparation to Ensure Stable Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thoames Jr, William J.; Chuska, Rick F.; LaRocca, Frank V.; Switzer, Robert C.; Macmurphy, Shawn L.; Ott, Melanie N.

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic cables are widely used in modern systems that must provide stable operation during exposure to changing environmental conditions. For example, a fiber optic cable on a satellite may have to reliably function over a temperature range of -50 C up to 125 C. While the system requirements for a particular application will dictate the exact method by which the fibers should be prepared, this work will examine multiple ruggedized fibers prepared in different fashions and subjected to thermal qualification testing. The data show that if properly conditioned the fiber cables can provide stable operation, but if done incorrectly, they will have large fluctuations in transmission.

  6. Developing Temporal Markers to Profile Operational Errors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    ATC subject matter experts ( SMEs ) to assist in the devel- opment of a comprehensive list of TMs. Their collective experience included 87 years of...controllers involved. The SMEs were provided with our definition of a temporal marker and a list of some TM examples, such as the time when the aircraft...the first control instruction to the pilot. Procedure The SMEs convened as a group on several occasions to create an exhaustive list of TMs. An

  7. Operations automation using temporal dependency networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    1991-01-01

    Precalibration activities for the Deep Space Network are time- and work force-intensive. Significant gains in availability and efficiency could be realized by intelligently incorporating automation techniques. An approach is presented to automation based on the use of Temporal Dependency Networks (TDNs). A TDN represents an activity by breaking it down into its component pieces and formalizing the precedence and other constraints associated with lower level activities. The representations are described which are used to implement a TDN and the underlying system architecture needed to support its use. The commercial applications of this technique are numerous. It has potential for application in any system which requires real-time, system-level control, and accurate monitoring of health, status, and configuration in an asynchronous environment.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotopic ratios of fish otoliths have been used in numerous studies as natural tags or markers to aid the study of connectivity among fish populations. We investigated the use of spatial and temporal changes in the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of otoliths to different...

  9. Temporal discrimination learning of operant feeding in goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Philip; Stephenson, David; Wright, Donald E.

    1994-01-01

    Operant temporal discrimination learning was investigated in goldfish. In the first experiment, there was a fixed daily change in illumination. Eight subjects were trained to operate a lever that reinforced each press with food. The period during which responses were reinforced was then progressively reduced until it was 1 hr in every 24. The final 1-hr feeding schedule was maintained over 4 weeks. The feeding period commenced at the same time each day throughout. The food dispensers were then made inactive, and a period of extinction ensued for 6 days. The pattern of responding suggested that the fish were able to exhibit temporal discrimination in anticipation of feeding time. This pattern of responding persisted for a limited number of days during the extinction procedure. The second experiment produced evidence that operant temporal discrimination could develop under continuous illumination. PMID:16812735

  10. Spectral decomposition of fractional operators and a reflected stable semigroup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patie, P.; Zhao, Y.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we provide the spectral decomposition in Hilbert space of the C0-semigroup P and its adjoint P ˆ having as generator, respectively, the Caputo and the right-sided Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives of index 1 < α < 2. These linear operators, which are non-local and non-self-adjoint, appear in many recent studies in applied mathematics and also arise as the infinitesimal generators of some substantial processes such as the reflected spectrally negative α-stable process. Our approach relies on intertwining relations that we establish between these semigroups and the semigroup of a Bessel type process whose generator is a self-adjoint second order differential operator. In particular, from this commutation relation, we characterize the positive real axis as the continuous point spectrum of P and provide a power series representation of the corresponding eigenfunctions. We also identify the positive real axis as the residual spectrum of the adjoint operator P ˆ and elucidate its role in the spectral decomposition of these operators. By resorting to the concept of continuous frames, we proceed by investigating the domain of the spectral operators and derive two representations for the heat kernels of these semigroups. As a by-product, we also obtain regularity properties for these latter and also for the solution of the associated Cauchy problem.

  11. Encapsulated graphene field-effect transistors for air stable operation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos Kymissis, Ioannis; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James

    2015-03-16

    In this work, we report the fabrication of encapsulated graphene field effects transistors (GFETs) with excellent air stability operation in ambient environment. Graphene's 2D nature makes its electronics properties very sensitive to the surrounding environment, and thus, non-encapsulated graphene devices show extensive vulnerability due to unintentional hole doping from the presence of water molecules and oxygen limiting their performance and use in real world applications. Encapsulating GFETs with a thin layer of parylene-C and aluminum deposited on top of the exposed graphene channel area resulted in devices with excellent electrical performance stability for an extended period of time. Moisture penetration is reduced significantly and carrier mobility degraded substantially less when compared to non-encapsulated control devices. Our CMOS compatible encapsulation method minimizes the problems of environmental doping and lifetime performance degradation, enabling the operation of air stable devices for next generation graphene-based electronics.

  12. Compact and stable temporally magnified tomography using a phase-locked broadband source.

    PubMed

    Li, Bowen; Wei, Xiaoming; Tan, Sisi; Kang, Jiqiang; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2016-04-01

    The temporally magnified tomography system is further improved in terms of resolution and imaging stability. We simplify the system configuration and improve the axial resolution simultaneously by utilizing a stabilized all-fiber broadband source. The highly stable spectrum of the source assisted by a phase-locked loop guarantees an improved imaging quality. In addition, the impact of the repetition-rate fluctuation of the source to the system stability is analyzed, which also applies to other temporal imaging systems. Achieving a 90-μm in-air resolution at 89-MHz A-scan rate and improved stability, we are taking one major step toward the practical application of this new optical tomographic modality.

  13. Daytime warming lowers community temporal stability by reducing the abundance of dominant, stable species.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongling; Zhang, Qian; Su, Fanglong; Zhang, Chunhui; Pu, Zhichao; Xia, Jianyang; Wan, Shiqiang; Jiang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Daytime warming and nighttime warming have the potential to influence plant community structure and ecosystem functions. However, their impacts on ecological stability remain largely unexplored. We conducted an eight-year field experiment to compare the effects of daytime and nighttime warming on the temporal stability of a temperate steppe in northern China. Our results showed that the cover and stability of dominant species, stability of subordinate species, and compensatory dynamics among species strongly influenced community-level stability. However, daytime, but not nighttime, warming significantly reduced community temporal stability mainly through the reduction in the abundance of dominant, stable species. These findings demonstrate the differential effects of daytime and nighttime warming on community stability and emphasize the importance of understanding the changes of dominant species for accurately predicting community dynamics under climate warming.

  14. Spatial and Temporal Migration Patterns of Neotropical Migrants in the Southwest Revealed by Stable Isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Kristina L.; van Riper, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary We used stable hydrogen isotopes (?D) to investigate both temporal and spatial patterns during spring migration for three warbler species, Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla), MacGillivray's Warbler (Oporornis tolmiei), and Nashville Warbler (Vermivora ruficapilla), across multiple migration routes in southwest North America. A strong correlation between stable hydrogen isotope values of feathers and the local precipitation at sites where feathers where collected across the breeding range for all three species reaffirmed that stable hydrogen isotopes were a good predictor of breeding locations. For the Wilson's Warbler, we found a significant negative relationship between the date when warblers passed through the sampling station and ?D values of their feathers, indicating that warblers who bred the previous season at southern latitudes migrated through the migration stations earlier than did warblers that had previously bred at more northern latitudes. This pattern was consistent across their southwestern migration route (5 sites sampled) and was consistent between years. Comparing ?D values between migration stations also showed a shift towards more negative ?D values from the western to the eastern migration stations sampled in this study, which corresponded to different geographical regions of the Wilson's Warblers' western breeding range. For MacGillivray's Warbler we found the same temporal pattern as Wilson's Warbler, with warblers that bred the previous season at southern latitudes migrating through the migration stations earlier than warblers that had previously bred at more northern latitudes. This pattern was consistent at the Lower Colorado River and Arivaca Creek, the two sites where sample sizes were adequate to test these hypotheses. Comparison of the ?D between the two sites indicated that the majority of warblers migrating through these stations were breeding within a geographically limited area of MacGillivray's Warblers' overall

  15. Cluster Analysis in Sociometric Research: A Pattern-Oriented Approach to Identifying Temporally Stable Peer Status Groups of Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zettergren, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A modern clustering technique was applied to age-10 and age-13 sociometric data with the purpose of identifying longitudinally stable peer status clusters. The study included 445 girls from a Swedish longitudinal study. The identified temporally stable clusters of rejected, popular, and average girls were essentially larger than corresponding…

  16. A spatio-temporal extension to the map cube operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, Juan C.; Moreno, Francisco J.; Echeverri, Jaime

    2012-09-01

    OLAP (On Line Analytical Processing) is a set of techniques and operators to facilitate the data analysis usually stored in a data warehouse. In this paper, we extend the functionality of an OLAP operator known as Map Cube with the definition and incorporation of a function that allows the formulation of spatio-temporal queries. For example, consider a data warehouse about crimes that includes data about the places where the crimes were committed. Suppose we want to find and visualize the trajectory (a trajectory is just the path that an object follows through space as a function of time) of the crimes of a suspect beginning with his oldest crime and ending with his most recent one. In order to meet this requirement, we extend the Map Cube operator.

  17. Highly enhanced and temporally stable field emission from MWCNTs grown on aluminum coated silicon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sreekanth, M.; Ghosh, S. Patra, R.; Srivastava, P.

    2015-06-15

    In this work, a detailed field emission study of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown on Si and Al coated Si substrates is reported. Morphological and microstructural studies of the films show higher entanglement of CNTs in the case of CNT/Si film as compared to CNT/Al/Si film. Raman studies show that the defect mediated peak (D) is substantially suppressed as compared to graphitic peak (G) resulting in significant reduction in I{sub D}/I{sub G} value in CNT/Al/Si film. Field emission (FE) current density of CNT/Al/Si film (∼25 mA/cm{sup 2}) is significantly higher as compared to that of CNT/Si film (∼1.6 mA/cm{sup 2}). A substantial improvement in temporal stability is also observed in CNT/Al/Si film. This enhancement in field emission current is attributed to strong adhesion between substrate and CNTs, low work function, high local field enhancement factor at the CNT tips and less entanglement of CNTs grown on Al/Si. The temporally stable CNT/Al/Si cold cathode can be a potential candidate to replace conventional electron sources in prototype devices.

  18. Stable Associations Masked by Temporal Variability in the Marine Copepod Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Moisander, Pia H; Sexton, Andrew D; Daley, Meaghan C

    2015-01-01

    Copepod-bacteria interactions include permanent and transient epi- and endobiotic associations that may play roles in copepod health, transfer of elements in the food web, and biogeochemical cycling. Microbiomes of three temperate copepod species (Acartia longiremis, Centropages hamatus, and Calanus finmarchicus) from the Gulf of Maine were investigated during the early summer season using high throughput amplicon sequencing. The most prominent stable component of the microbiome included several taxa within Gammaproteobacteria, with Pseudoalteromonas spp. especially abundant across copepod species. These Gammaproteobacteria appear to be promoted by the copepod association, likely benefitting from nutrient enriched microenvironments on copepods, and forming a more important part of the copepod-associated community than Vibrio spp. during the cold-water season in this temperate system. Taxon-specific associations included an elevated relative abundance of Piscirickettsiaceae and Colwelliaceae on Calanus, and Marinomonas sp. in Centropages. The communities in full and voided gut copepods had distinct characteristics, thus the presence of a food-associated microbiome was evident, including higher abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and chloroplast sequences in the transient communities. The observed variability was partially explained by collection date that may be linked to factors such as variable time since molting, gender differences, and changes in food availability and type over the study period. While some taxon-specific and stable associations were identified, temporal changes in environmental conditions, including food type, appear to be key in controlling the composition of bacterial communities associated with copepods in this temperate coastal system during the early summer.

  19. Pre-operative preparation for otologic surgery: temporal bone simulation

    PubMed Central

    Sethia, Rishabh; Wiet, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The field of temporal bone simulation (TBS) has largely focused on the development and validation of simulators as training and assessment tools. However, as technology has progressed over the years, researchers have envisioned new clinical applications for simulators extending to pre-operative surgical planning and case rehearsal. The purpose of this article is to review the current state of the art in TBS and to highlight recent advancements in the field. Due to space limitations, we will limit our discussion to computer-based virtual reality (VR) simulators. Recent findings A review of the recent literature on TBS revealed very limited application of VR simulators for pre-operative preparation. Current evidence suggests limitations in fidelity preclude successful patient-specific case rehearsal using VR simulation. Further investigation and clinical evaluation are required to validate its use outside of training and skill assessment. Summary This article provides an overview of the current use of VR simulators with emphasis on pre-operative planning. We evaluate the limitations of the technology, and discuss potential areas of improvement for the future. More studies are necessary to assess the value of VR simulation for pre-operative preparation. PMID:26339966

  20. Temporal and Spatial Variation of Surface Water Stable Isotopes in the Marys River Basin, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickolas, L. B.; Segura, C.; Brooks, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the temporal and spatial variability of water sources within a basin is vital to our ability to manage the impacts of climate variability and land cover change. Water stable isotopes can be used as a tool to determine geographic and seasonal sources of water at the basin scale. Previous studies in the Coastal Range of Oregon reported that the variation in the isotopic signatures of surface water does not conform to the commonly observed "rainout effect", which exhibits a trend of increasing isotopic depletion with rising elevation. The primary purpose of this research is to investigate the mechanisms governing seasonal and spatial variations in the isotopic signature of surface waters within the Marys River Basin, located in the Oregon Coastal Range. We hypothesize that catchment orientation, drainage area, geology, and topography act as controlling factors on groundwater flow, storage, and atmospheric moisture cycling, which explain variations in source water contribution. Surface water and precipitation samples were collected every 2-3 weeks for isotopic analysis of δ18O and δ2H for one year. Preliminary results indicate a significant difference (p<0.001) in isotopic signature between watersheds underlain by basalt and sandstone. The degree of separation is the most distinct during the summer when low flows likely reflect deeper groundwater sources, whereas isotopic signatures during the rainy season (fall & winter) show a greater degree of similarity between the two lithologies. These findings indicate that the more permeable sandstone formations may be hydrologically connected to enriched water sources on the windward side of the Coastal Range that sustain baseflow within catchments on the leeward side, while streams draining basalt catchments are fed by a more depleted source of water (e.g. precipitation originating within the Marys River Basin).

  1. Temporal characterization of bacteria in hayrings serving as stable fly larval development sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae) are important pests of pastured cattle, reducing weight gains, and causing discomfort to the animals. The focus of stable fly control has historically been on preventing adult stable flies from biting cattle. While the adult files biting t...

  2. Note: A new regulation method of stable operation of high power cathode ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. C.; Xie, Y. H. Hu, C. D.; Xie, Y. L.; Liu, S.; Liang, L. Z.; Liu, Z. M.

    2015-05-15

    The hot cathode ion source will tend to be unstable when operated with high power and long pulse. In order to achieve stable operation, a new regulation method based on the arc power (discharge power) feedback control was designed and tested on the hot cathode ion source test bed with arc discharge and beam extraction. The results show that the new regulation method can achieve stable arc discharge and beam extraction. It verifies the success of feedback control of arc source with arc power.

  3. Application Of Stable Isotope Analysis To Study Temporal Changes In Foraging Ecology In A Highly Endangered Amphibian

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, J. Hayley

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding dietary trends for endangered species may be essential to assessing the effects of ecological disturbances such as habitat modification, species introductions or global climate change. Documenting temporal variation in prey selection may also be crucial for understanding population dynamics. However, the rarity, secretive behaviours and obscure microhabitats of some endangered species can make direct foraging observations difficult or impossible. Furthermore, the lethality or invasiveness of some traditional methods of dietary analysis (e.g. gut contents analysis, gastric lavage) makes them inappropriate for such species. Stable isotope analysis facilitates non-lethal, indirect analysis of animal diet that has unrealized potential in the conservation of endangered organisms, particularly amphibians. Methodology/findings I determined proportional contributions of aquatic macroinvertebrate prey to the diet of an endangered aquatic salamander Eurycea sosorum over a two-year period using stable isotope analysis of 13/12C and 15/14N and the Bayesian stable isotope mixing model SIAR. I calculated Strauss’ dietary electivity indices by comparing these proportions with changing relative abundance of potential prey species through time. Stable isotope analyses revealed that a previously unknown prey item (soft-bodied planarian flatworms in the genus Dugesia) made up the majority of E. sosorum diet. Results also demonstrate that E. sosorum is an opportunistic forager capable of diet switching to include a greater proportion of alternative prey when Dugesia populations decline. There is also evidence of intra-population dietary variation. Conclusions/significance Effective application of stable isotope analysis can help circumvent two key limitations commonly experienced by researchers of endangered species: the inability to directly observe these species in nature and the invasiveness or lethality of traditional methods of dietary analysis. This

  4. Temporal variation in mycorrhizal diversity and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope abundance in the wintergreen meadow orchid Anacamptis morio.

    PubMed

    Ercole, Enrico; Adamo, Martino; Rodda, Michele; Gebauer, Gerhard; Girlanda, Mariangela; Perotto, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    Many adult orchids, especially photoautotrophic species, associate with a diverse range of mycorrhizal fungi, but little is known about the temporal changes that might occur in the diversity and functioning of orchid mycorrhiza during vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Temporal variations in the spectrum of mycorrhizal fungi and in stable isotope natural abundance were investigated in adult plants of Anacamptis morio, a wintergreen meadow orchid. Anacamptis morio associated with mycorrhizal fungi belonging to Tulasnella, Ceratobasidium and a clade of Pezizaceae (Ascomycetes). When a complete growing season was investigated, multivariate analyses indicated significant differences in the mycorrhizal fungal community. Among fungi identified from manually isolated pelotons, Tulasnella was more common in autumn and winter, the pezizacean clade was very frequent in spring, and Ceratobasidium was more frequent in summer. By contrast, relatively small variations were found in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope natural abundance, A. morio samples showing similar (15)N enrichment and (13)C depletion at the different sampling times. These observations suggest that, irrespective of differences in the seasonal environmental conditions, the plant phenological stages and the associated fungi, the isotopic content in mycorrhizal A. morio remains fairly constant over time.

  5. Temporal expectation and spectral expectation operate in distinct fashion on neuronal populations.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Fang; Hämäläinen, Jarmo A; Waszak, Florian

    2013-11-01

    The formation of temporal expectation (i.e., the prediction of "when") is of prime importance to sensory processing. It can modulate sensory processing at early processing stages probably via the entrainment of low-frequency neuronal oscillations in the brain. However, sensory predictions involve not only temporal expectation but also spectral expectation (i.e., the prediction of "what"). Here we investigated how temporal expectation may interrelate with spectral expectation by explicitly setting up temporal expectation and spectral expectation in a target detection task. We found that reaction time (RT) was shorter when targets were temporally expected than when they were temporally unexpected. The temporal expectation effect was larger with than without spectral expectation. However, this interaction in the behavioural data did not result from an interaction in the electroencephalography (EEG), where we observed independent main effects of temporal expectation and spectral expectation. More precisely, we found that the N1 and P2 event-related potential (ERP) components and the entrainment of low-frequency neuronal oscillations were exclusively modulated by temporal expectation, whilst only the P3 ERP component was modulated by spectral expectation. Our results, thus, support the idea that temporal expectation and spectral expectation operate in distinct fashion on neuronal populations.

  6. Stable isotope analysis of temporal variation in the diets of pre-fledged Laughing Gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knoff, A.J.; Macko, S.A.; Erwin, R.M.; Brown, K.M.

    2002-01-01

    The *13C, *15N, and *34S stable isotopic values of feathers from pre-fledged Laughing Gulls (Larus atricilla) in coastal Virginia and Jamaica Bay, New York were used to examine dietary variation during the nestling period. The tip portions of the feathers were used to indicate diet during the initiation of primary feather growth, whereas the base portions indicated diet during the period immediately prior to fledging. The results indicate that diets of the nestlings in Virginia moved to a higher trophic level during the period prior to fledging, however the New York nestlings did not appear to undergo any appreciable dietary change during this period. Overall, nestlings from both colonies consumed proportionately more foods of marine origin than freshwater or terrestrial. Therefore, the results do not support those of earlier studies that suggested that partially developed salt glands in young gulls might restrict the diet to more terrestrial or freshwater prey in the early stages of nestling growth.

  7. Spatial distribution and temporal variability of stable water isotopes in a large and shallow lake.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Wen, Xuefa; Wang, Wei; Xiao, Qitao; Xu, Jingzheng; Cao, Chang; Xu, Jiaping; Hu, Cheng; Shen, Jing; Liu, Shoudong; Lee, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotopic compositions of lake water provide additional information on hydrological, meteorological and paleoclimate processes. In this study, lake water isotopic compositions were measured for more than three years in Lake Taihu, a large and shallow lake in southern China, to investigate the isotopic spatial and seasonal variations. The results indicated that (1) the whole-lake mean δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of the lake water varied seasonally from -48.4 ± 5.8 to -25.1 ± 3.2 ‰ and from -6.5 ± 0.9 to -3.5 ± 0.8 ‰, respectively, (2) the spatial pattern of the lake water isotopic compositions was controlled by the direction of water flow and not by local evaporation rate, and (3) using a one-site isotopic measurement to represent the whole-lake mean may result in unreasonable estimates of the isotopic composition of lake evaporation and the lake water residence time in poorly mixed lakes. The original data, documented here as an online supplement, provides a good reference for testing sensitivity of lake water budget to various isotopic sampling strategies. We propose that detailed spatial measurement of lake water isotopic compositions provides a good proxy for water movement and pollutant and alga transports, especially over big lakes.

  8. A novel averaging technique for discrete entropy-stable dissipation operators for ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derigs, Dominik; Winters, Andrew R.; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2017-02-01

    Entropy stable schemes can be constructed with a specific choice of the numerical flux function. First, an entropy conserving flux is constructed. Secondly, an entropy stable dissipation term is added to this flux to guarantee dissipation of the discrete entropy. Present works in the field of entropy stable numerical schemes are concerned with thorough derivations of entropy conservative fluxes for ideal MHD. However, as we show in this work, if the dissipation operator is not constructed in a very specific way, it cannot lead to a generally stable numerical scheme. The two main findings presented in this paper are that the entropy conserving flux of Ismail & Roe can easily break down for certain initial conditions commonly found in astrophysical simulations, and that special care must be taken in the derivation of a discrete dissipation matrix for an entropy stable numerical scheme to be robust. We present a convenient novel averaging procedure to evaluate the entropy Jacobians of the ideal MHD and the compressible Euler equations that yields a discretization with favorable robustness properties.

  9. The Generalised Dolbeault Complex for Four Dirac Operators in the Stable Rank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krump, Lukáš

    2008-09-01

    The Hartog's type phenomena in several complex variables are best understood in term of the Dolbeault sequence. A lot of attention was paid in the last decades to its analogue in the function theory of several Clifford variables. The first operator in this resolution is the Dirac operator in several variables. The complete description is known in dimension 4. Much less is known in higher dimensions. The case of three variables was described completely by F. Colombo, I. Sabadini, F. Sommen, D. C. Struppa. The full description of the complex for all dimensions is not known at present. Even the case of the stable range (i.e., when the number of variables is less or equal to the half of dimension) is still not fully understood. In the paper, we construct the resolution for the case of four variables in the stable range. The main tool used in the construction is the Penrose transform.

  10. Food web structure of sandy beaches: Temporal and spatial variation using stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamino, Leandro; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2011-03-01

    The food web structure of two sandy beach ecosystems with contrasting morphodynamics (dissipative vs. reflective) was examined using stable carbon (δ 13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) isotope analysis. Organic matter sources (POM: particulate organic matter; SOM: sediment organic matter) and consumers (zooplankton, benthic invertebrates and fishes) were sampled seasonally in both sandy beaches. Food webs significantly differed between beaches: even though both webs were mainly supported by POM, depleted δ 13C and δ 15N values for food sources and consumers were found in the dissipative system (following the reverse pattern in δ 13C values for consumers) for all the four seasons. Primary consumers (zooplankton and benthic invertebrates) use different organic matter sources on each beach and these differences are propagated up in the food web. The higher productivity found in the dissipative beach provided a significant amount of food for primary consumers, notably suspension feeders. Thus, the dissipative beach supported a more complex food web with more trophic links and a higher number of prey and top predators than the reflective beach. Morphodynamic factors could explain the contrasting differences in food web structure. The high degree of retention (nutrients and phytoplankton) recorded for the surf zone of the dissipative beach would result in the renewed accumulation of POM that sustains a more diverse and richer fauna than the reflective beach. Further studies directed to assess connections between the macroscopic food web, the surf-zone microbial loop and the interstitial compartment will provide a deeper understanding on the functioning of sandy beach ecosystems.

  11. Remotely operated compact underwater temporally encoded imager: CUTEI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, Derek; Cochenour, Brandon; Mullen, Linda

    2016-05-01

    Remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) typically use traditional optical imaging systems, such as cameras, for high resolution imaging. Cameras are effective in clear water, but have extremely poor performance in degraded visual environments (DVEs) such as turbid coastal waters and harbors. This is due to the multiple scattering of the light from the particulates and organic matter in the water. Laser-based sensors have been developed to enhance optical imaging in DVEs1,3,4,5,6. However, since conventional approaches require that the illuminator and receiver be located on the same platform, the size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements are incompatible with small ROVs. Researchers at NAVAIR have developed a low cost optical imager utilizing a bistatic geometry where the illuminator and receiver are mounted on separate, smaller platforms. The illuminator steers a modulated laser beam with a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanner to sequentially illuminate an underwater object. A distant receiver collects the object reflected laser light and reconstructs the imagery. Communications information, including a synchronization sequence, is encoded onto the modulation which is used by the receiver to build the image. The SWaP of the illuminator's components have been optimized and integrated into a modified version of the OpenROV, a miniature, commercial off-the-shelf ROV. This paper reports on the efforts to reduce the SWaP of the modulated illuminator and the results of testing this system in a laboratory water tank environment.

  12. Stable Artificial Dissipation Operators for Finite Volume Schemes on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svard, Magnus; Gong, Jing; Nordstrom, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Our objective is to derive stable first-, second- and fourth-order artificial dissipation operators for node based finite volume schemes. Of particular interest are general unstructured grids where the strength of the finite volume method is fully utilized. A commonly used finite volume approximation of the Laplacian will be the basis in the construction of the artificial dissipation. Both a homogeneous dissipation acting in all directions with equal strength and a modification that allows different amount of dissipation in different directions are derived. Stability and accuracy of the new operators are proved and the theoretical results are supported by numerical computations.

  13. Stable, high-performance operation of a fiber-coupled superconducting nanowire avalanche photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Shigehito; Yabuno, Masahiro; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka

    2017-03-01

    We present a stable and high-performance fiber-coupled NbTiN superconducting nanowire avalanche photon detector (SNAP). We demonstrate afterpulse-free operation in serially connected two SNAPs (SC-2SNAP), even in the absence of a choke inductor, achieving a 7.7 times faster response speed than standard SSPDs. The SC-2SNAP device showed a system detection efficiency (SDE) of 81.0% with wide bias current margin, a dark count rate of 6.8 counts/s, and full width at half maximum timing jitter of 68 ps, operating at 2.3 K.

  14. Assessing site-specific spatio-temporal variations in hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes of human drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, C. D.; Bowen, G. J.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen (δ2H and δ18O) are environmental forensic tracers that can be used to constrain the origin and movement of animals, people, and products. The fundamental assumption underlying this method is that water resources at different geographic locations have distinct and characteristic isotopic signatures that are assimilated into organic tissues. Although much is known about regional-scale spatio-temporal variability in δ2H and δ18O of water, few studies have addressed the question of how distinct these geographic and seasonal patterns are for any given site. To address this question, a 2-year survey of δ2H and δ18O in tap water from across the contiguous U.S. and Canada was conducted. The data show that seasonal variability in δ2H and δ18O of tap water is generally low (<10 ‰ for δ2H), and those with the highest variability can be classified as: a) cities or towns in areas of high climate seasonality, or b) large cities in arid or seasonally arid regions which access and switch among multiple water sources throughout the year. The data suggest that inter-annual variation in tap water isotope ratios is typically low, with a median difference for month-month pairs during the 2 sampling years of 2.7 (δ2H). The results from this study confirm the existence of temporal variability in δ2H and δ18O of tap water, but suggest that this variability in human-managed systems is highly damped and may be amenable to classification, modeling, and prediction. In all, the data provide the foundation for incorporating temporal variation in predictive models of water and organic δ2H and δ18O, leading to more robust and statistically defensible tests of geographic origin.

  15. Temporal variation of nitrogen balance within constructed wetlands treating slightly polluted water using a stable nitrogen isotope experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanguang; Lei, Qiongye; Li, Zhengkui; Han, Huayang

    2016-02-01

    Slightly polluted water has become one of the main sources of nitrogen contaminants in recent years, for which constructed wetlands (CW) is a typical and efficient treatment. However, the knowledge about contribution of individual nitrogen removal pathways and nitrogen balance in constructed wetlands is still limited. In this study, a stable-isotope-addition experiment was performed in laboratory-scale constructed wetlands treating slightly polluted water to determine quantitative contribution of different pathways and temporal variation of nitrogen balance using Na(15)NO3 as tracer. Microbial conversion and substrate retention were found to be the dominant pathways in nitrogen removal contributing 24.4-79.9 and 8.9-70.7 %, respectively, while plant contributed only 4.6-11.1 % through direct assimilation but promoted the efficiency of other pathways. In addition, microbial conversion became the major way to remove N whereas nitrogen retained in substrate at first was gradually released to be utilized by microbes and plants over time. The findings indicated that N2 emission representing microbial conversion was not only the major but also permanent nitrogen removal process, thus keeping a high efficiency of microbial conversion is important for stable and efficient nitrogen removal in constructed wetlands.

  16. Experimental evaluation of stable long term operation of semiconductor magnetic sensors at ITER relevant environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakova, I.; Belyaev, S.; Bulavin, M.; Brudnyi, V.; Chekanov, V.; Coccorese, V.; Duran, I.; Gerasimov, S.; Holyaka, R.; Kargin, N.; Konopleva, R.; Kost, Ya.; Kuech, T.; Kulikov, S.; Makido, O.; Moreau, Ph; Murari, A.; Quercia, A.; Shurygin, F.; Strikhanov, M.; Timoshyn, S.; Vasil'evskii, I.; Vinichenko, A.

    2015-08-01

    The paper deals with radiation resistant sensors and their associated measuring instrumentation developed in the course of R and D activities carried out in the framework of an international collaboration. The first trial tests of three-dimensional (3D) probes with Hall sensors have been performed in European tokamaks TORE SUPRA (2004) and JET (2005). Later in 2009 six sets of 3D probes were installed in JET and now continue to operate. The statistical analysis performed in 2014 on the basis of the JET database have demonstrated stable long term operation of all 18 sensors of 3D probes. The results of measurements conducted at the neutron fluxes of nuclear reactors have demonstrated the operability of the sensors up to high neutron fluences of F  >  1018n • cm-2 that exceeds the maximum one for the locations of steady state sensors in ITER over its total lifetime.

  17. Nuclear DNA synthesis in vitro is mediated via stable replication forks assembled in a temporally specific fashion in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, N.H.; Stillman, B.W.

    1988-05-01

    A cell-free nuclear replication system that is S-phase specific, that requires the activity of DNA polymerase alpha, and that is stimulated three- to eightfold by cytoplasmic factors from S-phase cells was used to examine the temporal specificity of chromosomal DNA synthesis in vitro. Temporal specificity of DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei was assessed directly by examining the replication of restriction fragments derived from the amplified 200-kilobase dihydrofolate reductase domain of methotrexate-resistant CHOC 400 cells as a function of the cell cycle. In nuclei prepared from cells collected at the G1/S boundary of the cell cycle, synthesis of amplified sequences commenced within the immediate dihydrofolate reductase origin region and elongation continued for 60 to 80 min. The order of synthesis of amplified restriction fragments in nuclei from early S-phase cells in vitro appeared to be indistinguishable from that in vivo. Nuclei prepared from CHOC 400 cells poised at later times in the S phase synthesized characteristic subsets of other amplified fragments. The specificity of fragment labeling patterns was stable to short-term storage at 4/sup 0/C. The occurrence of stimulatory factors in cytosol extracts was cell cycle dependent in that minimal stimulation was observed with early G1-phase extracts, whereas maximal stimulation was observed with cytosol extracts from S-phase cells. Chromosomal synthesis was not observed in nuclei from G1 cells, nor did cytosol extracts from S-phase cells induce chromosomal replication in G1 nuclei. In contrast to chromosomal DNA synthesis, mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro was not stimulated by cytoplasmic factors and occurred at equivalent rates throughout the G1 and S phases.

  18. Exactness of the generalized Dolbeault complex for k Dirac operators in the stable rank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krump, Lukáš; Salač, Tomáš

    2012-09-01

    The Hartog's type phenomena in several complex variables are best understood in terms of the Dolbeault sequence. A lot of attention was paid in the last decades to its analogue in the function theory of several Clifford variables, i.e. the Dirac operator in several variables. A so-called BGG resolution of this operator is then an analogue to the Dolbeault sequence. The complete description is known in dimension 4. Much less is known in higher dimensions. The case of three variables was described completely by F. Colombo, I. Sabadini, F. Sommen, D. C. Struppa. The full description of the complex for all dimensions is not known at present. In the case of the stable rank (i.e., when the number of variables is less or equal to the half of the even dimension), certain progress has been done. In the paper, we construct the resolution for the case of k variables in the stable range, we show the case of k = 4 in details, and we show the exactness of this sequence. The tools used in the construction are the Penrose transform, Čech cohomology and Leray theorem.

  19. Functional connectivity MRI and post-operative language performance in temporal lobe epilepsy: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Pravatà, Emanuele; Sestieri, Carlo; Colicchio, Gabriella; Colosimo, Cesare; Romani, Gian Luca; Caulo, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    Anterior temporal lobectomy is an effective treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy of temporal origin, although new language impairment may develop after surgery. Since correlations between functional connectivity (FC) MRI of the language network and verbal-IQ performance before surgery have recently been reported, we investigated the existence of correlations between the preoperative FC of the language network and post-operative verbal-IQ decline. FC between nodes of the language network of the two hemispheres (Interhemispheric-FC) and within nodes of the left hemisphere (LH-FC) and language lateralization indexes were estimated in five right-handed patients with non-tumoral left temporal lobe epilepsy undergoing anterior temporal lobectomy. Correlations between preoperative FC measures and lateralization indexes, and the post-operative (12 months) neuropsychological verbal-IQ decline were investigated. Verbal-IQ decline was inversely correlated with the degree of left lateralization and directly correlated with the strength of Interhemispheric-FC. No significant correlation was found between LH-FC and post-operative verbal-IQ change. The results from this limited number of patients suggest that a stronger preoperative connectivity between homologue regions, associated with the absence of a definite hemispheric lateralization, appears to be an unfavorable prognostic biomarker.

  20. Temporal evolution of stable water isotopologues in cloud droplets in a hill cap cloud in central Europe (HCCT-2010)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiegel, J.K.; Aemisegger, F.; Scholl, M.; Wienhold, F.G.; Collett, J.L.; Lee, T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Mertes, S.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.; Werner, Roland A.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present the first study resolving the temporal evolution of δ2H and δ18O values in cloud droplets during 13 different cloud events. The cloud events were probed on a 937 m high mountain chain in Germany in the framework of the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010) in September and October 2010. The δ values of cloud droplets ranged from −77‰ to −15‰ (δ2H) and from −12.1‰ to −3.9‰ (δ18O) over the whole campaign. The cloud water line of the measured δ values was δ2H=7.8×δ18O+13×10−3, which is of similar slope, but with higher deuterium excess than other Central European Meteoric Water Lines. Decreasing δ values in the course of the campaign agree with seasonal trends observed in rain in central Europe. The deuterium excess was higher in clouds developing after recent precipitation revealing episodes of regional moisture recycling. The variations in δ values during one cloud event could either result from changes in meteorological conditions during condensation or from variations in the δ values of the water vapor feeding the cloud. To test which of both aspects dominated during the investigated cloud events, we modeled the variation in δ values in cloud water using a closed box model. We could show that the variation in δ values of two cloud events was mainly due to changes in local temperature conditions. For the other eleven cloud events, the variation was most likely caused by changes in the isotopic composition of the advected and entrained vapor. Frontal passages during two of the latter cloud events led to the strongest temporal changes in both δ2H (≈ 6‰ per hour) and δ18O (≈ 0.6‰ per hour). Moreover, a detailed trajectory analysis for the two longest cloud events revealed that variations in the entrained vapor were most likely related to rain out or changes in relative humidity and temperature at the moisture source region or both. This study illustrates the sensitivity of stable isotope

  1. Temporal and spatial variability in stable isotope compositions of a freshwater mussel: Implications for biomonitoring and ecological studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gustafson, L.; Showers, W.; Kwak, T.; Levine, J.; Stoskopf, M.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotopes can be used to elucidate ecological relationships in community and trophic studies. Findings are calibrated against baselines, e.g. from a producer or primary consumer, assumed to act as a reference to the isotopic context created by spatio-temporal attributes such as geography, climate, nutrient, and energy sources. The ability of an organism to accurately represent a community base depends on how, and over what time-scale, it assimilates ambient materials. Freshwater mussels have served as references for trophic studies of freshwater communities and as indicators of change in nutrient pollution load or source. Their suitability as reference animals has not yet been fully explored, however. We conducted a series of studies examining the suitability of freshwater mussels as isotopic baselines, using their ability to reflect variation in ambient nutrient loads as a case scenario. (1) We analyzed bivalve foot tissue ??15N and ??13C from 22 stream reaches in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, USA to show that compositions varied substantially among locations. Site mean bivalve ??13C values correlated with site ambient particulate organic matter (POM) ??13C values, and site mean bivalve ??15N values correlated with site ambient water dissolved ??15N-NO3 values. (2) Similarity of results among sample types demonstrated that the minimally invasive hemolymph sample is a suitable substitute for foot tissue in ??15N analyses, and that small sample sizes generate means representative of a larger population. Both findings can help minimize the impact of sampling on imperiled freshwater mussel populations. (3) In a bivalve transplantation study we showed that hemolymph ??15N compositions responded to a shift in ambient dissolved ??15N-NO3, although slowly. The tissue turnover time for bivalve hemolymph was 113 days. We conclude that bivalves serve best as biomonitors of chronic, rather than acute, fluctuations in stream nutrient loads, and provide initial

  2. Spatial and temporal migration patterns of Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) in the southwest as revealed by stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, K.L.; van Riper, Charles; Theimer, T.C.; Paxton, E.H.

    2007-01-01

    We used stable hydrogen isotopes (??D) to identify the breeding locations of Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) migrating through five sites spanning a cross-section of the species' southwestern migration route during the springs of 2003 and 2004. Determining the temporal and spatial patterns of migration and degree of population segregation during migration is critical to understanding long-term population trends of migrant birds. At all five migration sites, we found a significant negative relationship between the date Wilson's Warblers passed through the sampling station and ??D values of their feathers. These data were consistent with a pattern of "leap-frog" migration, in which individuals that bred the previous season at southern latitudes migrated through migration stations earlier than individuals that had previously bred at more northern latitudes. We documented that this pattern was consistent across sites and in multiple years. This finding corroborates previous research conducted on Wilson's Warbler during the fall migration. In addition, mean ??D values became more negative across sampling stations from west to east, with the mean ??D values at each station corresponding to different geographic regions of the Wilson's Warblers' western breeding range. These data indicate that Wilson's Warblers passing through each station represented a specific regional subset of the entire Wilson's Warbler western breeding range. As a result, habitat alterations at specific areas across the east-west expanse of the bird's migratory route in the southwestern United States could differentially affect Wilson's Warblers at different breeding areas. This migration information is critical for management of Neotropical migrants, especially in light of the rapid changes presently occurring over the southwestern landscape. ?? The American Ornithologists' Union, 2007.

  3. Photonic temporal integration of broadband intensity waveforms over long operation time windows.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Mohammad H; Park, Yongwoo; Azaña, José

    2011-09-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel design for temporal integration of microwave and optical intensity waveforms with combined high processing speed and a long operation time window. It is based on concatenating in series a discrete-time (low-speed) photonic integrator and a high-speed analog time-limited intensity integrator. This scheme is demonstrated here using a cascaded fiber-based interferometers' system (as a passive eight-point discrete-time integrator) and an analog time-limited intensity integrator. The latter is based on temporal intensity modulation of the input waveform with a rectangular-like incoherent energy spectrum followed by linear dispersion. Using this setup, we experimentally achieve accurate time integration of intensity signals with ~36 GHz bandwidths over an operation time window of ~4 ns, corresponding to a processing time-bandwidth product of >144.

  4. Does the ocean-atmosphere system have more than one stable mode of operation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, W. S.; Peteet, D. M.; Rind, D.

    1985-01-01

    The climate record obtained from two long Greenland ice cores reveals several brief climate oscillations during glacial time. The most recent of these oscillations, also found in continental pollen records, has greatest impact in the area under the meteorological influence of the northern Atlantic, but none in the United States. This suggests that these oscillations are caused by fluctuations in the formation rate of deep water in the northern Atlantic. As the present production of deep water in this area is driven by an excess of evaporation over precipitation and continental runoff, atmospheric water transport may be an important element in climate change. Changes in the production rate of deep water in this sector of the ocean may push the climate system from one quasi-stable mode of operation to another.

  5. Improvements in mixing operations of water treatment plants by use of a stable finite element model.

    PubMed

    Vellando, P; Fe, J; Juncosa, R; Padilla, F

    2007-06-01

    This work shows improvements made in mixing operations at water treatment plants, as a result of the hydrodynamic analysis of the mixing processes carried out by the use of a Finite Element Model. The code, developed in the Civil Engineering Department of the University of La Coruña, Spain, solves the Navier-Stokes equations that rule viscous incompressible flow by using a Streamline Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) stabilization technique. The incorporation of the SUPG formulation leads to obtaining stable solutions for Reynolds numbers of a moderate order in connection with meshes that are not very refined. Some water treatment units present significant deficiencies in their design. The numerical evaluation of the flow avoids the high expenses of the trial-and-error processes involved in installing and removing the mixing mechanisms and those derived from the need to halt the water treatment processes. As a result, an optimum design of the treatment plant is obtained at a low cost.

  6. Temporal and spatial variability of stable isotopes of the water molecule in the Ebro River basin, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrel, Philippe; Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Millot, Romain

    2014-05-01

    Variations in the stable-isotope O and H composition in a catchment's water balance are mainly caused by natural variations in the isotopic composition of rainfall, through the mixing with pre-existing waters and the influence of evaporation. Stable isotopes of water can be considered as conservative and as not being affected by exchanges with soil or rock. Stable isotopes were analysed in the surface waters along the course of the Ebro River, in main tributaries of the Ebro river, in some groundwater, and over a one year survey at the outlet. The global meteoric-water line is used to represent the meteoric input as well as the local rainwater characteristics measured in five stations, all surrounding the Ebro catchment. Mean weighted rain input showed enriched values for four stations and a depleted one for the latter (large continental circulation of air masses). The δ18O and δ2H relationships for surface- and ground waters collected in the Ebro catchment with other rivers draining the French side of the Pyrenees or along the Mediterranean Sea are compiled. Most of the points clearly plot close to the global and local meteoric-water lines reflecting a meteoric origin and a lack of significant evaporation or oxygen isotopes exchanges between water and the rock matrix. The tributaries present large variations in their δ18O and δ2H signatures but only the Guadalope river has an evaporated signal.ghe most depleted values are observed for the tributaries draining the Pyrenees agreeing with the Cauterets and Garonne river signatures on the French side. The Aragon, also draining the Pyrenees, has a more enriched signature that agree with the one observed in the Adour river on the French side. However, all tributaries have more depleted values than all mean rain water signal on the Ebro catchment as given by the local rain monitoring stations. If the Burgos station is considered as representative of long range continental transport, the depleted values in the

  7. Stable operation of a Secure QKD system in the real-world setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Akihisa

    2007-06-01

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) now steps forward from the proof of principle to the validation of the practical feasibility. Nevertheless, the QKD technology should respond to the challenges from the real-world such as stable operation against the fluctuating environment, and security proof under the practical setting. We report our recent progress on stable operation of a QKD system, and key generation with security assurance. A QKD system should robust to temperature fluctuation in a common office environment. We developed a loop-mirror, a substitution of a Faraday mirror, to allow easy compensation for the temperature dependence of the device. Phase locking technique was also employed to synchronize the system clock to the quantum signals. This technique is indispensable for the transmission system based on the installed fiber cables, which stretch and shrink due to the temperature change. The security proof of QKD, however, has assumed the ideal conditions, such as the use of a genuine single photon source and/or unlimited computational resources. It has been highly desirable to give an assurance of security for practical systems, where the ideal conditions are no longer satisfied. We have constructed a theory to estimate the leakage information on the transmitted key under the practically attainable conditions, and have developed a QKD system equipped with software for secure key distillation. The QKD system generates the final key at the rate of 2000 bps after 20 km fiber transmission. Eavesdropper's information on the final key is guaranteed to be less than 2-7 per bit. This is the first successful generation of the secure key with quantitative assurance of the upper bound of the leakage information. It will put forth the realization of highly secure metropolitan optical communication network against any types of eavesdropping.

  8. Stable, high-performance operation of a fiber-coupled superconducting nanowire avalanche photon detector.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shigehito; Yabuno, Masahiro; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka

    2017-03-20

    Recent progress in the development of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SSPD or SNSPD) has delivered excellent performance, and has had a great impact on a range of research fields. Significant efforts are being made to further improve the technology, and a primary concern remains to resolve the trade-offs between detection efficiency (DE), timing jitter, and response speed. We present a stable and high-performance fiber-coupled niobium titanium nitride superconducting nanowire avalanche photon detector (SNAP) that resolves these trade-offs. Autocorrelation function measurement revealed an afterpulse-free operation in serially connected two SNAP (SC-2SNAP), even in the absence of a choke inductor, achieving a 7.65 times faster response speed than standard SSPDs. The SC-2SNAP device showed a system detection efficiency (SDE) of 81.0% with wide bias current margin, a dark count rate of 6.8 counts/s, and full width at half maximum timing jitter of 68 ps, operating in a practical Gifford-McMahon cryocooler system.

  9. Imaging Modality of Choice for Pre-Operative Cochlear Imaging: HRCT vs. MRI Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Rajendra N.; Shah, Dipali C.; Vishwakarma, Rajesh; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Congenital inner ear malformations occur as a result of the arrest or aberrance of inner ear development due to the heredity, gene mutation or other factors. Ever since the availability of cochlear implants, pre-operative evaluation by imaging of temporal bone has gained much attention. Precise selection of the candidate for cochlear implant dependent on preoperative radiological investigations. Only CT (Computed Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) can provide a better picture of anatomy and pathology. Aim To compare pre-operative imaging findings of both MRI and High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) temporal bone and to find the best modality of choice in patients with bilateral profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SNHL). Materials and Methods This was a prospective, longitudinal, observational study conducted between June 2010 to November 2012. A total of 144 temporal bones were evaluated in 72 children with bilateral profound SNHL with congenital inner ear malformations. Each temporal bone was considered as a single case (144 cases). All the patients underwent HRCT and high field MRI study. MRI study included T2 W axial 3D FIESTA (Fast Imaging Employing Steady-state Acquisition) sequence. Anatomic abnormalities in each temporal bone were described and noted. For complete and better evaluation of Vestibulo-Cochlear Nerve (VCN) additional 3D oblique parasagittal view was taken perpendicular to the internal auditory canal with a small Field Of View (FOV). Results HRCT and MRI allowed accurate detection of inner ear malformations in children with bilateral SNHL. Majority of the patients presented with multiple structural abnormalities of inner ear. The common pathologies detected in the study were semicircular canal abnormality (89/144) followed by cochlear abnormalities (39/144). Most common cochlear abnormality was Mondini’s deformity (14/144). MRI demonstrated absent of vestibulo-cochlear nerve in 15 cases. Conclusion Few

  10. Delay Discounting Rates Are Temporally Stable in an Equivalent Present Value Procedure Using Theoretical and Area under the Curve Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Justin; McKay, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Temporal discounting rates have become a popular dependent variable in social science research. While choice procedures are commonly employed to measure discounting rates, equivalent present value (EPV) procedures may be more sensitive to experimental manipulation. However, their use has been impeded by the absence of test-retest reliability data.…

  11. Tracing geographic and temporal trafficking patterns for marijuana in Alaska using stable isotopes (C, N, O and H).

    PubMed

    Booth, Amanda L; Wooller, Matthew J; Howe, Timothy; Haubenstock, Norma

    2010-10-10

    A large proportion of Alaska Bureau of Alcohol and Drug Enforcement's time is spent controlling the production and distribution of marijuana. Marijuana in Alaska can originate from within (e.g., Fairbanks and the Matanuska-Susitna Valley) or from outside Alaska (e.g., Latin America, Canada and other locations in the United States of America). However it is difficult to track the supply proportions from various potential geographic areas in remote areas of the globe, such as Alaska. This is due to an insufficient ability to trace the source regions from which confiscated marijuana was originally grown. We analyzed multiple stable isotopes (C, N, O and H) in marijuana confiscated in Alaska, to identify the likely geographic source from which the marijuana originated. Fifty-six of the marijuana samples were from known grow locations in Alaska. These samples exhibited stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios (δ(18)O and δD) of 10.4‰ to 37.0‰ and -203.1‰ to -136.7‰, respectively. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) of the same samples ranged from -53.8‰ to -26.4‰ and -12.5‰ to 12.1‰, respectively. We use these data to compare with stable isotope analyses of marijuana confiscated in Alaska, but from unknown grow locations, which were found to have δ(18)O and δD ranging from 10.0‰ to 34.5‰ and -214.6‰ to -107.5‰, respectively. The large range of data suggests that the samples originated from multiple sources ranging from low to high latitudes. A large range in δ(15)N values from the samples was also evident (-5.0‰ to 14.7‰). Most intriguing of all was the unexpected large range in the stable carbon isotope compositions of the samples (-61.8‰ to -24.6‰). Twelve of the samples were found to have an exceedingly low δ(13)C values (-36.1‰ to -61.8‰) compared to typical δ(13)C values of other plants using C3 photosynthesis. Interior growing conditions (e.g., hydroponic and green house) and a variety of CO(2

  12. Stable “Trait” Variance of Temperament as a Predictor of the Temporal Course of Depression and Social Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Naragon-Gainey, Kristin; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Brown, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    A large body of research has found robust associations between dimensions of temperament (e.g., neuroticism, extraversion) and the mood and anxiety disorders. However, mood-state distortion (i.e., the tendency for current mood state to bias ratings of temperament) likely confounds these associations, rendering their interpretation and validity unclear. This issue is of particular relevance to clinical populations who experience elevated levels of general distress. The current study used the “trait-state-occasion” latent variable model (Cole, Martin, & Steiger, 2005) to separate the stable components of temperament from transient, situational influences such as current mood state. We examined the predictive power of the time-invariant components of temperament on the course of depression and social phobia in a large, treatment-seeking sample with mood and/or anxiety disorders (N = 826). Participants were assessed three times over the course of one year, using interview and self-report measures; most participants received treatment during this time. Results indicated that both neuroticism/behavioral inhibition (N/BI) and behavioral activation/positive affect (BA/P) consisted largely of stable, time-invariant variance (57% to 78% of total variance). Furthermore, the time-invariant components of N/BI and BA/P were uniquely and incrementally predictive of change in depression and social phobia, adjusting for initial symptom levels. These results suggest that the removal of state variance bolsters the effect of temperament on psychopathology among clinically distressed individuals. Implications for temperament-psychopathology models, psychopathology assessment, and the stability of traits are discussed. PMID:24016004

  13. Devices and methods of operation thereof for providing stable flow for centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J. (Inventor); Stevens, Mark A. (Inventor); Jett, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Centrifugal compressor flow stabilizing devices and methods of operation thereof are disclosed that act upon the flow field discharging from the impeller of a centrifugal compressor and modify the flow field ahead of the diffuser vanes such that flow conditions contributing to rotating stall and surge are reduced or even eliminated. In some embodiments, shaped rods and methods of operation thereof are disclosed, whereas in other embodiments reverse-tangent air injection devices and methods are disclosed.

  14. Elastomeric Microchip Electrospray Emitter for Stable Cone-Jet Mode Operation in the Nanoflow Regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Irimia, Daniel; Toner, Mehmet; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-05-15

    Despite widespread interest in applying lab-on-a-chip technologies to mass spectrometry (MS)-based analyses, the coupling of microfluidics to electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS remains challenging. We report a robust, integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip interface for ESI-MS using simple and widely accessible microfabrication procedures. The interface uses an auxiliary channel to provide electrical contact in the Taylor cone of the electrospray without sample loss or dilution. The electric field at the channel terminus is enhanced by two vertical cuts that cause the interface to taper to a line rather than to a point, and the formation of small Taylor cones at the channel exit ensures sub-nL post-column dead volumes. While comparable ESI-MS sensitivities were achieved using both microchip and conventional fused silica capillary emitters, stable cone-jet mode electrospray could be established over a far broader range of flow rates (from 50–1000 nL/min) and applied potentials using the microchip emitters. This special feature of the microchip emitter should minimize the fine tuning required for electrospray optimization and make the stable electrospray more resistant to external perturbations.

  15. Highly Stable Spatio-Temporal Mechanical Characterization of Nanocontact between Sharp Tips Using Electrostatic Microactuator inside Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Tadashi; Sato, Takaaki; Nabeya, Shinsuke; Kakushima, Kuniyuki; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    A microelectromechanical systems-in-transmission electron microscope (MEMS-in-TEM) setup was established to characterize mechanical properties of a nanostructure captured or generated between tips, while observing its shape and deformation. This setup achieved a stable actuation for several tens of minutes with sub-nm accuracy, and a precise TEM observation of 0.2 nm in spatial resolution. The displacements of a tip-moving actuator with and without the nanostructure were measured from TEM images; the difference between them indicates a force applied to the nanostructure. The force was obtained by multiplying the displacement difference with a spring constant of supporting beams of the tip. Here, we performed an approach-formation-retraction-fracture experiment of a gold nanocontact between tips under TEM observation over 10 min at the actuation speed of 0.1 nm/s. The force during the retraction-fracture process was measured. The maximum force was 66 nN due to the work hardening by the existence of dislocations. This setup will be a powerful tool to examine the role of atomic scale structure for the mechanical characteristics and the extremely-low-speed kinetics.

  16. A uniquely defined entropy stable matrix dissipation operator for high Mach number ideal MHD and compressible Euler simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Andrew R.; Derigs, Dominik; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2017-03-01

    We describe a unique averaging procedure to design an entropy stable dissipation operator for the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and compressible Euler equations. Often in the derivation of an entropy conservative numerical flux function much care is taken in the design and averaging of the entropy conservative numerical flux. We demonstrate in this work that if the discrete dissipation operator is not carefully chosen as well it can have deleterious effects on the numerical approximation. This is particularly true for very strong shocks or high Mach number flows present, for example, in astrophysical simulations. We present the underlying technique of how to construct a unique averaging technique for the discrete dissipation operator. We also demonstrate numerically the increased robustness of the approximation.

  17. Graph theoretical stable allocation as a tool for reproduction of control by human operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nooijen, Ronald; Ertsen, Maurits; Kolechkina, Alla

    2016-04-01

    During the design of central control algorithms for existing water resource systems under manual control it is important to consider the interaction with parts of the system that remain under manual control and to compare the proposed new system with the existing manual methods. In graph theory the "stable allocation" problem has good solution algorithms and allows for formulation of flow distribution problems in terms of priorities. As a test case for the use of this approach we used the algorithm to derive water allocation rules for the Gezira Scheme, an irrigation system located between the Blue and White Niles south of Khartoum. In 1925, Gezira started with 300,000 acres; currently it covers close to two million acres.

  18. Raceway control with oxygen, steam and coal for stable blast furnace operation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, L.M.

    1996-12-31

    Tata Steel operates seven blast furnaces at its Jamshedpur works. Coal injection was introduced in the three larger furnaces starting in 1991, and coal tar injection was commissioned in the A blast furnace in June, 1996. Presently, a coal injection level of 130 kg/thm has been achieved at G blast furnace, which is the newest and the largest among all blast furnaces at Tata Steel. The paper discusses the operational features of the blast furnaces at Tata Steel, practical limits of fuel injection, the philosophy of the control of raceway conditions, and experience with fuel injection at Tata Steel.

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) biomarkers in soil and sediment tracing: towards improved sampling protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiffarth, Dominic; Petticrew, Ellen; Owens, Philip; Lobb, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of CSSI in biomarkers, specifically fatty acids and derivatives thereof, has recently been investigated as a potential tracer in soil and sediment fingerprinting. The use of CSSIs is of interest because of the potential to discern sediment providence based on land use, which is often difficult or not possible with other tracing techniques alone, such as geochemistry and fallout radionuclides. However, challenges exist in producing a representative sample of potential source materials. This presentation focuses on the development of improved protocols for sample collection. The data presented here are part of a larger investigation into using CSSIs as tracers in an agricultural watershed (South Tobacco Creek) in southern Manitoba, Canada. Extensive sampling was performed throughout the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons in several locations within the watershed, with a focus on capturing within and between field spatial and temporal variability in one particular sub-watershed (the "Stepler" watershed). The Stepler watershed provided a unique opportunity to perform sampling in a natural environment where agricultural crops were hydrologically separated, thereby allowing for a sampling regime of transects strategically placed with little influence from nearby crops. A portion of the data which has been analyzed, showing temporal and spatial variability in terms of carbon stable isotope signal, biomarker concentrations and soil organic carbon, is presented. As CSSI protocols for tracing are still in development, these data aid in determining the robustness of the technique as well as helping to inform sampling approaches.

  20. Temporal changes in methane stable isotopes in polar ice cores: big picture and implications for ecosystem changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Michael; Schmitt, Jochen; Seth, Barbara; Beck, Jonas; Fischer, Hubertus

    2014-05-01

    Methane (CH4) is the third most important greenhouse gas after water vapour and carbon dioxide (CO2). Since the industrial revolution the mixing ratio of CH4 in the atmosphere rose to ~1800 ppb, a value never reached within the last 800 000 years. Nowadays, CH4 contributes ~20% to the total radiative forcing from all of the long-lived greenhouse gases. This CH4 increase can only be assessed in relation to natural methane changes in the past. Firn air and air enclosures in polar ice cores represent the only direct paleoatmospheric archive. The latter show that atmospheric CH4 concentrations changed in concert with northern hemisphere temperature during both glacial/interglacial transitions as well as rapid climate changes (Dansgaard-Oeschger events), however, the sources of the methane concentration changes are still a matter of debate. Stable isotopes of methane (δ13CH4 and δD(CH4)) may help to distinguish differences in the magnitude of source type emissions (e.g. Bock et al. 2010). However, recently we could show that it is difficult to interpret the atmospheric loading of methane by relative source mix changes alone (Möller et al. 2013). In fact it appears, that the carbon isotopic signature (δ13CH4) of e.g. tropical wetlands undergoes drastic shifts connected to climate, CO2, sea level or potentially other unknown processes. Here we present the big picture derived from the EDML (European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica, Dronning Maud Land) and Vostok ice cores (Möller et al. 2013) and additional new dual isotope data from 4 ice cores from both poles that cover three interglacials: the Holocene, MIS 5 and MIS 11. The contribution sheds light on our current understanding of methane biogeochemistry and discusses open questions. References: Bock, M., J. Schmitt, L. Möller, R. Spahni, T. Blunier, H. Fischer (2010). 'Hydrogen Isotopes Preclude Marine Hydrate CH4 Emissions at the Onset of Dansgaard-Oeschger Events', Science, 328, 1686-1689 Möller, L., T

  1. The contribution of thermophilic anaerobic digestion to the stable operation of wastewater sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Zábranská, J; Dohányos, M; Jenícek, P; Zaplatílková, P; Kutil, J

    2002-01-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge has been successfully operated in full-scale tanks almost three years. The higher loading capacity and specific biogas production rate in comparison with mesophilic digestion was proved. Thermophilic anaerobic sludge is also more resistant against foaming problems. Biogas from thermophilic tanks contains less hydrogen sulphide and other malodorous substances. Pathogens removal rate is apparently more efficient in the thermophilic process.

  2. Design optimization of MR-compatible rotating anode x-ray tubes for stable operation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Mihye; Lillaney, Prasheel; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Hybrid x-ray/MR systems can enhance the diagnosis and treatment of endovascular, cardiac, and neurologic disorders by using the complementary advantages of both modalities for image guidance during interventional procedures. Conventional rotating anode x-ray tubes fail near an MR imaging system, since MR fringe fields create eddy currents in the metal rotor which cause a reduction in the rotation speed of the x-ray tube motor. A new x-ray tube motor prototype has been designed and built to be operated close to a magnet. To ensure the stability and safety of the motor operation, dynamic characteristics must be analyzed to identify possible modes of mechanical failure. In this study a 3D finite element method (FEM) model was developed in order to explore possible modifications, and to optimize the motor design. The FEM provides a valuable tool that permits testing and evaluation using numerical simulation instead of building multiple prototypes.Methods: Two experimental approaches were used to measure resonance characteristics: the first obtained the angular speed curves of the x-ray tube motor employing an angle encoder; the second measured the power spectrum using a spectrum analyzer, in which the large amplitude of peaks indicates large vibrations. An estimate of the bearing stiffness is required to generate an accurate FEM model of motor operation. This stiffness depends on both the bearing geometry and adjacent structures (e.g., the number of balls, clearances, preload, etc.) in an assembly, and is therefore unknown. This parameter was set by matching the FEM results to measurements carried out with the anode attached to the motor, and verified by comparing FEM predictions and measurements with the anode removed. The validated FEM model was then used to sweep through design parameters [bearing stiffness (1×10{sup 5}–5×10{sup 7} N/m), shaft diameter (0.372–0.625 in.), rotor diameter (2.4–2.9 in.), and total length of motor (5.66–7.36 in.)] to

  3. Design optimization of MR-compatible rotating anode x-ray tubes for stable operation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mihye; Lillaney, Prasheel; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Hybrid x-ray/MR systems can enhance the diagnosis and treatment of endovascular, cardiac, and neurologic disorders by using the complementary advantages of both modalities for image guidance during interventional procedures. Conventional rotating anode x-ray tubes fail near an MR imaging system, since MR fringe fields create eddy currents in the metal rotor which cause a reduction in the rotation speed of the x-ray tube motor. A new x-ray tube motor prototype has been designed and built to be operated close to a magnet. To ensure the stability and safety of the motor operation, dynamic characteristics must be analyzed to identify possible modes of mechanical failure. In this study a 3D finite element method (FEM) model was developed in order to explore possible modifications, and to optimize the motor design. The FEM provides a valuable tool that permits testing and evaluation using numerical simulation instead of building multiple prototypes. Methods: Two experimental approaches were used to measure resonance characteristics: the first obtained the angular speed curves of the x-ray tube motor employing an angle encoder; the second measured the power spectrum using a spectrum analyzer, in which the large amplitude of peaks indicates large vibrations. An estimate of the bearing stiffness is required to generate an accurate FEM model of motor operation. This stiffness depends on both the bearing geometry and adjacent structures (e.g., the number of balls, clearances, preload, etc.) in an assembly, and is therefore unknown. This parameter was set by matching the FEM results to measurements carried out with the anode attached to the motor, and verified by comparing FEM predictions and measurements with the anode removed. The validated FEM model was then used to sweep through design parameters [bearing stiffness (1×105–5×107 N/m), shaft diameter (0.372–0.625 in.), rotor diameter (2.4–2.9 in.), and total length of motor (5.66–7.36 in.)] to increase the

  4. Stable Electrical Operation of 6H-SiC JFETs and ICs for Thousands of Hours at 500 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Beheim, Glenn M.; Okojie, Robert S.; Chang, Carl W.; Meredith, Roger D.; Ferrier, Terry L.; Evans, Laura J.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Prokop, Norman F.

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication and testing of the first semiconductor transistors and small-scale integrated circuits (ICs) to achieve up to 3000 h of stable electrical operation at 500 C in air ambient is reported. These devices are based on an epitaxial 6H-SiC junction field-effect transistor process that successfully integrated high temperature ohmic contacts, dielectric passivation, and ceramic packaging. Important device and circuit parameters exhibited less than 10% of change over the course of the 500 C operational testing. These results establish a new technology foundation for realizing durable 500 C ICs for combustion-engine sensing and control, deep-well drilling, and other harsh-environment applications.

  5. Stable and efficient operation of a large-bore copper vapor laser with funnel-shaped, grooved copper electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Pasandideh, K.; Zand, M.; Nazari Mahroo, H.

    2017-03-01

    Using an appropriate design of electrodes and adjustment of the thyratron decoupling circuit as a high-repetition-rate and high-voltage switch, very stable operation of a copper vapor laser at high pressures was obtained. This was achieved by canceling the intense filamentation in the laser plasma at the higher pressures. The transverse grooves on the inner surface of the funnel-shaped copper electrodes permit operation of the laser up to 100 torr. This design reduces the cathode-fall voltage, and as a result reduces the thermal loading in the cathode-fall region. The optimum pressure was 80 torr. At this condition the output power was more than that observed with expensive molybdenum electrodes in a similar laser system.

  6. Frequency characteristics of an inherently stable Nd:YAG laser operated at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, Matthias; Kovalchuk, Evgeny; Peters, Achim

    2009-07-10

    We report on frequency measurements of a free-running Nd:YAG laser operating at temperatures down to 6.5 K using a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Due to lower thermal expansion and thermo-optic effects as well as reduced electron-phonon interactions in Nd:YAG at cryogenic temperatures, a laser frequency stability on the order of 10{sup -11} at {tau} < or = 30s has been achieved. Within a one-week measurement period, absolute frequency deviations were lower than 1.85 MHz. This is up to a 100-fold improvement of frequency stability compared to any existing free-running solid-state laser.

  7. RF-driven tokamak reactor with sub-ignited, thermally stable operation

    SciTech Connect

    Harten, L.P.; Bers, A.; Fuchs, V.; Shoucri, M.M.

    1981-02-01

    A Radio-Frequency Driven Tokamak Reactor (RFDTR) can use RF-power, programmed by a delayed temperature measurement, to thermally stabilize a power equilibrium below ignition, and to drive a steady state current. We propose the parameters for such a device generating approx. = 1600 MW thermal power and operating with Q approx. = 40 (= power out/power in). A one temperature zero-dimensional model allows simple analytical formulation of the problem. The relevance of injected impurities for locating the equilibrium is discussed. We present the results of a one-dimensional (radial) code which includes the deposition of the supplementary power, and compare with our zero-dimensional model.

  8. A path to stable low-torque plasma operation in ITER with test blanket modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanctot, M. J.; Snipes, J. A.; Reimerdes, H.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N.; Hanson, J. M.; Buttery, R. J.; deGrassie, J. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gray, T. K.; Grierson, B. A.; King, J. D.; Kramer, G. J.; La Haye, R. J.; Pace, D. C.; Park, J.-K.; Salmi, A.; Shiraki, D.; Strait, E. J.; Solomon, W. M.; Tala, T.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    New experiments in the low-torque ITER Q  =  10 scenario on DIII-D demonstrate that n  =  1 magnetic fields from a single row of ex-vessel control coils enable operation at ITER performance metrics in the presence of applied non-axisymmetric magnetic fields from a test blanket module (TBM) mock-up coil. With n  =  1 compensation, operation below the ITER-equivalent injected torque is successful at three times the ITER equivalent toroidal magnetic field ripple for a pair of TBMs in one equatorial port, whereas the uncompensated TBM field leads to rotation collapse, loss of H-mode and plasma current disruption. In companion experiments at high plasma beta, where the n  =  1 plasma response is enhanced, uncorrected TBM fields degrade energy confinement and the plasma angular momentum while increasing fast ion losses; however, disruptions are not routinely encountered owing to increased levels of injected neutral beam torque. In this regime, n  =  1 field compensation leads to recovery of a dominant fraction of the TBM-induced plasma pressure and rotation degradation, and an 80% reduction in the heat load to the first wall. These results show that the n  =  1 plasma response plays a dominant role in determining plasma stability, and that n  =  1 field compensation alone not only recovers most of the impact on plasma performance of the TBM, but also protects the first wall from potentially damaging heat flux. Despite these benefits, plasma rotation braking from the TBM fields cannot be fully recovered using standard error field control. Given the uncertainty in extrapolation of these results to the ITER configuration, it is prudent to design the TBMs with as low a ferromagnetic mass as possible without jeopardizing the TBM mission.

  9. A path to stable low-torque plasma operation in ITER with test blanket modules

    DOE PAGES

    Lanctot, Matthew J.; Snipes, J. A.; Reimerdes, H.; ...

    2016-12-12

    New experiments in the low-torque ITER Q = 10 scenario on DIII-D demonstrate that n = 1 magnetic fields from a single row of ex-vessel control coils enable operation at ITER performance metrics in the presence of applied non-axisymmetric magnetic fields from a test blanket module (TBM) mock-up coil. With n = 1 compensation, operation below the ITER-equivalent injected torque is successful at three times the ITER equivalent toroidal magnetic field ripple for a pair of TBMs in one equatorial port, whereas the uncompensated TBM field leads to rotation collapse, loss of H-mode and plasma current disruption. In companion experimentsmore » at high plasma beta, where the n = 1 plasma response is enhanced, uncorrected TBM fields degrade energy confinement and the plasma angular momentum while increasing fast ion losses; however, disruptions are not routinely encountered owing to increased levels of injected neutral beam torque. In this regime, n = 1 field compensation leads to recovery of a dominant fraction of the TBM-induced plasma pressure and rotation degradation, and an 80% reduction in the heat load to the first wall. These results show that the n = 1 plasma response plays a dominant role in determining plasma stability, and that n = 1 field compensation alone not only recovers most of the impact on plasma performance of the TBM, but also protects the first wall from potentially damaging heat flux. Despite these benefits, plasma rotation braking from the TBM fields cannot be fully recovered using standard error field control. Lastly, given the uncertainty in extrapolation of these results to the ITER configuration, it is prudent to design the TBMs with as low a ferromagnetic mass as possible without jeopardizing the TBM mission.« less

  10. A path to stable low-torque plasma operation in ITER with test blanket modules

    SciTech Connect

    Lanctot, Matthew J.; Snipes, J. A.; Reimerdes, H.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N.; Hanson, J. M.; Buttery, R. J.; deGrassie, J. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gray, T. K.; Grierson, B. A.; King, J. D.; Kramer, G. J.; La Haye, R. J.; Pace, D. C.; Park, J. -K.; Salmi, A.; Shiraki, D.; Strait, E. J.; Solomon, W. M.; Tala, T.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-12-12

    New experiments in the low-torque ITER Q = 10 scenario on DIII-D demonstrate that n = 1 magnetic fields from a single row of ex-vessel control coils enable operation at ITER performance metrics in the presence of applied non-axisymmetric magnetic fields from a test blanket module (TBM) mock-up coil. With n = 1 compensation, operation below the ITER-equivalent injected torque is successful at three times the ITER equivalent toroidal magnetic field ripple for a pair of TBMs in one equatorial port, whereas the uncompensated TBM field leads to rotation collapse, loss of H-mode and plasma current disruption. In companion experiments at high plasma beta, where the n = 1 plasma response is enhanced, uncorrected TBM fields degrade energy confinement and the plasma angular momentum while increasing fast ion losses; however, disruptions are not routinely encountered owing to increased levels of injected neutral beam torque. In this regime, n = 1 field compensation leads to recovery of a dominant fraction of the TBM-induced plasma pressure and rotation degradation, and an 80% reduction in the heat load to the first wall. These results show that the n = 1 plasma response plays a dominant role in determining plasma stability, and that n = 1 field compensation alone not only recovers most of the impact on plasma performance of the TBM, but also protects the first wall from potentially damaging heat flux. Despite these benefits, plasma rotation braking from the TBM fields cannot be fully recovered using standard error field control. Lastly, given the uncertainty in extrapolation of these results to the ITER configuration, it is prudent to design the TBMs with as low a ferromagnetic mass as possible without jeopardizing the TBM mission.

  11. Highly Stable Operation of Lithium Metal Batteries Enabled by the Formation of a Transient High Concentration Electrolyte Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Mei, Donghai; Engelhard, Mark H.; Cartmell, Samuel S.; Polzin, Bryant; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Xu, Wu

    2016-02-08

    Lithium (Li) metal has been extensively investigated as an anode for rechargeable battery applications due to its ultrahigh specific capacity and the lowest redox potential. However, significant challenges including dendrite growth and low Coulombic efficiency are still hindering the practical applications of rechargeable Li metal batteries. Here, we demonstrate that long-term cycling of Li metal batteries can be realized by the formation of a transient high concentration electrolyte layer near the surface of Li metal anode during high rate discharge process. The highly concentrated Li+ ions in this transient layer will immediately solvate with the available solvent molecules and facilitate the formation of a stable and flexible SEI layer composed of a poly(ethylene carbonate) framework integrated with other organic/inorganic lithium salts. This SEI layer largely suppresses the corrosion of Li metal anode by free organic solvents and enables the long-term operation of Li metal batteries. The fundamental findings in this work provide a new direction for the development and operation of Li metal batteries that could be operated at high current densities for a wide range of applications.

  12. Neuronal Diversity and Temporal Dynamics: The Unity of Hippocampal Circuit Operations

    PubMed Central

    Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the cerebral cortex, diverse types of neurons form intricate circuits and cooperate in time for the processing and storage of information. Recent advances reveal a spatiotemporal division of labor in cortical circuits, as exemplified in the CA1 hippocampal area. In particular, distinct GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric acid–releasing) cell types subdivide the surface of pyramidal cells and act in discrete time windows, either on the same or on different subcellular compartments. They also interact with glutamatergic pyramidal cell inputs in a domain-specific manner and support synaptic temporal dynamics, network oscillations, selection of cell assemblies, and the implementation of brain states. The spatiotemporal specializations in cortical circuits reveal that cellular diversity and temporal dynamics coemerged during evolution, providing a basis for cognitive behavior. PMID:18599766

  13. Spatial and temporal variations in stable carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotopic composition of symbiotic scleractinian corals.

    PubMed

    Nahon, Sarah; Richoux, Nicole B; Kolasinski, Joanna; Desmalades, Martin; Ferrier Pages, Christine; Lecellier, Gael; Planes, Serge; Berteaux Lecellier, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Tropical scleractinian corals are considered autotrophic as they rely mainly on photosynthesis-derived nutrients transferred from their photosymbionts. Corals are also able to capture and ingest suspended particulate organic matter, so heterotrophy can be an important supplementary trophic pathway to optimize coral fitness. The aim of this in situ study was to elucidate the trophic status of 10 coral species under contrasted environmental conditions in a French Polynesian lagoon. Carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotopic compositions of coral host tissues and photosymbionts were determined at 3 different fringing reefs during wet and dry seasons. Our results highlighted spatial variability in stable isotopic compositions of both coral host tissues and photosymbionts. Samples from the site with higher level of suspended particulate matter were (13)C-depleted and (15)N-enriched relative to corals and photosymbionts from less turbid sites. However, differences in both δ(13)C and δ(15)N between coral host tissues and their photosymbionts (Δ(host-photosymbionts 13)C and Δ(host-photosymbionts 15)N) were small (0.27 ± 0.76‰ and 1.40 ± 0.90‰, respectively) and similar at all sites, thus indicating no general increases in the heterotrophic pathway. Depleted δ(13)C and enriched δ(15)N values of coral host tissues measured at the most turbid site were explained by changes in isotopic composition of the inorganic nutrients taken up by photosymbionts and also by changes in rate of isotopic fractionation with environmental conditions. Our results also highlighted a lack of significant temporal variations in δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of coral host and photosymbiont tissues and in Δ(host-photosymbionts 13)C and Δ(host-photosymbionts 15)N values. This temporal stability indicated that corals remained principally autotrophic even during the wet season when photosymbiont densities were lower and the concentrations of phytoplankton were higher. Increased coral

  14. Temporal synthesis of band 3 oligomers during terminal maturation of mouse erythroblasts. Dimers and tetramers exist in the membrane as preformed stable species.

    PubMed

    Hanspal, M; Golan, D E; Smockova, Y; Yi, S J; Cho, M R; Liu, S C; Palek, J

    1998-07-01

    Band 3, the anion transport protein of the erythrocyte membrane, exists in the membrane as a mixture of dimers (B3D) and tetramers (B3T). The dimers are not linked to the skeleton and constitute the free mobile band 3 fraction. The tetramers are linked to the skeleton by their interaction with ankyrin. In this report we have examined the temporal synthesis and assembly of band 3 oligomers into the plasma membrane during red cell maturation. The oligomeric state of newly synthesized band 3 in early and late erythroblasts was analyzed by size-exclusion high-pressure liquid chromatography of band 3 extracts derived by mild extraction of plasma membranes with the nonionic detergent C12E8 (octaethylene glycol n-dodecyl monoether). This analysis revealed that at the early erythroblast stage, the newly synthesized band 3 is present predominantly as tetramers, whereas at the late stages of erythroid maturation, it is present exclusively as dimers. To examine whether the dimers and tetramers exist in the membrane as preformed stable species or whether they are interconvertible, the fate of band 3 species synthesized during erythroblast maturation was examined by pulse-chase analysis. We showed that the newly synthesized band 3 dimers and tetramers are stable and that there is no interconversion between these species in erythroblast membranes. Pulse-chase analysis followed by cellular fractionation showed that, in early erythroblasts, the newly synthesized band 3 tetramers are initially present in the microsomal fraction and later incorporated stably into the plasma membrane fraction. In contrast, in late erythroblasts the newly synthesized band 3 dimers move rapidly to the plasma membrane fraction but then recycle between the plasma membrane and microsomal fractions. Fluorescence photobleaching recovery studies showed that significant fractions of B3T and B3D are laterally mobile in early and late erythroblast plasma membranes, respectively, suggesting that many B3T

  15. Spatio-temporal distribution and sources of Pb identified by stable isotopic ratios in sediments from the Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent areas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Jian; Hu, Limin; Liu, Ming; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Xilin; Fan, Dejiang

    2017-02-15

    To understand the spatio-temporal distribution and sources of Pb in the sediments of the Yangtze River Estuary and its adjacent areas, 25 surface sediments and 1 sediment core were collected from the study areas. The concentrations of Al and Pb of these sediments exhibit a decreasing trend from the nearshore towards the offshore, with higher concentrations in the coastal areas of the East China Sea (ECS) and southwest of Jeju Island. According to the stable isotopic ratios of Pb, in combination with the elemental ratios and clay mineral data, it is inferred that sedimentary Pb in the surface sediments of the coastal areas of the ECS may come primarily from the Yangtze River, while the Pb southwest of Jeju Island is probably derived from both the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers. The particulate Pb derived from the Yangtze River was possibly dispersed along two paths: the path southward along the coastline of the ECS and the path eastward associated with the Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW), which crosses the shelf of the ECS towards the area southeast of Jeju Island. Although the Yangtze River Basin witnessed rapid economic development during the period from the late 1970s to the middle 1990s, the influence of human activity on Pb concentration remained weak in the Yangtze River Estuary. Since the early 2000s, however, sedimentary Pb has been significantly increasing in the coastal mud areas of the ECS due to the increasing influence of human activity, such as the increase in atmospheric emission of anthropogenic Pb in China, construction of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD), and the construction of smaller dams in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River. Coal combustion and the smelting of non-ferrous metals are possible anthropogenic sources for the sedimentary Pb in the Yangtze River Estuary.

  16. Temporal-Bone Measurements of the Maximum Equivalent Pressure Output and Maximum Stable Gain of a Light Driven Hearing System that Mechanically Stimulates the Umbo

    PubMed Central

    Puria, Sunil; Santa Maria, Peter Luke; Perkins, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis That maximum equivalent pressure output (MEPO) and maximum stable gain (MSG) measurements demonstrate high output and high gain margins in a Light Driven Hearing System (Earlens). Background The non-surgical Earlens consists of a light-activated balanced-armature Tympanic Lens (Lens) to drive the middle ear through direct umbo contact. The Lens is driven and powered by encoded pulses of light. In comparison to conventional hearing aids, the Earlens is designed to provide higher levels of output over a broader frequency range and a significantly higher MSG with the MEPO providing an important fitting guideline. Methods Four fresh human cadaver temporal bones were used to measure MEPO directly. To calculate MEPO and MSG, we measured the pressure close to the eardrum and stapes velocity for sound drive and light drive using the Earlens. Results The baseline sound-driven measurements are consistent with previous reports. The average MEPO (N=4) varies from 116 to 128 dB SPL in the 0.7 to 10 kHz range, with the peak occurring at 7.6 kHz. From 0.1–0.7 kHz, it varies from 83 to 121 dB SPL. For the average MSG, a broad minimum of about 10 dB occurs in the 1–4 kHz range, above which it rises as high as 42 dB at 7.6 kHz. From 0.2 to 1 kHz, the MSG decreases linearly from about 40 dB to 10 dB. Conclusion With high output and high gain margins, the Earlens may offer broader spectrum amplification for treatment of mild to severe hearing impairment. PMID:26756140

  17. First experimental demonstration of temporal hypertelescope operation with a laboratory prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyeron, L.; Olivier, S.; Delage, L.; Reynaud, F.; Armand, P.; Bousquet, E.; Benoist, J.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we report the first experimental demonstration of a temporal hypertelescope (THT). Our breadboard including eight telescopes is first tested in a manual cophasing configuration on a one-dimensional object. The point-spread function (PSF) is measured and exhibits dynamics in the range of 300. A quantitative analysis of the potential biases demonstrates that this limitation is related to the residual-phase fluctuation on each interferometric arm. Secondly, an unbalanced binary star is imaged, demonstrating the imaging capability of THTs. In addition, a two-dimensional PSF is recorded, even if the telescope array is not optimized for this purpose.

  18. Second Order of Accuracy Stable Difference Schemes for Hyperbolic Problems Subject to Nonlocal Conditions with Self-Adjoint Operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Yildirim, Ozgur

    2011-09-01

    In the present paper, two new second order of accuracy absolutely stable difference schemes are presented for the nonlocal boundary value problem {d2u(t)/dt2+Au(t) = f(t) (0≤t≤1),u(0) = ∑ j = 1nαju(λj)+φ,ut(0) = ∑ j = 1nβjut(λj)+ψ,0<λ1<λ2<…<λn≤1 for differential equations in a Hilbert space H with the self-adjoint positive definite operator A. The stability estimates for the solutions of these difference schemes are established. In practice, one-dimensional hyperbolic equation with nonlocal boundary conditions and multidimensional hyperbolic equation with Dirichlet conditions are considered. The stability estimates for the solutions of difference schemes for the nonlocal boundary value hyperbolic problems are obtained and the numerical results are presented to support our theoretical statements.

  19. Stable operation during pilot-scale anaerobic digestion of nutrient-supplemented maize/sugar beet silage.

    PubMed

    Nges, Ivo Achu; Björn, Annika; Björnsson, Lovisa

    2012-08-01

    Biogas production from maize/sugar beet silage was studied under mesophilic conditions in a continuous stirred tank reactor pilot-scale process. While energy crop mono-digestion is often performed with very long hydraulic retention times (HRTs), the present study demonstrated an efficient process operating with a 50-day HRT and a corrected total solids (TS(corr)) based organic loading rate of 3.4 kg/m(3)d. The good performance was attributed to supplementation with both macro- and micronutrients and was evidenced by good methane yields (318 m(3)/ton TS(corr)), which were comparable to laboratory maximum expected yields, plus low total volatile fatty acid concentrations (<0.8 g/L). A viscoplastic and thixotropic digester fluid behaviour was observed, and the viscosity problems common in crop mono-digestion were not seen in this study. The effluent also complied with Swedish certification standards for bio-fertilizer for farmland application. Nutrient addition thus rendered a stable biogas process, while the effluent was a good quality bio-fertilizer.

  20. Mini-Mega-TORTORA wide-field monitoring system with sub-second temporal resolution: first year of operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S.; Beskin, G.; Biryukov, A.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Katkova, E.; Perkov, A.; Sasyuk, V.

    2016-12-01

    Here we present the summary of first years of operation and the first results of a novel 9-channel wide-field optical monitoring system with sub-second temporal resolution, Mini-Mega-TORTORA (MMT-9), which is in operation now at Special Astrophysical Observatory on Russian Caucasus. The system is able to observe the sky simultaneously in either wide (˜900 square degrees) or narrow (˜100 square degrees) fields of view, either in clear light or with any combination of color (Johnson-Cousins B, V or R) and polarimetric filters installed, with exposure times ranging from 0.1 s to hundreds of seconds. The real-time system data analysis pipeline performs automatic detection of rapid transient events, both near-Earth and extragalactic. The objects routinely detected by MMT include faint meteors and artificial satellites. The pipeline for a longer time scales variability analysis is still in development.

  1. Water column distribution of stable isotopes and carbonate properties in the South-eastern Levantine basin (Eastern Mediterranean): Vertical and temporal change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisma-Ventura, G.; Yam, R.; Kress, N.; Shemesh, A.

    2016-06-01

    Water column distributions of the oxygen isotopic composition of sea-water (δ18OSW) and the stable carbon isotope ratio of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC), total alkalinity (AT) and the pH (total scale) at 25 °C (25 °CpHTotal) were investigated along the Southeast Mediterranean (SE-Med) shelf and open water, during 2009-2010. While, the vertical profiles of δ18OSW lacked a clear depth signature, those of δ13CDIC were characterized by a structure that reflects the major water masses in the Levantine basin, with noticeable vertical gradients. The δ13CDIC Suess effect of the Levantine water column was estimated from the difference between the average profiles of 1988 and 2009-2010 (Δδ13CDIC). We observed δ13CDIC temporal change, which indicates propagation of anthropogenic CO2 (Cant) to depth of about 700 m. The Modified Atlantic Water (MAW; 0-200 m) and the Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW; 200-400 m) exhibited a depletion rate of - 0.13 ± 0.03 and - 0.11 ± 0.03‰ decade- 1, respectively, representing ~ 50% of the atmospheric change, while the deep water of the Adriatic source (700-1300 m) did not change during this period. A Δδ13CDIC depletion trend was also recognized below 1350 m, corresponding to the Aegean source deep water (EMDWAeg) and therefore associated to the Eastern Mediterranean Transient (EMT) event. Anthropogenic CO2 accumulation rate of 0.38 ± 0.12 mol C m- 2 yr- 1 for the upper 700 m of the SE-Med, over the last 22 yr, was estimated on the basis of mean depth-integrated δ13CDIC Suess effect profile. Our results confirm lower accumulation rate than that of the subtropical North Atlantic, resulting due to the super-saturation with respect to CO2 of the well-stratified Levantine surface water. High pCO2 saturation during summer (+ 150 μatm), in oppose to a small degree of under-saturation in winter (- 30 μatm) was calculated from surface water AT and 25 °CpHTotal data. However, the δ13CDIC depletion trend of the LIW and the

  2. Hours of Boredom, Moments of Terror: Temporal Desynchrony in Military and Security Force Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    activity in the 2–3 hour range is well tolerated but prolonged activities which exceed a period of 4 hours in duration tend to prove more problematic...transition both in basic and advanced training. This is difficult since the “ adrenaline rush” of real operations is never quite replicated in

  3. Mesocortical dopamine neurons operate in distinct temporal domains using multimodal signaling.

    PubMed

    Lavin, Antonieta; Nogueira, Lourdes; Lapish, Christopher C; Wightman, R Mark; Phillips, Paul E M; Seamans, Jeremy K

    2005-05-18

    In vivo extracellular recording studies have traditionally shown that dopamine (DA) transiently inhibits prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons, yet recent biophysical measurements in vitro indicate that DA enhances the evoked excitability of PFC neurons for prolonged periods. Moreover, although DA neurons apparently encode stimulus salience by transient alterations in firing, the temporal properties of the PFC DA signal associated with various behaviors is often extraordinarily prolonged. The present study used in vivo electrophysiological and electrochemical measures to show that the mesocortical system produces a fast non-DA-mediated postsynaptic response in the PFC that appears to be initiated by glutamate. In contrast, short burst stimulation of mesocortical DA neurons that produced transient (<4 s) DA release in the PFC caused a simultaneous reduction in spontaneous firing (consistent with extracellular in vivo recordings) and a form of DA-induced potentiation in which evoked firing was increased for tens of minutes (consistent with in vitro measurements). We suggest that the mesocortical system might transmit fast signals about reward or salience via corelease of glutamate, whereas the simultaneous prolonged DA-mediated modulation of firing biases the long-term processing dynamics of PFC networks.

  4. Temporally and functionally dissociable retrieval processing operations revealed by event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Damian; Wilding, Edward L

    2011-06-01

    In a pair of recent studies, frontally distributed event-related potential (ERP) indices of two distinct post-retrieval processes were identified. It has been proposed that one of these processes operates over any kinds of task relevant information in service of task demands, while the other operates selectively over recovered contextual (episodic) information. The experiment described here was designed to test this account, by requiring retrieval of different kinds of contextual information to that required in previous relevant studies. Participants heard words spoken in either a male or female voice at study and ERPs were acquired at test where all words were presented visually. Half of the test words had been spoken at study. Participants first made an old/new judgment, distinguishing via key press between studied and unstudied words. For words judged 'old', participants indicated the voice in which the word had been spoken at study, and their confidence (high/low) in the voice judgment. There was evidence for only one of the two frontal old/new effects that had been identified in the previous studies. One possibility is that the ERP effect in previous studies that was tied specifically to recollection reflects processes operating over only some kinds of contextual information. An alternative is that the index reflects processes that are engaged primarily when there are few contextual features that distinguish between studied stimuli.

  5. How Stable Is Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehr, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Provides a problem where students are asked to find the point at which a soda can floating in some liquid changes its equilibrium between stable and unstable as the soda is removed from the can. Requires use of Newton's first law, center of mass, Archimedes' principle, stable and unstable equilibrium, and buoyant force position. (MVL)

  6. The Nature of Temporally Variable Methane Emissions at Oil and Natural Gas Operations in the Eagle Ford Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, T. N.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Stirm, B. H.; Conley, S. A.; Mehrotra, S.; Faloona, I. C.; Mayfield, M.; Lyon, D. R.; Alvarez, R.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the current state of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas operations, policy makers refer to national inventories and reporting programs, and therefore, it is imperative that these reports are accurate and representative. Many studies exist that investigate the reliability of current monitoring methods, however, to our knowledge the temporal variability of the magnitude and source of methane (CH4) emissions from oil and gas facilities has not been reported in the literature. We present results from a field campaign conducted in June 2014 in the Eagle Ford basin, Texas to assess the temporal variability of emissions from a variety of facilities using data obtained through four different methods. The variability of total CH4 emission rate from individual facilities was investigated by repeated measurement of emissions from five gathering facilities using two aircraft-based mass balance approaches. Basin-wide emissions variation was examined by conducting a series of eight four hour afternoon aerial surveys of two 35 x 35 km areas, with transects oriented perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction. The emission source-type and magnitude were further investigated using helicopter-based FLIR camera observations conducted repeatedly at eight oil wells, one gas well, and four gathering facilities. Results indicate a high degree of variability in day-to-day and sometimes hour-to-hour CH4 emissions magnitude. FLIR camera observations suggest that the component-level source of facility emissions is also highly variable over time, with both storage tank vent stacks and tank hatches representing important components of the observed day-to-day variability. While some emissions were due to scheduled maintenance, others appeared to occur due to faulty and/or aging equipment. Here we discuss what was learned in terms of factors that explain the observed emission rate variability.

  7. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Gilbert, Jack A; Stephens, Brent

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO2 concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ∼8×106 data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  8. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  9. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE PAGES

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; ...

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore » measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is

  10. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Indoor Environmental Conditions, Human Occupancy, and Operational Characteristics in a New Hospital Building

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO2 concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ∼8×106 data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  11. Temporal changes in the bacterial community of animal feces and their correlation with stable fly oviposition, larval development, and adult fitness

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Thais A.; Zurek, Ludek

    2014-01-01

    Stable flies are blood-feeding insects with a great negative impact on animals world wide. Larvae develop primarily in animal manure and bacteria are essential for larval development; however, the principle of this dependence is not understood. We hypothesized that as the microbial community of animal manure changes over time, it plays an important role in stable fly fitness. Two-choice bioassays were conducted using 2 week old horse manure (control) and aging horse manure (fresh to 5 week old) to evaluate the effect of manure age on stable fly oviposition. Our data showed that fresh feces did not stimulate oviposition and that the attractiveness increased as manure aged but started to decline after 3 weeks. Bioassays assessing the effect of manure age at the time of oviposition on larval development demonstrated that 1–3 week old manure supported larval development significantly better than fresh, 4, and 5 week old manure. In addition, adult fitness (body size) was significantly higher in flies from 1 and 2 week old manure comparing to that of all other treatments. Analysis of the bacterial community of aging horse manure by 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA revealed a great reduction in bacterial diversity and richness from fresh to 1–5 week old manure and a major shift from strict anaerobes in fresh manure to facultative anaerobes and strict aerobes in aged manure. Overall, the microbial community of 2 and 3 week old horse manure with its dominant bacterial taxa Rhizobium, Devosia, and Brevundimonas stimulated stable fly oviposition the most and provided a suitable habitat for larval development. These bacteria represent the candidates for studies focused on better understanding of stable fly – microbial interactions. PMID:25426108

  12. Stable CW Single Frequency Operation of Fabry-Perot Laser Diodes by Self-Injection Phase Locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerksen, Gary L.; Krainak, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    Previously, single-frequency semiconductor laser operation using fiber Bragg gratings has been achieved by tWo methods: 1) use of the FBG as the output coupler for an anti-reflection-coated semiconductor gain element'; 2) pulsed operation of a gain-switched Fabry-Perot laser diode with FBG-optical and RF-electrical feedback'. Here, we demonstrate CW single frequency operation from a non-AR coated Fabry-Perot laser diode using only FBG optical feedback.

  13. Stable CW Single-Frequency Operation of Fabry-Perot Laser Diodes by Self-Injection Phase Locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerksen, Gary L.; Krainak, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Previously, single-frequency semiconductor laser operation using fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) has been achieved by two methods: (1) use of the FBG as the output coupler for an anti-reflection-coated semiconductor gain element; (2) pulsed operation of a gain-switched Fabry-Perot laser diode with FBG-optical and RF-electrical feedback. Here, we demonstrate CW single frequency operation from a non-AR coated Fabry-Perot laser diode using only FBG optical feedback.

  14. BiCMOS operational amplifier with precise and stable dc gain for high-frequency switched capacitor circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baschirotto, A.; Alini, R.; Castello, R.

    1991-07-01

    A novel approach in the design of high-frequency switched capacitor (SC) circuits is presented. It is based on the use of simple and fast amplifiers with low but precisely controlled gain value. The effect of the precisely known and stable opamp gain is compensated for by changing the capacitor values during the synthesis of the SC cell. An example of an opamp with these features and the synthesis of a biquadratic filter based on this approach are given.

  15. Temporal Scaling of Age-Dependent Mortality: Dynamics of Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans Is Easy to Speed Up or Slow Down, but Its Overall Trajectory Is Stable.

    PubMed

    Markov, A V; Naimark, E B; Yakovleva, E U

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of aging is often described by survival curves that show the proportion of individuals surviving to a given age. The shape of the survival curve reflects the dependence of mortality on age, and it varies greatly for different organisms. In a recently published paper, Stroustrup and coauthors ((2016) Nature, 530, 103-107) showed that many factors affecting the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans do not change the shape of the survival curve, but only stretch or compress it in time. Apparently, this means that aging is a programmed process whose trajectory is difficult to change, although it is possible to speed it up or slow it down. More research is needed to clarify whether the "rule of temporal scaling" is applicable to other organisms. A good indicator of temporal scaling is the coefficient of lifespan variation: similar values of this coefficient for two samples indicate similar shape of the survival curves. Preliminary results of experiments on adaptation of Drosophila melanogaster to unfavorable food show that temporal scalability of survival curves is sometimes present in more complex organisms, although this is not a universal rule. Both evolutionary and environmental changes sometimes affect only the average lifespan without changing the coefficient of variation (in this case, temporal scaling is present), but often both parameters (i.e. both scale and shape of the survival curve) change simultaneously. In addition to the relative stability of the coefficient of variation, another possible argument in favor of genetic determination of the aging process is relatively low variability of the time of death, which is sometimes of the same order of magnitude as the variability of timing of other ontogenetic events, such as the onset of sexual maturation.

  16. Temporal variatiions of Sea ice cover in the Baltic Sea derived from operational sea ice products used in NWP.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Martin; Paul, Gerhard; Potthast, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Sea ice cover is a crucial parameter for surface fluxes of heat and moisture over water areas. The isolating effect and the much higher albedo strongly reduces the turbulent exchange of heat and moisture from the surface to the atmosphere and allows for cold and dry air mass flow with strong impact on the stability of the whole boundary layer and consequently cloud formation as well as precipitation in the downstream regions. Numerical weather centers as, ECMWF, MetoFrance or DWD use external products to initialize SST and sea ice cover in their NWP models. To the knowledge of the author there are mainly two global sea ice products well established with operational availability, one from NOAA NCEP that combines measurements with satellite data, and the other from OSI-SAF derived from SSMI/S sensors. The latter one is used in the Ostia product. DWD additionally uses a regional product for the Baltic Sea provided by the national center for shipping and hydrografie which combines observations from ships (and icebreakers) for the German part of the Baltic Sea and model analysis from the hydrodynamic HIROMB model of the Swedish meteorological service for the rest of the domain. The temporal evolution of the three different products are compared for a cold period in Februar 2012. Goods and bads will be presented and suggestions for a harmonization of strong day to day jumps over large areas are suggested.

  17. High variability in spatial and temporal size-based trophodynamics of deep-sea fishes from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge elucidated by stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, William D. K.; Sweeting, Christopher J.; Wigham, Ben D.; McGill, Rona A. R.; Polunin, Nicholas V. C.

    2013-12-01

    Demersal fish play an important role in the deep-sea ecosystem by acting as a link to mobile food in the water column, consuming benthic fauna, breaking down large food parcels and dispersing organic matter over large areas. Poor diet resolution from stomach content analysis often impairs the ability to assess differences in inter- and intra-population trophodynamics and therefore understand resource partitioning among deep-sea fishes. Antimora rostrata (predator-scavenger), Coryphaenoides armatus (predator-scavenger), Coryphaenoides brevibarbis (predator) and Halosauropsis macrochir (predator) were collected from 3 stations on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) in 2007 and 2009 to investigate trophic ecology using δ13C and δ15N. Variability in lipid-normalised δ13C (δ13Cn) and δ15N was explained by body length in all species but slope and significance of the isotope-length relationships varied both temporally and spatially. δ15N increases with length were observed in A. rostrata at all stations, C. brevibarbis and H. macrochir at one or more stations but were absent in C. armatus. δ13Cn increased with length in A. rostrata but the slope of δ13Cn-length relationships varied spatially and temporally in C. armatus and C. brevibarbis. The co-occurring δ13Cn and δ15N size-based trends in A. rostrata and H. macrochir suggested that size-based trends were a result of increasing trophic position. In C. armatus and C. brevibarbis the isotope-length trends were difficult to distinguish among trophic position increases, shifts in resource use i.e. benthic to pelagic or internal physiology. However, the overall strength, direction and significance of isotope-length trends varied temporally and spatially which suggested varying degrees of overlap in trophic ecology and feeding plasticity among these species.

  18. The quiescent H-mode regime for high performance edge localized mode-stable operation in future burning plasmas [The quiescent H-mode regime for high performance ELM-stable operation in future burning plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalo, Andrea M.; Burrell, Keith H.; Eldon, David; Grierson, Brian A.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; Holland, Christopher; Huijsmans, Guido T. A.; Liu, Feng; Loarte, Alberto; Meneghini, Orso; Osborne, T. H.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Smith, S. P.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Turnbull, A. D.; Zeng, L.

    2015-05-26

    For the first time, DIII-D experiments have achieved stationary quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) operation for many energy confinement times at simultaneous ITER-relevant values of beta, confinement, and safety factor, in an ITER similar shape. QH-mode provides excellent energy confinement, even at very low plasma rotation, while operating without edge localized modes (ELMs) and with strong impurity transport via the benign edge harmonic oscillation (EHO). By tailoring the plasma shape to improve the edge stability, the QH-mode operating space has also been extended to densities exceeding 80% of the Greenwald limit, overcoming the long-standing low-density limit of QH-mode operation. In the theory, the density range over which the plasma encounters the kink-peeling boundary widens as the plasma cross-section shaping is increased, thus increasing the QH-mode density threshold. Here, the DIII-D results are in excellent agreement with these predictions, and nonlinear MHD analysis of reconstructed QH-mode equilibria shows unstable low n kink-peeling modes growing to a saturated level, consistent with the theoretical picture of the EHO. Furthermore, high density operation in the QH-mode regime has opened a path to a new, previously predicted region of parameter space, named “Super H-mode” because it is characterized by very high pedestals that can be more than a factor of two above the peeling-ballooning stability limit for similar ELMing H-mode discharges at the same density.

  19. The quiescent H-mode regime for high performance edge localized mode-stable operation in future burning plasmas [The quiescent H-mode regime for high performance ELM-stable operation in future burning plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Garofalo, Andrea M.; Burrell, Keith H.; Eldon, David; ...

    2015-05-26

    For the first time, DIII-D experiments have achieved stationary quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) operation for many energy confinement times at simultaneous ITER-relevant values of beta, confinement, and safety factor, in an ITER similar shape. QH-mode provides excellent energy confinement, even at very low plasma rotation, while operating without edge localized modes (ELMs) and with strong impurity transport via the benign edge harmonic oscillation (EHO). By tailoring the plasma shape to improve the edge stability, the QH-mode operating space has also been extended to densities exceeding 80% of the Greenwald limit, overcoming the long-standing low-density limit of QH-mode operation. In the theory,more » the density range over which the plasma encounters the kink-peeling boundary widens as the plasma cross-section shaping is increased, thus increasing the QH-mode density threshold. Here, the DIII-D results are in excellent agreement with these predictions, and nonlinear MHD analysis of reconstructed QH-mode equilibria shows unstable low n kink-peeling modes growing to a saturated level, consistent with the theoretical picture of the EHO. Furthermore, high density operation in the QH-mode regime has opened a path to a new, previously predicted region of parameter space, named “Super H-mode” because it is characterized by very high pedestals that can be more than a factor of two above the peeling-ballooning stability limit for similar ELMing H-mode discharges at the same density.« less

  20. Highly stable self-pulsed operation of an Er:Lu2O3 ceramic laser at 2.7 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Huang, Haitao; Shen, Deyuan; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hao; Tang, Dingyuan

    2017-04-01

    We report on the highly stable self-pulsed operation of a 2.74 µm Er:Lu2O3 ceramic laser pumped by a wavelength locked narrow bandwidth 976 nm laser diode. The operating pulse repetition rate is continuously tunable from 126 kHz to 270 kHz depending on the pump power level. For 12.3 W of absorbed diode pump power, the Er:Lu2O3 ceramic laser generates 820 mW of average output power at a 270 kHz repetition rate and with a pulse duration of 183 ns. The corresponding pulse-to-pulse amplitude fluctuation is estimated to be less than 0.7%. In the continues-wave (CW) mode of operation, the laser yields over 1.3 W of output power with a slope efficiency of 11.9% with respect to the 976 nm pump power.

  1. Stable CW Single-Frequency Operation of Fabry-Perot Laser Diodes by Self-Injection Phase Locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerksen, Gary L.; Krainak, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    Previously, single-frequency semiconductor laser operation using fiber Bragg gratings has been achieved by two methods: 1) use of the FBG as the output coupler for an anti-reflection-coated semiconductor gain element'; 2) pulsed operation of a gain-switched Fabry-Perot laser diode with FBG-optical and RF-electrical feedback. Here, we demonstrate CW single frequency operation from a non-AR coated Fabry-Perot laser diode using only FBG optical feedback. We coupled a nominal 935 run-wavelength Fabry-Perot laser diode to an ultra narrow band (18 pm) FBG. When tuned by varying its temperature, the laser wavelength is pulled toward the centerline of the Bragg grating, and the spectrum of the laser output is seen to fall into three discrete stability regimes as measured by the side-mode suppression ratio.

  2. Spatial and temporal expression of vegetation and atmospheric variability from stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of bat guano in the southern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, Christopher M.; McFarlane, Donald A.; Bird, Michael I.

    2007-07-01

    Stable isotopes of faeces contain information related to the animals feeding ecology. The use of stable isotope values from subfossil faeces as a palaeoenvironmental indicator depends on how faithfully the animal records their local environment. Here we present insectivorous bat guano δ 13C and δ 15N values from a precipitation gradient across the southern United States and northern Mexico to compare with local vegetation and climate. We find δ 13C values to be an excellent predictor of expected C 4/CAM vegetation, indicating that the bats are non-selective in their diet. Moreover, we find bat guano δ 13C values to be strongly correlated with summer precipitation amount and winter precipitation ratio. We also find evidence for a significant relationship with mean annual temperature. In general, we do not find δ 15N values to be related to any parameters along the climatic gradient we examined. Additionally, we measured δ 13C and δ 15N values of bulk guano deposited annually from 1968 to 1987 in a varved guano deposit at Eagle Creek Cave, Arizona. Neither δ 13C nor δ 15N values were significantly related to various local meteorological variables; however, we found δ 13C values of guano to be significantly related to drought and to the North American Monsoon indicating bat guano δ 13C values preserve an interpretable record of large-scale atmospheric variability.

  3. Sequence Variation in the T-Cell Epitopes of the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein among Field Isolates Is Temporally Stable: a 5-Year Longitudinal Study in Southern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Jalloh, Amadu; van Thien, Huynh; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Ohashi, Jun; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Kanbe, Toshio; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kawamoto, Fumihiko

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to decipher the nature and extent of antigen polymorphisms of malaria parasites in a setting where malaria is hypomesoendemic, we conducted a 5-year longitudinal study (1998 to 2003) by sequencing the Th2R and Th3R epitopes of the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of 142 Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Bao Loc, Vietnam. Samples were collected during the high-transmission season, September through December 1998 (n = 43), as well as from July 2000 to August 2001 (n = 34), September 2001 to July 2002 (n = 33), and August 2002 to July 2003 (n = 32). Marked sequence diversity was noted during the high-transmission season in 1998, but no significant variation in allele frequencies was observed over the years (χ2 = 70.003, degrees of freedom = 57, P = 0.116). The apparent temporal stability in allele frequency observed in this Bao Loc malaria setting may suggest that polymorphism in the Th2R and Th3R epitopes is not maintained by frequency-dependent immune selection. By including 36 isolates from Flores Island, Indonesia, and 19 isolates from Thaton, Myanmar, we investigated geographical patterns of sequence polymorphism for these epitopes in Southeast Asia; among the characterized isolates, a globally distributed variant appears to be predominant in Vietnam (75 of 142 isolates, or 52.8%) as well as in Myanmar (15 of 19 isolates, or 78.9%) and Indonesia (31 of 36 isolates, or 86.1%). Further analyses involving worldwide CSP sequences revealed distinct regional patterns, a finding which, together with the unique mutations observed here, may suggest a possible role for host or local factors in the generation of sequence diversity in the T-cell epitopes of CSP. PMID:16597843

  4. Six-decade temporal change and seasonal decomposition of climate variables in Lake Dianchi watershed (China): stable trend or abrupt shift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Liang, Zhongyao; Liu, Yong; Guo, Huaicheng; He, Dan; Zhao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Meteorological trend analysis is a useful tool for understanding climate change and can provide useful information on the possibility of future change. Lake Dianchi is the sixth largest freshwater body in China with serious eutrophication. Algal blooms outbreak was proven to be closely associated with some climatic factors in Lake Dianchi. It is therefore essential to explore the trends of climatic time series to understand the mechanism of climate change on lake eutrophication. We proposed an integrated method of Mann-Kendall (MK) test, seasonal-trend decomposition using locally weighted regression (LOESS) (STL), and regime shift index (RSI) to decompose the trend analysis and identify the stable and abrupt changes of some climate variables from 1951 to 2009. The variables include mean air temperature (Tm), maximum air temperatures (Tmax), minimum air temperatures (Tmin), precipitation (Prec), average relative humidity (Hum), and average wind speed (Wind). The results showed that (a) annual Tm, Tmax, and Tmin have a significant increasing trend with the increasing rates of 0.26, 0.15and 0.43 °C per decade, respectively; (b) annual precipitation has an insignificant decreasing trend with the decreasing rate of 3.17 mm per decade; (c) annual Hum has a significant decreasing trend in all seasons; and (d) there are two turning points for temperature rise around 1980 and 1995 and two abrupt change periods for precipitation with the extreme points appearing in 1963 and 1976. Temperature rise and precipitation decline in summer and autumn as well as wind speed decrease after the 1990s may be an important reason for algal blooms outbreak in Lake Dianchi. This study was expected to provide foundation and reference for regional water resource management.

  5. Towards the next generation of solid oxide fuel cells operating below 600 °c with chemically stable proton-conducting electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Emiliana; Bi, Lei; Pergolesi, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico

    2012-01-10

    The need for reducing the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operating temperature below 600 °C is imposed by cost reduction, which is essential for widespread SOFC use, but might also disclose new applications. To this aim, high-temperature proton-conducting (HTPC) oxides have gained widespread interest as electrolyte materials alternative to oxygen-ion conductors. This Progress Report describes recent developments in electrolyte, anode, and cathode materials for protonic SOFCs, addressing the issue of chemical stability, processability, and good power performance below 600 °C. Different fabrication methods are reported for anode-supported SOFCs, obtained using state-of-the-art, chemically stable proton-conducting electrolyte films. Recent findings show significant improvements in the power density output of cells based on doped barium zirconate electrolytes, pointing out towards the feasibility of the next generation of protonic SOFCs, including a good potential for the development of miniaturized SOFCs as portable power supplies.

  6. Verbal Dominant Memory Impairment and Low Risk for Post-operative Memory Worsening in Both Left and Right Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    KHALIL, Amr Farid; IWASAKI, Masaki; NISHIO, Yoshiyuki; JIN, Kazutaka; NAKASATO, Nobukazu; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative memory changes after temporal lobe surgery have been established mainly by group analysis of cognitive outcome. This study investigated individual patient-based memory outcome in surgically-treated patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). This study included 84 consecutive patients with intractable TLE caused by unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) who underwent epilepsy surgery (47 females, 41 left [Lt] TLE). Memory functions were evaluated with the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised before and at 1 year after surgery. Pre-operative memory function was classified into three patterns: verbal dominant memory impairment (Verb-D), visual dominant impairment (Vis-D), and no material-specific impairment. Post-operative changes in verbal and visual memory indices were classified into meaningful improvement, worsening, or no significant changes. Pre-operative patterns and post-operative changes in verbal and visual memory function were compared between the Lt and right (Rt) TLE groups. Pre-operatively, Verb-D was the most common type of impairment in both the Lt and Rt TLE groups (65.9 and 48.8%), and verbal memory indices were lower than visual memory indices, especially in the Lt compared with Rt TLE group. Vis-D was observed only in 11.6% of Rt and 7.3% of Lt TLE patients. Post-operatively, meaningful improvement of memory indices was observed in 23.3–36.6% of the patients, and the memory improvement was equivalent between Lt and Rt TLE groups and between verbal and visual materials. In conclusion, Verb-D is most commonly observed in patients with both the Lt and Rt TLE associated with HS. Hippocampectomy can improve memory indices in such patients regardless of the side of surgery and the function impaired. PMID:27250575

  7. Reduction of RF accelerating voltage of Pohang Light Source-II superconducting RF cavity for stable top-up mode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Y.; Yu, I.; Park, I.; Chun, M. H.; Sohn, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) is currently providing a top-up mode user-service operation with maximum available beam current of 400 mA and a beam emittance of below 10 nm-rad. The dimension of the beam bunch shortened to accomplish a low beam emittance of below 10 nm-rad from a high beam current of 400 mA increases the bunch charge density. As a result, the electron beam lifetime is significantly degraded and a high gradient of power is lost in the vacuum components of the storage ring. A study on how to reduce the bunch charge density without degrading beam emittance found that reducing the RF accelerating voltage (Vacc) can lower the bunch charge density by lengthening the bunch in the longitudinal direction. In addition, the Vacc required for stable operation with beam current of 400 mA can be reduced by lowering the external cavity quality factors (Qext values) of the superconducting cavities (SCs). To control the Qext values of SCs gradually without accessing the accelerator tunnel, a remote control motorized three-probe-tuner was installed in the transmission line of each SC. The optimum installation position of the three-probe-tuner was determined by using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation and by experimenting on various installation positions of the three-probe-tuner. The Qext values of all the SCs were lowered to 1.40 × 105, and then, the Vacc required to store the beam current of 400 mA was decreased from 4.8 MV to 4.2 MV, which corresponds to 10% lengthening of the beam bunches. The stable operation with the reduced Vacc was confirmed during a 400 mA ten-day top-up mode user-service. Currently, the RF system of the PLS-II storage ring delivers the user-service operation with lowered Qext values to reduce the power loss at the vacuum components as well as the cryogenic heat load of SCs, and no significant problems have been found. This method of reducing the Vacc may also be applied in other synchrotron facilities.

  8. Temporal Non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filk, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    In this article I investigate several possibilities to define the concept of "temporal non-locality" within the standard framework of quantum theory. In particular, I analyze the notions of "temporally non-local states", "temporally non-local events" and "temporally non-local observables". The idea of temporally non-local events is already inherent in the standard formalism of quantum mechanics, and Basil Hiley recently defined an operator in order to measure the degree of such a temporal non-locality. The concept of temporally non-local states enters as soon as "clock-representing states" are introduced in the context of special and general relativity. It is discussed in which way temporally non-local measurements may find an interesting application for experiments which test temporal versions of Bell inequalities.

  9. High-speed highly temperature stable 980 nm VCSELs operating at 25 Gb/s at up to 85 °C for short reach optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutig, Alex; Lott, James A.; Blokhin, Sergey A.; Moser, Philip; Wolf, Philip; Hofmann, Werner; Nadtochiy, Alexey M.; Bimberg, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The progressive penetration of optical communication links into traditional copper interconnect markets greatly expands the applications of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for the next-generation of board-to-board, moduleto- module, chip-to-chip, and on-chip optical interconnects. Stability of the VCSEL parameters at high temperatures is indispensable for such applications, since these lasers typically reside directly on or near integrated circuit chips. Here we present 980 nm oxide-confined VCSELs operating error-free at bit rates up to 25 Gbit/s at temperatures as high as 85 °C without adjustment of the drive current and peak-to-peak modulation voltage. The driver design is therefore simplified and the power consumption of the driver electronics is lowered, reducing the production and operational costs. Small and large signal modulation experiments at various temperatures from 20 up to 85 °C for lasers with different oxide aperture diameters are presented in order to analyze the physical processes controlling the performance of the VCSELs. Temperature insensitive maximum -3 dB bandwidths of around 13-15 GHz for VCSELs with aperture diameters of 10 μm and corresponding parasitic cut-off frequencies exceeding 22 GHz are observed. Presented results demonstrate the suitability of our VCSELs for practical high speed and high temperature stable short-reach optical links.

  10. Freshwater Recirculating Aquaculture System Operations Drive Biofilter Bacterial Community Shifts around a Stable Nitrifying Consortium of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Comammox Nitrospira

    PubMed Central

    Bartelme, Ryan P.; McLellan, Sandra L.; Newton, Ryan J.

    2017-01-01

    Recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) are unique engineered ecosystems that minimize environmental perturbation by reducing nutrient pollution discharge. RAS typically employ a biofilter to control ammonia levels produced as a byproduct of fish protein catabolism. Nitrosomonas (ammonia-oxidizing), Nitrospira, and Nitrobacter (nitrite-oxidizing) species are thought to be the primary nitrifiers present in RAS biofilters. We explored this assertion by characterizing the biofilter bacterial and archaeal community of a commercial scale freshwater RAS that has been in operation for >15 years. We found the biofilter community harbored a diverse array of bacterial taxa (>1000 genus-level taxon assignments) dominated by Chitinophagaceae (~12%) and Acidobacteria (~9%). The bacterial community exhibited significant composition shifts with changes in biofilter depth and in conjunction with operational changes across a fish rearing cycle. Archaea also were abundant, and were comprised solely of a low diversity assemblage of Thaumarchaeota (>95%), thought to be ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) from the presence of AOA ammonia monooxygenase genes. Nitrosomonas were present at all depths and time points. However, their abundance was >3 orders of magnitude less than AOA and exhibited significant depth-time variability not observed for AOA. Phylogenetic analysis of the nitrite oxidoreductase beta subunit (nxrB) gene indicated two distinct Nitrospira populations were present, while Nitrobacter were not detected. Subsequent identification of Nitrospira ammonia monooxygenase alpha subunit genes in conjunction with the phylogenetic placement and quantification of the nxrB genotypes suggests complete ammonia-oxidizing (comammox) and nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira populations co-exist with relatively equivalent and stable abundances in this system. It appears RAS biofilters harbor complex microbial communities whose composition can be affected directly by typical system operations while

  11. Temporal separation and self-rating of alertness as indicators of driver fatigue in commercial motor vehicle operators.

    PubMed

    Belz, Steven M; Robinson, Gary S; Casali, John G

    2004-01-01

    This on-road field investigation employed, for the first time, a completely automated trigger-based data collection system capable of evaluating driver performance in an extended-duration real-world commercial motor vehicle environment. The study examined the use of self-assessment of fatigue (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale) and temporal separation (minimum time to collision, minimum headway, and mean headway) as indicators of driver fatigue. Without exception, the correlation analyses for both the self-rating of alertness and temporal separation yielded models low in associative ability; neither metric was found to be a valid indicator of driver fatigue. In addition, based upon the data collected for this research, preliminary evidence suggests that driver fatigue onset within a real-world driving environment does not appear to follow the standard progression of events associated with the onset of fatigue within a simulated driving environment. Application of this research includes the development of an on-board driver performance/fatigue monitoring system that could potentially assist drivers in identifying the onset of fatigue.

  12. Analysing the Advantages of High Temporal Resolution Geostationary MSG SEVIRI Data Compared to Polar Operational Environmental Satellite Data for Land Surface Monitoring in Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fensholt, R.; Anyamba, A.; Huber, S.; Proud, S. R.; Tucker, C. J.; Small, J.; Pak, E.; Rasmussen, M. O.; Sandholt, I.; Shisanya, C.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1972, satellite remote sensing of the environment has been dominated by polar-orbiting sensors providing useful data for monitoring the earth s natural resources. However their observation and monitoring capacity are inhibited by daily to monthly looks for any given ground surface which often is obscured by frequent and persistent cloud cover creating large gaps in time series measurements. The launch of the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite into geostationary orbit has opened new opportunities for land surface monitoring. The Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) instrument on-board MSG with an imaging capability every 15 minutes which is substantially greater than any temporal resolution that can be obtained from existing polar operational environmental satellites (POES) systems currently in use for environmental monitoring. Different areas of the African continent were affected by droughts and floods in 2008 caused by periods of abnormally low and high rainfall, respectively. Based on the effectiveness of monitoring these events from Earth Observation (EO) data the current analyses show that the new generation of geostationary remote sensing data can provide higher temporal resolution cloud-free (less than 5 days) measurements of the environment as compared to existing POES systems. SEVIRI MSG 5-day continental scale composites will enable rapid assessment of environmental conditions and improved early warning of disasters for the African continent such as flooding or droughts. The high temporal resolution geostationary data will complement existing higher spatial resolution polar-orbiting satellite data for various dynamic environmental and natural resource applications of terrestrial ecosystems.

  13. Experimental analysis of spatio-temporal behavior of anodic dead-end mode operated polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manokaran, A.; Pushpavanam, S.; Sridhar, P.; Pitchumani, S.

    During the anodic dead-end mode operation of fuel cells, the inert gases (nitrogen and water) present in the cathode side gas channel permeate to the anode side and accumulate in the anode gas channel. The inert gas accumulation in the anode decreases the fuel cell performance by impeding the access of hydrogen to the catalyst. The performance of fuel cell under potentiostatic dead-end mode operation is shown to have three distinct regions viz. time lag region, transient current region and a steady state current region. A current distribution measurement setup is used to capture the evolution of the current distribution as a function of time and space. Co- and counter-flow operations of dead-end mode confirm the propagation of inert gas from the dead-end of anode channel to the inlet of anode. Experiments with different oxidants, oxygen and air, under dead-end mode confirm that nitrogen which permeates from cathode to anode causes the performance drop of the fuel cell. For different starting current densities of 0.15 A cm -2, 0.3 A cm -2 and 0.6 A cm -2 the inert gas occupies 35%, 45% and 57%, respectively of anode channel volume at the end of 60 min of dead-end mode operation.

  14. Revisiting the use of δ15N in meso-scale studies of marine food webs by considering spatio-temporal variations in stable isotopic signatures - The case of an open ecosystem: The Bay of Biscay (North-East Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouvelon, T.; Spitz, J.; Caurant, F.; Mèndez-Fernandez, P.; Chappuis, A.; Laugier, F.; Le Goff, E.; Bustamante, P.

    2012-08-01

    Most of the recent framework directives and environmental policies argue for the development and the use of indicators - notably trophodynamic indicators - that should be able to follow ecosystems' evolution in space and time, particularly under anthropogenic perturbations. In the last decades, the use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes ratios has increased exponentially, particularly in studies of marine ecosystems' trophic structure and functioning. This method is principally based on the assumption that the isotopic composition of a consumer directly reflects that of its food. Nevertheless, few studies have attempted to define the limits of this tool, before using it and drawing ecological conclusions from isotopic analysis. This study aimed to assess the importance of considering spatio-temporal variations in isotopic signatures of consumers when using δ13C and especially δ15N values in open ecosystems with complex food webs, using the Bay of Biscay (North-East Atlantic) as a case study. To this end, more than 140 species from this marine ecosystem were analysed for the isotopic signatures in their muscle tissue. They were sampled from coastal to oceanic and deep-sea areas and at different latitudes, to evaluate spatial variations of isotopic signatures. Selected species were also sampled over several years and in two seasons to account for inter-annual and seasonal variations. In the Bay of Biscay temperate ecosystem, which is subject to both coastal and oceanic influences - two main river inputs and upwelling areas - , δ13C and δ15N values significantly decreased from inshore to offshore species, and to a lesser extent from benthic to pelagic organisms. River discharges appeared to be the first factor influencing δ13C and δ15N values in consumers. From the important spatial variations detected in δ15N values in particular, we suggest that in such contrasted ecosystem, nitrogen isotopic ratios may also be revisited as an indicator of the feeding

  15. Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Norton, Anderson; Boyce, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has documented schemes and operations that undergird students' understanding of fractions. This prior research was based, in large part, on small-group teaching experiments. However, written assessments are needed in order for teachers and researchers to assess students' ways of operating on a whole-class scale. In this study,…

  16. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David D.

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  17. Studies and optimization of Pohang Light Source-II superconducting radio frequency system at stable top-up operation with beam current of 400 mA

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Youngdo Yu, Inha; Park, Insoo; Chun, Myunghwan; Lee, Byung-Joon; Hwang, Ilmoon; Ha, Taekyun; Shin, Seunghwan; Sohn, Younguk

    2014-12-21

    After three years of upgrading work, the Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) is now successfully operating. The final quantitative goal of PLS-II is a top-up user-service operation with beam current of 400 mA to be completed by the end of 2014. During the beam store test up to 400 mA in the storage ring (SR), it was observed that the vacuum pressure around the radio frequency (RF) window of the superconducting cavity rapidly increases over the interlock level limiting the availability of the maximum beam current storing. Although available beam current is enhanced by setting a higher RF accelerating voltage, it is better to keep the RF accelerating voltage as low as possible in the long time top-up operation. We investigated the cause of the window vacuum pressure increment by studying the changes in the electric field distribution at the superconducting cavity and waveguide according to the beam current. In our simulation, an equivalent physical modeling was developed using a finite-difference time-domain code. The simulation revealed that the electric field amplitude at the RF window is exponentially increased as the beam current increases, thus this high electric field amplitude causes a RF breakdown at the RF window, which comes with the rapid increase of window vacuum pressure. The RF accelerating voltage of PLS-II RF system was set to 4.95 MV, which was estimated using the maximum available beam current that works as a function of RF voltage, and the top-up operation test with the beam current of 400 mA was successfully carried out.

  18. Analysis of the sensitivity to rainfall spatio-temporal variability of an operational urban rainfall-runoff model in a multifractal framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gires, A.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D. J.; Lovejoy, S.

    2011-12-01

    In large urban areas, storm water management is a challenge with enlarging impervious areas. Many cities have implemented real time control (RTC) of their urban drainage system to either reduce overflow or limit urban contamination. A basic component of RTC is hydraulic/hydrologic model. In this paper we use the multifractal framework to suggest an innovative way to test the sensitivity of such a model to the spatio-temporal variability of its rainfall input. Indeed the rainfall variability is often neglected in urban context, being considered as a non-relevant issue at the scales involve. Our results show that on the contrary the rainfall variability should be taken into account. Universal multifractals (UM) rely on the concept of multiplicative cascade and are a standard tool to analyze and simulate with a reduced number of parameters geophysical processes that are extremely variable over a wide range of scales. This study is conducted on a 3 400 ha urban area located in Seine-Saint-Denis, in the North of Paris (France). We use the operational semi-distributed model that was calibrated by the local authority (Direction Eau et Assainnissement du 93) that is in charge of urban drainage. The rainfall data comes from the C-Band radar of Trappes operated by Météo-France. The rainfall event of February 9th, 2009 was used. A stochastic ensemble approach was implemented to quantify the uncertainty on discharge associated to the rainfall variability occurring at scales smaller than 1 km x 1 km x 5 min that is usually available with C-band radar networks. An analysis of the quantiles of the simulated peak flow showed that the uncertainty exceeds 20 % for upstream links. To evaluate a potential gain from a direct use of the rainfall data available at the resolution of X-band radar, we performed similar analysis of the rainfall fields of the degraded resolution of 9 km x 9 km x 20 min. The results show a clear decrease in uncertainty when the original resolution of C

  19. Temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Saramäki, Jari

    2012-10-01

    A great variety of systems in nature, society and technology-from the web of sexual contacts to the Internet, from the nervous system to power grids-can be modeled as graphs of vertices coupled by edges. The network structure, describing how the graph is wired, helps us understand, predict and optimize the behavior of dynamical systems. In many cases, however, the edges are not continuously active. As an example, in networks of communication via e-mail, text messages, or phone calls, edges represent sequences of instantaneous or practically instantaneous contacts. In some cases, edges are active for non-negligible periods of time: e.g., the proximity patterns of inpatients at hospitals can be represented by a graph where an edge between two individuals is on throughout the time they are at the same ward. Like network topology, the temporal structure of edge activations can affect dynamics of systems interacting through the network, from disease contagion on the network of patients to information diffusion over an e-mail network. In this review, we present the emergent field of temporal networks, and discuss methods for analyzing topological and temporal structure and models for elucidating their relation to the behavior of dynamical systems. In the light of traditional network theory, one can see this framework as moving the information of when things happen from the dynamical system on the network, to the network itself. Since fundamental properties, such as the transitivity of edges, do not necessarily hold in temporal networks, many of these methods need to be quite different from those for static networks. The study of temporal networks is very interdisciplinary in nature. Reflecting this, even the object of study has many names-temporal graphs, evolving graphs, time-varying graphs, time-aggregated graphs, time-stamped graphs, dynamic networks, dynamic graphs, dynamical graphs, and so on. This review covers different fields where temporal graphs are considered

  20. Impact of Phlebotomine Sand Flies on U.S. Military Operations at Tallil Air Base, Iraq: 2. Temporal and Geographic Distribution of Sand Flies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    collections, with StudentÐNewmanÐ Keuls test (P 0.05) used to separate mean values. Results TemporalDistribution of Phlebotomine SandFlies at Tallil...each. DielActivity of SandFlies atTallilAirBase. In total, 2,574 phlebotomine sand ßies was collected during 25 trap nights between 6 May 2003 and 30... SandFlies InsideTents at TAB.This studywas conducted between 25May and 30October 2003. Ninety-Þve replicates were conducted in tents that had no air

  1. Stable Fly Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult stable flies feed on the blood of humans, pets and livestock, inflicting painful bites. Stable flies need one and sometimes two bloodmeals each day to develop their eggs. Unlike mosquitoes where only the females bloodfeed, both male and female stable flies require blood to reproduce. Stable fl...

  2. Investigation of spatio-temporal variability of water uptake in a groundwater-dependent ecosystem using a stable isotope approach (δ18O, δ2H): Pfyn Forest, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, G.; Masini, J.; Goldscheider, N.; Gobat, J. M.; Hunkeler, D.

    2012-04-01

    total humidity of soil, this could be due to rapid infiltration and/or fractionation mainly under equilibrium, i.e. with a relatively high atmospheric humidity, what is possible under forest canopy. Plant water is located under the LMWL in September 2010 when the soil was relatively drought. This evaporative signature could be a clue of water stress. More investigations are however needed to check if this parameter can be used routinely to address water stress. - Secondly, through an analysis of variance, data reveal that at the ecosystem scale, water uptake depends on the site (type of soil, surrounding vegetation, distance from the river), on the growing status (non growing, flowering, mature, water stress) and on the species (poplar, willow, alder, pine). - At last, when focusing at the temporal variability for some individuals, it appears that both rainwater and groundwater may participate to water uptake. The water uptake patterns seem more complicated in mature areas (far from the riverbed) than in frequently flooded zones. This could be due to a more complex soil texture patchwork in the former, and a globally finer soil texture. In particular, it appears that groundwater may sometimes replace rainwater through capillary rise during warm periods.

  3. Magnetotelluric Data, Stable Distributions and Stable Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chave, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The author has noted for many years that the residuals from robust or bounded influence estimates of the magnetotelluric response function are systematically long tailed compared to a Gaussian or Rayleigh distribution. Consequently, the standard statistical model of a Gaussian core contaminated by a fraction of outlying data is not really valid. However, the typical result is an improvement on ordinary least squares, and has become standard in the electromagnetic induction community. A recent re-evaluation of the statistics of magnetotelluric response function estimation has shown that, in almost all cases, the residuals are alpha stable rather than Gaussian. Alpha stable distributions are characterized by four parameters: a shape parameter lying on (0, 2], a skewness parameter, a scale parameter and a location parameter, and cannot be expressed in closed form except for a few special cases. When the shape parameter is 2, the result is Gaussian, but when it is smaller the resulting distribution has infinite variance. Typical magnetotelluric residuals are alpha stable with a shape parameter lying between 1 and 2. This suggests that robust methods improve response function estimates by eliminating data corresponding to the largest stable residuals while leaving the bulk of the population alone. A better statistical approach is based on stable regression that directly accommodates the actual residual distribution without eliminating the most extreme ones. This paper will introduce such an algorithm, and illustrate its functionality with a variety of magnetotelluric data. Further work remains to produce a robust stable regression algorithm that will eliminate real outliers such as lightning strikes or instrument problems without affecting the bulk stable population. Stable distributions are intimately associated with fractional derivative physical processes. Since the Maxwell equations and the constitutive relations pertaining to the earth do not contain any fractional

  4. Responses of spatial-temporal dynamics of bacterioplankton community to large-scale reservoir operation: a case study in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Lu, Lunhui; Guo, Jinsong; Yang, Jixiang; Zhang, Jiachao; He, Bin; Xu, Linlin

    2017-01-01

    Large rivers are commonly regulated by damming, yet the effects of such disruption on bacterioplankton community structures have not been adequately studied. The aim of this study was to explore the biogeographical patterns present under dam regulation and to uncover the major drivers structuring bacterioplankton communities. Bacterioplankton assemblages in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) were analyzed using Illumina Miseq sequencing by comparing seven sites located within the TGR before and after impoundment. This approach revealed ecological and spatial-temporal variations in bacterioplankton community composition along the longitudinal axis. The community was dynamic and dominated by Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria phyla, encompassing 39.26% and 37.14% of all sequences, respectively, followed by Bacteroidetes (8.67%) and Cyanobacteria (3.90%). The Shannon-Wiener index of the bacterioplankton community in the flood season (August) was generally higher than that in the impoundment season (November). Principal Component Analysis of the bacterioplankton community compositions showed separation between different seasons and sampling sites. Results of the relationship between bacterioplankton community compositions and environmental variables highlighted that ecological processes of element cycling and large dam disturbances are of prime importance in driving the assemblages of riverine bacterioplankton communities. PMID:28211884

  5. Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina) Updated:Sep 19,2016 You may have heard the term “angina pectoris” or “stable angina” in your doctor’s office, but ...

  6. Impact of phlebotomine sand flies on U.S. Military operations at Tallil Air Base, Iraq: 2. Temporal and geographic distribution of sand flies.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Russell E; Burkett, Douglas A; Sherwood, Van; Caci, Jennifer; Spradling, Sharon; Jennings, Barton T; Rowton, Edgar; Gilmore, Wayne; Blount, Keith; White, Charles E; Putnam, John L

    2007-01-01

    CDC miniature light traps were used to evaluate the general biology of phlebotomine sand flies from April 2003 to November 2004 at Tallil Air Base, Iraq. Factors evaluated include species diversity and temporal (daily and seasonal) and geographic distribution of the sand flies. In addition, the abundance of sand flies inside and outside tents and buildings was observed. In total, 61,630 sand flies were collected during 1,174 trap nights (mean 52 per trap, range 0-1,161), with 90% of traps containing sand flies. Sand fly numbers were low in April, rose through May, were highest from mid-June to early September, and dropped rapidly in late September and October. More than 70% of the sand flies were female, and of these sand flies, 8% contained visible blood. Phlebotomus alexandri Sinton, Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli, Phlebotomus sergenti Parrot, and Sergentomyia spp. accounted for 30, 24, 1, and 45% of the sand flies that were identified, respectively. P. alexandri was more abundant earlier in the season (April and May) than P. papatasi, whereas P. papatasi predominated later in the season (August and September). Studies on the nocturnal activity of sand flies indicated that they were most active early in the evening during the cooler months, whereas they were more active in the middle of the night during the hotter months. Light traps placed inside tents with and without air conditioners collected 83 and 70% fewer sand flies, respectively, than did light traps placed outside the tents. The implications of these findings to Leishmania transmission in the vicinity of Tallil Air Base are discussed.

  7. Spatio-temporal variations of carbon dioxide and its gross emission regulated by artificial operation in a typical hydropower reservoir in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Zhang, Zengyu; Xiao, Yan; Guo, Jinsong; Wu, Shengjun; Liu, Jing

    2014-05-01

    Supersaturation and excess emission of greenhouse gases in freshwater reservoirs have received a great deal of attention in recent years. Although impoundment of reservoirs has been shown to contribute to the net emission of greenhouse gases, reservoir age, geographical distribution, submerged soil type and artificial regulation also have a great impact on their emissions. To examine how large scale reservoir operation impact the water column CO2 and its air-water interface flux, a field study was conducted in 2010 to evaluate potential ecological processes that regulate the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in the water column in the Pengxi River backwater area (PBA), a typical tributary in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China. Measurements of total alkalinity (TA), pH and water temperature were applied to compute the pCO2. And this approach was also validated by calculation of pCO2 from the dissolved inorganic carbon data of samples. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to determine how the dynamics of the water pCO2 were related to the available variables. The estimated pCO2 in our sample ranged from 26 to 4,087 μatm in the surface water. During low water operation from July to early September, there was an obvious pCO2 stratification, and pCO2 in the surface was almost unsaturated. This phenomenon was also observed in the spring bloom during discharge period. Conversely, there was no significant pCO2 stratification and the entire water column was supersaturated during high water operation from November to the following February. Significant correlation was observed between the magnitude of pCO2, DO and chlorophyll a, suggesting that phytoplankton dynamics regulate pCO2 in the PBA. The average areal rate of CO2 emissions from the Pengxi River ranged from 18.06 to 48.09 mmol m(-2) day(-1), with an estimated gross CO2 emission from the water surface of 14-37 t day(-1) in this area in 2010. Photosynthesis and respiration rates by phytoplankton might be the

  8. Temporal logics meet telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutten, Eric; Marce, Lionel

    1989-01-01

    The specificity of telerobotics being the presence of a human operator, decision assistance tools are necessary for the operator, especially in hostile environments. In order to reduce execution hazards due to a degraded ability for quick and efficient recovery of unexpected dangerous situations, it is of importance to have the opportunity, amongst others, to simulate the possible consequences of a plan before its actual execution, in order to detect these problematic situations. Hence the idea of providing the operator with a simulator enabling him to verify the temporal and logical coherence of his plans. Therefore, the power of logical formalisms is used for representation and deduction purposes. Starting from the class of situations that are represented, a STRIPS (the STanford Research Institute Problem Solver)-like formalism and its underlying logic are adapted to the simulation of plans of actions in time. The choice of a temporal logic enables to build a world representation, on which the effects of plans, grouping actions into control structures, will be transcribed by the simulation, resulting in a verdict and information about the plan's coherence.

  9. INVERSE STABLE SUBORDINATORS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; STRAKA, PETER

    2013-01-01

    The inverse stable subordinator provides a probability model for time-fractional differential equations, and leads to explicit solution formulae. This paper reviews properties of the inverse stable subordinator, and applications to a variety of problems in mathematics and physics. Several different governing equations for the inverse stable subordinator have been proposed in the literature. This paper also shows how these equations can be reconciled. PMID:25045216

  10. Stable Gain-Switched Thulium Fiber Laser With 140-nm Tuning Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengqiu; Meng, Yafei; Kelleher, Edmund; Guo, Guoxiang; Li, Yao; Xu, Yongbing; Zhu, Shining

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a gain-switched thulium fiber laser that can be continuously tuned over 140 nm, while maintaining stable nanosecond single-pulse operation. To the best of our knowledge, this system represents the broadest tuning range for a gain-switched fiber laser. The system simplicity and wideband wavelength tunability combined with the ability to control the temporal characteristics of the gain-switched pulses mean this is a versatile source highly suited to a wide range of applications in the eye-safe region of the infrared, including spectroscopy, sensing and material processing, as well as being a practical seed source for pumping nonlinear processes.

  11. Chondroblastoma of the Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Samuel H.; Levine, Jennifer M.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the presentation and clinical course of two patients with temporal bone chondroblastoma, and to review the literature on temporal bone chondroblastoma to identify characteristic clinical and radiological presentations, and optimal treatment regimens. MEDLINE literature searches covering the period from 1966 to January 1998, in all languages, were performed as well as a review of the bibliographies of the identified studies. Strict inclusion criteria were upheld, In total 18 studies had patients whose data could be analyzed. From the 18 studies, 34 patients were identified, but only 21 cases met the inclusion criteria. Demographic, clinical presentation, radiological, operative and treatment parameters were analyzed in this cohort of patients. Ninety-five percent of patients were found to have invasion of the middle cranial fossa and 76% were found to have erosion into the superior aspect of the external auditory canal by temporal bone chondroblastoma. The characteristic growth pattern of temporal bone chondroblastoma may result from embryonal or cartilagenous rests entrapped in the tympanosquamous suture line in the middle fossa floor. Temporal bone chondroblastoma represents a pathology that does not arise from, or have a growth pattern resembling other pathologies in the temporal bone. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171120

  12. Unstable neurons underlie a stable learned behavior

    PubMed Central

    Liberti, William A.; Markowitz, Jeffrey E.; Perkins, L. Nathan; Liberti, Derek C.; Leman, Daniel P.; Guitchounts, Grigori; Velho, Tarciso; Kotton, Darrell N.; Lois, Carlos; Gardner, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Motor skills can be maintained for decades, but the biological basis of this memory persistence remains largely unknown. The zebra finch, for example, sings a highly stereotyped song that is stable for years, but it is not known whether the precise neural patterns underlying song are stable or shift from day to day. Here, we demonstrate that the population of projection neurons coding for song in the pre-motor nucleus HVC change from day to day. The most dramatic shifts occur over intervals of sleep. In contrast to the transient participation of excitatory neurons, ensemble measurements dominated by inhibition persist unchanged even after damage to downstream motor nerves. These observations offer a principle of motor stability: spatio-temporal patterns of inhibition can maintain a stable scaffold for motor dynamics while the population of principle neurons that directly drive behavior shift from one day to the next. PMID:27723744

  13. Overview and first results from project STABLE (STAble Boundary Layer Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.H.; Kurzeja, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The STABLE project (STAble Boundary Layer Experiment) is a multiyear research effort conceived in 1984 by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and planned by several research groups to study turbulence and diffusion in the stable boundary layer (SBL). The program was jointly planned by Department of Energy (DOE) affiliated laboratories and universities including SRL, Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), North Carolina State University (NCSU), and The Pennsylvania State University. STABLE's goals are to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of turbulent events during the nighttime, to determine the validity of present models and theories in describing the structure and evolution of the SBL, to determine the role of waves and intermittent turbulence in dispersing chemicals, and to determine better parameterization for describing the mean state and intermittent events in the SBL. By taking advantage of special facility, the program seeks to economize effort and cost. 1 ref., 7 figs.

  14. Temporal mapping and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Charles G. (Inventor); Shrestha, Bijay (Inventor); Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan (Inventor); Mali, Preeti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A compositing process for selecting spatial data collected over a period of time, creating temporal data cubes from the spatial data, and processing and/or analyzing the data using temporal mapping algebra functions. In some embodiments, the temporal data cube is creating a masked cube using the data cubes, and computing a composite from the masked cube by using temporal mapping algebra.

  15. Efficient Methods for Stable Distributions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    are used, corresponding to the common values used in digital signal processing. Five new functions for discrete/quantized stable distributions were...written. • sgendiscrete generates discrete stable random variates. It works by generating continuous stable random variables using the Chambers- Mallows ...with stable distributions. It allows engineers and scientists to analyze data and work with stable distributions within the common matlab environment

  16. Vestibular Schwannoma Atypically Invading Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo Jeong; Yang, Na-Rae

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) usually present the widening of internal auditory canal (IAC), and these bony changes are typically limited to IAC, not extend to temporal bone. Temporal bone invasion by VS is extremely rare. We report 51-year-old man who revealed temporal bone destruction beyond IAC by unilateral VS. The bony destruction extended anteriorly to the carotid canal and inferiorly to the jugular foramen. On histopathologic examination, the tumor showed typical benign schwannoma and did not show any unusual vascularity or malignant feature. Facial nerve was severely compressed and distorted by tumor, which unevenly eroded temporal bone in surgical field. Vestibular schwannoma with atypical invasion of temporal bone can be successfully treated with combined translabyrinthine and lateral suboccipiral approach without facial nerve dysfunction. Early detection and careful dissection of facial nerve with intraoperative monitoring should be considered during operation due to severe adhesion and distortion of facial nerve by tumor and eroded temporal bone. PMID:25932298

  17. Stable Short-Term Frequency Support Using Adaptive Gains for a DFIG-Based Wind Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jinsik; Jang, Gilsoo; Muljadi, Eduard; Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe; Cheol Kang, Yong

    2016-09-01

    For the fixed-gain inertial control of wind power plants (WPPs), a large gain setting provides a large contribution to supporting system frequency control, but it may cause over-deceleration for a wind turbine generator that has a small amount of kinetic energy (KE). Further, if the wind speed decreases during inertial control, even a small gain may cause over-deceleration. This paper proposes a stable inertial control scheme using adaptive gains for a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG)-based WPP. The scheme aims to improve the frequency nadir (FN) while ensuring stable operation of all DFIGs, particularly when the wind speed decreases during inertial control. In this scheme, adaptive gains are set to be proportional to the KE stored in DFIGs, which is spatially and temporally dependent. To improve the FN, upon detecting an event, large gains are set to be proportional to the KE of DFIGs; to ensure stable operation, the gains decrease with the declining KE. The simulation results demonstrate that the scheme improves the FN while ensuring stable operation of all DFIGs in various wind and system conditions. Further, it prevents over-deceleration even when the wind speed decreases during inertial control.

  18. The Stable Pairing Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwell, Raymond N.; Seabold, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The Gale-Shapley stable marriage theorem is a fascinating piece of twentieth-century mathematics that has many practical applications--from labor markets to school admissions--yet is accessible to secondary school mathematics students. David Gale and Lloyd Shapley were both mathematicians and economists who published their work on the Stable…

  19. High-Order Entropy Stable Formulations for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Fisher, Travis C.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic approach is presented for developing entropy stable (SS) formulations of any order for the Navier-Stokes equations. These SS formulations discretely conserve mass, momentum, energy and satisfy a mathematical entropy inequality. They are valid for smooth as well as discontinuous flows provided sufficient dissipation is added at shocks and discontinuities. Entropy stable formulations exist for all diagonal norm, summation-by-parts (SBP) operators, including all centered finite-difference operators, Legendre collocation finite-element operators, and certain finite-volume operators. Examples are presented using various entropy stable formulations that demonstrate the current state-of-the-art of these schemes.

  20. A stable gain-switched Ho:CYA laser resonantly pumped at 1922 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. N.; Chen, B. H.; Shen, D. Y.; Xu, X. D.

    2017-04-01

    We report on a gain-switched Ho:CaYAlO4 laser resonantly pumped by a home-constructed high power Tm:fiber laser at ~1922 nm. Stable nanosecond single-pulse operation could be maintained when the continuous-wave pump signal was modulated at repetition rates of 60–100 kHz with an acousto-optic modulator. A pulse duration of 311 ns has been obtained at a 60 kHz repetition rate under a pump power level of 11 W. The temporal stability and simplicity of operation make this laser suitable for a variety of applications, such as spectroscopy, gas sensing, and as the seed source of a master oscillation power amplifier system.

  1. Temporal nonlocality in bistable perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmanspacher, Harald; Filk, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    A novel conceptual framework for theoretical psychology is presented and illustrated for the example of bistable perception. A basic formal feature of this framework is the non-commutativity of operations acting on mental states. A corresponding model for the bistable perception of ambiguous stimuli, the Necker-Zeno model, is sketched and some empirical evidence for it so far is described. It is discussed how a temporal nonlocality of mental states, predicted by the model, can be understood and tested.

  2. Temporal beam splitter and temporal interference

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, J.T.; Martins, A.M.; Guerreiro, A.

    2003-10-01

    The effect of photon beam splitting in a time-varying medium is described by classical and quantum theoretical models. It generalizes the concept of time refraction, introduced recently by the authors as a natural extrapolation of the usual concepts of refraction and reflection into the time domain. Total time reflection is shown to exist. A sequence of time refraction processes is shown to lead to temporal interference effects. The concept of temporal beam splitter is introduced. Bogoliubov transformations for the temporal beam splitter are derived. Resonant amplification of light by change in time in the optical medium is shown to exist.

  3. Atlas of temporal variations - interdisciplinary scientific work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamburtsev, A. G.; Oleinik, O. V.

    2003-04-01

    The year 2002 will culminate in the publication of the third volume of the fundamental interdisciplinary work "Atlas of Temporal Variations in Natural, Anthropogenic and Social Processes", which now will comprise three volumes (1994, 1998, 2002). The Atlas has pooled the information on the main peculiarities of processes' behaviour in various natural and humanitarian spheres over the widest temporal and spatial range. The main scientific goal of the work consists in discovering the behaviour pattern of natural, anthropogenic and social processes and the cause and effect links between them. Thus, the Atlas contains extensive comparative generalisation from the vastly different data. For one thing, it is a fundamental work on the law-governed nature of evolution in natural and social spheres; for another, it can be used as a reference book and valuable source of information for research in different directions. The authors seek to treat every piece of information as part of an integrated whole. When analysing the data, we operate on the premise that surrounding nature, society and their elements are open dynamic systems. Systems of this kind exhibit non-linear characteristics and a tendency towards ordered and chaotic behaviour. These features are revealed in the course of the analysis of time series. The data processing procedures applied are unified, all processes being generally expressed in terms of their time series and time-spectral diagrams. The technique is aimed at determination of investigated parameters' rhythms and the analysis of their evolution. This approach enables us to show the dynamics of processes occurring in absolutely dissimilar objects and performs their comparative analysis, with particular emphasis placed on rhythms and trends. As a result successions of illustrations are obtained and formed the basis of the Atlas. The Atlas covers processes that occur in objects belonging to the lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and social sphere as well

  4. Temporal bone meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Hooper, R; Siu, K; Cousins, V

    1990-10-01

    Meningiomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of space-occupying lesions of the temporal bone. Five cases of meningiomas of the temporal bone are described and the literature reviewed. These tumours may stimulate Schwannomas and glomus tumours in their presentation and radiological findings. The tumours were managed by combining standard neurosurgical approaches with temporal bone and skull base techniques.

  5. Stable glow discharge detector

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2004-05-18

    A highly sensitive electronic ion cell for the measurement of trace elements in He carrier gas which involves glow discharge. A constant wave (CW) stable glow discharge detector which is controlled through a biased resistor, can detect the change of electron density caused by impurities in the He carrier gas by many orders of magnitude larger than that caused by direct ionization or electron capture. The stable glow discharge detector utilizes a floating pseudo-electrode to form a probe in or near the plasma and a solid rod electrode. By using this probe, the large variation of electron density due to trace amounts of impurities can be directly measured. The solid rod electrode provides greater stability and thus easier alignment.

  6. Stable isotopes in mineralogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Stable isotope fractionations between minerals are functions of the fundamental vibrational frequencies of the minerals and therefore bear on several topics of mineralogical interest. Isotopic compositions of the elements H, C, O, Si, and S can now be determined routinely in almost any mineral. A summary has been made of both published and new results of laboratory investigations, analyses of natural materials, and theoretical considerations which bear on the importance of temperature, pressure, chemical composition and crystal structure to the isotopic properties of minerals. It is shown that stable isotope studies can sometimes provide evidence for elucidating details of crystal structure and can be a powerful tool for use in tracing the reaction paths of mineralogical reactions. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Stable local oscillator module.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  8. Handbook of stable strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Skoryna, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: chemistry of strontium; biogeochemistry of strontium; uptake of stable strontium by plants and effects on plant growth; divalent cation-dependent deposits in paramecium; effects of strontium ion on the hydrolysis of ATP; stronium ions and membranes - screening versus binding at charged surfaces; mitochondrial granules in the liver of rats kept on stable strontium supplementation; divalent cations and regulation of cyclic nucleotides in nervous systems; strontium as the substitute for calcium in the excitation-contraction coupling of crayfish muscle fibers; hemodynamic effects of strontium in the dog; some mechanical characteristics of strontium-mediated contractions in heart muscle; effects of calcium, magnesium, and strontium on drug-receptor interactions; strontium and histamine secretion; and effects of strontium in human dental enamel.

  9. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  10. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  11. Comprehensive Retrieval of Spatio-temporal Variations in Atmospheric Radionuclides just after the Fukushima Accident by Analyzing Filter-tapes of Operational Air Pollution Monitoring Stations in Eastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Moriguchi, Yuichi; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2016-04-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FD1NPS) accident on March 11, 2011, many datasets have been available of deposition density of radionuclides in soils in eastern Japan. By contrast, no time-series data of atmospheric radionuclides has been measured in the Fukushima prefecture (FP), although very limited data is available in the Tokyo metropolitan area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPS. As a result, atmospheric transport models simulating the atmospheric concentrations and surface deposition of radionuclides have large uncertainty, as well as the estimate of release rate of source terms and of internal exposure from inhalation. One year after the accident, we collected the used filter-tapes installed in Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) monitors with beta-ray attenuation method operated by local governments in the air pollution monitoring network of eastern Japan. The SPM monitoring stations are mostly located in the urban and/or industrial area to measure the hourly mass concentration of SPM less than 10 μm in diameter for health effect due to atmospheric aerosols. By measuring radionuclides in SPM on the filter-tapes, we retrieved hourly atmospheric Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations during March 12-23, 2011, when atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial environments were seriously suffered in most of eastern Japan. Until now, we measured hourly radiocesium at around 100 SPM sites in the southern Tohoku region (ST) including the FP and in the TMA. By analysing the dataset, about 10 plumes/polluted air masses with Cs-137 concentrations higher than 10 Bq m-3 were found, and some plumes were newly detected in this study. And the spatio-temporal distributions of atmospheric Cs-137 were clearly shown for all the plumes. The east coast area of the FP where the FD1NPS was located in the centre was attacked several times by the plumes, and suffered the highest time-integrated Cs-137 concentration during the period among the ST and TMA

  12. STABLE ISOTOPES AS INDICATORS OF SOIL WATER DYNAMICS IN WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream water quality and quantity depend on discharge rates of water and nutrients from soils. However, soil-water storage is very dynamic and strongly influenced by plants. We analyzed stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to quantify spatial and temporal changes in evaporati...

  13. Robust temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perissinotto, Andrea; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Baptista, Maria J.; Monaghan, Mark; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; D'hooge, Jan; Vilaça, João. L.; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Given the dynamic nature of cardiac function, correct temporal alignment of pre-operative models and intraoperative images is crucial for augmented reality in cardiac image-guided interventions. As such, the current study focuses on the development of an image-based strategy for temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac imaging sequences, such as cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or 3D Ultrasound (US). First, we derive a robust, modality-independent signal from the image sequences, estimated by computing the normalized cross-correlation between each frame in the temporal sequence and the end-diastolic frame. This signal is a resembler for the left-ventricle (LV) volume curve over time, whose variation indicates different temporal landmarks of the cardiac cycle. We then perform the temporal alignment of these surrogate signals derived from MRI and US sequences of the same patient through Dynamic Time Warping (DTW), allowing to synchronize both sequences. The proposed framework was evaluated in 98 patients, which have undergone both 3D+t MRI and US scans. The end-systolic frame could be accurately estimated as the minimum of the image-derived surrogate signal, presenting a relative error of 1.6 +/- 1.9% and 4.0 +/- 4.2% for the MRI and US sequences, respectively, thus supporting its association with key temporal instants of the cardiac cycle. The use of DTW reduces the desynchronization of the cardiac events in MRI and US sequences, allowing to temporally align multimodal cardiac imaging sequences. Overall, a generic, fast and accurate method for temporal synchronization of MRI and US sequences of the same patient was introduced. This approach could be straightforwardly used for the correct temporal alignment of pre-operative MRI information and intra-operative US images.

  14. Experimental temporal quantum steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2016-11-01

    Temporal steering is a form of temporal correlation between the initial and final state of a quantum system. It is a temporal analogue of the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (spatial) steering. We demonstrate, by measuring the photon polarization, that temporal steering allows two parties to verify if they have been interacting with the same particle, even if they have no information about what happened with the particle in between the measurements. This is the first experimental study of temporal steering. We also performed experimental tests, based on the violation of temporal steering inequalities, of the security of two quantum key distribution protocols against individual attacks. Thus, these results can lead to applications for secure quantum communications and quantum engineering.

  15. Experimental temporal quantum steering

    PubMed Central

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Temporal steering is a form of temporal correlation between the initial and final state of a quantum system. It is a temporal analogue of the famous Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (spatial) steering. We demonstrate, by measuring the photon polarization, that temporal steering allows two parties to verify if they have been interacting with the same particle, even if they have no information about what happened with the particle in between the measurements. This is the first experimental study of temporal steering. We also performed experimental tests, based on the violation of temporal steering inequalities, of the security of two quantum key distribution protocols against individual attacks. Thus, these results can lead to applications for secure quantum communications and quantum engineering. PMID:27901121

  16. Temporal plus epilepsy is a major determinant of temporal lobe surgery failures.

    PubMed

    Barba, Carmen; Rheims, Sylvain; Minotti, Lorella; Guénot, Marc; Hoffmann, Dominique; Chabardès, Stephan; Isnard, Jean; Kahane, Philippe; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Reasons for failed temporal lobe epilepsy surgery remain unclear. Temporal plus epilepsy, characterized by a primary temporal lobe epileptogenic zone extending to neighboured regions, might account for a yet unknown proportion of these failures. In this study all patients from two epilepsy surgery programmes who fulfilled the following criteria were included: (i) operated from an anterior temporal lobectomy or disconnection between January 1990 and December 2001; (ii) magnetic resonance imaging normal or showing signs of hippocampal sclerosis; and (iii) postoperative follow-up ≥ 24 months for seizure-free patients. Patients were classified as suffering from unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy, bitemporal epilepsy or temporal plus epilepsy based on available presurgical data. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to calculate the probability of seizure freedom over time. Predictors of seizure recurrence were investigated using Cox proportional hazards model. Of 168 patients included, 108 (63.7%) underwent stereoelectroencephalography, 131 (78%) had hippocampal sclerosis, 149 suffered from unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (88.7%), one from bitemporal epilepsy (0.6%) and 18 (10.7%) from temporal plus epilepsy. The probability of Engel class I outcome at 10 years of follow-up was 67.3% (95% CI: 63.4-71.2) for the entire cohort, 74.5% (95% CI: 70.6-78.4) for unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy, and 14.8% (95% CI: 5.9-23.7) for temporal plus epilepsy. Multivariate analyses demonstrated four predictors of seizure relapse: temporal plus epilepsy (P < 0.001), postoperative hippocampal remnant (P = 0.001), past history of traumatic or infectious brain insult (P = 0.022), and secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (P = 0.023). Risk of temporal lobe surgery failure was 5.06 (95% CI: 2.36-10.382) greater in patients with temporal plus epilepsy than in those with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. Temporal plus epilepsy represents a hitherto unrecognized prominent cause of

  17. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  18. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  19. Stable umbral chromospheric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, V. M. J.; Scullion, E.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kiselman, D.; Gallagher, P. T.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: We seek to understand the morphology of the chromosphere in sunspot umbra. We investigate if the horizontal structures observed in the spectral core of the Ca II H line are ephemeral visuals caused by the shock dynamics of more stable structures, and examine their relationship with observables in the H-alpha line. Methods: Filtergrams in the core of the Ca II H and H-alpha lines as observed with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope are employed. We utilise a technique that creates composite images and tracks the flash propagation horizontally. Results: We find 0.̋15 wide horizontal structures, in all of the three target sunspots, for every flash where the seeing is moderate to good. Discrete dark structures are identified that are stable for at least two umbral flashes, as well as systems of structures that live for up to 24 min. We find cases of extremely extended structures with similar stability, with one such structure showing an extent of 5''. Some of these structures have a correspondence in H-alpha, but we were unable to find a one-to-one correspondence for every occurrence. If the dark streaks are formed at the same heights as umbral flashes, there are systems of structures with strong departures from the vertical for all three analysed sunspots. Conclusions: Long-lived Ca II H filamentary horizontal structures are a common and likely ever-present feature in the umbra of sunspots. If the magnetic field in the chromosphere of the umbra is indeed aligned with the structures, then the present theoretical understanding of the typical umbra needs to be revisited. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  1. Economic Impact of Stable Flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A dynamic model was created to estimate the economic impact of stable flies on livestock production. Based upon a nationwide average of 10 stable flies per animal for 3 months per year, the model estimates the impact of stable flies to be $543 million to the dairy industry, $1.34 billion to pasture ...

  2. Temperature Compensated Sapphire Resonator for Ultra-Stable Oscillator Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Santiago, D. G.; Wang, R. T.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the design and test of a whispering gallery sapphire resonator for which the dominant microwave mode family shows frequency-stable, compensated operation for temperatures above 77 kelvin.

  3. Electrically actuatable temporal tristimulus-color device

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1992-01-01

    The electrically actuated light filter operates in a cyclical temporal mode to effect a tristimulus-color light analyzer. Construction is based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer comprised of a high-speed movable mirror pair and cyclically powered electrical actuators. When combined with a single vidicon tube or a monochrome solid state image sensor, a temporally operated tristimulus-color video camera is effected. A color-generated is accomplished when constructed with a companion light source and is a flicker-free colored-light source for transmission type display systems. Advantages of low cost and small physical size result from photolithographic batch-processing manufacturability.

  4. Detecting spatial and temporal dot patterns in noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drum, Bruce

    1991-06-01

    The visual system can be thought of as an image processor that first reduces the dynamic retinal image to a temporal succession of noisy but redundant arrays of retinal ganglion cell signals and then reconstructs from these signals a stable representation of the external world. The process by which this reconstruction takes place is still poorly understood. An obvious requirement, however, is the capability to reject the noise in the individual neural signals. I am investigating the visual system's noise rejection capabilities by determining how much noise must be added to dot patterns to reduce them to detection threshold. The stimuli are patches of nonrandom dots surrounded by dynamic random dots of the same mean luminance and contrast. The non randomness, or coherence, of the stimulus patterns is controlled by randomizing a known percentage of stimulus dots in each frame of the dynamic display. The stimulus patterns can be limited to either spatial or temporal information. In addition to coherence, the size, duration and retinal location of the stimulus can be varied, as well as the temporal frequency, dot size, contrast and mean luminance of the entire display. Coherence thresholds are generally elevated by any operation that reduced the number of ganglion cells responding to the stimulus, either by reducing the stimulus area or duration or by limiting the response to a subset of ganglion cells (e.g., the receptive field overlap or response redundancy factor can be reduced by preferentially stimulating only one functional ganglion cell type, or by testing glaucoma patients with partially destroyed ganglion cell layers). The visual system thus appears to reduce noise effects by integrating neural responses that are correlated in either space or time.

  5. Temporal Bisection in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Wearden, John H.

    2001-01-01

    Trained 3-, 5-, and 8-year-olds in temporal bisection task, with nonstandard comparison stimuli spaced linearly between short or long standard visual stimuli. Statistical analyses and results from different theoretical models of the data all suggested that temporal sensitivity was higher in the 8-year-olds than in younger groups, even when the…

  6. Temporal Prediction in lieu of Periodic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Charles E.; Wyart, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Predicting not only what will happen, but also when it will happen is extremely helpful for optimizing perception and action. Temporal predictions driven by periodic stimulation increase perceptual sensitivity and reduce response latencies. At the neurophysiological level, a single mechanism has been proposed to mediate this twofold behavioral improvement: the rhythmic entrainment of slow cortical oscillations to the stimulation rate. However, temporal regularities can occur in aperiodic contexts, suggesting that temporal predictions per se may be dissociable from entrainment to periodic sensory streams. We investigated this possibility in two behavioral experiments, asking human participants to detect near-threshold auditory tones embedded in streams whose temporal and spectral properties were manipulated. While our findings confirm that periodic stimulation reduces response latencies, in agreement with the hypothesis of a stimulus-driven entrainment of neural excitability, they further reveal that this motor facilitation can be dissociated from the enhancement of auditory sensitivity. Perceptual sensitivity improvement is unaffected by the nature of temporal regularities (periodic vs aperiodic), but contingent on the co-occurrence of a fulfilled spectral prediction. Altogether, the dissociation between predictability and periodicity demonstrates that distinct mechanisms flexibly and synergistically operate to facilitate perception and action. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Temporal predictions are increasingly recognized as fundamental instruments for optimizing performance, enabling mammals to exploit regularities in the world. However, the notion of temporal predictions is often confounded with the idea of entrainment to periodic sensory inputs. At the behavioral level, it is also unclear whether perceptual sensitivity and reaction time improvements benefit the same way from temporal predictions and periodic stimulation. In two behavioral experiments on human

  7. Strategies for Global Optimization of Temporal Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Paul; Morris, Robert; Khatib, Lina; Ramakrishnan, Sailesh

    2004-01-01

    A temporal reasoning problem can often be naturally characterized as a collection of constraints with associated local preferences for times that make up the admissible values for those constraints. Globally preferred solutions to such problems emerge as a result of well-defined operations that compose and order temporal assignments. The overall objective of this work is a characterization of different notions of global preference, and to identify tractable sub-classes of temporal reasoning problems incorporating these notions. This paper extends previous results by refining the class of useful notions of global temporal preference that are associated with problems that admit of tractable solution techniques. This paper also answers the hitherto open question of whether problems that seek solutions that are globally preferred from a Utilitarian criterion for global preference can be found tractably.

  8. Spatio-temporal clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisilevich, Slava; Mansmann, Florian; Nanni, Mirco; Rinzivillo, Salvatore

    Spatio-temporal clustering is a process of grouping objects based on their spatial and temporal similarity. It is relatively new subfield of data mining which gained high popularity especially in geographic information sciences due to the pervasiveness of all kinds of location-based or environmental devices that record position, time or/and environmental properties of an object or set of objects in real-time. As a consequence, different types and large amounts of spatio-temporal data became available that introduce new challenges to data analysis and require novel approaches to knowledge discovery. In this chapter we concentrate on the spatio-temporal clustering in geographic space. First, we provide a classification of different types of spatio-temporal data. Then, we focus on one type of spatio-temporal clustering - trajectory clustering, provide an overview of the state-of-the-art approaches and methods of spatio-temporal clustering and finally present several scenarios in different application domains such as movement, cellular networks and environmental studies.

  9. [Duration and temporality].

    PubMed

    Fouks, L; Guibert, S; Cardon; Montot

    1990-01-01

    The notion of temporality in living is in perpetual motion between passive temporality and creative conscience. Human existence is not purely immanent, a flow of transcedence continually runs through it. Melancholia is a lose of creativity accompanied by a feeling that time as lived has stopped, time being lived as a new mode of space. Maniac temporality is an improductive and unsociable furious flight toward. The melancholic feeling out of time is crushed by the problematic of alterity, sin and eternity. The maniac lives an imaginary and deceptive problematic. The ambivalent ideal of the schizophrenic is both a return to biological life as well as a fascination by formal thought.

  10. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  11. Managing temporal relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Daniel L.; Geoffroy, Amy L.; Gohring, John R.

    1990-01-01

    Various temporal constraints on the execution of activities are described, and their representation in the scheduling system MAESTRO is discussed. Initial examples are presented using a sample activity described. Those examples are expanded to include a second activity, and the types of temporal constraints that can obtain between two activities are explored. Soft constraints, or preferences, in activity placement are discussed. Multiple performances of activities are considered, with respect to both hard and soft constraints. The primary methods used in MAESTRO to handle temporal constraints are described as are certain aspects of contingency handling with respect to temporal constraints. A discussion of the overall approach, with indications of future directions for this research, concludes the study.

  12. Using Advanced Tensiometers to Monitor Temporal Variations in Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, R. L.; Young, M. H.; Dixon, K. L.; Rossabi, J.; Hyde, W. K.; Holmes-Burns, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Savannah River Site has installed a comprehensive vadose zone monitoring system (VZMS) at it's low level radioactive waste disposal facility to collect the necessary information to calculate contaminant flux. The VZMS includes water content reflectometers, suction lysimeters, advanced tensiometers (ATs), water flux meters, access ports for neutron probes, and a tipping bucket rain gauge. Forty one ATs were installed from 1999 to 2001 at depths ranging from 2 to 60 feet and have been operated continuously. The installation depths were based on a hydrostatigraphic model developed from core logs, cone penetrometer logs, moisture content profiles, water retention curves model that were obtained during the phased installation of the VZMS. An AT consists of a porous cup installed at a prescribed depth with casing back to the surface and a pressure transducer that is lowered into the casing and connects with the porous cup. The pressure transducer transmits it's signal to a datalogger where the data is stored for future retrieval using a cellular phone communications package. Results from the 2 year operating period show that the AT calibrations are stable and t ATs are capable of extended monitoring of pore pressures in the 0 to 300 cm H2 O range. The ATs had sufficient resolution to detect the naturally occurring fluctuations in pore pressure (1 to 100 cm H2 O over 1 to 72 hours) that resulted from infiltration events at the site. The stable performance of the ATs combined with their ability to detect naturally occurring fluctuations in pore pressure make the ATs a useful tool in measuring temporal pore pressure variations for use in calibrating numerical models of fluid flow in variably saturated porous media.

  13. Temporal Bone Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Vrionis, Fotios D.; Robertson, Jon H.; Gardner, Gale; Heilman, Carl B.

    1999-01-01

    Meningiomas involving the temporal bone may originate from arachnoid cell nests present within the temporal bone (intratemporal), but more frequently originate from arachnoid cell nests of the posterior or middle cranial fossa with secondary invasion of the TB (extratemporal). In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 13 patients with meningiomas involving the temporal bone who underwent surgery. Tumors of the posterior fossa with only temporal bone hyperostosis, but without invasion, were excluded. Patients presented primarily with otologic symptoms and signs. The tumors originated in the temporal bone (5/13), jugular foramen (4/13), petroclival region (2/13), the asterion (1/13) or the internal auditory meatus (1/13). All of the intratemporal meningiomas had the radiological appearance of en-plaque menigiomas. The tumor extended into the middle ear (11/13), eustachian tube (5/13), and/or the labyrinth (3/13). A gross total resection was achieved in 11 patients and a subtotal resection in 2 patients. The lower cranial nerves were infiltrated by tumor in 4 patients, and were sacrificed. At a mean follow-up of approximately 6 years, 12 patients are currently alive and doing well and 1 died from tumor progression. Six patients showed tumor recurrence and were reoperated on (5/6) or followed conservatively (1/6). Surgical treatment of temporal bone meningiomas is associated with high recurrence rate due to indiscreet tumor margins. Combined surgical approaches (temporal craniotomy and mastoidectomy) by neurosurgical and otological teams are recommended for meningiomas originating in the temporal bone. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3p134-aFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17171128

  14. DELAYED REINFORCEMENT OF OPERANT BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    Lattal, Kennon A

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of delay of reinforcement is considered from the perspective of three questions that seem basic not only to understanding delay of reinforcement, but, also, by implication, the contributions of temporal relations between events to operant behavior. The first question is whether effects of the temporal relation between responses and reinforcers can be isolated from other features of the environment that often accompany delays, such as stimuli or changes in the temporal distribution or rate of reinforcement. The second question is that of the effects of delays on operant behavior. Beyond the common denominator of a temporal separation between reinforcers and the responses that produce them, delay of reinforcement procedures differ from one another along several dimensions, making delay effects circumstance dependent. The final question is one of interpreting delay of reinforcement effects. It centers on the role of the response–reinforcer temporal relation in the context of other, concurrently operating behavioral processes. PMID:20676272

  15. A temporal cloak at telecommunication data rate.

    PubMed

    Lukens, Joseph M; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2013-06-13

    Through advances in metamaterials--artificially engineered media with exotic properties, including negative refractive index--the once fanciful invisibility cloak has now assumed a prominent place in scientific research. By extending these concepts to the temporal domain, investigators have recently described a cloak which hides events in time by creating a temporal gap in a probe beam that is subsequently closed up; any interaction which takes place during this hole in time is not detected. However, these results are limited to isolated events that fill a tiny portion of the temporal period, giving a fractional cloaking window of only about 10(-4) per cent at a repetition rate of 41 kilohertz (ref. 15)--which is much too low for applications such as optical communications. Here we demonstrate another technique for temporal cloaking, which operates at telecommunication data rates and, by exploiting temporal self-imaging through the Talbot effect, hides optical data from a receiver. We succeed in cloaking 46 per cent of the entire time axis and conceal pseudorandom digital data at a rate of 12.7 gigabits per second. This potential to cloak real-world messages introduces temporal cloaking into the sphere of practical application, with immediate ramifications in secure communications.

  16. Compact and stable multibeam fiber injector

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L. F., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    A compact and stable 20-beam injector was built for launching laser light into fibers for Fabry Perot velocity measurements of shock-driven surfaces. The fiber injector uses commercial mounts on mini-rails. Dielectric-coated beamsplitters provide accurate amplitude division. Minimal adjustments for stable operation are permitted by the use of a real-time video-viewer. The video system includes a non-linear camera for CW alignment and a linearized camera with a frame grabber for pulsed measurement and analysis. All 20-injection points are displayed on a single monitor. Optical requirements are given for image relay and magnification. Stimulated Brillouin scattering limitations on high-power are quantified.

  17. Delayed Reinforcement of Operant Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattal, Kennon A.

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of delay of reinforcement is considered from the perspective of three questions that seem basic not only to understanding delay of reinforcement but also, by implication, the contributions of temporal relations between events to operant behavior. The first question is whether effects of the temporal relation between…

  18. General asymmetric neutral networks and structure design by genetic algorithms: A learning rule for temporal patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Bornholdt, S.; Graudenz, D.

    1993-07-01

    A learning algorithm based on genetic algorithms for asymmetric neural networks with an arbitrary structure is presented. It is suited for the learning of temporal patterns and leads to stable neural networks with feedback.

  19. [Stable fibrous subaortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Attié, F; Dumont, C; Mispireta, J; Kuri, J; Mata, L A

    1975-01-01

    The authors studied 37 patients belonging to the Pediatric Cardiology Service of the Institute National of Cardiology who were carriers of fixed fibrinous subaortic stenosis. The diagnosis was established by surgery or autopsy. Isolated subvalvular obstruction was found in 24 patients (63%), which represents the most important number of cases in the literature. The analysis of the 24 cases permitted important conclusions: 1. All the patients had systolic thrills in the suprasternal hollow and carotidinous pathways. 2. No case had protosystolic click. In all, the murmur's epicenter was in the 3rd and 4th IIS in the parasternal line, a fact which can lead to a mistaken diagnosis of interventricular septal defect. 66.6% of the patients had a diastolic murmur heard in the aortic focus, a secondary accompaniement to secondary valvular aortic insufficiency. The intensity of the second aortic sound held an inverse relationship to the magnitude of the gradient. The presence of paradoxic splitting of the second heart sound as well as prolongation of the expulsion period in the carotidogram are indexes for the severity of the obstruction. 3. A relationship between the severity of the lesion and the dilatation of the left atrium was found. The cardiomegaly had no relationship to the severity of the obstruction with the increase in ventricular telediastolic pressure or to the evolution time. 4. An adequate hemodynamic study permits evaluating and locating the site of the obstruction. Likewise, precise ventriculography appraises the nature of the narrowing. 5. Aortic regurgitation is located at the valvular level. Aortography permits its affirmation. Probably the stream coming from subvalvular stenosis produces fibrosis or asynchronism in the closing of the aortic valves. 6. Surgical treatment offers excelent perspectives in mortality as well as reducing the gradient. None of our patients operated on had hospital or later death. 7. Postoperatory evaluation was performed on six

  20. Modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplates and temporal fascial flap for recurrent temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Ying, Binbin; Hu, Jing; Zhu, Songsong

    2013-05-01

    This study introduced the modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplate and temporal fascial flap for recurrent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation and evaluated its clinical effects. Seven patients were treated by the modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplate and temporal fascial flap. The postoperative follow-up period ranged from half a year to 2 years to access the maximal mouth opening, TMJ disorder symptoms (pain and sound), and incidence of recurrence. No recurrence was observed in all of the 7 patients postoperatively. The mean preoperative and postoperative MMOs were 49.7 mm and 40.1 mm, respectively. There were 3 patients who reported the alleviation of pain and/or sound postoperatively. Two older patients with long-term course of disease reported no improvement of the TMJ symptoms in terms of pain and sound postoperatively. Our results showed that the modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplates and temporal fascial flap provided a more stable support for the condylar movement with less recurrence, suggesting that this operation could be a good alternative for the treatment of recurrent TMJ dislocation.

  1. Temporal Lorentzian spectral triples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    We present the notion of temporal Lorentzian spectral triple which is an extension of the notion of pseudo-Riemannian spectral triple with a way to ensure that the signature of the metric is Lorentzian. A temporal Lorentzian spectral triple corresponds to a specific 3 + 1 decomposition of a possibly noncommutative Lorentzian space. This structure introduces a notion of global time in noncommutative geometry. As an example, we construct a temporal Lorentzian spectral triple over a Moyal-Minkowski spacetime. We show that, when time is commutative, the algebra can be extended to unbounded elements. Using such an extension, it is possible to define a Lorentzian distance formula between pure states with a well-defined noncommutative formulation.

  2. Memory Retrieval as Temporal Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gordon D. A.; Vousden, Janet I.; McCormack, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Temporal distinctiveness models of memory retrieval claim that memories are organised partly in terms of their positions along a temporal dimension, and suggest that memory retrieval involves temporal discrimination. According to such models the retrievability of memories should be related to the discriminability of their temporal distances at the…

  3. Approximate Qualitative Temporal Reasoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    i.e., their boundaries can be placed in such a way that they coincide with the cell boundaries of the appropriate partition of the time-line. (Think of...respect to some appropriate partition of the time-line. For example, I felt well on Saturday. When I measured my temperature I had a fever on Monday and on...Bittner / Approximate Qualitative Temporal Reasoning 49 [27] I. A. Goralwalla, Y. Leontiev , M. T. Özsu, D. Szafron, and C. Combi. Temporal granularity for

  4. Spatial and temporal variations of microbial community in a mixed plug-flow loop reactor fed with dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Chen, Po-Hsu; Yu, Zhongtang

    2014-07-01

    Mixed plug-flow loop reactor (MPFLR) has been widely adopted by the US dairy farms to convert cattle manure to biogas. However, the microbiome in MPFLR digesters remains unexplored. In this study, the microbiome in a MPFLR digester operated on a mega-dairy farm was examined thrice over a 2 month period. Within 23 days of retention time, 55-70% of total manure solid was digested. Except for a few minor volatile fatty acids (VFAs), total VFA concentration and pH remained similar along the course of the digester and over time. Metagenomic analysis showed that although with some temporal variations, the bacterial community was rather stable spatially in the digester. The methanogenic community was also stable both spatially and temporally in the digester. Among methanogens, genus Methanosaeta dominated in the digester. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis and metagenomic analysis yielded different relative abundance of individual genera of methanogens, especially for Methanobacterium, which was predominant based on qPCR analysis but undetectable by metagenomics. Collectively, the results showed that only small microbial and chemical gradients existed within the digester, and the digestion process occurred similarly throughout the MPFLR digester. The findings of this study may help improve the operation and design of this type of manure digesters.

  5. Spatial and temporal variations of microbial community in a mixed plug-flow loop reactor fed with dairy manure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Chen, Po-Hsu; Yu, Zhongtang

    2014-01-01

    Mixed plug-flow loop reactor (MPFLR) has been widely adopted by the US dairy farms to convert cattle manure to biogas. However, the microbiome in MPFLR digesters remains unexplored. In this study, the microbiome in a MPFLR digester operated on a mega-dairy farm was examined thrice over a 2 month period. Within 23 days of retention time, 55–70% of total manure solid was digested. Except for a few minor volatile fatty acids (VFAs), total VFA concentration and pH remained similar along the course of the digester and over time. Metagenomic analysis showed that although with some temporal variations, the bacterial community was rather stable spatially in the digester. The methanogenic community was also stable both spatially and temporally in the digester. Among methanogens, genus Methanosaeta dominated in the digester. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis and metagenomic analysis yielded different relative abundance of individual genera of methanogens, especially for Methanobacterium, which was predominant based on qPCR analysis but undetectable by metagenomics. Collectively, the results showed that only small microbial and chemical gradients existed within the digester, and the digestion process occurred similarly throughout the MPFLR digester. The findings of this study may help improve the operation and design of this type of manure digesters. PMID:24690147

  6. Stable isotopes in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Marsh, Julian B; Das, Sai Krupa; Welty, Francine K

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is recognized as a major public health problem. Obesity is a multifactorial disease and is often associated with a wide range of comorbidities including hypertension, non-insulin dependent (Type II) diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease, all of which contribute to morbidity and mortality. This review deals with stable isotope mass spectrometric methods and the application of stable isotopes to metabolic studies of obesity. Body composition and total energy expenditure (TEE) can be measured by mass spectrometry using stable isotope labeled water, and the metabolism of protein, lipid, and carbohydrate can be measured using appropriate labeled tracer molecules.

  7. Stable Spheromaks with Profile Control

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K; Jayakumar, R

    2008-01-29

    A spheromak equilibrium with zero edge current is shown to be stable to both ideal MHD and tearing modes that normally produce Taylor relaxation in gun-injected spheromaks. This stable equilibrium differs from the stable Taylor state in that the current density j falls to zero at the wall. Estimates indicate that this current profile could be sustained by non-inductive current drive at acceptable power levels. Stability is determined using the NIMROD code for linear stability analysis. Non-linear NIMROD calculations with non-inductive current drive could point the way to improved fusion reactors.

  8. Stable and sporadic symbiotic communities of coral and algal holobionts

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Eric R; Barott, Katie L; Nulton, Jim; Vermeij, Mark JA; Rohwer, Forest L

    2016-01-01

    Coral and algal holobionts are assemblages of macroorganisms and microorganisms, including viruses, Bacteria, Archaea, protists and fungi. Despite a decade of research, it remains unclear whether these associations are spatial–temporally stable or species-specific. We hypothesized that conflicting interpretations of the data arise from high noise associated with sporadic microbial symbionts overwhelming signatures of stable holobiont members. To test this hypothesis, the bacterial communities associated with three coral species (Acropora rosaria, Acropora hyacinthus and Porites lutea) and two algal guilds (crustose coralline algae and turf algae) from 131 samples were analyzed using a novel statistical approach termed the Abundance-Ubiquity (AU) test. The AU test determines whether a given bacterial species would be present given additional sampling effort (that is, stable) versus those species that are sporadically associated with a sample. Using the AU test, we show that coral and algal holobionts have a high-diversity group of stable symbionts. Stable symbionts are not exclusive to one species of coral or algae. No single bacterial species was ubiquitously associated with one host, showing that there is not strict heredity of the microbiome. In addition to the stable symbionts, there was a low-diversity community of sporadic symbionts whose abundance varied widely across individual holobionts of the same species. Identification of these two symbiont communities supports the holobiont model and calls into question the hologenome theory of evolution. PMID:26555246

  9. Temporal limits on rubber hand illusion reflect individuals' temporal resolution in multisensory perception.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Marcello; Robinson, Jeffrey; Migliorati, Daniele; Donno, Brunella; Ferri, Francesca; Northoff, Georg

    2016-12-01

    Synchronous, but not asynchronous, multisensory stimulation has been successfully employed to manipulate the experience of body ownership, as in the case of the rubber hand illusion. Hence, it has been assumed that the rubber hand illusion is bound by the same temporal rules as in multisensory integration. However, empirical evidence of a direct link between the temporal limits on the rubber hand illusion and those on multisensory integration is still lacking. Here we provide the first comprehensive evidence that individual susceptibility to the rubber hand illusion depends upon the individual temporal resolution in multisensory perception, as indexed by the temporal binding window. In particular, in two studies we showed that the degree of temporal asynchrony necessary to prevent the induction of the rubber hand illusion depends upon the individuals' sensitivity to perceiving asynchrony during visuo-tactile stimulation. That is, the larger the temporal binding window, as inferred from a simultaneity judgment task, the higher the level of asynchrony tolerated in the rubber hand illusion. Our results suggest that current neurocognitive models of body ownership can be enriched with a temporal dimension. Moreover, our results suggest that the different aspects of body ownership operate over different time scales.

  10. Stable Lobed Mixer With Combustion Demonstrated and Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center collaborated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on an experiment to study the use of lobed mixers to improve the fuel-air mixing process and increase combustion intensity in combustors with minimal pressure loss. This experiment is the first known stable combusting flow studied for this device, and the data show a much faster and much more uniform combustion process than for flat-plate mixers. Several potential benefits may be realized from this study in future combustors, including a reduction in NO_x emissions because of the more uniform temperature distribution. The experiment was done in Lewis' Planar Reacting Shear Layer facility, which was adapted to accept a lobed mixer in addition to the original planar tip. A graduate student at MIT provided the mixer design concept, and Lewis provided the engineering, operations, and research expertise. The experiment used hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures to react with vitiated hot air at 920 K. A flow speed of about 120 m/sec and a speed ratio of 0.5 were used. Flow diagnostics consisted of traversing fine-wire thermocouples and pitot probes for flow mapping. Supplementary fluorescence images were taken with a charged coupled device (CCD) camera to show the location and temporal behavior of the reaction zone. The data showed that the lobed mixer consumed the reactants between 3 to 10 times faster than a corresponding planar shear layer. The figure shows the dramatic difference in the measured temperature distribution with and without the lobed mixer. The increased mixing rate was due to a larger interfacial area as well as to the secondary flow from the streamwise vortices off the tips of the lobes. In addition, the fluorescence images showed that the lobes acted as flame stabilizers.

  11. Earthquakes in stable continental crust

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.C.; Kanter, L.R. )

    1990-03-01

    Earthquakes can strike even in stable crust, well away from the familiar earthquake zones at the edges of tectonic plates, but their mere occurrence is both a source of concern in planning critical facilities such as nuclear power plants. The authors sought answers to two major questions: Just how much seismic activity does take place within the stable parts of continents And are there specific geologic features that make some areas of stable crust particularly susceptible to earthquakes They began by studying North America alone, but it soon became clear that the fairly short record of these rare events on a single continent would not provide enough data for reliable analysis. Hence, they decided to substitute space for time--to survey earthquake frequency and distribution in stable continental areas worldwide. This paper discusses their findings.

  12. Earthquakes in Stable Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Arch C.; Kanter, Lisa R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are some of the reasons for earthquakes which occur in stable crust away from familiar zones at the ends of tectonic plates. Crust stability and the reactivation of old faults are described using examples from India and Australia. (CW)

  13. Temporal Aperture Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The two types of modulation techniques useful to X-ray imaging are reviewed. The use of optimum coded temporal aperature modulation is shown, in certain cases, to offer an advantage over a spatial aperture modulator. Example applications of a diffuse anisotropic X-ray background experiment and a wide field of view hard X-ray imager are discussed.

  14. Information and Temporality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flender, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Being able to give reasons for what the world is and how it works is one of the defining characteristics of modernity. Mathematical reason and empirical observation brought science and engineering to unprecedented success. However, modernity has reached a post-state where an instrumental view of technology needs revision with reasonable arguments and evidence, i.e. without falling back to superstition and mysticism. Instrumentally, technology bears the potential to ease and to harm. Easing and harming can't be controlled like the initial development of technology is a controlled exercise for a specific, mostly easing purpose. Therefore, a revised understanding of information technology is proposed based upon mathematical concepts and intuitions as developed in quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics offers unequaled opportunities because it raises foundational questions in a precise form. Beyond instrumentalism it enables to raise the question of essences as that what remains through time what it is. The essence of information technology is acausality. The time of acausality is temporality. Temporality is not a concept or a category. It is not epistemological. As an existential and thus more comprehensive and fundamental than a concept or a category temporality is ontological; it does not simply have ontic properties. Rather it exhibits general essences. Datability, significance, spannedness and openness are general essences of equiprimordial time (temporality).

  15. Temporal molecular and isotopic analysis of active bacterial communities in two New Zealand sponges.

    PubMed

    Simister, Rachel; Taylor, Michael W; Rogers, Karyne M; Schupp, Peter J; Deines, Peter

    2013-07-01

    The characterization of changes in microbial communities is an essential step towards a better understanding of host-microbe associations. It is well established that sponges (phylum Porifera) harbour a diverse and abundant microbial community, but it is not known whether these microbial communities change over time. Here, we followed two sponge species (Ancorina alata and Tethya stolonifera) over a 2-year sampling period using RNA (16S rRNA)-based amplicon pyrosequencing and bulk stable isotope analysis (δ(13) C and δ(15)N). A total of 4468 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was identified, which were affiliated with 26 bacterial phyla. Bacterial communities of both sponge species were remarkably stable throughout the monitoring period, driven by a small number of OTUs that dominated their respective communities. Variability of sponge-associated bacterial communities was driven by OTUs that were low in abundance or transient over time. Stable isotope analysis provided evidence of both bacteria- and host-derived nutrients and their variability throughout the season. While δ(15) N values were similar, significant differences were found in δ(13) C of sponge tissue, indicative of a varying reliance on particulate organic matter as a carbon source. Further temporal studies, such as those undertaken here, will be highly valuable to identify which members of a sponge bacterial community are truly symbiotic in nature.

  16. Functionally stable and phylogenetically diverse microbial enrichments from microbial fuel cells during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Shun'ichi; Suzuki, Shino; Norden-Krichmar, Trina M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Gorby, Yuri A; Bretschger, Orianna

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microorganisms as biocatalysts to recover energy from organic matter in the form of electricity. One of the goals of MFC research is to develop the technology for cost-effective wastewater treatment. However, before practical MFC applications are implemented it is important to gain fundamental knowledge about long-term system performance, reproducibility, and the formation and maintenance of functionally-stable microbial communities. Here we report findings from a MFC operated for over 300 days using only primary clarifier effluent collected from a municipal wastewater treatment plant as the microbial resource and substrate. The system was operated in a repeat-batch mode, where the reactor solution was replaced once every two weeks with new primary effluent that consisted of different microbial and chemical compositions with every batch exchange. The turbidity of the primary clarifier effluent solution notably decreased, and 97% of biological oxygen demand (BOD) was removed after an 8-13 day residence time for each batch cycle. On average, the limiting current density was 1000 mA/m(2), the maximum power density was 13 mW/m(2), and coulombic efficiency was 25%. Interestingly, the electrochemical performance and BOD removal rates were very reproducible throughout MFC operation regardless of the sample variability associated with each wastewater exchange. While MFC performance was very reproducible, the phylogenetic analyses of anode-associated electricity-generating biofilms showed that the microbial populations temporally fluctuated and maintained a high biodiversity throughout the year-long experiment. These results suggest that MFC communities are both self-selecting and self-optimizing, thereby able to develop and maintain functional stability regardless of fluctuations in carbon source(s) and regular introduction of microbial competitors. These results contribute significantly toward the practical application

  17. L-Band Transmit/Receive Module for Phase-Stable Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andricos, Constantine; Edelstein, Wendy; Krimskiy, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been shown to provide very sensitive measurements of surface deformation and displacement on the order of 1 cm. Future systematic measurements of surface deformation will require this capability over very large areas (300 km) from space. To achieve these required accuracies, these spaceborne sensors must exhibit low temporal decorrelation and be temporally stable systems. An L-band (24-cmwavelength) InSAR instrument using an electronically steerable radar antenna is suited to meet these needs. In order to achieve the 1-cm displacement accuracy, the phased array antenna requires phase-stable transmit/receive (T/R) modules. The T/R module operates at L-band (1.24 GHz) and has less than 1- deg absolute phase stability and less than 0.1-dB absolute amplitude stability over temperature. The T/R module is also high power (30 W) and power efficient (60-percent overall efficiency). The design is currently implemented using discrete components and surface mount technology. The basic T/R module architecture is augmented with a calibration loop to compensate for temperature variations, component variations, and path loss variations as a function of beam settings. The calibration circuit consists of an amplitude and phase detector, and other control circuitry, to compare the measured gain and phase to a reference signal and uses this signal to control a precision analog phase shifter and analog attenuator. An architecture was developed to allow for the module to be bidirectional, to operate in both transmit and receive mode. The architecture also includes a power detector used to maintain a transmitter power output constant within 0.1 dB. The use of a simple, stable, low-cost, and high-accuracy gain and phase detector made by Analog Devices (AD8302), combined with a very-high efficiency T/R module, is novel. While a self-calibrating T/R module capability has been sought for years, a practical and cost-effective solution has

  18. Basin-scale spatio-temporal variability and control of phytoplankton photosynthesis in the Baltic Sea: The first multiwavelength fast repetition rate fluorescence study operated on a ship-of-opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houliez, Emilie; Simis, Stefan; Nenonen, Susanna; Ylöstalo, Pasi; Seppälä, Jukka

    2017-05-01

    This study presents the results of the first field application of a flow-through multi-wavelength Fast Repetition Rate fluorometer (FRRF) equipped with two excitation channels (458 and 593 nm). This device aims to improve the measurement of mixed cyanobacteria and algae community's photosynthetic parameters and was designed to be easily incorporated into existing ferrybox systems. We present a spatiotemporal analysis of the maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) and functional absorption cross section (σPSII) recorded from April to August 2014 on a ship-of-opportunity commuting twice per week between Helsinki (Finland) and Travemünde (Germany). Temporal variations of Fv/Fm and σPSII differed between areas of the Baltic Sea. However, even though the Baltic Sea is characterized by several physico-chemical gradients, no gradient was observed in Fv/Fm and σPSII spatial distribution suggesting complex interactions between biotic and abiotic controls. σPSII was sensitive to phytoplankton seasonal succession and thus differed according to the wavelength used to excite photosystems II (PSII) pigments. This was particularly true in summer when high σPSII(593) values were observed later and longer than high σPSII(458) values, reflecting the role of cyanobacteria in photosynthetic light uptake measured at community scale. In contrast, Fv/Fm variations were similar after excitation at 458 nm or 593 nm suggesting that the adjustment of Fv/Fm in response to environmental factors was similar for the different groups (algae vs. cyanobacteria) present within the phytoplankton community.

  19. Multisensory temporal integration: Task and stimulus dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Ryan A.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of human sensory systems to integrate information across the different modalities provides a wide range of behavioral and perceptual benefits. This integration process is dependent upon the temporal relationship of the different sensory signals, with stimuli occurring close together in time typically resulting in the largest behavior changes. The range of temporal intervals over which such benefits are seen is typically referred to as the temporal binding window (TBW). Given the importance of temporal factors in multisensory integration under both normal and atypical circumstances such as autism and dyslexia, the TBW has been measured with a variety of experimental protocols that differ according to criterion, task, and stimulus type, making comparisons across experiments difficult. In the current study we attempt to elucidate the role that these various factors play in the measurement of this important construct. The results show a strong effect of stimulus type, with the TBW assessed with speech stimuli being both larger and more symmetrical than that seen using simple and complex non-speech stimuli. These effects are robust across task and statistical criteria, and are highly consistent within individuals, suggesting substantial overlap in the neural and cognitive operations that govern multisensory temporal processes. PMID:23604624

  20. Optimal Temporal Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Fuat; Freestone, David; Simen, Patrick; deSouza, Laura; Cohen, Jonathan D.; Holmes, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Time is an essential feature of most decisions, because the reward earned from decisions frequently depends on the temporal statistics of the environment (e.g., on whether decisions must be made under deadlines). Accordingly, evolution appears to have favored a mechanism that predicts intervals in the seconds to minutes range with high accuracy on average, but significant variability from trial to trial. Importantly, the subjective sense of time that results is sufficiently imprecise that maximizing rewards in decision-making can require substantial behavioral adjustments (e.g., accumulating less evidence for a decision in order to beat a deadline). Reward maximization in many daily decisions therefore requires optimal temporal risk assessment. Here, we review the temporal decision-making literature, conduct secondary analyses of relevant published datasets, and analyze the results of a new experiment. The paper is organized in three parts. In the first part, we review literature and analyze existing data suggesting that animals take account of their inherent behavioral variability (their “endogenous timing uncertainty”) in temporal decision-making. In the second part, we review literature that quantitatively demonstrates nearly optimal temporal risk assessment with sub-second and supra-second intervals using perceptual tasks (with humans and mice) and motor timing tasks (with humans). We supplement this section with original research that tested human and rat performance on a task that requires finding the optimal balance between two time-dependent quantities for reward maximization. This optimal balance in turn depends on the level of timing uncertainty. Corroborating the reviewed literature, humans and rats exhibited nearly optimal temporal risk assessment in this task. In the third section, we discuss the role of timing uncertainty in reward maximization in two-choice perceptual decision-making tasks and review literature that implicates timing uncertainty

  1. Morphological study of surgical approach by superior temporal sulcus-temporal horn of lateral ventricle approach using volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Jia, Linpei; Dong, Yidian; Zhao, Hang; Liu, Haoyuan; Yang, Kerong; Li, Youqiong

    2014-03-01

    In this research, we acquired the length of the superior temporal sulcus, the shortest distance from the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle, and the approach angle between the median sagittal plane and the shortest segment from the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle measuring 98 specimens by magnetic resonance imaging volume rendering. At the same time, we preliminarily oriented the point of the superior temporal sulcus, which is closest to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle, aimed at finding out the best entrance point of surgical approach through the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle and reducing the damage to optic radiation as well as other nerve fibers during the operation. The results indicate that the point at the front side 3/5 of the superior temporal sulcus may be the ideal surgical approach entrance point, and there is no difference between 2 cerebral hemispheres (P < 0.05).

  2. Coverage centralities for temporal networks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Yano, Yosuke; Yoshida, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Structure of real networked systems, such as social relationship, can be modeled as temporal networks in which each edge appears only at the prescribed time. Understanding the structure of temporal networks requires quantifying the importance of a temporal vertex, which is a pair of vertex index and time. In this paper, we define two centrality measures of a temporal vertex based on the fastest temporal paths which use the temporal vertex. The definition is free from parameters and robust against the change in time scale on which we focus. In addition, we can efficiently compute these centrality values for all temporal vertices. Using the two centrality measures, we reveal that distributions of these centrality values of real-world temporal networks are heterogeneous. For various datasets, we also demonstrate that a majority of the highly central temporal vertices are located within a narrow time window around a particular time. In other words, there is a bottleneck time at which most information sent in the temporal network passes through a small number of temporal vertices, which suggests an important role of these temporal vertices in spreading phenomena. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Temporal Network Theory and Applications", edited by Petter Holme.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-60498-7

  3. Temporal Surface Reconstruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-03

    sequence of images. Structure information can be recovered from images through a number of visual mechanisms such as shading, motion and stereo . Image...stages which are repeated (continued on back) 14. SUBJECT TERMS (key words) 1S. NUMBER OF PAGES 3D reconstruction structure estimation temporal visio 149...such as shading, motion and stereo . Image information is commonly available in a time-continuous fashion and this work proposes a method for estimating

  4. Temporal Data, Temporal Data Models, Temporal Data Languages and Temporal Database Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    bibliographies are in chronological order dating from the 1960’s. Breutmann, B., Falkenberg , E., Mauer, R ., CSL: A language for Defining Conceptual Schemas... Falkenberg , E., and Mauer, R ., CSL: A language for Defining Conceptual Schemas, Data Base Architect, North-Holland Publishing Company, 1979. 33. Jones, S...of real-time military applications using temporal database computers. DTIC INS ECTED N~ ~AA DTIC TAF Li Av ....... C~C. -: , r I I %A TABLE OF

  5. Modeling the Temporal Evolution of Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Shara I.; Cobian, Alexander G.; Tevis, Sarah E.; Kennedy, Gregory D.; Craven, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative complications have a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality; these impacts are exacerbated when patients experience multiple complications. However, the task of modeling the temporal sequencing of complications has not been previously addressed. We present an approach based on Markov chain models for characterizing the temporal evolution of post-operative complications represented in the American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program database. Our work demonstrates that the models have significant predictive value. In particular, an inhomogenous Markov chain model effectively predicts the development of serious complications (coma longer than a day, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, septic shock, renal failure, pneumonia) and interventional complications (unplanned re-intubation, longer than 2 days on a ventilator and bleeding transfusion). PMID:28269851

  6. Visual information for judging temporal range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Mowafy, Lyn

    1993-01-01

    Work in our laboratory suggests that pilots can extract temporal range information (i.e., the time to pass a given waypoint) directly from out-the-window motion information. This extraction does not require the use of velocity or distance, but rather operates solely on a 2-D motion cue. In this paper, we present the mathematical derivation of this information, psychophysical evidence of human observers' sensitivity, and possible advantages and limitations of basing vehicle control on this parameter.

  7. First stable isotope analysis of Asiatic wild ass tail hair from the Mongolian Gobi.

    PubMed

    Horacek, Micha; Sturm, Martina Burnik; Kaczensky, Petra

    Stable isotope analysis has become a powerful tool to study feeding ecology, water use or movement pattern in contemporary, historic and ancient species. Certain hair and teeth grow continuously, and when sampled longitudinally can provide temporally explicit information on dietary regime and movement pattern. In an initial trial, we analysed a tail sample of an Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus) from the Mongolian Gobi. We found seasonal variations in H, C and N isotope patterns, likely being the result of temporal variations in available feeds, water supply and possibly physiological status. Thus stable isotope analysis shows promise to study the comparative ecology of the three autochthonous equid species in the Mongolian Gobi.

  8. Imaging of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Abele, Travis A; Wiggins, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    A variety of congenital, infectious, inflammatory, vascular, and benign and malignant neoplastic pathology affects the temporal bone. Knowledge of normal temporal bone anatomy and space-specific differential diagnoses is key to imaging interpretation of temporal bone. Correlation with clinical history and physical examination is vital to making the correct diagnosis or providing an appropriate differential. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are complementary imaging modalities in the evaluation of temporal bone abnormalities.

  9. Towards highly stable polymer electronics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolka, Mark; Nasrallah, Iyad; Broch, Katharina; Sadhanala, Aditya; Hurhangee, Michael; McCulloch, Iain; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-11-01

    Due to their ease of processing, organic semiconductors are promising candidates for applications in high performance flexible displays and fast organic electronic circuitry. Recently, a lot of advances have been made on organic semiconductors exhibiting surprisingly high performance and carrier mobilities exceeding those of amorphous silicon. However, there remain significant concerns about their operational and environmental stability, particularly in the context of applications that require a very high level of threshold voltage stability, such as active-matrix addressing of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays. Here, we report a novel technique for dramatically improving the operational stress stability, performance and uniformity of high mobility polymer field-effect transistors by the addition of specific small molecule additives to the polymer semiconductor film. We demonstrate for the first time polymer FETs that exhibit stable threshold voltages with threshold voltage shifts of less than 1V when subjected to a constant current operational stress for 1 day under conditions that are representative for applications in OLED active matrix displays. The approach constitutes in our view a technological breakthrough; it also makes the device characteristics independent of the atmosphere in which it is operated, causes a significant reduction in contact resistance and significantly improves device uniformity. We will discuss in detail the microscopic mechanism by which the molecular additives lead to this significant improvement in device performance and stability.

  10. Tellurium Stable Isotope Fractionation in Chondritic Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, M. A.; Hammond, S. J.; Parkinson, I. J.

    2014-09-01

    New Te double spike procedures were set up to obtain high-precision accurate Te stable isotope data. Tellurium stable isotope data for 16 chondrite falls are presented, providing evidence for significant Te stable isotope fractionation.

  11. Temporal Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. D.; Thomas, B. C.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999, Stolz and Adams unveiled a subgrid-scale model for LES based upon approximately inverting (defiltering) the spatial grid-filter operator and termed .the approximate deconvolution model (ADM). Subsequently, the utility and accuracy of the ADM were demonstrated in a posteriori analyses of flows as diverse as incompressible plane-channel flow and supersonic compression-ramp flow. In a prelude to the current paper, a parameterized temporal ADM (TADM) was developed and demonstrated in both a priori and a posteriori analyses for forced, viscous Burger's flow. The development of a time-filtered variant of the ADM was motivated-primarily by the desire for a unifying theoretical and computational context to encompass direct numerical simulation (DNS), large-eddy simulation (LES), and Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes simulation (RANS). The resultant methodology was termed temporal LES (TLES). To permit exploration of the parameter space, however, previous analyses of the TADM were restricted to Burger's flow, and it has remained to demonstrate the TADM and TLES methodology for three-dimensional flow. For several reasons, plane-channel flow presents an ideal test case for the TADM. Among these reasons, channel flow is anisotropic, yet it lends itself to highly efficient and accurate spectral numerical methods. Moreover, channel-flow has been investigated extensively by DNS, and a highly accurate data base of Moser et.al. exists. In the present paper, we develop a fully anisotropic TADM model and demonstrate its utility in simulating incompressible plane-channel flow at nominal values of Re(sub tau) = 180 and Re(sub tau) = 590 by the TLES method. The TADM model is shown to perform nearly as well as the ADM at equivalent resolution, thereby establishing TLES as a viable alternative to LES. Moreover, as the current model is suboptimal is some respects, there is considerable room to improve TLES.

  12. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

  13. Synthesis of thermally stable polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, G. B.

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of bis triazo linediones with divinyl esters and substituted styrenes was investigated. Twenty new polymers were derived via reaction of two previously synthesized bis triazol linediones and four new bis atriazol linediones with eight styrenes. The structure and polymer properties of these thermally stable polymers was examined. The reaction of triazo linediones with enol esters was also considered.

  14. Seasonality and predictability shape temporal species diversity.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Jonathan D; Bogan, Michael T; Bonada, Núria; Rios-Touma, Blanca; Lytle, David A

    2017-01-31

    Temporal environmental fluctuations, such as seasonality, exert strong controls on biodiversity. While the effects of seasonality are well known, the predictability of fluctuations across years may influence seasonality in ways that are less well understood. The ability of a habitat to support unique, non-nested assemblages of species at different times of the year should depend on both seasonality (occurrence of events at specific periods of the year) and predictability (the reliability of event recurrence) of characteristic ecological conditions. Drawing on tools from wavelet analysis and information theory, we develop a framework for quantifying both seasonality and predictability of habitats, and applied this using global long-term rainfall data. Our analysis predicted that temporal beta diversity should be maximized in highly-predictable and highly-seasonal climates, and that low degrees of seasonality, predictability, or both would lower diversity in characteristic ways. Using stream invertebrate communities as a case study, we demonstrated that temporal species diversity, as exhibited by community turnover, was determined by a balance between temporal environmental variability (seasonality) and the reliability of this variability (predictability). Communities in highly-seasonal Mediterranean environments exhibited strong oscillations in community structure, with turnover from one unique community type to another across seasons, whereas communities in aseasonal New Zealand environments fluctuated randomly. Understanding the influence of seasonal and other temporal scales of environmental oscillations on diversity is not complete without a clear understanding of their predictability, and our framework provides tools for examining these trends at a variety of temporal scales, seasonal and beyond. Given the uncertainty of future climates, seasonality and predictability are critical considerations for both basic science and management of ecosystems (e.g. dam

  15. [Temporal meaning of suffering].

    PubMed

    Porée, J

    2015-09-01

    If we had to find a few simple words to express what a suffering human being experiences, no matter what ills are causing the suffering and no matter what circumstances underlie the ills themselves, we could unmistakably say that it is the experience of not being able to go on like this. Suffering can be described, in this same sense, as an alteration in temporality. However, describing suffering as such only makes sense if we already have a conception of normal temporality. Yet for this, philosophical tradition offers not one but four competing conceptions. In the present article, we begin by briefly presenting these different conceptions. We then show how each one sheds light, by way of contrast, on a phenomenon whose meaning thus appears to be essentially negative. But does this phenomenon have a negative meaning only? Doesn't it correspond as much to a transformation as an alteration of temporality? This is what we will strive to establish in the third part of the article by relating suffering to hope, in a paradoxical sense of the term. Of the four conceptions of time likely to shed a contrasting light on the upheavals that suffering introduces into our life experience, the one described by Aristotle in Physics is historically the first. In particular, the notion of succession originates therein. But this conception does not account for what makes time the unit of a past, a present, and a future. In Book XI of Confessions, St. Augustine situated this unit not in nature but in the human mind. Hence, his definition of time as a distension of the soul and the necessary division into physical time and psychic time it entails. Husserl's Lessons on the phenomenology of the consciousness of internal time lend credit to this division, but they illuminate only the internal constitution of the "present", which is at the heart of the psychological conception of time. In Being and Time, Heidegger breaks away from this long-standing tradition; in his view, physical time

  16. Higher Order Fractional Stable Motion: Hyperdiffusion with Heavy Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Reiichiro

    2016-10-01

    We introduce the class of higher order fractional stable motions that can exhibit hyperdiffusive spreading with heavy tails. We define the class as a generalization of higher order fractional Brownian motion as well as a generalization of linear fractional stable motions. Higher order fractional stable motions are self-similar with Hurst index larger than one and non-Gaussian stable marginals with infinite variance and have stationary higher order increments. We investigate their sample path properties and asymptotic dependence structure on the basis of codifference. In particular, by incrementing or decrementing sample paths once under suitable conditions, the diffusion rate can be accelerated or decelerated by one order. With a view towards simulation study, we provide a ready-for-use sample path simulation recipe at discrete times along with error analysis. The proposed simulation scheme requires only elementary numerical operations and is robust to high frequency sampling, irregular spacing and super-sampling.

  17. Stable isotopic compositions in Australian precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianrong; Fu, Guobin; Song, Xianfang; Charles, Stephen P.; Zhang, Yinghua; Han, Dongmei; Wang, Shiqin

    2010-12-01

    Stable deuterium (δD) and oxygen-18 (δ18O) isotopes in 1962 to 2002 precipitation from the seven Australian stations of the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) were used to investigate isotope characteristics including temporal and spatial distributions across different regions of Australia. On the basis of 1534 samples, the local meteoric water line (LMWL) was established as δD = 7.10δ18O + 8.21. δ18O showed a depletion trend from north and south to central Australia (a continental effect) and from west to east. Precipitation amount effects were generally greater than temperature effects, with quadratic or logarithmic correlations describing δ/T and δ/P better than linear relationships. Nonlinear stepwise regression was used to determine the significant meteorological control factors for each station, explaining about 50% or more of the δ18O variations. Geographical control factors for δ18O were given by the relationship δ18O (‰) = -0.005 longitude (°) - 0.034 latitude (°)-0.003 altitude (m) - 4.753. Four different types of d-excess patterns demonstrated particular precipitation formation conditions for four major seasonal rainfall zones. Finally, wavelet coherence (WTC) between δ18O and SOI confirmed that the influence of ENSO decreased from east and north to west Australia.

  18. Spatio-temporal variability in ventricular fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Harold M.; Evans, Steven J.; Fenton, Flavio H.; Garfinkel, Alan

    2001-03-01

    It is widely believed that reentrant ventricular tachycardia arises when a spiral wave of activation takes over and drives the ventricle at a rate significantly faster than sinus rhythm, and that ventricular fibrillation (VF), a spatio-temporally disorganized form of cardiac activity leading to sudden cardiac death, arises when this spiral breaks down into multiple offspring. Many authors have found that VF displays significant spatial and temporal organization. The purpose of this research is to quantify time scales and temporal and spatial variability in VF. Surface electrograms were obtained from a stable canine model of VF (cf. Nwasokwa and Bodenheimer, Am. J. Physiol. 253, H643 (1987)). These electrograms were analyzed to identify activation times to an accuracy of 1 ms (cf. Garfinkel et al., J. Clin. Invest. 99, 305 (1997)), yielded eighteen usable series, each containing over 1024 intervactivation intervals, two or three from widely spaced sites per episode of VF, 7 total episodes in 4 animals. Spatial and long-term (60 - 120 sec) temporal variability were analyzed and compared by ANOVA techniques (Evans et al., Proc. Royal Soc. B265, 2167 (1998)). In 6 of 7 episodes, spatial variability among sites was statistically more significant than variability between the first and second halves of each series. More recently, Fourier analysis of these series found three distinct scaling regions, with power law dynamics in each and break points of ca. 1 sec and 4 sec. Finally, there was significant variability in the fraction of "short" interactivation intervals (lasting < 60 of 125 ms) among sites. Together these results suggest variability in physiological properties among sites and consequent variability in spiral wave dynamics among sites.

  19. EXAMINING THE TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF AMMONIA AND NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM AGRICULTURAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper examines the temporal variability of airborne emissions of ammonia from livestock operations and fertilizer application and nitric oxide from soils. In the United States, the livestock operations and fertilizer categories comprise the majority of the ammonia emissions...

  20. Temporal resolution in children.

    PubMed

    Wightman, F; Allen, P; Dolan, T; Kistler, D; Jamieson, D

    1989-06-01

    The auditory temporal resolving power of young children was measured using an adaptive forced-choice psychophysical paradigm that was disguised as a video game. 20 children between 3 and 7 years of age and 5 adults were asked to detect the presence of a temporal gap in a burst of half-octave-band noise at band center frequencies of 400 and 2,000 Hz. The minimum detectable gap (gap threshold) was estimated adaptively in 20-trial runs. The mean gap thresholds in the 400-Hz condition were higher for the younger children than for the adults, with the 3-year-old children producing the highest thresholds. Gap thresholds in the 2,000-Hz condition were generally lower than in the 400-Hz condition and showed a similar age effect. All the individual adaptive runs were "adult-like," suggesting that the children were generally attentive to the task during each run. However, the variability of threshold estimates from run to run was substantial, especially in the 3-5-year-old children. Computer simulations suggested that this large within-subjects variability could have resulted from frequent, momentary lapses of attention, which would lead to "guessing" on a substantial portion of the trials.

  1. Temporal summaries: supporting temporal categorical searching, aggregation and comparison.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taowei David; Plaisant, Catherine; Shneiderman, Ben; Spring, Neil; Roseman, David; Marchand, Greg; Mukherjee, Vikramjit; Smith, Mark

    2009-01-01

    When analyzing thousands of event histories, analysts often want to see the events as an aggregate to detect insights and generate new hypotheses about the data. An analysis tool must emphasize both the prevalence and the temporal ordering of these events. Additionally, the analysis tool must also support flexible comparisons to allow analysts to gather visual evidence. In a previous work, we introduced align, rank, and filter (ARF) to accentuate temporal ordering. In this paper, we present temporal summaries, an interactive visualization technique that highlights the prevalence of event occurrences. Temporal summaries dynamically aggregate events in multiple granularities (year, month, week, day, hour, etc.) for the purpose of spotting trends over time and comparing several groups of records. They provide affordances for analysts to perform temporal range filters. We demonstrate the applicability of this approach in two extensive case studies with analysts who applied temporal summaries to search, filter, and look for patterns in electronic health records and academic records.

  2. Stable Summability and Approximation Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-25

    Sturm - Liouville system [2,8] * heat equation [2,11] * Schrodinger and Dirac operators [8,10] * Fourier integrals [3,11], and * abstract operators ...34. Proceedings of the Workshop on Spectral Theory of Sturm - Liouville Differential Operators , Argonne National Laboratory. ANL-84, 73, Dec. 1984, pp. 181-185. 3...AO reports. These are: 1. With H. Diamond, 1. Kon. "A Regularization of the Pointwise Summation of Singular Sturm - Liouville Eigenfunction Expansions

  3. Changes in multifractal properties for stable angina pectoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knežević, Andrea; Martinis, Mladen; Krstačić, Goran; Vargović, Emil

    2005-12-01

    The multifractal approach has been applied to temporal fluctuations of heartbeat (RR) intervals, measured in various regimes of physical activity (ergometric data), taken from healthy subjects and those having stable angina pectoris (SAP). The problem we address here is whether SAP changes multifractality observed in healthy subjects. The G-moment method is used to analyse the multifractal spectrum. It is observed that both sets of data characterize multifractality, but a different trend in multifractal behaviour is found for SAP disease, under pronounced physical activity.

  4. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  5. Stable Stratification for Solar Ponds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, G. D.

    1982-01-01

    Stable density gradient forms in pond saturated with disodium phosphate (DSP). Volume of DSP saturated water tends to develop temperature and density layers. Since tests indicate thermal and density gradients remain in equilibrium at heat removal rates of 60 percent or more of heat input rate, pond containing DSP would be suitable for collecting solar energy and transferring it to heat exchanger for practical use.

  6. Advanced Thermally Stable Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    A. Boehman; C. Song; H. H. Schobert; M. M. Coleman; P. G. Hatcher; S. Eser

    1998-01-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet fuels has five components: 1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; 2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles during thermal stressing; 3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; 4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and 5) assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics from coal.

  7. Stable isotopes in tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarroll, Danny; Loader, Neil J.

    2004-04-01

    Stable isotopes in tree rings could provide palaeoclimate reconstructions with perfect annual resolution and statistically defined confidence limits. Recent advances make the approach viable for non-specialist laboratories. The relevant literature is, however, spread across several disciplines, with common problems approached in different ways. Here we provide the first overview of isotope dendroclimatology, explaining the underlying theory and describing the steps taken in building and interpreting isotope chronologies. Stable carbon isotopes record the balance between stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate, dominated at dry sites by relative humidity and soil water status and at moist sites by summer irradiance and temperature. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopic ratios record source water, which contains a temperature signal, and leaf transpiration, controlled dominantly by vapour pressure deficit. Variable exchange with xylem (source) water during wood synthesis determines the relative strength of the source water and leaf enrichment signals. Producing long Holocene chronologies will require a change in emphasis towards processing very large numbers of samples efficiently, whilst retaining analytical precision. A variety of sample preparation and data treatment protocols have been used, some of which have a deleterious effect on the palaeoclimate signal. These are reviewed and suggestions made for a more standardised approach.

  8. Qualitative and temporal reasoning in engine behavior analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, W. E.; Stamps, M. E.; Ali, M.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulation models, engine experts, and experimental data are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of abnormal engine behavior. Engine parameters monitored during operation are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of actual engine behavior. Similarities between the representations of failure scenarios and the actual engine behavior are used to diagnose fault conditions which have already occurred, or are about to occur; to increase the surveillance by the monitoring system of relevant engine parameters; and to predict likely future engine behavior.

  9. Ultra-stable oscillator with complementary transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A high frequency oscillator, having both good short and long term stability, is formed by including a piezoelectric crystal in the base circuit of a first bi-polar transistor circuit, the bi-polar transistor itself operated below its transitional frequency and having its emitter load chosen so that the input impedance, looking into the base thereof, exhibits a negative resistance in parallel with a capacitive reactance. Combined with this basic circuit is an auxiliary, complementary, second bi-polar transistor circuit of the same form with the piezoelectric crystal being common to both circuits. By this configuration small changes in quiescent current are substantially cancelled by opposite variations in the second bi-polar transistor circuit, thereby achieving from the oscillator a signal having its frequency of oscillation stable over long time periods as well as short time periods.

  10. LP based approach to optimal stable matchings

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, Chung-Piaw; Sethuraman, J.

    1997-06-01

    We study the classical stable marriage and stable roommates problems using a polyhedral approach. We propose a new LP formulation for the stable roommates problem. This formulation is non-empty if and only if the underlying roommates problem has a stable matching. Furthermore, for certain special weight functions on the edges, we construct a 2-approximation algorithm for the optimal stable roommates problem. Our technique uses a crucial geometry of the fractional solutions in this formulation. For the stable marriage problem, we show that a related geometry allows us to express any fractional solution in the stable marriage polytope as convex combination of stable marriage solutions. This leads to a genuinely simple proof of the integrality of the stable marriage polytope. Based on these ideas, we devise a heuristic to solve the optimal stable roommates problem. The heuristic combines the power of rounding and cutting-plane methods. We present some computational results based on preliminary implementations of this heuristic.

  11. Temporal dosimeter and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Lopez, Thomas A.

    2003-09-30

    The invention includes a temporal dosimeter. One dosimeter embodiment includes a housing that is opaque to visible light but transparent to ionizing radiation. The dosimeter also includes a sensor for recording dosages of ionizing radiation, a drive mechanism, a power source, and rotatable shields that work together to produce a compound aperture to unveil different portions of the sensor at different times to ionizing radiation. Another dosimeter embodiment includes a housing, a sensor, a shield with an aperture portion, and a linear actuator drive mechanism coupled to the sensor for moving the sensor past the aperture portion. The sensor turns as it moves past the aperture, tracing a timeline record of exposure to ionizing radiation along a helical path on the sensor.

  12. Persistent Temporal Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilley, David; Ramachandran, Umakishore

    Distributed continuous live stream analysis applications are increasingly common. Video-based surveillance, emergency response, disaster recovery, and critical infrastructure protection are all examples of such applications. They are characterized by a variety of high- and low-bandwidth streams as well as a need for analyzing both live and archived streams. We present a system called Persistent Temporal Streams (PTS) that supports a higher-level, domain-targeted programming abstraction for such applications. PTS provides a simple but expressive stream abstraction encompassing transport, manipulation and storage of streaming data. In this paper, we present a system architecture for implementing PTS. We provide an experimental evaluation which shows the system-level primitives can be implemented in a lightweight and high-performance manner, and an application-based evaluation designed to show that a representative high-bandwidth stream analysis application can be implemented relatively simply and with good performance.

  13. TOODM: A temporal object-oriented data model with temporal constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, E.; Segev, A.

    1991-04-01

    A static Entity-Relationship (ER) or static Extended ER (EER) data model is not sufficient for representing the underlying time component of the data, more complex data types as found in planning, design and office automation applications or the operation required for this complex data. The decreasing cost of mass storage devices accompanied by an increased need for real-time systems and easier access to historical and planning data has made the study of the temporal aspects of data models more interesting both theoretically and practically. Furthermore, the ER-based data models can capture relationships between classes but they do not understand the object-oriented paradigm since they treat application-specific relationships and paradigm-specific relationships such as inheritance in the same manner. This shortcoming accompanied by a lack of support for the time dimension results in the specification of temporal relationships and constraints at the application level and often leads to inconsistencies in the data. In this paper, we extend the object-based ER model into a temporal, object-oriented model, incorporate temporal structures and constraints in the data model and propose a temporal, object-oriented query language for the model.

  14. Temporal characterization of a multi-wavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambin Iezzi, Victor; Büttner, Thomas F. S.; Tehranchi, Amirhossein; Loranger, Sébastien; Kabakova, Irina V.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides the first detailed temporal characterization of a multi-wavelength-Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (MWBEFL) by measuring the optical intensity of the individual frequency channels with high temporal resolution. It is found that the power in each channel is highly unstable due to the excitation of several cavity modes for typical conditions of operation. Also provided is the real-time measurements of the MWBEFL output power for two configurations that were previously reported to emit phase-locked picosecond pulse trains, concluded from their autocorrelation measurements. Real-time measurements reveal a high degree of instability without the formation of a stable pulse train. Finally, we model the MWBEFL using coupled wave equations describing the evolution of the Brillouin pump, Stokes and acoustic waves in the presence of stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the optical Kerr effect. A good qualitative consistency between the simulation and experimental results is evident, in which the interference signal at the output shows strong instability as well as the chaotic behavior due to the dynamics of participating pump and Stokes waves.

  15. Temporal Variations in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hammel, H. B.; dePater, I.; Noll, K.; Wong, M.; Clarke, J.; Sanchez-Levega, A.; Orton, G. S.; Gonzaga, S.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Jupiter has undergone many atmospheric changes from storms turning red to global. cloud upheavals, and most recently, a cornet or asteroid impact. Yet, on top of these seemingly random changes events there are also periodic phenomena, analogous to observed Earth and Saturn atmospheric oscillations. We will present 15 years of Hubble data, from 1994 to 2009, to show how the equatorial tropospheric cloud deck and winds have varied over that time, focusing on the F953N, F41 ON and F255W filters. These filters give leverage on wind speeds plus cloud opacity, cloud height and tropospheric haze thickness, and stratospheric haze, respectively. The wind data consistently show a periodic oscillation near 7-8 S latitude. We will discuss the potential for variations with longitude and cloud height, within the calibration limits of those filters. Finally, we will discuss the role that large atmospheric events, such as the impacts in 1994 and 2009, and the global upheaval of 2007, have on temporal studies, This work was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program. HST observational support was provided by NASA through grants from Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract NAS5-26555.

  16. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created in practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.

  17. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created inmore » practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.« less

  18. Stellar Temporal Intensity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kian, Tan Peng

    Stellar intensity interferometry was developed by Hanbury-Brown & Twiss [1954, 1956b, 1957, 1958] to bypass the diffraction limit of telescope apertures, with successful measurements including the determination of 32 stellar angular diameters using the Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer [Hanbury-Brown et al., 1974]. This was achieved by measuring the intensity correlations between starlight received by a pair of telescopes separated by varying baselines b which, by invoking the van Cittert-Zernicke theorem [van Cittert, 1934; Zernicke, 1938], are related to the angular intensity distributions of the stellar light sources through a Fourier transformation of the equal-time complex degree of coherence gamma(b) between the two telescopes. This intensity correlation, or the second order correlation function g(2) [Glauber, 1963], can be described in terms of two-photoevent coincidence measurements [Hanbury-Brown, 1974] for our use of photon-counting detectors. The application of intensity interferometry in astrophysics has been largely restricted to the spatial domain but not found widespread adoption due to limitations by its signal-to-noise ratio [Davis et al., 1999; Foellmi, 2009; Jensen et al., 2010; LeBohec et al., 2008, 2010], although there is a growing movement to revive its use [Barbieri et al., 2009; Capraro et al., 2009; Dravins & Lagadec, 2014; Dravins et al., 2015; Dravins & LeBohec, 2007]. In this thesis, stellar intensity interferometry in the temporal domain is investigated instead. We present a narrowband spectral filtering scheme [Tan et al., 2014] that allows direct measurements of the Lorentzian temporal correlations, or photon bunching, from the Sun, with the preliminary Solar g(2)(tau = 0) = 1.3 +/- 0.1, limited mostly by the photon detector response [Ghioni et al., 2008], compared to the theoretical value of g(2)(0) = 2. The measured temporal photon bunching signature of the Sun exceeded the previous records of g(2)(0) = 1.03 [Karmakar et al

  19. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  20. Biocybernetic system evaluates indices of operator engagement in automated task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, A. T.; Bogart, E. H.; Bartolome, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    A biocybernetic system has been developed as a method to evaluate automated flight deck concepts for compatibility with human capabilities. A biocybernetic loop is formed by adjusting the mode of operation of a task set (e.g., manual/automated mix) based on electroencephalographic (EEG) signals reflecting an operator's engagement in the task set. A critical issue for the loop operation is the selection of features of the EEG to provide an index of engagement upon which to base decisions to adjust task mode. Subjects were run in the closed-loop feedback configuration under four candidate and three experimental control definitions of an engagement index. The temporal patterning of system mode switching was observed for both positive and negative feedback of the index. The indices were judged on the basis of their relative strength in exhibiting expected feedback control system phenomena (stable operation under negative feedback and unstable operation under positive feedback). Of the candidate indices evaluated in this study, an index constructed according to the formula, beta power/(alpha power + theta power), reflected task engagement best.

  1. Medical Temporal-Knowledge Discovery via Temporal Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    Moskovitch, Robert; Shahar, Yuval

    2009-01-01

    Medical knowledge includes frequently occurring temporal patterns in longitudinal patient records. These patterns are not easily detectable by human clinicians. Current knowledge could be extended by automated temporal data mining. However, multivariate time-oriented data are often present at various levels of abstraction and at multiple temporal granularities, requiring a transformation into a more abstract, yet uniform dimension suitable for mining. Temporal abstraction (of both the time and value dimensions) can transform multiple types of point-based data into a meaningful, time-interval-based data representation, in which significant, interval-based temporal patterns can be discovered. We introduce a modular, fast time-interval mining method, KarmaLego, which exploits the transitivity inherent in temporal relations. We demonstrate the usefulness of KarmaLego in finding meaningful temporal patterns within a set of records of diabetic patients; several patterns seem to have a different frequency depending on gender. We also suggest additional uses of the discovered patterns for temporal clustering of the mined population and for classifying multivariate time series. PMID:20351898

  2. Temporal Adverbials in Text Structuring: On Temporal Text Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virtanen, Tuija

    This paper discusses clause-initial adverbials of time functioning as signals of the temporal text strategy. A chain of such markers creates cohesion and coherence by forming continuity in the text and also signals textual boundaries that occur on different hierarchic levels. The temporal text strategy is closely associated with narrative text.…

  3. Operation Condition Monitoring using Temporal Weighted Dempster-Shafer Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    Theory, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY Garvin , D., (1988). Managing quality . NY: Free Press. Yu , D,. Frincke, D., (2005). Alert Confidence...timeliness. Outdated informat ion as one of three kind of major informat ion problems ( Garvin , 1988), is not sufficiently fo r the task of fault...HEALTH MANAGEMENT SOCIETY 2014 770 ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE PROGNOSTICS AND HEALTH M ANAGEMENT SOCIETY 2014 2 2. METHODOLOGY 2.1. D-S evidence theory

  4. Spatial Grouping Determines Temporal Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermens, Frouke; Scharnowski, Frank; Herzog, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    To make sense out of a continuously changing visual world, people need to integrate features across space and time. Despite more than a century of research, the mechanisms of features integration are still a matter of debate. To examine how temporal and spatial integration interact, the authors measured the amount of temporal fusion (a measure of…

  5. Temporal Predictability Facilitates Causal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greville, W. James; Buehner, Marc J.

    2010-01-01

    "Temporal predictability" refers to the regularity or consistency of the time interval separating events. When encountering repeated instances of causes and effects, we also experience multiple cause-effect temporal intervals. Where this interval is constant it becomes possible to predict when the effect will follow from the cause. In…

  6. A Stable Geodetic Reference Frame within the COCONET Footprint to Enable High-Accuracy Ground Deformation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Wang, G.; Yu, J.

    2014-12-01

    COCONET(Continuously Operating Caribbean GPS Observational Network) is a multidisciplinary research infrastructure focused on improving the ability to understand, predict, and prepare for multiple natural hazards in the Caribbean, Central America, and Northern Andes. GPS data alone cannot provide accurate ground deformation information over time and space. A precise regional reference frame is needed in interpolating GPS observations to address regional and local ground deformations. Failure to use a precise reference frame would cause unintended negative consequences. The mainly purpose of this study is to establish a stable geodetic reference frame within the COCONet footprint (abbreviated as "COCONet-RF") and to provide positional time series and velocities (relative to COCONet-RF) of all permanent GPS stations within the COCONet footprint to the public. The GIPSY software package was used to calculate position within IGS08. The local reference frame was realized by a 14-parameter Helmert transformation technique. It will be periodically updated in order to synchronize with the update of the IGS reference frame. This stable COCONer-RF would provide a higher accuracy geodetic infrastructure for delineating the magnitude and spatial and temporal variations of ground deformations associated with landslides, faulting, subsidence, and volcanoes. Researchers who are not familiar with GPS data processing and reference transformation will be able to directly integrate COCONET products into their specific research.

  7. Effects of temporal fluctuations on mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pool, Maria; Dentz, Marco; Post, Vincent E. A.; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-04-01

    Mixing and dispersion in coastal aquifers are strongly influenced by periodic temporal flow fluctuations on multiple time-scales ranging from days (tides), seasons (pumping and recharge) to glacial cycles (regression and transgressions). Transient forcing effects lead to a complex space- ant time-dependent flow response which induces enhanced spreading and mixing of a dissolved substance. We study effective mixing and solute transport in temporally fluctuating one-dimensional flow for a stable stratification of two fluids of different density. We derive explicit expressions for the concentration distribution and variance to identify the controls and obtain realistic predictions of the coupling between mixing and oscillatory transient flow. We find that the magnitude of transient-driven mixing is mainly controlled by the hydraulic diffusivity, the period and the initial interface location. We also find a spatial dependence of the effective dispersion coefficient which at long times causes the concentration profile to become asymmetric. Sand column experiments under well-controlled laboratory conditions are presented to validate the theoretical effective model defined. The proposed formulation is found to provide very good predictions and correctly reproduces the experimental mixing dynamics.

  8. Re-examining "temporal niche".

    PubMed

    Smarr, Benjamin L; Schwartz, Michael D; Wotus, Cheryl; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2013-07-01

    The circadian system temporally organizes physiology and behavior throughout the 24-h day. At the core of this organization lies a network of multiple circadian oscillators located within the central nervous system as well as in virtually every peripheral organ. These oscillators define a 24-h temporal landscape of mutually interacting circadian rhythms that is known as the temporal niche of a species. This temporal niche is constituted by the collective phases of all biological rhythms emerging from this multi-oscillatory system. We review evidence showing that under different environmental conditions, this system can adopt different harmonic configurations. Thus, the classic chronobiological approach of searching for "the" circadian phase of an animal-typically by studying circadian rhythms of locomotor activity-represents a narrow look into the circadian system of an animal. We propose that the study of hormonal rhythms may lead to a more insightful assessment of a species' temporal niche.

  9. Temporal context in floristic classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R. W.; Lees, B. G.

    1996-11-01

    Multi-temporal remote sensing data present a number of significant problems for the statistical and spatial competence of a classifier. Ideally, a classifier of multi-temporal data should be temporally invariant. It must have the capacity to account for the variations in season, growth cycle, radiometric, and atmospheric conditions at any point in time when classifying the land cover. This paper tests two methods of creating a temporally invariant classifier based on the pattern recognition capabilities of a neural network. A suite of twelve multi-temporal datasets spread over 5 yr along with a comprehensive mix of environmental variables are fused into floristic classification images by the neural network. Uncertainties in the classifications are addressed explicitly with a confidence mask generated from the fuzzy membership value's output by the neural network. These confidence masks are used to produce constrained classification images. The overall accuracy percentage achieved from a study site containing highly disturbed undulating terrain averages 60%. The first method of training, sequential learning of temporal context, is tested by an examination of the step-by-step evolution of the sequential training process. This reveals that the sequential classifier may not have learned about time, because time was constant during each network training session. It also suggests that there are optimal times during the annual cycle to train the classifier for particular floristic classes. The second method of training the classifier is randomised exposure to the entire temporal training suite. Time was now a fluctuating input variable during the network training process. This method produced the best spatially accurate results. The performance of this classifier as a temporally invariant classifier is tested amongst four multi-temporal datasets with encouraging results. The classifier consistently achieved an overall accuracy percentage of 60%. The pairwise predicted

  10. Spatial-temporal data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrajac, Dragoljub Milos

    Spatial-temporal data mining techniques have become increasingly important in emerging fields such as remote sensing, precision agriculture, geoscience and brain imaging. In this Thesis, novel spatial-temporal data mining methods and algorithms are presented. After the introductory remarks, modeling spatial-temporal attributes with short observation history using spatial-temporal autoregressive models on uniform grid is explored. Model specifications (including covariance structure and stationarity) are discussed as well as issues in model identification, estimation and forecasting on three different sampling schedules. The proposed technique is experimentally evaluated on simulated spatial-temporal processes that confirm to model assumptions as well as on real-life agricultural data. Subsequently, we proceed with spatial-temporal prediction of a response variable with a partial observability of influential attributes. After mathematical definition of the proposed model, evaluation of the estimation technique on synthetic data that conform to the modeling assumptions is performed and a model is assessed on simulated realistic spatial-temporal data, obtained using the proposed data generator. The following part of the Thesis is dedicated to spatial-temporal profit optimization using neural network modeling. Profit optimization is proposed using a two-phase process that consists of estimation of response/attribute dependence and profit optimization for a particular tuple of attribute values. The proposed method is evaluated on simulated precision agriculture data. Next, we introduce a spatial-temporal data simulator, which is an important tool for evaluation of knowledge discovery methods for spatial-temporal domains. Various aspects of the proposed data generator are discussed, including generation of features and simulation of response variable as well as a practical implementation of the proposed method and its application on experiments with simulated data. The

  11. 2. View of stable looking south with garage/stable to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of stable looking south with garage/stable to the right and paddock fence to the left - Richmond Hill Plantation, Stable/Garage, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  12. Brain regions underlying word finding difficulties in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Trebuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnes; Guedj, Eric; Alario, F-Xavier; Laguitton, Virginie; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Liegeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2009-10-01

    Word finding difficulties are often reported by epileptic patients with seizures originating from the language dominant cerebral hemisphere, for example, in temporal lobe epilepsy. Evidence regarding the brain regions underlying this deficit comes from studies of peri-operative electro-cortical stimulation, as well as post-surgical performance. This evidence has highlighted a role for the anterior part of the dominant temporal lobe in oral word production. These conclusions contrast with findings from activation studies involving healthy speakers or acute ischaemic stroke patients, where the region most directly related to word retrieval appears to be the posterior part of the left temporal lobe. To clarify the neural basis of word retrieval in temporal lobe epilepsy, we tested forty-three drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy patients (28 left, 15 right). Comprehensive neuropsychological and language assessments were performed. Single spoken word production was elicited with picture or definition stimuli. Detailed analysis allowed the distinction of impaired word retrieval from other possible causes of naming failure. Finally, the neural substrate of the deficit was assessed by correlating word retrieval performance and resting-state brain metabolism in 18 fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose-Positron Emission Tomography. Naming difficulties often resulted from genuine word retrieval failures (anomic states), both in picture and in definition tasks. Left temporal lobe epilepsy patients showed considerably worse performance than right temporal lobe epilepsy patients. Performance was poorer in the definition than in the picture task. Across patients and the left temporal lobe epilepsy subgroup, frequency of anomic state was negatively correlated with resting-state brain metabolism in left posterior and basal temporal regions (Brodmann's area 20-37-39). These results show the involvement of posterior temporal regions, within a larger antero-posterior-basal temporal network, in

  13. Mixture of Skewed α-Stable Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, S. R. Hosseini; Nassiri, V.; Mohammadian, Gh. R.; Mohammadpour, A.

    2011-03-01

    Expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and the Bayesian techniques are two approaches for statistical inference of mixture models [3, 4]. By noting the advantages of the Bayesian methods, practitioners prefer them. However, implementing Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms can be very complicated for stable distributions, due to the non-analytic density or distribution function formulas. In this paper, we introduce a new class of mixture of heavy-tailed distributions, called mixture of skewed stable distributions. Skewed stable distributions belongs to the exponential family and they have analytic density representation. It is shown that skewed stable distributions dominate skew stable distribution functions and they can be used to model heavy-tailed data. The class of skewed stable distributions has an analytic representation for its density function and the Bayesian inference can be done similar to the exponential family of distributions. Finally, mixture of skewed stable distributions are compared to the mixture of stable distributions through a simulations study.

  14. Interpreting bryophyte stable carbon isotope composition: Plants as temporal and spatial climate recorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royles, Jessica; Horwath, Aline B.; Griffiths, Howard

    2014-04-01

    are unable to control tissue water content although physiological adaptations allow growth in a wide range of habitats. Carbon isotope signals in two mosses (Syntrichia ruralis and Chorisodontium aciphyllum) and two liverworts (Conocephalum conicum and Marchantia polymorpha), whether instantaneous (real time, Δ13C), or organic matter (as δ13COM), provide an assimilation-weighted summary of bryophyte environmental adaptations. In mosses, δ13COM is within the measured range of Δ13C values, which suggests that other proxies, such as compound-specific organic signals, will be representative of historical photosynthetic and growth conditions. The liverworts were photosynthetically active over a wider range of relative water contents (RWC) than the mosses. There was a consistent 5‰ offset between Δ13C values in C. conicum and M. polymorpha, suggestive of greater diffusion limitation in the latter. Analysis of a C. aciphyllum moss-peat core showed the isotopic composition over the past 200 years reflects recent anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Once corrected for source-CO2 inputs, the seasonally integrated Δ13COM between 1350 and 2000 A.D. varied by 1.5‰ compared with potential range of the 12‰ measured experimentally, demonstrating the relatively narrow range of conditions under which the majority of net assimilation takes place. Carbon isotope discrimination also varies spatially, with a 4‰ shift in epiphytic bryophyte organic matter found between lowland Amazonia and upper montane tropical cloud forest in the Peruvian Andes, associated with increased diffusion limitation.

  15. Results of the Stable Microgravity Vibration Isolation Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edberg, Donald; Boucher, Robert; Schenck, David; Nurre, Gerald; Whorton, Mark; Kim, Young; Alhorn, Dean

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the STABLE microgravity isolation system developed and successfully flight tested in October 1995. A description of the hardware design and operational principles is given. A sample of the measured flight data is presented, including an evaluation of attenuation performance provided by the actively controlled electromagnetic isolation system. Preliminary analyses of flight data show that the acceleration environment aboard STABLE's isolated platform was attenuated by a factor of more than 25 between 0.1 and 100 Hz. STABLE was developed under a cooperative agreement between National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Marshall Space Flight Center, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The flight hardware was designed, fabricated, integrated, tested, and delivered to the Cape during a five month period.

  16. On the Formation of a Stable Penumbra in a Region of Flux Emergence in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murabito, M.; Romano, P.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Zuccarello, F.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the formation of the first penumbral sector around a pore in the following polarity of the NOAA Active Region (AR) 11490. We used a high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution data set acquired by the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectrometer operating at the NSO/Dunn Solar Telescope, as well as data taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. On the side toward the leading polarity, elongated granules in the photosphere and an arch filament system (AFS) in the chromosphere are present, while the magnetic field shows a sea-serpent configuration, indicating a region of magnetic flux emergence. We found that the formation of a stable penumbra in the following polarity of the AR begins in the area facing the opposite polarity located below the AFS in the flux emergence region, different from what was found by Schlichenmaier and colleagues. Moreover, during the formation of the first penumbral sector, the area characterized by magnetic flux density larger than 900 G and the area of the umbra increase.

  17. Stable density stratification solar pond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A stable density-stratification solar pond for use in the collection and storage of solar thermal energy including a container having a first section characterized by an internal wall of a substantially cylindrical configuration and a second section having an internal wall of a substantially truncated conical configuration surmounting the first section in coaxial alignment therewith, the second section of said container being characterized by a base of a diameter substantially equal to the diameter of the first section and a truncated apex defining a solar energy acceptance opening is discussed. A body of immiscible liquids is disposed within the container and comprises a lower portion substantially filling the first section of the container and an upper portion substantially filling the second section of the container, said lower portion being an aqueous based liquid of a darker color than the upper portion and of a greater density. A protective cover plate is removably provided for covering the acceptance opening.

  18. Stable States of Biological Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.; Yukalova, E. P.; Henry, J.-Y.; Cobb, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    A novel model of biological organisms is advanced, treating an organism as a self-consistent system subject to a pathogen flux. The principal novelty of the model is that it describes not some parts, but a biological organism as a whole. The organism is modeled by a five-dimensional dynamical system. The organism homeostasis is described by the evolution equations for five interacting components: healthy cells, ill cells, innate immune cells, specific immune cells, and pathogens. The stability analysis demonstrates that, in a wide domain of the parameter space, the system exhibits robust structural stability. There always exist four stable stationary solutions characterizing four qualitatively differing states of the organism: alive state, boundary state, critical state, and dead state.

  19. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  20. Are Ionic Liquids Chemically Stable?

    PubMed

    Wang, Binshen; Qin, Li; Mu, Tiancheng; Xue, Zhimin; Gao, Guohua

    2017-02-27

    Ionic liquids have attracted a great deal of interest in recent years, illustrated by their applications in a variety of areas involved with chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering. Usually, the stabilities of ionic liquids are highlighted as one of their outstanding advantages. However, are ionic liquids really stable in all cases? This review covers the chemical stabilities of ionic liquids. It focuses on the reactivity of the most popular imidazolium ionic liquids at structural positions, including C2 position, N1 and N3 positions, and C4 and C5 positions, and decomposition on the imidazolium ring. Additionally, we discuss decomposition of quaternary ammonium and phosphonium ionic liquids and hydrolysis and nucleophilic reactions of anions of ionic liquids. The review aims to arouse caution on potential decomposition of ionic liquids and provides a guide for better utilization of ionic liquids.

  1. Ancestry, Temporality, and Potentiality

    PubMed Central

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I examine the variety of ways potential is articulated, entailed, and produced in how the field of cancer genetics is being constituted as a domain of transnational research and an emerging site of health-care intervention in southern Brazil. Drawing on analysis of fieldwork in Brazilian cancer-genetics clinics, I explore how different expressions of potential come to inform dynamically the pursuit of prevention, care, and research as diversely scaled investments for those working and living with cancer-genetics knowledge and technologies. It illustrates how specific temporalities help to constitute and “abductively” frame the meaning of these different potentials particularly as this relates to a focus on ancestry. Colonial histories of migration, the embodied effects of dietary habits, or the moral failings of near and distant ancestors as well as promissory futures and the contingency of lived lives become at different times templates for identifying, materializing, and transforming how the potential of cancer genetics in Brazil is articulated. Potential is also expressed through an idiom of “choice” in different efforts to situate participation in cancer-genetics research as prevention or to negotiate access to basic public health. I explore how these expressions of cancer genetics as potential powerfully yet unevenly work to sustain knowledge practices as well as propel patients and their families into fledgling domains of clinical practice and scientific research. At the same time there is always an “excess of meaning” in these endeavors that make visible lines of fracture and disjuncture in collective efforts to make future histories of and from the pursuit of cancer genetics in southern Brazil. PMID:25018561

  2. Stable line defects in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-11-01

    Line defects in two-dimensional (2D) materials greatly modulate various properties of their pristine form. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, we investigate the structural reconstructions of different kinds of grain boundaries in the silicene sheets. It is evident that depending upon the presence of silicon adatoms and edge shape of grain boundaries (i.e., armchair or zigzag), stable extended line defects (ELDs) can be introduced in a controlled way. Further studies show the stability of these line-defects in silicene, grown on Ag(111) surface at room-temperature. Importantly, unlike most of the 2D sheet materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, 5-5-8 line defects modify the nonmagnetic semimetallic pristine silicene sheet to spin-polarized metal. As ferromagnetically ordered magnetic moments remain strongly localized at the line defect, a one-dimensional spin channel gets created in silicene. Interestingly, these spin channels are quite stable because, unlike the edge of nanoribbons, structural reconstruction or contamination cannot destroy the ordering of magnetic moments here. Zigzag silicene nanoribbons with a 5-5-8 line defect also exhibit various interesting electronic and magnetic properties depending upon their width as well as the nature of the magnetic coupling between edge and defect spin states. Upon incorporation of other ELDs, such as 4-4-4 and 4-8 defects, 2D sheets and nanoribbons of silicene show a nonmagnetic metallic or semiconducting ground state. Highlighting the controlled formation of ELDs and consequent emergence of technologically important properties in silicene, we propose new routes to realize silicene-based nanoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  3. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, Paul

    1998-08-11

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit.

  4. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    O`Connor, P.

    1998-08-11

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit. 11 figs.

  5. Stable CSR in storage rings: A model

    SciTech Connect

    Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Venturini, Marco; Abo-Bakr, Michael; Feikes, Jorge; Holldack, Karsten; Kuske, Peter; Wustefeld, Godehart; Hubers, Heinz-Willerm; Warnock, Robert

    2005-01-03

    A comprehensive historical view of the work done on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in storage rings is given in reference [1]. Here we want just to point out that even if the issue of CSR in storage rings was already discussed over 50 years ago, it is only recently that a considerable number of observations have been reported. In fact, intense bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation with a stochastic character were measured in the terahertz frequency range, at several synchrotron light source storage rings [2-8]. It has been shown [8-11], that this bursting emission of CSR is associated with a single bunch instability, usually referred as microbunching instability (MBI), driven by the fields of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the bunch itself. Of remarkably different characteristics was the CSR emission observed at BESSY II in Berlin, when the storage ring was tuned into a special low momentum compaction mode [12, 13]. In fact, the emitted radiation was not the quasi-random bursting observed in the other machines, but a powerful and stable flux of broadband CSR in the terahertz range. This was an important result, because it experimentally demonstrated the concrete possibility of constructing a stable broadband source with extremely high power in the terahertz region. Since the publication of the first successful experiment using the ring as a CSR source [14], BESSY II has regular scheduled user s shifts dedicated to CSR experiments. At the present time, several other laboratories are investigating the possibility of a CSR mode of operation [15-17] and a design for a new ring optimized for CSR is at an advanced stage [18]. In what follows, we describe a model that first accounts for the BESSY II observations and then indicates that the special case of BESSY II is actually quite general and typical when relativistic electron storage rings are tuned for short bunches. The model provides a scheme for predicting and optimizing the performance of ring

  6. Uses of stable isotopes in fish ecology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of fish tissues (other than otoliths) for stable isotope ratios can provide substantial information on fish ecology, including physiological ecology. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon frequently are used to determine the mix of diet sources for consumers. Stable i...

  7. Sugar feeding in adult stable flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult stable flies, (Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)), are known to feed readily on sugars in the laboratory. However, little is known concerning the extent of stable fly sugar feeding in wild populations. We examined the frequency of sugar feeding in stable flies in rural and urban environments. In additi...

  8. A new first-order turbulence mixing model for the stable atmospheric boundary-layer: development and testing in large-eddy and single column models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Golaz, J.

    2011-12-01

    Parameterization of the stably-stratified atmospheric boundary-layer is of crucial importance to different aspects of numerical weather prediction at regional scales and climate modeling at global scales, such as land-surface temperature forecasts, fog and frost prediction, and polar climate. It is well-known that most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing of the stable boundary-layer to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component under strong stability, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. In this study we develop and test a general turbulence mixing model of the stable boundary-layer which works under different stabilities and for steady as well as unsteady conditions. A-priori large-eddy simulation (LES) tests are presented to motivate and verify the new parameterization. Subsequently, an assessment of this model using the GFDL single-column model (SCM) is performed. Idealized test cases including continuously varying stability, as well as stability discontinuity, are used to test the new SCM against LES results. A good match of mean and flux profiles is found when the new parameterization is used, while other traditional first-order turbulence models using the concept of stability function perform poorly. SCM spatial resolution is also found to have little impact on the performance of the new turbulence closure, but temporal resolution is important and a numerical stability criterion based on the model time step is presented.

  9. Transformation of temporal sequences in the zebra finch auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yoonseob; Lagoy, Ryan; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G; Gardner, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how temporally patterned stimuli are transformed as they propagate from primary to secondary zones in the thalamorecipient auditory pallium in zebra finches. Using a new class of synthetic click stimuli, we find a robust mapping from temporal sequences in the primary zone to distinct population vectors in secondary auditory areas. We tested whether songbirds could discriminate synthetic click sequences in an operant setup and found that a robust behavioral discrimination is present for click sequences composed of intervals ranging from 11 ms to 40 ms, but breaks down for stimuli composed of longer inter-click intervals. This work suggests that the analog of the songbird auditory cortex transforms temporal patterns to sequence-selective population responses or ‘spatial codes', and that these distinct population responses contribute to behavioral discrimination of temporally complex sounds. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18205.001 PMID:27897971

  10. Extended temporal cloak based on the inverse temporal Talbot effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Bowen; Wang, Xie; Kang, Jiqiang; Wei, Yuan; Yung, Toni; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2017-02-15

    A temporal cloak with a significantly extended cloaking window and spatial distribution is created using the inverse temporal Talbot effect. The continuously cloaking window and the total cloaking ratio are 196 ps and 74%, respectively, which are 5.4 and 1.6 times larger than the previous record. Moreover, the cloak is maintained over 5-km of dispersion-compensating fiber (DCF), which enables cloaking temporal events at multiple positions simultaneously. To demonstrate the cloaking performance, both message-encoded and pseudo-random temporal events are successfully concealed. Last, but not least, since our configuration does not require opposite sign of dispersion, the idea can be applied analogously to the spatial domain according to the space-time duality, thus also enriching the spatial cloaking technique.

  11. Women Overestimate Temporal Duration: Evidence from Chinese Emotional Words

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingming; Zhang, Lingcong; Yu, Yibing; Liu, Tiantian; Luo, Wenbo

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have proven the effect of emotion on temporal perception, using various emotional stimuli. However, research investigating this issue from the lexico-semantic perspective and gender difference remains scarce. In this study, participants were presented with different types of emotional words designed in classic temporal bisection tasks. In Experiment 1 where the arousal level of emotional words was controlled, no pure effect of valence on temporal perception was found; however, we observed the overestimation of women relative to men. Furthermore, in Experiment 2, an orthogonal design of valence and arousal with neutral condition was employed to study the arousal-mechanism of temporal distortion effect and its difference between genders. The results showed that the gender difference observed in Experiment 1 was robust and was not influenced by valence and arousal. Taken together, our findings suggest a stable gender difference in the temporal perception of semantic stimuli, which might be related to some intrinsic properties of linguistic stimuli and sex differences in brain structure as well as physiological features. The automatic processing of time information was also discussed. PMID:28149285

  12. The ability of the auditory system to cope with temporal subsampling depends on the hierarchical level of processing.

    PubMed

    Zoefel, Benedikt; Reddy Pasham, Naveen; Brüers, Sasskia; VanRullen, Rufin

    2015-09-09

    Evidence for rhythmic or 'discrete' sensory processing is abundant for the visual system, but sparse and inconsistent for the auditory system. Fundamental differences in the nature of visual and auditory inputs might account for this discrepancy: whereas the visual system mainly relies on spatial information, time might be the most important factor for the auditory system. In contrast to vision, temporal subsampling (i.e. taking 'snapshots') of the auditory input stream might thus prove detrimental for the brain as essential information would be lost. Rather than embracing the view of a continuous auditory processing, we recently proposed that discrete 'perceptual cycles' might exist in the auditory system, but on a hierarchically higher level of processing, involving temporally more stable features. This proposal leads to the prediction that the auditory system would be more robust to temporal subsampling when applied on a 'high-level' decomposition of auditory signals. To test this prediction, we constructed speech stimuli that were subsampled at different frequencies, either at the input level (following a wavelet transform) or at the level of auditory features (on the basis of LPC vocoding), and presented them to human listeners. Auditory recognition was significantly more robust to subsampling in the latter case, that is on a relatively high level of auditory processing. Although our results do not directly demonstrate perceptual cycles in the auditory domain, they (a) show that their existence is possible without disrupting temporal information to a critical extent and (b) confirm our proposal that, if they do exist, they should operate on a higher level of auditory processing.

  13. Turbulence Spreading into Linearly Stable Zone and Transport Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    T.S. Hahm; P.H. Diamond; Z. Lin; K. Itoh; S.-I. Itoh

    2003-10-20

    We study the simplest problem of turbulence spreading corresponding to the spatio-temporal propagation of a patch of turbulence from a region where it is locally excited to a region of weaker excitation, or even local damping. A single model equation for the local turbulence intensity I(x, t) includes the effects of local linear growth and damping, spatially local nonlinear coupling to dissipation and spatial scattering of turbulence energy induced by nonlinear coupling. In the absence of dissipation, the front propagation into the linearly stable zone occurs with the property of rapid progression at small t, followed by slower subdiffusive progression at late times. The turbulence radial spreading into the linearly stable zone reduces the turbulent intensity in the linearly unstable zone, and introduces an additional dependence on the rho* is always equal to rho i/a to the turbulent intensity and the transport scaling. These are in broad, semi-quantitative agreements with a number of global gyrokinetic simulation results with zonal flows and without zonal flows. The front propagation stops when the radial flux of fluctuation energy from the linearly unstable region is balanced by local dissipation in the linearly stable region.

  14. Closed-Cycle, Frequency-Stable CO2 Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batten, Carmen E. (Editor); Miller, Irvin M. (Editor); Wood, George M., Jr. (Editor); Willetts, David V. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings contain a collection of papers and comments presented at a workshop on technology associated with long-duration closed-cycle operation of frequency-stable, pulsed carbon dioxide lasers. This workshop was held at the NASA Langley Research Center June 10 to 12, 1986. The workshop, jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), was attended by 63 engineers and scientists from the United States and the United Kingdom. During the 2 1/2 days of the workshop, a number of issues relating to obtaining frequency-stable operation and to the catalytic control of laser gas chemistry were discussed, and specific recommendations concerning future activities were drafted.

  15. Highly Stable Conjugated Polyelectrolytes for Water-Based Hybrid Mode Electrochemical Transistors.

    PubMed

    Zeglio, Erica; Eriksson, Jens; Gabrielsson, Roger; Solin, Niclas; Inganäs, Olle

    2017-03-16

    Hydrophobic, self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) are introduced as highly stable active materials for organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs). The hydrophobicity of CPEs renders films very stable in aqueous solutions. The devices operate at gate voltages around zero and show no signs of degradation when operated for 10(4) cycles under ambient conditions. These properties make the produced OECTs ideal devices for applications in bioelectronics.

  16. On nonstable and stable population momentum.

    PubMed

    Espenshade, Thomas J; Olgiati, Analia S; Levin, Simon A

    2011-11-01

    This article decomposes total population momentum into two constituent and multiplicative parts: "nonstable" momentum and "stable" momentum. Nonstable momentum depends on deviations between a population's current age distribution and its implied stable age distribution. Stable momentum is a function of deviations between a population's implied stable and stationary age distributions. In general, the factorization of total momentum into the product of nonstable and stable momentum is a very good approximation. The factorization is exact, however, when the current age distribution is stable or when observed fertility is already at replacement. We provide numerical illustrations by calculating nonstable, stable, and total momentum for 176 countries, the world, and its major regions. In short, the article brings together disparate strands of the population momentum literature and shows how the various kinds of momentum fit together into a single unifying framework.

  17. Power and reduced temporal discounting.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Priyanka D; Fast, Nathanael J

    2013-04-01

    Decision makers generally feel disconnected from their future selves, an experience that leads them to prefer smaller immediate gains to larger future gains. This pervasive tendency is known as temporal discounting, and researchers across disciplines are interested in understanding how to overcome it. Following recent advances in the power literature, we suggest that the experience of power enhances one's connection with the future self, which in turn results in reduced temporal discounting. In Study 1, we found that participants assigned to high-power roles were less likely than participants assigned to low-power roles to display temporal discounting. In Studies 2 and 3, priming power reduced temporal discounting in monetary and nonmonetary tasks, and, further, connection with the future self mediated the relation between power and reduced discounting. In Study 4, experiencing a general sense of power in the workplace predicted actual lifetime savings. These results have important implications for future research.

  18. Temporal predictability enhances auditory detection

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, Emma L. A.; Harper, Nicol S.; Cooke, James E.; Schnupp, Jan W. H.

    2015-01-01

    Periodic stimuli are common in natural environments and are ecologically relevant, for example, footsteps and vocalizations. This study reports a detectability enhancement for temporally cued, periodic sequences. Target noise bursts (embedded in background noise) arriving at the time points which followed on from an introductory, periodic “cue” sequence were more easily detected (by ~1.5 dB SNR) than identical noise bursts which randomly deviated from the cued temporal pattern. Temporal predictability and corresponding neuronal “entrainment” have been widely theorized to underlie important processes in auditory scene analysis and to confer perceptual advantage. This is the first study in the auditory domain to clearly demonstrate a perceptual enhancement of temporally predictable, near-threshold stimuli. PMID:24907846

  19. Temporal predictability enhances auditory detection.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Emma L A; Harper, Nicol S; Cooke, James E; Schnupp, Jan W H

    2014-06-01

    Periodic stimuli are common in natural environments and are ecologically relevant, for example, footsteps and vocalizations. This study reports a detectability enhancement for temporally cued, periodic sequences. Target noise bursts (embedded in background noise) arriving at the time points which followed on from an introductory, periodic "cue" sequence were more easily detected (by ∼1.5 dB SNR) than identical noise bursts which randomly deviated from the cued temporal pattern. Temporal predictability and corresponding neuronal "entrainment" have been widely theorized to underlie important processes in auditory scene analysis and to confer perceptual advantage. This is the first study in the auditory domain to clearly demonstrate a perceptual enhancement of temporally predictable, near-threshold stimuli.

  20. Automated Learning of Temporal Expressions.

    PubMed

    Redd, Douglas; Shaoa, YiJun; Yang, Jing; Divita, Guy; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Clinical notes contain important temporal information that are critical for making clinical diagnosis and treatment as well as for retrospective analyses. Manually created regular expressions are commonly used for the extraction of temporal information; however, this can be a time consuming and brittle approach. We describe a novel algorithm for automatic learning of regular expressions in recognizing temporal expressions. Five classes of temporal expressions are identified. Keywords specific to those classes are used to retrieve snippets of text representing the same keywords in context. Those snippets are used for Regular Expression Discovery Extraction (REDEx). These learned regular expressions are then evaluated using 10-fold cross validation. Precision and recall are very high, above 0.95 for most classes.

  1. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  2. A diversity of synaptic filters are created by temporal summation of excitation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    George, Andrew A.; Lyons-Warren, Ariel M.; Ma, Xiaofeng; Carlson, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Temporal filtering is a fundamental operation of nervous systems. In peripheral sensory systems, the temporal pattern of spiking activity can encode various stimulus qualities, and temporal filtering allows postsynaptic neurons to detect behaviorally-relevant stimulus features from these spike trains. Intrinsic excitability, short-term synaptic plasticity, and voltage-dependent dendritic conductances have all been identified as mechanisms that can establish temporal filtering behavior in single neurons. Here we show that synaptic integration of temporally-summating excitation and inhibition can establish diverse temporal filters of presynaptic input. Mormyrid electric fish communicate by varying the intervals between electric organ discharges. The timing of each discharge is coded by peripheral receptors into precisely-timed spikes. Within the midbrain posterior exterolateral nucleus, temporal filtering by individual neurons results in selective responses to a particular range of presynaptic interspike intervals. These neurons are diverse in their temporal filtering properties, reflecting the wide range of intervals that must be detected during natural communication behavior. By manipulating presynaptic spike timing with high temporal resolution, we demonstrate that tuning to behaviorally-relevant patterns of presynaptic input is similar in vivo and in vitro. We reveal that GABAergic inhibition plays a critical role in establishing different temporal filtering properties. Further, our results demonstrate that temporal summation of excitation and inhibition establishes selective responses to high and low rates of synaptic input, respectively. Simple models of synaptic integration reveal that variation in these two competing influences provides a basic mechanism for generating diverse temporal filters of synaptic input. PMID:21994388

  3. Brain Regions Underlying Word Finding Difficulties in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trebuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnes; Guedj, Eric; Alario, F-Xavier; Laguitton, Virginie; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Liegeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Word finding difficulties are often reported by epileptic patients with seizures originating from the language dominant cerebral hemisphere, for example, in temporal lobe epilepsy. Evidence regarding the brain regions underlying this deficit comes from studies of peri-operative electro-cortical stimulation, as well as post-surgical performance.…

  4. The grounding of temporal metaphors

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Vicky T.; Desai, Rutvik H.

    2016-01-01

    Grounded cognition suggests that the processing of conceptual knowledge cued by language relies on the sensory-motor regions. Does temporal language similarly engage brain areas involved in time perception? Participants read sentences that describe the temporal extent of events with motion verbs (Her seminar stretches across the afternoon) and their static controls. Comparison conditions were fictive motion (Her backyard stretches across the desert) and literal motion (Her arm stretches across the table), along with their static controls. Several time sensitive locations, identified using a meta-analysis, showed activation specific to temporal metaphors, including in the left insula, right claustrum, and bilateral posterior superior temporal sulci. Fictive and literal motion contrasts did not show this difference. Fictive motion contrast showed activation in a conceptual motion sensitive area of the left posterior inferior temporal sulcus. These data suggest that language of time is at least partially grounded in experiential time. In addition, motion semantics has different consequences for events and objects: temporal events become animate, while static entities become motional. PMID:26854961

  5. Temporal binding of interval markers

    PubMed Central

    Derichs, Christina; Zimmermann, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    How we estimate the passage of time is an unsolved mystery in neuroscience. Illusions of subjective time provide an experimental access to this question. Here we show that time compression and expansion of visually marked intervals result from a binding of temporal interval markers. Interval markers whose onset signals were artificially weakened by briefly flashing a whole-field mask were bound in time towards markers with a strong onset signal. We explain temporal compression as the consequence of summing response distributions of weak and strong onset signals. Crucially, temporal binding occurred irrespective of the temporal order of weak and strong onset markers, thus ruling out processing latencies as an explanation for changes in interval duration judgments. If both interval markers were presented together with a mask or the mask was shown in the temporal interval center, no compression occurred. In a sequence of two intervals, masking the middle marker led to time compression for the first and time expansion for the second interval. All these results are consistent with a model view of temporal binding that serves a functional role by reducing uncertainty in the final estimate of interval duration. PMID:27958311

  6. Low energy stable plasma calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Frederick-Frost, K M; Lynch, K A

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a low energy plasma calibration facility for testing and calibration of rocket-borne charged-particle detectors and for the investigation of plasma sheath formation in an environment with ionospheric plasma energies, densities, and Debye lengths. We describe the vacuum system and associated plasma source, which was modified from a Naval Research Laboratory design [Bowles et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 455 (1996)]. Mechanical and electrical modifications to this cylindrical microwave resonant source are outlined together with a different method of operating the magnetron that achieves a stable discharge. This facility produces unmagnetized plasmas with densities from 1x10(3)/cm(3) to 6x10(5)/cm(3), electron temperatures from 0.1 to 1.7 eV, and plasma potentials from 0.5 to 8 V depending on varying input microwave power and neutral gas flow. For the range of input microwave power explored (350-600 W), the energy density of the plasma remains constant because of an inverse relationship between density and temperature. This relationship allows a wide range of Debye lengths (0.3-8.4 cm) to be investigated, which is ideal for simulating the ionospheric plasma sheaths we explore.

  7. Stable microbial community composition on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Musilova, Michaela; Tranter, Martyn; Bennett, Sarah A.; Wadham, Jemma; Anesio, Alexandre M.

    2015-01-01

    The first molecular-based studies of microbes in snow and on glaciers have only recently been performed on the vast Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). Aeolian microbial seeding is hypothesized to impact on glacier surface community compositions. Localized melting of glacier debris (cryoconite) into the surface ice forms cryoconite holes, which are considered ‘hot spots’ for microbial activity on glaciers. To date, few studies have attempted to assess the origin and evolution of cryoconite and cryoconite hole communities throughout a melt season. In this study, a range of experimental approaches was used for the first time to study the inputs, temporal and structural transformations of GrIS microbial communities over the course of a whole ablation season. Small amounts of aeolian (wind and snow) microbes were potentially seeding the stable communities that were already present on the glacier (composed mainly of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria). However, the dominant bacterial taxa in the aeolian samples (Firmicutes) did not establish themselves in local glacier surface communities. Cryoconite and cryoconite hole community composition remained stable throughout the ablation season following the fast community turnover, which accompanied the initial snow melt. The presence of stable communities in cryoconite and cryoconite holes on the GrIS will allow future studies to assess glacier surface microbial diversity at individual study sites from sampling intervals of short duration only. Aeolian inputs also had significantly different organic δ13C values (-28.0 to -27.0‰) from the glacier surface values (-25.7 to -23.6‰), indicating that in situ microbial processes are important in fixing new organic matter and transforming aeolian organic carbon. The continuous productivity of stable communities over one melt season makes them important contributors to biogeochemical nutrient cycling on glaciers. PMID:25852658

  8. Stable microbial community composition on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Musilova, Michaela; Tranter, Martyn; Bennett, Sarah A; Wadham, Jemma; Anesio, Alexandre M

    2015-01-01

    The first molecular-based studies of microbes in snow and on glaciers have only recently been performed on the vast Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). Aeolian microbial seeding is hypothesized to impact on glacier surface community compositions. Localized melting of glacier debris (cryoconite) into the surface ice forms cryoconite holes, which are considered 'hot spots' for microbial activity on glaciers. To date, few studies have attempted to assess the origin and evolution of cryoconite and cryoconite hole communities throughout a melt season. In this study, a range of experimental approaches was used for the first time to study the inputs, temporal and structural transformations of GrIS microbial communities over the course of a whole ablation season. Small amounts of aeolian (wind and snow) microbes were potentially seeding the stable communities that were already present on the glacier (composed mainly of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria). However, the dominant bacterial taxa in the aeolian samples (Firmicutes) did not establish themselves in local glacier surface communities. Cryoconite and cryoconite hole community composition remained stable throughout the ablation season following the fast community turnover, which accompanied the initial snow melt. The presence of stable communities in cryoconite and cryoconite holes on the GrIS will allow future studies to assess glacier surface microbial diversity at individual study sites from sampling intervals of short duration only. Aeolian inputs also had significantly different organic δ(13)C values (-28.0 to -27.0‰) from the glacier surface values (-25.7 to -23.6‰), indicating that in situ microbial processes are important in fixing new organic matter and transforming aeolian organic carbon. The continuous productivity of stable communities over one melt season makes them important contributors to biogeochemical nutrient cycling on glaciers.

  9. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  10. Temporal stability of electrical conductivity in a sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera-Parrilla, Aura; Brevik, Eric C.; Giráldez, Juan V.; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2016-07-01

    Understanding of soil spatial variability is needed to delimit areas for precision agriculture. Electromagnetic induction sensors which measure the soil apparent electrical conductivity reflect soil spatial variability. The objectives of this work were to see if a temporally stable component could be found in electrical conductivity, and to see if temporal stability information acquired from several electrical conductivity surveys could be used to better interpret the results of concurrent surveys of electrical conductivity and soil water content. The experimental work was performed in a commercial rainfed olive grove of 6.7 ha in the `La Manga' catchment in SW Spain. Several soil surveys provided gravimetric soil water content and electrical conductivity data. Soil electrical conductivity values were used to spatially delimit three areas in the grove, based on the first principal component, which represented the time-stable dominant spatial electrical conductivity pattern and explained 86% of the total electrical conductivity variance. Significant differences in clay, stone and soil water contents were detected between the three areas. Relationships between electrical conductivity and soil water content were modelled with an exponential model. Parameters from the model showed a strong effect of the first principal component on the relationship between soil water content and electrical conductivity. Overall temporal stability of electrical conductivity reflects soil properties and manifests itself in spatial patterns of soil water content.

  11. Temporal disaggregation of daily meteorological grid data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vormoor, K.; Skaugen, T.

    2012-04-01

    For operational flood forecasting, the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Administration (NVE) applies the conceptual HBV rainfall-runoff model for 117 catchments. The hydrological models are calibrated and run using an extensive meteorological grid data set providing daily temperature and precipitation data back to 1957 for entire Norway at 1x1 km grid resolution (seNorge grids). The daily temporal resolution is dictated by the resolution of historical meteorological data. However, since meteorological forecasts and runoff observations are also available at a much finer than a daily time-resolution (e.g. 6 hourly), and many hydrological extreme events happens at a temporal scale of less than daily, it is important to try to establish a historical dataset of meteorological input at a finer corresponding temporal resolution. We present a simple approach for the temporal disaggregation of the daily meteorological seNorge grids into 6-hour values by consulting a HIRLAM hindcast grid data series with an hourly time resolution and a 10x10 km grid resolution. The temporal patterns of the hindcast series are used to disaggregate the daily interpolated observations from the seNorge grids. In this way, we produce a historical grid dataset from 1958-2010 with 6-hourly temperature and precipitation for entire Norway on a 1x1 km grid resolution. For validation and to see if additional information is gained, the disaggregated data is compared with observed values from selected meteorological stations. In addition, the disaggregated data is evaluated against daily data, simply split into four fractions. The validation results indicate that additional information is indeed gained and point out the benefit of disaggregated data compared to daily data split into four. With regard to temperature, the disaggregated values show very low deviations (MAE, RMSE), and are highly correlated with observed values. Regarding precipitation, the disaggregated data shows cumulative

  12. On Nonstable and Stable Population Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Olgiati, Analia S.; Levin, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    This article decomposes total population momentum into two constituent and multiplicative parts: “nonstable” momentum and “stable” momentum. Nonstable momentum depends on deviations between a population’s current age distribution and its implied stable age distribution. Stable momentum is a function of deviations between a population’s implied stable and stationary age distributions. In general, the factorization of total momentum into the product of nonstable and stable momentum is a very good approximation. The factorization is exact, however, when the current age distribution is stable or when observed fertility is already at replacement. We provide numerical illustrations by calculating nonstable, stable, and total momentum for 176 countries, the world, and its major regions. In short, the article brings together disparate strands of the population momentum literature and shows how the various kinds of momentum fit together into a single unifying framework. PMID:21948106

  13. Recursive implementations of temporal filters for image motion computation.

    PubMed

    Clifford, C W; Langley, K

    2000-05-01

    Efficient algorithms for image motion computation are important for computer vision applications and the modelling of biological vision systems. Intensity-based image motion computation proceeds in two stages: the convolution of linear spatiotemporal filter kernels with the image sequence, followed by the non-linear combination of the filter outputs. If the spatiotemporal extent of the filter kernels is large, then the convolution stage can be very intensive computationally. One effective means of reducing the storage required and computation involved in implementing the temporal convolutions is the introduction of recursive filtering. Non-recursive methods require the number of frames of the image sequence stored at any given time to be equal to the temporal extent of the slowest temporal filter. In contrast, recursive methods encode recent stimulus history implicitly in the values of a small number of variables updated through a series of feedback equations. Recursive filtering reduces the number of values stored in memory during convolution and the number of mathematical operations involved in computing the filters' outputs. This paper extends previous recursive implementations of gradient- and correlation-based motion analysis algorithms [Fleet DJ, Langley K (1995) IEEE PAMI 17: 61-67; Clifford CWG, Ibbotson MR, Langley K (1997) Vis Neurosci 14: 741-749], describing a recursive implementation of causal band-pass temporal filters suitable for use in energy- and phase-based algorithms for image motion computation. It is shown that the filters' temporal frequency tuning curves fit psychophysical estimates of the temporal properties of human visual filters.

  14. Chondroblastoma of the temporal bone: consistent middle fossa involvement.

    PubMed

    Selesnick, S H; Levine, J M

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the presentation and clinical course of two patients with temporal bone chondroblastoma, and to review the literature on temporal bone chondroblastoma to identify characteristic clinical and radiological presentations, and optimal treatment regimens. MEDLINE literature searches covering the period from 1966 to January 1998, in all languages, were performed as well as a review of the bibliographies of the identified studies. Strict inclusion criteria were upheld, In total 18 studies had patients whose data could be analyzed. From the 18 studies, 34 patients were identified, but only 21 cases met the inclusion criteria. Demographic, clinical presentation, radiological, operative and treatment parameters were analyzed in this cohort of patients. Ninety-five percent of patients were found to have invasion of the middle cranial fossa and 76% were found to have erosion into the superior aspect of the external auditory canal by temporal bone chondroblastoma. The characteristic growth pattern of temporal bone chondroblastoma may result from embryonal or cartilagenous rests entrapped in the tympanosquamous suture line in the middle fossa floor. Temporal bone chondroblastoma represents a pathology that does not arise from, or have a growth pattern resembling other pathologies in the temporal bone.

  15. Linearly first- and second-order, unconditionally energy stable schemes for the phase field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Han, Daozhi

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a series of linear, unconditionally energy stable numerical schemes for solving the classical phase field crystal model. The temporal discretizations are based on the first order Euler method, the second order backward differentiation formulas (BDF2) and the second order Crank-Nicolson method, respectively. The schemes lead to linear elliptic equations to be solved at each time step, and the induced linear systems are symmetric positive definite. We prove that all three schemes are unconditionally energy stable rigorously. Various classical numerical experiments in 2D and 3D are performed to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed schemes.

  16. Bayesian Inference for Skewed Stable Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokripour, Mona; Nassiri, Vahid; Mohammadpour, Adel

    2011-03-01

    Stable distributions are a class of distributions which allow skewness and heavy tail. Non-Gaussian stable random variables play the role of normal distribution in the central limit theorem, for normalized sums of random variables with infinite variance. The lack of analytic formula for density and distribution functions of stable random variables has been a major drawback to the use of stable distributions, also in the case of inference in Bayesian framework. Buckle introduced priors for the parameters of stable random variables to obtain an analytic form of posterior distribution. However, many researchers tried to solve the problem, through the Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, e.g. [8] and their references. In this paper a new class of heavy-tailed distribution is introduced, called skewed stable. This class has two main advantages: It has many inferential advantages, since it is a member of exponential family, so the Bayesian inference can be drawn similar to the exponential family of distributions and modelling skew data with stable distributions is dominated by this family. Finally, Bayesian inference for skewed stable arc compared to the stable distributions through a few simulations study.

  17. Ultraviolet and thermally stable polymer compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.; Gloria, H. R.; Goldsberry, R. E.; Reinisch, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Copolymers, produced from aromatic substituted aromatic azine-siloxane compositions, are thermally stable, solar ultraviolet light non-degradable by wavelengths shorter than those reaching earth surface.

  18. The mechanisms of temporal inference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, B. R.; Green, S. R.

    1987-01-01

    The properties of a temporal language are determined by its constituent elements: the temporal objects which it can represent, the attributes of those objects, the relationships between them, the axioms which define the default relationships, and the rules which define the statements that can be formulated. The methods of inference which can be applied to a temporal language are derived in part from a small number of axioms which define the meaning of equality and order and how those relationships can be propagated. More complex inferences involve detailed analysis of the stated relationships. Perhaps the most challenging area of temporal inference is reasoning over disjunctive temporal constraints. Simple forms of disjunction do not sufficiently increase the expressive power of a language while unrestricted use of disjunction makes the analysis NP-hard. In many cases a set of disjunctive constraints can be converted to disjunctive normal form and familiar methods of inference can be applied to the conjunctive sub-expressions. This process itself is NP-hard but it is made more tractable by careful expansion of a tree-structured search space.

  19. Selective temporal attention enhances the temporal resolution of visual perception: Evidence from a temporal order judgment task.

    PubMed

    Correa, Angel; Sanabria, Daniel; Spence, Charles; Tudela, Pío; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2006-01-27

    We investigated whether attending to a particular point in time affects temporal resolution in a task in which participants judged which of two visual stimuli had been presented first. The results showed that temporal resolution can be improved by attending to the relevant moment as indicated by the temporal cue. This novel finding is discussed in terms of the differential effects of spatial and temporal attention on temporal resolution.

  20. Infections on Temporal Networks—A Matrix-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Koher, Andreas; Lentz, Hartmut H. K.; Hövel, Philipp; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2016-01-01

    We extend the concept of accessibility in temporal networks to model infections with a finite infectious period such as the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. This approach is entirely based on elementary matrix operations and unifies the disease and network dynamics within one algebraic framework. We demonstrate the potential of this formalism for three examples of networks with high temporal resolution: networks of social contacts, sexual contacts, and livestock-trade. Our investigations provide a new methodological framework that can be used, for instance, to estimate the epidemic threshold, a quantity that determines disease parameters, for which a large-scale outbreak can be expected. PMID:27035128

  1. Connecting laboratory behavior to field function through stable isotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric R.; Pangle, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Inherent difficulties of tracking and observing organisms in the field often leave researchers with no choice but to conduct behavioral experiments under laboratory settings. However, results of laboratory experiments do not always translate accurately to natural conditions. A fundamental challenge in ecology is therefore to scale up from small area and short-duration laboratory experiments to large areas and long durations over which ecological processes generally operate. In this study, we propose that stable isotope analysis may be a tool that can link laboratory behavioral observations to past field interactions or function of individual organisms. We conducted laboratory behavioral assays to measure dominance of invasive rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus, and used stable isotope analysis to hindcast trophic positions of these crayfish under preceding natural conditions. We hypothesized that more dominant crayfish in our assays would have higher trophic positions if dominance were related to competitive ability or willingness to pursue high-risk, high-reward prey. We did not find a relationship between crayfish dominance and trophic position, and therefore infer that laboratory dominance of crayfish may not necessarily relate to their ecology in the field. However, this is to our knowledge the first attempt to directly relate laboratory behavior to field performance via stable isotope analysis. We encourage future studies to continue to explore a possible link between laboratory and field behavior via stable isotope analysis, and propose several avenues to do so. PMID:27077010

  2. Connecting laboratory behavior to field function through stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Glon, Mael G; Larson, Eric R; Pangle, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    Inherent difficulties of tracking and observing organisms in the field often leave researchers with no choice but to conduct behavioral experiments under laboratory settings. However, results of laboratory experiments do not always translate accurately to natural conditions. A fundamental challenge in ecology is therefore to scale up from small area and short-duration laboratory experiments to large areas and long durations over which ecological processes generally operate. In this study, we propose that stable isotope analysis may be a tool that can link laboratory behavioral observations to past field interactions or function of individual organisms. We conducted laboratory behavioral assays to measure dominance of invasive rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus, and used stable isotope analysis to hindcast trophic positions of these crayfish under preceding natural conditions. We hypothesized that more dominant crayfish in our assays would have higher trophic positions if dominance were related to competitive ability or willingness to pursue high-risk, high-reward prey. We did not find a relationship between crayfish dominance and trophic position, and therefore infer that laboratory dominance of crayfish may not necessarily relate to their ecology in the field. However, this is to our knowledge the first attempt to directly relate laboratory behavior to field performance via stable isotope analysis. We encourage future studies to continue to explore a possible link between laboratory and field behavior via stable isotope analysis, and propose several avenues to do so.

  3. Turbulence and mixing in the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagüe, C.; Morales, G.; Terradellas, E.; Cuxart, J.

    2003-04-01

    Transport and mixing in the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer is not well understood yet. However this is an important feature in atmospheric pollution as well as in other environmental studies. A Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES98) took place from the 10th to the 28th of September 1998. Two masts (100 m and 10 m) were instrumented with five sonic anemometers, 14 thermocouples, 8 cup anemometers, vanes,radiometers, etc. In addition, a sodar, a tethered balloon and a triangular array of cup anemometers were operating during the campaign. The experiment showed three different regimes, being specially interesting the one between 14th and 21st of September where stable and very stable conditions were present. In this work we present the behaviour of turbulent and stability parameters at several heights. The different evolutions of the Nocturnal Boundary Layer and the main parameters that controle its behaviour are discussed.The influence of internal gravity waves and their interaction with turbulence is also studied using wavelets.

  4. Temporal Partitioning on Multicore Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud Pathan, Ristat; Hashi, Feysal; Stenstrom, Per; Green, Lars-Goran; Hult, Torbjorn; Sandin, Patrik

    2014-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of ensuring temporal partitioning according to the ARINC-653 standard for integrating multiple applications on the same multicore platform. To employ temporal partitioning, we propose the design and analysis of a hierarchical scheduling framework (HSF) for multicore platform. In HSF, each application has a server task, which is mapped to one of the physical cores of the multicore platform. The HSF framework is based on scheduling at two-levels: (i) a system-level scheduler for each core schedules the server tasks that are mapped to that core, and (ii) a task- level scheduler for each application schedules the tasks of the application. This paper presents the design and analysis of this two-level HSF that can be used to ensure temporal partitioning and meeting all the deadlines of each application tasks. The effectiveness of our technique is demonstrated using real-world space applications provided by RUAG Space Sweden AB.

  5. Contact process with temporal disorder.

    PubMed

    Barghathi, Hatem; Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, José A

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of time-varying environmental noise, i.e., temporal disorder, on the nonequilibrium phase transition of the contact process. Combining a real-time renormalization group, scaling theory, and large scale Monte-Carlo simulations in one and two dimensions, we show that the temporal disorder gives rise to an exotic critical point. At criticality, the effective noise amplitude diverges with increasing time scale, and the probability distribution of the density becomes infinitely broad, even on a logarithmic scale. Moreover, the average density and survival probability decay only logarithmically with time. This infinite-noise critical behavior can be understood as the temporal counterpart of infinite-randomness critical behavior in spatially disordered systems, but with exchanged roles of space and time. We also analyze the generality of our results, and we discuss potential experiments.

  6. Contact process with temporal disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghathi, Hatem; Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, José A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of time-varying environmental noise, i.e., temporal disorder, on the nonequilibrium phase transition of the contact process. Combining a real-time renormalization group, scaling theory, and large scale Monte-Carlo simulations in one and two dimensions, we show that the temporal disorder gives rise to an exotic critical point. At criticality, the effective noise amplitude diverges with increasing time scale, and the probability distribution of the density becomes infinitely broad, even on a logarithmic scale. Moreover, the average density and survival probability decay only logarithmically with time. This infinite-noise critical behavior can be understood as the temporal counterpart of infinite-randomness critical behavior in spatially disordered systems, but with exchanged roles of space and time. We also analyze the generality of our results, and we discuss potential experiments.

  7. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, David

    2016-01-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that ‘kernels’ reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual. PMID:27335223

  8. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds.

    PubMed

    Stowell, Dan; Gill, Lisa; Clayton, David

    2016-06-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that 'kernels' reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual.

  9. Stable isotope analyses of palaeo-pollen records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, D.; Loader, N.

    2002-12-01

    Pollen stratigraphy is one of the most widely used tools for studying climate and vegetation dynamics over global and multi-millennial scales. Since the isotopic compositions of photosynthates that are used to form the pollen structure reflect environmental conditions during the time of pollen formation, the stable carbon, oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions (δ13C, δ18O and δ{}D) of the pollen grains may reflect this environmental information. Although there are many preliminary tests and methodological problems to overcome before we can fully utilise palaeo-pollen records, it is the general goal of our research to use pollen isotope records together with conventional palynological analyses to provide additional, independent spatial and temporal palaeo-environmental information and to provide new data on terrestrial ecosystem dynamics, including the timing of environmental changes, phase relationships of vegetation responses and regional and temporal variations in δ13C, Δ13C, δ18O and δ{}D. These isotopic records will facilitate in the modelling of palaeo-environments. By separating and analysing different pollen species, including C3 and C4, we also aim to assess species-specific climatic responses. We present results describing some recent investigations concerning the nature of the isotopic signal contained within pollen, the methodological developments we have made to measure the pollen isotopic composition and the future challenges that must be overcome before this potentially powerful quantitative terrestrial palaeo-archive can be fully and correctly utilised.

  10. Stable spatial solitons in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Ultanir, E A; Michaelis, D; Lederer, F; Stegeman, G I

    2003-02-15

    The existence of stable dissipative spatial solitons at low intensities in patterned electrode semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is predicted theoretically. In contrast to conventional SOAs, this system may support stable solitons because the inherent saturating losses provide subcritical bifurcations for both the plane-wave and the soliton solution.

  11. On stiffly stable implicit linear multistep methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    The motivation to increase the step size with no degradation of numerical accuracy and stability has led to the discovery of particular members of the class of stiffly stable implicit linear multistep algorithms. Sufficient conditions for a consistent linear multistep method to be stiffly stable are given. These conditions involve properties of the stability mapping from the extended complex plane onto itself.

  12. Blood feeding behavior of the stable fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable fly is a fly that looks similar to a house fly but both sexes are blood feeders. Blood is required for successful fertilization and development of eggs. Bites are painful but there is usually no pain after the fly stops feeding. The stable fly is a persistent feeder and will continue trying t...

  13. Spatio-temporal generation regimes in quasi-CW Raman fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Nikita; Sugavanam, Srikanth; Churkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-21

    We present experimental measurements of intensity spatio-temporal dynamics in quasi-CW Raman fiber laser. Depending on the power, the laser operates in different spatio-temporal regimes varying from partial mode-locking near the generation threshold to almost stochastic radiation and a generation of short-lived pulses at high power. The transitions between the generation regimes are evident in intensity spatio-temporal dynamics. Two-dimensional auto-correlation functions provide an additional insight into temporal and spatial properties of the observed regimes.

  14. Coding of multisensory temporal patterns in human superior temporal sulcus

    PubMed Central

    Noesselt, Tömme; Bergmann, Daniel; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Münte, Thomas; Spence, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists have long been interested in how the temporal aspects of perception are represented in the brain. In the present study, we investigated the neural basis of the temporal perception of synchrony/asynchrony for audiovisual speech stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Subjects judged the temporal relation of (a)synchronous audiovisual speech streams, and indicated any changes in their perception of the stimuli over time. Differential hemodynamic responses for synchronous versus asynchronous stimuli were observed in the multisensory superior temporal sulcus complex (mSTS-c) and prefrontal cortex. Within mSTS-c we found adjacent regions expressing an enhanced BOLD-response to the different physical (a)synchrony conditions. These regions were further modulated by the subjects' perceptual state. By calculating the distances between the modulated regions within mSTS-c in single-subjects we demonstrate that the “auditory leading (AL)” and “visual leading (VL) areas” lie closer to “synchrony areas” than to each other. Moreover, analysis of interregional connectivity indicates a stronger functional connection between multisensory prefrontal cortex and mSTS-c during the perception of asynchrony. Taken together, these results therefore suggest the presence of distinct sub-regions within the human STS-c for the maintenance of temporal relations for audiovisual speech stimuli plus differential functional connectivity with prefrontal regions. The respective local activity in mSTS-c is dependent both upon the physical properties of the stimuli presented and upon the subjects' perception of (a)synchrony. PMID:22973202

  15. Higher order temporal finite element methods through mixed formalisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkyu

    2014-01-01

    The extended framework of Hamilton's principle and the mixed convolved action principle provide new rigorous weak variational formalism for a broad range of initial boundary value problems in mathematical physics and mechanics. In this paper, their potential when adopting temporally higher order approximations is investigated. The classical single-degree-of-freedom dynamical systems are primarily considered to validate and to investigate the performance of the numerical algorithms developed from both formulations. For the undamped system, all the algorithms are symplectic and unconditionally stable with respect to the time step. For the damped system, they are shown to be accurate with good convergence characteristics.

  16. Phase Stable RF-over-fiber Transmission using Heterodyne Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.; Byrd, J. M.; Doolittle, L.; Huang, G.; Staples, J. W.

    2010-01-02

    New scientific applications require phase-stabilized RF distribution to multiple remote locations. These include phased-array radio telescopes and short pulse free electron lasers. RF modulated onto a CW optical carrier and transmitted via fiber is capable of low noise, but commercially available systems aren't long term stable enough for these applications. Typical requirements are for less than 50fs long term temporal stability between receivers, which is 0.05 degrees at 3GHz. Good results have been demonstrated for RF distribution schemes based on transmission of short pulses, but these require specialized free-space optics and high stability mechanical infrastructure. We report a method which uses only standard telecom optical and RF components, and achieves less than 20fs RMS error over 300m of standard single-mode fiber. We demonstrate stable transmission of 3GHz over 300m of fiber with less than 0.017 degree (17fs) RMS phase error. An interferometer measures optical phase delay, providing information to a feed-forward correction of RF phase.

  17. Multiphase pumping - operation & control

    SciTech Connect

    Salis, J. de; Marolies, C. de; Falcimaigne, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reviews field issues related to the planning, installation and operation of the helico-axial multiphase pumps. Interest for multiphase production, which leads to simpler and smaller in-field installations, is primarily dictated by the need for more a cost effective production system. Multiphase pumping is essentially a means of adding energy to the unprocessed effluent which enables the liquid/gas mixture to be transported over long distances without the need for prior separation. The Poseidon helico-axial pumps, under normal operating conditions, are largely unaffected by process fluctuations at pump inlet (changes in pressure, liquid or gas flow rate). They have demonstrated a stable behavior (self-adaptive capability with regards to instantaneous changes). A multiphase pump set is designed to operate under changing/fluctuating process conditions. An important issue related to pump operability and flexibility has to do with the driver selection: fixed speed vs. variable speed. In some cases a fixed speed drive provides sufficient operational flexibility. In other cases variable speed can be chosen. Pump operation & control strategies are presented and discussed.

  18. Navigability of multiplex temporal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Song, Qiao-Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Real world complex systems have multiple levels of relationships and in many cases, they need to be modeled as multiplex networks where the same nodes can interact with each other in different layers, such as social networks. However, social relationships only appear at prescribed times so the temporal structures of edge activations can also affect the dynamical processes located above them. To consider both factors are simultaneously, we introduce multiplex temporal networks and propose three different walk strategies to investigate the concurrent dynamics of random walks and the temporal structure of multiplex networks. Thus, we derive analytical results for the multiplex centrality and coverage function in multiplex temporal networks. By comparing them with the numerical results, we show how the underlying topology of the layers and the walk strategy affect the efficiency when exploring the networks. In particular, the most interesting result is the emergence of a super-diffusion process, where the time scale of the multiplex is faster than that of both layers acting separately.

  19. Temporal scaling in information propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  20. Auditory Temporal Conditioning in Neonates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, W. K.; And Others

    Twenty normal newborns, approximately 36 hours old, were tested using an auditory temporal conditioning paradigm which consisted of a slow rise, 75 db tone played for five seconds every 25 seconds, ten times. Responses to the tones were measured by instantaneous, beat-to-beat heartrate; and the test trial was designated as the 2 1/2-second period…

  1. Temporal Processing Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Christine A.; Boggs, Jennifer; O'Donnell, Brian F.; Shekhar, Anantha; Hetrick, William P.

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia may be associated with a fundamental disturbance in the temporal coordination of information processing in the brain, leading to classic symptoms of schizophrenia such as thought disorder and disorganized and contextually inappropriate behavior. Despite the growing interest and centrality of time-dependent conceptualizations of the…

  2. Temporal scaling in information propagation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-18

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  3. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  4. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection.

  5. Inclusion of temporal priors for automated neonatal EEG classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temko, Andriy; Stevenson, Nathan; Marnane, William; Boylan, Geraldine; Lightbody, Gordon

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to use recent advances in the clinical understanding of the temporal evolution of seizure burden in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy to improve the performance of automated detection algorithms. Probabilistic weights are designed from temporal locations of neonatal seizure events relative to time of birth. These weights are obtained by fitting a skew-normal distribution to the temporal seizure density and introduced into the probabilistic framework of the previously developed neonatal seizure detector. The results are validated on the largest available clinical dataset, comprising 816.7 h. By exploiting these priors, the receiver operating characteristic area is increased by 23% (relative) reaching 96.74%. The number of false detections per hour is decreased from 0.45 to 0.25, while maintaining the correct detection of seizure burden at 70%.

  6. A semiparametric spatio-temporal model for solar irradiance data

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Joshua D.; Harvill, Jane L.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we evaluate semiparametric spatio-temporal models for global horizontal irradiance at high spatial and temporal resolution. These models represent the spatial domain as a lattice and are capable of predicting irradiance at lattice points, given data measured at other lattice points. Using data from a 1.2 MW PV plant located in Lanai, Hawaii, we show that a semiparametric model can be more accurate than simple interpolation between sensor locations. We investigate spatio-temporal models with separable and nonseparable covariance structures and find no evidence to support assuming a separable covariance structure. These results indicate a promising approach for modeling irradiance at high spatial resolution consistent with available ground-based measurements. Moreover, this kind of modeling may find application in design, valuation, and operation of fleets of utility-scale photovoltaic power systems.

  7. A semiparametric spatio-temporal model for solar irradiance data

    DOE PAGES

    Patrick, Joshua D.; Harvill, Jane L.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we evaluate semiparametric spatio-temporal models for global horizontal irradiance at high spatial and temporal resolution. These models represent the spatial domain as a lattice and are capable of predicting irradiance at lattice points, given data measured at other lattice points. Using data from a 1.2 MW PV plant located in Lanai, Hawaii, we show that a semiparametric model can be more accurate than simple interpolation between sensor locations. We investigate spatio-temporal models with separable and nonseparable covariance structures and find no evidence to support assuming a separable covariance structure. These results indicate a promising approach for modeling irradiance atmore » high spatial resolution consistent with available ground-based measurements. Moreover, this kind of modeling may find application in design, valuation, and operation of fleets of utility-scale photovoltaic power systems.« less

  8. Temporal Coding of Volumetric Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llull, Patrick Ryan

    'Image volumes' refer to realizations of images in other dimensions such as time, spectrum, and focus. Recent advances in scientific, medical, and consumer applications demand improvements in image volume capture. Though image volume acquisition continues to advance, it maintains the same sampling mechanisms that have been used for decades; every voxel must be scanned and is presumed independent of its neighbors. Under these conditions, improving performance comes at the cost of increased system complexity, data rates, and power consumption. This dissertation explores systems and methods capable of efficiently improving sensitivity and performance for image volume cameras, and specifically proposes several sampling strategies that utilize temporal coding to improve imaging system performance and enhance our awareness for a variety of dynamic applications. Video cameras and camcorders sample the video volume (x,y,t) at fixed intervals to gain understanding of the volume's temporal evolution. Conventionally, one must reduce the spatial resolution to increase the framerate of such cameras. Using temporal coding via physical translation of an optical element known as a coded aperture, the compressive temporal imaging (CACTI) camera emonstrates a method which which to embed the temporal dimension of the video volume into spatial (x,y) measurements, thereby greatly improving temporal resolution with minimal loss of spatial resolution. This technique, which is among a family of compressive sampling strategies developed at Duke University, temporally codes the exposure readout functions at the pixel level. Since video cameras nominally integrate the remaining image volume dimensions (e.g. spectrum and focus) at capture time, spectral (x,y,t,lambda) and focal (x,y,t,z) image volumes are traditionally captured via sequential changes to the spectral and focal state of the system, respectively. The CACTI camera's ability to embed video volumes into images leads to exploration

  9. Temporal Stability of Genetic Variability and Differentiation in the Three-Spined Stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

    PubMed Central

    DeFaveri, Jacquelin; Merilä, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Temporal variation in allele frequencies, whether caused by deterministic or stochastic forces, can inform us about interesting demographic and evolutionary phenomena occurring in wild populations. In spite of the continued surge of interest in the genetics of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) populations, little attention has been paid towards the temporal stability of allele frequency distributions, and whether there are consistent differences in effective size (Ne) of local populations. We investigated temporal stability of genetic variability and differentiation in 15 microsatellite loci within and among eight collection sites of varying habitat type, surveyed twice over a six-year time period. In addition, Nes were estimated with the expectation that they would be lowest in isolated ponds, intermediate in larger lakes and largest in open marine sites. In spite of the marked differences in genetic variability and differentiation among the study sites, the temporal differences in allele frequencies, as well as measures of genetic diversity and differentiation, were negligible. Accordingly, the Ne estimates were temporally stable, but tended to be lower in ponds than in lake or marine habitats. Hence, we conclude that allele frequencies in putatively neutral markers in three-spined sticklebacks seem to be temporally stable – at least over periods of few generations – across a wide range of habitat types differing markedly in levels of genetic variability, effective population size and gene flow. PMID:25853707

  10. Schwartz operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyl, M.; Kiukas, J.; Werner, R. F.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce Schwartz operators as a non-commutative analog of Schwartz functions and provide a detailed discussion of their properties. We equip them, in particular, with a number of different (but equivalent) families of seminorms which turns the space of Schwartz operators into a Fréchet space. The study of the topological dual leads to non-commutative tempered distributions which are discussed in detail as well. We show, in particular, that the latter can be identified with a certain class of quadratic forms, therefore making operations like products with bounded (and also some unbounded) operators and quantum harmonic analysis available to objects which are otherwise too singular for being a Hilbert space operator. Finally, we show how the new methods can be applied by studying operator moment problems and convergence properties of fluctuation operators.

  11. Temporal motifs in time-dependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovanen, Lauri; Karsai, Márton; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2011-11-01

    Temporal networks are commonly used to represent systems where connections between elements are active only for restricted periods of time, such as telecommunication, neural signal processing, biochemical reaction and human social interaction networks. We introduce the framework of temporal motifs to study the mesoscale topological-temporal structure of temporal networks in which the events of nodes do not overlap in time. Temporal motifs are classes of similar event sequences, where the similarity refers not only to topology but also to the temporal order of the events. We provide a mapping from event sequences to coloured directed graphs that enables an efficient algorithm for identifying temporal motifs. We discuss some aspects of temporal motifs, including causality and null models, and present basic statistics of temporal motifs in a large mobile call network.

  12. GMRES and integral operators

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, C.T.; Xue, Z.Q.

    1994-12-31

    Many discretizations of integral equations and compact fixed point problems are collectively compact and strongly convergent in spaces of continuous functions. These properties not only lead to stable and convergent approximations but also can be used in the construction of fast multilevel algorithms. Recently the GMRES algorithm has become a standard coarse mesh solver. The purpose of this paper is to show how the special properties of integral operators and their approximations are reflected in the performance of the GMRES iteration and how these properties can be used to strengthen the norm in which convergence takes place. The authors illustrate these ideas with composite Gauss rules for integral equations on the unit interval.

  13. Scaling of processes shaping the clonal dynamics and genetic mosaic of seagrasses through temporal genetic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Becheler, R; Benkara, E; Moalic, Y; Hily, C; Arnaud-Haond, S

    2014-01-01

    Theoretically, the dynamics of clonal and genetic diversities of clonal plant populations are strongly influenced by the competition among clones and rate of seedling recruitment, but little empirical assessment has been made of such dynamics through temporal genetic surveys. We aimed to quantify 3 years of evolution in the clonal and genetic composition of Zostera marina meadows, comparing parameters describing clonal architecture and genetic diversity at nine microsatellite markers. Variations in clonal structure revealed a decrease in the evenness of ramet distribution among genets. This illustrates the increasing dominance of some clonal lineages (multilocus lineages, MLLs) in populations. Despite the persistence of these MLLs over time, genetic differentiation was much stronger in time than in space, at the local scale. Contrastingly with the short-term evolution of clonal architecture, the patterns of genetic structure and genetic diversity sensu stricto (that is, heterozygosity and allelic richness) were stable in time. These results suggest the coexistence of (i) a fine grained (at the scale of a 20 × 30 m quadrat) stable core of persistent genets originating from an initial seedling recruitment and developing spatial dominance through clonal elongation; and (ii) a local (at the scale of the meadow) pool of transient genets subjected to annual turnover. This simultaneous occurrence of initial and repeated recruitment strategies highlights the different spatial scales at which distinct evolutionary drivers and mating systems (clonal competition, clonal growth, propagule dispersal and so on) operate to shape the dynamics of populations and the evolution of polymorphism in space and time. PMID:24022498

  14. A Stable and Conservative Interface Treatment of Arbitrary Spatial Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Nordstrom, Jan; Gottlieb, David

    1998-01-01

    Stable and accurate interface conditions are derived for the linear advection-diffusion equation. The conditions are functionally independent of the spatial order of accuracy and rely only on the form of the discrete operator. We focus on high-order finite-difference operators that satisfy the summation-by-parts (SBP) property. We prove that stability is a natural consequence of the SBP operators used in conjunction with the new boundary conditions. In addition, we show that the interface treatments are conservative. New finite-difference operators of spatial accuracy up to sixth order are constructed: these operators satisfy the SBP property. Finite-difference operators are shown to admit design accuracy (p(sup th)-order global accuracy) when (p - 1)(sup th)-order stencil closures are used near the boundaries if the physical boundary conditions are implemented to at least p(sup th)-order accuracy. Stability and accuracy are demonstrated on the nonlinear Burgers' equation for an twelve-subdomain problem with randomly distributed interfaces.

  15. Bi-stable optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a bistable optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to move an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, between two stable positions. A non-powered means holds the actuation arm in either of the two stable positions. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm between the two stable positions.

  16. A System to Create Stable Nanoparticle Aerosols from Nanopowders

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yaobo; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle aerosols released from nanopowders in workplaces are associated with human exposure and health risks. We developed a novel system, requiring minimal amounts of test materials (min. 200 mg), for studying powder aerosolization behavior and aerosol properties. The aerosolization procedure follows the concept of the fluidized-bed process, but occurs in the modified volume of a V-shaped aerosol generator. The airborne particle number concentration is adjustable by controlling the air flow rate. The system supplied stable aerosol generation rates and particle size distributions over long periods (0.5-2 hr and possibly longer), which are important, for example, to study aerosol behavior, but also for toxicological studies. Strict adherence to the operating procedures during the aerosolization experiments ensures the generation of reproducible test results. The critical steps in the standard protocol are the preparation of the material and setup, and the aerosolization operations themselves. The system can be used for experiments requiring stable aerosol concentrations and may also be an alternative method for testing dustiness. The controlled aerosolization made possible with this setup occurs using energy inputs (may be characterized by aerosolization air velocity) that are within the ranges commonly found in occupational environments where nanomaterial powders are handled. This setup and its operating protocol are thus helpful for human exposure and risk assessment. PMID:27501179

  17. Functional Connectome before and following Temporal Lobectomy in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei; Ji, Gong-Jun; Xu, Qiang; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhengge; Yang, Fang; Sun, Kangjian; Jiao, Qing; Richardson, Mark P.; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Lu, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    As mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) has been recognized as a network disorder, a longitudinal connectome investigation may shed new light on the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology related to distinct surgical outcomes. Resting-state functional MRI data was acquired from mTLE patients before (n = 37) and after (n = 24) anterior temporal lobectomy. According to surgical outcome, patients were classified as seizure-free (SF, n = 14) or non-seizure-free (NSF, n = 10). First, we found higher network resilience to targeted attack on topologically central nodes in the SF group compared to the NSF group, preoperatively. Next, a two-way mixed analysis of variance with between-subject factor ‘outcome’ (SF vs. NSF) and within-subject factor ‘treatment’ (pre-operation vs. post-operation) revealed divergent dynamic reorganization in nodal topological characteristics between groups, in the temporoparietal junction and its connection with the ventral prefrontal cortex. We also correlated the network damage score (caused by surgical resection) with postsurgical brain function, and found that the damage score negatively correlated with postoperative global and local parallel information processing. Taken together, dynamic connectomic architecture provides vital information for selecting surgical candidates and for understanding brain recovery mechanisms following epilepsy surgery. PMID:27001417

  18. Functional Connectome before and following Temporal Lobectomy in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei; Ji, Gong-Jun; Xu, Qiang; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhengge; Yang, Fang; Sun, Kangjian; Jiao, Qing; Richardson, Mark P; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Lu, Guangming

    2016-03-22

    As mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) has been recognized as a network disorder, a longitudinal connectome investigation may shed new light on the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology related to distinct surgical outcomes. Resting-state functional MRI data was acquired from mTLE patients before (n = 37) and after (n = 24) anterior temporal lobectomy. According to surgical outcome, patients were classified as seizure-free (SF, n = 14) or non-seizure-free (NSF, n = 10). First, we found higher network resilience to targeted attack on topologically central nodes in the SF group compared to the NSF group, preoperatively. Next, a two-way mixed analysis of variance with between-subject factor 'outcome' (SF vs. NSF) and within-subject factor 'treatment' (pre-operation vs. post-operation) revealed divergent dynamic reorganization in nodal topological characteristics between groups, in the temporoparietal junction and its connection with the ventral prefrontal cortex. We also correlated the network damage score (caused by surgical resection) with postsurgical brain function, and found that the damage score negatively correlated with postoperative global and local parallel information processing. Taken together, dynamic connectomic architecture provides vital information for selecting surgical candidates and for understanding brain recovery mechanisms following epilepsy surgery.

  19. Environmental controls on stable isotope ratios in New Zealand Podocarpaceae: Implications for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, Marianne J.; Baldini, James U. L.; Gröcke, Darren R.

    2014-09-01

    Stable isotope ratios of various proxies are widely used for palaeoclimate reconstruction, and it is often assumed that isotope ratios reflect vegetation abundance or type. However, very little research exists on the isotopic equilibration of extant biomes under variable environmental conditions. In this study, carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from leaves of various Podocarpaceae genera, endemic to New Zealand, are linked to environmental parameters from the Land Environments New Zealand model. The dominant influence on stable isotope ratios within the majority of Podocarpaceae studied here is vapour pressure deficit (VPD). A simple latitudinal trend does not exist, and neither temperature nor rainfall (decoupled from VPD) controls the stable isotope ratios. The results suggest that modern spatial heterogeneity in VPD affects the stable isotope values of vegetation, and that historic VPD variability would change the stable isotope ratios of Podocarpaceae without necessitating a change in vegetation type, density, or productivity. This represents an alternative model for temporal isotope change within geochemical proxies and reinforces the need for increased stable isotopic research in modern plant ecosystems to better understand modern, and eventually palaeoclimatic processes affecting the terrestrial biosphere.

  20. Spatial-temporal database model based on geodatabase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongmei; Luo, Yu

    2009-10-01

    Entities in the real world have non-spatial attributes, as well as spatial and temporal features. A spatial-temporal data model aims at describing appropriately these intrinsic characteristics within the entities and model them on a conceptual level so that the model can present both static information and dynamic information that occurs over time. In this paper, we devise a novel spatial-temporal data model which is based on Geodatabase. The model employs object-oriented analysis method, combining object concept with event. The entity is defined as a feature class encapsulating attributes and operations. The operations detect change and store the changes automatically in a historic database in Geodatabase. Furthermore, the model takes advantage of the existing strengths of the relational database at the bottom level of Geodatabase, such as trigger and constraint, to monitor events on the attributes or locations and respond to the events correctly. A case of geographic database for Kunming municipal sewerage geographic information system is implemented by the model. The database reveals excellent performance on managing data and tracking the details of change. It provides a perfect data platform for querying, recurring history and predicting the trend of future. The instance demonstrates the spatial-temporal data model is efficient and practicable.

  1. Finding Mutual Exclusion Invariants in Temporal Planning Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardini, Sara; Smith, David E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for automatically extracting temporal mutual exclusion invariants from PDDL2.2 planning instances. We first identify a set of invariant candidates by inspecting the domain and then check these candidates against properties that assure invariance. If these properties are violated, we show that it is sometimes possible to refine a candidate by adding additional propositions and turn it into a real invariant. Our technique builds on other approaches to invariant synthesis presented in the literature, but departs from their limited focus on instantaneous discrete actions by addressing temporal and numeric domains. To deal with time, we formulate invariance conditions that account for both the entire structure of the operators (including the conditions, rather than just the effects) and the possible interactions between operators. As a result, we construct a technique that is not only capable of identifying invariants for temporal domains, but is also able to find a broader set of invariants for non-temporal domains than the previous techniques.

  2. Cubic map algebra functions for spatio-temporal analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mennis, J.; Viger, R.; Tomlin, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    We propose an extension of map algebra to three dimensions for spatio-temporal data handling. This approach yields a new class of map algebra functions that we call "cube functions." Whereas conventional map algebra functions operate on data layers representing two-dimensional space, cube functions operate on data cubes representing two-dimensional space over a third-dimensional period of time. We describe the prototype implementation of a spatio-temporal data structure and selected cube function versions of conventional local, focal, and zonal map algebra functions. The utility of cube functions is demonstrated through a case study analyzing the spatio-temporal variability of remotely sensed, southeastern U.S. vegetation character over various land covers and during different El Nin??o/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phases. Like conventional map algebra, the application of cube functions may demand significant data preprocessing when integrating diverse data sets, and are subject to limitations related to data storage and algorithm performance. Solutions to these issues include extending data compression and computing strategies for calculations on very large data volumes to spatio-temporal data handling.

  3. Temporal succession in carbon incorporation from macromolecules by particle-attached bacteria in marine microcosms.

    PubMed

    Mayali, Xavier; Stewart, Benjamin; Mabery, Shalini; Weber, Peter K

    2016-02-01

    We investigated bacterial carbon assimilation from stable isotope-labelled macromolecular substrates (proteins; lipids; and two types of polysaccharides, starch and cellobiose) while attached to killed diatom detrital particles during laboratory microcosms incubated for 17 days. Using Chip-SIP (secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis of RNA microarrays), we identified generalist operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from the Gammaproteobacteria, belonging to the genera Colwellia, Glaciecola, Pseudoalteromonas and Rheinheimera, and from the Bacteroidetes, genera Owenweeksia and Maribacter, that incorporated the four tested substrates throughout the incubation period. Many of these OTUs exhibited the highest isotope incorporation relative to the others, indicating that they were likely the most active. Additional OTUs from the Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria exhibited generally (but not always) lower activity and did not incorporate all tested substrates at all times, showing species succession in organic carbon incorporation. We also found evidence to suggest that both generalist and specialist OTUs changed their relative substrate incorporation over time, presumably in response to changing substrate availability as the particles aged. This pattern was demonstrated by temporal succession from relatively higher starch incorporation early in the incubations, eventually switching to higher cellobiose incorporation after 2 weeks.

  4. Nonlinear plants, factorizations and stable feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, Charles A.; Kabuli, M. Guntekin

    1987-01-01

    For nonlinear plants represented by causal maps defined over extended spaces, right factorization and normalized right-coprime factorization concepts are discussed in terms of well-posed stable feedback systems. This setup covers continuous-time, discrete-time, time-invariant or time-varying input-output maps. The nonlinear maps are factored in terms of causal bounded-input bounded-output stable maps. In factored form, all instabilities of the original map are represented by the inverse of a causal stable `denominator' map. The existence of maps with right factorizations and normalized right-coprime factorizations is shown using a well-posed stable unity-feedback system. In the case where one of the subsystems has a normalized right-coprime factorization, the stability of the feedback system is equivalent to the stability of the pseudostate map.

  5. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  6. Thermally Stable Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    2006-01-01

    A class of thermally stable piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymers, and an improved method of making them, have been invented. These polymers can be used as substrates for a wide variety of electromechanical transducers, sensors, and actuators.

  7. Stable Isotope Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2012-01-03

    The isotopic distribution of the atoms composing the molecules of microorganisms is a function of the substrates used by the organisms. The stable isotope content of an organism is fixed so long as no further substrate consumption and biosynthesis occurs, while the radioactive isotopic content decays over time. The distribution of stable isotopes of C, N, O and H in heterotrophic microorganisms is a direct function of the culture medium, and therefore the stable isotope composition can be used to associate samples with potential culture media and also with one another. The 14C content depends upon the 14C content, and therefore the age, of the organic components of the culture medium, as well as on the age of the culture itself. Stable isotope signatures can thus be used for sample matching, to associate cultures with specific growth media, and to predict characteristics of growth media.

  8. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacokinetic profile or mode of action of a drug substance. Secondly, stable isotopes may be used for the assessment of drug products or drug delivery systems by determination of parameters such as the bioavailability or the release profile. Thirdly, patients may be assessed in relation to patient-specific drug treatment; this concept is often called personalized medicine. In this article, the application of stable isotope technology in the aforementioned three areas is reviewed, with emphasis on developments over the past 25 years. The applications are illustrated with examples from clinical studies in humans. PMID:21801197

  9. Unusually Stable Helical Coil Allotrope of Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Guan, Jie; Jiang, Jingwei; Tománek, David

    2016-12-14

    We have identified an unusually stable helical coil allotrope of phosphorus. Our ab initio density functional theory calculations indicate that the uncoiled, isolated straight one-dimensional chain is equally stable as a monolayer of black phosphorus dubbed phosphorene. The coiling tendency and the attraction between adjacent coil segments add an extra stabilization energy of ∼12 meV/atom to the coil allotrope, similar in value to the ∼16 meV/atom interlayer attraction in bulk black phosphorus. Thus, the helical coil structure is essentially as stable as black phosphorus, the most stable phosphorus allotrope known to date. With an optimum radius of 2.4 nm, the helical coil of phosphorus may fit well and even form inside wide carbon nanotubes.

  10. On Stable Marriages and Greedy Matchings

    SciTech Connect

    Manne, Fredrik; Naim, Md; Lerring, Hakon; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2016-12-11

    Research on stable marriage problems has a long and mathematically rigorous history, while that of exploiting greedy matchings in combinatorial scientific computing is a younger and less developed research field. In this paper we consider the relationships between these two areas. In particular we show that several problems related to computing greedy matchings can be formulated as stable marriage problems and as a consequence several recently proposed algorithms for computing greedy matchings are in fact special cases of well known algorithms for the stable marriage problem. However, in terms of implementations and practical scalable solutions on modern hardware, the greedy matching community has made considerable progress. We show that due to the strong relationship between these two fields many of these results are also applicable for solving stable marriage problems.

  11. Polymeric foams stable at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Harrison, E. S.; Delano, C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Crosslinked poly(N-arylenebenzimidazoles) are stable up to 370 C. Polymers are made by mixing appropriate stoichiometric amounts of tetramine and aromatic dicarboxylic acid anhydride with phenol or alkyl-substituted phenol.

  12. The Synthesis of Stable Grasps in the Plane.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    ft-AIG5 903 THE SYNTHESIS OF STABLE GRASPS IN THE PLANE(U) / MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB V NGUYEN OCT 85 AI-M...assembly operations become easier and less sensitive to errors. -4 ’I MASSACIIUSI’TS INST’I’TI,’ O1 ’IINOIOGY ARTIIFICIAL IN’i’II(I’N(’I AI)ItA’i’ORY...Acknowledgments: This report describes research done at the General Mo- tors Research Laboratories and at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Mas

  13. Lengthened temporal integration in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Brent D; Gandhi, Shilpa; Aurbach, Elyse L; Williams, Nina; Williams, Micah; Wassef, Adel; Eagleman, David M

    2013-01-01

    Research in schizophrenia has tended to emphasize deficits in higher cognitive abilities, such as attention, memory, and executive function. Here we provide evidence for dysfunction at a more fundamental level of perceptual processing, temporal integration. On a measure of flicker fusion, patients with schizophrenia exhibited significantly lower thresholds than age and education matched healthy controls. We reasoned that this finding could result from a longer window of temporal integration or could reflect diminished repetition suppression: if every frame of the repeating stimulus were represented as novel, its perceived duration would be accordingly longer. To tease apart these non-exclusive hypotheses, we asked patients to report the number of stimuli perceived on the screen at once (numerosity) as they watched rapidly flashing stimuli that were either repeated or novel. Patients reported significantly higher numerosity than controls in all conditions, again indicating a longer window of temporal integration in schizophrenia. Further, patients showed the largest difference from controls in the repeated condition, suggesting a possible effect of weaker repetition suppression. Finally, we establish that our findings generalize to several different classes of stimuli (letters, pictures, faces, words, and pseudo-words), demonstrating a non-specific effect of a lengthened window of integration. We conclude that the visual system in schizophrenics integrates input over longer periods of time, and that repetition suppression may also be deficient. We suggest that these abnormalities in the processing of temporal information may underlie higher-level deficits in schizophrenia and account for the disturbed sense of continuity and fragmentation of events in time reported by patients.

  14. Effective Visualization of Temporal Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lihua; Healey, Christopher G; Bass, Steffen A

    2016-01-01

    An ensemble is a collection of related datasets, called members, built from a series of runs of a simulation or an experiment. Ensembles are large, temporal, multidimensional, and multivariate, making them difficult to analyze. Another important challenge is visualizing ensembles that vary both in space and time. Initial visualization techniques displayed ensembles with a small number of members, or presented an overview of an entire ensemble, but without potentially important details. Recently, researchers have suggested combining these two directions, allowing users to choose subsets of members to visualization. This manual selection process places the burden on the user to identify which members to explore. We first introduce a static ensemble visualization system that automatically helps users locate interesting subsets of members to visualize. We next extend the system to support analysis and visualization of temporal ensembles. We employ 3D shape comparison, cluster tree visualization, and glyph based visualization to represent different levels of detail within an ensemble. This strategy is used to provide two approaches for temporal ensemble analysis: (1) segment based ensemble analysis, to capture important shape transition time-steps, clusters groups of similar members, and identify common shape changes over time across multiple members; and (2) time-step based ensemble analysis, which assumes ensemble members are aligned in time by combining similar shapes at common time-steps. Both approaches enable users to interactively visualize and analyze a temporal ensemble from different perspectives at different levels of detail. We demonstrate our techniques on an ensemble studying matter transition from hadronic gas to quark-gluon plasma during gold-on-gold particle collisions.

  15. Temporal ecology in the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Wolkovich, E M; Cook, B I; McLauchlan, K K; Davies, T J

    2014-11-01

    Two fundamental axes - space and time - shape ecological systems. Over the last 30 years spatial ecology has developed as an integrative, multidisciplinary science that has improved our understanding of the ecological consequences of habitat fragmentation and loss. We argue that accelerating climate change - the effective manipulation of time by humans - has generated a current need to build an equivalent framework for temporal ecology. Climate change has at once pressed ecologists to understand and predict ecological dynamics in non-stationary environments, while also challenged fundamental assumptions of many concepts, models and approaches. However, similarities between space and time, especially related issues of scaling, provide an outline for improving ecological models and forecasting of temporal dynamics, while the unique attributes of time, particularly its emphasis on events and its singular direction, highlight where new approaches are needed. We emphasise how a renewed, interdisciplinary focus on time would coalesce related concepts, help develop new theories and methods and guide further data collection. The next challenge will be to unite predictive frameworks from spatial and temporal ecology to build robust forecasts of when and where environmental change will pose the largest threats to species and ecosystems, as well as identifying the best opportunities for conservation.

  16. The temporal basis of angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chakravartula, Shilpa

    2017-01-01

    The process of new blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) is highly dynamic, involving complex coordination of multiple cell types. Though the process must carefully unfold over time to generate functional, well-adapted branching networks, we seldom hear about the time-based properties of angiogenesis, despite timing being central to other areas of biology. Here, we present a novel, time-based formulation of endothelial cell behaviour during angiogenesis and discuss a flurry of our recent, integrated in silico/in vivo studies, put in context to the wider literature, which demonstrate that tissue conditions can locally adapt the timing of collective cell behaviours/decisions to grow different vascular network architectures. A growing array of seemingly unrelated ‘temporal regulators’ have recently been uncovered, including tissue derived factors (e.g. semaphorins or the high levels of VEGF found in cancer) and cellular processes (e.g. asymmetric cell division or filopodia extension) that act to alter the speed of cellular decisions to migrate. We will argue that ‘temporal adaptation’ provides a novel account of organ/disease-specific vascular morphology and reveals ‘timing’ as a new target for therapeutics. We therefore propose and explain a conceptual shift towards a ‘temporal adaptation’ perspective in vascular biology, and indeed other areas of biology where timing remains elusive. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Systems morphodynamics: understanding the development of tissue hardware’. PMID:28348255

  17. A GRASS GIS based Spatio-Temporal Algebra for Raster-, 3D Raster- and Vector Time Series Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppelt, Thomas; Gebbert, Sören

    2015-04-01

    Enhancing the well known and widely used map algebra proposed by Dr. Charles Dana Tomlin [1] with the time dimension is an ongoing research topic. The efficient processing of large time series of raster, 3D raster and vector datasets, e. g. raster datasets for temperature or precipitations on continental scale, requires a sophisticated spatio-temporal algebra that is capable of handling datasets with different temporal granularities and spatio-temporal extents. With the temporal enabled GRASS GIS [2] and the GRASS GIS Temporal Framework new spatio-temporal data types are available in GRASS GIS 7, called space time datasets. These space time datasets represent time series of raster, 3D raster and vector map layers. Furthermore the temporal framework provides a wide range of functionalities to support the implementation of a temporal algebra. While spatial capabilities of GRASS GIS are used to perform the spatial processing of the time stamped map layers that are registered in a space time dataset, the temporal processing is provided by the GRASS GIS temporal framework that supports time intervals and time instances. Mixing time instance and time intervals as well as gaps, overlapping or inclusion of intervals and instances is possible. Hence this framework allows an arbitrary layout of the time dimension. We implemented two ways to process space time datasets with arbitrary temporal layout, the temporal topology and the granularity based spatio-temporal algebra. The algebra provides the functionality to define complex spatio-temporal topological operators that process time and space in a single expression. The algebra includes methods to select map layers from space time datasets based on their temporal relations, to temporally shift time stamped map layers, to create temporal buffer and to snap time instances of time stamped map layers to create a valid temporal topology. In addition spatio-temporal operations can be evaluated within conditional statements. These

  18. Negative dysphotopsia after temporal corneal incisions.

    PubMed

    Cooke, David L

    2010-04-01

    Temporal incisions made during cataract extraction have been purported to cause negative dysphotopsia. A case in which negative dysphotopsia occurred after superior scleral tunnel incisions is described. The dystopsia symptoms resolved immediately after intraocular lens exchange using temporal corneal incisions.

  19. Tracing amino acid exchange during host-pathogen interaction by combined stable-isotope time-resolved Raman spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Boitor, Radu A.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the temporal and spatial interchange of the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) between human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) and tachyzoites of the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is combined with Raman micro-spectroscopy to selectively monitor the incorporation of deuterium-labelled Phe into proteins in individual live tachyzoites. Our results show a very rapid uptake of L-Phe(D8) by the intracellular growing parasite. T. gondii tachyzoites are capable of extracting L-Phe(D8) from host cells as soon as it invades the cell. L-Phe(D8) from the host cell completely replaces the L-Phe within T. gondii tachyzoites 7–9 hours after infection. A quantitative model based on Raman spectra allowed an estimation of the exchange rate of Phe as 0.5–1.6 × 104 molecules/s. On the other hand, extracellular tachyzoites were not able to consume L-Phe(D8) after 24 hours of infection. These findings further our understanding of the amino acid trafficking between host cells and this strictly intracellular parasite. In particular, this study highlights new aspects of the metabolism of amino acid Phe operative during the interaction between T. gondii and its host cell.

  20. Tracing Cadmium in the Environment: an Evolving Stable Isotope Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullen, T. D.; Bouse, R. M.; Brown, C. L.; Croteau, M.; Luoma, S. N.; Topping, B. R.

    2005-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a trace constituent in rocks and waters, and like many transition metals is an essential dietary nutrient at low levels but highly toxic in elevated doses. In many respects, cadmium behaves chemically like calcium (Ca) and thus substitutes for Ca in liquid-solid partitioning reactions and generally follows Ca through biogeochemical cycles and metabolic processes. Cd is comprised of 8 stable isotopes, and given the isotopic systematics of environmental Ca it is likely that variations in the stable isotope composition of Cd in natural materials will result from both inorganic and biologic processes. In order to assess the potential of Cd isotope variations to reveal information about sources, metabolic and biogeochemical pathways and fates of environmental Cd, we have initiated a broad study of the stable isotope composition of Cd in a variety of natural and anthropogenically-influenced systems. As an example, here we report the results of the first systematic study of the stable isotope composition of Cd in biologic materials. We focused on the isotopic variability of Cd in tissues of two species of clam collected from the San Francisco Bay estuary, Potamocorbula amurensis which resides in brackish water and Corbicula fluminea which resides in fresh and slightly brackish water. Both clam species concentrate Cd in their soft and hard tissues. During both low-flow conditions in August and high-flow conditions in April, δ116Cd of soft tissues of Potamocorbula was consistently negative and increased down-estuary with increasing salinity (δ116Cd is defined as the per mil difference of the 116Cd/110Cd ratio between a sample and our standard, igneous rock BIR-1). Samples collected in August were systematically displaced to higher δ116Cd than those collected in April. Soft tissues of Corbicula collected in both August and April from upstream, fully fresh-water sampling sites had identical δ116Cd, while soft tissues of Corbicula collected from our site at

  1. Business & Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with John D. Musso, executive director of the Association of School Business Officials (ASBO) International. Musso talks about trends and issues that will most affect school business and operations in 2007 and beyond. Despite the challenges facing school operations, he believes that the key to being successful at…

  2. Operational Amplifiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxcroft, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the introduction of low cost equipment into high school and college physical science classes. Examines the properties of an "ideal" operational amplifier and discusses how it might be used under saturated and non-saturated conditions. Notes the action of a "real" operational amplifier. (TW)

  3. Corps Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-26

    Coordinates and synchronizes aviation operations. Coordinates and synchronizes space support. Provides terrain visualization and terrain...section acquires, manages, and distributes geospatial data and terrain visualization products to the CG and staff. This section includes imagery analysts...operations by integrating information from internal and external sources. The ABCS provides a COP using a common map set and database to present a visual

  4. Payload Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cissom, R. D.; Melton, T. L.; Schneider, M. P.; Lapenta, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide the future ISS scientist and/or engineer a sense of what ISS payload operations are expected to be. This paper uses a real-time operations scenario to convey this message. The real-time operations scenario begins at the initiation of payload operations and runs through post run experiment analysis. In developing this scenario, it is assumed that the ISS payload operations flight and ground capabilities are fully available for use by the payload user community. Emphasis is placed on telescience operations whose main objective is to enable researchers to utilize experiment hardware onboard the International Space Station as if it were located in their terrestrial laboratory. An overview of the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) systems and user ground system options is included to provide an understanding of the systems and interfaces users will utilize to perform payload operations. Detailed information regarding POIC capabilities can be found in the POIC Capabilities Document, SSP 50304.

  5. Operating Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Brown, Robert L.

    1984-01-01

    A computer operating system spans multiple layers of complexity, from commands entered at a keyboard to the details of electronic switching. In addition, the system is organized as a hierarchy of abstractions. Various parts of such a system and system dynamics (using the Unix operating system as an example) are described. (JN)

  6. Chemodectomas arising in temporal bone structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, W.J.; Million, R.R.; Cassisi, N.J.; Singleton, G.T.

    1982-02-01

    Eighteen patients with chemodectomas arising in temporal bone structures were evaluated and treated at the University of Florida. Seventeen patients have each been followed a minimum of 3 years. Patients were retrospectively staged as having ''local'' or ''advanced'' disease, depending on the presence or absence of bone destruction and/or cranial nerve involvement. Fourteen of the patients received radiation therapy as all or part of their therapy; 6 patients were treated with radiation therapy alone, 3 patients were irradiated immediately postoperatively for residual disease, and 5 patients had radiation therapy for recurrence after operation. They were treated with cobalt-60 radiation with doses ranging from 3760 to 5640 rad. All irradiated patients demonstrated evidence of tumor regression, and none have had tumor recurrence with followup of 3-12 years. Of the 8 patients with cranial nerve paralysis prior to therapy, 5 had return of function of 1 or more cranial nerves. One of 6 patients treated initially with radiation therapy had a complication, while 6 of 8 patients irradiated postoperatively had complications. None of the complications were fatal. Three patients treated by operation for early disease limited to the hypotympanum had the disease controlled for 11-12 years. Guidelines for the selection of initial therapy are discussed.

  7. Development of a subway operation incident delay model using accelerated failure time approaches.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jinxian; Zheng, Yang; Yan, Xuedong; Meng, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to develop a subway operational incident delay model using the parametric accelerated time failure (AFT) approach. Six parametric AFT models including the log-logistic, lognormal and Weibull models, with fixed and random parameters are built based on the Hong Kong subway operation incident data from 2005 to 2012, respectively. In addition, the Weibull model with gamma heterogeneity is also considered to compare the model performance. The goodness-of-fit test results show that the log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is most suitable for estimating the subway incident delay. First, the results show that a longer subway operation incident delay is highly correlated with the following factors: power cable failure, signal cable failure, turnout communication disruption and crashes involving a casualty. Vehicle failure makes the least impact on the increment of subway operation incident delay. According to these results, several possible measures, such as the use of short-distance and wireless communication technology (e.g., Wifi and Zigbee) are suggested to shorten the delay caused by subway operation incidents. Finally, the temporal transferability test results show that the developed log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is stable over time.

  8. Temporal Variability of the Bioaerosol Background at a Subway Station: Concentration Level, Size Distribution, and Diversity of Airborne Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dybwad, Marius; Skogan, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring bioaerosol environments may present a challenge to biological detection-identification-monitoring (BIODIM) systems aiming at rapid and reliable warning of bioterrorism incidents. One way to improve the operational performance of BIODIM systems is to increase our understanding of relevant bioaerosol backgrounds. Subway stations are enclosed public environments which may be regarded as potential bioterrorism targets. This study provides novel information concerning the temporal variability of the concentration level, size distribution, and diversity of airborne bacteria in a Norwegian subway station. Three different air samplers were used during a 72-h sampling campaign in February 2011. The results suggested that the airborne bacterial environment was stable between days and seasons, while the intraday variability was found to be substantial, although often following a consistent diurnal pattern. The bacterial levels ranged from not detected to 103 CFU m−3 and generally showed increased levels during the daytime compared to the nighttime levels, as well as during rush hours compared to non-rush hours. The airborne bacterial levels showed rapid temporal variation (up to 270-fold) on some occasions, both consistent and inconsistent with the diurnal profile. Airborne bacterium-containing particles were distributed between different sizes for particles of >1.1 μm, although ∼50% were between 1.1 and 3.3 μm. Anthropogenic activities (mainly passengers) were demonstrated as major sources of airborne bacteria and predominantly contributed 1.1- to 3.3-μm bacterium-containing particles. Our findings contribute to the development of realistic testing and evaluation schemes for BIODIM equipment by providing information that may be used to simulate operational bioaerosol backgrounds during controlled aerosol chamber-based challenge tests with biological threat agents. PMID:24162566

  9. A modified anterior temporal approach for low-position aneurysms of the upper basilar complex

    PubMed Central

    Katsuno, Makoto; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Izumi, Naoto; Hashimoto, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although surgery for aneurysms of the upper basilar complex is generally accomplished by a pterional or subtemporal approach, both techniques have disadvantages. Therefore, attempts have been made to combine both the approaches, such as an anterior temporal approach, which exposes the anterior aspect of the temporal lobe during standard fronto-temporal craniotomy. However, in all these techniques, the temporal vein is sacrificed to allow posterior retraction of the temporal lobe, which may cause venous infarction in the temporal lobe. Methods: Our institutional review board approved this prospective study. We modified the anterior temporal approach for low-position aneurysms of the upper basilar complex by performing posterior clinoidectomy as necessary, thereby preventing the sacrifice of all vessels. Results: From 2007 to 2014, seven patients were operated on using this modified approach, and four patients underwent additional posterior clinoidectomy. Complete clip ligation was performed for all aneurysms without sacrificing any vessels, and there were no permanent complications attributable to manipulation for clipping or posterior clinoidectomy. Conclusions: The modified anterior temporal approach allows a wider operating field within the retro-carotid space, without sacrificing any vessels, and permits safer posterior clinoidectomy and aneurysm clipping in patients with low-position aneurysms of the basilar complex. PMID:25657863

  10. Temporal Phenomena in the Korean Conjunctive Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dongmin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize the temporal phenomena in the Korean conjunctive constructions. These constructions consist of three components: a verbal stem, a clause medial temporal suffix, and a clause terminal suffix. This study focuses on both the temporality of the terminal connective suffixes and the grammatical meanings of the…

  11. Lateralized Temporal Order Judgement in Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddle, Elizabeth B.; Jackson, Georgina M.; Rorden, Chris; Jackson, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Temporal and spatial attentional deficits in dyslexia were investigated using a lateralized visual temporal order judgment (TOJ) paradigm that allowed both sensitivity to temporal order and spatial attentional bias to be measured. Findings indicate that adult participants with a positive screen for dyslexia were significantly less sensitive to the…

  12. Temporal Stability of Genetic Structure in a Mesopelagic Copepod.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Erica; Andrews, Kimberly R; Peijnenburg, Katja T C A; Portner, Elan; Norton, Emily L

    2015-01-01

    Although stochasticity in oceanographic conditions is known to be an important driver of temporal genetic change in many marine species, little is known about whether genetically distinct plankton populations can persist in open ocean habitats. A prior study demonstrated significant population genetic structure among oceanic gyres in the mesopelagic copepod Haloptilus longicornis in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and we hypothesized that populations within each gyre represent distinct gene pools that persist over time. We tested this expectation through basin-scale sampling across the Atlantic Ocean in 2010 and 2012. Using both mitochondrial (mtCOII) and microsatellite markers (7 loci), we show that the genetic composition of populations was stable across two years in both the northern and southern subtropical gyres. Genetic variation in this species was partitioned among ocean gyres (FCT = 0.285, P < 0.0001 for mtCOII, FCT = 0.013, P < 0.0001 for microsatellites), suggesting strong spatial population structure, but no significant partitioning was found among sampling years. This temporal persistence of population structure across a large geographic scale was coupled with chaotic genetic patchiness at smaller spatial scales, but the magnitude of genetic differentiation was an order of magnitude lower at these smaller scales. Our results demonstrate that genetically distinct plankton populations persist over time in highly-dispersive open ocean habitats, and this is the first study to rigorously test for temporal stability of large scale population structure in the plankton.

  13. Temporal Stability of Genetic Structure in a Mesopelagic Copepod

    PubMed Central

    Goetze, Erica; Andrews, Kimberly R.; Peijnenburg, Katja T. C. A.; Portner, Elan; Norton, Emily L.

    2015-01-01

    Although stochasticity in oceanographic conditions is known to be an important driver of temporal genetic change in many marine species, little is known about whether genetically distinct plankton populations can persist in open ocean habitats. A prior study demonstrated significant population genetic structure among oceanic gyres in the mesopelagic copepod Haloptilus longicornis in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and we hypothesized that populations within each gyre represent distinct gene pools that persist over time. We tested this expectation through basin-scale sampling across the Atlantic Ocean in 2010 and 2012. Using both mitochondrial (mtCOII) and microsatellite markers (7 loci), we show that the genetic composition of populations was stable across two years in both the northern and southern subtropical gyres. Genetic variation in this species was partitioned among ocean gyres (FCT = 0.285, P < 0.0001 for mtCOII, FCT = 0.013, P < 0.0001 for microsatellites), suggesting strong spatial population structure, but no significant partitioning was found among sampling years. This temporal persistence of population structure across a large geographic scale was coupled with chaotic genetic patchiness at smaller spatial scales, but the magnitude of genetic differentiation was an order of magnitude lower at these smaller scales. Our results demonstrate that genetically distinct plankton populations persist over time in highly-dispersive open ocean habitats, and this is the first study to rigorously test for temporal stability of large scale population structure in the plankton. PMID:26302332

  14. Rational temporal predictions can underlie apparent failures to delay gratification

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Joseph T.; Kable, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    An important category of seemingly maladaptive decisions involves failure to postpone gratification. A person pursuing a desirable long-run outcome may abandon it in favor of a short-run alternative that has been available all along. Here we present a theoretical framework in which this seemingly irrational behavior emerges from stable preferences and veridical judgments. Our account recognizes that decision makers generally face uncertainty regarding the time at which future outcomes will materialize. When timing is uncertain, the value of persistence depends crucially on the nature of a decision-maker’s prior temporal beliefs. Certain forms of temporal beliefs imply that a delay’s predicted remaining length increases as a function of time already waited. In this type of situation, the rational, utility-maximizing strategy is to persist for a limited amount of time and then give up. We show empirically that people’s explicit predictions of remaining delay lengths indeed increase as a function of elapsed time in several relevant domains, implying that temporal judgments offer a rational basis for limiting persistence. We then develop our framework into a simple working model and show how it accounts for individual differences in a laboratory task (the well-known “marshmallow test”). We conclude that delay-of-gratification failure, generally viewed as a manifestation of limited self-control capacity, can instead arise as an adaptive response to the perceived statistics of one’s environment. PMID:23458085

  15. Stable population coding for working memory coexists with heterogeneous neural dynamics in prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Murray, John D; Bernacchia, Alberto; Roy, Nicholas A; Constantinidis, Christos; Romo, Ranulfo; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2017-01-10

    Working memory (WM) is a cognitive function for temporary maintenance and manipulation of information, which requires conversion of stimulus-driven signals into internal representations that are maintained across seconds-long mnemonic delays. Within primate prefrontal cortex (PFC), a critical node of the brain's WM network, neurons show stimulus-selective persistent activity during WM, but many of them exhibit strong temporal dynamics and heterogeneity, raising the questions of whether, and how, neuronal populations in PFC maintain stable mnemonic representations of stimuli during WM. Here we show that despite complex and heterogeneous temporal dynamics in single-neuron activity, PFC activity is endowed with a population-level coding of the mnemonic stimulus that is stable and robust throughout WM maintenance. We applied population-level analyses to hundreds of recorded single neurons from lateral PFC of monkeys performing two seminal tasks that demand parametric WM: oculomotor delayed response and vibrotactile delayed discrimination. We found that the high-dimensional state space of PFC population activity contains a low-dimensional subspace in which stimulus representations are stable across time during the cue and delay epochs, enabling robust and generalizable decoding compared with time-optimized subspaces. To explore potential mechanisms, we applied these same population-level analyses to theoretical neural circuit models of WM activity. Three previously proposed models failed to capture the key population-level features observed empirically. We propose network connectivity properties, implemented in a linear network model, which can underlie these features. This work uncovers stable population-level WM representations in PFC, despite strong temporal neural dynamics, thereby providing insights into neural circuit mechanisms supporting WM.

  16. Adjusting for temporal change in trophic position results in reduced rates of contaminant decline.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Craig E; Weseloh, D V Chip

    2006-09-15

    The development of ecological tracers to track the flow of energy and nutrients through food webs has provided new insights into the factors that are important in regulating diet composition in wildlife. The Great Lakes Herring Gull Monitoring Program has provided information regarding temporal trends in levels of bioaccumulative contaminants since the early 1970s. In recent years, data from this program have also been generated to examine ecological changes in the Great Lakes. Because the contaminants that are evaluated as part of this program biomagnify, food is the primary determinant of contaminant concentrations in the eggs that are analyzed annually. Fluctuations in diet composition could affect the interpretation of temporal trends by affecting exposure to contaminants. Retrospective analyses involving ecological tracers, i.e., stable nitrogen isotopes and fatty acids, have shown temporal change in the diets of Great Lakes herring gulls at some monitoring colonies. These dietary differences have led to temporal variation in the trophic position of herring gulls. Given that higher trophic level organisms incur greater exposure to biomagnifying contaminants, it is necessary to adjust for these temporal changes in trophic position to get an accurate indication of how contaminant burdens are changing within the Great Lakes ecosystem. Here, we outline a method to adjust for temporal changes in indicator species trophic position and discuss how these adjustments affect the interpretation of contaminant temporal trend monitoring data.

  17. Compact, Highly Stable Ion Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John

    2008-01-01

    A mercury-ion clock now at the breadboard stage of development (see figure) has a stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock: In tests, the clock exhibited an Allan deviation of between 2 x 10(exp -13) and 3 x 10(exp -13) at a measurement time of 1 second, averaging to about 10(exp -15) at 1 day. However, the clock occupies a volume of only about 2 liters . about a hundredth of the volume of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling parts of the apparatus are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein only a getter pump is used to maintain the vacuum. Hence, this apparatus is a prototype of a generation of small, potentially portable high-precision clocks for diverse ground- and space-based navigation and radio science applications. Furthermore, this new ion-clock technology is about 100 times more stable and precise than the rubidium atomic clocks currently in use in the NAV STAR GPS Earth-orbiting satellites. In this clock, mercury ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole linear radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, the ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a Hg-202 radio-frequency-discharge ultraviolet lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions resonant at frequency of about 40.507 GHz are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at that frequency. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling caused by wall collisions inherent to gas-cell clocks. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave- resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. The basic ion-shuttling, two-trap scheme as described thus far is not new: it has been the basis of designs of prior larger clocks. The novelty of the present development lies in major redesigns of its physics package (the ion traps and the vacuum and optical subsystems) to effect

  18. Restoring Natural Streamflow Variability by Modifying Multi-purpose Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, J.

    2010-12-01

    Multi-purpose reservoirs typically provide benefits of water supply, hydroelectric power, and flood mitigation. Hydroelectric power generations generally do not consume water. However, temporal distribution of downstream flows is highly changed due to hydro-peaking effects. Associated with offstream diversion of water supplies for municipal, industrial, and agricultural requirements, natural streamflow characteristics of magnitude, duration, frequency, timing, and rate of change is significantly altered by multi-purpose reservoir operation. Natural flow regime has long been recognized a master factor for ecosystem health and biodiversity. Restoration of altered flow regime caused by multi-purpose reservoir operation is the main objective of this study. This study presents an optimization framework that modifying reservoir operation to seeking balance between human and environmental needs. The methodology presented in this study is applied to the Feitsui Reservoir, located in northern Taiwan, with main purpose of providing stable water-supply and auxiliary purpose of electricity generation and flood-peak attenuation. Reservoir releases are dominated by two decision variables, i.e., duration of water releases for each day and percentage of daily required releases within the duration. The current releasing policy of the Feitsui Reservoir releases water for water-supply and hydropower purposes during 8:00 am to 16:00 pm each day and no environmental flows releases. Although greater power generation is obtained by 100% releases distributed within 8-hour period, severe temporal alteration of streamflow is observed downstream of the reservoir. Modifying reservoir operation by relaxing these two variables and reserve certain ratio of streamflow as environmental flow to maintain downstream natural variability. The optimal reservoir releasing policy is searched by the multi-criterion decision making technique for considering reservoir performance in terms of shortage ratio

  19. Analysis of temporal jitter in a copper vapor laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. Durga Praveen; Gantayet, L. M.; Singh, Sunita; Rawat, A. S.; Rana, Paramjit; V, Rajasree; Agarwalla, Sandeep K.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2012-02-01

    Temporal jitter in a magnetic pulse compression based copper vapor laser (CVL) system is analyzed by considering ripple present in the input dc power supply and ripple present in the magnetic core resetting power supply. It is shown that the jitter is a function of the ratio of operating voltage to the designed voltage, percentage ripple, and the total propagation delay of the magnetic pulse compression circuit. Experimental results from a CVL system operating at a repetition rate of 9 kHz are presented.

  20. Rod-cone interactions and the temporal impulse response of the cone pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zele, Andrew J.; Cao, Dingcai; Pokorny, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Dark-adapted rods suppress cone-mediated flicker detection. This study evaluates the effect that rod activity has on cone temporal processing by investigating whether rod mediated suppression changes the cone pathway impulse response function, regardless of the form of the temporal signal. Stimuli were generated with a 2-channel photostimulator that has four primaries for the central field and four primaries for the surround. Cone pathway temporal impulse response functions were derived from temporal contrast sensitivity data with periodic stimuli, and from two-pulse discrimination data in which pairs of briefly pulsed stimuli were presented successively at a series of stimulus onset asynchronies. Dark-adapted rods altered the amplitude and timing of cone pathway temporal impulse response functions, irrespective of whether they were derived from measurements with temporally periodic stimuli or in a brief presentation temporal resolution task with pulsed stimuli. Rod-cone interactions are a fundamental operation in visual temporal processing under mesopic light levels, acting to decrease the temporal bandwidth of the visual system. PMID:18486960

  1. Effectiveness of Temporal Augmentation Using a Calvarial Onlay Graft during Pterional Craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon Soo; Yi, Hyung Suk; Kim, Han Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Temporal hollowing occurs to varying degrees after pterional craniotomy. The most common cause of temporal hollowing is a bony defect of the pterional and temporal regions due to the resection of the sphenoid ridge and temporal squama for adequate exposure without overhang. The augmentation of such bony defects is important in preventing craniofacial deformities and postoperative hollowness. Temporal cranioplasty has been performed using a range of materials, such as acrylics, porous polyethylene, bone cement, titanium, muscle flaps, and prosthetic dermis. These methods are limited by the risk of damage to adjacent tissue and infection, a prolonged preparation phase, the possibility of reabsorption, and cost inefficiency. We have developed a method of temporal augmentation using a calvarial onlay graft as a single-stage neurosurgical reconstructive operation in patients requiring craniotomy. In this report, we describe the surgical details and review our institutional outcomes. The patients were divided into pterional craniotomy and onlay graft groups. Clinical temporal hollowing was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Temporal soft tissue thickness was measured on preoperative and postoperative computed tomography (CT) studies. Both the VAS and CT-based assessments were compared between the groups. Our review indicated that the use of an onlay graft was associated with a lower VAS score and left-right discrepancy in the temporal contour than were observed in patients undergoing pterional craniotomy without an onlay graft. PMID:27019813

  2. Stable lithium electrodeposition in liquid and nanoporous solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A.

    2014-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium, sodium and aluminium metal-based batteries are among the most versatile platforms for high-energy, cost-effective electrochemical energy storage. Non-uniform metal deposition and dendrite formation on the negative electrode during repeated cycles of charge and discharge are major hurdles to commercialization of energy-storage devices based on each of these chemistries. A long-held view is that unstable electrodeposition is a consequence of inherent characteristics of these metals and their inability to form uniform electrodeposits on surfaces with inevitable defects. We report on electrodeposition of lithium in simple liquid electrolytes and in nanoporous solids infused with liquid electrolytes. We find that simple liquid electrolytes reinforced with halogenated salt blends exhibit stable long-term cycling at room temperature, often with no signs of deposition instabilities over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge and thousands of operating hours. We rationalize these observations with the help of surface energy data for the electrolyte/lithium interface and impedance analysis of the interface during different stages of cell operation. Our findings provide support for an important recent theoretical prediction that the surface mobility of lithium is significantly enhanced in the presence of lithium halide salts. Our results also show that a high electrolyte modulus is unnecessary for stable electrodeposition of lithium.

  3. Structured illumination temporal compressive microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Pang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We present a compressive video microscope based on structured illumination with incoherent light source. The source-side illumination coding scheme allows the emission photons being collected by the full aperture of the microscope objective, and thus is suitable for the fluorescence readout mode. A 2-step iterative reconstruction algorithm, termed BWISE, has been developed to address the mismatch between the illumination pattern size and the detector pixel size. Image sequences with a temporal compression ratio of 4:1 were demonstrated. PMID:27231586

  4. Temporal pattern processing in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Comins, Jordan A; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2014-10-01

    Understanding how the brain perceives, organizes and uses patterned information is directly related to the neurobiology of language. Given the present limitations, such knowledge at the scale of neurons, neural circuits and neural populations can only come from non-human models, focusing on shared capacities that are relevant to language processing. Here we review recent advances in the behavioral and neural basis of temporal pattern processing of natural auditory communication signals in songbirds, focusing on European starlings. We suggest a general inhibitory circuit for contextual modulation that can act to control sensory representations based on patterning rules.

  5. Executing clinical guidelines: temporal issues.

    PubMed Central

    Terenziani, P.; Mastromonaco, F.; Molino, G.; Torchio, M.

    2000-01-01

    In our previous work, we proposed a domain-independent language to describe clinical guidelines and a graphical tool to acquire them. In this paper, we describe an approach to execute clinical guidelines. We propose a flexible execution engine that can be used in clinical decision support applications, and also for medical education, or for integrating guidelines into the clinical workflow. We also focus our attention on temporal issues in the execution of guidelines, including the treatment of composite, concurrent and/or cyclic actions. PMID:11080004

  6. Contextual and temporal clinical guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Guarnero, A.; Marzuoli, M.; Molino, G.; Terenziani, P.; Torchio, M.; Vanni, K.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for managing clinical guidelines. We sketch a modular architecture, allowing us to separate conceptually distinct aspects in the management and use of clinical guidelines. In particular, we describe the clinical guidelines knowledge representation module and we sketch the acquisition module. The main focus of the paper is the definition of an expressive formalism for representing clinical guidelines, which allows one to deal with the context dependent character of clinical guidelines and takes into account different temporal aspects. PMID:9929306

  7. Low work function, stable thin films

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Fehring, Jr., Edward J.; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2000-01-01

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  8. Concentration of stable elements in food products

    SciTech Connect

    Montford, M.A.; Shank, K.E.; Hendricks, C.; Oakes, T.W.

    1980-01-01

    Food samples were taken from commercial markets and analyzed for stable element content. The concentrations of most stable elements (Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hf, I, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sr, Ta, Th, Ti, V, Zn, Zr) were determined using multiple-element neutron activation analysis, while the concentrations of other elements (Cd, Hg, Ni, Pb) were determined using atomic absorption. The relevance of the concentrations found are noted in relation to other literature values. An earlier study was extended to include the determination of the concentration of stable elements in home-grown products in the vicinity of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Comparisons between the commercial and local food-stuff values are discussed.

  9. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    A third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme developed by Yamaleev and Carpenter was proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions of systems of linear hyperbolic equations. Herein, a systematic approach is presented that enables 'energy stable' modifications for existing WENO schemes of any order. The technique is demonstrated by developing a one-parameter family of fifth-order upwind-biased ESWENO schemes; ESWENO schemes up to eighth order are presented in the appendix. New weight functions are also developed that provide (1) formal consistency, (2) much faster convergence for smooth solutions with an arbitrary number of vanishing derivatives, and (3) improved resolution near strong discontinuities.

  10. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    A new third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially NonOscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme for scalar and vector linear hyperbolic equations with piecewise continuous initial conditions is developed. The new scheme is proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions. In contrast to the existing high-resolution shock-capturing schemes, no assumption that the reconstruction should be total variation bounded (TVB) is explicitly required to prove stability of the new scheme. A rigorous truncation error analysis is presented showing that the accuracy of the 3rd-order ESWENO scheme is drastically improved if the tuning parameters of the weight functions satisfy certain criteria. Numerical results show that the new ESWENO scheme is stable and significantly outperforms the conventional third-order WENO finite difference scheme of Jiang and Shu in terms of accuracy, while providing essentially nonoscillatory solutions near strong discontinuities.

  11. Stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The principle and applications of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) in mycotoxin analysis are critically reviewed. The general section includes historical aspects of SIDAs, the prerequisites and limitations of the use of stable isotopically labelled internal standards, and possible calibration procedures. In the application section actual SIDAs for the analysis of trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, patulin, and ochratoxin A are presented. The syntheses and availability of labelled mycotoxins for use as internal standards is reviewed and specific advances in food analysis and toxicology are demonstrated. The review indicates that LC-MS applications, in particular, require the use of stable isotopically labelled standards to compensate for losses during clean-up and for discrimination due to ion suppression. As the commercial availability of these compounds continues to increase, SIDAs can be expected to find expanding use in mycotoxin analysis.

  12. The accumulation of stable cytogenetic rearrangements with age-determined by chromosome painting

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, M.J.; Lee, D.A.; Senft, J.R.; Briner, J.F.; Moore, D.H. II; Tucker, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Chromosome painting is a rapid method of quantifying structural chromosomal rearrangements. The method is particularly useful for detecting stable aberrations which are difficult and expensive to quantify with classical methods. Translocations, being inherently stable, can be used as a biodosimeter for chronic and temporally-displaced exposure to radiation. Translocations may also be useful for quantifying chronic exposure to environmentally related agents which may result in an accumulation of cytogenetic damage with age. Because most chemical exposures are low and chronic, conventional cytogenetic methods are not expected to be informative. To understand the extent that age and lifestyle factors impact the frequency of stable aberrations, we used chromosome painting in healthy individuals who have not been occupationally or accidentally exposed to radiation or chemicals, and who have not received chemo- or radiotherapy. To date we have analyzed 15 umbilical cord bloods as well as peripheral blood samples from 83 adults aged up to 77 years. Because stable aberrations are rare in unexposed people, we have scored large numbers of cells from each subject. Thus far we have analyzed the equivalent of more than 78,000 metaphases from these 83 people, and have observed an average of 0.75% of cells with translocations or stable insertions. A significant curvilinear relationship with age is apparent (R{sup 2} = 0.69, p <0.00001). No effect with smoking was seen.

  13. Stable fly phenology in a mixed agricultural--wildlife ecosystem in northeast Montana.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Kristina M; Johnson, Gregory D

    2013-02-01

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), is a cosmopolitan species of blood-feeding Muscidae and an important pest of cattle. Although the cattle industry is the largest commodity in Montana, no research has been conducted on the abundance, distribution, or impact of stable flies in the state. Observations of stable flies attacking West Nile virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, WNV) -infected pelicans on a refuge in close proximity to pastured and confined cattle provided an opportunity to describe stable fly phenology in a mixed agricultural-wildlife ecosystem. Coroplast cards used to monitor and compare adult populations in three habitats (peninsula, pasture, confinement lot) located within 1.5-4.5 km of each other revealed that temporal dynamics differed by site. Adult abundance was generally lowest at the confinement lot, the only location where larval development was identified. Stable flies were collected on all traps placed in pasture, with traps adjacent to pastured cattle consistently collecting the most. Adults also were collected on the peninsula supporting the pelicans' nesting site, but whether the potential hosts or physical landscape served as an attractant is unclear. At all three sites, data indicated that overwintering was not successful and that a transition occurred from early season immigrating adults that used suitable local larval development substrates to subsequent autochthonous populations.

  14. Effects of oral supplementation with stable strontium

    PubMed Central

    Skoryna, Stanley C.

    1981-01-01

    The biologic effects of stable strontium, a naturally occurring trace element in the diet and the body, have been little investigated. This paper discusses the effects of oral supplementation with stable strontium in laboratory studies and clinical investigations. The extent of intestinal absorption of various doses of orally administered strontium was estimated by determining serum and tissue levels with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The central observation is that increased oral intake produces a direct increase in serum levels and intracellular uptake of strontium. The results of these studies, as well as those of other investigators, demonstrate that a moderate dosage of stable strontium does not adversely affect the level of calcium either in the serum or in soft tissues. In studies of patients receiving 1 to 1.5 g/d of strontium gluconate, a sustained increase in the serum level of strontium produced a 100-fold increase in the strontium:calcium ratio. In rats, studies indicate that an increase in intracellular strontium content following supplementation may exert a protective effect on mitochondrial structure, probably by means of a stabilizing effect of strontium on membranes. The strontium:calcium ratio in animals receiving a standard diet is higher in the cell than in the extracellular fluid; this may be of physiologic significance. An increase in density that corresponded to the deposition of stable strontium was observed in areas of bone lesions due to metastatic cancer in patients receiving stable strontium supplementation. This suggests the possibility of using strontium to mineralize osteophenic areas and to relieve bone pain. Also, because of reports of an inverse relation between the incidence of dental caries and a high strontium content in drinking water, the use of natural water containing relatively high levels of stable strontium should be considered. In each of these instances it is important to maintain a normal dietary intake of

  15. Nonlinearly stable compact schemes for shock calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockburn, Bernardo; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1992-01-01

    The applications of high-order, compact finite difference methods in shock calculations are discussed. The main concern is to define a local mean which will serve as a reference for introducing a local nonlinear limiting to control spurious numerical oscillations while maintaining the formal accuracy of the scheme. For scalar conservation laws, the resulting schemes can be proven total-variation stable in one space dimension and maximum-norm stable in multiple space dimensions. Numerical examples are shown to verify accuracy and stability of such schemes for problems containing shocks. These ideas can also be applied to other implicit schemes such as the continuous Galerkin finite element methods.

  16. Stable isotopes in Lithuanian bioarcheological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipityte, Raminta; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of bioarcheological material of ancient human populations allows us to understand the subsistence behavior associated with various adaptations to the environment. Feeding habits are essential to the survival and growth of ancient populations. Stable isotope analysis is accepted tool in paleodiet (Schutkowski et al, 1999) and paleoenvironmental (Zernitskaya et al, 2014) studies. However, stable isotopes can be useful not only in investigating human feeding habits but also in describing social and cultural structure of the past populations (Le Huray and Schutkowski, 2005). Only few stable isotope investigations have been performed before in Lithuanian region suggesting a quite uniform diet between males and females and protein intake from freshwater fish and animal protein. Previously, stable isotope analysis has only been used to study a Stone Age population however, more recently studies have been conducted on Iron Age and Late medieval samples (Jacobs et al, 2009). Anyway, there was a need for more precise examination. Stable isotope analysis were performed on human bone collagen and apatite samples in this study. Data represented various ages (from 5-7th cent. to 18th cent.). Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis on medieval populations indicated that individuals in studied sites in Lithuania were almost exclusively consuming C3 plants, C3 fed terrestrial animals, and some freshwater resources. Current investigation demonstrated social differences between elites and country people and is promising in paleodietary and daily life reconstruction. Acknowledgement I thank prof. dr. G. Grupe, Director of the Anthropological and Palaeoanatomical State Collection in Munich for providing the opportunity to work in her laboratory. The part of this work was funded by DAAD. Antanaitis-Jacobs, Indre, et al. "Diet in early Lithuanian prehistory and the new stable isotope evidence." Archaeologia Baltica 12 (2009): 12-30. Le Huray, Jonathan D., and Holger

  17. Development of thermally stable polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Megahed, T.N.E.D., Kukacka, L.E.; Fontana, J.J.

    1989-10-01

    This work pertains to the development of a polymer concrete type that is thermally stable under working temperatures of 200{degree} to 300{degree}F. This material is highly durable and thermally stable with high flexural strength and ductility. Its consistency, while fresh, is suitable for both casting in place or precasting techniques. Several optimization stages were applied ranging from mixing ratios and type of aggregate to resin formulation itself. An optimized range of mixing ratios is developed along with optimized mix ingredients, relating mechanical performance to elevated temperature at various degrees of workability.

  18. Large scale stochastic spatio-temporal modelling with PCRaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karssenberg, Derek; Drost, Niels; Schmitz, Oliver; de Jong, Kor; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2013-04-01

    PCRaster is a software framework for building spatio-temporal models of land surface processes (http://www.pcraster.eu). Building blocks of models are spatial operations on raster maps, including a large suite of operations for water and sediment routing. These operations are available to model builders as Python functions. The software comes with Python framework classes providing control flow for spatio-temporal modelling, Monte Carlo simulation, and data assimilation (Ensemble Kalman Filter and Particle Filter). Models are built by combining the spatial operations in these framework classes. This approach enables modellers without specialist programming experience to construct large, rather complicated models, as many technical details of modelling (e.g., data storage, solving spatial operations, data assimilation algorithms) are taken care of by the PCRaster toolbox. Exploratory modelling is supported by routines for prompt, interactive visualisation of stochastic spatio-temporal data generated by the models. The high computational requirements for stochastic spatio-temporal modelling, and an increasing demand to run models over large areas at high resolution, e.g. in global hydrological modelling, require an optimal use of available, heterogeneous computing resources by the modelling framework. Current work in the context of the eWaterCycle project is on a parallel implementation of the modelling engine, capable of running on a high-performance computing infrastructure such as clusters and supercomputers. Model runs will be distributed over multiple compute nodes and multiple processors (GPUs and CPUs). Parallelization will be done by parallel execution of Monte Carlo realizations and sub regions of the modelling domain. In our approach we use multiple levels of parallelism, improving scalability considerably. On the node level we will use OpenCL, the industry standard for low-level high performance computing kernels. To combine multiple nodes we will use

  19. Similarity breeds proximity: Pattern similarity within and across contexts is related to later mnemonic judgments of temporal proximity

    PubMed Central

    Ezzyat, Youssef; Davachi, Lila

    2014-01-01

    Summary Experiences unfold over time, but little is known about the mechanisms that support the formation of coherent episodic memories for temporally-extended events. Recent work in animals has provided evidence for signals in hippocampus that could link events across temporal gaps, however it is unknown whether and how such signals might be related to later memory for temporal information in humans. We measured patterns of fMRI BOLD activity as people encoded items that were separated in time and manipulated the presence of shared or distinct context across items. We found that hippocampal pattern similarity in the BOLD response across trials predicted later temporal memory decisions when context changed. By contrast, pattern similarity in lateral occipital cortex was related to memory only when context remained stable. These data provide the first evidence in humans that representational stability in hippocampus across time may be a mechanism for temporal memory organization. PMID:24607235

  20. Temporal asynchrony and spatial perception

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Maria; Polat, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Collinear facilitation is an enhancement in the visibility of a target by laterally placed iso-oriented flankers in a collinear (COL) configuration. Iso-oriented flankers placed in a non-collinear configuration (side-by-side, SBS) produce less facilitation. Surprisingly, presentation of both configurations simultaneously (ISO-CROSS) abolishes the facilitation rather than increases it - a phenomenon that can’t be fully explained by the spatial properties of the target and flankers. Based on our preliminary data and recent studies, we hypothesized that there might be a novel explanation based on the temporal properties of the excitation and inhibition, resulting in asynchrony between the lateral inputs received from COL and SBS, leading to cancelation of the facilitatory component in ISO-CROSS. We explored this effect using a detection task in humans. The results replicated the previous results showing that the preferred facilitation for COL and SBS was abolished for the ISO-CROSS configuration. However, presenting the SBS flankers, but not the COL flankers 20 msec before ISO-CROSS restored the facilitatory effect. We propose a novel explanation that the perceptual advantage of collinear facilitation may be cancelled by the delayed input from the sides; thus, the final perception is determined by the overall spatial-temporal integration of the lateral interactions. PMID:27460532

  1. Temporal Constraint Reasoning With Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, Lina; Morris, Paul; Morris, Robert; Rossi, Francesca

    2001-01-01

    A number of reasoning problems involving the manipulation of temporal information can naturally be viewed as implicitly inducing an ordering of potential local decisions involving time (specifically, associated with durations or orderings of events) on the basis of preferences. For example. a pair of events might be constrained to occur in a certain order, and, in addition. it might be preferable that the delay between them be as large, or as small, as possible. This paper explores problems in which a set of temporal constraints is specified, where each constraint is associated with preference criteria for making local decisions about the events involved in the constraint, and a reasoner must infer a complete solution to the problem such that, to the extent possible, these local preferences are met in the best way. A constraint framework for reasoning about time is generalized to allow for preferences over event distances and durations, and we study the complexity of solving problems in the resulting formalism. It is shown that while in general such problems are NP-hard, some restrictions on the shape of the preference functions, and on the structure of the preference set, can be enforced to achieve tractability. In these cases, a simple generalization of a single-source shortest path algorithm can be used to compute a globally preferred solution in polynomial time.

  2. An Efficient Pattern Mining Approach for Event Detection in Multivariate Temporal Data.

    PubMed

    Batal, Iyad; Cooper, Gregory; Fradkin, Dmitriy; Harrison, James; Moerchen, Fabian; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a pattern mining approach to learn event detection models from complex multivariate temporal data, such as electronic health records. We present Recent Temporal Pattern mining, a novel approach for efficiently finding predictive patterns for event detection problems. This approach first converts the time series data into time-interval sequences of temporal abstractions. It then constructs more complex time-interval patterns backward in time using temporal operators. We also present the Minimal Predictive Recent Temporal Patterns framework for selecting a small set of predictive and non-spurious patterns. We apply our methods for predicting adverse medical events in real-world clinical data. The results demonstrate the benefits of our methods in learning accurate event detection models, which is a key step for developing intelligent patient monitoring and decision support systems.

  3. An Efficient Pattern Mining Approach for Event Detection in Multivariate Temporal Data

    PubMed Central

    Batal, Iyad; Cooper, Gregory; Fradkin, Dmitriy; Harrison, James; Moerchen, Fabian; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes a pattern mining approach to learn event detection models from complex multivariate temporal data, such as electronic health records. We present Recent Temporal Pattern mining, a novel approach for efficiently finding predictive patterns for event detection problems. This approach first converts the time series data into time-interval sequences of temporal abstractions. It then constructs more complex time-interval patterns backward in time using temporal operators. We also present the Minimal Predictive Recent Temporal Patterns framework for selecting a small set of predictive and non-spurious patterns. We apply our methods for predicting adverse medical events in real-world clinical data. The results demonstrate the benefits of our methods in learning accurate event detection models, which is a key step for developing intelligent patient monitoring and decision support systems. PMID:26752800

  4. Awareness of Temporal Lag is Necessary for Motor–Visual Temporal Recalibration

    PubMed Central

    Tsujita, Masaki; Ichikawa, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Consistent exposure to a temporal lag between observers' voluntary action and its visual feedback induced recalibration of temporal order perception between a motor action and a visual stimulus. It remains unclear what kinds of processing underlie this motor–visual temporal recalibration. This study examined the necessity of awareness of a temporal lag between a motor action and its visual feedback for motor–visual temporal recalibration. In Experiment 1, we allocated observers to either the multiple-step or single-step lag conditions. In the multiple-step lag condition, we first inserted a small temporal lag and subsequently increased it with progress of the adaptation period, to make observers unaware of the temporal lag during the adaptation period. In the single-step lag condition, we instructed observers about the temporal lag before adaptation, and inserted a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of the adaptation period to ensure that they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration only in the single-step lag condition. In Experiment 2, we exposed all observers to a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of adaptation period with no instruction about insertion of the temporal lag. We asked observers at the end of the experiment whether they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration for only observers who were aware of the lag. These results suggest that awareness of the temporal lag plays a crucial role in motor–visual temporal recalibration. PMID:26778983

  5. Awareness of Temporal Lag is Necessary for Motor-Visual Temporal Recalibration.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Masaki; Ichikawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Consistent exposure to a temporal lag between observers' voluntary action and its visual feedback induced recalibration of temporal order perception between a motor action and a visual stimulus. It remains unclear what kinds of processing underlie this motor-visual temporal recalibration. This study examined the necessity of awareness of a temporal lag between a motor action and its visual feedback for motor-visual temporal recalibration. In Experiment 1, we allocated observers to either the multiple-step or single-step lag conditions. In the multiple-step lag condition, we first inserted a small temporal lag and subsequently increased it with progress of the adaptation period, to make observers unaware of the temporal lag during the adaptation period. In the single-step lag condition, we instructed observers about the temporal lag before adaptation, and inserted a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of the adaptation period to ensure that they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration only in the single-step lag condition. In Experiment 2, we exposed all observers to a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of adaptation period with no instruction about insertion of the temporal lag. We asked observers at the end of the experiment whether they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration for only observers who were aware of the lag. These results suggest that awareness of the temporal lag plays a crucial role in motor-visual temporal recalibration.

  6. Towards operational multisensor registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J. M.; Kwok, Ronald; Curlander, John C.

    1991-01-01

    To use data from a number of different remote sensors in a synergistic manner, a multidimensional analysis of the data is necessary. However, prior to this analysis, processing to correct for the systematic geometric distortion characteristic of each sensor is required. Furthermore, the registration process must be fully automated to handle a large volume of data and high data rates. A conceptual approach towards an operational multisensor registration algorithm is presented. The performance requirements of the algorithm are first formulated given the spatially, temporally, and spectrally varying factors that influence the image characteristics and the science requirements of various applications. Several registration techniques that fit within the structure of this algorithm are also presented. Their performance was evaluated using a multisensor test data set assembled from LANDSAT TM, SEASAT, SIR-B, Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), and SPOT sensors.

  7. Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma of the Petrous Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joy C.; Thorell, William E.; Treves, John S.; Fidler, Mary E.; Moore, Gary F.; Leibrock, Lyal G.

    2000-01-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is an unusual, benign bone lesion that most commonly affects the maxilla and mandible; skull involvement is rare. The etiology is uncertain but may be related to trauma. GCRG is difficult to distinguish from giant cell tumor of the bone and has a lower recurrence rate. Thirteen reports of temporal bone GCRG in 11 patients have been reported. One report of a petrous GCRG in a 3-year-old girl has been identified. A 38-year-old male presented with a 2-year history of fullness in his left ear, ipsilateral hearing loss, and intermittent cacosmia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large left-sided anterior temporal extradural mass. The patient underwent a left frontotemporal craniotomy and resection of a left temporal fossa tumor that involved the petrous and squamous parts of the temporal bone. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful, except for increased hearing loss secondary to opening of the epitympanum. Follow-up at one month revealed no other problems. Histopathology of the specimen was consistent with a giant cell reparative granuloma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2p91-aFigure 3 PMID:17171108

  8. Spatio-temporal credit assignment in neuronal population learning.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Johannes; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2011-06-01

    In learning from trial and error, animals need to relate behavioral decisions to environmental reinforcement even though it may be difficult to assign credit to a particular decision when outcomes are uncertain or subject to delays. When considering the biophysical basis of learning, the credit-assignment problem is compounded because the behavioral decisions themselves result from the spatio-temporal aggregation of many synaptic releases. We present a model of plasticity induction for reinforcement learning in a population of leaky integrate and fire neurons which is based on a cascade of synaptic memory traces. Each synaptic cascade correlates presynaptic input first with postsynaptic events, next with the behavioral decisions and finally with external reinforcement. For operant conditioning, learning succeeds even when reinforcement is delivered with a delay so large that temporal contiguity between decision and pertinent reward is lost due to intervening decisions which are themselves subject to delayed reinforcement. This shows that the model provides a viable mechanism for temporal credit assignment. Further, learning speeds up with increasing population size, so the plasticity cascade simultaneously addresses the spatial problem of assigning credit to synapses in different population neurons. Simulations on other tasks, such as sequential decision making, serve to contrast the performance of the proposed scheme to that of temporal difference-based learning. We argue that, due to their comparative robustness, synaptic plasticity cascades are attractive basic models of reinforcement learning in the brain.

  9. From EGEE Operations Portal towards EGI Operations Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Hélène; L'Orphelin, Cyril; Reynaud, Sylvain; Lequeux, Olivier; Loikkanen, Sinikka; Veyre, Pierre

    Grid operators in EGEE have been using a dedicated dashboard as their central operational tool, stable and scalable for the last 5 years despite continuous upgrade from specifications by users, monitoring tools or data providers. In EGEE-III, recent regionalisation of operations led the Operations Portal developers to conceive a standalone instance of this tool. We will see how the dashboard reorganization paved the way for the re-engineering of the portal itself. The outcome is an easily deployable package customized with relevant information sources and specific decentralized operational requirements. This package is composed of a generic and scalable data access mechanism, Lavoisier; a renowned php framework for configuration flexibility, Symfony and a MySQL database. VO life cycle and operational information, EGEE broadcast and Downtime notifications are next for the major reorganization until all other key features of the Operations Portal are migrated to the framework. Features specifications will be sketched at the same time to adapt to EGI requirements and to upgrade. Future work on feature regionalisation, on new advanced features or strategy planning will be tracked in EGI- Inspire through the Operations Tools Advisory Group, OTAG, where all users, customers and third parties of the Operations Portal are represented from January 2010.

  10. An atypical case of lacrimal sac fistula located on the temporal side of the lateral canthus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyu-Nam; Huh, Hyun-Do; Park, Jong-Moon; Seo, Seong-Wook

    2012-12-01

    We report a case of congenital lacrimal sac fistula located on the temporal side of the lateral canthus. A systemically healthy 1-year-old girl came to the outpatient clinic with a complaint of tearing on the temporal side of the right lateral canthus since birth. On examination, a small orifice was found in the skin on the temporal side of the lateral canthus. There was no evidence of inflammation or swelling within the opening. Surgeons carried out an operation under general anesthesia. They passed a probe through the lacrimal orifice and advanced it toward the lacrimal sac. Next, they introduced saline to the inferior punctum and found that it drained to the lateral fistula. The lower lid stretched as the dissected fistula was pulled. After the operation, the patient was free of the symptom. This paper is to report a case of congenital lacrimal sac fistula located on the temporal side of the lateral canthus.

  11. Applied Operations Research: Operator's Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    NASA operates high value critical equipment (HVCE) that requires trouble shooting, periodic maintenance and continued monitoring by Operations staff. The complexity HVCE and information required to maintain and trouble shoot HVCE to assure continued mission success as paper is voluminous. Training on new HVCE is commensurate with the need for equipment maintenance. LaRC Research Directorate has undertaken a proactive research to support Operations staff by initiation of the development and prototyping an electronic computer based portable maintenance aid (Operator's Assistant). This research established a goal with multiple objectives and a working prototype was developed. The research identified affordable solutions; constraints; demonstrated use of commercial off the shelf software; use of the US Coast Guard maintenance solution; NASA Procedure Representation Language; and the identification of computer system strategies; where these demonstrations and capabilities support the Operator, and maintenance. The results revealed validation against measures of effectiveness and overall proved a substantial training and capability sustainment tool. The research indicated that the OA could be deployed operationally at the LaRC Compressor Station with an expectation of satisfactorily results and to obtain additional lessons learned prior to deployment at other LaRC Research Directorate Facilities. The research revealed projected cost and time savings.

  12. Stable Fly Project in Campo Grande, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Andrew Li, Jerry Hogsette, and Adalberto Pérez de León, all USDA-ARS, and Lane Foil, LSU, are collaborating as consultants on an Embrapa-funded research project for the control of large stable fly populations associated with sugar cane production in Brazil. Our Brazilian counterpart, Dr. Paulo Cança...

  13. Stable Fly Project in Campo Grande, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Andrew Li, Jerry Hogsette, and Beto Perez de Leon, all USDA, and Lane Foil, LSU, are collaborating as consultants on an Embrapa-funded research project for the control of large stable fly populations associated with sugar cane production in Brazil. Our Brazilian counterpart, Dr. Paulo Cançado, is t...

  14. Stable dissipative solitons in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Ultanir, Erdem A; Stegeman, George I; Michaelis, Dirk; Lange, Christoph H; Lederer, Falk

    2003-06-27

    We have observed for the first time stable spatial solitons in semiconductor optical amplifiers. Soliton destabilization due to the growth of background noise was suppressed by using patterned electrodes on the device. Numerical simulations fit very well with the experiment results. We show that it is possible to excite these solitons with about 60 mW input power.

  15. Substitution of stable isotopes in Chlorella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.; Uphaus, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Replacement of biologically important isotopes in the alga Chlorella by corresponding heavier stable isotopes produces increasingly greater deviations from the normal cell size and changes the quality and distribution of certain cellular components. The usefulness of isotopically altered organisms increases interest in the study of such permuted organisms.

  16. Exact simulation of max-stable processes.

    PubMed

    Dombry, Clément; Engelke, Sebastian; Oesting, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Max-stable processes play an important role as models for spatial extreme events. Their complex structure as the pointwise maximum over an infinite number of random functions makes their simulation difficult. Algorithms based on finite approximations are often inexact and computationally inefficient. We present a new algorithm for exact simulation of a max-stable process at a finite number of locations. It relies on the idea of simulating only the extremal functions, that is, those functions in the construction of a max-stable process that effectively contribute to the pointwise maximum. We further generalize the algorithm by Dieker & Mikosch (2015) for Brown-Resnick processes and use it for exact simulation via the spectral measure. We study the complexity of both algorithms, prove that our new approach via extremal functions is always more efficient, and provide closed-form expressions for their implementation that cover most popular models for max-stable processes and multivariate extreme value distributions. For simulation on dense grids, an adaptive design of the extremal function algorithm is proposed.

  17. Thermodynamically Stable Vortex States in Superconducting Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. M.; Sobnack, M. B.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    We develop a new condensed matter theory of the formation of thermodynamically stable vortex structures in quantum nanowires. We write down the Gibbs free energy functional for the systems and we minimise the free energy to obtain the optimal position of vortices for different applied fields and temperatures. We also study the nucleation of vortices in, and their escape from, the nanostructural superconductors.

  18. Thermodynamically Stable Vortex States in Superconducting Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. M.; Sobnack, M. B.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2011-03-01

    We develop a new condensed matter theory of the formation of thermodynamically stable vortex structures in quantum nanowires. We write down the Gibbs free energy functional for the systems and we minimise the free energy to obtain the optimal position of vortices for different applied fields and temperatures. We also study the nucleation of vortices in, and their escape from, the nanostructural superconductors.

  19. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of obtaining stable carbon isotope analyses of coprocessing products is to determine the amount of coal (or petroleum) carbon that is present in any reaction product. This carbon-sourcing of distillate fractions, soluble resid, and insoluble organic matter, etc. is useful in modeling reactions, and evaluating synergistic effects if they exist.

  20. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-12-31

    The purpose of obtaining stable carbon isotope analyses of coprocessing products is to determine the amount of coal (or petroleum) carbon that is present in any reaction product. This carbon-sourcing of distillate fractions, soluble resid, and insoluble organic matter, etc. is useful in modeling reactions, and evaluating synergistic effects if they exist.

  1. CTOD for slow stable crack growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Ipina, J. E.

    1992-11-01

    An incremental method is developed for calculating values of CTOD under slow stable crack growth conditions. The method, which only needs the data required for an R-curve test, gives more accurate CTOD values than those obtained using existing standards.

  2. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1996-02-27

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw`s Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements. 32 figs.

  3. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1996-01-01

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw's Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements.

  4. Spatio-temporal variation in European starling reproductive success at multiple small spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Brickhill, Daisy; Evans, Peter Gh; Reid, Jane M

    2015-08-01

    Understanding population dynamics requires spatio-temporal variation in demography to be measured across appropriate spatial and temporal scales. However, the most appropriate spatial scale(s) may not be obvious, few datasets cover sufficient time periods, and key demographic rates are often incompletely measured. Consequently, it is often assumed that demography will be spatially homogeneous within populations that lack obvious subdivision. Here, we quantify small-scale spatial and temporal variation in a key demographic rate, reproductive success (RS), within an apparently contiguous population of European starlings. We used hierarchical cluster analysis to define spatial clusters of nest sites at multiple small spatial scales and long-term data to test the hypothesis that small-scale spatio-temporal variation in RS occurred. RS was measured as the number of chicks alive ca. 12 days posthatch either per first brood or per nest site per breeding season (thereby incorporating multiple breeding attempts). First brood RS varied substantially among spatial clusters and years. Furthermore, the pattern of spatial variation was stable across years; some nest clusters consistently produced more chicks than others. Total seasonal RS also varied substantially among spatial clusters and years. However, the magnitude of variation was much larger and the pattern of spatial variation was no longer temporally consistent. Furthermore, the estimated magnitude of spatial variation in RS was greater at smaller spatial scales. We thereby demonstrate substantial spatial, temporal, and spatio-temporal variation in RS occurring at very small spatial scales. We show that the estimated magnitude of this variation depended on spatial scale and that spatio-temporal variation would not have been detected if season-long RS had not been measured. Such small-scale spatio-temporal variation should be incorporated into empirical and theoretical treatments of population dynamics.

  5. Spatio-temporal variation in European starling reproductive success at multiple small spatial scales

    PubMed Central

    Brickhill, Daisy; Evans, Peter GH; Reid, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding population dynamics requires spatio-temporal variation in demography to be measured across appropriate spatial and temporal scales. However, the most appropriate spatial scale(s) may not be obvious, few datasets cover sufficient time periods, and key demographic rates are often incompletely measured. Consequently, it is often assumed that demography will be spatially homogeneous within populations that lack obvious subdivision. Here, we quantify small-scale spatial and temporal variation in a key demographic rate, reproductive success (RS), within an apparently contiguous population of European starlings. We used hierarchical cluster analysis to define spatial clusters of nest sites at multiple small spatial scales and long-term data to test the hypothesis that small-scale spatio-temporal variation in RS occurred. RS was measured as the number of chicks alive ca. 12 days posthatch either per first brood or per nest site per breeding season (thereby incorporating multiple breeding attempts). First brood RS varied substantially among spatial clusters and years. Furthermore, the pattern of spatial variation was stable across years; some nest clusters consistently produced more chicks than others. Total seasonal RS also varied substantially among spatial clusters and years. However, the magnitude of variation was much larger and the pattern of spatial variation was no longer temporally consistent. Furthermore, the estimated magnitude of spatial variation in RS was greater at smaller spatial scales. We thereby demonstrate substantial spatial, temporal, and spatio-temporal variation in RS occurring at very small spatial scales. We show that the estimated magnitude of this variation depended on spatial scale and that spatio-temporal variation would not have been detected if season-long RS had not been measured. Such small-scale spatio-temporal variation should be incorporated into empirical and theoretical treatments of population dynamics. PMID:26380670

  6. HUNT STABLE COMPLEX LOOKING SOUTHWEST THROUGH EASTERNMOST SET OF PIERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HUNT STABLE COMPLEX LOOKING SOUTHWEST THROUGH EASTERNMOST SET OF PIERS TOWARD STABLE - Overhills, Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Approximately 15 miles NW of Fayetteville, Overhills, Harnett County, NC

  7. Concurrent design of a morphing aerofoil with variable stiffness bi-stable laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuder, I. K.; Fasel, U.; Ermanni, P.; Arrieta, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    Morphing systems able to efficiently adjust their characteristics to resolve the conflicting demands of changing operating conditions offer great potential for enhanced performance and functionality. The main practical challenge, however, consists in combining the desired compliance to accomplish radical reversible geometry modifications at reduced actuation effort with the requirement of high stiffness imposed by operational functions. A potential decoupling strategy entails combining the conformal shape adaptation benefits of distributed compliance with purely elastic stiffness variability provided by embedded bi-stable laminates. This selective compliance can allow for on-demand stiffness adaptation by switching between the stable states of the internal elements. The current paper considers the optimal positioning of the bi-stable components within the structure while assessing the energy required for morphing under aerodynamic loading. Compared to a time-invariant system, activating specific deformation modes permits decreasing the amount of actuation energy, and hence the amount of actuation material to be carried. A concurrent design and optimisation framework is implemented to develop selective configurations targeting different flight conditions. First, an aerodynamically favourable high-lift mode achieves large geometric changes due to reduced actuation demands. This is only possible by virtue of the internally tailored compliance, arising from the stable state switch of the embedded bi-stable components. A second, stiff configuration, targets operation under increased aerodynamic loading. The dynamic adequacy of the design is proved via high fidelity fluid-structure interaction simulations.

  8. Large-eddy Simulation of the Nighttime Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bowen

    and reconstruction LES framework. The DRM is a mixed model that consists of subgrid scale (SGS) and resolved subfilter scale (RSFS) components. The RSFS portion is represented by a scale-similarity model that allows for backscatter of energy from the SFS to the mean flow. Compared to conventional closures, the DRM is able to sustain resolved turbulence under moderate stability at coarser resolution (thus saving computational resources). The DRM performs equally well at fine resolution. Under strong stability, the DRM simulates an intermittently turbulent SBL, whereas conventional closures predict false laminar flows. The improved simulation methodology of the SBL has many potential applications in the area of wind energy, numerical weather prediction, pollution modeling and so on. The SBL is first simulated over idealized flat terrain with prescribed forcings and periodic lateral boundaries. A wide range of stability regimes, from weakly to strongly stable conditions, is tested to evaluate model performance. Under strongly stable conditions, intermittency due to mean shear and turbulence interactions is simulated and analyzed. Furthermore, results of the strongly stable SBL are used to improve wind farm siting and nighttime operations. Moving away from the idealized setting, the SBL is simulated over relatively flat terrain at a Kansas site over the Great Plains, where the Cooperative Atmospheric-Surface Exchange Study -- 1999 (CASES-99) took place. The LES obtains realistic initial and lateral boundary conditions from a meso-scale model reanalysis through a grid nesting procedure. Shear-instability induced intermittency observed on the night of Oct 5th during CASES-99 is reproduced to good temporal and magnitude agreement. The LES locates the origin of the shear-instability waves in a shallow upwind valley, and uncovers the intermittency mechanism to be wave breaking over a standing wave (formed over a stagnant cold-air bubble) across the valley. Finally, flow over

  9. A temporal bottleneck in the language comprehension network.

    PubMed

    Vagharchakian, Laurianne; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine; Pallier, Christophe; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2012-06-27

    Humans can understand spoken or written sentences presented at extremely fast rates of ∼400 wpm, far exceeding the normal speech rate (∼150 wpm). How does the brain cope with speeded language? And what processing bottlenecks eventually make language incomprehensible above a certain presentation rate? We used time-resolved fMRI to probe the brain responses to spoken and written sentences presented at five compression rates, ranging from intelligible (60-100% of the natural duration) to challenging (40%) and unintelligible (20%). The results show that cortical areas differ sharply in their activation speed and amplitude. In modality-specific sensory areas, activation varies linearly with stimulus duration. However, a large modality-independent left-hemispheric language network, including the inferior frontal gyrus (pars orbitalis and triangularis) and the superior temporal sulcus, shows a remarkably time-invariant response, followed by a sudden collapse for unintelligible stimuli. Finally, linear and nonlinear responses, reflecting a greater effort as compression increases, are seen at various prefrontal and parietal sites. We show that these profiles fit with a simple model according to which the higher stages of language processing operate at a fixed speed and thus impose a temporal bottleneck on sentence comprehension. At presentation rates faster than this internal processing speed, incoming words must be buffered, and intelligibility vanishes when buffer storage and retrieval operations are saturated. Based on their temporal and amplitude profiles, buffer regions can be identified with the left inferior frontal/anterior insula, precentral cortex, and mesial frontal cortex.

  10. Reclaimed mineland curve number response to temporal distribution of rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, R.C.; Agouridis, C.T.; Vingralek, P.T.; Fogle, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    The curve number (CN) method is a common technique to estimate runoff volume, and it is widely used in coal mining operations such as those in the Appalachian region of Kentucky. However, very little CN data are available for watersheds disturbed by surface mining and then reclaimed using traditional techniques. Furthermore, as the CN method does not readily account for variations in infiltration rates due to varying rainfall distributions, the selection of a single CN value to encompass all temporal rainfall distributions could lead engineers to substantially under- or over-size water detention structures used in mining operations or other land uses such as development. Using rainfall and runoff data from a surface coal mine located in the Cumberland Plateau of eastern Kentucky, CNs were computed for conventionally reclaimed lands. The effects of temporal rainfall distributions on CNs was also examined by classifying storms as intense, steady, multi-interval intense, or multi-interval steady. Results indicate that CNs for such reclaimed lands ranged from 62 to 94 with a mean value of 85. Temporal rainfall distributions were also shown to significantly affect CN values with intense storms having significantly higher CNs than multi-interval storms. These results indicate that a period of recovery is present between rainfall bursts of a multi-interval storm that allows depressional storage and infiltration rates to rebound. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association.

  11. Selective sensitivity of schedule-induced activity to an operant suppression contingency.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, R W; Matthews, T J

    1992-01-01

    The sensitivity of pigeons' schedule-induced activity to operant consequences was studied in two experiments. During a 30-s interval between food presentations, a keylight stimulus brightened incrementally. Stable terminal key pecking and interim locomotor activity developed. An operant "setback" contingency was applied to activity. The contingency arranged for locomotor movements (detected by a nine-panel floorboard) to be followed by a resetting of the keylight brightness to a dimmer value and a 1-s delay of reinforcement (for individual responses). Experiment 1 showed that activity patterns were highly sensitive to their operant consequences. Accompanying key-peck rates were only transiently affected. In Experiment 2, the setback contingency was imposed during restricted portions of the trial, and differential operant control of activity was demonstrated. However, birds in this study produced higher rates of key pecking as activity rates were reduced. These results suggest that although schedule-induced activity arises in response to the temporal arrangement of stimulus events, this behavior may retain considerable sensitivity to response-consequence relations. PMID:1447542

  12. Utilizing AI in Temporal, Spatial, and Resource Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stottler, Richard; Kalton, Annaka; Bell, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Aurora is a software system enabling the rapid, easy solution of complex scheduling problems involving spatial and temporal constraints among operations and scarce resources (such as equipment, workspace, and human experts). Although developed for use in the International Space Station Processing Facility, Aurora is flexible enough that it can be easily customized for application to other scheduling domains and adapted as the requirements change or become more precisely known over time. Aurora s scheduling module utilizes artificial-intelligence (AI) techniques to make scheduling decisions on the basis of domain knowledge, including knowledge of constraints and their relative importance, interdependencies among operations, and possibly frequent changes in governing schedule requirements. Unlike many other scheduling software systems, Aurora focuses on resource requirements and temporal scheduling in combination. For example, Aurora can accommodate a domain requirement to schedule two subsequent operations to locations adjacent to a shared resource. The graphical interface allows the user to quickly visualize the schedule and perform changes reflecting additional knowledge or alterations in the situation. For example, the user might drag the activity corresponding to the start of operations to reflect a late delivery.

  13. Temporal logic and semidirect products: An effective characterization of the until hierarchy

    SciTech Connect

    Therien, D.; Wilke, T.

    1996-12-31

    We reveal an intimate connection between semidirect products of finite semigroups and substitution of formulas in linear temporal logic. We use this connection to obtain an algebraic characterization of the {open_quote}until{close_quote} hierarchy of linear temporal logic; the k-th level of that hierarchy is comprised of all temporal properties that are expressible by a formula of nesting depth at most k in the {open_quote}until{close_quote} operator Applying deep results firm finite semigroup theory we are able to prove that each level of the until hierarchy is decidable.

  14. Tunable temporal gap based on simultaneous fast and slow light in electro-optic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangzhen; Chen, Yuping; Jiang, Haowei; Liu, Yi'an; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrated a tunable temporal gap based on simultaneous fast and slow light in electro-optic photonic crystals. The light experiences an anomalous dispersion near the transmission center and a normal dispersion away from the center, where it can be accelerated and slowed down, respectively. We also obtained the switch between fast and slow light by adjusting the external electric filed. The observed largest temporal gap is 541 ps, which is crucial in practical event operation inside the gap. The results offer a new solution for temporal cloak.

  15. Auditory Evoked Fields Elicited by Spectral, Temporal, and Spectral–Temporal Changes in Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Teismann, Henning; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo

    2012-01-01

    Natural sounds contain complex spectral components, which are temporally modulated as time-varying signals. Recent studies have suggested that the auditory system encodes spectral and temporal sound information differently. However, it remains unresolved how the human brain processes sounds containing both spectral and temporal changes. In the present study, we investigated human auditory evoked responses elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral–temporal sound changes by means of magnetoencephalography. The auditory evoked responses elicited by the spectral–temporal change were very similar to those elicited by the spectral change, but those elicited by the temporal change were delayed by 30–50 ms and differed from the others in morphology. The results suggest that human brain responses corresponding to spectral sound changes precede those corresponding to temporal sound changes, even when the spectral and temporal changes occur simultaneously. PMID:22593751

  16. Spatial attention alleviates temporal crowding, but neither temporal nor spatial uncertainty are necessary for the emergence of temporal crowding.

    PubMed

    Tkacz-Domb, Shira; Yeshurun, Yaffa

    2017-03-01

    Recently, we demonstrated temporal crowding with normal observers: Target identification was impaired when it was surrounded by other stimuli in time, even when the interstimuli intervals (ISIs) were relatively long. Here, we examined whether temporal and spatial uncertainties play a critical role in the emergence of temporal crowding. We presented a sequence of three letters to the same peripheral location, right or left of fixation, separated by varying ISI (106-459 ms). One of these letters was the target, and the observers indicated its orientation. To eliminate temporal uncertainty, the position of the target within the sequence was fixed for an entire block (Experiment 1). To eliminate spatial uncertainty, we employed spatial attentional precues that indicated the letters' location. The precue was either auditory (Experiment 2) or visual (Experiment 3). We found temporal crowding to result in worse performance with shorter ISIs, even when there was no temporal or spatial uncertainty. Unlike the auditory cue, the visual cue affected performance. Specifically, when there was uncertainty regarding the target location (i.e., when the target appeared in the first display), precueing the target location improved overall performance and reduced the ISI effect, although it was not completely eliminated. These results suggest that temporal and spatial uncertainties are not necessary for the emergence of temporal crowding and that spatial attention can reduce temporal crowding.

  17. Stable Isotopes in Ice: Tracers of the Global Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuffey, K. M.

    2003-12-01

    Significant advances in geophysical sciences most often follow from development of new abilities to measure Earth's properties. One major development of the past half century has been the measurement of stable isotopic composition of precipitation and its variations on vast spatial and temporal scales, the latter especially in Arctic and Antarctic glacial ice. The venerable tradition of research in this subject emanates directly from work of Dansgaard, Craig, and Epstein. Here I discuss how isotopic variations induced by atmospheric distillation offer a compelling example of a geophysical phenomenon arising from microphysical properties, but one that is dependent on the global-scale environment. I discuss how the geography of precipitation isotopes is explicable by treating the problem as an advective diffusive reaction system. Three of the most important results of environmental geophysics have emerged from analyses exploiting (in part) the record of this system in polar ice: the strong but quixotic coupling of climate and biogeochemistry on multi-millennial time scales; the high but plausible (and contentious) values for global climate sensitivity to radiative forcings; and the documentation of past very rapid climate changes. Looking forward, I also discuss the major unresolved issues lurking behind this facade of success, including poor understanding of the controls on deuterium excess at low temperatures, and inability to quantify many non-temperature effects on isotope time series (many of which were clearly discussed by Dansgaard nearly forty years ago).

  18. Stalagmite stable isotope record of recent tropical cyclone events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit Frappier, Amy; Sahagian, Dork; Carpenter, Scott J.; González, Luis A.; Frappier, Brian R.

    2007-02-01

    We present a 23 yr stalagmite record (1977 2000) of oxygen isotope variation, associated with 11 tropical cyclones (TCs), from Actun Tunichil Muknal cave in central Belize. High-resolution microsampling yielded a record of monthly to weekly temporal resolution that contains abrupt decreases (negative excursions) in calcite δ18O values that correspond with recent TC rain events nearby. A logistic discriminant model reliably identified TC proxy signals using the measurable parameters δ18O and δ13C values, and single point changes in δ18O value. The logistic model correctly identified 80% of excursions as TC events and incorrectly classified only 1 of nearly 1200 nonstorm sampling points. In addition to enabling high-resolution TC frequency reconstruction, this geologic proxy also provides information about the intensity of individual TCs. A multiple regression predicted TC intensity (R2 = 0.465, p = 0.034) using sampling frequency and excursion amplitude. Consistent with previous low-resolution studies, we found that the decadal average δ18O value was lower during the 1990s when several TCs produced rainfall in the area, but higher during the 1980s when only one TC struck. Longer, accurately dated, high-resolution speleothem stable isotope records may be a useful new tool for paleotempestology, to clarify associations between highly variable TC activity and the dynamic range of Quaternary climate.

  19. Hourly temporal distribution of wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligiannis, Ilias; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2016-04-01

    The wind process is essential for hydrometeorology and additionally, is one of the basic renewable energy resources. Most stochastic forecast models are limited up to daily scales disregarding the hourly scale which is significant for renewable energy management. Here, we analyze hourly wind timeseries giving emphasis on the temporal distribution of wind within the day. We finally present a periodic model based on statistical as well as hydrometeorological reasoning that shows good agreement with data. Acknowledgement: This research is conducted within the frame of the undergraduate course "Stochastic Methods in Water Resources" of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The School of Civil Engineering of NTUA provided moral support for the participation of the students in the Assembly.

  20. [Temporal dimensions of suicide: hypothesis].

    PubMed

    Carbonell-Camós, Eliseu

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the temporal dimensions of suicide by taking into account the multiple existing approaches-circadian physiology, psychiatric or sociological epidemiology of suicide-however promoting a socio-anthropological perspective. From this perspective, suicide is examined as a social phenomenon inscribed in time. By beginning with a concern that is characteristic of anthropology of time, knowingly the relation between time of nature and time of society, the author addresses a key issue of the study of suicide already elaborated by Durkheim, in the relation between change that is a basic expression of the passage of time and suicide. After presenting different scientific contributions on the subject, the author proposes an hypothesis allowing integration of the influence of time related to natural phenomenon (cosmobiological rhythms) and the relation of time to social phenomenon (politico-economic rhythms) in relation with suicide and this, according to Gabennesch's theory of "failed promises."

  1. Stable isotope paleoaltimetry and the evolution of landscapes and life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    circulation and associated teleconnections in the global climate system that affect δ18O or δD of precipitation; (2) Evaluating on a case-by-case basis if temporal and spatial changes in isotope lapse rates influence interpretations of paleoelevation; (3) Interfacing with phylogenetic techniques to evaluate competing hypotheses with respect to the timing of surface uplift and the diversification of lineages; (4) Characterizing feedbacks between changes in surface elevation and atmospheric circulation as these are likely to be equally important to the diversification of lineages than changes in surface elevation alone. Tackling these challenges will benefit from the accelerating pace of improved data-model comparisons and rapidly evolving geochemical techniques for reconstructing precipitation patterns. Most importantly, stable isotope paleoaltimetry has the potential to develop into a truly interdisciplinary field if innovative tectonic/paleoclimatic and evolutionary biology/phylogenetic approaches are integrated into a common research framework. It therefore, opens new avenues to study the long-term evolution of landscapes and life.

  2. Operating Efficiently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The ailing economy has spared few schools and universities. Faced with funding cutbacks, most education administrators have had to make difficult choices about where to allocate dwindling resources. Even in the best of financial times, educating students is the first priority. When money is tight, school maintenance and operations (M&O)…

  3. Operation Shadow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Marilyn Parrish

    Operation Shadow provides materials for a career education program which gives students ages 11-13 an opportunity to relate school subjects to the world of work. Students spend one month in classroom activities, including study of characteristics of self and others and how these characteristics and interests affect one's choice of a life career.…

  4. Motor Activity Improves Temporal Expectancy

    PubMed Central

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  5. Synaptic encoding of temporal contiguity

    PubMed Central

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Fusi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Often we need to perform tasks in an environment that changes stochastically. In these situations it is important to learn the statistics of sequences of events in order to predict the future and the outcome of our actions. The statistical description of many of these sequences can be reduced to the set of probabilities that a particular event follows another event (temporal contiguity). Under these conditions, it is important to encode and store in our memory these transition probabilities. Here we show that for a large class of synaptic plasticity models, the distribution of synaptic strengths encodes transitions probabilities. Specifically, when the synaptic dynamics depend on pairs of contiguous events and the synapses can remember multiple instances of the transitions, then the average synaptic weights are a monotonic function of the transition probabilities. The synaptic weights converge to the distribution encoding the probabilities also when the correlations between consecutive synaptic modifications are considered. We studied how this distribution depends on the number of synaptic states for a specific model of a multi-state synapse with hard bounds. In the case of bistable synapses, the average synaptic weights are a smooth function of the transition probabilities and the accuracy of the encoding depends on the learning rate. As the number of synaptic states increases, the average synaptic weights become a step function of the transition probabilities. We finally show that the information stored in the synaptic weights can be read out by a simple rate-based neural network. Our study shows that synapses encode transition probabilities under general assumptions and this indicates that temporal contiguity is likely to be encoded and harnessed in almost every neural circuit in the brain. PMID:23641210

  6. Development of a Safety Management Web Tool for Horse Stables.

    PubMed

    Leppälä, Jarkko; Kolstrup, Christina Lunner; Pinzke, Stefan; Rautiainen, Risto; Saastamoinen, Markku; Särkijärvi, Susanna

    2015-11-12

    Managing a horse stable involves risks, which can have serious consequences for the stable, employees, clients, visitors and horses. Existing industrial or farm production risk management tools are not directly applicable to horse stables and they need to be adapted for use by managers of different types of stables. As a part of the InnoEquine project, an innovative web tool, InnoHorse, was developed to support horse stable managers in business, safety, pasture and manure management. A literature review, empirical horse stable case studies, expert panel workshops and stakeholder interviews were carried out to support the design. The InnoHorse web tool includes a safety section containing a horse stable safety map, stable safety checklists, and examples of good practices in stable safety, horse handling and rescue planning. This new horse stable safety management tool can also help in organizing work processes in horse stables in general.

  7. Temporal variability of particulate organic carbon in the lower Changjiang (Yangtze River) in the post-Three Gorges Dam period: Links to anthropogenic and climate impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Bao, Hongyan; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Jing; Kattner, Gerhard

    2015-11-01

    Suspended particles from the lower Changjiang were collected monthly from 2003 to 2011, which corresponds to the three construction periods of the Three Gorges Dam. Organic carbon (%OC), organic carbon to total nitrogen molar ratio, stable carbon isotope, and terrestrial biomarkers were examined. Rating curve studies were applied for the temporal trend analysis. The composition of particulate lignin phenols exhibited clear annual and periodic variations but only minor seasonal changes. Lignin phenol ratios (vanillyl/syringyl and cinnamyl/vanillyl) indicated that the terrigenous organic matter (OM) was primarily composed of woody and nonwoody tissue derived from angiosperm plants. The low-lignin phenol yields (Λ8) in combination with higher acid to aldehyde ratios reflected a substantial contribution from soil OM to the particle samples or modifications during river transport. The temporal shift of the lignin phenol vegetation index with the sediment load during the flood seasons revealed particulate organic matter (POM) erosion from soils and the impact of hydrodynamic processes. The dam operations affected the seasonal variability of terrigenous OM fluxes, although the covariation of lignin and sediment loads with discharged water implies that unseasonal extreme conditions and climate change most likely had larger influences, because decreases in the sediment load and lignin flux alter the structure and composition of particulate OM (POM) on interannual time scales, indicating that they may be driven by climate variability. The modification of the composition and structure of POM will have significant impacts on regional carbon cycles and marine ecosystems.

  8. The Temporal Configuration of Airline Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burghouwt, Guillaume; deWit, Jaap

    2003-01-01

    The deregulation of US aviation in 1978 resulted in the reconfiguration of airline networks into hub-and-spoke systems, spatially concentrated around a small number of central airports or 'hubs' through which an airline operates a number of daily waves of flights. A hub-and-spoke network requires a concentration of traffic in both space and time. In contrast to the U.S. airlines, European airlines had entered the phase of spatial network concentration long before deregulation. Bilateral negotiation of traffic fights between governments forced European airlines to focus their networks spatially on small number of 'national' airports. In general, these star-shaped networks were not coordinated in time. Transfer opportunities at central airports were mostly created 'by accident'. With the deregulation of the EU air transport market from 1988 on, a second phase of airline network concentration started. European airlines concentrated their networks in time by adopting or intensifying wave-system structures in their flight schedules. Temporal concentration may increase the competitive position of the network in a deregulated market because of certain cost and demand advantages.

  9. Determining Spatio-Temporal Cadastral Data Requirement for Infrastructure of Ladm for Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, M.; Polat, Z. A.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, the nature of land title and cadastral (LTC) data in the Turkey is dynamic from a temporal perspective which depends on the LTC operations. Functional requirements with respect to the characteristics are investigated based upon interviews of professionals in public and private sectors. These are; Legal authorities, Land Registry and Cadastre offices, Highway departments, Foundations, Ministries of Budget, Transportation, Justice, Public Works and Settlement, Environment and Forestry, Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Culture and Internal Affairs, State Institute of Statistics (SIS), execution offices, tax offices, real estate offices, private sector, local governments and banks. On the other hand, spatio-temporal LTC data very important component for creating infrastructure of Land Administration Model (LADM). For this reason, spatio-temporal LTC data needs for LADM not only updated but also temporal. The investigations ended up with determine temporal analyses of LTC data, traditional LTC system and tracing temporal analyses in traditional LTC system. In the traditional system, the temporal analyses needed by all these users could not be performed in a rapid and reliable way. The reason for this is that the traditional LTC system is a manual archiving system. The aims and general contents of this paper: (1) define traditional LTC system of Turkey; (2) determining the need for spatio-temporal LTC data and analyses for core domain model for LADM. As a results of temporal and spatio-temporal analysis LTC data needs, new system design is important for the Turkish LADM model. Designing and realizing an efficient and functional Temporal Geographic Information Systems (TGIS) is inevitable for the Turkish LADM core infrastructure. Finally this paper outcome is creating infrastructure for design and develop LADM for Turkey.

  10. Highly stable, extremely high-temperature, nonvolatile memory based on resistance switching in polycrystalline Pt nanogaps

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroya; Shinomura, Yuma; Kashiwabara, Shota; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Naitoh, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Highly stable, nonvolatile, high-temperature memory based on resistance switching was realized using a polycrystalline platinum (Pt) nanogap. The operating temperature of the memory can be drastically increased by the presence of a sharp-edged Pt crystal facet in the nanogap. A short distance between the facet edges maintains the nanogap shape at high temperature, and the sharp shape of the nanogap densifies the electric field to maintain a stable current flow due to field migration. Even at 873 K, which is a significantly higher temperature than feasible for conventional semiconductor memory, the nonvolatility of the proposed memory allows stable ON and OFF currents, with fluctuations of less than or equal to 10%, to be maintained for longer than eight hours. An advantage of this nanogap scheme for high-temperature memory is its secure operation achieved through the assembly and disassembly of a Pt needle in a high electric field. PMID:27725705

  11. Highly stable, extremely high-temperature, nonvolatile memory based on resistance switching in polycrystalline Pt nanogaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroya; Shinomura, Yuma; Kashiwabara, Shota; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Naitoh, Yasuhisa

    2016-10-01

    Highly stable, nonvolatile, high-temperature memory based on resistance switching was realized using a polycrystalline platinum (Pt) nanogap. The operating temperature of the memory can be drastically increased by the presence of a sharp-edged Pt crystal facet in the nanogap. A short distance between the facet edges maintains the nanogap shape at high temperature, and the sharp shape of the nanogap densifies the electric field to maintain a stable current flow due to field migration. Even at 873 K, which is a significantly higher temperature than feasible for conventional semiconductor memory, the nonvolatility of the proposed memory allows stable ON and OFF currents, with fluctuations of less than or equal to 10%, to be maintained for longer than eight hours. An advantage of this nanogap scheme for high-temperature memory is its secure operation achieved through the assembly and disassembly of a Pt needle in a high electric field.

  12. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Surface Soil Moisture in Evaluating Ground Truth Monitoring Sites for Remotely Sensed Observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil moisture is an intrinsic state variable that varies considerably in space and time. Although soil moisture is highly variable, repeated measurements of soil moisture at the field or small watershed scale can often reveal certain locations as being temporally stable and representative of the are...

  13. Temporal Characteristics of OCO-2 XCO2 and its Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, G. B.; Fisher, B.; O'Dell, C.; Mandrake, L.; Wunch, D.; Eldering, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) mission has been collecting data for more than one year. We provide a look at the XCO2 and associated diagnostics from the v7 data release. During normal operations, OCO-2 gathers 20-30 million soundings per month, of which approximately 10% are selected for XCO2 retrievals. Of those selected, approximately 85% result in a converged retrieval, yielding ~1.5-3 million XCO2 soundings which are passed to the post-processing screening and bias correction algorithms. We examine temporal dependence of XCO2, spatial coverage, data quantity, and quality statistics. We also examine the bias correction, warn levels, and aerosols to quantify their temporal behavior over the OCO-2 mission so far.

  14. Pseudoaneurysm of the superficial temporal artery.

    PubMed

    Nemade, S S; Eiman, M; Blondet, R; Beber, C; Nanes, M; Kirton, O C; Trainor, L D; Silverman, M A

    1996-08-01

    Ours is the first report of pseudoaneurysm of the superficial temporal in a 90-year-old woman. Although falls with associated head and scalp injuries in the geriatric population are common, pseudoaneurysm of the superficial temporal artery is rarely reported, probably due to the generally protected course of the superficial temporal artery across the skull. Clinicians' familiarity with this entity is important for early diagnosis and intervention.

  15. Shape recognition and inferior temporal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, E L; Desimone, R; Albright, T D; Gross, C G

    1983-01-01

    Inferior temporal cortex plays an important role in shape recognition. To study the shape selectivity of single inferior temporal neurons, we recorded their responses to a set of shapes systematically varying in boundary curvature. Many inferior temporal neurons were selective for stimuli of specific boundary curvature and maintained this selectivity over changes in stimulus size or position. The method of describing boundary curvature was that of Fourier descriptors. PMID:6577453

  16. Goldfish hippocampal pallium is essential to associate temporally discontiguous events.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Expósito, B; Gómez, A; Martín-Monzón, I; Reiriz, M; Rodríguez, F; Salas, C

    2017-03-01

    There is general agreement that the hippocampus of vertebrates, from fish to mammals, is involved in map-like spatial memory. However, in mammals the role of the hippocampus goes beyond the spatial domain as it is also involved in binding the temporally separate events that compose episodic memories. In this regard, the hippocampus of mammals is essential for trace classical conditioning, in which a stimulus-free time gap separates the conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US), but not for delay conditioning, in which both stimuli coincide in time. Although the involvement of the hippocampus in encoding relational memories based on a temporal frame-work has been extensively studied in mammals, there is scarce evidence about the possible contribution of the hippocampus of non-mammalian vertebrates to the temporal, non-spatial dimension of relational memories. The present work was aimed to determine if the ventral part of the lateral division of the area dorsalis telencephali (Dlv) of goldfish, proposed as homologous to the hippocampus of mammals, is also involved in trace classical conditioning. With this purpose, goldfish with lesions in Dlv, complete telencephalon ablation and sham operation, were trained in delay and trace heart rate classical conditioning. Dlv lesions severely impaired the acquisition of the conditioned response when a stimulus-free time gap was elapsed between the CS and the US (trace conditioning), but not when both stimuli overlapped in time (delay conditioning), revealing that this region, like the hippocampus of mammals, is essential to form the temporal associative memories required by trace conditioning. Present data suggest that the presence of a hippocampal pallium involved in relational, episodic-like memory that preserves both the spatial and the temporal dimensions of past events, could be a primitive feature of the vertebrate brain that has been conserved through evolution.

  17. Eccentric exercise in vivo: strain-induced muscle damage and adaptation in a stable system.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A

    2010-04-01

    The muscle tendon unit is a stable system, designed to operate eccentrically with efficiency and resiliency. Fiber strains, although minimized by tendon compliance during exercise, are essential components to decoding the mechanical and chemical signals during exercise. Subsequent cellular adaptations minimize the subsequent "dose" of stress and strain and serve to limit the exacerbation of damage into injury.

  18. Spatio-temporal coherence of free-electron laser radiation in the extreme ultraviolet determined by a Michelson interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, V.; Rödel, C.; Brenner, G.; Döppner, T.; Düsterer, S.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Fletcher, L.; Förster, E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Harmand, M.; Hartley, N. J.; Kazak, L.; Komar, D.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Przystawik, A.; Redlin, H.; Skruszewicz, S.; Sperling, P.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; Zastrau, U.

    2014-09-01

    A key feature of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from free-electron lasers (FELs) is its spatial and temporal coherence. We measured the spatio-temporal coherence properties of monochromatized FEL pulses at 13.5 nm using a Michelson interferometer. A temporal coherence time of (59±8) fs has been determined, which is in good agreement with the spectral bandwidth given by the monochromator. Moreover, the spatial coherence in vertical direction amounts to about 15% of the beam diameter and about 12% in horizontal direction. The feasibility of measuring spatio-temporal coherence properties of XUV FEL radiation using interferometric techniques advances machine operation and experimental studies significantly.

  19. Spatio-temporal coherence of free-electron laser radiation in the extreme ultraviolet determined by a Michelson interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hilbert, V.; Rödel, C.; Zastrau, U.; Brenner, G.; Düsterer, S.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Harmand, M.; Przystawik, A.; Redlin, H.; Toleikis, S.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Fletcher, L.; Förster, E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Lee, H. J.; Hartley, N. J.; Kazak, L.; Komar, D.; Skruszewicz, S.; and others

    2014-09-08

    A key feature of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from free-electron lasers (FELs) is its spatial and temporal coherence. We measured the spatio-temporal coherence properties of monochromatized FEL pulses at 13.5 nm using a Michelson interferometer. A temporal coherence time of (59±8) fs has been determined, which is in good agreement with the spectral bandwidth given by the monochromator. Moreover, the spatial coherence in vertical direction amounts to about 15% of the beam diameter and about 12% in horizontal direction. The feasibility of measuring spatio-temporal coherence properties of XUV FEL radiation using interferometric techniques advances machine operation and experimental studies significantly.

  20. Establishing operations

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Jack

    1993-01-01

    The first two books on behavior analysis (Skinner, 1938; Keller & Schoenfeld, 1950) had chapter-length coverage of motivation. The next generation of texts also had chapters on the topic, but by the late 1960s it was no longer being given much treatment in the behavior-analytic literature. The present failure to deal with the topic leaves a gap in our understanding of operant functional relations. A partial solution is to reintroduce the concept of the establishing operation, defined as an environmental event, operation, or stimulus condition that affects an organism by momentarily altering (a) the reinforcing effectiveness of other events and (b) the frequency of occurrence of that part of the organism's repertoire relevant to those events as consequences. Discriminative and motivative variables can be distinguished as follows: The former are related to the differential availability of an effective form of reinforcement given a particular type of behavior; the latter are related to the differential reinforcing effectiveness of environmental events. An important distinction can also be made between unconditioned establishing operations (UEOs), such as food deprivation and painful stimulation, and conditioned establishing operations (CEOs) that depend on the learning history of the organism. One type of CEO is a stimulus that has simply been paired with a UEO and as a result may take on some of the motivative properties of that UEO. The warning stimulus in avoidance procedures is another important type of CEO referred to as reflexive because it establishes its own termination as a form of reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has accomplished such termination. Another CEO is closely related to the concept of conditional conditioned reinforcement and is referred to as a transitive CEO, because it establishes some other stimulus as a form of effective reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has produced that other stimulus. The multiple control of human

  1. Temporal efficiency evaluation and small-worldness characterization in temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhongxiang; Chen, Yu; Li, Junhua; Fam, Johnson; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Sun, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Numerous real-world systems can be modeled as networks. To date, most network studies have been conducted assuming stationary network characteristics. Many systems, however, undergo topological changes over time. Temporal networks, which incorporate time into conventional network models, are therefore more accurate representations of such dynamic systems. Here, we introduce a novel generalized analytical framework for temporal networks, which enables 1) robust evaluation of the efficiency of temporal information exchange using two new network metrics and 2) quantitative inspection of the temporal small-worldness. Specifically, we define new robust temporal network efficiency measures by incorporating the time dependency of temporal distance. We propose a temporal regular network model, and based on this plus the redefined temporal efficiency metrics and widely used temporal random network models, we introduce a quantitative approach for identifying temporal small-world architectures (featuring high temporal network efficiency both globally and locally). In addition, within this framework, we can uncover network-specific dynamic structures. Applications to brain networks, international trade networks, and social networks reveal prominent temporal small-world properties with distinct dynamic network structures. We believe that the framework can provide further insight into dynamic changes in the network topology of various real-world systems and significantly promote research on temporal networks.

  2. Temporal efficiency evaluation and small-worldness characterization in temporal networks

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhongxiang; Chen, Yu; Li, Junhua; Fam, Johnson; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Numerous real-world systems can be modeled as networks. To date, most network studies have been conducted assuming stationary network characteristics. Many systems, however, undergo topological changes over time. Temporal networks, which incorporate time into conventional network models, are therefore more accurate representations of such dynamic systems. Here, we introduce a novel generalized analytical framework for temporal networks, which enables 1) robust evaluation of the efficiency of temporal information exchange using two new network metrics and 2) quantitative inspection of the temporal small-worldness. Specifically, we define new robust temporal network efficiency measures by incorporating the time dependency of temporal distance. We propose a temporal regular network model, and based on this plus the redefined temporal efficiency metrics and widely used temporal random network models, we introduce a quantitative approach for identifying temporal small-world architectures (featuring high temporal network efficiency both globally and locally). In addition, within this framework, we can uncover network-specific dynamic structures. Applications to brain networks, international trade networks, and social networks reveal prominent temporal small-world properties with distinct dynamic network structures. We believe that the framework can provide further insight into dynamic changes in the network topology of various real-world systems and significantly promote research on temporal networks. PMID:27682314

  3. Production of stable isotopes utilizing the plasma separation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, T. S.; Tarallo, F. J.; Stevenson, N. R.

    2005-12-01

    A plasma separation process (PSP) is being operated at Theragenics Corporation's®, Oak Ridge, TN, facility for the enrichment of stable isotopes. The PSP utilizes ion cyclotron mass discrimination to separate isotopes on a relatively large scale. With a few exceptions, nearly any metallic element could be processed with PSP. Output isotope enrichment factor depends on natural abundance and mass separation and can be fairly high in some cases. The Theragenics™ PSP facility is believed to be the only such process currently in operation. This system was developed and formerly operated under the US Department of Energy Advanced Isotope Separation program. Theragenics™ also has a laboratory at the PSP site capable of harvesting the isotopes from the process and a mass spectrometer system for analyzing enrichment and product purity. Since becoming operational in 2002, Theragenics™ has utilized the PSP to separate isotopes of several elements including: dysprosium, erbium, gadolinium, molybdenum and nickel. Currently, Theragenics™ is using the PSP for the separation of 102Pd, which is used as precursor for the production of 103Pd. The 103Pd radioisotope is the active ingredient in TheraSeed®, which is used in the treatment of early stage prostate cancer and being investigated for other medical applications. New industrial, medical and research applications are being investigated for isotopes that can be enriched on the PSP. Pre-enrichment of accelerator or reactor targets offers improved radioisotope production. Theragenics operates 14 cyclotrons for proton activation and has access to HFIR at ORNL for neutron activation of radioisotopes.

  4. Carbon and nitrogen biogeochemistry in the ocean: A study using stable isotope natural abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rau, G. H.; Desmarais, David J.

    1985-01-01

    Determining the biogeochemical pathways traveled by carbon and nitrogen in the ocean is fundamental to the understanding of how the ocean participates in the cycling of these elements within the biosphere. Because biological production, metabolism, and respiration can significantly alter the natural abundance of C-13 and N-15, these abundances can provide important information about the nature of these biological processes and their variability in the marine environment. The research initially seeks to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of stable isotope abundances in organic matter, and to relate these abundances to C and N biogeochemical processes within selected areas of the northeastern Pacific Ocean.

  5. Synthesis on evaporation partitioning using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Bogaard, Thom; Wenninger, Jochen; Jonson Sutanto, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    Partitioning of evaporation into productive (transpiration) and non-productive evaporation (interception, soil evaporation) is of highest importance for water management practices, irrigation scheme design, and climate modeling. Despite this urge, the magnitude of the ratio of transpiration over total evaporation is still under debate and poorly understood due to measuring difficulties. However, with the current development in isotope measuring devices, new opportunities arise to untangle the partitioning of evaporation. In this paper we synthesize the opportunities and limitations using stable water isotopes in evaporation partitioning. We will analyze a set of field as well as laboratory studies to demonstrate the different evaporation components for various climate and vegetation conditions using stable isotopes 18O/16O and 2H/1H. Experimental data on evaporation partitioning of crops, grass, shrubs and trees are presented and we will discuss the specific experimental set-ups and data collection methods. The paper will be a synthesis of these studies.

  6. Stable field emission from nanoporous silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myung-Gyu; Lezec, Henri J; Sharifi, Fred

    2013-02-15

    We report on a new type of stable field emitter capable of electron emission at levels comparable to thermal sources. Such an emitter potentially enables significant advances in several important technologies which currently use thermal electron sources. These include communications through microwave electronics, and more notably imaging for medicine and security where new modalities of detection may arise due to variable-geometry x-ray sources. Stable emission of 6 A cm(-2) is demonstrated in a macroscopic array, and lifetime measurements indicate these new emitters are sufficiently robust to be considered for realistic implementation. The emitter is a monolithic structure, and is made in a room-temperature process. It is fabricated from a silicon carbide wafer, which is formed into a highly porous structure resembling an aerogel, and further patterned into an array. The emission properties may be tuned both through control of the nanoscale morphology and the macroscopic shape of the emitter array.

  7. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycely O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers. acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors, in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors. weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 1000 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  8. Operation Poorman

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, N.; Tsitouras, J.

    1981-03-18

    The objectives of Operation Poorman were to design and build a portable seismic system and to set up and use this system in a cold-weather environment. The equipment design uses current technology to achieve a low-power, lightweight system that is configured into three modules. The system was deployed in Alaska during wintertime, and the results provide a basis for specifying a mission-ready seismic verification system.

  9. Relative performance of a vibratory energy harvester in mono- and bi-stable potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masana, Ravindra; Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2011-11-01

    Motivated by the need for broadband vibratory energy harvesting, many research studies have recently proposed energy harvesters with nonlinear characteristics. Based on the shape of their potential function, such devices are classified as either mono- or bi-stable energy harvesters. This paper aims to investigate the relative performance of these two classes under similar excitations and electric loading conditions. To achieve this goal, an energy harvester consisting of a clamped-clamped piezoelectric beam bi-morph is considered. The shape of the harvester's potential function is altered by applying a static compressive axial load at one end of the beam. This permits operation in the mono-stable (pre-buckling) and bi-stable (post-buckling) configurations. For the purpose of performance comparison, the axial load is used to tune the harvester's oscillation frequencies around the static equilibria such that they have equal values in the mono- and bi-stable configurations. The harvester is subjected to harmonic base excitations of different magnitudes and a slowly varying frequency spanning a wide band around the tuned oscillation frequency. The output voltage measured across a purely resistive load is compared over the frequency range considered. Two cases are discussed; the first compares the performance when the bi-stable harvester has deep potential wells, while the second treats a bi-stable harvester with shallow wells. Both numerical and experimental results demonstrate the essential role that the potential shape plays in conjunction with the base acceleration to determine whether the bi-stable harvester can outperform the mono-stable one and for what range of frequencies. Results also illustrate that, for a bi-stable harvester with shallow potential wells, super-harmonic resonances can activate the inter-well dynamics even for a small base acceleration, thereby producing large voltages in the low frequency range.

  10. Coprime factorizations in stable linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, Charles A.; Gundes, A. Nazli; Kabuli, M. Guntekin

    1988-01-01

    A block-diagonal linear (not necessarily time-invariant) map P with a right-coprime factorization ND-1 (or a left-coprime factorization D-1N) is considered. It is shown that the individual blocks in P have right-coprime factorizations (left-coprime factorizations, respectively) if and only if the denominator map D has a special block-triangular structure. This condition is applied to the stable linear feedback system S(P1,P2).

  11. Stable Spheromaks Sustained by Neutral Beam Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K; Jayakumar, R; McLean, H S

    2008-05-14

    It is shown that spheromak equilibria, stable at zero-beta but departing from the Taylor state, could be sustained by non-inductive current drive at acceptable power levels. Stability to both ideal MHD and tearing modes is verified using the NIMROD code for linear stability analysis. Non-linear NIMROD calculations with non-inductive current drive and pressure effects could point the way to improved fusion reactors.

  12. On Prediction of Harmonizable Stable Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    increments; sub-Gaussian processes; etc. Surprisinqly, all these three classes (and many more) are actually disjoint (see Cambanis and Soltani (1984...1982) for one step ahead prediction. The general multi-step case was considered by Cambanis and Soltani (1984). The problem of interpolation has...their Gaussian counterparts (Cambanis and Soltani (1984)). We show that for stable processes there are three different kinds of predictors one may *l

  13. Quantifying uncertainty in stable isotope mixing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul; Syme, James; Heikoop, Jeffrey; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Perkins, George; Newman, Brent; Chrystal, Abbey E.; Hagerty, Shannon B.

    2015-05-01

    Mixing models are powerful tools for identifying biogeochemical sources and determining mixing fractions in a sample. However, identification of actual source contributors is often not simple, and source compositions typically vary or even overlap, significantly increasing model uncertainty in calculated mixing fractions. This study compares three probabilistic methods, Stable Isotope Analysis in R (SIAR), a pure Monte Carlo technique (PMC), and Stable Isotope Reference Source (SIRS) mixing model, a new technique that estimates mixing in systems with more than three sources and/or uncertain source compositions. In this paper, we use nitrate stable isotope examples (δ15N and δ18O) but all methods tested are applicable to other tracers. In Phase I of a three-phase blind test, we compared methods for a set of six-source nitrate problems. PMC was unable to find solutions for two of the target water samples. The Bayesian method, SIAR, experienced anchoring problems, and SIRS calculated mixing fractions that most closely approximated the known mixing fractions. For that reason, SIRS was the only approach used in the next phase of testing. In Phase II, the problem was broadened where any subset of the six sources could be a possible solution to the mixing problem. Results showed a high rate of Type I errors where solutions included sources that were not contributing to the sample. In Phase III some sources were eliminated based on assumed site knowledge and assumed nitrate concentrations, substantially reduced mixing fraction uncertainties and lowered the Type I error rate. These results demonstrate that valuable insights into stable isotope mixing problems result from probabilistic mixing model approaches like SIRS. The results also emphasize the importance of identifying a minimal set of potential sources and quantifying uncertainties in source isotopic composition as well as demonstrating the value of additional information in reducing the uncertainty in calculated

  14. Spectro-temporal dynamics of Kerr combs with parametric seeding.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guoping; Martinenghi, Romain; Diallo, Souleymane; Saleh, Khaldoun; Coillet, Aurélien; Chembo, Yanne K

    2015-03-20

    We report a joint theoretical and experimental investigation of the parametric seeding of a primary Kerr optical frequency comb. Electro-optic modulation sidebands matching multiple free-spectral ranges of an ultrahigh-Q millimeter-size magnesium fluoride disk resonator are used as seed signals. These seed signals interact through four-wave mixing with the spectral components of a stable primary comb and give rise to complex spectro-temporal patterns. We show that the new frequency combs feature multiscale frequency spacing, with major frequency gaps in the order of a few hundred gigahertz, and minor frequency spacing in the order of a few tens of gigahertz. The experimental results are in agreement with numerical simulations using the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We expect such versatile and coherent optical frequency combs to have potential applications in optical communications systems where frequency management assigns predefined spectral windows at the emitter stage.

  15. Planktivorous Fish Recognize Temporal Motion Patterns of Suspended Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickler, J. R.; Tsonis, A.

    2004-12-01

    Small planktivorous fish feed by selective captures of individual zooplankters. We realize that: 1) the predator, as well as the prey is suspended in the water column, which does not provide either with stable reference points; 2) the ambient flow field acts differently on the larger predators than on the much smaller prey; and 3) within the water column there are many suspended particles of lower nutritional value than the zooplankters represent. We investigated in the laboratory whether or not fish can distinguish between small targets moving with different swimming patterns, e.g. particles entrained passively in the ambient water flow versus entrained but actively swimming particles. We created in an aquarium computer-animated stimuli with motion patterns ranging from random to actual swimming motions of live animals. The results show that planktivorous fish can recognize temporal patterns in a visually homogeneous environment. Therefore, blue-water fish must process visual information similar to terrestrial animals processing auditory information.

  16. Intraindividual Temporal miRNA Variability in Serum, Plasma, and White Blood Cell Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Ammerlaan, Wim; Betsou, Fay

    2016-10-01

    Blood microRNAs (miRNAs) are ideal biomarkers, and blood derivatives are often collected in the scope of miRNA research projects. However, knowledge of temporal variations of miRNAs in healthy individuals is lacking. In this study, miRNA variability was measured over a 1-year period in different blood derivatives, collected every 2-3 months from two healthy donors. There is a continuum of intraindividual temporal variability, with particularly stable (coefficient of variation [CV] <20%-30%) and particularly unstable (CV >100%-130%) miRNAs in serum, plasma, and specific white blood cell subpopulations. The temporal intraindividual variability of miRNAs should be taken into consideration in experimental design of biospecimen collections and validation of diagnostic biomarkers.

  17. Plant diversity increases spatio-temporal niche complementarity in plant-pollinator interactions.

    PubMed

    Venjakob, Christine; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Ebeling, Anne; Tscharntke, Teja; Scherber, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing biodiversity decline impairs ecosystem processes, including pollination. Flower visitation, an important indicator of pollination services, is influenced by plant species richness. However, the spatio-temporal responses of different pollinator groups to plant species richness have not yet been analyzed experimentally. Here, we used an experimental plant species richness gradient to analyze plant-pollinator interactions with an unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution. We observed four pollinator functional groups (honeybees, bumblebees, solitary bees, and hoverflies) in experimental plots at three different vegetation strata between sunrise and sunset. Visits were modified by plant species richness interacting with time and space. Furthermore, the complementarity of pollinator functional groups in space and time was stronger in species-rich mixtures. We conclude that high plant diversity should ensure stable pollination services, mediated via spatio-temporal niche complementarity in flower visitation.

  18. Battery-powered, electrocuting trap for stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae).

    PubMed

    Pickens, L G

    1991-11-01

    A solar-charged, battery-powered, electrocuting grid was combined with a white plywood base to make a portable, pulsed-current, pest-electrocuting device that attracted and killed stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), outdoors. The grid was powered once every 1-2 s by a 0.016-s pulse of 60-Hz alternating current of 4 mA and 9,500 V. Power was turned off at night by a photoresistor. The trap functioned continuously for 14 d with an unrecharged 12-V, 18A/h lawn-tractor battery and killed as many as 4,000 flies per day. Solar cells were used to charge a single 12-V battery continuously that operated 12 grids for a period of 90 d. The grid did not short circuit for any length of time even during heavy rainstorms or when large insects were killed. The incorporation of moiré patterns and the utilization of the correct size, orientation, and placement of wires made the electrocuting grid itself attractive to stable flies. The traps were spaced at distances of up to 120 m from the battery and pulse circuit. The electrocuting traps were more effective than sticky traps and avoided the problems associated with chemicals. They are well suited for use around calf pens, dog kennels, or large animal shelters.

  19. Optical bi-stable shutter development/improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizon, J. L.; Haddad, N.; Castillo, R.

    2012-09-01

    Two of the VLT instruments (Giraffe and VIMOS) are using the large magnetic E/150 from Prontor (with an aperture diameter of 150 mm). As we were facing an unacceptable number of failures with this component some improvement plan was discussed already in 2004. The final decision for starting this program was conditioned by the decision from the constructor to stop the production. The opportunity was taken to improve the design building a fully bi-stable mechanism in order to reduce the thermal dissipation. The project was developed in collaboration between the two main ESO sites doing the best use of the manpower and of the technical capability available at the two centers. The project took advantage of the laser Mask Manufacturing Unit and the invar sheets used to prepare the VIMOS MOS mask to fabricate the shutter petals. Our paper describes the development including the intensive and long optimization period. To conclude this optimization we proceed with a long life test on two units. These units have demonstrate a very high level of reliability (up to 100 000 cycles without failure which can be estimated to an equivalent 6 years of operation of the instrument) A new bi-stable shutter driver and controller have also been developed. Some of the highlights of this unit are the fully configurable coil driving parameters, usage of braking strategy to dump mechanical vibration and reduce mechanical wearing, configurable usage of OPEN and CLOSE sensors, non volatile storage of parameters, user friendly front panel interface.

  20. Influence of Pressure on Stable Film Boiling of Subcooled Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabirov, A. R.; Yagov, V. V.; Kaban'kov, O. N.; Leksin, M. A.; Kanin, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    Film boiling of subcooled liquids is an integral part of the hardening process. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying film boiling is important for modeling processes in atomic power engineering and cryogenic technology. Stationary processes of film boiling of subcooled liquids under conditions of their free motion near cylindrical heaters, just as subcooled liquid turbulent flow past high-temperature surfaces, represent quite a different type of process. In cooling metal spheres heated to a high temperature by a subcooled water, a special regime of film boiling is observed (microbubble boiling) distinguished by high intensity of heat transfer. Such a regime has not been revealed up to now for nonaqueous liquids. The paper presents new experimental data on heat transfer regimes in cooling nickel spheres in subcooled isopropanol and perfluorohexane at pressures of up to 1 MPa. It has been established that stable film boiling is the main regime of heat transfer that accounts for the larger part of the total time of cooling. The regimes of highly intensive film boiling heat transfer were not observed in the entire range of operational parameters even in the case of extreme subcoolings of liquid below their saturation temperature (to 170 K). The intensity of heat transfer in stable film boiling increases noticeably with subcooling of a chilling liquid.

  1. Recent developments in low cost stable structures for space

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.C.; Grastataro, C.; Smith, B.G.

    1994-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) is advancing the development of low cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in spacecraft and stable structures. The use of advanced composites is well developed, but the application of an all-composite tracker structure has never been achieved. This paper investigates the application of composite technology to the design and fabrication of an all-composite spacecraft bus for small satellites, using technology directly applicable to central tracking in a high luminosity environment. The satellite program Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) is the second in a series of satellites to be launched into orbit for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This paper will discuss recent developments in the area of low cost composites, used for either spacecraft or ultra stable applications in high energy physics (HEP) detectors. The use of advanced composites is a relatively new development in the area of HEP. The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) spawned a new generation of Trackers which made extensive use of graphite fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composite systems. LANL has designed a structure employing new fabrication technology. This concept will lower the cost of composite structures to a point that they may now compete with conventional materials. This paper will discuss the design, analysis and proposed fabrication of a small satellite structure. Central tracking structures using advanced materials capable of operating in an adverse environment typical of that found in a high luminosity collider could use identical concepts.

  2. A scanning tunneling microscopy tip with a stable atomic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeong-Cheol; Seidman, David N.

    2004-02-01

    A single stable adatom on a {110}-type plane of a tungsten tip is created via field-evaporation in a field-ion microscope (FIM) operating at room temperature. This single adatom has sufficient surface mobility at room temperature and migrates, in one-dimension, along a <111>-type direction toward an edge of a {110}-type plane, due to the existence of an electric field gradient. The plane edge has a higher local electric field than its center, since it has a higher local geometric curvature. This result implies that the stable position of a single adatom during a scan of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip on a surface is at the edge and not at the center of a {110}-type plane at room temperature. Therefore, the electron wave function of a tip is not symmetric and this fact should be taken into account in a careful analysis of STM images. Also a tip with a dislocation emerging at a {110}-type plane is suggested as an improved STM tip configuration, as the step at the surface, created by the intersection of the dislocation with it, is a perpetual source of single adatoms.

  3. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application an authentic continuous-unit products. The experimental details used for stable carbon isotope analyses by the organization that performs most of those analyses under this contract are described. A method was developed previously under this contract to correct the carbon sourcing calculations performed from stable carbon isotope analyses for selective isotopic fractionation. The method relies on three assumptions. This quarter, a study was completed to define the sensitivity of the carbon sourcing results to errors in the assumptions. Carbon contents and carbon isotope ratios were determined for the available feeds and product fractions from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Run 238-10 (Texas lignite/Hondo vacuum still bottoms (VSB), Texas lignite/Cold Lake VSB and Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB). These data were used for carbon sourcing calculations and individual feedstock conversion calculations. A previously devised means for correcting for selective isotope fractionation was applied. 6 refs., 30 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. The Evolutionarily Stable Distribution of Fitness Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Daniel P.; Good, Benjamin H.; Desai, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of fitness effects (DFE) of new mutations is a key parameter in determining the course of evolution. This fact has motivated extensive efforts to measure the DFE or to predict it from first principles. However, just as the DFE determines the course of evolution, the evolutionary process itself constrains the DFE. Here, we analyze a simple model of genome evolution in a constant environment in which natural selection drives the population toward a dynamic steady state where beneficial and deleterious substitutions balance. The distribution of fitness effects at this steady state is stable under further evolution and provides a natural null expectation for the DFE in a population that has evolved in a constant environment for a long time. We calculate how the shape of the evolutionarily stable DFE depends on the underlying population genetic parameters. We show that, in the absence of epistasis, the ratio of beneficial to deleterious mutations of a given fitness effect obeys a simple relationship independent of population genetic details. Finally, we analyze how the stable DFE changes in the presence of a simple form of diminishing-returns epistasis. PMID:25762525

  5. Detonation of Meta-stable Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, Allen; Kuhl, Allen L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Seizew, Michael R.; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2008-05-31

    We consider the energy accumulation in meta-stable clusters. This energy can be much larger than the typical chemical bond energy (~;;1 ev/atom). For example, polymeric nitrogen can accumulate 4 ev/atom in the N8 (fcc) structure, while helium can accumulate 9 ev/atom in the excited triplet state He2* . They release their energy by cluster fission: N8 -> 4N2 and He2* -> 2He. We study the locus of states in thermodynamic state space for the detonation of such meta-stable clusters. In particular, the equilibrium isentrope, starting at the Chapman-Jouguet state, and expanding down to 1 atmosphere was calculated with the Cheetah code. Large detonation pressures (3 and 16 Mbar), temperatures (12 and 34 kilo-K) and velocities (20 and 43 km/s) are a consequence of the large heats of detonation (6.6 and 50 kilo-cal/g) for nitrogen and helium clusters respectively. If such meta-stable clusters could be synthesized, they offer the potential for large increases in the energy density of materials.

  6. The evolutionarily stable distribution of fitness effects.

    PubMed

    Rice, Daniel P; Good, Benjamin H; Desai, Michael M

    2015-05-01

    The distribution of fitness effects (DFE) of new mutations is a key parameter in determining the course of evolution. This fact has motivated extensive efforts to measure the DFE or to predict it from first principles. However, just as the DFE determines the course of evolution, the evolutionary process itself constrains the DFE. Here, we analyze a simple model of genome evolution in a constant environment in which natural selection drives the population toward a dynamic steady state where beneficial and deleterious substitutions balance. The distribution of fitness effects at this steady state is stable under further evolution and provides a natural null expectation for the DFE in a population that has evolved in a constant environment for a long time. We calculate how the shape of the evolutionarily stable DFE depends on the underlying population genetic parameters. We show that, in the absence of epistasis, the ratio of beneficial to deleterious mutations of a given fitness effect obeys a simple relationship independent of population genetic details. Finally, we analyze how the stable DFE changes in the presence of a simple form of diminishing-returns epistasis.

  7. Dianionic tetraborates do exist as stable entities.

    PubMed

    Dreuw, Andreas; Zint, Norbert; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2002-09-11

    To date, B(6)H(6)(2-) and some of its derivatives are the smallest members of the closo-borates that have been synthesized and analyzed in condensed phases. In contrast, no stable dianionic tetraborate has yet been observed, either in solution or solids or in the gas phase. In this work, the gas-phase stability of dianionic tetraborates B(4)X(4)(2-) (X = H, CN, NC, or BO) is investigated with ab initio methods. For this objective, the geometries of the dianions are optimized, the electronic stability is tested, and various fragmentation channels are studied. In agreement with previous examinations, tetrahedral isomers of all examined tetraborates have been found to represent geometrically stable isomers and to exhibit a triplet electronic ground state. However, these isomers are electronically unstable, i.e., their additional electrons are not bound. Furthermore, new D(2)(d)()-symmetric isomers of B(4)X(4)(2-) (X = H, CN, NC, or BO) have been identified that have a closed-shell singlet ground state and are lower in energy than their tetrahedral counterparts. Moreover, B(4)(CN)(4)(2-) and B(4)(BO)(4)(2-) represent stable gas-phase dianions and are predicted to be observable in suitable experiments. The electronic properties and geometries of these dianions are discussed in detail and explained in terms of the electrostatic repulsion of the excess electrons and the aromaticity of the dianions.

  8. A stable snow-atmosphere coupled mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Zhu, Yuxiang; Liu, Haiwen; Liu, Zhongfang; Liu, Yanju; Li, Xiuping; Chen, Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Snow is both an important lower boundary forcing of the atmosphere and a response to atmospheric forcing in the extratropics. It is still unclear whether a stable snow-atmosphere coupled mode exists in the extratropics, like the ENSO in the tropics. Using Sliding Correlation analysis over Any Window, the present study quantitatively evaluates the stability of coupling relationships between the major modes of winter snow over the Northern Hemisphere and the winter atmospheric Arctic Oscillation (AO), the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO) and the Siberian High over the period 1872-2010, and discusses their possible relationships for different seasons. Results show that the first mode of the winter snow cover fraction and the winter AO together constitute a stable snow-atmosphere coupled mode, the SNAO. The coupled mode is stronger during recent decades than before. The snow anomaly over Europe is one key factor of the SNAO mode due to the high stability there, and the polar vortex anomaly in the atmosphere is its other key factor. The continuity of signals in the SNAO between autumn and winter is weaker than that between winter and spring. The second winter snow mode is generally stably correlated with the winter AAO and was more stable before the 1970s. The AAO signal with boreal snow has a strong continuity in seasonal transition. Generally, through these coupled modes, snow and atmosphere can interact in the same season or between different seasons: autumn snow can influence the winter atmosphere; the winter atmosphere can influence spring snow.

  9. Hydroclimatology of Continental Watersheds: 1. Temporal Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakos, Konstantine P.; Bae, Deg-Hyo; Cayan, Daniel R.

    1995-03-01

    The linkage between meteorology/climate and hydrology of temperate latitude catchments on daily to decade time scales is studied. Detailed hydrology is provided by a hydrologic catchment model, adapted from the operational streamflow forecast model of the National Weather Service River Forecast System. The model is tuned to respond to observed daily precipitation and potential evaporation input. Results from the Bird Creek basin with outlet near Sperry, Oklahoma, and from the Boone River basin with outlet at Webster City, Iowa, indicate that the model quite accurately simulates the observed daily discharge over 40 years at each of the two 2000-km2 basins. Daily cross-correlations between observed and simulated basin outflows were better than 0.8 for both basins over a 40-year historical period. Soil moisture variability over a period of four decades is studied, and an assessment of temporal and spatial (as related to the separation distance of the two basins) scales present in the estimated soil moisture record is made. Negative soil water anomalies have larger magnitudes than positive anomalies, and comparison of the simulated soil water records of the two basins indicates spatial scales of variability that in several cases are as long as the interbasin distance. The temporal scales of soil water content are considerably longer than those of the forcing atmospheric variables for all seasons and both basins. Timescales of upper and total soil water content anomalies are typically 1 and 3 months, respectively. Linkage between the hydrologic components and both local and regional-to-hemispheric atmospheric variability is studied, both for atmosphere forcing hydrology and ydrology forcing atmosphere. For both basins, cross- correlation analysis shows that local precipitation strongly forces soil water in the upper soil layers with a 10-day lag. There is no evidence of soil water feedback to local precipitation. However, significant cross-correlation values are

  10. Temporal Ontologies for Geoscience: Alignment Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Time is a central concept in geoscience. Geologic histories are composed of sequences of geologic processes and events. Calibration of their timing ties a local history into a broader context, and enables correlation of events between locations. The geologic timescale is standardized in the International Chronostratigraphic Chart, which specifies interval names, and calibrations for the ages of the interval boundaries. Time is also a key concept in the world at large. A number of general purpose temporal ontologies have been developed, both stand-alone and as parts of general purpose or upper ontologies. A temporal ontology for geoscience should apply or extend a suitable general purpose temporal ontology. However, geologic time presents two challenges: Geology involves greater spans of time than in other temporal ontologies, inconsistent with the year-month-day/hour-minute-second formalization that is a basic assumption of most general purpose temporal schemes; The geologic timescale is a temporal topology. Its calibration in terms of an absolute (numeric) scale is a scientific issue in its own right supporting a significant community. In contrast, the general purpose temporal ontologies are premised on exact numeric values for temporal position, and do not allow for temporal topology as a primary structure. We have developed an ontology for the geologic timescale to account for these concerns. It uses the ISO 19108 distinctions between different types of temporal reference system, also linking to an explicit temporal topology model. Stratotypes used in the calibration process are modelled as sampling-features following the ISO 19156 Observations and Measurements model. A joint OGC-W3C harmonization project is underway, with standardization of the W3C OWL-Time ontology as one of its tasks. The insights gained from the geologic timescale ontology will assist in development of a general ontology capable of modelling a richer set of use-cases from geoscience.

  11. Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

    2011-07-01

    Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10-6/° C near 550nm, which corresponds to ˜800m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations.

  12. Ignitor with stable low-energy thermite igniting system

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Michael D.; Munger, Alan C.

    1991-02-05

    A stable compact low-energy igniting system in an ignitor utilizes two components, an initiating charge and an output charge. The initiating charge is a thermite in ultra-fine powder form compacted to 50-70% of theoretical maximum density and disposed in a cavity of a header of the ignitor adjacent to an electrical ignition device, or bridgewire, mounted in the header cavity. The initiating charge is ignitable by operation of the ignition device in a hot-wire mode. The output charge is a thermite in high-density consoladated form compacted to 90-99% of theoretical maximum density and disposed adjacent to the initiating charge on an opposite end thereof from the electrical ignition device and ignitable by the initiating charge. A sleeve is provided for mounting the output charge to the ignitor header with the initiating charge confined therebetween in the cavity.

  13. Stable propagation of synchronous spiking in cortical neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesmann, Markus; Gewaltig, Marc-Oliver; Aertsen, Ad

    1999-12-01

    The classical view of neural coding has emphasized the importance of information carried by the rate at which neurons discharge action potentials. More recent proposals that information may be carried by precise spike timing have been challenged by the assumption that these neurons operate in a noisy fashion-presumably reflecting fluctuations in synaptic input-and, thus, incapable of transmitting signals with millisecond fidelity. Here we show that precisely synchronized action potentials can propagate within a model of cortical network activity that recapitulates many of the features of biological systems. An attractor, yielding a stable spiking precision in the (sub)millisecond range, governs the dynamics of synchronization. Our results indicate that a combinatorial neural code, based on rapid associations of groups of neurons co-ordinating their activity at the single spike level, is possible within a cortical-like network.

  14. Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

    2011-07-20

    Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10(-6)/°C near 550 nm, which corresponds to ∼800 m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations.

  15. Context effects and the temporal stability of stated preferences.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Ulf; Hundeshagen, Cordula; Beyer, Heiko; Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan von

    2016-11-01

    In stated preference studies it is assumed that individuals' answers reflect true preferences and are stable over time. We test these two assumptions of validity and reliability using as an example a choice experiment study on ethical consumption that measures preferences for a Peace Product jointly produced by Israeli and Palestinian producers as well as for organic products. In a web survey conducted in Germany, we investigate the validity assumption by manipulating the question context and presenting one group of respondents with questions on anti-Semitic and anti-Arabic attitudes before the choice tasks, and presenting another group with these questions after the choice tasks. In order to test the assumption of temporal stability, the same experimental set-up was repeated in a second survey based on a new sample ten months after the first. However, prior to the second survey an external event, a major violent dispute between Israelis and the Palestinians occurred. Overall, we find evidence for a context effect but not for temporal instability. In both surveys, the placement of the attitudinal questions before the choice tasks has a positive effect on the valuation of products from Israel, Palestinian products and the Peace Product (i.e. a directional context effect). The respondents seem to act according to an anti-discrimination norm. In line with this reasoning, we find an attention shift caused by the attitudinal questions. Organic products are valued much less positively if discriminatory attitudes are surveyed before the choice tasks. Furthermore, despite the violent dispute, stated preferences are very stable over time. This indicates high reliability of stated preference studies and encourages the use of study results by private and public decision makers.

  16. Chromosome painting and the accumulation of stable cytogenetic damage with age in healthy controls

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J.D.; Ramsey, M.J.; Lee, D.A.

    1995-11-01

    Chromosome painting is now routinely used to identify induced stable chromosomal rearrangements, which are difficult and expensive to analyze with classical cytogenetic methods. Theoretically the inherent stability of translocations, in contrast to unstable dicentrics, enables their use as a biodosimeter for chronic and temporally-displaced exposure. To quantify the effects of adverse exposure, it is important that the baseline frequency of stable aberrations be well understood. Recently we have used chromosome painting to show that translocations accumulate with age. We have now extended this study to nearly 100 subjects ranging in age from newborns (umbilical cord bloods, n=14) to adults aged 19-79 years. All subjects were healthy, had not received chemo- or radiotherapy, and had not been occupationally or accidentally exposed to radiation or chemicals. We scored the equivalent of 1000 metaphase cells for each subject, and observed an overall average of 1.36 stable aberrations per 100 cells. Stable aberrations increased significantly with age, and were observed at frequencies of 0.19{plus_minus}0.04, 0.77{plus_minus}0.07, and 2.39{plus_minus}0.24 per 100 cells in cord blood, adults aged 19 to 49, and adults over age 50, respectively. To understand the extent that lifestyle factors influence the frequency of stable aberrations, each subject (or one parent of each newborn) completed a comprehensive questionnaire inquiring about lifestyle factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and dietary habits. No smoking effect is apparent in adults, however newborns whose mothers smoked during pregnancy had a 2.6-fold increase in stable aberration frequencies (p=0.033). Repeat samples from a subset of the adults suggest that individual translocation frequencies change little over a period of -3 years.

  17. Measuring ultracomplex supercontinuum pulses and spatio-temporal distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xun

    This thesis contains two components of research: studies of supercontinuum pulses generated in the novel microstructure fiber, and research on spatio-temporal coupling in ultrafast laser beams. One of the most exciting developments in optics in recent years has been the invention of the microstructure optical fiber. By controlling the structural parameters of these novel fibers in design and manufacturing, their dispersion profile can be freely tailored, opening up a huge application base. One particularly interesting effect in the microstructure fiber is the generation of ultrabroadband supercontinuum with only nJ-level Ti:sapphire oscillator pulse pump. This supercontinuum is arguably the most complicated ultrafast pulse ever generated, with its huge time-bandwidth product (>1000 from a 16-cm-long fiber). Although many applications have been demonstrated or envisioned with this continuum, its generation is a very complicated process that is poorly understood, and the characteristics of the continuum pulses are not clearly known. In this work, we make a full-intensity-and-phase measurement of the continuum pulses using cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating (XFROG). The results reveal surprising unstable fine spectral structure in the continuum pulses, which is confirmed by single-shot measurements. Our study on the coherence of the continuum, on the other hand, shows that the spectral phase of the supercontinuum is fairly stable. Numerical simulations are carried out whose results are in good agreement with experiments. The second component of this thesis is the study of spatio-temporal coupling in ultrafast beams. We propose two definitions of spatial chirp, point out their respective physical meanings, and derive their relationship. On the common perception of the equivalence between pulse-front tilt and angular dispersion, we show that the equivalence only holds for plane waves. We establish a generalized theory of ultrafast laser beams with first

  18. Benthic foraminiferal stable isotope record of organic carbon fluxes during deposition of Mediterranean sapropel S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodor, Marc; Schmiedl, Gerhard; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We integrated Late Glacial to Holocene stable isotope records for different epi- and endobenthic foraminifera from the Mediterranean Sea in order to document the sequence of environmental changes across formation of the most recent sapropel S1. The stable carbon isotope record of epibenthic taxa corroborates results from model experiments indicating a Late Glacial onset of deep-water stagnation with short-term reventilation events during cold intervals of the Heinrich event 1, the Younger Dryas, and the 8.2 event. The stable carbon isotope difference between epi- and shallow endobenthic foraminifera exhibits marked temporal fluctuations linked to microhabitat shifts and changes in organic matter fluxes. We generated a transfer function for organic carbon fluxes based on a correlation between the stable carbon isotope signature of modern benthic foraminifera and observed organic carbon flux rates from different Mediterranean basins. Application of this transfer function to the down-core data reveals generally elevated organic matter fluxes during the Last Glacial Maximum and the Younger Dryas, while values drop significantly during the Bølling-Allerød interstadial and with onset of the Holocene. Our results support a scenario where average organic matter fluxes in the eastern Mediterranean Sea were not significantly enhanced during formation of sapropel S1. Instead, our data corroborate earlier results from benthic foraminiferal faunal successions and model experiments suggesting that sufficient amounts of organic matter are buried under oligotrophic conditions in an intermittently hypoxic water column.

  19. Continental-Scale Stable Isotope Measurements at NEON to Address Ecological Processes Across Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Goodman, K. J.; Hinckley, E. S.; West, J. B.; Williams, D. G.; Bowen, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a national-scale research platform. The overarching goal of NEON is to enable understanding and forecasting of the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on aspects of continental-scale ecology (such as biodiversity, biogeochemistry, infectious diseases, ecohydrology, etc.). NEON focuses explicitly on questions that relate to grand challenges in environmental science, are relevant to large regions, and would otherwise be very difficult to address with traditional ecological approaches. The use of stable isotope approaches in ecological research has grown steadily during the last two decades. Stable isotopes at natural abundances in the environment trace and integrate the interaction between abiotic and biotic components across temporal and spatial scales. In this poster, we will present the NEON data products that incorporate stable isotope measurements in atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic ecosystems in North America. We further outline current questions in the natural sciences community and how these data products can be used to address continental-scale ecological questions, such as the ecological impacts of climate change, terrestrial-aquatic system linkages, land-atmosphere exchange, landscape ecohydrological processes, and linking biogeochemical cycles across systems. Specifically, we focus on the use of stable isotopes to evaluate water availability and residence times in terrestrial systems, as well as nutrient sources to terrestrial systems, and cycling across ecosystem boundaries.

  20. Ultra high purity, dimensionally stable INVAR 36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold M. (Inventor); Lane, Marc S. (Inventor); Odonnell, Timothy P. (Inventor); Hsieh, Cheng H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An INVAR 36 material having long-term dimensional stability is produced by sintering a blend of powders of nickel and iron under pressure in an inert atmosphere to form an alloy containing less than 0.01 parts of carbon and less than 0.1 part aggregate and preferably 0.01 part individually of Mn, Si, P, S and Al impurities. The sintered alloy is heat treated and slowly and uniformly cooled to form a material having a coefficient of thermal expansion of less than 1 ppm/C and a temporal stability of less than 1 ppm/year.